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Sample records for single virus particle

  1. Single particle labeling of RNA virus in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Ouyang, Ting; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Ren, Linzhu

    2017-06-02

    Real-time and visual tracking of viral infection is crucial for elucidating the infectious and pathogenesis mechanisms. To track the virus successfully, an efficient labeling method is necessary. In this review, we first discuss the practical labeling techniques for virus tracking in live cells. We then describe the current knowledge of interactions between RNA viruses (especially influenza viruses, immunodeficiency viruses, and Flaviviruses) and host cellular structures, obtained using single particle labeling techniques combined with real-time fluorescence microscopy. Single particle labeling provides an easy system for understanding the RNA virus life cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reconstructing an icosahedral virus from single-particle diffraction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin, D. K.; Poon, H.-C.; Schwander, P.; Uddin, M.; Schmidt, M.

    2011-08-01

    The first experimental data from single-particle scattering experiments from free electron lasers (FELs) are now becoming available. The first such experiments are being performed on relatively large objects such as viruses, which produce relatively low-resolution, low-noise diffraction patterns in so-called ``diffract-and-destroy'' experiments. We describe a very simple test on the angular correlations of measured diffraction data to determine if the scattering is from an icosahedral particle. If this is confirmed, the efficient algorithm proposed can then combine diffraction data from multiple shots of particles in random unknown orientations to generate a full 3D image of the icosahedral particle. We demonstrate this with a simulation for the satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV), the atomic coordinates of whose asymmetric unit is given in Protein Data Bank entry 2BUK.

  3. Single-Particle Tracking of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Productive Entry into Human Primary Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Li, Wei; Yin, Wen; Guo, Jia; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Zeng, Dejun; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wu, Yuntao; Zhang, Xian-En; Cui, Zongqiang

    2017-04-25

    Macrophages are one of the major targets of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), but the viral entry pathway remains poorly understood in these cells. Noninvasive virus labeling and single-virus tracking are effective tools for studying virus entry. Here, we constructed a quantum dot (QD)-encapsulated infectious HIV-1 particle to track viral entry at a single-particle level in live human primary macrophages. QDs were encapsulated in HIV-1 virions by incorporating viral accessory protein Vpr-conjugated QDs during virus assembly. With the HIV-1 particles encapsulating QDs, we monitored the early phase of viral infection in real time and observed that, during infection, HIV-1 was endocytosed in a clathrin-mediated manner; the particles were translocated into Rab5A-positive endosomes, and the core was released into the cytoplasm by viral envelope-mediated endosomal fusion. Drug inhibition assays verified that endosome fusion contributes to HIV-1 productive infection in primary macrophages. Additionally, we observed that a dynamic actin cytoskeleton is critical for HIV-1 entry and intracellular migration in primary macrophages. HIV-1 dynamics and infection could be blocked by multiple different actin inhibitors. Our study revealed a productive entry pathway in macrophages that requires both endosomal function and actin dynamics, which may assist in the development of inhibitors to block the HIV entry in macrophages.

  4. Single Particle Cryo-electron Microscopy and 3-D Reconstruction of Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    With fast progresses in instrumentation, image processing algorithms, and computational resources, single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) 3-D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses has now reached near-atomic resolutions (3–4 Å). With comparable resolutions and more predictable outcomes, cryo-EM is now considered a preferred method over X-ray crystallography for determination of atomic structure of icosahedral viruses. At near-atomic resolutions, all-atom models or backbone models can be reliably built that allow residue level understanding of viral assembly and conformational changes among different stages of viral life cycle. With the developments of asymmetric reconstruction, it is now possible to visualize the complete structure of a complex virus with not only its icosahedral shell but also its multiple non-icosahedral structural features. In this chapter, we will describe single particle cryo-EM experimental and computational procedures for both near-atomic resolution reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and asymmetric reconstruction of viruses with both icosahedral and non-icosahedral structure components. Procedures for rigorous validation of the reconstructions and resolution evaluations using truly independent de novo initial models and refinements are also introduced. PMID:24357374

  5. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of Rift Valley fever virus

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, Michael B.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Holbrook, Michael R.; Watowich, Stanley J.

    2009-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae; Phlebovirus) is an emerging human veterinary pathogen causing acute hepatitis in ruminants and has the potential to Single-particle cryo-EM reconstruction of RVFV MP-12 hemorrhagic fever in humans. We report a three-dimensional reconstruction of RVFV vaccine strain MP-12 (RVFV MP-12) by cryo-electron microcopy using icosahedral symmetry of individual virions. Although the genomic core of RVFV MP-12 is apparently poorly ordered, the glycoproteins on...

  6. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking,

  7. RNA interference and single particle tracking analysis of hepatitis C virus endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E Coller

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters hepatocytes following a complex set of receptor interactions, culminating in internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. However, aside from receptors, little is known about the cellular molecular requirements for infectious HCV entry. Therefore, we analyzed a siRNA library that targets 140 cellular membrane trafficking genes to identify host genes required for infectious HCV production and HCV pseudoparticle entry. This approach identified 16 host cofactors of HCV entry that function primarily in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, including components of the clathrin endocytosis machinery, actin polymerization, receptor internalization and sorting, and endosomal acidification. We next developed single particle tracking analysis of highly infectious fluorescent HCV particles to examine the co-trafficking of HCV virions with cellular cofactors of endocytosis. We observe multiple, sequential interactions of HCV virions with the actin cytoskeleton, including retraction along filopodia, actin nucleation during internalization, and migration of internalized particles along actin stress fibers. HCV co-localizes with clathrin and the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl prior to internalization. Entering HCV particles are associated with the receptor molecules CD81 and the tight junction protein, claudin-1; however, HCV-claudin-1 interactions were not restricted to Huh-7.5 cell-cell junctions. Surprisingly, HCV internalization generally occurred outside of Huh-7.5 cell-cell junctions, which may reflect the poorly polarized nature of current HCV cell culture models. Following internalization, HCV particles transport with GFP-Rab5a positive endosomes, which is consistent with trafficking to the early endosome. This study presents technical advances for imaging HCV entry, in addition to identifying new host cofactors of HCV infection, some of which may be antiviral targets.

  8. Isolation and characterization of subgenomic DNAs encapsidated in 'single' T = 1 isometric particles of Maize streak virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casado, Carolina G.; Javier Ortiz, G.; Padron, Eric; Bean, Samantha J.; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Boulton, Margaret I.

    2004-01-01

    'Single' T = 1 isometric particles of Maize streak virus (MSV) have been isolated from infected maize leaves. Biochemical and genetic characterizations show that these particles contain subgenomic (sg) MSV DNA encapsidated by the MSV coat protein. The largest sg DNA is 1.56 kb, slightly larger than half genome size, although sg DNAs as small as 0.2 kb were also cloned. The sg DNAs are not infectious, and they do not appear to play a role in the pathogenicity of MSV. This is the first report of sg DNAs for MSV and, to our knowledge, the first time that encapsidated sg DNAs have been characterized at the sequence level for any geminivirus. These data will assist in our investigations into the role of genomic DNA in the formation of the unique geminate capsid architecture of the Geminiviridae

  9. Insight into the three-dimensional structure of maize chlorotic mottle virus revealed by Cryo-EM single particle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Qin-Fen; Gao, Yuan-Zhu; Zhou, Xue-Ping; Ji, Gang; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Hong, Jian; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2015-11-01

    Maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) is the only member of the Machlomovirus genus in the family Tombusviridae. Here, we obtained the Cryo-EM structure of MCMV by single particle analysis with most local resolution at approximately 4 Å. The Cα backbone was built based on residues with bulky side chains. The resolved C-terminus of the capsid protein subunit and obvious openings at the 2-fold axis demonstrated the compactness of the asymmetric unit, which indicates an important role in the stability of MCMV. The Asp116 residue from each subunit around the 5-fold and 3-fold axes contributed to the negative charges in the centers of the pentamers and hexamers, which might serve as a solid barrier against the leakage of genomic RNA. Finally, the loops most exposed on the surface were analyzed and are proposed to be potential functional sites related to MCMV transmission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chikungunya virus fusion properties elucidated by single-particle and bulk approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Blijleven, Jelle S.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly spreading, enveloped alphavirus causing fever, rash and debilitating polyarthritis. No specific treatment or vaccines are available to treat or prevent infection. For the rational design of vaccines and antiviral drugs, it is imperative to understand the

  11. A single intranasal administration of virus-like particle vaccine induces an efficient protection for mice against human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yue-Ying; Fu, Yuan-Hui; Yan, Yi-Fei; Hua, Ying; Ma, Yao; Zhang, Xiu-Juan; Song, Jing-Dong; Peng, Xiang-Lei; Huang, Jiaqiang; Hong, Tao; He, Jin-Sheng

    2017-08-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important pediatric pathogen causing acute viral respiratory disease in infants and young children. However, no licensed vaccines are currently available. Virus-like particles (VLPs) may bring new hope to producing RSV VLP vaccine with high immunogenicity and safety. Here, we constructed the recombinants of matrix protein (M) and fusion glycoprotein (F) of RSV, respectively into a replication-deficient first-generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which were used to co-infect Vero cells to assemble RSV VLPs successfully. The resulting VLPs showed similar immunoreactivity and function to RSV virion in vitro. Moreover, Th1 polarized response, and effective mucosal virus-neutralizing antibody and CD8 + T-cell responses were induced by a single intranasal (i.n.) administration of RSV VLPs rather than intramuscular (i.m.) inoculation, although the comparable RSV F-specific serum IgG and long-lasting RSV-specific neutralizing antibody were detected in the mice immunized by both routes. Upon RSV challenge, VLP-immunized mice showed increased viral clearance but decreased signs of enhanced lung pathology and fewer eosinophils compared to mice immunized with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV). In addition, a single i.n. RSV VLP vaccine has the capability to induce RSV-specific long-lasting neutralizing antibody responses observable up to 15 months. Our results demonstrate that the long-term and memory immune responses in mice against RSV were induced by a single i.n. administration of RSV VLP vaccine, suggesting a successful approach of RSV VLPs as an effective and safe mucosal vaccine against RSV infection, and an applicable and qualified platform of FGAd-infected Vero cells for VLP production. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of Rift Valley fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Michael B; Freiberg, Alexander N; Holbrook, Michael R; Watowich, Stanley J

    2009-04-25

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae; Phlebovirus) is an emerging human and veterinary pathogen causing acute hepatitis in ruminants and has the potential to cause hemorrhagic fever in humans. We report a three-dimensional reconstruction of RVFV vaccine strain MP-12 (RVFV MP-12) by cryo-electron microcopy using icosahedral symmetry of individual virions. Although the genomic core of RVFV MP-12 is apparently poorly ordered, the glycoproteins on the virus surface are highly symmetric and arranged on a T=12 icosahedral lattice. Our RVFV MP-12 structure allowed clear identification of inter-capsomer contacts and definition of possible glycoprotein arrangements within capsomers. This structure provides a detailed model for phleboviruses, opens new avenues for high-resolution structural studies of the bunyavirus family, and aids the design of antiviral diagnostics and effective subunit vaccines.

  13. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of Rift Valley fever virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, Michael B.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Holbrook, Michael R.; Watowich, Stanley J.

    2009-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae; Phlebovirus) is an emerging human and veterinary pathogen causing acute hepatitis in ruminants and has the potential to cause hemorrhagic fever in humans. We report a three-dimensional reconstruction of RVFV vaccine strain MP-12 (RVFV MP-12) by cryo-electron microcopy using icosahedral symmetry of individual virions. Although the genomic core of RVFV MP-12 is apparently poorly ordered, the glycoproteins on the virus surface are highly symmetric and arranged on a T = 12 icosahedral lattice. Our RVFV MP-12 structure allowed clear identification of inter-capsomer contacts and definition of possible glycoprotein arrangements within capsomers. This structure provides a detailed model for phleboviruses, opens new avenues for high-resolution structural studies of the bunyavirus family, and aids the design of antiviral diagnostics and effective subunit vaccines.

  14. Isolation of Single-Domain Antibody Fragments That Preferentially Detect Intact (146S Particles of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus for Use in Vaccine Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel M. Harmsen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intact (146S foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDVs can dissociate into specific (12S viral capsid degradation products. FMD vaccines normally consist of inactivated virions. Vaccine quality is dependent on 146S virus particles rather than 12S particles. We earlier isolated two llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs that specifically recognize 146S particles of FMDV strain O1 Manisa and shown their potential use in quality control of FMD vaccines during manufacturing. These 146S-specific VHHs were specific for particular O serotype strains and did not bind strains from other FMDV serotypes. Here, we describe the isolation of 146S-specific VHHs against FMDV SAT2 and Asia 1 strains by phage display selection from llama immune libraries. VHHs that bind both 12S and 146S particles were readily isolated but VHHs that bind specifically to 146S particles could only be isolated by phage display selection using prior depletion for 12S particles. We obtained one 146S-specific VHH—M332F—that binds to strain Asia 1 Shamir and several VHHs that preferentially bind 146S particles of SAT2 strain SAU/2/00, from which we selected VHH M379F for further characterization. Both M332F and M379F did not bind FMDV strains from other serotypes. In a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA employing unlabeled and biotinylated versions of the same VHH M332F showed high specificity for 146S particles but M379F showed lower 146S-specificity with some cross-reaction with 12S particles. These ELISAs could detect 146S particle concentrations as low as 2.3–4.6 µg/l. They can be used for FMD vaccine quality control and research and development, for example, to identify virion stabilizing excipients.

  15. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana M Sánchez-Puig

    Full Text Available Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  16. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M; Lorenzo, María M; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV) are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  17. A single particle energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics

    1993-09-01

    We consider the binding energies of {Lambda} hypernuclei (HN), in particular the single-particle (s.p.) energy data, which have been obtained for a wide range of HN with mass numbers A {le} 89 and for orbital angular momenta {ell}{sub {Lambda}} {le} 4. We briefly review some of the relevant properties of A hypernuclei. These are nuclei {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}Z with baryon number A in which a single {Lambda} hyperon (baryon number = 1) is bound to an ordinary nucleus {sup A}Z consisting of A - 1 nucleons = Z protons + N neutrons. The {Lambda} hyperon is neutral, has spin 1/2, strangeness S = {minus}1, isospin I = O and a mass M{sub {Lambda}} = 1116 MeV/c{sup 2}. Although the {Lambda} interacts with a nucleon, its interaction is only about half as strong as that between two nucleons, and thus very roughly V{sub {Lambda}N} {approx} 0.5 V{sub NN}. As a result, the two-body {Lambda}N system is unbound, and the lightest bound HN is the three-body hypertriton {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H in which the {Lambda} is bound to a deuteron with the {Lambda}-d separation energy being only {approx} 0.1 MeV corresponding to an exponential tail of radius {approx} 15 fm! In strong interactions the strangeness S is of course conserved, and the {Lambda} is distinct from the nucleons. In a HN strangeness changes only in the weak decays of the {Lambda} which can decay either via ``free`` pionic decay {Lambda} {yields} N + {pi} or via induced decay {Lambda} + N {yields} N + N which is only possible in the presence of nucleons. Because of the small energy release the pionic decay is strongly suppressed in all but the lightest HN and the induced decay dominates. However, the weak decay lifetime {approx} 10{sup {minus}10}s is in fact close to the lifetime of a free {Lambda}. Since this is much longer than the strong interaction time {approx} 10{sup {minus}22}s we can ignore the weak interactions when considering the binding of HN, just as for ordinary nuclei.

  18. A single particle energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the binding energies of Λ hypernuclei (HN), in particular the single-particle (s.p.) energy data, which have been obtained for a wide range of HN with mass numbers A ≤ 89 and for orbital angular momenta ell Λ ≤ 4. We briefly review some of the relevant properties of A hypernuclei. These are nuclei Λ A Z with baryon number A in which a single Λ hyperon (baryon number = 1) is bound to an ordinary nucleus A Z consisting of A - 1 nucleons = Z protons + N neutrons. The Λ hyperon is neutral, has spin 1/2, strangeness S = -1, isospin I = O and a mass M Λ = 1116 MeV/c 2 . Although the Λ interacts with a nucleon, its interaction is only about half as strong as that between two nucleons, and thus very roughly V ΛN ∼ 0.5 V NN . As a result, the two-body ΛN system is unbound, and the lightest bound HN is the three-body hypertriton Λ 3 H in which the Λ is bound to a deuteron with the Λ-d separation energy being only ∼ 0.1 MeV corresponding to an exponential tail of radius ∼ 15 fm exclamation point In strong interactions the strangeness S is of course conserved, and the Λ is distinct from the nucleons. In a HN strangeness changes only in the weak decays of the Λ which can decay either via ''free'' pionic decay Λ → N + π or via induced decay Λ + N → N + N which is only possible in the presence of nucleons. Because of the small energy release the pionic decay is strongly suppressed in all but the lightest HN and the induced decay dominates. However, the weak decay lifetime ∼ 10 -10 s is in fact close to the lifetime of a free Λ. Since this is much longer than the strong interaction time ∼ 10 -22 s we can ignore the weak interactions when considering the binding of HN, just as for ordinary nuclei

  19. Nanoscale three-dimensional single particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Aurélie; Lamb, Don C

    2011-11-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) in biological systems is a quickly growing field. Many new technologies are being developed providing new tracking capabilities, which also lead to higher demands and expectations for SPT. Following a single biomolecule as it performs its function provides quantitative mechanistic information that cannot be obtained in classical ensemble methods. From the 3D trajectory, information is available over the diffusional behavior of the particle and precise position information can also be used to elucidate interactions of the tracked particle with its surroundings. Thus, three-dimensional (3D) SPT is a very valuable tool for investigating cellular processes. This review presents recent progress in 3D SPT, from image-based techniques toward more sophisticated feedback approaches. We focus mainly on the feedback technique known as orbital tracking. We present here a modified version of the original orbital tracking in which the intensities from two z-planes are simultaneously measured allowing a concomitant wide-field imaging. The system can track single particles with a precision down to 5 nm in the x-y plane and 7 nm in the axial direction. The capabilities of the system are demonstrated using single virus tracing to follow the infection pathway of Prototype Foamy Virus in living cells.

  20. Direct quantitative screening of influenza A virus without DNA amplification by single-particle dual-mode total internal reflection scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungah; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Yeung, Edward S; Kang, Seong Ho

    2017-01-15

    Quantitative screening of influenza A (H7N9) virus without DNA amplification was performed based on single-particle dual-mode total internal reflection scattering (SD-TIRS) with a transmission grating (TG). A gold nanopad was utilized as a substrate for the hybridization of probe DNA molecules with the TIRS nanotag (silver-nanoparticle). The TG effectively isolated the scattering signals in first-order spectral images (n=+1) of the nanotag from that of the substrate, providing excellent enhancement of signal-to-noise and selectivity. By using single-DNA molecule/TIRS nanotag hybridization, target DNA molecules of H7N9 were detected down to 74 zM, which is at least 100,000 times lower than the current detection limit of 9.4fM. By simply modifying the design of the probe DNA molecules, this technique can be used to directly screen other viral DNAs in various human biological samples at the single-molecule level without target amplification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bräuchle, Christoph; Michaelis, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Closing a gap in the literature, this handbook gathers all the information on single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer. It covers all aspects of this hot and modern topic, from detecting virus entry to membrane diffusion, and from protein folding using spFRET to coupled dye systems, as well recent achievements in the field. Throughout, the first-class editors and top international authors present content of the highest quality, making this a must-have for physical chemists, spectroscopists, molecular physicists and biochemists.

  2. Single particle electrochemical sensors and methods of utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeniger, Joseph [Oakland, CA; Flounders, Albert W [Berkeley, CA; Hughes, Robert C [Albuquerque, NM; Ricco, Antonio J [Los Gatos, CA; Wally, Karl [Lafayette, CA; Kravitz, Stanley H [Placitas, NM; Janek, Richard P [Oakland, CA

    2006-04-04

    The present invention discloses an electrochemical device for detecting single particles, and methods for using such a device to achieve high sensitivity for detecting particles such as bacteria, viruses, aggregates, immuno-complexes, molecules, or ionic species. The device provides for affinity-based electrochemical detection of particles with single-particle sensitivity. The disclosed device and methods are based on microelectrodes with surface-attached, affinity ligands (e.g., antibodies, combinatorial peptides, glycolipids) that bind selectively to some target particle species. The electrodes electrolyze chemical species present in the particle-containing solution, and particle interaction with a sensor element modulates its electrolytic activity. The devices may be used individually, employed as sensors, used in arrays for a single specific type of particle or for a range of particle types, or configured into arrays of sensors having both these attributes.

  3. Enhanced light microscopy visualization of virus particles from Zika virus to filamentous ebolaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George G Daaboul

    Full Text Available Light microscopy is a powerful tool in the detection and analysis of parasites, fungi, and prokaryotes, but has been challenging to use for the detection of individual virus particles. Unlabeled virus particles are too small to be visualized using standard visible light microscopy. Characterization of virus particles is typically performed using higher resolution approaches such as electron microscopy or atomic force microscopy. These approaches require purification of virions away from their normal millieu, requiring significant levels of expertise, and can only enumerate small numbers of particles per field of view. Here, we utilize a visible light imaging approach called Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS that allows automated counting and sizing of thousands of individual virions. Virions are captured directly from complex solutions onto a silicon chip and then detected using a reflectance interference imaging modality. We show that the use of different imaging wavelengths allows the visualization of a multitude of virus particles. Using Violet/UV illumination, the SP-IRIS technique is able to detect individual flavivirus particles (~40 nm, while green light illumination is capable of identifying and discriminating between vesicular stomatitis virus and vaccinia virus (~360 nm. Strikingly, the technology allows the clear identification of filamentous infectious ebolavirus particles and virus-like particles. The ability to differentiate and quantify unlabeled virus particles extends the usefulness of traditional light microscopy and can be embodied in a straightforward benchtop approach allowing widespread applications ranging from rapid detection in biological fluids to analysis of virus-like particles for vaccine development and production.

  4. Single Particle Entropy in Heated Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Chankova, R.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Sunde, A. C.; Syed, N. U. H.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal motion of single particles represents the largest contribution to level density (or entropy) in atomic nuclei. The concept of single particle entropy is presented and shown to be an approximate extensive (additive) quantity for mid-shell nuclei. A few applications of single particle entropy are demonstrated

  5. Saha equation, single and two particle states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeft, W. D.; Girardeau, M. D.; Strege, B.

    1990-01-01

    Single- and two-particle properties in a dense plasma are discussed in connection with their role in the mass action law for a partially ionized plasma. The two-particle-bound states are nearly density independent, while the continuum is essentially shifted. The single-particle states are damped, and their energy has a negative shift and a parabolic behavior for small momenta.

  6. Quantitative Imaging of Single, Unstained Viruses with Coherent X Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Changyong; Jiang Huaidong; Mancuso, Adrian; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Miao Jianwei; Peng Li; Sun Ren; Shah, Sanket S.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    We report the recording and reconstruction of x-ray diffraction patterns from single, unstained viruses, for the first time. By separating the diffraction pattern of the virus particles from that of their surroundings, we performed quantitative and high-contrast imaging of a single virion. The structure of the viral capsid inside a virion was visualized. This work opens the door for quantitative x-ray imaging of a broad range of specimens from protein machineries and viruses to cellular organelles. Moreover, our experiment is directly transferable to the use of x-ray free electron lasers, and represents an experimental milestone towards the x-ray imaging of large protein complexes

  7. Single-particle detection of transcription following rotavirus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Eric N; Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Harrison, Stephen C

    2017-07-12

    Infectious rotavirus particles are triple-layered, icosahedral assemblies. The outer layer proteins, VP4 (cleaved to VP8* and VP5*) and VP7, surround a transcriptionally competent, double-layer particle (DLP), which they deliver into the cytosol. During entry of rhesus rotavirus, VP8* interacts with cell-surface gangliosides, allowing engulfment into a membrane vesicle by a clathrin-independent process. Escape into the cytosol and outer-layer shedding depend on interaction of a hydrophobic surface on VP5* with the membrane bilayer and on a large-scale conformational change. We report here experiments that detect the fate of released DLPs and their efficiency in initiating RNA synthesis. By replacing the outer layer with fluorescently tagged, recombinant proteins and also tagging the DLP, we distinguish particles that have lost their outer layer and entered the cytosol (uncoated) from those still within membrane vesicles. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization with probes for nascent transcripts to determine how soon after uncoating transcription began and what fraction of the uncoated particles were active in initiating RNA synthesis. We detected RNA synthesis by uncoated particles as early as 15 minutes after adding virus. Uncoating efficiency was 20-50%; of the uncoated particles, about 10% synthesized detectable RNA. In the format of our experiments, about 1% of the added particles attached to the cell surface, giving an overall added-particle to RNA-synthesizing particle ratio of between 1000 and 5000 to 1, in good agreement with the particle-to-focus-forming unit determined by infectivity assays. Thus, RNA synthesis by even a single, uncoated particle can initiate infection in a cell. IMPORTANCE The pathways by which a virus enters a cell transform its packaged genome into an active one. Contemporary fluorescence microscopy can detect individual virus particles as they enter cells, allowing us to map their multi-step entry pathways. Rotaviruses, like most

  8. Brightness calibrates particle size in single particle fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihe; Sun, Zezhou; Di, Weihua; Qin, Weiping; Yuan, Zhen; Wu, Changfeng

    2015-04-01

    This Letter provides a novel approach to quantify the particle sizes of highly bright semiconductor polymer dots (Pdots) for single-particle imaging and photobleaching studies. A quadratic dependence of single-particle brightness on particle size was determined by single-particle fluorescence imaging and intensity statistics. In terms of the same imaging conditions, the particle diameter can be quantified by comparing the individual brightness intensity with associated calibration curve. Based on this sizing method, photobleaching trajectories and overall photon counts emitted by single particles were analyzed. It is found that photobleaching rate constants of different sized Pdots are not strongly dependent on particle diameter except the sparsely occurring fluorescence blinking in certain dim particles and the rapid photobleaching component in some bright particles. The overall photon counts increase with increasing particle diameter. However, those larger than 30 nm deviate away from the increasing tendency. These results reveal the significance of selecting appropriate Pdots (≤30  nm) for single-particle imaging and tracking applications.

  9. Single-particle dispersion in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Xiao, Zuoli

    2018-04-01

    Single-particle dispersion statistics in compressible box turbulence are studied using direct numerical simulation. Focus is placed on the detailed discussion of effects of the particle Stokes number and turbulent Mach number, as well as the forcing type. When solenoidal forcing is adopted, it is found that the single-particle dispersion undergoes a transition from the ballistic regime at short times to the diffusive regime at long times, in agreement with Taylor's particle dispersion argument. The strongest dispersion of heavy particles is announced when the Stokes number is of order 1, which is similar to the scenario in incompressible turbulence. The dispersion tends to be suppressed as the Mach number increases. When hybrid solenoidal and compressive forcing at a ratio of 1/2 is employed, the flow field shows apparent anisotropic property, characterized by the appearance of large shock wave structures. Accordingly, the single-particle dispersion shows extremely different behavior from the solenoidal forcing case.

  10. Distribution of lead in single atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D. M.; Hudson, P. K.; Cziczo, D. J.; Gallavardin, S.; Froyd, K. D.; Johnston, M. V.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Reinard, M. S.; Thomson, D. S.; Thornberry, T.; Wexler, A. S.

    2007-06-01

    Three independent single particle mass spectrometers measured Pb in individual aerosol particles. These data provide unprecedented sensitivity and statistical significance for the measurement of Pb in single particles. This paper explores the reasons for the frequency of Pb in fine particles now that most gasoline is unleaded. Trace amounts of Pb were found in 5 to 25% of 250 to 3000 nm diameter particles sampled by both aircraft and surface instruments in the eastern and western United States. Over 5% of particles at a mountain site in Switzerland contained Pb. Particles smaller than 100 nm with high Pb content were also observed by an instrument that was only operated in urban areas. Lead was found on all types of particles, including Pb present on biomass burning particles from remote fires. Less common particles with high Pb contents contributed a majority of the total amount of Pb. Single particles with high Pb content often also contained alkali metals, Zn, Cu, Sn, As, and Sb. The association of Pb with Zn and other metals is also found in IMPROVE network filter data from surface sites. Sources of airborne Pb in the United States are reviewed for consistency with these data. The frequent appearance of trace Pb is consistent with widespread emissions of fine Pb particles from combustion sources followed by coagulation with larger particles during long-range transport. Industrial sources that directly emit Pb-rich particles also contribute to the observations. Clean regions of the western United States show some transport of Pb from Asia but most Pb over the United States comes from North American sources. Resuspension of Pb from soil contaminated by the years of leaded gasoline was not directly apparent.

  11. Multiplex single particle analysis in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhauser, D; Romeo, G; Causa, F; De Santo, I; Netti, P A

    2014-10-21

    A straightforward way to measure separated micrometric sized particles in microfluidic flow is reported. The light scattering profile (LSP) of each single particle is fully characterized by using a CMOS-camera based small angle light scattering (SALS) apparatus, ranging from 2° up to 30°. To ensure controlled particle passage through the incident laser, a viscoelastic 3D alignment effect by viscoelastic induced particle migration has been implemented in a simple and cost-effective microfluidic device. Different polystyrene particle sizes are measured in microfluidic flows and the obtained scattering signatures are matched with the Lorenz-Mie based scattering theory. The results confirm the possibility of using this apparatus for real multiplex particle analyses in microfluidic particle flows.

  12. Virus-like particles as nanovaccine candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen, G.; Aguilar, J. C.; Dueñas, S.; Hermida, L.; Iglesias, E.; Penton, E.; Lobaina, Y.; Lopez, M.; Mussachio, A.; Falcon, V.; Alvarez, L.; Martinez, G.; Gil, L.; Valdes, I.; Izquierdo, A.; Lazo, L.; Marcos, E.; Guzman, G.; Muzio, V.; Herrera, L.

    2013-03-01

    The existing vaccines are mainly limited to the microorganisms we are able to culture and produce and/or to those whose killing is mediated by humoral response (antibody mediated). It has been more difficult to develop vaccines capable of inducing a functional cellular response needed to prevent or cure chronic diseases. New strategies should be taken into account in the improvement of cell-based immune responses in order to prevent and control the infections and eventually clear the virus. Preclinical and clinical results with vaccine candidates developed as a vaccine platform based on virus-like particles (VLPs) evidenced their ability to stimulate mucosal as well as systemic immunity. Particles based on envelope, membrane or nucleocapsid microbial proteins induce a strong immune response after nasal or parenteral administration in mice, non-human primates and humans. In addition, the immune response obtained was modulated in a Th1 sense. The VLPs were also able to immunoenhance the humoral and cellular immune responses against several viral pathogens. Studies in animals and humans with nasal and systemic formulations evidenced that it is possible to induce functional immune response against HBV, HCV, HIV and dengue virus. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October - 2 November 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  13. Virus-like particles as nanovaccine candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillen, G; Aguilar, J C; Dueñas, S; Hermida, L; Iglesias, E; Penton, E; Lobaina, Y; Lopez, M; Mussachio, A; Falcon, V; Alvarez, L; Martinez, G; Gil, L; Valdes, I; Izquierdo, A; Lazo, L; Marcos, E; Guzman, G; Muzio, V; Herrera, L

    2013-01-01

    The existing vaccines are mainly limited to the microorganisms we are able to culture and produce and/or to those whose killing is mediated by humoral response (antibody mediated). It has been more difficult to develop vaccines capable of inducing a functional cellular response needed to prevent or cure chronic diseases. New strategies should be taken into account in the improvement of cell-based immune responses in order to prevent and control the infections and eventually clear the virus. Preclinical and clinical results with vaccine candidates developed as a vaccine platform based on virus-like particles (VLPs) evidenced their ability to stimulate mucosal as well as systemic immunity. Particles based on envelope, membrane or nucleocapsid microbial proteins induce a strong immune response after nasal or parenteral administration in mice, non-human primates and humans. In addition, the immune response obtained was modulated in a Th1 sense. The VLPs were also able to immunoenhance the humoral and cellular immune responses against several viral pathogens. Studies in animals and humans with nasal and systemic formulations evidenced that it is possible to induce functional immune response against HBV, HCV, HIV and dengue virus. (paper)

  14. The probe rules in single particle tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mathias P.; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) enables light microscopy at a sub-diffraction limited spatial resolution by a combination of imaging at low molecular labeling densities and computational image processing. SPT and related single molecule imaging techniques have found a rapidly expanded use within...

  15. Oligonucleotide length dependent formation of virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maassen, Stan J; de Ruiter, Mark Vincent; Lindhoud, Saskia; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M

    2018-03-08

    Understanding the assembly pathway of viruses can contribute to creating monodisperse virus-based materials. In this study the Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus is used to determine the interactions between the capsid proteins of viruses and their cargo. The assembly of the capsid proteins in the presence of different lengths of short single-stranded DNA is studied at neutral pH, where the protein-protein interactions are weak. Chromatography, electrophoresis, microscopy, and light scattering shows that the assembly efficiency and speed of the particles increases with increasing length of oligonucleotides. The minimal length required for assembly at the conditions used here is shown to be 14 nucleotides. Assembly of particles containing such short strands of ssDNA can take almost a month. This slow assembly process enabled the study of intermediate states, confirming a low cooperative assembly for CCMV and allows for further expansion of current assembly theories. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Fundamental study of single biomass particle combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, M.

    2013-06-01

    This thesis is a comprehensive study of single biomass particle combustion. The effect of particle shape and size and operating conditions on biomass conversion characteristics were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experimental samples were divided in two groups: particles with regular shapes (spheres and cylinders) and particles with irregular shapes (almost flake-like). A CAMSIZER analyser (Retsch Technology GMBH) was used to determine the size and shape of the particles via Dynamical Digital Image Processing. The experiments were performed in a single particle reactor under well-defined conditions, and the complete combustion processes were recorded as video sequences by a CCD camera installed in the set-up. One of the project objectives is to simulate conditions reasonably close to the conditions in a power plant boiler, i.e., reasonably high temperatures (up to 1600 deg. C) and varying oxygen concentrations in the 5 to 20% range. A one-dimensional mathematical model was used to simulate all the intraparticle conversion processes (drying, recondensation, devolatilisation, char gasification/oxidation and heat/mass/momentum transfer) within single particles of different shapes and size under various conditions. The model also predicts the flame layer domain of a single particle. The model was validated by experimental results under different conditions; good agreement between the model predictions and the experimental data was observed. Both the experimental and modelling results showed that cylindrical particles lose mass faster than spherical particles of a similar volume (mass) and that the burnout time is reduced by increasing the particle aspect ratio (surface area to volume ratio). Very similar conversion times were observed for cylindrical particles with nearly identical surface area to volume ratios. Similar conversion times were also observed for two size classes of pulverised particles (with irregular shapes) made from the same type of

  17. Particle segmentation algorithm for flexible single particle reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiang; Zhou, Niyun; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2017-01-01

    As single particle cryo-electron microscopy has evolved to a new era of atomic resolution, sample heterogeneity still imposes a major limit to the resolution of many macromolecular complexes, especially those with continuous conformational flexibility. Here, we describe a particle segmentation algorithm towards solving structures of molecules composed of several parts that are relatively flexible with each other. In this algorithm, the different parts of a target molecule are segmented from raw images according to their alignment information obtained from a preliminary 3D reconstruction and are subjected to single particle processing in an iterative manner. This algorithm was tested on both simulated and experimental data and showed improvement of 3D reconstruction resolution of each segmented part of the molecule than that of the entire molecule.

  18. Single-particle Schroedinger fluid. I. Formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, K.K.; Griffin, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of a single quantal particle moving in a time-dependent external potential well is formulated specifically to emphasize and develop the fluid dynamical aspects of the matter flow. This idealized problem, the single-particle Schroedinger fluid, is shown to exhibit already a remarkably rich variety of fluid dynamical features, including compressible flow and line vortices. It provides also a sufficient framework to encompass simultaneously various simplified fluidic models for nuclei which have earlier been postulated on an ad hoc basis, and to illuminate their underlying restrictions. Explicit solutions of the single-particle Schroedinger fluid problem are studied in the adiabatic limit for their mathematical and physical implications (especially regarding the collective kinetic energy). The basic generalizations for extension of the treatment to the many-body Schroedinger fluid are set forth

  19. Characterization of chikungunya virus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitchakarn Noranate

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is becoming a global concern due to the increasing number of outbreaks throughout the world and the absence of any CHIKV-specific vaccine or treatment. Virus-like particles (VLPs are multistructured proteins that mimic the organization and conformation of native viruses but lack the viral genome. They are noninfectious and potentially safer vaccine candidates. Recent studies demonstrated that the yield of CHIKV VLPs varies depending on the strains, despite the 95% amino acid similarity of the strains. This might be due to the codon usage, since protein expression is differently controlled by different organisms. We optimized the region encoding CHIKV structural proteins, C-E3-E2-6k-E1, inserted it into a mammalian expression vector, and used the resulting construct to transfect 293 cells. We detected 50-kDa proteins corresponding to E1 and/or E2 in the cell lysate and the supernatant. Transmission electron microscopy revealed spherical particles with a 50- to 60-nm diameter in the supernatant that resembled the native CHIKV virions. The buoyant density of the VLPs was 1.23 g/mL, and the yield was 20 µg purified VLPs per 108 cells. The VLPs aggregated when mixed with convalescent sera from chikungunya patients, indicating that their antigenicity is similar to that of native CHIKV. Antibodies elicited with the VLPs were capable of detecting native CHIKV, demonstrating that the VLPs retain immunogenicity similar to that of the native virion. These results indicated that CHIKV VLPs are morphologically, antigenically, and immunologically similar to the native CHIKV, suggesting that they have potential for use in chikungunya vaccines.

  20. Dual color single particle tracking via nanobodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, David; Winterflood, Christian M; Ewers, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Single particle tracking is a powerful tool to investigate the function of biological molecules by following their motion in space. However, the simultaneous tracking of two different species of molecules is still difficult to realize without compromising the length or density of trajectories, the localization accuracy or the simplicity of the assay. Here, we demonstrate a simple dual color single particle tracking assay using small, bright, high-affinity labeling via nanobodies of accessible targets with widely available instrumentation. We furthermore apply a ratiometric step-size analysis method to visualize differences in apparent membrane viscosity. (paper)

  1. Single particle tomography in EMAN2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaz-Montoya, Jesús G; Flanagan, John; Schmid, Michael F; Ludtke, Steven J

    2015-06-01

    Single particle tomography (SPT or subtomogram averaging) offers a powerful alternative to traditional 2-D single particle reconstruction for studying conformationally or compositionally heterogeneous macromolecules. It can also provide direct observation (without labeling or staining) of complexes inside cells at nanometer resolution. The development of computational methods and tools for SPT remains an area of active research. Here we present the EMAN2.1 SPT toolbox, which offers a full SPT processing pipeline, from particle picking to post-alignment analysis of subtomogram averages, automating most steps. Different algorithm combinations can be applied at each step, providing versatility and allowing for procedural cross-testing and specimen-specific strategies. Alignment methods include all-vs-all, binary tree, iterative single-model refinement, multiple-model refinement, and self-symmetry alignment. An efficient angular search, Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) acceleration and both threaded and distributed parallelism are provided to speed up processing. Finally, automated simulations, per particle reconstruction of subtiltseries, and per-particle Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) correction have been implemented. Processing examples using both real and simulated data are shown for several structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Projection operator treatment of single particle resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev, A.; Beres, W.P.

    1976-01-01

    A projection operator method is used to obtain the energy and width of a single particle resonance. The resonance energy is found without scanning. An example of the first g/sub 9/2/ neutron resonance in 40 Ca is given and compared with the traditional phase shift method. The results of both approaches are quite similar. 4 figures

  3. Single particle raster image analysis of diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longfils, M; Schuster, E; Lorén, N; Särkkä, A; Rudemo, M

    2017-04-01

    As a complement to the standard RICS method of analysing Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy images with estimation of the image correlation function, we introduce the method SPRIA, Single Particle Raster Image Analysis. Here, we start by identifying individual particles and estimate the diffusion coefficient for each particle by a maximum likelihood method. Averaging over the particles gives a diffusion coefficient estimate for the whole image. In examples both with simulated and experimental data, we show that the new method gives accurate estimates. It also gives directly standard error estimates. The method should be possible to extend to study heterogeneous materials and systems of particles with varying diffusion coefficient, as demonstrated in a simple simulation example. A requirement for applying the SPRIA method is that the particle concentration is low enough so that we can identify the individual particles. We also describe a bootstrap method for estimating the standard error of standard RICS. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Microorganism characterization by single particle mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Scott C

    2009-01-01

    In recent years a major effort by several groups has been undertaken to identify bacteria by mass spectrometry at the single cell level. The intent of this review is to highlight the recent progress made in the application of single particle mass spectrometry to the analysis of microorganisms. A large portion of the review highlights improvements in the ionization and mass analysis of bio-aerosols, or particles that contain biologically relevant molecules such as peptides or proteins. While these are not direct applications to bacteria, the results have been central to a progression toward single cell mass spectrometry. Developments in single particle matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) are summarized. Recent applications of aerosol laser desorption/ionization (LDI) to the analysis of single microorganisms are highlighted. Successful applications of off-line and on-the-fly aerosol MALDI to microorganism detection are discussed. Limitations to current approaches and necessary future achievements are also addressed. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Site-specific binding of viral plus single-stranded RNA to replicase-containing open virus-like particles of yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban, R; Fujimura, T; Wickner, R B

    1988-01-01

    X double-stranded RNA is a deletion mutant of L-A double-stranded RNA and is encapsidated in viral particles by the L-A-encoded major coat protein. X double-stranded RNA has all the cis sites necessary to be transcribed, encapsidated, and replicated. We have cloned X double-stranded RNA and sequenced it. The complete X double-stranded RNA sequence deduced indicates that the first 25 bases of the X plus-strand 5' end originated from the 5' end of the L-A plus strand and that most, if not all, ...

  6. Single particle raster image analysis of diffusion for particle mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longfils, M; Röding, M; Altskär, A; Schuster, E; Lorén, N; Särkkä, A; Rudemo, M

    2018-03-01

    Recently we complemented the raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) method of analysing raster images via estimation of the image correlation function with the method single particle raster image analysis (SPRIA). In SPRIA, individual particles are identified and the diffusion coefficient of each particle is estimated by a maximum likelihood method. In this paper, we extend the SPRIA method to analyse mixtures of particles with a finite set of diffusion coefficients in a homogeneous medium. In examples with simulated and experimental data with two and three different diffusion coefficients, we show that SPRIA gives accurate estimates of the diffusion coefficients and their proportions. A simple technique for finding the number of different diffusion coefficients is also suggested. Further, we study the use of RICS for mixtures with two different diffusion coefficents and investigate, by plotting level curves of the correlation function, how large the quotient between diffusion coefficients needs to be in order to allow discrimination between models with one and two diffusion coefficients. We also describe a minor correction (compared to published papers) of the RICS autocorrelation function. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. Single particle closed orbits in Yukawa potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, R.; Sounda, S.

    2018-02-01

    Orbit of a single particle moving under the Yukawa potential is studied and there exists precessing ellipse type orbits. The amount of precession can be tuned through the coupling parameter α. With a suitable choice of the coupling parameter; we get a closed bound orbit. In some cases few petals are observed which is possessed of a closed bound nature for suitably chosen coupling parameter. Threshold energy has also been calculated for bound orbits.

  8. Non-chromatographic preparation of a bacterially produced single-shot modular virus-like particle capsomere vaccine for avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Nani; Wu, Yang; Fan, Yuanyuan; Meers, Joanne; Lua, Linda H L; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2015-11-04

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) causes significant economic loss, reduced food security and poses an ongoing pandemic threat. Poultry vaccination significantly decreases these problems and recognizes that the health of humans, animals and ecosystems are connected. Low-cost manufacture of poultry vaccine matched quickly to the ever-changing circulating strain is needed for effective vaccination. Here, we re-engineered the process to manufacture bacterially synthesized modular capsomere comprising influenza M2e, previously shown to confer complete protection in challenged mice, for application in poultry. Modular capsomere was prepared using a simplified non-chromatographic salting-out precipitation method and its immunogenicity tested in vivo in poultry. Modular capsomere crudely purified by precipitation (pCapM2e) contained more contaminants than equivalent product purified by chromatography (cCapM2e). Unadjuvanted pCapM2e containing 80 EU of endotoxin per dose was inferior to highly purified and adjuvanted cCapM2e (2 EU per dose). However, addition of adjuvant to pCapM2e resulting in high immunogenicity after only a single dose of vaccination, yet without any local adverse reaction. This finding suggests a strong synergy between adjuvant, antigen and contaminants, and the possible existence of a "Goldilocks" level of contaminants, where high immunogenicity and low reactogenicity can be obtained in a single-shot vaccination. The simplified process offers potential cost and speed advantages to address the needs in influenza poultry vaccination in low-cost veterinary markets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Virus-Like Particles Exhibit Potential as a Pan-Filovirus Vaccine for Both Ebola and Marburg Viral Infections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swenson, Dana L; Warfield, Kelly L; Negley, Diane L; Schmaljohn, Alan; Aman, M. J; Bavari, Sina

    2005-01-01

    .... Previously, we showed that expression of the homologous glycoprotein (GP) and matrix protein VP40 from a single filovirus, either EBOV or MARV, resulted in formation of wild-type virus-like particles (VLPs) in mammalian cells...

  10. Single-virus tracking approach to reveal the interaction of Dengue virus with autophagy during the early stage of infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Li-Wei; Huang, Yi-Lung; Lee, Jin-Hui; Huang, Long-Ying; Chen, Wei-Jun; Lin, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Jyun-Yu; Xiang, Rui; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Ping, Yueh-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the major infectious pathogens worldwide. DENV infection is a highly dynamic process. Currently, no antiviral drug is available for treating DENV-induced diseases since little is known regarding how the virus interacts with host cells during infection. Advanced molecular imaging technologies are powerful tools to understand the dynamics of intracellular interactions and molecular trafficking. This study exploited a single-virus particle tracking technology to address whether DENV interacts with autophagy machinery during the early stage of infection. Using confocal microscopy and three-dimensional image analysis, we showed that DENV triggered the formation of green fluorescence protein-fused microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) puncta, and DENV-induced autophagosomes engulfed DENV particles within 15-min postinfection. Moreover, single-virus particle tracking revealed that both DENV particles and autophagosomes traveled together during the viral infection. Finally, in the presence of autophagy suppressor 3-methyladenine, the replication of DENV was inhibited and the location of DENV particles spread in cytoplasma. In contrast, the numbers of newly synthesized DENV were elevated and the co-localization of DENV particles and autophagosomes was detected while the cells were treated with autophagy inducer rapamycin. Taken together, we propose that DENV particles interact with autophagosomes at the early stage of viral infection, which promotes the replication of DENV.

  11. Damping of unbound single-particle modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortier, S.; Beaumel, D.; Gales, S.; Guillot, J.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Laurent, H.; Maison, J.M.; Bordewijk, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Crawley, G.M.; Massolo, C.P.; Renteria, M.; Khendriche, A.

    1995-01-01

    The (α, 3 He-n) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy on 64 Ni, 90 Zr, and 120 Sn target nuclei. Neutrons in coincidence with 3 He particles emitted at 0 degree were detected using the multidetector array EDEN, in order to get information about the decay of single-particle states embedded in the (α, 3 He) continuum. Neutron angular correlations, multiplicity values, and branching ratios to low-lying states of the final nuclei have been compared with the predictions of the statistical decay model. Evidence for a significant nonstatistical decay branch has been observed in the three nuclei below about 15 MeV excitation energy. Direct branching ratios in 91 Zr deduced from this analysis are compared with the predictions of two nuclear structure models. At higher excitation energy, the decay characteristics of the (α, 3 He) continuum are shown to be mainly statistical

  12. Evaluation of nanoparticle tracking analysis for total virus particle determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramberger Petra

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The NanoSight LM10 with Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA software was evaluated for the quantification of latex particles, adenovirus 5, and influenza virus. The inter-day variability was determined by measuring the same sample over several consecutive days and the method’s accuracy was demonstrated by using known concentrations of the subject particles. NTA analysis was also used to quantify chromatographic fractions of adenovirus and influenza virus after purification on a CIM monolithic column. NTA results were compared and evaluated against hemagglutination (HA and end point dilution assay, determining total and infection virus particle number, respectively. The results demonstrated that nanoparticle tracking analysis is a method for fast estimation of virus concentration in different samples. In addition, it can provide a better insight into the sample status, regarding the level of virus aggregation.

  13. Single-Particle States in $^{133}$Sn

    CERN Multimedia

    Huck, A

    2002-01-01

    % IS338 \\\\ \\\\ It is suggested to investigate the $\\beta^- $-decay of $^{133}$In and $^{134}$In in order to determine the single-particle states in $^{133}$Sn, which are so far unknown and needed for the shell-model description of the region close to $^{132}$Sn. Large hyper-pure Ge-detectors will be used for the $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy. In the experiments with $^{134}$In, delayed neutrons in coincidence with $\\gamma$-rays from excited states in $^{133}$Sn provide the opportunity for a very selective detection of the states in question.

  14. Detection of three honeybee viruses simultaneously by a single ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A single multiplex reverse transcriptase (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for the simultaneous detection of three honeybee viruses: acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), sacbrood virus (SBV) and black queen cell virus (BQCV). Unique PCR primers were designed from the complete genome ...

  15. Performance of single mechanoluminescent particle as ubiquitous light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Nao; Xu, Chao-Nan

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we have investigated mechanoluminescent (ML) performance of single ML particle as ubiquitous light source. When using high-speed CCD camera with image intensifier and microscopic equipment, mechanoluminescence from single particle was observed. As to the quantitative ML evaluation of the single ML particle was carried out using photomultiplier, and successfully estimated the performance of the single ML particle as an intensity controllable light source in nW order. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Single Assay Detection of Acute Bee Paralysis Virus, Kashmir Bee Virus and Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew; Kryger, Per

    2012-01-01

    A new RT-PCR primer pair designed to identify Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (ABPV), Kashmir Bee Virus (KBV) or Israeli Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (IAPV) of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in a single assay is described. These primers are used to screen samples for ABPV, KBV, or IAPV in a single RT-PCR ......-PCR reaction saving time and money. The primers are located in the predicted overlapping gene (pog/ORFX) which is highly conserved across ABPV, KBV, IAPV and other dicistroviruses of social insects. This study has also identified the first case of IAPV in Denmark....

  17. Surface chemistry and morphology in single particle optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiz-Kanik, Fulya; Sevenler, Derin Deniz; Ünlü, Neşe Lortlar; Chiari, Marcella; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2017-05-01

    Biological nanoparticles such as viruses and exosomes are important biomarkers for a range of medical conditions, from infectious diseases to cancer. Biological sensors that detect whole viruses and exosomes with high specificity, yet without additional labeling, are promising because they reduce the complexity of sample preparation and may improve measurement quality by retaining information about nanoscale physical structure of the bio-nanoparticle (BNP). Towards this end, a variety of BNP biosensor technologies have been developed, several of which are capable of enumerating the precise number of detected viruses or exosomes and analyzing physical properties of each individual particle. Optical imaging techniques are promising candidates among broad range of label-free nanoparticle detectors. These imaging BNP sensors detect the binding of single nanoparticles on a flat surface functionalized with a specific capture molecule or an array of multiplexed capture probes. The functionalization step confers all molecular specificity for the sensor's target but can introduce an unforeseen problem; a rough and inhomogeneous surface coating can be a source of noise, as these sensors detect small local changes in optical refractive index. In this paper, we review several optical technologies for label-free BNP detectors with a focus on imaging systems. We compare the surface-imaging methods including dark-field, surface plasmon resonance imaging and interference reflectance imaging. We discuss the importance of ensuring consistently uniform and smooth surface coatings of capture molecules for these types of biosensors and finally summarize several methods that have been developed towards addressing this challenge.

  18. Damping of unbound single-particle modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortier, S.; Beaumel, D.; Gales, S.; Guillot, J.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Laurent, H.; Maison, J.M.; Bordewijk, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Crawley, G.M.; Massolo, C.P.; Renteria, M.; Khendriche, A. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)]|[Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)]|[Nuclear Research Institute, Debrecen P.O. Box 51, H-4001 (Hungary)]|[NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)]|[Dep. Fisica, Fac. Cs. Exactas, UNLP, CC Nio 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)]|[Institut de Sciences Exactes,Universite de Tizi-Ouzou, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    1995-11-01

    The ({alpha},{sup 3}He-{ital n}) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy on {sup 64}Ni, {sup 90}Zr, and {sup 120}Sn target nuclei. Neutrons in coincidence with {sup 3}He particles emitted at 0{degree} were detected using the multidetector array EDEN, in order to get information about the decay of single-particle states embedded in the ({alpha},{sup 3}He) continuum. Neutron angular correlations, multiplicity values, and branching ratios to low-lying states of the final nuclei have been compared with the predictions of the statistical decay model. Evidence for a significant nonstatistical decay branch has been observed in the three nuclei below about 15 MeV excitation energy. Direct branching ratios in {sup 91}Zr deduced from this analysis are compared with the predictions of two nuclear structure models. At higher excitation energy, the decay characteristics of the ({alpha},{sup 3}He) continuum are shown to be mainly statistical.

  19. Single particle level scheme for alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirea, M.

    1998-01-01

    The fine structure phenomenon in alpha decay was evidenced by Rosenblum. In this process the kinetic energy of the emitted particle has several determined values related to the structure of the parent and the daughter nucleus. The probability to find the daughter in a low lying state was considered strongly dependent on the spectroscopic factor defined as the square of overlap between the wave function of the parent in the ground state and the wave functions of the specific excited states of the daughter. This treatment provides a qualitative agreement with the experimental results if the variations of the penetrability between different excited states are neglected. Based on single particle structure during fission, a new formalism explained quantitatively the fine structure of the cluster decay. It was suggested that this formalism can be applied also to alpha decay. For this purpose, the first step is to construct the level scheme of this type of decay. Such a scheme, obtained with the super-asymmetric two-center potential, is plotted for the alpha decay of 223 Ra. It is interesting to note that, diabatically, the level with spin 3/2 emerging from 1i 11/2 (ground state of the parent) reaches an excited state of the daughter in agreement with the experiment. (author)

  20. Monitoring virus entry into living cells using DiD-labeled dengue virus particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayala Nunez, Vanesa; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of approaches can be applied to investigate the multiple steps and interactions that occur during virus entry into the host cell. Single-virus tracking is a powerful real-time imaging technique that offers the possibility to monitor virus-cell binding, internalization, intracellular

  1. Fundamental Study of Single Biomass Particle Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam

    results showed that cylindrical particles lose mass faster than spherical particles of a similar volume (mass) and that the burnout time is reduced by increasing the particle aspect ratio (surface area to volume ratio). Very similar conversion times were observed for cylindrical particles with nearly...... identical surface area to volume ratios. Similar conversion times were also observed for two size classes of pulverised particles (with irregular shapes) made from the same type of wood because of their similar surface area to volume ratios. The ignition, devolatilisation and burnout times of particles were...

  2. Chikungunya virus-like particle vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.W.H.

    2013-01-01

      Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne alphavirus (family Togaviridae) and is the causative agent of chikungunya fever. This disease is characterised by the sudden onset of high fever and long-lasting arthritic disease. First identified in Tanzania in 1952, CHIKV has re-emerged in

  3. Chikungunya virus-like particle vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.W.H.

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne alphavirus (family Togaviridae) and is the causative agent of chikungunya fever. This disease is characterised by the sudden onset of high fever and long-lasting arthritic disease. First identified in Tanzania in 1952,

  4. High sensitivity detection and sorting of infectious human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) particles by flow virometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Michał M; Tilton, John C

    2017-05-01

    Detection of viruses by flow cytometry is complicated by their small size. Here, we characterized the ability of a standard (FACSAria II) and a sub-micron flow cytometer (A50 Micro) to resolve HIV-1 viruses. The A50 was superior at resolving small particles but did not reliably distinguish HIV-1, extracellular vesicles, and laser noise by light scatter properties alone. However, single fluorescent HIV-1 particles could readily be detected by both cytometers. Fluorescent particles were sorted and retained infectivity, permitting further exploration of the functional consequences of HIV-1 heterogeneity. Finally, flow cytometry had a limit of detection of 80 viruses/ml, nearly equal to PCR assays. These studies demonstrate the power of flow cytometry to detect and sort viral particles and provide a critical toolkit to validate methods to label wild-type HIV-1; quantitatively assess integrity and aggregation of viruses and virus-based therapeutics; and efficiently screen drugs inhibiting viral assembly and release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative analysis of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) and new RHDV2 virus antigenicity, using specific virus-like particles

    OpenAIRE

    Bárcena, Juan; Guerra, Beatriz; Angulo, Iván; González, Julia; Valcárcel, Félix; Mata, Carlos P.; Castón, José R.; Blanco, Esther; Alejo, Alí

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In 2010 a new Lagovirus related to rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) emerged in France and has since rapidly spread throughout domestic and wild rabbit populations of several European countries. The new virus, termed RHDV2, exhibits distinctive genetic, antigenic and pathogenic features. Notably, RHDV2 kills rabbits previously vaccinated with RHDV vaccines. Here we report for the first time the generation and characterization of RHDV2-specific virus-like particl...

  6. Many-particle nucleon-nucleon forces from nuclear single-particle states

    OpenAIRE

    Birbrair, B. L.; Ryazanov, V. I.

    1999-01-01

    As follows from the energies of single-particle states in ^{40}Ca, ^{90}Zr and ^{208}Pb nuclei the contribution of many-particle NN forces to the nuclear single-particle potential is at least the sum of repulsive and attractive parts resulting from three-particle and four-particle forces respectively. In addition the specified nucleon density distributions in the above nuclei are determined from both the 1 GeV proton-nucleus elastic scattering and the single-particle energies.

  7. Stochastic transport of particles across single barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuter, Christian; Siems, Ullrich; Henseler, Peter; Nielaba, Peter; Leiderer, Paul; Erbe, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Transport phenomena of interacting particles are of high interest for many applications in biology and mesoscopic systems. Here we present measurements on colloidal particles, which are confined in narrow channels on a substrate and interact with a barrier, which impedes the motion along the channel. The substrate of the particle is tilted in order for the particles to be driven towards the barrier and, if the energy gained by the tilt is large enough, surpass the barrier by thermal activation. We therefore study the influence of this barrier as well as the influence of particle interaction on the particle transport through such systems. All experiments are supported with Brownian dynamics simulations in order to complement the experiments with tests of a large range of parameter space which cannot be accessed in experiments.

  8. Double-labelled HIV-1 particles for study of virus-cell interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, Marko; Briggs, John A.G.; Endress, Thomas; Glass, Baerbel; Riegelsberger, Stefan; Kraeusslich, Hans-Georg; Lamb, Don C.; Braeuchle, Christoph; Mueller, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) delivers its genome to a host cell through fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane. While the viral and cellular proteins involved in entry have been analyzed in detail, the dynamics of virus-cell fusion are largely unknown. Single virus tracing (SVT) provides the unique opportunity to visualize viral particles in real time allowing direct observation of the dynamics of this stochastic process. For this purpose, we developed a double-coloured HIV derivative carrying a green fluorescent label attached to the viral matrix protein combined with a red label fused to the viral Vpr protein designed to distinguish between complete virions and subviral particles lacking MA after membrane fusion. We present here a detailed characterization of this novel tool together with exemplary live cell imaging studies, demonstrating its suitability for real-time analyses of HIV-cell interaction

  9. Ultrastructure of Zika virus particles in cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Ferreira Barreto-Vieira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV has infected thousands of Brazilian people and spread to other American countries since 2015. The introduction of ZIKV brought a strong impact to public health in Brazil. It is of utmost importance to identify a susceptible cell line that will enable the isolation and identification of the virus from patient samples, viral mass production, and testing of drug and vaccine candidates. Besides real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction diagnosis for detecting the viral genome, virus isolation in cell lines was useful in order to study the structure of the viral particle and its behaviour inside cells. Analysis of ZIKV infected cell lines was achieved using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Blood was obtained from a Brazilian patient during the first days after presenting with signs of the disease, and ZIKV from the patient’s blood was isolated in the C6/36 mosquito cell line. Afterwards, Vero cells were inoculated with the viral suspension, fixed six days after inoculation, embedded in polymers, and ultra-thin cut. Like dengue viruses, this flavivirus showed numerous virus particles present inside cellular vesicles thereby confirming the susceptibility of the Vero cell line to ZIKV replication. TEM is a unique technique available to make the virus visible.

  10. Enveloped virus-like particles as vaccines against pathogenic arboviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijlman, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne arboviruses form a continuous threat to human and animal health, but few arboviral vaccines are currently available. Advances in expression technology for complex, enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs) create new opportunities to develop potent vaccines against pathogenic

  11. Distinct circular single-stranded DNA viruses exist in different soil types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavy, Brian; Swanson, Maud M; Cock, Peter J A; Dawson, Lorna; Freitag, Thomas E; Singh, Brajesh K; Torrance, Lesley; Mushegian, Arcady R; Taliansky, Michael

    2015-06-15

    The potential dependence of virus populations on soil types was examined by electron microscopy, and the total abundance of virus particles in four soil types was similar to that previously observed in soil samples. The four soil types examined differed in the relative abundances of four morphological groups of viruses. Machair, a unique type of coastal soil in western Scotland and Ireland, differed from the others tested in having a higher proportion of tailed bacteriophages. The other soils examined contained predominantly spherical and thin filamentous virus particles, but the Machair soil had a more even distribution of the virus types. As the first step in looking at differences in populations in detail, virus sequences from Machair and brown earth (agricultural pasture) soils were examined by metagenomic sequencing after enriching for circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) (CRESS-DNA) virus genomes. Sequences from the family Microviridae (icosahedral viruses mainly infecting bacteria) of CRESS-DNA viruses were predominant in both soils. Phylogenetic analysis of Microviridae major coat protein sequences from the Machair viruses showed that they spanned most of the diversity of the subfamily Gokushovirinae, whose members mainly infect obligate intracellular parasites. The brown earth soil had a higher proportion of sequences that matched the morphologically similar family Circoviridae in BLAST searches. However, analysis of putative replicase proteins that were similar to those of viruses in the Circoviridae showed that they are a novel clade of Circoviridae-related CRESS-DNA viruses distinct from known Circoviridae genera. Different soils have substantially different taxonomic biodiversities even within ssDNA viruses, which may be driven by physicochemical factors. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Single-particle behaviour in circulating fluidized beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1997-01-01

    . A radioactive tracking facility, which detects single radioactive particles, is developed and applied to determine the dynamic picture of the particle trajectories in the simulated boiler. The tracer particles are observed to move between the zone above and below the secondary air inlet with a mean frequency...

  13. Microprocessor-based single particle calibration of scintillation counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, G. K. D.; Pathak, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    A microprocessor-base set-up is fabricated and tested for the single particle calibration of the plastic scintillator. The single particle response of the scintillator is digitized by an A/D converter, and a 8085 A based microprocessor stores the pulse heights. The digitized information is printed. Facilities for CRT display and cassette storing and recalling are also made available.

  14. Automated data collection in single particle electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yong Zi; Cheng, Anchi; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Automated data collection is an integral part of modern workflows in single particle electron microscopy (EM) research. This review surveys the software packages available for automated single particle EM data collection. The degree of automation at each stage of data collection is evaluated, and the capabilities of the software packages are described. Finally, future trends in automation are discussed. PMID:26671944

  15. Kinetic plots in aqueous size exclusion chromatography of monoclonal antibodies and virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, Judith; Conze, Werner; Müller, Egbert

    2015-12-24

    The growing importance of monoclonal antibodies and virus particles has led to a pressure for faster size exclusion chromatography. In recent years, numerous small particle columns for size exclusion chromatography of biologicals have been introduced. Small particles are a strategy to reduce analysis time. In the following study, opportunities of small particles in size exclusion chromatography of large biomolecules are investigated. Poppe plots reveal that the lower particle size limit depends on the size of the sample molecule. Hydrodynamic radii of monoclonal antibody monomer, aggregates and H1N1 as well as the diffusion coefficients were determined. Considering this sample compound dependency, kinetic plots referring to the resolution of a distinct compound pair instead of the plate number of a single analyte are more meaningful. Plate times were found to be equivalent with 4 and 2μm particles for a monoclonal antibody aggregate separation at resolutions smaller than 1.8. Quantification of a H1N1 in clarified cell culture can be accomplished with 17μm and 13μm particles at equal plate times at resolutions smaller than 2.5. Virus polydispersity is likely to be affected by run times of several hours at room temperature and shear forces resulting from particles smaller than 10μm. Comparatively high flow rates should be applied in size exclusion chromatography of the 100nm H1N1 virions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative analysis of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) and new RHDV2 virus antigenicity, using specific virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena, Juan; Guerra, Beatriz; Angulo, Iván; González, Julia; Valcárcel, Félix; Mata, Carlos P; Castón, José R; Blanco, Esther; Alejo, Alí

    2015-09-24

    In 2010 a new Lagovirus related to rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) emerged in France and has since rapidly spread throughout domestic and wild rabbit populations of several European countries. The new virus, termed RHDV2, exhibits distinctive genetic, antigenic and pathogenic features. Notably, RHDV2 kills rabbits previously vaccinated with RHDV vaccines. Here we report for the first time the generation and characterization of RHDV2-specific virus-like particles (VLPs). Our results further confirmed the differential antigenic properties exhibited by RHDV and RHDV2, highlighting the need of using RHDV2-specific diagnostic assays to monitor the spread of this new virus.

  17. New apparatus of single particle trap system for aerosol visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hidenori; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Kitayama, Chiho; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio

    2014-08-01

    Control of transport and deposition of charged aerosol particles is important in various manufacturing processes. Aerosol visualization is an effective method to directly observe light scattering signal from laser-irradiated single aerosol particle trapped in a visualization cell. New single particle trap system triggered by light scattering pulse signal was developed in this study. The performance of the device was evaluated experimentally. Experimental setup consisted of an aerosol generator, a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), an optical particle counter (OPC) and the single particle trap system. Polystylene latex standard (PSL) particles (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 μm) were generated and classified according to the charge by the DMA. Singly charged 0.5 and 1.0 μm particles and doubly charged 2.0 μm particles were used as test particles. The single particle trap system was composed of a light scattering signal detector and a visualization cell. When the particle passed through the detector, trigger signal with a given delay time sent to the solenoid valves upstream and downstream of the visualization cell for trapping the particle in the visualization cell. The motion of particle in the visualization cell was monitored by CCD camera and the gravitational settling velocity and the electrostatic migration velocity were measured from the video image. The aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was in good agreement with Stokes diameter calculated from the electrostatic migration velocity for individual particles. It was also found that the aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was a one-to-one function of the scattered light intensity of individual particles. The applicability of this system will be discussed.

  18. The genetics of virus particle shape in equine influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, Debra; Bruce, Emily A; Bryant, Neil; Wise, Helen M; MacRae, Shona; Rash, Adam; Smith, Nikki; Turnbull, Matthew L; Medcalf, Liz; Daly, Janet M; Digard, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Many human strains of influenza A virus produce highly pleomorphic virus particles that at the extremes can be approximated as either spheres of around 100 nm diameter or filaments of similar cross-section but elongated to lengths of many microns. The role filamentous virions play in the virus life cycle remains enigmatic. Here, we set out to define the morphology and genetics of virus particle shape in equine influenza A virus, using reverse genetics and microscopy of infected cells. The majority of H3N8 strains tested were found to produce filamentous virions, as did the prototype H7N7 A/eq/Prague/56 strain. The exception was the prototype H3N8 isolate, A/eq/Miami/63. Reassortment of equine influenza virus M genes from filamentous and non-filamentous strains into the non-filamentous human virus A/PR/8/34 confirmed that segment 7 is a major determinant of particle shape. Sequence analysis identified three M1 amino acid polymorphisms plausibly associated with determining virion morphology, and the introduction of these changes into viruses confirmed the importance of two: S85N and N231D. However, while either change alone affected filament production, the greatest effect was seen when the polymorphisms were introduced in conjunction. Thus, influenza A viruses from equine hosts also produce filamentous virions, and the major genetic determinants are set by the M1 protein. However, the precise sequence determinants are different to those previously identified in human or porcine viruses. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Modeling of calcination of single kaolinitic clay particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    The present work aims at modeling of the calcination (dehydroxylation) process of clay particles, specifically kaolinite, and its thermal transformation. For such purpose, 1D single particle calcination model was developed based on the concept of shrinking core model to assess the dehydroxylation...... distribution within the clay particle and simultaneous density changes due to the reaction kinetics. Accordingly, a particular residence time was noticed as a point where kaolinitic clay particles attain optimum conversion to metakaolinite which is pozzolanic....

  20. Single Particle Studies of Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry on Aluminum Oxide Particles in a Quadrupole Trap

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunter, A

    2000-01-01

    ... on upper atmospheric chemical cycles and ozone. The experimental investigation employs a laboratory quadrupole trap electrodynamic levitation apparatus to study heterogeneous processes on single aluminum oxide particles representative...

  1. Reaction Gradients Viewed Inside Single Photoactive Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P.; Corral Arroyo, P.; Dou, J.; Kreiger, U.; Luo, B.; Peter, T.; Ammann, M.

    2017-12-01

    In terms of chemical selectivity and spatial resolution, a technique known as scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled to near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) is unmatched and will remain so for years into the future. We present a recent development coupling STXM/NEXAFS to a custom-built photochemical environmental reactor in which aerosol particles reside allowing for in situ chemical imaging. A laboratory investigation of metal-organic complex photochemistry was conducted. Transition metals are of great importance to atmospheric chemistry and aerosol photochemical aging due to their ability to catalyze oxidation reactions. Aerosol particles composed of mixtures of citric acid and iron citrate were probed for their organic carbon composition and iron oxidation state under atmospherically relevant conditions. At 40% relative humidity, oxygen diffusion and reaction was severely limited. Fe was reoxidized in the first 200 nm of the particle surface leaving reduced iron in the core. Similar gradients were observed at 60% RH, however waiting approximately 2 hours in the dark resulted in a recovery of the initial Fe(III) concentration. We draw two main conclusions from our findings. Frist, the oxidation gradients must have been the result of anoxic conditions at the interior of aerosol particles. This was predicted using a newly developed model for molecular diffusion through multiple layers with a reaction framework describing the photochemical processing of the metal organic matrix. Second, the lifetime of organic radicals in an anoxic diffusion limited organic matrix must be considerably long ( hours) to completely reoxidize iron as they wait for molecular oxygen. Long radical lifetimes in viscous organic aerosol in turn, could create high radical concentrations or favor radical-radical reactions in particles typically not considered when oxygen is plentiful. Our results impact predictions of aerosol physiochemical properties, e

  2. DAMPING OF UNBOUND SINGLE-PARTICLE MODES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FORTIER, S; BEAUMEL, D; GALES, S; GUILLOT, J; LANGEVINJOLIOT, H; LAURENT, H; MAISON, JM; BORDEWIJK, J; BRANDENBURG, S; KRASZNAHORKAY, A; CRAWLEY, GM; MASSOLO, CP; RENTERIA, M; KHENDRICHE, A

    1995-01-01

    The (alpha, He-3-n) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy on Ni-64, Zr-90, and Sn-120 target nuclei. Neutrons in coincidence with He-3 particles emitted at 0 degrees were detected using the multidetector array EDEN, in order to get information about the decay of the

  3. Single-particle density matrix of liquid 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakarchuk, I.A.

    2008-01-01

    The density single-particle matrix in the coordinate notation was calculated based on the expression for the interacting Bose-particle N system density matrix. Under the low temperatures the mentioned matrix in the first approximation enables to reproduce the Bogoliubov theory results. In the classical terms the mentioned theory enables to reproduce the results of the theory of the classical fluids in the approximation of the chaotic phases. On the basis of the density single-particle matrix one managed to obtain the function of the pulse distribution of the particles, the Bose-liquid average kinetic energy, and to study the Bose-Einstein condensation phenomenon [ru

  4. Defective interfering particles in monolayer-propagated Newcastle disease virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, J.M.; Simon, E.H.

    1976-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) serially passaged in chick embryo fibroblasts (M-NDV) gives rise to defective interfering (NDV-DI) particles, while NDV passaged in embryonated eggs (E-NDV) does not. Co-infection with these particles and infectious virions results in a 99 percent reduction in yield. Interference is not due to interferon or to prevention of absorption of infectious virions and is specific for NDV. The particles mediating interference sediment at the same velocity as infectious virions. The accumulation of NDV-DI particles in monolayers but not in eggs may be a consequence of the fact that M-NDV virions are larger and probably contain more RNA, or it may reflect differences in NDV replicative processes in eggs and monolayers, or both

  5. Structure, single-particle and many-particle coefficients of Lennard ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We investigate the effects of temperature and density on the single-particle and many-particle coefficients as well as on the structures of homogenous systems in which the particles are assumed to interact via a continuous soft sphere potential in the microcanonical ensemble. The pair distribution function and therefore the ...

  6. Progress in Developing Virus-like Particle Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Fu-Shi; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Recombinant vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) or nanoparticles have been successful in their safety and efficacy in preclinical and clinical studies. The technology of expressing enveloped VLP vaccines has combined with molecular engineering of proteins in membrane-anchor and immunogenic forms mimicking the native conformation of surface proteins on the enveloped viruses. This review summarizes recent developments in influenza VLP vaccines against seasonal, pandemic, and avian influenza viruses from the perspective of use in humans. The immunogenicity and efficacies of influenza VLP vaccine in the homologous and cross-protection were reviewed. Discussions include limitations of current influenza vaccination strategies and future directions to confer broadly cross protective new influenza vaccines as well as vaccination. PMID:27058302

  7. Zika virus-like particle (VLP) based vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boigard, Hélène; Alimova, Alexandra; Martin, George R.; Katz, Al; Gottlieb, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The newly emerged mosquito-borne Zika virus poses a major public challenge due to its ability to cause significant birth defects and neurological disorders. The impact of sexual transmission is unclear but raises further concerns about virus dissemination. No specific treatment or vaccine is currently available, thus the development of a safe and effective vaccine is paramount. Here we describe a novel strategy to assemble Zika virus-like particles (VLPs) by co-expressing the structural (CprME) and non-structural (NS2B/NS3) proteins, and demonstrate their effectiveness as vaccines. VLPs are produced in a suspension culture of mammalian cells and self-assembled into particles closely resembling Zika viruses as shown by electron microscopy studies. We tested various VLP vaccines and compared them to analogous compositions of an inactivated Zika virus (In-ZIKV) used as a reference. VLP immunizations elicited high titers of antibodies, as did the In-ZIKV controls. However, in mice the VLP vaccine stimulated significantly higher virus neutralizing antibody titers than comparable formulations of the In-ZIKV vaccine. The serum neutralizing activity elicited by the VLP vaccine was enhanced using a higher VLP dose and with the addition of an adjuvant, reaching neutralizing titers greater than those detected in the serum of a patient who recovered from a Zika infection in Brazil in 2015. Discrepancies in neutralization levels between the VLP vaccine and the In-ZIKV suggest that chemical inactivation has deleterious effects on neutralizing epitopes within the E protein. This along with the inability of a VLP vaccine to cause infection makes it a preferable candidate for vaccine development. PMID:28481898

  8. Clustering and cellular distribution characteristics of virus particles of Tomato spotted wilt virus and Tomato zonate spot virus in different plant hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongkai; Zheng, Kuanyu; Dong, Jiahong; Fang, Qi; Hong, Jian; Wang, Xifeng

    2016-01-19

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Tomato zonate spot virus (TZSV) are the two dominant species of thrip-transmitted tospoviruses, cause significant losses in crop yield in Yunnan and its neighboring provinces in China. TSWV and TZSV belong to different serogroup of tospoviruses but induce similar symptoms in the same host plant species, which makes diagnostic difficult. We used different electron microscopy preparing methods to investigate clustering and cellular distribution of TSWV and TZSV in the host plant species. Negative staining of samples infected with TSWV and TZSV revealed that particles usually clustered in the vesicles, including single particle (SP), double particles clustering (DPC), triple particles clustering (TPC). In the immunogold labeling negative staining against proteins of TZSV, the antibodies against Gn protein were stained more strongly than the N protein. Ultrathin section and high pressure freeze (HPF)-electron microscopy preparations revealed that TSWV particles were distributed in the cisternae of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), filamentous inclusions (FI) and Golgi bodies in the mesophyll cells. The TSWV particles clustered as multiple particles clustering (MPC) and distributed in globular viroplasm or cisternae of ER in the top leaf cell. TZSV particles were distributed more abundantly in the swollen membrane of ER in the mesophyll cell than those in the phloem parenchyma cells and were not observed in the top leaf cell. However, TZSV virions were mainly present as single particle in the cytoplasm, with few clustering as MPC. In this study, we identified TSWV and TZSV particles had the distinct cellular distribution patterns in the cytoplasm from different tissues and host plants. This is the first report of specific clustering characteristics of tospoviruses particles as well as the cellular distribution of TSWV particles in the FI and globular viroplasm where as TZSV particles inside the membrane of ER. These results indicated that

  9. A dynamic cell entry pathway of respiratory syncytial virus revealed by tracking the quantum dot-labeled single virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lin Ling; Li, Chun Mei; Zhen, Shu Jun; Li, Yuan Fang; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2017-06-14

    Studying the cell entry pathway at the single-particle level can provide detailed and quantitative information for the dynamic events involved in virus entry. Indeed, the viral entry dynamics cannot be monitored by static staining methods used in cell biology, and thus virus dynamic tracking could be useful in the development of effective antiviral strategies. Therefore, the aim of this work was to use a quantum dot-based single-particle tracking approach to monitor the cell entry behavior of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in living cells. The time-lapse fluorescence imaging and trajectory analysis of the quantum dot-labeled RSV showed that RSV entry into HEp-2 cells consisted of a typical endocytosis trafficking process. Three critical events during RSV entry were observed according to entry dynamic and fluorescence colocalization analysis. Firstly, RSV was attached to lipid rafts of the cell membrane, and then it was efficiently delivered into the perinuclear region within 2 h post-infection, mostly moving and residing into the lysosome compartment. Moreover, the relatively slow velocity of RSV transport across the cytoplasm and the formation of the actin tail indicated actin-based RSV motility, which was also confirmed by the effects of cytoskeletal inhibitors. Taken together, these findings provided new insights into the RSV entry mechanism and virus-cell interactions in RSV infection that could be beneficial in the development of antiviral drugs and vaccines.

  10. Single particle measurements and two particle interferometry results from CERN experiment NA44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon-Gillo, J.

    1994-01-01

    CERN experiment NA44 is optimized for the study of identified single and multiple particle distributions to p T = 0 near mid-rapidity. We measure π +- , K +- , p, bar p, d and bar d, in p + A and A + A collisions at 450 and 20OGeV/u, respectively. Two-particle intensity interferometry results from π + π + , K + K + , and K - K - measurements and single particle distributions are presented

  11. Particle-to-PFU ratio of Ebola virus influences disease course and survival in cynomolgus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfson, Kendra J; Avena, Laura E; Beadles, Michael W; Staples, Hilary; Nunneley, Jerritt W; Ticer, Anysha; Dick, Edward J; Owston, Michael A; Reed, Christopher; Patterson, Jean L; Carrion, Ricardo; Griffiths, Anthony

    2015-07-01

    This study addresses the role of Ebola virus (EBOV) specific infectivity in virulence. Filoviruses are highly lethal, enveloped, single-stranded negative-sense RNA viruses that can cause hemorrhagic fever. No approved vaccines or therapies exist for filovirus infections, and infectious virus must be handled in maximum containment. Efficacy testing of countermeasures, in addition to investigations of pathogenicity and immune response, often requires a well-characterized animal model. For EBOV, an obstacle in performing accurate disease modeling is a poor understanding of what constitutes an infectious dose in animal models. One well-recognized consequence of viral passage in cell culture is a change in specific infectivity, often measured as a particle-to-PFU ratio. Here, we report that serial passages of EBOV in cell culture resulted in a decrease in particle-to-PFU ratio. Notably, this correlated with decreased potency in a lethal cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of infection; animals were infected with the same viral dose as determined by plaque assay, but animals that received more virus particles exhibited increased disease. This suggests that some particles are unable to form a plaque in a cell culture assay but are able to result in lethal disease in vivo. These results have a significant impact on how future studies are designed to model EBOV disease and test countermeasures. Ebola virus (EBOV) can cause severe hemorrhagic disease with a high case-fatality rate, and there are no approved vaccines or therapies. Specific infectivity can be considered the total number of viral particles per PFU, and its impact on disease is poorly understood. In stocks of most mammalian viruses, there are particles that are unable to complete an infectious cycle or unable to cause cell pathology in cultured cells. We asked if these particles cause disease in nonhuman primates by infecting monkeys with equal infectious doses of genetically identical stocks

  12. Single-camera, three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kevin; Regaard, Boris; Heinemann, Stefan; Sick, Volker

    2012-04-09

    This paper introduces single-camera, three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (SC3D-PTV), an image-based, single-camera technique for measuring 3-component, volumetric velocity fields in environments with limited optical access, in particular, optically accessible internal combustion engines. The optical components used for SC3D-PTV are similar to those used for two-camera stereoscopic-µPIV, but are adapted to project two simultaneous images onto a single image sensor. A novel PTV algorithm relying on the similarity of the particle images corresponding to a single, physical particle produces 3-component, volumetric velocity fields, rather than the 3-component, planar results obtained with stereoscopic PIV, and without the reconstruction of an instantaneous 3D particle field. The hardware and software used for SC3D-PTV are described, and experimental results are presented.

  13. Single particle orbitals of the heaviest known actinide nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.

    1992-01-01

    Single particle states in the actinide nuclei have been well characterized by decay scheme, (n, γ) and one nucleon transfer reaction studies. The energies of the single particle states are used to calculate the shell corrections which may give rise to stable superheavy elements. Large shell corrections for the superheavy elements arise from the gaps in the proton single-particle spectrum at Z = 114 and in the neutron single-particle spectrum at N = 184. The gap at Z = 114 is determined by the splitting of the f 7/2 and f 5/2 orbitals and the gap at N = 184 is determined by the locations of the h 11/2 , k 17/2 and j 13/2 spherical orbitals. Many of these states have been identified in very heavy actinide nuclei. Experiments identifying these states and the relation of the observed energies to the stability of superheavy elements are discussed

  14. Single-particle dynamics - RF acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montague, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper the rf acceleration of both synchronous and non-synchronous particles is discussed and a simple linearized equation of small amplitude synchrotron oscillations is derived. Phase stability, the hamiltonian for synchrotron oscillations, oscillation amplitudes and adiabatic damping are then briefly discussed. The final sections of the paper contain a description of the basic principles of rf beam stacking in the longitudinal phase space of intersecting Storage Rings and a description of phase displacement acceleration which inspite of certain disadvantages, remains an attractive technique for proton storage rings. (B.D.)

  15. Single particle mass spectral signatures from vehicle exhaust particles and the source apportionment of on-line PM2.5by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Ma, Shexia; Gao, Bo; Li, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yanjun; Cai, Jing; Li, Mei; Yao, Ling'ai; Huang, Bo; Zheng, Mei

    2017-09-01

    In order to accurately apportion the many distinct types of individual particles observed, it is necessary to characterize fingerprints of individual particles emitted directly from known sources. In this study, single particle mass spectral signatures from vehicle exhaust particles in a tunnel were performed. These data were used to evaluate particle signatures in a real-world PM 2.5 apportionment study. The dominant chemical type originating from average positive and negative mass spectra for vehicle exhaust particles are EC species. Four distinct particle types describe the majority of particles emitted by vehicle exhaust particles in this tunnel. Each particle class is labeled according to the most significant chemical features in both average positive and negative mass spectral signatures, including ECOC, NaK, Metal and PAHs species. A single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was also employed during the winter of 2013 in Guangzhou to determine both the size and chemical composition of individual atmospheric particles, with vacuum aerodynamic diameter (d va ) in the size range of 0.2-2μm. A total of 487,570 particles were chemically analyzed with positive and negative ion mass spectra and a large set of single particle mass spectra was collected and analyzed in order to identify the speciation. According to the typical tracer ions from different source types and classification by the ART-2a algorithm which uses source fingerprints for apportioning ambient particles, the major sources of single particles were simulated. Coal combustion, vehicle exhaust, and secondary ion were the most abundant particle sources, contributing 28.5%, 17.8%, and 18.2%, respectively. The fraction with vehicle exhaust species particles decreased slightly with particle size in the condensation mode particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Single-sheet identification method of heavy charged particles using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the single-sheet particle identification technique in CR-39 and CN-85 polycarbonate by plotting track cone length ... in neutron dosimetry, gamma and cosmic rays detection, heavy ion and nuclear physics and corpuscular ..... [13] R P Henke and E V Benton, Charged particle tracks in polymers: No. 5-A com- puter code for ...

  17. Calibration of single particle sizing velocimeters using photomask reticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirleman, E. D.; Holve, D. J.; Hovenac, E. A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of photomask reticle calibration standards for single particle instruments is discussed. The calibration method studied involves the use of photomask reticles where the particle artifacts are actually disks of chrome thin film in the clear field reticles produced by photolithography and etching processes. Consideration is given to various aspects of theory, design, and performance.

  18. Influence of Torrefaction on Single Particle Combustion of Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Zhimin; Jian, Jie; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the influence of torrefaction on the char reactivity, char yield, and combustion time of 3-5 mm spherical wood particles in a single particle combustion reactor (SPC) operating at a nominal temperature of 1231 °C. The devolatilization times were reduced and the char burnout...

  19. The Measles Virus Receptor SLAMF1 Can Mediate Particle Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Carneiro, Daniel; McKeating, Jane A; Bailey, Dalan

    2017-04-01

    The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule F1 (SLAMF1) is both a microbial sensor and entry receptor for measles virus (MeV). Herein, we describe a new role for SLAMF1 to mediate MeV endocytosis that is in contrast with the alternative, and generally accepted, model that MeV genome enters cells only after fusion at the cell surface. We demonstrated that MeV engagement of SLAMF1 induces dramatic but transient morphological changes, most prominently in the formation of membrane blebs, which were shown to colocalize with incoming viral particles, and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton in infected cells. MeV infection was dependent on these dynamic cytoskeletal changes as well as fluid uptake through a macropinocytosis-like pathway as chemical inhibition of these processes inhibited entry. Moreover, we identified a role for the RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling axis in this MeV internalization process, highlighting a novel role for this recently characterized pathway in virus entry. Our study shows that MeV can hijack a microbial sensor normally involved in bacterial phagocytosis to drive endocytosis using a complex pathway that shares features with canonical viral macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and mechanotransduction. This uptake pathway is specific to SLAMF1-positive cells and occurs within 60 min of viral attachment. Measles virus remains a significant cause of mortality in human populations, and this research sheds new light on the very first steps of infection of this important pathogen. IMPORTANCE Measles is a significant disease in humans and is estimated to have killed over 200 million people since records began. According to current World Health Organization statistics, it still kills over 100,000 people a year, mostly children in the developing world. The causative agent, measles virus, is a small enveloped RNA virus that infects a broad range of cells during infection. In particular, immune cells are infected via interactions between glycoproteins found

  20. Single-particle imaging for biosensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Isil, Cagatay; Seymour, Elif; Yurdakul, Celalettin; Solmaz, Berkan; Koc, Aykut; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2017-10-01

    Current state-of-the-art technology for in-vitro diagnostics employ laboratory tests such as ELISA that consists of a multi-step test procedure and give results in analog format. Results of these tests are interpreted by the color change in a set of diluted samples in a multi-well plate. However, detection of the minute changes in the color poses challenges and can lead to false interpretations. Instead, a technique that allows individual counting of specific binding events would be useful to overcome such challenges. Digital imaging has been applied recently for diagnostics applications. SPR is one of the techniques allowing quantitative measurements. However, the limit of detection in this technique is on the order of nM. The current required detection limit, which is already achieved with the analog techniques, is around pM. Optical techniques that are simple to implement and can offer better sensitivities have great potential to be used in medical diagnostics. Interference Microscopy is one of the tools that have been investigated over years in optics field. More of the studies have been performed in confocal geometry and each individual nanoparticle was observed separately. Here, we achieve wide-field imaging of individual nanoparticles in a large field-of-view ( 166 μm × 250 μm) on a micro-array based sensor chip in fraction of a second. We tested the sensitivity of our technique on dielectric nanoparticles because they exhibit optical properties similar to viruses and cells. We can detect non-resonant dielectric polystyrene nanoparticles of 100 nm. Moreover, we perform post-processing applications to further enhance visibility.

  1. Infrared absorption spectroscopy of single particles using photophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.

    1985-01-01

    In situ absorption spectroscopy was performed on a single suspended salt particle using photophoresis. The charged ammonium sulfate particle was levitated in an electric-quadrpole field and illuminated by a CO 2 laser. The size-dependent absorption spectrum of ammonium sulfate particles was observed for the first time to our knowledge at 930-1080 cm -1 . The effects of gas pressure and laser power were also determined. For particles approximately 10 μm in diameter, the photophoretic force was observed to be negative

  2. Magnetophoretic circuits for digital control of single particles and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Byeonghwa; Reddy, Venu; Hu, Xinghao; Kim, Kunwoo; Jadhav, Mital; Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Noh, Young-Woock; Lim, Yong Taik; Yellen, Benjamin B.; Kim, Cheolgi

    2014-05-01

    The ability to manipulate small fluid droplets, colloidal particles and single cells with the precision and parallelization of modern-day computer hardware has profound applications for biochemical detection, gene sequencing, chemical synthesis and highly parallel analysis of single cells. Drawing inspiration from general circuit theory and magnetic bubble technology, here we demonstrate a class of integrated circuits for executing sequential and parallel, timed operations on an ensemble of single particles and cells. The integrated circuits are constructed from lithographically defined, overlaid patterns of magnetic film and current lines. The magnetic patterns passively control particles similar to electrical conductors, diodes and capacitors. The current lines actively switch particles between different tracks similar to gated electrical transistors. When combined into arrays and driven by a rotating magnetic field clock, these integrated circuits have general multiplexing properties and enable the precise control of magnetizable objects.

  3. Single particle composition measurements of artificial Calcium Carbonate aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, S. R.; Mentel, T. F.; Schwinger, T.; Croteau, P. L.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Trimborn, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mineral dust, with an estimated total source from natural and anthropogenic emissions of up to 2800 Tg/yr, is one of the two largest contributors to total aerosol mass, with only Sea salt having a similar source strength (up to 2600 Tg/yr). The composition of dust particles varies strongly depending on the production process and, most importantly, the source location. Therefore, the composition of single dust particles can be used both to trace source regions of air masses as well as to identify chemical aging processes. Here we present results of laboratory studies on generating artificial calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles, a model compound for carbonaceous mineral dust particles. Particles were generated by atomizing an aqueous hydrogen carbonate solution. Water was removed using a silica diffusion dryer., then the particles were processed in an oven at temperatures up to 900°C, converting the hydrogen carbonate to its anhydrous form. The resulting aerosol was analyzed using an on-line single particle laser ablation aerosol particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LAAPTOF). The results confirm the conversion to calcium carbonate, and validate that the produced particles indeed can be used as a model compound for carbonaceous dust aerosols.

  4. Imaging and manipulation of single viruses by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baclayon, M.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Roos, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    The recent developments in virus research and the application of functional viral particles in nanotechnology and medicine rely on sophisticated imaging and manipulation techniques at nanometre resolution in liquid, air and vacuum. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a tool that combines these

  5. Proteomic analysis of purified coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Dingming

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV is the coronavirus of domestic chickens causing major economic losses to the poultry industry. Because of the complexity of the IBV life cycle and the small number of viral structural proteins, important virus-host relationships likely remain to be discovered. Toward this goal, we performed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis fractionation coupled to mass spectrometry identification approaches to perform a comprehensive proteomic analysis of purified IBV particles. Results Apart from the virus-encoded structural proteins, we detected 60 host proteins in the purified virions which can be grouped into several functional categories including intracellular trafficking proteins (20%, molecular chaperone (18%, macromolcular biosynthesis proteins (17%, cytoskeletal proteins (15%, signal transport proteins (15%, protein degradation (8%, chromosome associated proteins (2%, ribosomal proteins (2%, and other function proteins (3%. Interestingly, 21 of the total host proteins have not been reported to be present in virions of other virus families, such as major vault protein, TENP protein, ovalbumin, and scavenger receptor protein. Following identification of the host proteins by proteomic methods, the presence of 4 proteins in the purified IBV preparation was verified by western blotting and immunogold labeling detection. Conclusions The results present the first standard proteomic profile of IBV and may facilitate the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms.

  6. Microcavity single virus detection and sizing with molecular sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantham, V. R.; Holler, S.; Kolchenko, V.; Wan, Z.; Arnold, S.

    2013-02-01

    We report the label-free detection and sizing of the smallest individual RNA virus, MS2 by a spherical microcavity. Mass of this virus is ~6 ag and produces a theoretical resonance shift ~0.25 fm upon adsorbing an individual virus at the equator of the bare microcavity, which is well below the r.m.s background noise of 2 fm. However, detection was accomplished with ease (S/N = 8, Q = 4x105) using a single dipole stimulated plasmonic-nanoshell as a microcavity wavelength shift enhancer. Analytical expressions based on the "reactive sensing principle" are developed to extract the radius of the virus from the measured signals. Estimated limit of detection for these experiments was ~0.4 ag or 240 kDa below the size of all known viruses, largest globular and elongated proteins [Phosphofructokinase (345 kDa) and Fibrinogen (390 kDa), respectively].

  7. Single Particle Tracking: Analysis Techniques for Live Cell Nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relich, Peter Kristopher, II

    Single molecule experiments are a set of experiments designed specifically to study the properties of individual molecules. It has only been in the last three decades where single molecule experiments have been applied to the life sciences; where they have been successfully implemented in systems biology for probing the behaviors of sub-cellular mechanisms. The advent and growth of super-resolution techniques in single molecule experiments has made the fundamental behaviors of light and the associated nano-probes a necessary concern amongst life scientists wishing to advance the state of human knowledge in biology. This dissertation disseminates some of the practices learned in experimental live cell microscopy. The topic of single particle tracking is addressed here in a format that is designed for the physicist who embarks upon single molecule studies. Specifically, the focus is on the necessary procedures to generate single particle tracking analysis techniques that can be implemented to answer biological questions. These analysis techniques range from designing and testing a particle tracking algorithm to inferring model parameters once an image has been processed. The intellectual contributions of the author include the techniques in diffusion estimation, localization filtering, and trajectory associations for tracking which will all be discussed in detail in later chapters. The author of this thesis has also contributed to the software development of automated gain calibration, live cell particle simulations, and various single particle tracking packages. Future work includes further evaluation of this laboratory's single particle tracking software, entropy based approaches towards hypothesis validations, and the uncertainty quantification of gain calibration.

  8. Three-dimensional single particle tracking in dense dust clouds by stereoscopy of fluorescent particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himpel, Michael; Killer, Carsten; Buttenschön, Birger; Melzer, André

    2012-12-01

    In dense dust clouds of a dusty plasma single particle trajectories are impossible to follow due to occlusion of particles and ambiguities in particle correspondences. By stereoscopic imaging of fluorescent tracer particles, we were able to reconstruct 3D single particle trajectories within dense dust clouds. Several measurements are shown that justify to regard the tracer particles as suitable representatives for the whole dust system. A first analysis of dust density waves in dense clouds already shows that these waves exhibit three-dimensional dynamics at larger wave amplitudes that cannot be resolved by 2D imaging techniques: a broad velocity distribution perpendicular to the oscillation plane due to dust-dust collisions is seen, while the velocity distribution in the oscillation direction is bimodal and shifted due to the bulk wave propagation.

  9. Three-dimensional single particle tracking in dense dust clouds by stereoscopy of fluorescent particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himpel, Michael; Killer, Carsten; Buttenschoen, Birger; Melzer, Andre [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    In dense dust clouds of a dusty plasma single particle trajectories are impossible to follow due to occlusion of particles and ambiguities in particle correspondences. By stereoscopic imaging of fluorescent tracer particles, we were able to reconstruct 3D single particle trajectories within dense dust clouds. Several measurements are shown that justify to regard the tracer particles as suitable representatives for the whole dust system. A first analysis of dust density waves in dense clouds already shows that these waves exhibit three-dimensional dynamics at larger wave amplitudes that cannot be resolved by 2D imaging techniques: a broad velocity distribution perpendicular to the oscillation plane due to dust-dust collisions is seen, while the velocity distribution in the oscillation direction is bimodal and shifted due to the bulk wave propagation.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of recombinant hepatitis E virus-like particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Che-Yen; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Higashiura, Akifumi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Li, Tian-Cheng; Takeda, Naokazu; Xing, Li; Hjalmarsson, Erik; Friberg, Claes; Liou, Der-Ming; Sung, Yen-Jen; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Cheng, R. Holland

    2008-01-01

    A recombinant virus-like particle that is a potential oral hepatitis E vaccine was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 8.3 Å resolution and the X-ray structure was phased with the aid of a low-resolution density map determined using cryo-electron microscopy data. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) accounts for the majority of enterically transmitted hepatitis infections worldwide. Currently, there is no specific treatment for or vaccine against HEV. The major structural protein is derived from open reading frame (ORF) 2 of the viral genome. A potential oral vaccine is provided by the virus-like particles formed by a protein construct of partial ORF3 protein (residue 70–123) fused to the N-terminus of the ORF2 protein (residues 112–608). Single crystals obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K diffract X-rays to 8.3 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 337, b = 343, c = 346 Å, α = β = γ = 90°, and contain one particle per asymmetric unit

  11. High sensitivity fluorescent single particle and single molecule detection apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathies, Richard A.; Peck, Konan; Stryer, Lubert

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus is described for ultrasensitive detection of single fluorescent particles down to the single fluorescent molecule limit in a fluid or on a substrate comprising means for illuminating a predetermined volume of the fluid or area of the substrate whereby to emit light including background light from the fluid and burst of photons from particles residing in the area. The photon burst is detected in real time to generate output representative signal. The signal is received and the burst of energy from the fluorescent particles is distinguished from the background energy to provide an indication of the number, location or concentration of the particles or molecules.

  12. Comparison of Influenza Virus Particle Purification Using Magnetic Sulfated Cellulose Particles with an Established Centrifugation Method for Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serve, Anja; Pieler, Michael Martin; Benndorf, Dirk; Rapp, Erdmann; Wolff, Michael Werner; Reichl, Udo

    2015-11-03

    A method for the purification of influenza virus particles using novel magnetic sulfated cellulose particles is presented and compared to an established centrifugation method for analytics. Therefore, purified influenza A virus particles from adherent and suspension MDCK host cell lines were characterized on the protein level with mass spectrometry to compare the viral and residual host cell proteins. Both methods allowed one to identify all 10 influenza A virus proteins, including low-abundance proteins like the matrix protein 2 and nonstructural protein 1, with a similar impurity level of host cell proteins. Compared to the centrifugation method, use of the novel magnetic sulfated cellulose particles reduced the influenza A virus particle purification time from 3.5 h to 30 min before mass spectrometry analysis.

  13. Cytoplasmic Motifs in the Nipah Virus Fusion Protein Modulate Virus Particle Assembly and Egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Gunner P; Contreras, Erik M; Dabundo, Jeffrey; Henderson, Bryce A; Matz, Keesha M; Ortega, Victoria; Ramirez, Alfredo; Park, Arnold; Aguilar, Hector C

    2017-05-15

    Nipah virus (NiV), a paramyxovirus in the genus Henipavirus , has a mortality rate in humans of approximately 75%. While several studies have begun our understanding of NiV particle formation, the mechanism of this process remains to be fully elucidated. For many paramyxoviruses, M proteins drive viral assembly and egress; however, some paramyxoviral glycoproteins have been reported as important or essential in budding. For NiV the matrix protein (M), the fusion glycoprotein (F) and, to a much lesser extent, the attachment glycoprotein (G) autonomously induce the formation of virus-like particles (VLPs). However, functional interactions between these proteins during assembly and egress remain to be fully understood. Moreover, if the F-driven formation of VLPs occurs through interactions with host cell machinery, the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of F is a likely interactive domain. Therefore, we analyzed NiV F CT deletion and alanine mutants and report that several but not all regions of the F CT are necessary for efficient VLP formation. Two of these regions contain YXXØ or dityrosine motifs previously shown to interact with cellular machinery involved in F endocytosis and transport. Importantly, our results showed that F-driven, M-driven, and M/F-driven viral particle formation enhanced the recruitment of G into VLPs. By identifying key motifs, specific residues, and functional viral protein interactions important for VLP formation, we improve our understanding of the viral assembly/egress process and point to potential interactions with host cell machinery. IMPORTANCE Henipaviruses can cause deadly infections of medical, veterinary, and agricultural importance. With recent discoveries of new henipa-like viruses, understanding the mechanisms by which these viruses reproduce is paramount. We have focused this study on identifying the functional interactions of three Nipah virus proteins during viral assembly and particularly on the role of one of these proteins, the

  14. Evolution of single-particle structure of silicon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalova, O. V.; Fedorov, N. A.; Klimochkina, A. A.; Markova, M. L.; Spasskaya, T. I.; Tretyakova, T. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    New data on proton and neutron single-particle energies E_{nlj} of Si isotopes with neutron number N from 12 to 28 as well as occupation probabilities N_{nlj} of single-particle states of stable isotopes 28, 30Si near the Fermi energy were obtained by the joint evaluation of the stripping and pick-up reaction data and excited state decay schemes of neighboring nuclei. The evaluated data indicate the following features of single-particle structure evolution: persistence of Z = 14 subshell closure with N increase, the new magicity of the number N = 16, and the conservation of the magic properties of the number N = 20 in Si isotopic chain. The features were described by the dispersive optical model. The calculation also predicts the weakening of N = 28 shell closure and demonstrates evolution of a bubble-like structure of the proton density distributions in neutron-rich Si isotopes.

  15. Optimal estimation of diffusion coefficients from single-particle trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Blainey, Paul C.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    How does one optimally determine the diffusion coefficient of a diffusing particle from a single-time-lapse recorded trajectory of the particle? We answer this question with an explicit, unbiased, and practically optimal covariance-based estimator (CVE). This estimator is regression-free and is far...... substrate, the CVE is biased by substrate motion. However, given some long time series and a substrate under some tension, an extended MLE can separate particle diffusion on the substrate from substrate motion in the laboratory frame. This provides benchmarks that allow removal of bias caused by substrate...

  16. Large Silver Halide Single Crystals as Charged Particle Track Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmiss, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The trajectory of the particle is made visible under a microscope by the accumulation of metallic silver at regions of the lattice damaged by the particle. This decoration of the particle track is accomplished by exposure of the crystal to light. The decoration of normally present lattice imperfections such as dislocations can be suppressed by the addition to the crystal of less than ten parts per million of a suitable polyvalent metal impurity. An account of some preliminary attempts to grow thin single crystals of AgCl is given also, and suggestions for a more refined technique are offered.

  17. An improved labeling strategy enables automated detection of single-virus fusion and assessment of HIV-1 protease activity in single virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Chetan; Francis, Ashwanth C; Desai, Tanay M; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2017-12-08

    Enveloped viruses transfer their genomes into host cells by fusing their membrane to that of the cell. To visualize single-virus fusion in living cells, researchers take advantage of the proteolytic maturation of HIV, type 1 (HIV-1), which can generate free fluorescent proteins within the viral particle. Co-labeling viruses with a content marker and a fluorescently tagged Vpr (a viral core protein) enables detection of single-virus fusions, but a major limitation of this approach is that not all viral particles incorporate both markers. Here we designed a labeling strategy based on the bifunctional mCherry-2xCL-YFP-Vpr construct, in which 2xCL denotes a tandem cleavage site for the viral protease. This bifunctional marker was efficiently cleaved during virus maturation, producing free mCherry and the core-associated YFP-Vpr. A nearly perfect colocalization of these two markers in virions and their fixed 1:1 ratio enabled automated detection of single-particle fusion in both fixed and live cells based on loss of the mCherry signal. Furthermore, a drop in FRET efficiency between YFP and mCherry because of cleavage of the bifunctional marker, which manifested as a marked shift in the normalized YFP/mCherry fluorescence ratio, reliably predicted viral protease activity in single virions. This feature could discriminate between the particles containing free mCherry, and therefore likely representing mature viruses, and immature particles whose fusion cannot be detected. In summary, our new labeling strategy offers several advantages compared with previous approaches, including increased reliability and throughput of detection of viral fusion. We anticipate that our method will have significant utility for studying viral fusion and maturation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Single Particle Nanoplasmonic Sensing in Individual Nanofluidic Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Joachim; Albinsson, David; Fritzsche, Michael; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Westerlund, Fredrik; Langhammer, Christoph

    2016-12-14

    Nanoplasmonics allows label-free optical sensing and spectroscopy at the single nanoparticle level by exploiting plasmonic excitations in metal nanoparticles. Nanofluidics offers exclusive possibilities for applying and controlling fluid flow and mass transport at the nanoscale and toward nanosized objects. Here, we combine these two concepts in a single device, by integrating single particle nanoplasmonic sensing with nanofluidics using advanced nanofabrication. The developed devices enable on-chip referenced parallel single particle nanoplasmonic sensing inside multiple individual nanofluidic channels with dimensions down to the 100 nm range. Beyond detailed discussion of the nanofabrication, general device characterization, and parallelized single particle plasmonic readout concepts, we demonstrate device function on two examples: (i) in situ measurements of local buffer concentrations inside a nanofluidic channel; (ii) real time binding kinetics of alkanethiol molecules to a single plasmonic nanonatenna sensor in a single nanochannel. Our concept thus provides a powerful solution for controlling mass transport to and from individual (plasmonic) nanoparticles, which in a long-term perspective offers unique opportunities for label-free detection of analyte molecules at low concentrations and for fundamental studies of fluids in extreme confinement.

  19. Recombinant virus like particles as drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgens, Christiane; Weyermann, Jörg; Zimmer, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    The drug delivery system described here is based on a virus like particle consisting of the recombinant expressed major capsid protein of Polyomavirus, VP1. Polyoma, a murine virus belonging to the Papovaviridae, forms a non-enveloped icosahedral capsid. These capsids are organized as a double shell composed of three different proteins: VP1,VP2 and VP3. The outer shell of the vision is composed of 360 VP1 molecules arranged as 72 pentamers. These capsids have a diameter of about 50 nm. The VP1 protein acts as a major ligand for certain membrane receptors during virus infection. Furthermore, the N-terminus of the VP1 protein contains a DNA-binding domain and a nuclear localization sequence. The recombinant production of the VP1 protein offers a save way to obtain a highly purified, non pathogenic pharmaceutical excipient. Combining these aspects, VP1 proteins provide a targeting as well as a drug binding site when used as a save drug carrier for gene therapy. Current applications are also including oligonucleotides as well as small molecules as well as vaccines.

  20. Single particle analysis with a 3600 light scattering photometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholdi, M.F.

    1979-06-01

    Light scattering by single spherical homogeneous particles in the diameter range 1 to 20 μm and relative refractive index 1.20 is measured. Particle size of narrowly dispersed populations is determined and a multi-modal dispersion of five components is completely analyzed. A 360 0 light scattering photometer for analysis of single particles has been designed and developed. A fluid stream containing single particles intersects a focused laser beam at the primary focal point of an ellipsoidal reflector ring. The light scattered at angles theta = 2.5 0 to 177.5 0 at phi = 0 0 and 180 0 is reflected onto a circular array of photodiodes. The ellipsoidal reflector is situated in a chamber filled with fluid matching that of the stream to minimize refracting and reflecting interfaces. The detector array consists of 60 photodiodes each subtending 3 0 in scattering angle on 6 0 centers around 360 0 . 32 measurements on individual particles can be acquired at rates of 500 particles per second. The intensity and angular distribution of light scattered by spherical particles are indicative of size and relative refractive index. Calculations, using Lorenz--Mie theory, of differential scattering patterns integrated over angle corresponding to the detector geometry determined the instrument response to particle size. From this the expected resolution and experimental procedures are determined.Ultimately, the photometer will be utilized for identification and discrimination of biological cells based on the sensitivity of light scattering to size, shape, refractive index differences, internal granularity, and other internal morphology. This study has demonstrated the utility of the photometer and indicates potential for application to light scattering studies of biological cells

  1. Emissions from Ethanol-Gasoline Blends: A Single Particle Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. McMurry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its agricultural origin and function as a fuel oxygenate, ethanol is being promoted as an alternative biomass-based fuel for use in spark ignition engines, with mandates for its use at state and regional levels. While it has been established that the addition of ethanol to a fuel reduces the particulate mass concentration in the exhaust, little attention has been paid to changes in the physicochemical properties of the emitted particles. In this work, a dynamometer-mounted GM Quad-4 spark ignition engine run without aftertreatment at 1,500 RPM and 100% load was used with four different fuel blends, containing 0, 20, 40 and 85 percent ethanol in gasoline. This allowed the effects of the fuel composition to be isolated from other effects. Instrumentation employed included two Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers covering different size ranges for analysis of single particle composition, an Aethalometer for black carbon, a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer for particle size distributions, a Photoelectric Aerosol Sensor for particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH species and gravimetric filter measurements for particulate mass concentrations. It was found that, under the conditions investigated here, additional ethanol content in the fuel changes the particle size distribution, especially in the accumulation mode, and decreases the black carbon and total particulate mass concentrations. The molecular weight distribution of the PAHs was found to decrease with added ethanol. However, PAHs produced from higher ethanol-content fuels are associated with NO2− (m/z—46 in the single-particle mass spectra, indicating the presence of nitro-PAHs. Compounds associated with the gasoline (e.g., sulfur-containing species are diminished due to dilution as ethanol is added to the fuel relative to those associated with the lubricating oil (e.g., calcium, zinc, phosphate in the single particle spectra. These changes have potential

  2. Spatially Resolved Sensitivity of Single-Particle Plasmon Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuwer, Michael A; van Hoof, Bas; Zijlstra, Peter

    2018-03-01

    The high sensitivity of localized surface plasmon resonance sensors to the local refractive index allows for the detection of single-molecule binding events. Though binding events of single objects can be detected by their induced plasmon shift, the broad distribution of observed shifts remains poorly understood. Here, we perform a single-particle study wherein single nanospheres bind to a gold nanorod, and relate the observed plasmon shift to the binding location using correlative microscopy. To achieve this we combine atomic force microscopy to determine the binding location, and single-particle spectroscopy to determine the corresponding plasmon shift. As expected, we find a larger plasmon shift for nanospheres binding at the tip of a rod compared to its sides, in good agreement with numerical calculations. However, we also find a broad distribution of shifts even for spheres that were bound at a similar location to the nanorod. Our correlative approach allows us to disentangle effects of nanoparticle dimensions and binding location, and by comparison to numerical calculations we find that the biggest contributor to this observed spread is the dispersion in nanosphere diameter. These experiments provide insight into the spatial sensitivity and signal-heterogeneity of single-particle plasmon sensors and provides a framework for signal interpretation in sensing applications.

  3. Study on the fragmentation of granite due to the impact of single particle and double particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchun Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle Impact Drilling (PID is a novel method to improve the rate of penetration (ROP. In order to further improve the performance of PID, an investigation into the effect of single and double particles: (1 diameter; (2 initial velocity; (3 distance; and (4 angle of incidence was undertaken to investigate their effects on broken volume and penetration depth into hard brittle rock. For this purpose, the laboratory experiment of single particle impact rock was employed. Meanwhile, based on the LS-DYNA, a new finite element (FE simulation of the PID, including single and double particles impact rock, has been presented. The 3-dimensional (3D, aix-symmetric, dynamic-explicit, Lagrangian model has been considered in this simulation. And the Elastic and Holmquist Johnson Cook (HJC material behaviors have been used for particles and rocks, respectively. The FE simulation results of single particle impacting rock are good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, in this article the optimal impact parameters, including diameter, initial velocity, distance and the angle of incidence, are obtained in PID.

  4. Decay properties of high-lying single-particles modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumel, D; Fortier, S; Gales, S; Guillot, J; LangevinJoliot, H; Laurent, H; Maison, JM; Vernotte, J; Bordewijck, J; Brandenburg, S; Krasznahorkay, A; Crawley, GM; Massolo, CP; Renteria, M; Khendriche, A

    1996-01-01

    The neutron decay of high-lying single-particle states in Ni-64, Zr-90, Sn-120 and (208)pb excited by means of the (alpha,He-3) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy using the multidetector EDEN. The characteristics of this reaction are studied using inclusive spectra and angular

  5. Single-particle spectral density of the Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehlig, B.; Eskes, H.; Hayn, R.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the single-particle spectral function for the Hubbard model within the framework of a projection technique equivalent to the two-pole approximation. We show that the two-pole approximation can be well understood as an average characterization of the upper and the lower Hubbard bands,

  6. SINGLE-PARTICLE SPECTRAL DENSITY OF THE HUBBARD-MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEHLIG, B; ESKES, H; HAYN, R; MEINDERS, MBJ

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the single-particle spectral function for the Hubbard model within the framework of a projection technique equivalent to the two-pole approximation. We show that the two-pole approximation can be well understood as an average characterization of the upper and the lower Hubbard bands,

  7. Ergodicity of a single particle confined in a nanopore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardi, S.; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Frascolli, F.

    2012-01-01

    -ergodic component of the phase space for energy levels typical of experiments, is surprisingly small, i.e. we conclude that the ergodic hypothesis is a reasonable approximation even for a single particle trapped in a nanopore. Due to the numerical scope of this work, our focus will be the onset of ergodic behavior...

  8. Single particle degrees of freedom in the interacting boson model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is given of different aspects of the Interacting Boson Fermion Model, the extension of the interacting Boson Model to odd mass nuclei. The microscopic model for the coupling of single-particle degrees of freedom to the system of bosons is outlined and the interaction between the bosons

  9. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiniotis, Georgios; Southworth, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    Recent technological breakthroughs in image acquisition have enabled single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to achieve near-atomic resolution structural information for biological complexes. The improvements in image quality coupled with powerful computational methods for sorting distinct particle populations now also allow the determination of compositional and conformational ensembles, thereby providing key insights into macromolecular function. However, the inherent instability and dynamic nature of biological assemblies remain a tremendous challenge that often requires tailored approaches for successful implementation of the methodology. Here, we briefly describe the fundamentals of single-particle cryo-EM with an emphasis on covering the breadth of techniques and approaches, including low- and high-resolution methods, aiming to illustrate specific steps that are crucial for obtaining structural information by this method. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Single-camera, three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, K.; Regaard, B.; Heinemann, S.; Sick, V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces single-camera, three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (SC3D-PTV), an image-based, single-camera technique for measuring 3-component, volumetric velocity fields in environments with limited optical access, in particular, optically accessible internal combustion engines. The optical components used for SC3D-PTV are similar to those used for two-camera stereoscopic-PIV, but are adapted to project two simultaneous images onto a single image sensor. A novel PTV algor...

  11. Two-Way Communication with a Single Quantum Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Santo, Flavio; Dakić, Borivoje

    2018-02-01

    In this Letter we show that communication when restricted to a single information carrier (i.e., single particle) and finite speed of propagation is fundamentally limited for classical systems. On the other hand, quantum systems can surpass this limitation. We show that communication bounded to the exchange of a single quantum particle (in superposition of different spatial locations) can result in "two-way signaling," which is impossible in classical physics. We quantify the discrepancy between classical and quantum scenarios by the probability of winning a game played by distant players. We generalize our result to an arbitrary number of parties and we show that the probability of success is asymptotically decreasing to zero as the number of parties grows, for all classical strategies. In contrast, quantum strategy allows players to win the game with certainty.

  12. Tomato spotted wilt virus particle assembly : studying the role of the structural proteins in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, M.

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Bunyaviridae have spherical, enveloped virus particles that acquire their lipid membrane at the Golgi complex. For the animal-infecting bunyaviruses, virus assembly involves budding of ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) into vacuolised lumen of the Golgi complex, after which the

  13. Particle interactions of fluticasone propionate and salmeterol xinafoate detected with single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetzer, Martin W; Morrical, Bradley D; Fergenson, David P; Imanidis, Georgios

    2017-10-30

    Particle co-associations between the active pharmaceutical ingredients fluticasone propionate and salmeterol xinafoate were examined in dry powder inhaled (DPI) and metered dose inhaled (MDI) combination products. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry was used to investigate the particle interactions in Advair Diskus ® (500/50 mcg) and Seretide ® (125/25 mcg). A simple rules tree was used to identify each compound, either alone or co-associated at the level of the individual particle, using unique marker peaks in the mass spectra for the identification of each drug. High levels of drug particle co-association (fluticasone-salmeterol) were observed in the aerosols emitted from Advair Diskus ® and Seretide ® . The majority of the detected salmeterol particles were found to be in co-association with fluticasone in both tested devices. Another significant finding was that rather coarse fluticasone particles (in DPI) and fine salmeterol particles (both MDI and DPI) were forming the particle co-associations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Production of virus-like particles for vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuenmayor, J; Gòdia, F; Cervera, L

    2017-10-25

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are nanostructures that resemble the structures of viruses. They are composed of one or more structural proteins that can be arranged in several layers and can also contain a lipid outer envelope. VLPs trigger a high humoral and cellular immune response due to their repetitive structures. A key factor regarding VLP safety is the lack of viral genomic material, which enhances safety during both manufacture and administration. Contemporary VLP production may take advantage of several systems, including bacterial, yeast, insect and mammalian cells. The choice of production platform depends on several factors, including cost and the need for post-translational modifications (PTMs), which can be essential in generating an optimal immune response. Some VLP-based vaccines designed to prevent several infectious diseases are already approved and on the market, with many others at the clinical trial or research stage. Interest in this technology has recently increased due to its advantages over classical vaccines. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of VLP production systems and the newest generation of VLP-based vaccines now available. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Escherichia coli-derived virus-like particles in vaccine development

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xiaofen; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ningshao; Zhao, Qinjian

    2017-01-01

    Recombinant virus-like particle-based vaccines are composed of viral structural proteins and mimic authentic native viruses but are devoid of viral genetic materials. They are the active components in highly safe and effective vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases. Several expression systems have been used for virus-like particle production, ranging from Escherichia coli to mammalian cell lines. The prokaryotic expression system, especially Escherichia coli, is the preferred expr...

  16. Immunogenicity and efficacy of immunodeficiency virus-like particles pseudotyped with the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuate, Seraphin; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Stoiber, Heribert; Nchinda, Godwin; Floto, Anja; Franz, Monika; Sauermann, Ulrike; Bredl, Simon; Deml, Ludwig; Ignatius, Ralf; Norley, Steve; Racz, Paul; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Steinman, Ralph M.; Wagner, Ralf; Uberla, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Vaccination with exogenous antigens such as recombinant viral proteins, immunodeficiency virus-derived whole inactivated virus particles, or virus-like particles (VLP) has generally failed to provide sufficient protection in animal models for AIDS. Pseudotyping VLPs with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G), which is known to mediate entry into dendritic cells, might allow more efficient stimulation of immune responses. Therefore, we pseudotyped noninfectious immunodeficiency virus-like particles with VSV-G and carried out a preliminary screen of their immunogenicity and vaccination efficacy. Incorporation of VSV-G into HIV-1 VLPs led to hundred-fold higher antibody titers to HIV-1 Gag and enhancement of T cell responses in mice. Repeated vaccination of rhesus monkeys for 65 weeks with VSV-G pseudotyped simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-like particles (VLP[G]) provided initial evidence for efficient suppression of viral load after mucosal challenge with the SIVmac239 virus. Challenge of monkeys after a 28 week vaccination regimen with VLP[G] led to a reduction in peak viremia, but persistent suppression of viral load was not achieved. Due to limitations in the number of animals available for this study, improved efficacy of VSV-G pseudotyped VLPs in nonhuman primates could not be demonstrated. However, mouse experiments revealed that pseudotyping of VLPs with fusion-competent VSV-G clearly improves their immunogenicity. Additional strategies, particularly adjuvants, should be considered to provide greater protection against a challenge with pathogenic immunodeficiency virus

  17. Thermal Stability of RNA Phage Virus-Like Particles Displaying Foreign Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peabody David S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To be useful for genetic display of foreign peptides a viral coat protein must tolerate peptide insertions without major disruption of subunit folding and capsid assembly. The folding of the coat protein of RNA phage MS2 does not normally tolerate insertions in its AB-loop, but an engineered single-chain dimer readily accepts them as long as they are restricted to one of its two halves. Results Here we characterize the effects of peptide insertions on the thermal stabilities of MS2 virus-like particles (VLPs displaying a variety of different peptides in one AB-loop of the coat protein single-chain dimer. These particles typically denature at temperatures around 5-10°C lower than unmodified VLPs. Even so, they are generally stable up to about 50°C. VLPs of the related RNA phage PP7 are cross-linked with intersubunit disulfide bonds and are therefore significantly more stable. An AB-loop insertion also reduces the stability of PP7 VLPs, but they only begin to denature above about 70°C. Conclusions VLPs assembled from MS2 single-chain dimer coat proteins with peptide insertions in one of their AB-loops are somewhat less stable than the wild-type particle, but still resist heating up to about 50°C. Because they possess disulfide cross-links, PP7-derived VLPs provide an alternate platform with even higher stability.

  18. A phenomenological model for particle retention in single, saturated fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sandrina; Dickson, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Fractured aquifers are some of the most poorly characterized subsurface environments despite posing one of the highest risks to the protection of potable groundwater. This research was designed to improve the understanding of the factors affecting particle transport through fractures by developing a phenomenological model based on laboratory-scale transport data. The model presented in this research employed data from over 70 particle tracer tests conducted in single, saturated, variable-aperture fractures that were obtained from the natural environment and fractured in the laboratory or cast from epoxy in the laboratory. The particles employed were Escherichia coli RS2-GFP and microspheres. The tracer experiments were conducted in natural (dolomitic limestone and granite) as well as epoxy replicas of the natural fractures. The multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the most important factors influencing particle retention in fractures are the ratio of the ionic strength of solution to collector charge, the ratio of particle to collector charge, and the ratio of advective to diffusive forces as described by the Peclet number. The model was able to reasonably (R(2)  = 0.64) predict the fraction of particles retained; however, it is evident that some factors not accounted for in the model also contributed to retention. This research presents a novel approach to understanding particle transport in fractures, and illustrates the relative importance of various factors affecting the transport mechanisms. The utility of this model lies in the increased understanding of particle transport in fractures, which is extremely useful for directing future research. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  19. Real-time analysis of insoluble particles in glacial ice using single-particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Matthew; Zawadowicz, Maria A.; Das, Sarah B.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2017-11-01

    Insoluble aerosol particles trapped in glacial ice provide insight into past climates, but analysis requires information on climatically relevant particle properties, such as size, abundance, and internal mixing. We present a new analytical method using a time-of-flight single-particle mass spectrometer (SPMS) to determine the composition and size of insoluble particles in glacial ice over an aerodynamic size range of ˜ 0.2-3.0 µm diameter. Using samples from two Greenland ice cores, we developed a procedure to nebulize insoluble particles suspended in melted ice, evaporate condensed liquid from those particles, and transport them to the SPMS for analysis. We further determined size-dependent extraction and instrument transmission efficiencies to investigate the feasibility of determining particle-class-specific mass concentrations. We find SPMS can be used to provide constraints on the aerodynamic size, composition, and relative abundance of most insoluble particulate classes in ice core samples. We describe the importance of post-aqueous processing to particles, a process which occurs due to nebulization of aerosols from an aqueous suspension of originally soluble and insoluble aerosol components. This study represents an initial attempt to use SPMS as an emerging technique for the study of insoluble particulates in ice cores.

  20. Rapid detection of hendra virus using magnetic particles and quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisi, Fabio; Falcaro, Paolo; Buso, Dario; Hill, Anita J; Barr, Jennifer A; Crameri, Gary; Nguyen, Tich-Lam; Wang, Lin-Fa; Mulvaney, Paul

    2012-09-01

    A proof-of-concept for the development of a fast and portable Hendra virus biosensor is presented. Hendra virus, a deadly emerging pathogen in Australia, can be co-localized, concentrated and revealed using simultaneously magnetic and luminescent functional particles. This method should be applicable for the early detection of any other virus by targeting the specific virus with the corresponding antibody. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Development of Virus-Like-Particle Vaccine and Reporter Assay for Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Himanshu; Sedano, Melina; Plata, Gabrielle; Punke, Erin B; Joshi, Anjali

    2017-10-15

    Recent worldwide outbreaks of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection and the lack of an approved vaccine raise serious concerns regarding preparedness to combat this emerging virus. We used a virus-like particle (VLP)-based approach to develop a vaccine and a microneutralization assay for ZIKV. A synthetic capsid-premembrane-envelope (C-prM-E) gene construct of ZIKV was used to generate reporter virus particles (RVPs) that package a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter-expressing West Nile virus (WNV) replicon. The assay was adapted to a 96-well format, similar to the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), and showed high reproducibility with specific detection of ZIKV neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, C-prM-E and prM-E VLPs were tested as vaccine candidates in mice and compared to DNA vaccination. While the ZIKV prM-E construct alone was sufficient for generating VLPs, efficient VLP production from the C-prM-E construct could be achieved in the presence of the WNV NS2B-3 protease, which cleaves C from prM, allowing virus release. Immunization studies in mice showed that VLPs generated higher neutralizing antibody titers than those with the DNA vaccines, with C-prM-E VLPs giving slightly higher titers than those with prM-E VLPs. The superiority of C-prM-E VLPs suggests that inclusion of capsid may have benefits for ZIKV and other flaviviral VLP vaccines. To facilitate the VLP platform, we generated a stable cell line expressing high levels of ZIKV prM-E proteins that constitutively produce VLPs as well as a cell line expressing ZIKV C-prM-E proteins for RVP production. While several vaccine platforms have been proposed for ZIKV, this study describes a safe, effective, and economical VLP-based vaccine against ZIKV. IMPORTANCE To address the growing Zika virus epidemic, we undertook this study with two objectives: first, to develop a safe, effective, and economical vaccine for ZIKV, and second, to develop a rapid and versatile assay to detect the anti-ZIKV immune

  2. Single-particle response function in finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomo, S.; Texas A and M Univ., College Station

    1982-01-01

    I derive expressions for the single-particle response (structure) function S(E, q) and its sum rule, (Pauli blocking factor) P(q) = ∫ dE S(E, q), in terms of the Wiqner transforms (WTs) of the single-particle wave functions and the scattering probe sigma(q, r) and discuss the semi-classical phase-space interpretation of the results. For sigma(q, r) = esup(iq x r), I derive simple expressions for S(E, q) and P(q) for finite nuclei within the harmonic-oscillator model and compare the results with the well-known results of the Fermi-gas model. (orig.)

  3. Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) in biophysical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan; Ha, Ji Won; Augspurger, Ashley E.; Chen, Kuangcai; Zhu, Shaobin; Fang, Ning

    2013-10-01

    The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport.The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Three supplementary movies and an experimental section. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02254d

  4. Laboratory Measurements of Single-Particle Polarimetric Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, M.; Penttila, A.; Maconi, G.; Kassamakov, I.; Helander, P.; Puranen, T.; Salmi, A.; Hæggström, E.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-12-01

    Measuring scattering properties of different targets is important for material characterization, remote sensing applications, and for verifying theoretical results. Furthermore, there are usually simplifications made when we model targets and compute the scattering properties, e.g., ideal shape or constant optical parameters throughout the target material. Experimental studies help in understanding the link between the observed properties and computed results. Experimentally derived Mueller matrices of studied particles can be used as input for larger-scale scattering simulations, e.g., radiative transfer computations. This method allows to bypass the problem of using an idealized model for single-particle optical properties. While existing approaches offer ensemble- and orientation-averaged particle properties, our aim is to measure individual particles with controlled or known orientation. With the newly developed scatterometer, we aim to offer novel possibility to measure single, small (down to μm-scale) targets and their polarimetric spectra. This work presents an experimental setup that measures light scattered by a fixed small particle with dimensions ranging between micrometer and millimeter sizes. The goal of our setup is nondestructive characterization of such particles by measuring light of multiple wavelengths scattered in 360° in a horizontal plane by an ultrasonically levitating sample, whilst simultaneously controlling its 3D position and orientation. We describe the principles and design of our instrument and its calibration. We also present example measurements of real samples. This study was conducted under the support from the European Research Council, in the frame of the Advanced Grant project No. 320773 `Scattering and Absorption of Electromagnetic Waves in Particulate Media' (SAEMPL).

  5. Spin resonance strength calculation through single particle tracking for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The strengths of spin resonances for the polarized-proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are currently calculated with the code DEPOL, which numerically integrates through the ring based on an analytical approximate formula. In this article, we test a new way to calculate the spin resonance strengths by performing Fourier transformation to the actual transverse magnetic fields seen by a single particle traveling through the ring. Comparison of calculated spin resonance strengths is made between this method and DEPOL.

  6. Understanding particle size and distance driven competition of interparticle interactions and effective single-particle anisotropy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pacáková, Barbara; Mantlíková, Alice; Nižňanský, D.; Kubíčková, Simona; Vejpravová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 20 (2016), 1-11, č. článku 206004. ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic nanoparticles * single-particle anisotropy * dipolar energy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.649, year: 2016

  7. Automated single particle detection and tracking for large microscopy datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rhodri S; Yang, Lei; Dun, Alison; Smyth, Annya M; Duncan, Rory R; Rickman, Colin; Lu, Weiping

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in optical microscopy have enabled the acquisition of very large datasets from living cells with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Our ability to process these datasets now plays an essential role in order to understand many biological processes. In this paper, we present an automated particle detection algorithm capable of operating in low signal-to-noise fluorescence microscopy environments and handling large datasets. When combined with our particle linking framework, it can provide hitherto intractable quantitative measurements describing the dynamics of large cohorts of cellular components from organelles to single molecules. We begin with validating the performance of our method on synthetic image data, and then extend the validation to include experiment images with ground truth. Finally, we apply the algorithm to two single-particle-tracking photo-activated localization microscopy biological datasets, acquired from living primary cells with very high temporal rates. Our analysis of the dynamics of very large cohorts of 10 000 s of membrane-associated protein molecules show that they behave as if caged in nanodomains. We show that the robustness and efficiency of our method provides a tool for the examination of single-molecule behaviour with unprecedented spatial detail and high acquisition rates.

  8. Simulating Biomass Fast Pyrolysis at the Single Particle Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciesielski, Peter [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wiggins, Gavin [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Jakes, Joseph E. [U.S. Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

    2017-07-01

    Simulating fast pyrolysis at the scale of single particles allows for the investigation of the impacts of feedstock-specific parameters such as particle size, shape, and species of origin. For this reason particle-scale modeling has emerged as an important tool for understanding how variations in feedstock properties affect the outcomes of pyrolysis processes. The origins of feedstock properties are largely dictated by the composition and hierarchical structure of biomass, from the microstructural porosity to the external morphology of milled particles. These properties may be accounted for in simulations of fast pyrolysis by several different computational approaches depending on the level of structural and chemical complexity included in the model. The predictive utility of particle-scale simulations of fast pyrolysis can still be enhanced substantially by advancements in several areas. Most notably, considerable progress would be facilitated by the development of pyrolysis kinetic schemes that are decoupled from transport phenomena, predict product evolution from whole-biomass with increased chemical speciation, and are still tractable with present-day computational resources.

  9. A theorem on the single particle energy in a Fermi gas with interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, N.M.; Hove, Léon van

    1958-01-01

    This paper investigates single particle properties in a Fermi gas with interaction at the absolute zero of temperature. In such a system a single particle energy has only a meaning for particles of momentum k close to the Fermi momentum kF. These single particle states are metastable with a

  10. Drift correction of the dissolved signal in single particle ICPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Geert; Rauch, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented where drift, the random fluctuation of the signal intensity, is compensated for based on the estimation of the drift function by a moving average. It was shown using single particle ICPMS (spICPMS) measurements of 10 and 60 nm Au NPs that drift reduces accuracy of spICPMS analysis at the calibration stage and during calculations of the particle size distribution (PSD), but that the present method can again correct the average signal intensity as well as the signal distribution of particle-containing samples skewed by drift. Moreover, deconvolution, a method that models signal distributions of dissolved signals, fails in some cases when using standards and samples affected by drift, but the present method was shown to improve accuracy again. Relatively high particle signals have to be removed prior to drift correction in this procedure, which was done using a 3 × sigma method, and the signals are treated separately and added again. The method can also correct for flicker noise that increases when signal intensity is increased because of drift. The accuracy was improved in many cases when flicker correction was used, but when accurate results were obtained despite drift, the correction procedures did not reduce accuracy. The procedure may be useful to extract results from experimental runs that would otherwise have to be run again. Graphical Abstract A method is presented where a spICP-MS signal affected by drift (left) is corrected (right) by adjusting the local (moving) averages (green) and standard deviations (purple) to the respective values at a reference time (red). In combination with removing particle events (blue) in the case of calibration standards, this method is shown to obtain particle size distributions where that would otherwise be impossible, even when the deconvolution method is used to discriminate dissolved and particle signals.

  11. Vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles protects chickens from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J Halbherr

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×10⁸ infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade. Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry.

  12. Viruses and Tetraspanins: Lessons from Single Molecule Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmane, Selma; Rubinstein, Eric; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Tetraspanins are four-span membrane proteins that are widely distributed in multi-cellular organisms and involved in several infectious diseases. They have the unique property to form a network of protein-protein interaction within the plasma membrane, due to the lateral associations with one another and with other membrane proteins. Tracking tetraspanins at the single molecule level using fluorescence microscopy has revealed the membrane behavior of the tetraspanins CD9 and CD81 in epithelial cell lines, providing a first dynamic view of this network. Single molecule tracking highlighted that these 2 proteins can freely diffuse within the plasma membrane but can also be trapped, permanently or transiently, in tetraspanin-enriched areas. More recently, a similar strategy has been used to investigate tetraspanin membrane behavior in the context of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In this review we summarize the main results emphasizing the relationship in terms of membrane partitioning between tetraspanins, some of their partners such as Claudin-1 and EWI-2, and viral proteins during infection. These results will be analyzed in the context of other membrane microdomains, stressing the difference between raft and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, but also in comparison with virus diffusion at the cell surface. New advanced single molecule techniques that could help to further explore tetraspanin assemblies will be also discussed. PMID:24800676

  13. Ultrastructural Characterization of Turnip Mosaic Virus-Induced Cellular Rearrangements Reveals Membrane-Bound Viral Particles Accumulating in Vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Juan; Basu, Kaustuv; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    Positive-strand RNA [(+) RNA] viruses remodel cellular membranes to facilitate virus replication and assembly. In the case of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), the viral membrane protein 6K2 plays an essential role in endomembrane alterations. Although 6K2-induced membrane dynamics have been widely studied by confocal microscopy, the ultrastructure of this remodeling has not been extensively examined. In this study, we investigated the formation of TuMV-induced membrane changes by chemical fixation and high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution (HPF/FS) for transmission electron microscopy at different times of infection. We observed the formation of convoluted membranes connected to rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) early in the infection process, followed by the production of single-membrane vesicle-like (SMVL) structures at the midstage of infection. Both SMVL and double-membrane vesicle-like structures with electron-dense cores, as well as electron-dense bodies, were found late in the infection process. Immunogold labeling results showed that the vesicle-like structures were 6K2 tagged and suggested that only the SMVL structures were viral RNA replication sites. Electron tomography (ET) was used to regenerate a three-dimensional model of these vesicle-like structures, which showed that they were, in fact, tubules. Late in infection, we observed filamentous particle bundles associated with electron-dense bodies, which suggests that these are sites for viral particle assembly. In addition, TuMV particles were observed to accumulate in the central vacuole as membrane-associated linear arrays. Our work thus unravels the sequential appearance of distinct TuMV-induced membrane structures for viral RNA replication, viral particle assembly, and accumulation. Positive-strand RNA viruses remodel cellular membranes for different stages of the infection process, such as protein translation and processing, viral RNA synthesis, particle assembly, and virus transmission. The

  14. Particle size effects on protein and virus-like particle adsorption on perfusion chromatography media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yige; Abraham, Dicky; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-01-02

    The resin structure, chromatographic behavior, and adsorption kinetics of proteins and virus-like-particles (VLPs) are studied for POROS HS 20 and POROS HS 50 (23 and 52 μm mean diameter, respectively) to determine the effects of particle size on perfusion chromatography and to determine the predictive ability of available models. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inverse size-exclusion chromatography (iSEC) show similar structures for the two resins, both containing 200-1000 nm pores that transect a network of much smaller pores. For non-binding conditions, trends of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) as a function of reduced velocity are consistent with perfusion. The estimated intraparticle flow fractions for these conditions are 0.0018 and 0.00063 for POROS HS 20 and HS 50, respectively. For strong binding conditions, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) shows asymmetrical intraparticle concentrations profiles and enhanced rates of IgG adsorption on POROS HS 20 at 1000 cm/h. The corresponding effective diffusivity under flow is 2-3 times larger than for non-flow conditions and much larger than observed for POROS HS 50, consistent with available models. For VLPs, however, adsorption is confined to a thin layer near the particle surface for both resins, suggesting that the bound VLPs block the pores. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Single-particle absorption spectroscopy by photothermal contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Nizzero, Sara; Hoggard, Anneli; Wang, Lin-Yung; Cai, Yi-Yu; Su, Man-Nung; Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan

    2015-05-13

    Removing effects of sample heterogeneity through single-molecule and single-particle techniques has advanced many fields. While background free luminescence and scattering spectroscopy is widely used, recording the absorption spectrum only is rather difficult. Here we present an approach capable of recording pure absorption spectra of individual nanostructures. We demonstrate the implementation of single-particle absorption spectroscopy on strongly scattering plasmonic nanoparticles by combining photothermal microscopy with a supercontinuum laser and an innovative calibration procedure that accounts for chromatic aberrations and wavelength-dependent excitation powers. Comparison of the absorption spectra to the scattering spectra of the same individual gold nanoparticles reveals the blueshift of the absorption spectra, as predicted by Mie theory but previously not detectable in extinction measurements that measure the sum of absorption and scattering. By covering a wavelength range of 300 nm, we are furthermore able to record absorption spectra of single gold nanorods with different aspect ratios. We find that the spectral shift between absorption and scattering for the longitudinal plasmon resonance decreases as a function of nanorod aspect ratio, which is in agreement with simulations.

  16. Volumetric particle image velocimetry with a single plenoptic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahringer, Timothy W.; Lynch, Kyle P.; Thurow, Brian S.

    2015-11-01

    A novel three-dimensional (3D), three-component (3C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique based on volume illumination and light field imaging with a single plenoptic camera is described. A plenoptic camera uses a densely packed microlens array mounted near a high resolution image sensor to sample the spatial and angular distribution of light collected by the camera. The multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) computed tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct a volumetric intensity field from individual snapshots and a cross-correlation algorithm is used to estimate the velocity field from a pair of reconstructed particle volumes. This work provides an introduction to the basic concepts of light field imaging with a plenoptic camera and describes the unique implementation of MART in the context of plenoptic image data for 3D/3C PIV measurements. Simulations of a plenoptic camera using geometric optics are used to generate synthetic plenoptic particle images, which are subsequently used to estimate the quality of particle volume reconstructions at various particle number densities. 3D reconstructions using this method produce reconstructed particles that are elongated by a factor of approximately 4 along the optical axis of the camera. A simulated 3D Gaussian vortex is used to test the capability of single camera plenoptic PIV to produce a 3D/3C vector field, where it was found that lateral displacements could be measured to approximately 0.2 voxel accuracy in the lateral direction and 1 voxel in the depth direction over a 300× 200× 200 voxel volume. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated experimentally using a home-built plenoptic camera based on a 16-megapixel interline CCD camera and a 289× 193 array of microlenses and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. 3D/3C measurements were performed in the wake of a low Reynolds number circular cylinder and compared with measurements made using a conventional 2D/2C PIV system. Overall, single camera

  17. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Sam; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for example, gasoline). In this process, metal deposition and intrusion is a major cause for irreversible catalyst deactivation and shifts in product distribution. We used x-ray nanotomography of industrial FCC particles at differing degrees of deactivation to quantify changes in single-particle macroporosity and pore connectivity, correlated to iron and nickel deposition. Our study reveals that these metals are incorporated almost exclusively in near-surface regions, severely limiting macropore accessibility as metal concentrations increase. Because macropore channels are “highways” of the pore network, blocking them prevents feedstock molecules from reaching the catalytically active domains. Consequently, metal deposition reduces conversion with time on stream because the internal pore volume, although itself unobstructed, becomes largely inaccessible. PMID:26601160

  18. Experimental investigation of virus and clay particles cotransport in partially saturated columns packed with glass beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2015-02-15

    Suspended clay particles in groundwater can play a significant role as carriers of viruses, because, depending on the physicochemical conditions, clay particles may facilitate or hinder the mobility of viruses. This experimental study examines the effects of clay colloids on the transport of viruses in variably saturated porous media. All cotransport experiments were conducted in both saturated and partially saturated columns packed with glass beads, using bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 as model viruses, and kaolinite (KGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. The various experimental collision efficiencies were determined using the classical colloid filtration theory. The experimental data indicated that the mass recovery of viruses and clay colloids decreased as the water saturation decreased. Temporal moments of the various breakthrough concentrations collected, suggested that the presence of clays significantly influenced virus transport and irreversible deposition onto glass beads. The mass recovery of both viruses, based on total effluent virus concentrations, was shown to reduce in the presence of suspended clay particles. Furthermore, the transport of suspended virus and clay-virus particles was retarded, compared to the conservative tracer. Under unsaturated conditions both clay particles facilitated the transport of ΦX174, while hindered the transport of MS2. Moreover, the surface properties of viruses, clays and glass beads were employed for the construction of classical DLVO and capillary potential energy profiles, and the results suggested that capillary forces play a significant role on colloid retention. It was estimated that the capillary potential energy of MS2 is lower than that of ΦX174, and the capillary potential energy of KGa-1b is lower than that of STx-1b, assuming that the protrusion distance through the water film is the same for each pair of particles. Moreover, the capillary potential energy is several orders of

  19. Crosslinked Functional Polymer Nanowire Formation Along Single Particle Tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, S.

    2006-01-01

    The use of high-energy charged particles has extended to many fields in recent years. In medicine, non-homogeneous energy deposition along an ion trajectory (ion track) plays a crucial role in cancer radiotherapy, allowing for high spatial selectivity in the distribution of the radiation dose. The direct observation and application of ion tracks in media have also attracted interest in materials science, where it is known as nuclear track fabrication. Since the discovery that high-energy particle leave latent tracks in inorganic and organic polymer materials, the technique has also been applied to the production of micro- and nano-sized pores in materials through chemical etching of the tracks. The clear correlation between the etched pore and the characteristics of the incident charged particle has been utilized for measurement of the velocity and mass of the incident particles, and such organic film detectors are widely used in dosimetry, and in particular for galactic cosmic rays in space. The scope of the present paper is the direct nano-structure formation based on crosslinking reactions induced in nano-scale ultra-small spaces of single particle tracks. We have developed the simple one-step formation processes of nanowires without using any chemical etching or refilling processes. The present technique is in striking contrast to the previous 'nuclear track' nanofabrication techniques. According to its high feasibility for the preparation of 1-D nanowires based on 'any' kinds of polymeric materials, the present paper demonstrates the formation of not only simple polymer nanowires but also ceramic and/or multi-segment multi-functional nanowires

  20. Epstein–Barr virus particles induce centrosome amplification and chromosomal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, Anatoliy; Tsai, Ming-Han; Schlosser, Yvonne T.; Kratz, Anne-Sophie; Bernhardt, Katharina; Fink, Susanne; Mizani, Tuba; Lin, Xiaochen; Jauch, Anna; Mautner, Josef; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Feederle, Regina; Hoffmann, Ingrid; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Infections with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) are associated with cancer development, and EBV lytic replication (the process that generates virus progeny) is a strong risk factor for some cancer types. Here we report that EBV infection of B-lymphocytes (in vitro and in a mouse model) leads to an increased rate of centrosome amplification, associated with chromosomal instability. This effect can be reproduced with virus-like particles devoid of EBV DNA, but not with defective virus-like particles that cannot infect host cells. Viral protein BNRF1 induces centrosome amplification, and BNRF1-deficient viruses largely lose this property. These findings identify a new mechanism by which EBV particles can induce chromosomal instability without establishing a chronic infection, thereby conferring a risk for development of tumours that do not necessarily carry the viral genome. PMID:28186092

  1. Inclusive photoproduction of single charged particles at high p T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Atkinson, M.; Baake, M.; Bagdasarian, L. S.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brook, N.; Charity, T.; Clegg, A. B.; Coyle, P.; Danaher, S.; Danagulian, S.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Diekmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Eades, J.; Ellison, R. J.; Flower, P. S.; Foster, J. M.; Galbraith, W.; Galumian, P. I.; Gapp, C.; Gebert, F.; Hallewell, G.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hickman, M. T.; Hoeger, C.; Holzkamp, S.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Ibbotson, M.; Jakob, H. P.; Joseph, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Kingler, J.; Koersgen, G.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; McCann, H.; McClatchey, R.; McManus, C.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J. A. G.; Morris, J. V.; Newton, D.; O'Connor, A.; Oedingen, R.; Oganesian, A. G.; Ottewell, P. J.; Paterson, C. N.; Paul, E.; Reid, D.; Rotscheidt, H.; Sharp, P. H.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Thacker, N. A.; Thompson, L.; Thompson, R. J.; Voigtlaender-Tetzner, A.; Waterhouse, J.; Weigend, A. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    1989-03-01

    Single charged-particle inclusive cross sections for photon, pion and kaon beams on hydrogen at the CERN-SPS are presented as functions of p T and x F . Data cover the range 0.01.6 GeV/c for the photon-induced data. Using the hadron-induced data to estimate the hadronic behaviour of the photon, the difference distributions and ratios of cross sections are a measure of the contribution of the point-like photon interactions. The data are compared with QCD calculations and show broadly similar features.

  2. Decay properties of high-lying single-particles modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S.; Galès, S.; Guillot, J.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Laurent, H.; Maison, J. M.; Vernotte, J.; Bordewijck, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Crawley, G. M.; Massolo, C. P.; Renteria, M.; Khendriche, A.

    1996-02-01

    The neutron decay of high-lying single-particle states in 64Ni, 90Zr, 120Sn and 208Pb excited by means of the (α, 3He) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy using the multidetector EDEN. The characteristics of this reaction are studied using inclusive spectra and angular correlation analysis. The structure located between 11 and 15 MeV in 91Zr, and between 8 and 12 MeV excitation energy in 209Pb display large departures from a pure statistical decay. The corresponding non-statistical branching ratios are compared with the results of two theoretical calculations.

  3. Real stabilization method for nuclear single-particle resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Zhou Shangui; Meng Jie; Zhao Enguang

    2008-01-01

    We develop the real stabilization method within the framework of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. With the self-consistent nuclear potentials from the RMF model, the real stabilization method is used to study single-particle resonant states in spherical nuclei. As examples, the energies, widths, and wave functions of low-lying neutron resonant states in 120 Sn are obtained. These results are compared with those from the scattering phase-shift method and the analytic continuation in the coupling constant approach and satisfactory agreements are found

  4. Single-particle cryo-EM at crystallographic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Until only a few years ago, single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) was usually not the first choice for many structural biologists due to its limited resolution in the range of nanometer to subnanometer. Now, this method rivals X-ray crystallography in terms of resolution and can be used to determine atomic structures of macromolecules that are either refractory to crystallization or difficult to crystallize in specific functional states. In this review, I discuss the recent breakthroughs in both hardware and software that transformed cryo-microscopy, enabling understanding of complex biomolecules and their functions at atomic level. PMID:25910205

  5. Coupled cluster approach to the single-particle Green's function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nooijen, M.; Snijders, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Diagrammatic and coupled cluster techniques are used to develop an approach to the single-particle Green's function G which concentrates on G directly rather than first approximating the irreducible self-energy and then solving Dyson's equation. As a consequence the ionization and attachment parts of the Green's function satisfy completely decoupled sets of equations. The proposed coupled cluster Green's function method (CCGF) is intimately connected to both coupled cluster linear response theory (CCLRT) and the normal coupled cluster method (NCCM). These relations are discussed in detail

  6. Three envelope proteins of hepatitis B virus: large S, middle S, and major S proteins needed for the formation of Dane particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, K; Tsurimoto, T; Matsubara, K

    1991-07-01

    The infectious particles of hepatitis B virus are called Dane particles and consist of viral nucleic acid encapsulated within a core particle that is enveloped by virus-coded surface proteins. The major S protein constitutes a significant fraction of these surface proteins. In addition, there are two other related proteins (large S and middle S), but their role in envelope formation has not yet been elucidated. We modified the translation initiation codon ATG of each of the envelope proteins by site-directed mutagenesis and found that mutant genomes that did not produce one or two of these proteins were unable to form Dane particles. The particles released into the culture medium by such mutants did not carry DNA. Synthesis of virus-coded RNA still occurred normally, and core particles carrying DNA accumulated intracellularly. The DNA in such core particles was mostly in the double-stranded open circular form, in contrast to the normal situation in which the particles contain mostly RNA and its complementary single-stranded DNA or else contain linear DNA that is partially single stranded and otherwise duplex. The role of the large S and middle S proteins in the formation of Dane particles is discussed.

  7. Understanding particle size and distance driven competition of interparticle interactions and effective single-particle anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacakova, B; Mantlikova, A; Niznansky, D; Kubickova, S; Vejpravova, J

    2016-05-25

    Magnetic response of single-domain nanoparticles (NPs) in concentrated systems is strongly affected by mutual interparticle interactions. However, particle proximity significantly influences single-particle effective anisotropy. To solve which of these two phenomena plays a dominant role in the magnetic response of real NP systems, systematic study on samples with well-defined parameters is required. In our work, we prepared a series of nanocomposites constituted of highly-crystalline and well-isolated CoFe2O4 NPs embedded in an amorphous SiO2 matrix using a single-molecule precursor method. This preparation method enabled us to reach a wide interval of particle size and concentration. We observed that the characteristic parameters of the single-domain state (coercivity, blocking temperature) and dipole-dipole interaction energy ([Formula: see text]) scaled with each other and increased with increasing [Formula: see text], where d XRD was the NP diameter and r was the interparticle distance. Our results are in excellent agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations of the particle growth. Moreover, we demonstrated that the contribution of [Formula: see text] acting as an additional energetic barrier to the superspin reversal or as an average static field did not sufficiently explain how the concentrated NP systems responded to an external magnetic field. Alternations in the blocking temperature and coercivity of our NP systems accounted for reformed relaxations of the NP superspins and modified effective anisotropy energy of the interacting NPs. Therefore, the concept of modified NP effective anisotropy explains the magnetic response of our concentrated NP systems better than the concept of the energy barrier influenced by interparticle interactions.

  8. Single Event Rates for Devices Sensitive to Particle Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, L. D.; Scheick, L. Z.; Banker, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    Single event rates (SER) can include contributions from low-energy particles such that the linear energy transfer (LET) is not constant. Previous work found that the environmental description that is most relevant to the low-energy contribution to the rate is a "stopping rate per unit volume" even when the physical mechanisms for a single-event effect do not require an ion to stop in some device region. Stopping rate tables are presented for four heavy-ion environments that are commonly used to assess device suitability for space applications. A conservative rate estimate utilizing limited test data is derived, and the example of SEGR rate in a power MOSFET is presented.

  9. Proliferative pododermatitis associated with virus-like particles in a northern gannet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoust, P Y; Wadowska, D; Kibenge, F; Campagnoli, R P; Latimer, K S; Ritchie, B W

    2000-04-01

    Small multifocal lesions of proliferative pododermatitis were observed in an emaciated adult male northern gannet (Morus bassanus). Ultrastructurally, these lesions were associated with numerous virus-like particles with a size and morphology suggestive of Papovaviridae. DNA in situ hybridization with probes for avian polyomaviral and papillomaviral nucleic acid and an immunohistochemical test for the presence of papillomaviral antigen failed to identify this virus further. To our knowledge, papovavirus-like particles have not been recognized previously in this avian species.

  10. Design of a Single-Layer Microchannel for Continuous Sheathless Single-Stream Particle Inertial Focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Tang, Fei; Li, Weihua; Wang, Xiaohao

    2018-02-06

    High-throughput, high-precision single-stream focusing of microparticles has a potentially wide range of applications in biochemical analysis and clinical diagnosis. In this work, we develop a sheathless three-dimensional (3D) particle-focusing method in a single-layer microchannel. This novel microchannel consists of periodic high-aspect-ratio curved channels and straight channels. The proposed method takes advantage of both the curved channels, which induce Dean flow to promote particle migration, and straight channels, which suppress the remaining stirring effects of Dean flow to stabilize the achieved particle focusing. The 3D particle focusing is demonstrated experimentally, and the mechanism is analyzed theoretically. The effects of flow rate, particle size, and cycle number on the focusing performance were also investigated. The experimental results demonstrate that polystyrene particles with diameters of 5-20 μm can be focused into a 3D single file within seven channel cycles, with the focusing accuracy up to 98.5% and focusing rate up to 98.97%. The focusing throughput could reach up to ∼10 5 counts/min. Furthermore, its applicability to biological cells is also demonstrated by 3D focusing of HeLa and melanoma cells and bovine blood cells in the proposed microchannel. The proposed sheathless passive focusing scheme, featuring a simple channel structure, small footprint (9 mm × 1.2 mm), compact layout, and uncomplicated fabrication procedure, holds great promise as an efficient 3D focusing unit for the development of next-generation on-chip flow cytometry.

  11. Conformational changes of a single magnetic particle string within gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hai-Ning; Groenewold, Jan; Picken, S J; Mendes, Eduardo

    2014-02-21

    Magnetorheological (MR) gels consist of micron sized magnetic particles inside a gel matrix. Before physical cross-linking, the suspension is subjected to a small magnetic field which creates a particle string structure. After cross-linking, the string is kept within the gel at room temperature. Under an external homogeneous magnetic field and mechanical deformation, the soft swollen gel matrix allows the string to largely rearrange at microscopic scales. With the help of two homemade magneto cells mounted on an optical microscope, we were able to follow the conformational change and instabilities of a single magnetic particle string under the combined influence of shear (or stretch) and the magnetic field. In the absence of mechanical deformation, an external magnetic field, applied in the perpendicular direction to the string, breaks it into small pieces generating periodic structures like sawteeth. When an external magnetic field is applied parallel to the pre-aligned string, it exhibits a length contraction. However, under shear strain perpendicular to the original pre-structured string (and magnetic field), the string breaks and short string segments tilt, making an angle with the original direction that is smaller than that of the applied shear (non-affine). The difference in tilt angle scales with the inverse length of the small segments L-1 and the magnetic flux density B, reflecting the ability of the gel matrix to expel solvents under local stress.

  12. High resolution single particle refinement in EMAN2.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James M; Chen, Muyuan; Baldwin, Philip R; Ludtke, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    EMAN2.1 is a complete image processing suite for quantitative analysis of grayscale images, with a primary focus on transmission electron microscopy, with complete workflows for performing high resolution single particle reconstruction, 2-D and 3-D heterogeneity analysis, random conical tilt reconstruction and subtomogram averaging, among other tasks. In this manuscript we provide the first detailed description of the high resolution single particle analysis pipeline and the philosophy behind its approach to the reconstruction problem. High resolution refinement is a fully automated process, and involves an advanced set of heuristics to select optimal algorithms for each specific refinement task. A gold standard FSC is produced automatically as part of refinement, providing a robust resolution estimate for the final map, and this is used to optimally filter the final CTF phase and amplitude corrected structure. Additional methods are in-place to reduce model bias during refinement, and to permit cross-validation using other computational methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Single-particle excitations in disordered Weyl fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pixley, J. H.; Chou, Yang-Zhi; Goswami, Pallab; Huse, David A.; Nandkishore, Rahul; Radzihovsky, Leo; Das Sarma, S.

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically study the single-particle Green function of a three-dimensional disordered Weyl semimetal using a combination of techniques. These include analytic T -matrix and renormalization group methods with complementary regimes of validity and an exact numerical approach based on the kernel polynomial technique. We show that at any nonzero disorder, Weyl excitations are not ballistic: They instead have a nonzero linewidth that for weak short-range disorder arises from nonperturbative resonant impurity scattering. Perturbative approaches find a quantum critical point between a semimetal and a metal at a finite disorder strength, but this transition is avoided due to nonperturbative effects. At moderate disorder strength and intermediate energies the avoided quantum critical point renormalizes the scaling of single-particle properties. In this regime we compute numerically the anomalous dimension of the fermion field and find η =0.13 ±0.04 , which agrees well with a renormalization group analysis (η =0.125 ). Our predictions can be directly tested by ARPES and STM measurements in samples dominated by neutral impurities.

  14. Single Particle Soot Photometer intercomparison at the AIDA chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Laborde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles, consisting of black carbon (BC, organic carbon (OC, inorganic salts, and trace elements, are emitted into the atmosphere during incomplete combustion. Accurate measurements of atmospheric BC are important as BC particles cause adverse health effects and impact the climate.

    Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the properties and mass concentrations of BC particles remains difficult. The Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2 can contribute to improving this situation by measuring the mass of refractory BC in individual particles as well as its mixing state.

    Here, the results of the first detailed SP2 intercomparison, involving 6 SP2s from 6 different research groups, are presented, including the most evolved data products that can presently be calculated from SP2 measurements.

    It was shown that a detection efficiency of almost 100% down to 1 fg BC per particle can readily be achieved, and that this limit can be pushed down to ∼0.2 fg BC with optimal SP2 setup. Number and mass size distributions of BC cores agreed within ±5% and ±10%, respectively, in between the SP2s, with larger deviations in the range below 1 fg BC.

    The accuracy of the SP2's mass concentration measurement depends on the calibration material chosen. The SP2 has previously been shown to be equally sensitive to fullerene soot and ambient BC from sources where fossil fuel was dominant and less sensitive to fullerene soot than to Aquadag. Fullerene soot was therefore chosen as the standard calibration material by the SP2 user community; however, many data sets rely solely on Aquadag calibration measurements. The difference in SP2 sensitivity was found to be almost equal (fullerene soot to Aquadag response ratio of ∼0.75 at 8.9 fg BC for all SP2s. This allows the calculation of a fullerene soot equivalent calibration curve from a measured Aquadag calibration, when no fullerene soot calibration is available. It could be

  15. Dynamics of Single Chains of Suspended Ferrofluid Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutillas, S.; Liu, J.

    1999-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the dynamics of isolated chains made of super-paramagnetic particles under the influence of a magnetic field. The motivation of this work is to understand if the chain fluctuations exist and, if it does, how does the fluctuation affect chain aggregation. We find that single chains strongly fluctuate and that the characteristic frequency of their fluctuations is inversely proportional to the magnetic field strength. The higher the field the lower the characteristic frequency of the chain fluctuations. In the high magnetic field limit, chains behave like rigid rods without any internal motions. In this work, we used ferrofluid particles suspended in water. These particles do not have any intrinsic magnetization. Once a magnetic field is applied, a dipole moment is induced in each particle, proportional to the magnetic field. A dipolar magnetic interaction then occurs between particles. If dipole-dipole magnetic energy is higher than the thermal energy, the result is a structure change inside the dipolar fluid. The ratio of these two energies is expressed by a coupling constant lambda as: lambda = (pi(a(exp 3))(chi(exp 2))(mu(sub 0))(H(sub 0))(exp 2))/18kT Where a is the particle radius, mu(sub 0) is the vacuum magnetic permeability, H(sub 0) the applied magnetic field, k the Boltzmann constant and T the absolute temperature. If lambda > 1, magnetic particles form chains along the field direction. The lateral coalescence of several chains may form bigger aggregates especially if the particle volume fraction is high. While many studies and applications deal with the rheological properties and the structural changes of these dipolar fluids, this work focuses on the understanding of the chain dynamics. In order to probe the chain dynamics, we used dynamic light scattering (DLS) in self-beating mode as our experimental technique. The experimental geometry is such that the scattering plane is perpendicular to the magnetic field

  16. Infectious mutants of cassava latent virus generated in vivo from intact recombinant DNA clones containing single copies of the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, J; Townsend, R

    1986-08-11

    Intact recombinant DNAs containing single copies of either component of the cassava latent virus genome can elicit infection when mechanically inoculated to host plants in the presence of the appropriate second component. Characterisation of infectious mutant progeny viruses, by analysis of virus-specific supercoiled DNA intermediates, indicates that most if not all of the cloning vector has been deleted, achieved at least in some cases by intermolecular recombination in vivo between DNAs 1 and 2. Significant rearrangements within the intergenic region of DNA 2, predominantly external to the common region, can be tolerated without loss of infectivity suggesting a somewhat passive role in virus multiplication for the sequences in question. Although packaging constraints might impose limits on the amount of DNA within geminate particles, isolation of an infectious coat protein mutant defective in virion production suggests that packaging is not essential for systemic spread of the viral DNA.

  17. Surface properties, more than size, limiting convective distribution of virus-sized particles and viruses in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Michael Y; Hoffer, Alan; Morrison, Paul F; Hamilton, John F; Hughes, Jeffrey; Schlageter, Kurt S; Lee, Jeongwu; Kelly, Brandon R; Oldfield, Edward H

    2005-08-01

    Achieving distribution of gene-carrying vectors is a major barrier to the clinical application of gene therapy. Because of the blood-brain barrier, the distribution of genetic vectors to the central nervous system (CNS) is even more challenging than delivery to other tissues. Direct intraparenchymal microinfusion, a minimally invasive technique, uses bulk flow (convection) to distribute suspensions of macromolecules widely through the extracellular space (convection-enhanced delivery [CED]). Although acute injection into solid tissue is often used for delivery of oligonucleotides, viruses, and liposomes, and there is preliminary evidence that certain of these large particles can spread through the interstitial space of the brain by the use of convection, the use of CED for distribution of viruses in the brain has not been systematically examined. That is the goal of this study. Investigators used a rodent model to examine the influence of size, osmolarity of buffering solutions, and surface coating on the volumetric distribution of virus-sized nanoparticles and viruses (adeno-associated viruses and adenoviruses) in the gray matter of the brain. The results demonstrate that channels in the extracellular space of gray matter in the brain are large enough to accommodate virus-sized particles and that the surface characteristics are critical determinants for distribution of viruses in the brain by convection. These results indicate that convective distribution can be used to distribute therapeutic viral vectors in the CNS.

  18. Virus Particle Detection by Convolutional Neural Network in Transmission Electron Microscopy Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Eisuke; Sato, Takaaki; Sano, Daisuke; Utagawa, Etsuko; Kato, Tsuyoshi

    2018-01-19

    A new computational method for the detection of virus particles in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images is presented. Our approach is to use a convolutional neural network that transforms a TEM image to a probabilistic map that indicates where virus particles exist in the image. Our proposed approach automatically and simultaneously learns both discriminative features and classifier for virus particle detection by machine learning, in contrast to existing methods that are based on handcrafted features that yield many false positives and require several postprocessing steps. The detection performance of the proposed method was assessed against a dataset of TEM images containing feline calicivirus particles and compared with several existing detection methods, and the state-of-the-art performance of the developed method for detecting virus was demonstrated. Since our method is based on supervised learning that requires both the input images and their corresponding annotations, it is basically used for detection of already-known viruses. However, the method is highly flexible, and the convolutional networks can adapt themselves to any virus particles by learning automatically from an annotated dataset.

  19. Protection against Multiple Subtypes of Influenza Viruses by Virus-Like Particle Vaccines Based on a Hemagglutinin Conserved Epitope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoheng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We selected the conserved sequence in the stalk region of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA trimmer, the long alpha helix (LAH, as the vaccine candidate sequence, and inserted it into the major immunodominant region (MIR of hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc, and, by using the E. coli expression system, we prepared a recombinant protein vaccine LAH-HBc in the form of virus-like particles (VLP. Intranasal immunization of mice with this LAH-HBc VLP plus cholera toxin B subunit with 0.2% of cholera toxin (CTB* adjuvant could effectively elicit humoral and cellular immune responses and protect mice against a lethal challenge of homologous influenza viruses (A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8 (H1N1. In addition, passage of the immune sera containing specific antibodies to naïve mice rendered them resistant against a lethal homologous challenge. Immunization with LAH-HBc VLP vaccine plus CTB* adjuvant could also fully protect mice against a lethal challenge of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus or the avian H9N2 virus and could partially protect mice against a lethal challenge of the avian H5N1 influenza virus. This study demonstrated that the LAH-HBc VLP vaccine based on a conserved sequence of the HA trimmer stalk region is a promising candidate vaccine for developing a universal influenza vaccine against multiple influenza viruses infections.

  20. Decay properties of high-lying single-particles modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumel, D. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Fortier, S. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Gales, S. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Guillot, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Langevin-Joliot, H. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Laurent, H. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 -Orsay (France); Maison, J.M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Vernotte, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Bordewijck, J. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, 9747 Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, S. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, 9747 Groningen (Netherlands); Krasznahorkay, A. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, 9747 Groningen (Netherlands); Crawley, G.M. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Massolo, C.P. [Universitad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Renteria, M. [Universitad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Khendriche, A. [University of Tizi-Ouzou, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    1996-03-18

    The neutron decay of high-lying single-particle states in {sup 64}Ni, {sup 90}Zr, {sup 120}Sn and {sup 208}Pb excited by means of the ({alpha},{sup 3}He) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy using the multidetector EDEN. The characteristics of this reaction are studied using inclusive spectra and angular correlation analysis. The structure located between 11 and 15 MeV in {sup 91}Zr, and between 8 and 12 MeV excitation energy in {sup 209}Pb display large departures from a pure statistical decay. The corresponding non-statistical branching ratios are compared with the results of two theoretical calculations. (orig.).

  1. Classification using diffraction patterns for single-particle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hongli; Zhang, Kaiming [Department of Biophysics, the Health Science Centre, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Meng, Xing, E-mail: xmeng101@gmail.com [Wadsworth Centre, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York 12201 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    An alternative method has been assessed; diffraction patterns derived from the single particle data set were used to perform the first round of classification in creating the initial averages for proteins data with symmetrical morphology. The test protein set was a collection of Caenorhabditis elegans small heat shock protein 17 obtained by Cryo EM, which has a tetrahedral (12-fold) symmetry. It is demonstrated that the initial classification on diffraction patterns is workable as well as the real-space classification that is based on the phase contrast. The test results show that the information from diffraction patterns has the enough details to make the initial model faithful. The potential advantage using the alternative method is twofold, the ability to handle the sets with poor signal/noise or/and that break the symmetry properties. - Highlights: • New classification method. • Create the accurate initial model. • Better in handling noisy data.

  2. Classification using diffraction patterns for single-particle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hongli; Zhang, Kaiming; Meng, Xing

    2016-01-01

    An alternative method has been assessed; diffraction patterns derived from the single particle data set were used to perform the first round of classification in creating the initial averages for proteins data with symmetrical morphology. The test protein set was a collection of Caenorhabditis elegans small heat shock protein 17 obtained by Cryo EM, which has a tetrahedral (12-fold) symmetry. It is demonstrated that the initial classification on diffraction patterns is workable as well as the real-space classification that is based on the phase contrast. The test results show that the information from diffraction patterns has the enough details to make the initial model faithful. The potential advantage using the alternative method is twofold, the ability to handle the sets with poor signal/noise or/and that break the symmetry properties. - Highlights: • New classification method. • Create the accurate initial model. • Better in handling noisy data.

  3. Single image defogging based on particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fan; Zhou, Cong; Liu, Li-jue; Tang, Jin

    2017-11-01

    Due to the lack of enough information to solve the equation of image degradation model, existing defogging methods generally introduce some parameters and set these values fixed. Inappropriate parameter setting leads to difficulty in obtaining the best defogging results for different input foggy images. Therefore, a single image defogging algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) is proposed in this letter to adaptively and automatically select optimal parameter values for image defogging algorithms. The proposed method is applied to two representative defogging algorithms by selecting the two main parameters and optimizing them using the PSO algorithm. Comparative study and qualitative evaluation demonstrate that the better quality results are obtained by using the proposed parameter selection method.

  4. Search for single photons from supersymmetric particle production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, E.; Ford, W.T.; Qi, N.; Read A.L. Jr.; Smith, J.G.; Camporesi, T.; De Sangro, R.; Marini, A.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Ronga, F.; Blume, H.T.; Hurst, R.B.; Venuti, J.P.; Wald, H.B.; Weinstein, R.; Band, H.R.; Gettner, M.W.; Goderre, G.P.; Meyer, O.A.; Moromisato, J.H.; Polvado, R.O.; Shambroom, W.D.; Sleeman, J.C.; von Goeler, E.; Ash, W.W.; Chadwick, G.B.; Clearwater, S.H.; Coombes, R.W.; Kaye, H.S.; Lau, K.H.; Leedy, R.E.; Lynch, H.L.; Messner, R.L.; Moss, L.J.; Muller, F.; Nelson, H.N.; Ritson, D.M.; Rosenberg, L.J.; Wiser, D.E.; Zdarko, R.W.; Groom, D.E.; Lee, H.Y.; Delfino, M.C.; Heltsley, B.K.; Johnson, J.R.; Lavine, T.L.; Maruyama, T.; Prepost, R.

    1985-03-18

    A search in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation for final states which contain only a single energetic photon has been performed at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV with the MAC detector at PEP. The upper limit on an anomalous signal has been interpreted in terms of mass limits for supersymmetric particles under the assumption of radiative pair paroduction of either supersymmetric photons or neutrinos. For the supersymmetric electron (e) this limit is m/sub e/>37 GeV/c/sup 2/ at the 90% confidence level if M/sub e//sub L/ = m/sub e//sub R/ and the supersymmetric photo (gamma-tilde) has m/sub gamma-tilde/ = 0.

  5. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein B Requires a Cysteine Residue at Position 633 for Folding, Processing, and Incorporation into Mature Infectious Virus Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laquerre, Sylvie; Anderson, Dina B.; Argnani, Rafaela; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    1998-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB) resides in the virus envelope in an oligomeric form and plays an essential role in virus entry into susceptible host cells. The oligomerizing domain is a movable element consisting of amino acids 626 to 653 in the gB external domain. This domain contains a single cysteine residue at position 633 (Cys-633) that is predicted to form an intramolecular disulfide bridge with Cys-596. In this study, we examined gB oligomerization, processing, and incorporation into mature virus during infection by two mutant viruses in which either the gB Cys-633 [KgB(C633S)] or both Cys-633 and Cys-596 [KgB(C596S/C633S)] residues were mutated to serine. The result of immunofluorescence studies and analyses of released virus particles showed that the mutant gB molecules were not transported to the cell surface or incorporated into mature virus envelopes and thus infectious virus was not produced. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed that the mutant gB molecules were in an oligomeric configuration and that these mutants produced hetero-oligomers with a truncated form of gB consisting of residues 1 to 43 and 595 to 904, the latter containing the oligomerization domain. Pulse-chase experiments in combination with endoglycosidase H treatment determined that the mutant molecules were improperly processed, having been retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that the cysteine mutations resulted in gB misfolding and retention by the molecular chaperones calnexin, calreticulin, and Grp78 in the ER. The altered conformation of the gB mutant glycoproteins was directly detected by a reduction in monoclonal antibody recognition of two previously defined distinct antigenic sites located within residues 381 to 441 and 595 to 737. The misfolded molecules were not transported to the cell surface as hetero-oligomers with wild-type gB, suggesting that the conformational change could not be corrected by

  6. Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells exhibit dendritic cell stimulating activity and induce neutralizing antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Ling; Lin Jianguo; Sun Yuliang; Bennouna, Soumaya; Lo, Michael; Wu Qingyang; Bu Zhigao; Pulendran, Bali; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses (rBV) expressing Ebola virus VP40 (rBV-VP40) or GP (rBV-GP) proteins were generated. Infection of Sf9 insect cells by rBV-VP40 led to assembly and budding of filamentous particles from the cell surface as shown by electron microscopy. Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by coinfection of Sf9 cells with rBV-VP40 and rBV-GP, and incorporation of Ebola GP into VLPs was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Recombinant baculovirus infection of insect cells yielded high levels of VLPs, which were shown to stimulate cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells similar to VLPs produced in mammalian cells. The immunogenicity of Ebola VLPs produced in insect cells was evaluated by immunization of mice. Analysis of antibody responses showed that most of the GP-specific antibodies were of the IgG2a subtype, while no significant level of IgG1 subtype antibodies specific for GP was induced, indicating the induction of a Th1-biased immune response. Furthermore, sera from Ebola VLP immunized mice were able to block infection by Ebola GP pseudotyped HIV virus in a single round infection assay, indicating that a neutralizing antibody against the Ebola GP protein was induced. These results show that production of Ebola VLPs in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses represents a promising approach for vaccine development against Ebola virus infection

  7. Microphysical Properties of Single Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Grazia; Song, Young-Chul; Pereira, Kelly; Hamilton, Jacqueline; Topping, David; Reid, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) deriving from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can account for a substantial fraction of the overall atmospheric aerosol mass.[1] Therefore, the investigation of SOA microphysical properties is crucial to better comprehend their role in the atmospheric processes they are involved in. This works describes a single particle approach to accurately characterise the hygroscopic response, the optical properties and the gas-particle partitioning kinetics of water and semivolatile components for laboratory generated SOA. SOA was generated from the oxidation of different VOCs precursors (e.g. α-pinene, toluene) in a photo-chemical flow reactor, which consists of a temperature and relative humidity controlled 300 L polyvinyl fluoride bag. Known VOC, NOx and ozone concentrations are introduced in the chamber and UV irradiation is performed by means of a Hg pen-ray. SOA samples were collected with an electrical low pressure impactor, wrapped in aluminium foil and kept refrigerated at -20°C. SOA samples were extracted in a 1:1 water/methanol mixture. Single charged SOA particles were generated from the obtained solution using a microdispenser and confined within an electrodynamic balance (EDB), where they sit in a T (250-320 K) and RH (0-95%) controlled nitrogen flow. Suspended droplets are irradiated with a 532 nm laser and the evolving angularly resolved scattered light is used to keep track of changes in droplet size. One of the key features of this experimental approach is that very little SOA solution is required because of the small volumes needed to load the dispensers (evaporation kinetics experiments (CK-EDB) of suspended probe and sample droplets.[2] The variation of the refractive index of SOA droplets following to water or SVOCs evaporative loss was measured as a function of water activity by fitting the collected light scattering patterns with a generated Mie-Theory library of phase functions.[3] Long trapping

  8. Quantitative analysis of Nipah virus proteins released as virus-like particles reveals central role for the matrix protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eaton Bryan T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV is an emerging paramyxovirus distinguished by its ability to cause fatal disease in both animal and human hosts. Together with Hendra virus (HeV, they comprise the genus Henipavirus in the Paramyxoviridae family. NiV and HeV are also restricted to Biosafety Level-4 containment and this has hampered progress towards examining details of their replication and morphogenesis. Here, we have established recombinant expression systems to study NiV particle assembly and budding through the formation of virus-like particles (VLPs. Results When expressed by recombinant Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA or plasmid transfection, individual NiV matrix (M, fusion (F and attachment (G proteins were all released into culture supernatants in a membrane-associated state as determined by sucrose density gradient flotation and immunoprecipitation. However, co-expression of F and G along with M revealed a shift in their distribution across the gradient, indicating association with M in VLPs. Protein release was also altered depending on the context of viral proteins being expressed, with F, G and nucleocapsid (N protein reducing M release, and N release dependent on the co-expression of M. Immunoelectron microscopy and density analysis revealed VLPs that were similar to authentic virus. Differences in the budding dynamics of NiV proteins were also noted between rMVA and plasmid based strategies, suggesting that over-expression by poxvirus may not be appropriate for studying the details of recombinant virus particle assembly and release. Conclusion Taken together, the results indicate that NiV M, F, and G each possess some ability to bud from expressing cells, and that co-expression of these viral proteins results in a more organized budding process with M playing a central role. These findings will aid our understanding of paramyxovirus particle assembly in general and could help facilitate the development of a novel vaccine

  9. Structure and Assembly of Intracellular Mature Vaccinia Virus: Isolated-Particle Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Gareth; Wepf, Roger; Wendt, Thomas; Locker, Jacomine Krijnse; Cyrklaff, Marek; Roos, Norbert

    2001-01-01

    In a series of papers, we have provided evidence that during its assembly vaccinia virus is enveloped by a membrane cisterna that originates from a specialized, virally modified, smooth-membraned domain of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Recently, however, Hollinshead et al. (M. Hollinshead, A. Vanderplasschen, G. I. Smith, and D. J. Vaux, J. Virol. 73:1503–1517, 1999) argued against this hypothesis, based on their interpretations of thin-sectioned material. The present article is the first in a series of papers that describe a comprehensive electron microscopy (EM) analysis of the vaccinia Intracellular Mature Virus (IMV) and the process of its assembly in HeLa cells. In this first study, we analyzed the IMV by on-grid staining, cryo-scanning EM (SEM), and cryo-transmission EM. We focused on the structure of the IMV particle, both after isolation and in the context of viral entry. For the latter, we used high-resolution cryo-SEM combined with cryofixation, as well as a novel approach we developed for investigating vaccinia IMV bound to plasma membrane fragments adsorbed onto EM grids. Our analysis revealed that the IMV is made up of interconnected cisternal and tubular domains that fold upon themselves via a complex topology that includes an S-shaped fold. The viral tubules appear to be eviscerated from the particle during viral infection. Since the structure of the IMV is the result of a complex assembly process, we also provide a working model to explain how a specialized smooth-ER domain can be modulated to form the IMV. We also present theoretical arguments for why it is highly unlikely that the IMV is surrounded by only a single membrane. PMID:11602744

  10. A Single Amino Acid Change in the Marburg Virus Glycoprotein Arises during Serial Cell Culture Passages and Attenuates the Virus in a Macaque Model of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfson, Kendra J; Avena, Laura E; Delgado, Jenny; Beadles, Michael W; Patterson, Jean L; Carrion, Ricardo; Griffiths, Anthony

    2018-01-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) causes disease with high case fatality rates, and there are no approved vaccines or therapies. Licensing of MARV countermeasures will likely require approval via the FDA's Animal Efficacy Rule, which requires well-characterized animal models that recapitulate human disease. This includes selection of the virus used for exposure and ensuring that it retains the properties of the original isolate. The consequences of amplification of MARV for challenge studies are unknown. Here, we serially passaged and characterized MARV through 13 passes from the original isolate. Surprisingly, the viral genome was very stable, except for a single nucleotide change that resulted in an amino acid substitution in the hydrophobic region of the signal peptide of the glycoprotein (GP). The particle/PFU ratio also decreased following passages, suggesting a role for the amino acid in viral infectivity. To determine if amplification introduces a phenotype in an animal model, cynomolgus macaques were exposed to either 100 or 0.01 PFU of low- and high-passage-number MARV. All animals succumbed when exposed to 100 PFU of either passage 3 or 13 viruses, although animals exposed to the high-passage-number virus survived longer. However, none of the passage 13 MARV-exposed animals succumbed to 0.01-PFU exposure compared to 75% of passage 3-exposed animals. This is consistent with other filovirus studies that show some particles that are unable to yield a plaque in cell culture can cause lethal disease in vivo . These results have important consequences for the design of experiments that investigate MARV pathogenesis and that test the efficacy of MARV countermeasures. IMPORTANCE Marburg virus (MARV) causes disease with a high case fatality rate, and there are no approved vaccines or therapies. Serial amplification of viruses in cell culture often results in accumulation of mutations, but the effect of such cell culture passage on MARV is unclear. Serial passages of MARV

  11. Preparation of quadri-subtype influenza virus-like particles using bovine immunodeficiency virus gag protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretyakova, Irina; Hidajat, Rachmat; Hamilton, Garrett; Horn, Noah; Nickols, Brian; Prather, Raphael O. [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD (United States); Tumpey, Terrence M. [Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road N.E., Atlanta, GA (United States); Pushko, Peter, E-mail: ppushko@medigen-usa.com [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Influenza VLPs comprised of hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), and matrix (M1) proteins have been previously used for immunological and virological studies. Here we demonstrated that influenza VLPs can be made in Sf9 cells by using the bovine immunodeficiency virus gag (Bgag) protein in place of M1. We showed that Bgag can be used to prepare VLPs for several influenza subtypes including H1N1 and H10N8. Furthermore, by using Bgag, we prepared quadri-subtype VLPs, which co-expressed within the VLP the four HA subtypes derived from avian-origin H5N1, H7N9, H9N2 and H10N8 viruses. VLPs showed hemagglutination and neuraminidase activities and reacted with specific antisera. The content and co-localization of each HA subtype within the quadri-subtype VLP were evaluated. Electron microscopy showed that Bgag-based VLPs resembled influenza virions with the diameter of 150–200 nm. This is the first report of quadri-subtype design for influenza VLP and the use of Bgag for influenza VLP preparation. - Highlights: • BIV gag protein was configured as influenza VLP core component. • Recombinant influenza VLPs were prepared in Sf9 cells using baculovirus expression system. • Single- and quadri-subtype VLPs were prepared by using BIV gag as a VLP core. • Co-localization of H5, H7, H9, and H10 HA was confirmed within quadri-subtype VLP. • Content of HA subtypes within quadri-subtype VLP was determined. • Potential advantages of quadri-subtype VLPs as influenza vaccine are discussed.

  12. Preparation of quadri-subtype influenza virus-like particles using bovine immunodeficiency virus gag protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tretyakova, Irina; Hidajat, Rachmat; Hamilton, Garrett; Horn, Noah; Nickols, Brian; Prather, Raphael O.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Pushko, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Influenza VLPs comprised of hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), and matrix (M1) proteins have been previously used for immunological and virological studies. Here we demonstrated that influenza VLPs can be made in Sf9 cells by using the bovine immunodeficiency virus gag (Bgag) protein in place of M1. We showed that Bgag can be used to prepare VLPs for several influenza subtypes including H1N1 and H10N8. Furthermore, by using Bgag, we prepared quadri-subtype VLPs, which co-expressed within the VLP the four HA subtypes derived from avian-origin H5N1, H7N9, H9N2 and H10N8 viruses. VLPs showed hemagglutination and neuraminidase activities and reacted with specific antisera. The content and co-localization of each HA subtype within the quadri-subtype VLP were evaluated. Electron microscopy showed that Bgag-based VLPs resembled influenza virions with the diameter of 150–200 nm. This is the first report of quadri-subtype design for influenza VLP and the use of Bgag for influenza VLP preparation. - Highlights: • BIV gag protein was configured as influenza VLP core component. • Recombinant influenza VLPs were prepared in Sf9 cells using baculovirus expression system. • Single- and quadri-subtype VLPs were prepared by using BIV gag as a VLP core. • Co-localization of H5, H7, H9, and H10 HA was confirmed within quadri-subtype VLP. • Content of HA subtypes within quadri-subtype VLP was determined. • Potential advantages of quadri-subtype VLPs as influenza vaccine are discussed.

  13. Microstructure of atmospheric particles revealed by TXM and a new mode of influenza virus transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, L.M., E-mail: baoliangman@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang, G.L., E-mail: zhangguilin@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Lei, Q.T.; Li, Y.; Li, X.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Hwu, Y.K. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Yi, J.M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne 60439 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    For control of influenza, firstly it is important to find the real virus transmission media. Atmospheric aerosol particles are presumably one of the media. In this study, three typical atmospheric inhaled particles in Shanghai were studied by the synchrotron based transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM). Three dimensional microstructure of the particles reveals that there are many pores contained in, particularly the coal combustion fly particles which may be possible virus carrier. The particles can transport over long distance and cause long-range infections due to its light weight. We suggest a mode which is droplet combining with aerosol mode. By this mode the transmission of global and pandemic influenzas and infection between inland avian far from population and poultry or human living in cities along coast may be explained.

  14. Microstructure of atmospheric particles revealed by TXM and a new mode of influenza virus transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, L.M.; Zhang, G.L.; Lei, Q.T.; Li, Y.; Li, X.L.; Hwu, Y.K.; Yi, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    For control of influenza, firstly it is important to find the real virus transmission media. Atmospheric aerosol particles are presumably one of the media. In this study, three typical atmospheric inhaled particles in Shanghai were studied by the synchrotron based transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM). Three dimensional microstructure of the particles reveals that there are many pores contained in, particularly the coal combustion fly particles which may be possible virus carrier. The particles can transport over long distance and cause long-range infections due to its light weight. We suggest a mode which is droplet combining with aerosol mode. By this mode the transmission of global and pandemic influenzas and infection between inland avian far from population and poultry or human living in cities along coast may be explained

  15. Mass spectra features of biomass burning boiler and coal burning boiler emitted particles by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiao; Li, Mei; Shi, Guoliang; Wang, Haiting; Ma, Xian; Wu, Jianhui; Shi, Xurong; Feng, Yinchang

    2017-11-15

    In this study, single particle mass spectra signatures of both coal burning boiler and biomass burning boiler emitted particles were studied. Particle samples were suspended in clean Resuspension Chamber, and analyzed by ELPI and SPAMS simultaneously. The size distribution of BBB (biomass burning boiler sample) and CBB (coal burning boiler sample) are different, as BBB peaks at smaller size, and CBB peaks at larger size. Mass spectra signatures of two samples were studied by analyzing the average mass spectrum of each particle cluster extracted by ART-2a in different size ranges. In conclusion, BBB sample mostly consists of OC and EC containing particles, and a small fraction of K-rich particles in the size range of 0.2-0.5μm. In 0.5-1.0μm, BBB sample consists of EC, OC, K-rich and Al_Silicate containing particles; CBB sample consists of EC, ECOC containing particles, while Al_Silicate (including Al_Ca_Ti_Silicate, Al_Ti_Silicate, Al_Silicate) containing particles got higher fractions as size increase. The similarity of single particle mass spectrum signatures between two samples were studied by analyzing the dot product, results indicated that part of the single particle mass spectra of two samples in the same size range are similar, which bring challenge to the future source apportionment activity by using single particle aerosol mass spectrometer. Results of this study will provide physicochemical information of important sources which contribute to particle pollution, and will support source apportionment activities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Chimeric plant virus particles administered nasally or orally induce systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brennan, F.R.; Bellaby, T.; Helliwell, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The humoral immune responses to the D2 peptide of fibronectin-binding protein B (FnBP) of Staphylococcus aureus, expressed on the plant virus cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), were evaluated after mucosal delivery to mice. Intranasal immunization of these chimeric virus particles (CVPs), either alone o...... demonstrate for the first time that recombinant plant viruses have potential as mucosal vaccines without the requirement for adjuvant and that the nasal route is most effective for the delivery of these nonreplicating particles....... or in the presence of ISCOM matrix, primed CPMV-specific T cells and generated high titers of CPMV- and FnBP-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in sera. Furthermore, CPMV- and FnBP-specific IgA and IgG could also be detected in the bronchial, intestinal, and vaginal lavage fluids, highlighting the ability of CVPs...

  17. Real-Time Measurement of Fluorescence Spectra From Single Airborne Biological Particles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Steven

    1999-01-01

    ... (total and spectrally dispersed) of individual airborne particles, and describe our present system, which can measure fluorescence spectra or single micrometer-sized bioaerosol particles with good signal-to-noise ratios...

  18. Universal large deviations for the tagged particle in single-file motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Chaitra; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Dhar, Abhishek

    2014-09-19

    We consider a gas of point particles moving in a one-dimensional channel with a hard-core interparticle interaction that prevents particle crossings--this is called single-file motion. Starting from equilibrium initial conditions we observe the motion of a tagged particle. It is well known that if the individual particle dynamics is diffusive, then the tagged particle motion is subdiffusive, while for ballistic particle dynamics, the tagged particle motion is diffusive. Here we compute the exact large deviation function for the tagged particle displacement and show that this is universal, independent of the individual dynamics.

  19. Virus-like particle secretion and genotype-dependent immunogenicity of dengue virus serotype 2 DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galula, Jedhan U; Shen, Wen-Fan; Chuang, Shih-Te; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Chao, Day-Yu

    2014-09-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), composed of four distinct serotypes, is the most important and rapidly emerging arthropod-borne pathogen and imposes substantial economic and public health burdens. We constructed candidate vaccines containing the DNA of five of the genotypes of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and evaluated the immunogenicity, the neutralizing (Nt) activity of the elicited antibodies, and the protective efficacy elicited in mice immunized with the vaccine candidates. We observed a significant correlation between the level of in vitro virus-like particle secretion, the elicited antibody response, and the protective efficacy of the vaccines containing the DNA of the different DENV genotypes in immunized mice. However, higher total IgG antibody levels did not always translate into higher Nt antibodies against homologous and heterologous viruses. We also found that, in contrast to previous reports, more than 50% of total IgG targeted ectodomain III (EDIII) of the E protein, and a substantial fraction of this population was interdomain highly neutralizing flavivirus subgroup-cross-reactive antibodies, such as monoclonal antibody 1B7-5. In addition, the lack of a critical epitope(s) in the Sylvatic genotype virus recognized by interdomain antibodies could be the major cause of the poor protection of mice vaccinated with the Asian 1 genotype vaccine (pVD2-Asian 1) from lethal challenge with virus of the Sylvatic genotype. In conclusion, although the pVD2-Asian 1 vaccine was immunogenic, elicited sufficient titers of Nt antibodies against all DENV-2 genotypes, and provided 100% protection against challenge with virus of the homologous Asian 1 genotype and virus of the heterologous Cosmopolitan genotype, it is critical to monitor the potential emergence of Sylvatic genotype viruses, since vaccine candidates under development may not protect vaccinated humans from these viruses. Five genotype-specific dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) DNA vaccine candidates were

  20. The single-particle microbeam facility at CEA-Saclay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodja, H. [DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); CNRS, UMR9956, Laboratoire Pierre Suee, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)], E-mail: hicham.khodja@cea.fr; Hanot, M.; Carriere, M.; Hoarau, J. [DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); CNRS, UMR9956, Laboratoire Pierre Suee, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Angulo, J.F. [DSV, IRCM, SRO, Laboratoire de Genetique de la Radiosensibilite, F-92265 Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2009-06-15

    Low dose and non-targeted effect studies continue to attract the attention of a growing number of radiobiologists. Experimental setups based on light ion microbeams constitute a tool of choice for this kind of investigations. However, a careful attention must be given to experimental conditions, as setup-induced stress levels should be well below those induced by the irradiation itself. Here, we present the current status of the single-particle microbeam facility that has been developed these last years at the nuclear microprobe of Saclay. The driving idea was to build a facility in which local irradiation studies are performed in an environment close to cellular biology standards. This facility includes unique features, such as (i) a compact setup that allows easy access and vertical irradiation mode, (ii) a collimated beam that can be mechanically positioned under the desired cells at a very fast speed, avoiding the requirement of a focusing element and (iii) a controlled environment (temperature, CO{sub 2}, humidity) that allows performing of very long term experiments on cultured cells. Fluorescent techniques are implemented and permit in situ monitoring of cellular responses to irradiations. Several radiobiological studies are already underway and this will be illustrated with recent results regarding DNA damage and reactive oxygen species signaling time courses following targeted irradiations.

  1. Production of FMDV virus-like particles by a SUMO fusion protein approach in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Shu-Mei

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virus-like particles (VLPs are formed by the self-assembly of envelope and/or capsid proteins from many viruses. Some VLPs have been proven successful as vaccines, and others have recently found applications as carriers for foreign antigens or as scaffolds in nanoparticle biotechnology. However, production of VLP was usually impeded due to low water-solubility of recombinant virus capsid proteins. Previous studies revealed that virus capsid and envelope proteins were often posttranslationally modified by SUMO in vivo, leading into a hypothesis that SUMO modification might be a common mechanism for virus proteins to retain water-solubility or prevent improper self-aggregation before virus assembly. We then propose a simple approach to produce VLPs of viruses, e.g., foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV. An improved SUMO fusion protein system we developed recently was applied to the simultaneous expression of three capsid proteins of FMDV in E. coli. The three SUMO fusion proteins formed a stable heterotrimeric complex. Proteolytic removal of SUMO moieties from the ternary complexes resulted in VLPs with size and shape resembling the authentic FMDV. The method described here can also apply to produce capsid/envelope protein complexes or VLPs of other disease-causing viruses.

  2. Mathematical modelling of the combustion of a single wood particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porteiro, J.; Miguez, J.L.; Granada, E.; Moran, J.C. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Maquinas y Motores Termicos y Fluidos. Universidad de Vigo, Lagoas Marcosende 9 36200 Vigo (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    A mathematical model describing the thermal degradation of densified biomass particles is presented here. The model uses a novel discretisation scheme and combines intra-particle combustion processes with extra-particle transport processes, thereby including thermal and diffusional control mechanisms. The influence of structural changes on the physical-thermal properties of wood in its different stages is studied together with shrinkage of the particle during its degradation. The model is used to compare the predicted data with data on the mass loss dynamics and internal temperature of several particles from previous works and relevant literature, with good agreement. (author)

  3. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Single-Particle Subcellular Irradiations at the MIT Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-01-01

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube

  4. Novel adenovirus encoded virus-like particles displaying the placental malaria associated VAR2CSA antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anne-Marie C; dos Santos Marques Resende, Mafalda; Salanti, Ali

    2017-01-01

    and the CSA binding region of VAR2CSA has been identified as a promising vaccine target against placental malaria. Here we designed adenovirus encoded virus-like particles (VLP) by co-encoding Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) gag and VAR2CSA. The VAR2CSA antigen was fused to the transmembrane (TM...... revealed a unique targeting of several epitopes in mice that had been primed with VAR2CSA HA TM-CT. Consequently, modification of VLP anchors is an important point of optimization in virus-encoded retroviral VLP-based vaccines, and adenovirus VLPs boosted by recombinant proteins offer hope of increasing...

  5. Three-dimensional visualization of forming Hepatitis C virus-like particles by electron-tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badia-Martinez, Daniel; Peralta, Bibiana; Andrés, German; Guerra, Milagros; Gil-Carton, David; Abrescia, Nicola G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus infects almost 170 million people per year but its assembly pathway, architecture and the structures of its envelope proteins are poorly understood. Using electron tomography of plastic-embedded sections of insect cells, we have visualized the morphogenesis of recombinant Hepatitis C virus-like particles. Our data provide a three-dimensional sketch of viral assembly at the endoplasmic reticulum showing different budding stages and contiguity of buds. This latter phenomenon could play an important role during the assembly of wt-HCV and explain the size-heterogeneity of its particles.

  6. Three-dimensional visualization of forming Hepatitis C virus-like particles by electron-tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badia-Martinez, Daniel; Peralta, Bibiana [Structural Biology Unit, CIC bioGUNE, CIBERehd, 48160 Derio (Spain); Andres, German; Guerra, Milagros [Electron Microscopy Unit, Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa, CSIC-UAM, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gil-Carton, David [Structural Biology Unit, CIC bioGUNE, CIBERehd, 48160 Derio (Spain); Abrescia, Nicola G.A., E-mail: nabrescia@cicbiogune.es [Structural Biology Unit, CIC bioGUNE, CIBERehd, 48160 Derio (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2012-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus infects almost 170 million people per year but its assembly pathway, architecture and the structures of its envelope proteins are poorly understood. Using electron tomography of plastic-embedded sections of insect cells, we have visualized the morphogenesis of recombinant Hepatitis C virus-like particles. Our data provide a three-dimensional sketch of viral assembly at the endoplasmic reticulum showing different budding stages and contiguity of buds. This latter phenomenon could play an important role during the assembly of wt-HCV and explain the size-heterogeneity of its particles.

  7. Plant-derived chimeric virus particles for the diagnosis of primary Sjögren syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eTinazzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants are ideal for the production of protein-based nanomaterials because they synthesize and assemble complex multimeric proteins that cannot be expressed efficiently using other platforms. Plant viruses can be thought of as self-replicating proteinaceous nanomaterials generally stable and easily produced in high titers. We used Potato virus X (PVX chimeric virus particles (CVPs and Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV empty virus-like particles (eVLPs to display a linear peptide (lipo derived from human lipocalin , which is immunodominant in Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS and is thus recognized by autoantibodies in SjS patient serum. These virus-derived nanoparticles (VNPs were thus used to develop a diagnostic assay for SjS based on a direct enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA format. We found that PVX-lipo formulations were more sensitive than the chemically synthesized immunodominant peptide and equally specific when used to distinguish between healthy individuals and SjS patients. Our novel assay therefore allows the diagnosis of SjS using a simple, low-invasive serum test, contrasting with the invasive labial biopsy required for current tests. Our results demonstrate that nanomaterials based on plant viruses can be used as diagnostic reagents for SjS, and could also be developed for the diagnosis of other diseases.

  8. Plant-Derived Chimeric Virus Particles for the Diagnosis of Primary Sjögren Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinazzi, Elisa; Merlin, Matilde; Bason, Caterina; Beri, Ruggero; Zampieri, Roberta; Lico, Chiara; Bartoloni, Elena; Puccetti, Antonio; Lunardi, Claudio; Pezzotti, Mario; Avesani, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Plants are ideal for the production of protein-based nanomaterials because they synthesize and assemble complex multimeric proteins that cannot be expressed efficiently using other platforms. Plant viruses can be thought of as self-replicating proteinaceous nanomaterials generally stable and easily produced in high titers. We used Potato virus X (PVX), chimeric virus particles, and Cowpea mosaic virus, empty virus-like particles to display a linear peptide (lipo) derived from human lipocalin, which is immunodominant in Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) and is thus recognized by autoantibodies in SjS patient serum. These virus-derived nanoparticles were thus used to develop a diagnostic assay for SjS based on a direct enzyme linked immunosorbent assay format. We found that PVX-lipo formulations were more sensitive than the chemically synthesized immunodominant peptide and equally specific when used to distinguish between healthy individuals and SjS patients. Our novel assay therefore allows the diagnosis of SjS using a simple, low-invasive serum test, contrasting with the invasive labial biopsy required for current tests. Our results demonstrate that nanomaterials based on plant viruses can be used as diagnostic reagents for SjS, and could also be developed for the diagnosis of other diseases.

  9. Single-particle Analyses of Compositions, Morphology, and Viscosity of Aerosol Particles Collected During GoAmazon2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, K.; Gong, Z.; Bateman, A. P.; Martin, S. T.; Cirino, G. G.; Artaxo, P.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Single-particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles collected during the GoAmazon2014 campaign. These TEM results indicate aerosol types and mixing states, both of which are important for evaluating particle optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity. The samples were collected at the T3 site, which is located in the Amazon forest with influences from the urban pollution plume from Manaus. Samples were also collected from the T0 site, which is in the middle of the jungle with minimal to no influences of anthropogenic sources. The aerosol particles mainly originated from 1) anthropogenic pollution (e.g., nanosphere soot, sulfate), 2) biogenic emissions (e.g., primary biogenic particles, organic aerosols), and 3) long-range transport (e.g., sea salts). We found that the biogenic organic aerosol particles contain homogeneously distributed potassium. Particle viscosity is important for evaluating gas-particle interactions and atmospheric chemistry for the particles. Viscosity can be estimated from the rebounding behavior at controlled relative humidities, i.e., highly viscous particles display less rebound on a plate than low-viscosity particles. We collected 1) aerosol particles from a plate (non-rebounded), 2) those that had rebounded from the plate and were then captured onto an adjacent sampling plate, and 3) particles from ambient air using a separate impactor sampler. Preliminary results show that more than 90% of non-rebounded particles consisted of nanosphere soot with or without coatings. The coatings mostly consisted of organic matter. Although rebounded particles also contain nanosphere soot (number fraction 64-69%), they were mostly internally mixed with sulfate, organic matter, or their mixtures. TEM tilted images suggested that the rebounded particles were less deformed on the substrate, whereas the non-rebounded particles were more deformed, which could

  10. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  11. Experimental Study on Effects of Particle Shape and Operating Conditions on Combustion Characteristics of Single Biomass Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momeni, M.; Yin, Chungen; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the ignition, devolatilization, and burnout of single biomass particles of various shapes and sizes under process conditions that are similar to those in an industrial combustor. A chargecoupled device (CCD) camera is used to record the whole...... combustion process. For the particles with similar volume (mass), cylindrical particles are found to lose mass faster than spherical particles and the burnout time is shortened by increasing the particle aspect ratio (surface area). The conversion times of cylindrical particles with almost the same surface...... area/volume ratio are very close to each other. The ignition, devolatilization, and burnout times of cylindrical particles are also affected by the oxidizer temperature and oxygen concentration, in which the oxygen concentration is found to have a more pronounced effect on the conversion times at lower...

  12. Engineering RNA phage MS2 virus-like particles for peptide display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Sheldon Keith

    Phage display is a powerful and versatile technology that enables the selection of novel binding functions from large populations of randomly generated peptide sequences. Random sequences are genetically fused to a viral structural protein to produce complex peptide libraries. From a sufficiently complex library, phage bearing peptides with practically any desired binding activity can be physically isolated by affinity selection, and, since each particle carries in its genome the genetic information for its own replication, the selectants can be amplified by infection of bacteria. For certain applications however, existing phage display platforms have limitations. One such area is in the field of vaccine development, where the goal is to identify relevant epitopes by affinity-selection against an antibody target, and then to utilize them as immunogens to elicit a desired antibody response. Today, affinity selection is usually conducted using display on filamentous phages like M13. This technology provides an efficient means for epitope identification, but, because filamentous phages do not display peptides in the high-density, multivalent arrays the immune system prefers to recognize, they generally make poor immunogens and are typically useless as vaccines. This makes it necessary to confer immunogenicity by conjugating synthetic versions of the peptides to more immunogenic carriers. Unfortunately, when introduced into these new structural environments, the epitopes often fail to elicit relevant antibody responses. Thus, it would be advantageous to combine the epitope selection and immunogen functions into a single platform where the structural constraints present during affinity selection can be preserved during immunization. This dissertation describes efforts to develop a peptide display system based on the virus-like particles (VLPs) of bacteriophage MS2. Phage display technologies rely on (1) the identification of a site in a viral structural protein that is

  13. Raman Spectroscopy of Optically Trapped Single Biological Micro-Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Redding

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The combination of optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for the study, characterization, and identification of biological micro-particles. In essence, optical trapping helps to overcome the limitation imposed by the relative inefficiency of the Raman scattering process. This allows Raman spectroscopy to be applied to individual biological particles in air and in liquid, providing the potential for particle identification with high specificity, longitudinal studies of changes in particle composition, and characterization of the heterogeneity of individual particles in a population. In this review, we introduce the techniques used to integrate Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping in order to study individual biological particles in liquid and air. We then provide an overview of some of the most promising applications of this technique, highlighting the unique types of measurements enabled by the combination of Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping. Finally, we present a brief discussion of future research directions in the field.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr: oligomerization is an essential feature for its incorporation into virus particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein-Seetharaman Judith

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV-1 Vpr, a nonstructural viral protein associated with virus particles, has a positive role in the efficient transport of PIC into the nucleus of non-dividing target cells and enhances virus replication in primary T cells. Vpr is a 96 amino acid protein and the structure by NMR shows three helical domains. Vpr has been shown to exist as dimers and higher order oligomers. Considering the multifunctional nature of Vpr, the contribution of distinct helical domains to the dimer/oligomer structure of Vpr and the relevance of this feature to its functions are not clear. To address this, we have utilized molecular modeling approaches to identify putative models of oligomerization. The predicted interface residues were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis and evaluated their role in intermolecular interaction and virion incorporation. The interaction between Vpr molecules was monitored by Bimolecular Fluorescence complementation (BiFC method. The results show that Vpr forms oligomers in live cells and residues in helical domains play critical roles in oligomerization. Interestingly, Vpr molecules defective in oligomerization also fail to incorporate into the virus particles. Based on the data, we suggest that oligomerization of Vpr is essential for virion incorporation property and may also have a role in the events associated with virus infection.

  15. Heterologous Gene Expression from Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Replicon Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Kristopher M.; Yount, Boyd; Baric, Ralph S.

    2002-01-01

    We have recently isolated a transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) infectious construct designated TGEV 1000 (B. Yount, K. M. Curtis, and R. S. Baric, J. Virol. 74:10600–10611, 2000). Using this construct, a recombinant TGEV was constructed that replaced open reading frame (ORF) 3A with a heterologous gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP). Following transfection of baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, a recombinant TGEV (TGEV-GFP2) was isolated that replicated efficiently and expresse...

  16. Single particle dynamics and nonlinear resonances in circular accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to single particle dynamics in circular accelerators with an emphasis on nonlinear resonances. We begin with the Hamiltonian and the equations of motion in the neighborhood of the design orbit. In the linear theory this yields linear betatron oscillations about a closed orbit. It is useful then to introduce the action-angle variables of the linear problem. Next we discuss the nonlinear terms which are present in an actual accelerator, and in particular, we motivate the inclusion of sextupoles to cure chromatic effects. To study the effects of the nonlinear terms, we next discuss canonical perturbation theory which leads us to nonlinear resonances. After showing a few examples of perturbation theory, we abandon it when very close to a resonance. This leads to the study of an isolated resonance in one degree of freedom with a 'time'-dependent Hamiltonian. We see the familiar resonance structure in phase space which is simply closed islands when the nonlinear amplitude dependence of the frequency or 'tune' is included. To show the limits of the validity of the isolated resonance approximation, we discuss two criteria for the onset of chaotic motion. Finally, we study an isolated coupling resonance in two degrees of freedom with a 'time'-dependent Hamiltonian and calculate the two invariants in this case. This leads to a surface of section which is a 2-torus in 4-dimensional phase space. However, we show that it remains a 2-torus when projected into particular 3-dimensional subspaces, and thus can be viewed in perspective

  17. Considerations of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion in single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Koon-Sing; Lui, Kwok-On; Lee, Kin-Ho; Chan, Wing-Tat, E-mail: wtchan@hku.hk

    2013-11-01

    The intensity of individual gold nanoparticles with nominal diameters of 80, 100, 150, and 200 nm was measured using single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Since the particles are not perfectly monodisperse, a distribution of ICP-MS intensity was obtained for each nominal diameter. The distribution of particle mass was determined from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of the particles. The distribution of ICP-MS intensity and the distribution of particle mass for each nominal diameter were correlated to give a calibration curve. The calibration curves are linear, but the slope decreases as the nominal diameter increases. The reduced slope is probably due to a smaller degree of vaporization of the large particles. In addition to the degree of particle vaporization, the rate of analyte diffusion in the ICP is an important factor that determines the measured ICP-MS intensity. Simulated ICP-MS intensity versus particle size was calculated using a simple computer program that accounts for the vaporization rate of the gold nanoparticles and the diffusion rate and degree of ionization of the gold atoms. The curvature of the simulated calibration curves changes with sampling depth because the effects of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion on the ICP-MS intensity are dependent on the residence time of the particle in the ICP. Calibration curves of four hypothetical particles representing the four combinations of high and low boiling points (2000 and 4000 K) and high and low analyte diffusion rates (atomic masses of 10 and 200 Da) were calculated to further illustrate the relative effects of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion. The simulated calibration curves show that the sensitivity of single-particle ICP-MS is smaller than that of the ICP-MS measurement of continuous flow of standard solutions by a factor of 2 or more. Calibration using continuous flow of standard solution is semi-quantitative at best. An

  18. Long-term protective immunity from an influenza virus-like particle vaccine administered with a microneedle patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Fu-Shi; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Song, Jae-Min; Hwang, Hye Suk; Compans, Richard W; Prausnitz, Mark R; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2013-09-01

    Skin vaccination with influenza virus-like particles (VLPs) using microneedles has been shown to induce protection similar to or better than that induced by intramuscular immunization. In this study, we examined the long-term protective efficacy of influenza (H1N1 A/PR/8/34) VLPs after skin vaccination using microneedle patches coated with the vaccine. Microneedle vaccination of mice in the skin induced 100% protection against lethal challenge infection with influenza A/PR/8/34 virus 14 months after a single vaccine dose. Influenza virus-specific total IgG response and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers were maintained at high levels for over 1 year after microneedle vaccination. Microneedle vaccination also induced substantial levels of lung IgG and IgA antibody responses, and antibody-secreting plasma cells from spleen and bone marrow, as well as conferring effective control of lung viral loads, resulting in complete protection 14 months after vaccination. These strong and long-lasting immune responses were enabled in part by stabilization of the vaccine by formulation with trehalose during microneedle patch fabrication. Administration of the stabilized vaccine using microneedles was especially effective at enabling strong recall responses measured 4 days after lethal virus challenge, including increased HAI and antibody-secreting cells in the spleen and reduced viral titer and inflammatory response in the lung. The results in this study indicate that skin vaccination with VLP vaccine using a microneedle patch provides long-term protection against influenza in mice.

  19. Haemagglutinin and nucleoprotein replicon particle vaccination of swine protects against the pandemic H1N1 2009 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Veen, R L; Mogler, M A; Russell, B J; Loynachan, A T; Harris, D L H; Kamrud, K I

    2013-10-12

    The recent emergence of the pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) and H3N2 variant influenza A viruses (IAV) in 2009 and 2011-2012, respectively, highlight the zoonotic potential of influenza viruses and the need for vaccines capable of eliciting heterosubtypic protection. In these studies, single-cycle, propagation-defective replicon particle (RP) vaccines expressing IAV haemagglutinin (HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) genes were constructed and efficacy was evaluated in homologous and heterologous pig challenge studies with the pH1N1 2009 influenza virus (A/California/04/2009). Homologous HA RP vaccination eliminated virus shedding and decreased pulmonary pathology in pigs following pH1N1 2009 challenge. An RP vaccine expressing an H3N2-derived NP gene was able to decrease nasal shedding and viral load following heterosubtypic pH1N1 2009 challenge in pigs. These studies indicate that although homologous vaccination of swine remains the most effective means of preventing IAV infection, other vaccine alternatives do offer a level of heterosubtypic protection, and should continue to be evaluated for their ability to provide broader protection.

  20. Single particle aerosol mass spectrometry of coal combustion particles associated with high lung cancer rates in Xuanwei and Fuyuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Senlin; Tan, Zhengying; Liu, Pinwei; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Dingyu; Yu, Shang; Cheng, Ping; Win, Myat Sandar; Hu, Jiwen; Tian, Linwei; Wu, Minghong; Yonemochi, Shinich; Wang, Qingyue

    2017-11-01

    Coal combustion particles (CCPs) are linked to the high incidence of lung cancer in Xuanwei and in Fuyuan, China, but studies on the chemical composition of the CCPs are still limited. Single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was recently developed to measure the chemical composition and size of single particles in real-time. In this study, SPAMS was used to measure individual combustion particles emitted from Xuanwei and Fuyuan coal samples and the results were compared with those by ICP-MS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The total of 38,372 particles mass-analyzed by SPAMS can be divided into 9 groups based on their chemical composition and their number percentages: carbonaceous, Na-rich, K-rich, Al-rich, Fe-rich, Si-rich, Ca-rich, heavy metal-bearing, and PAH-bearing particles. The carbonaceous and PAH-bearing particles are enriched in the size range below 0.56 μm, Fe-bearing particles range from 0.56 to 1.0 μm in size, and heavy metals such as Ti, V, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Pb have diameters below 1 μm. The TEM results show that the particles from Xuanwei and Fuyuan coal combustion can be classified into soot aggregates, Fe-rich particles, heavy metal containing particles, and mineral particles. Non-volatile particles detected by SPAMS could also be observed with TEM. The number percentages by SPAMS also correlate with the mass concentrations measured by ICP-MS. Our results could provide valuable insight for understanding high lung cancer incidence in the area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A virus-like particle vaccine candidate for influenza A virus based on multiple conserved antigens presented on hepatitis B tandem core particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Alejandro; Morris, Stephen; Maucourant, Sophie; D'Ascanio, Isabella; Crescente, Vincenzo; Lu, I-Na; Farinelle, Sophie; Muller, Claude P; Whelan, Michael; Rosenberg, William

    2018-02-01

    Existing Influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines target variable parts of the virus that may change between seasons. Vaccine design relies on predicting the predominant circulating influenza strains but when there is a mismatch between vaccine and circulating strains, efficacy is sub-optimal. Furthermore, current approaches provide limited protection against emerging influenza strains that may cause pandemics. One solution is to design vaccines that target conserved protein domains of influenza, which remain largely unchanged over time and are likely to be found in emergent variants. We present a virus-like particle (VLP), built using the hepatitis B virus tandem core platform, as an IAV vaccine candidate containing multiple conserved antigens. Hepatitis B core protein spontaneously assembles into a VLP that is immunogenic and confers immunogenicity to proteins incorporated into the major insertion region (MIR) of core monomers. However, insertion of antigen sequences may disrupt particle assembly preventing VLP formation or result in unstable particles. We have overcome these problems by genetically manipulating the hepatitis B core to express core monomers in tandem, ligated with a flexible linker, incorporating different antigens at each of the MIRs. Immunisation with this VLP, named Tandiflu1, containing 4 conserved antigens from matrix protein 2 ectodomain and hemagglutinin stalk, leads to production of cross-reactive and protective antibodies. The polyclonal antibodies induced by Tandiflu1 can bind IAV Group 1 hemagglutinin types H1, H5, H11, H9, H16 and a conserved epitope on matrix protein 2 expressed by most strains of IAV. Vaccination with Tandiflu1 results in 100% protection from a lethal influenza challenge with H1N1 IAV. Serum transfer from vaccinated animals is sufficient to confer protection from influenza-associated illness in naïve mice. These data suggest that a Tandem Core based IAV vaccine might provide broad protection against common and emergent H1

  2. Real time analysis of lead-containing atmospheric particles in Beijing during springtime by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Li, Mei; Huang, Zhengxu; Li, Lei; Gao, Wei; Nian, Huiqing; Zou, Lilin; Fu, Zhong; Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-07-01

    Using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS), the chemical composition and size distributions of lead (Pb)-containing particles with diameter from 0.1 μm to 2.0 μm in Beijing were analyzed in the spring of 2011 during clear, hazy, and dusty days. Based on mass spectral features of particles, cluster analysis was applied to Pb-containing particles, and six major classes were acquired consisting of K-rich, carboneous, Fe-rich, dust, Pb-rich, and Cl-rich particles. Pb-containing particles accounted for 4.2-5.3%, 21.8-22.7%, and 3.2% of total particle number during clear, hazy and dusty days, respectively. K-rich particles are a major contribution to Pb-containing particles, varying from 30.8% to 82.1% of total number of Pb-containing particles, lowest during dusty days and highest during hazy days. The results reflect that the chemical composition and amount of Pb-containing particles has been affected by meteorological conditions as well as the emissions of natural and anthropogenic sources. K-rich particles and carbonaceous particles could be mainly assigned to the emissions of coal combustion. Other classes of Pb-containing particles may be associated with metallurgical processes, coal combustion, dust, and waste incineration etc. In addition, Pb-containing particles during dusty days were first time studied by SPAMS. This method could provide a powerful tool for monitoring and controlling of Pb pollution in real time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Samanbir; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for

  4. Visualization of the African swine fever virus infection in living cells by incorporation into the virus particle of green fluorescent protein-p54 membrane protein chimera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernaez, Bruno; Escribano, Jose M.; Alonso, Covadonga

    2006-01-01

    Many stages of African swine fever virus infection have not yet been studied in detail. To track the behavior of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in the infected cells in real time, we produced an infectious recombinant ASFV (B54GFP-2) that expresses and incorporates into the virus particle a chimera of the p54 envelope protein fused to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The incorporation of the fusion protein into the virus particle was confirmed immunologically and it was determined that p54-EGFP was fully functional by confirmation that the recombinant virus made normal-sized plaques and presented similar growth curves to the wild-type virus. The tagged virus was visualized as individual fluorescent particles during the first stages of infection and allowed to visualize the infection progression in living cells through the viral life cycle by confocal microscopy. In this work, diverse potential applications of B54GFP-2 to study different aspects of ASFV infection are shown. By using this recombinant virus it was possible to determine the trajectory and speed of intracellular virus movement. Additionally, we have been able to visualize for first time the ASFV factory formation dynamics and the cytophatic effect of the virus in live infected cells. Finally, we have analyzed virus progression along the infection cycle and infected cell death as time-lapse animations

  5. T-body formation precedes virus-like particle maturation in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malagon, Francisco; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2011-01-01

    T-bodies are localized S. cerevisiae RNPs containing Ty1 retroviral components and speculated to play a role in the assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs). Mapping requirements for T-body formation, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of immature TyA1/Gag (Gag-p49), a structural component of ...

  6. Selective flocculation and precipitation for the improvement of virus-like particle recovery from yeast homogenate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsoka, S.; Ciniawskyj, O. C.; Thomas, Owen R. T.

    2000-01-01

    virus-like particles (VLPs), from cell debris and other intracellular components. Selective flocculation for debris removal followed by selective precipitation of the target protein can be used as a preclarification step to aid purification. In this paper, selective borax flocculation of cell debris...

  7. In Vitro Assembly of Virus-Like Particles of a Gammaretrovirus, the Murine Leukemia Virus XMRV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hadravová, Romana; de Marco, A.; Ulbrich, P.; Štokrová, Jitka; Doležal, Michal; Pichová, Iva; Ruml, T.; Briggs, J. A. G.; Rumlová, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 3 (2012), s. 1297-1306 ISSN 0022-538X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1388; GA MŠk 1M0508 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Program:1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : human-immunodeficiency-virus * Rous sarcoma virus * chronic-fatigue-syndrome * Pfizer monkey virus * N-terminal domain Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.076, year: 2012

  8. Factors Influencing the Ignition and Burnout of a Single Biomass Particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Yin, Chungen

    2011-01-01

    Ignition and burnout of a single biomass particle were studied numerically. A one-dimensional particle combustion model was developed which is capable to simulate all the intraparticle conversion processes (drying, recondensation, devolatilization, char gasification/oxidation and heat/mass/moment......Ignition and burnout of a single biomass particle were studied numerically. A one-dimensional particle combustion model was developed which is capable to simulate all the intraparticle conversion processes (drying, recondensation, devolatilization, char gasification/oxidation and heat...... concentration were not very significant. The influences of these factors on particle burnout were much more remarkable than ignition behaviour....

  9. Planck scale physics of the single-particle Schrödinger equation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    August 2002 physics pp. 375–383. Planck scale physics of the single-particle Schrödinger equation with gravitational self-interaction. VIKRAM SONI. National Physical Laboratory, K.S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110 016, India. Abstract. We consider the modification of a single-particle Schrödinger equation by the inclusion.

  10. Enumeration of an extremely high particle-to-PFU ratio for Varicella-zoster virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, John E; Henderson, Ernesto P; Grose, Charles

    2009-07-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is renowned for its low titers. Yet investigations to explore the low infectivity are hampered by the fact that the VZV particle-to-PFU ratio has never been determined with precision. Herein, we accomplish that task by applying newer imaging technology. More than 300 images were taken of VZV-infected cells on 4 different samples at high magnification. We enumerated the total number of viral particles within 25 cm(2) of the infected monolayer at 415 million. Based on these numbers, the VZV particle:PFU ratio was approximately 40,000:1 for a cell-free inoculum.

  11. Burnout of pulverized biomass particles in large scale boiler – Single particle model approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saastamoinen, Jaakko; Aho, Martti; Moilanen, Antero

    2010-01-01

    the particle combustion model is coupled with one-dimensional equation of motion of the particle, is applied for the calculation of the burnout in the boiler. The particle size of biomass can be much larger than that of coal to reach complete burnout due to lower density and greater reactivity. The burner...... location and the trajectories of the particles might be optimised to maximise the residence time and burnout....

  12. Development of transgenic watermelon resistant to Cucumber mosaic virus and Watermelon mosaic virus by using a single chimeric transgene construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Ku, Hsin-Mei; Chiang, Yi-Hua; Ho, Hsiu-Yin; Yu, Tsong-Ann; Jan, Fuh-Jyh

    2012-10-01

    Watermelon, an important fruit crop worldwide, is prone to attack by several viruses that often results in destructive yield loss. To develop a transgenic watermelon resistant to multiple virus infection, a single chimeric transgene comprising a silencer DNA from the partial N gene of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV) fused to the partial coat protein (CP) gene sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) was constructed and transformed into watermelon (cv. Feeling) via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Single or multiple transgene copies randomly inserted into various locations in the genome were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Transgenic watermelon R(0) plants were individually challenged with CMV, CGMMV or WMV, or with a mixture of these three viruses for resistance evaluation. Two lines were identified to exhibit resistance to CMV, CGMMV, WMV individually, and a mixed inoculation of the three viruses. The R(1) progeny of the two resistant R(0) lines showed resistance to CMV and WMV, but not to CGMMV. Low level accumulation of transgene transcripts in resistant plants and small interfering (si) RNAs specific to CMV and WMV were readily detected in the resistant R(1) plants by northern blot analysis, indicating that the resistance was established via RNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Loss of the CGMMV CP-transgene fragment in R1 progeny might be the reason for the failure to resistant CGMMV infection, as shown by the absence of a hybridization signal and no detectable siRNA specific to CGMMV in Southern and northern blot analyses. In summary, this study demonstrated that fusion of different viral CP gene fragments in transgenic watermelon contributed to multiple virus resistance via PTGS. The construct and resistant watermelon lines developed in this study could be used in a watermelon breeding program for resistance to multiple viruses.

  13. Universal label-free in-process quantification of influenza virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sofia B; Moleirinho, Mafalda G; Wheatley, David; Welsh, John; Gantier, René; Alves, Paula M; Peixoto, Cristina; Carrondo, Manuel J T

    2017-08-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are becoming established as vaccines, in particular for influenza pandemics, increasing the interest in the development of VLPs manufacturing bioprocess. However, for complex VLPs, the analytical tools used for quantification are not yet able to keep up with the bioprocess progress. Currently, quantification for Influenza relies on traditional methods: hemagglutination assay or Single Radial Immunodiffusion. These analytical technologies are time-consuming, cumbersome, and not supportive of efficient downstream process development and monitoring. Hereby we report a label-free tool that uses Biolayer interferometry (BLI) technology applied on an Octet platform to quantify Influenza VLPs at all stages of bioprocess. Human (α2,6-linked sialic acid) and avian (α2,3-linked sialic acid) biotinylated receptors associated with streptavidin biosensors were used, to quantify hemagglutinin content in several mono- and multivalent Influenza VLPs. The applied method was able to quantify hemagglutinin from crude samples up to final bioprocessing VLP product. BLI technology confirmed its value as a high throughput analytical tool with high sensitivity and improved detection limits compared to traditional methods. This simple and fast method allowed for real-time results, which are crucial for in-line monitoring of downstream processing, improving process development, control and optimization. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Production of highly immunogenic virus-like particles of bovine papillomavirus type 6 in silkworm pupae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoko; Iizuka, Tetsuya; Hatama, Shinichi; Kanno, Toru; Mase, Masaji; Shibahara, Tomoyuki

    2017-10-13

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) are the causative agent of bovine teat papillomatosis, which can lead to severe economic losses in dairy cattle. Among the 14 identified BPV genotypes, BPV type 6 (BPV6) is the most frequently detected in teat papilloma lesions, and is therefore thought to play a major role in teat papillomatosis. To develop an effective vaccine against BPV6 infection, we produced virus-like particles of BPV6 (BPV6-VLP) in silkworm (Bombyx mori) pupae and purified these by heparin affinity chromatography using a single column. About 0.7mg purified BPV6-VLP was obtained from one pupa. BPV6-VLP-immunized mice produced a specific IgG to BPV6 that recognized BPV6 antigen with high sensitivity in an immunohistochemical analysis. Thus, silkworm pupae are a useful bioreactor for the production of BPV6-VLP, which can potentially be used as a vaccine for bovine teat papillomatosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity in Chemical Composition on Online Single-Particle Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Sea Spray Aerosol Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Camille M; Collins, Douglas B; Prather, Kimberly A

    2017-04-04

    Knowledge of the surface composition of sea spray aerosols (SSA) is critical for understanding and predicting climate-relevant impacts. Offline microscopy and spectroscopy studies have shown that dry supermicron SSA tend to be spatially heterogeneous particles with sodium- and chloride-rich cores surrounded by organic enriched surface layers containing minor inorganic seawater components such as magnesium and calcium. At the same time, single-particle mass spectrometry reveals several different mass spectral ion patterns, suggesting that there may be a number of chemically distinct particle types. This study investigates factors controlling single particle mass spectra of nascent supermicron SSA. Depth profiling experiments conducted on SSA generated by a fritted bubbler and total ion intensity analysis of SSA generated by a marine aerosol reference tank were compared with observations of ambient SSA observed at two coastal locations. Analysis of SSA produced by utilizing controlled laboratory methods reveals that single-particle mass spectra with weak sodium ion signals can be produced by the desorption of the surface of typical dry SSA particles composed of salt cores and organic-rich coatings. Thus, this lab-based study for the first time unifies findings from offline and online measurements as well as lab and field studies of the SSA particle-mixing state.

  16. Virus-like particles suppress growth of the red-tide-forming marine dinoflagellate Gymnodinium mikimotoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onji, Masashi; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Suzuki, Satoru

    2003-01-01

    We isolated 2 virus-like agents that suppressed growth of Gymnodinium mikimotoi from coastal waters of the Uwa Sea, Japan. The agents found in the flagellate cells, named GM6 and GM7, were filterable in a 0.22-microm-pore filter with approximately 100-nm shapes. Electron microscopic observation showed the presence of virus-like particles in severely damaged G. mikimotoi cells infected by GM6. The growth-suppression activity of the agents (GM6 or GM7) was lost by heating at 50 degrees C, with treatments of DNase and protease, and filtration through a 0.05-microm filter. Our results suggest that the agents are DNA viruses infectious to and virulent for G. mikimotoi. This is the first report of a virus-like agent specific to G. mikimotoi.

  17. Recombinant norovirus-specific scFv inhibit virus-like particle binding to cellular ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Michele E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses cause epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in all age-groups. The rapid onset and ease of person-to-person transmission suggest that inhibitors of the initial steps of virus binding to susceptible cells have value in limiting spread and outbreak persistence. We previously generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb 54.6 that blocks binding of recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLP to Caco-2 intestinal cells and inhibits VLP-mediated hemagglutination. In this study, we engineered the antigen binding domains of mAb 54.6 into a single chain variable fragment (scFv and tested whether these scFv could function as cell binding inhibitors, similar to the parent mAb. Results The scFv54.6 construct was engineered to encode the light (VL and heavy (VH variable domains of mAb 54.6 separated by a flexible peptide linker, and this recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Purified scFv54.6 recognized native VLPs by immunoblot, inhibited VLP-mediated hemagglutination, and blocked VLP binding to H carbohydrate antigen expressed on the surface of a CHO cell line stably transfected to express α 1,2-fucosyltransferase. Conclusion scFv54.6 retained the functional properties of the parent mAb with respect to inhibiting norovirus particle interactions with cells. With further engineering into a form deliverable to the gut mucosa, norovirus neutralizing antibodies represent a prophylactic strategy that would be valuable in outbreak settings.

  18. Online single particle analysis of ice particle residuals from mountain-top mixed-phase clouds using laboratory derived particle type assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Susan; Schneider, Johannes; Klimach, Thomas; Mertes, Stephan; Schenk, Ludwig Paul; Kupiszewski, Piotr; Curtius, Joachim; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    In situ single particle analysis of ice particle residuals (IPRs) and out-of-cloud aerosol particles was conducted by means of laser ablation mass spectrometry during the intensive INUIT-JFJ/CLACE campaign at the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l.) in January-February 2013. During the 4-week campaign more than 70 000 out-of-cloud aerosol particles and 595 IPRs were analyzed covering a particle size diameter range from 100 nm to 3 µm. The IPRs were sampled during 273 h while the station was covered by mixed-phase clouds at ambient temperatures between -27 and -6 °C. The identification of particle types is based on laboratory studies of different types of biological, mineral and anthropogenic aerosol particles. The outcome of these laboratory studies was characteristic marker peaks for each investigated particle type. These marker peaks were applied to the field data. In the sampled IPRs we identified a larger number fraction of primary aerosol particles, like soil dust (13 ± 5 %) and minerals (11 ± 5 %), in comparison to out-of-cloud aerosol particles (2.4 ± 0.4 and 0.4 ± 0.1 %, respectively). Additionally, anthropogenic aerosol particles, such as particles from industrial emissions and lead-containing particles, were found to be more abundant in the IPRs than in the out-of-cloud aerosol. In the out-of-cloud aerosol we identified a large fraction of aged particles (31 ± 5 %), including organic material and secondary inorganics, whereas this particle type was much less abundant (2.7 ± 1.3 %) in the IPRs. In a selected subset of the data where a direct comparison between out-of-cloud aerosol particles and IPRs in air masses with similar origin was possible, a pronounced enhancement of biological particles was found in the IPRs.

  19. Characterization of rice black-streaked dwarf virus- and rice stripe virus-derived siRNAs in singly and doubly infected insect vector Laodelphax striatellus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junmin Li

    Full Text Available Replication of RNA viruses in insect cells triggers an antiviral defense that is mediated by RNA interference (RNAi which generates viral-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs. However, it is not known whether an antiviral RNAi response is also induced in insects by reoviruses, whose double-stranded RNA genome replication is thought to occur within core particles. Deep sequencing of small RNAs showed that when the small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus was infected by Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV (Reoviridae; Fijivirus, more viral-derived siRNAs accumulated than when the vector insect was infected by Rice stripe virus (RSV, a negative single-stranded RNA virus. RBSDV siRNAs were predominantly 21 and 22 nucleotides long and there were almost equal numbers of positive and negative sense. RBSDV siRNAs were frequently generated from hotspots in the 5'- and 3'-terminal regions of viral genome segments but these hotspots were not associated with any predicted RNA secondary structures. Under laboratory condition, L. striatellus can be infected simultaneously with RBSDV and RSV. Double infection enhanced the accumulation of particular genome segments but not viral coat protein of RBSDV and correlated with an increase in the abundance of siRNAs derived from RBSDV. The results of this study suggest that reovirus replication in its insect vector potentially induces an RNAi-mediated antiviral response.

  20. Characterization of rice black-streaked dwarf virus- and rice stripe virus-derived siRNAs in singly and doubly infected insect vector Laodelphax striatellus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junmin; Andika, Ida Bagus; Shen, Jiangfeng; Lv, Yuanda; Ji, Yongqiang; Sun, Liying; Chen, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Replication of RNA viruses in insect cells triggers an antiviral defense that is mediated by RNA interference (RNAi) which generates viral-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). However, it is not known whether an antiviral RNAi response is also induced in insects by reoviruses, whose double-stranded RNA genome replication is thought to occur within core particles. Deep sequencing of small RNAs showed that when the small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus) was infected by Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) (Reoviridae; Fijivirus), more viral-derived siRNAs accumulated than when the vector insect was infected by Rice stripe virus (RSV), a negative single-stranded RNA virus. RBSDV siRNAs were predominantly 21 and 22 nucleotides long and there were almost equal numbers of positive and negative sense. RBSDV siRNAs were frequently generated from hotspots in the 5'- and 3'-terminal regions of viral genome segments but these hotspots were not associated with any predicted RNA secondary structures. Under laboratory condition, L. striatellus can be infected simultaneously with RBSDV and RSV. Double infection enhanced the accumulation of particular genome segments but not viral coat protein of RBSDV and correlated with an increase in the abundance of siRNAs derived from RBSDV. The results of this study suggest that reovirus replication in its insect vector potentially induces an RNAi-mediated antiviral response.

  1. Improvement of Barley yellow dwarf virus-PAV detection in single aphids using a fluorescent real time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Frédéric; Kervarrec, Christine; Mieuzet, Lucie; Riault, Gérard; Vialatte, Aude; Jacquot, Emmanuel

    2003-06-09

    One of the major factors determining the incidence of Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) on autumn-sown cereals is the viruliferous state of immigrant winged aphids. This variable is assessed routinely using the enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). However, the threshold for virus detection by ELISA can lead to false negative results for aphids carrying less than 10(6) particles. Although molecular detection techniques enabling the detection of lower virus quantities in samples are available, the relatively laborious sample preparation and data analysis have restricted their use in routine applications. A gel-free real-time one-step reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol is described for specific detection and quantitation of BYDV-PAV, the most widespread BYDV species in Western Europe. This new assay, based on TaqMan technology, detects and quantifies from 10(2) to 10(8) BYDV-PAV RNA copies. This test is 10 and 10(3) times more sensitive than the standard RT-PCR and ELISA assays published previously for BYDV-PAV detection and significantly improves virus detection in single aphids. Extraction of nucleic acids from aphids using either phenol/chloroform or chelatin resin-based protocols allow the use of pooled samples or of a small part (up to 1/1600th) of a single aphid extract for efficient BYDV-PAV detection.

  2. Fractal and Morphological Characteristics of Single Marble Particle Crushing in Uniaxial Compression Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Crushing of rock particles is a phenomenon commonly encountered in geotechnical engineering practice. It is however difficult to study the crushing of rock particles using classical theory because the physical structure of the particles is complex and irregular. This paper aims at evaluating fractal and morphological characteristics of single rock particle. A large number of particle crushing tests are conducted on single rock particle. The force-displacement curves and the particle size distributions (PSD of crushed particles are analysed based on particle crushing tests. Particle shape plays an important role in both the micro- and macroscale responses of a granular assembly. The PSD of an assortment of rocks are analysed by fractal methods, and the fractal dimension is obtained. A theoretical formula for particle crushing strength is derived, utilising the fractal model, and a simple method is proposed for predicting the probability of particle survival based on the Weibull statistics. Based on a few physical assumptions, simple equations are derived for determining particle crushing energy. The results of applying these equations are tested against the actual experimental data and prove to be very consistent. Fractal theory is therefore applicable for analysis of particle crushing.

  3. Novel Circular Single-Stranded DNA Viruses among an Asteroid, Echinoid and Holothurian (Phylum: Echinodermata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Elliot W; Bistolas, Kalia S I; Button, Jason B; Hewson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Echinoderms are prone to large population fluctuations that can be mediated by pervasive disease events. For the majority of echinoderm disease events the causative pathogen is unknown. Viruses have only recently been explored as potential pathogens using culture-independent techniques though little information currently exists on echinoderm viruses. In this study, ten circular ssDNA viruses were discovered in tissues among an asteroid (Asterias forbesi), an echinoid (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) and a holothurian (Parastichopus californicus) using viral metagenomics. Genome architecture and sequence similarity place these viruses among the rapidly expanding circular rep-encoding single stranded (CRESS) DNA viral group. Multiple genomes from the same tissue were no more similar in sequence identity to each other than when compared to other known CRESS DNA viruses. The results from this study are the first to describe a virus from a holothurian and continue to show the ubiquity of these viruses among aquatic invertebrates.

  4. Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, Arthur [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The SP2 is an instrument that measures, in situ, the time-dependent scattering and incandescence signals produced by individual BC-containing particles as they travel through a continuous-wave laser beam. Any particle traversing the laser beam will scatter light, and the BC component of a BC-containing particle will absorb some of the laser energy until its temperature is raised to the point at which it incandesces (hereafter we adopt the standard terminology of the SP2 community and denote any substance determined by the SP2 to be BC as refractory black carbon (rBC)). The amplitude of the rBC incandescence signal is related to the amount of refractory material contained in the illuminated particle. By binning the individual incandescence signals per unit sample volume, the mass concentration [ng/m3] of rBC can be derived. By binning the individual signals by volume equivalent diameter the size distribution (dN/dlogDVED) per unit time can be derived. The rBC mass loading per unit time and the rBC size distribution unit time are the core data products produced by the SP2. Additionally, the scattering channel can be used to provide information on the rBC particle population-based mixing states within ambient aerosols. However, this data product is produced on a requested-basis since additional detailed analysis and QC/QA must be conducted.

  5. Detecting the Presence of Nora Virus in "Drosophila" Utilizing Single Fly RT-PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Bethany; Ericson, Brad; Carlson, Darby J.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    A single fly RT-PCR protocol has recently been developed to detect the presence of the persistent, horizontally transmitted Nora virus in "Drosophila." Wild-caught flies from Ohio were tested for the presence of the virus, with nearly one-fifth testing positive. The investigation presented can serve as an ideal project for biology…

  6. Acheta domesticus Volvovirus, a Novel Single-Stranded Circular DNA Virus of the House Cricket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hanh T; Bergoin, Max; Tijssen, Peter

    2013-03-14

    The genome of a novel virus of the house cricket consists of a 2,517-nucleotide (nt) circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecule with 4 open reading frames (ORFs). One ORF had a low identity to circovirus nucleotide sequences (NS). The unique properties of this volvovirus suggested that it belongs to a new virus family or genus.

  7. Acheta domesticus Volvovirus, a Novel Single-Stranded Circular DNA Virus of the House Cricket

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Hanh T.; Bergoin, Max; Tijssen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The genome of a novel virus of the house cricket consists of a 2,517-nucleotide (nt) circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecule with 4 open reading frames (ORFs). One ORF had a low identity to circovirus nucleotide sequences (NS). The unique properties of this volvovirus suggested that it belongs to a new virus family or genus.

  8. Protection induced by virus-like particle vaccine containing tandem repeat gene of respiratory syncytial virus G protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ah-Ra Kim

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract illness in infants, young children and the elderly. However, there is no licensed vaccine available against RSV infection. In this study, we generated virus-like particle (VLP vaccine and investigated the vaccine efficacy in a mouse model. For VLP vaccines, tandem gene (1-780 bp for V1 VLPs and tandem repeat gene (repeated 450-780 bp for V5 VLPs were constructed in pFastBacTM vectors, respectively. Influenza matrix protein 1 (M1 was used as a core protein in the VLPs. Notably, upon challenge infection, significantly lower virus loads were measured in the lung of mice immunized with V1 or V5 VLPs compared to those of naïve mice and formalin-inactivated RSV immunized control mice. In particular, V5 VLPs immunization showed significantly lower virus titers than V1 VLPs immunization. Furthermore, V5 VLPs immunization elicited increased memory B cells responses in the spleen. These results indicated that V5 VLP vaccine containing tandem repeat gene protein provided better protection than V1 VLPs with significantly decreased inflammation in the lungs. Thus, V5 VLPs could be a potential vaccine candidate against RSV.

  9. Single scattering from nonspherical Chebyshev particles: A compendium of calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiscombe, W. J.; Mugnai, A.

    1986-01-01

    A large set of exact calculations of the scattering from a class of nonspherical particles known as Chebyshev particles' has been performed. Phase function and degree of polarization in random orientation, and parallel and perpendicular intensities in fixed orientations, are plotted for a variety of particles shapes and sizes. The intention is to furnish a data base against which both experimental data, and the predictions of approximate methods, can be tested. The calculations are performed with the widely-used Extended Boundary Condition Method. An extensive discussion of this method is given, including much material that is not easily available elsewhere (especially the analysis of its convergence properties). An extensive review is also given of all extant methods for nonspherical scattering calculations, as well as of the available pool of experimental data.

  10. Response of microchannel plates in ionization mode to single particles and electromagnetic showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Brianza, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; Ciriolo, V.; del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Gotti, C.; Govoni, P.; Katcin, A. A.; Malberti, M.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pigazzini, S.; Preiato, F.; Prisekin, V. G.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.

    2018-01-01

    Hundreds of concurrent collisions per bunch crossing are expected at future hadron colliders. Precision timing calorimetry has been advocated as a way to mitigate the pileup effects and, thanks to their excellent time resolution, microchannel plates (MCPs) are good candidate detectors for this goal. We report on the response of MCPs, used as secondary emission detectors, to single relativistic particles and to electromagnetic showers. Several prototypes, with different geometries and characteristics, were exposed to particle beams at the INFN-LNF Beam Test Facility and at CERN. Their time resolution and efficiency are measured for single particles and as a function of the multiplicity of particles. Efficiencies between 50% and 90% to single relativistic particles are reached, and up to 100% in presence of a large number of particles. Time resolutions between 20 ps and 30 ps are obtained.

  11. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian Günther

    2015-01-01

    even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes......¨dinger equation with a source term originating from a localized particle that generates a wave while being simultaneously guided by it. We show that the ensuing particle-wave dynamics can capture some characteristics of quantum mechanics such as orbital quantization. However, the particle-wave dynamics can...... not reproduce quantum mechanics in general, and we show that the single-particle statistics for our model in a double-slit experiment with an additional splitter plate differs qualitatively from that of quantum mechanics....

  12. Magnetic tweezers for manipulation of magnetic particles in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, H.; Giesguth, M.; Dietz, K.-J.; Reiss, G.; Herth, S.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic tweezers gain increasing interest for applications in biology. Here, a setup of magnetic tweezers is introduced using micropatterned conducting lines on transparent glass slides. Magnetic particles of 1 μm diameter were injected in barley cell vacuoles using a microinject system under microscopic control. Time dependent tracking of the particles after application of a magnetic field was used to determine the viscosity of vacuolar sap in vivo relative to water and isolated vacuolar fluid. The viscosity of vacuolar sap in cells was about 2-fold higher than that of extracted vacuolar fluid and 5 times higher than that of water.

  13. Single particle behaviour in circulating fluidized bed combustors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus

    1994-01-01

    of fuel particles in a boiler. A cold pilot scale model of a circulating fluidized bed combustor was used. Here sand was recirculated by means of air. Pressure measurements along the riser determined suspension density. A radioactive tracking facility to determined the dynamic picture of the particle...... trajectories in the simulated boiler. In the splash zone, closest to the secondary air inlet an exponential decay in the solids suspension density with the riser height was observed. A transport zone was characterized by an exponential decay in the solids suspension but with a smaller decay constant...

  14. Single Gradientless Light Beam Drags Particles as Tractor Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Haifeng

    2011-01-01

    is the strong nonparaxiality of the light beam, which contributes to the pulling force owing to momentum conservation. The nonparaxiality of the Bessel beam can be manipulated to possess a dragging force along both the radial longitudinal directions, i.e., a "tractor beam" with stable trajectories is achieved......Usually a light beam pushes a particle when the photons act upon it. We investigate the optical forces by nonparaxial gradientless beams and find that the forces can drag suitable particles all the way towards the light source. The major criterion of realizing the backward dragging force...

  15. Detection and characterization of chemical aerosol using laser-trapping single-particle Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalume, Aimable; Beresnev, Leonid A; Santarpia, Joshua; Pan, Yong-Le

    2017-08-10

    Detection and characterization of the presence of chemical agent aerosols in various complex atmospheric environments is an essential defense mission. Raman spectroscopy has the ability to identify chemical molecules, but there are limited numbers of photons detectable from single airborne aerosol particles as they are flowing through a detection system. In this paper, we report on a single-particle Raman spectrometer system that can measure strong spontaneous, stimulated, and resonance Raman spectral peaks from a single laser-trapped chemical aerosol particle, such as a droplet of the VX nerve agent chemical simulant diethyl phthalate. Using this system, time-resolved Raman spectra and elastic scattered intensities were recorded to monitor the chemical properties and size variation of the trapped particle. Such a system supplies a new approach for the detection and characterization of single airborne chemical aerosol particles.

  16. High rate discharge capability of single particle electrode of LiCoO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dokko, Kaoru [Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Nakata, Natsuko; Kanamura, Kiyoshi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-ohsawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    The electrochemical properties of a single particle of LiCoO{sub 2} (8 {mu}m in diameter) in an organic electrolyte were characterized using a microelectrode technique, and the high rate capability of commercially available micron-sized LiCoO{sub 2} was examined in this study. A Pt microfilament (10 {mu}m in diameter) was attached to the single LiCoO{sub 2} particle in the electrolyte during optical microscope observation, and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests were carried out. The discharge capacity of the single LiCoO{sub 2} particle (8 {mu}m diameter) was 0.157 nA h in the potential range of 3.0-4.2 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}, which was close to the theoretical capacity. The discharge rate capability of the single LiCoO{sub 2} particle was excellent, and the particle exhibited its full-discharge capacity up to a high rate of 30 C (5 nA). The discharge reaction of the single particle was not controlled by the solid-state diffusion of Li{sup +}, but by the charge transfer process at a rate lower than 30 C. The discharge capacity of the particle measured at a high rate of 300 C (50 nA) was 0.12 nA h, which was more than 75% of the full capacity of a single particle. (author)

  17. High rate discharge capability of single particle electrode of LiCoO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokko, Kaoru; Nakata, Natsuko; Kanamura, Kiyoshi

    The electrochemical properties of a single particle of LiCoO 2 (8 μm in diameter) in an organic electrolyte were characterized using a microelectrode technique, and the high rate capability of commercially available micron-sized LiCoO 2 was examined in this study. A Pt microfilament (10 μm in diameter) was attached to the single LiCoO 2 particle in the electrolyte during optical microscope observation, and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests were carried out. The discharge capacity of the single LiCoO 2 particle (8 μm diameter) was 0.157 nA h in the potential range of 3.0-4.2 V vs. Li/Li +, which was close to the theoretical capacity. The discharge rate capability of the single LiCoO 2 particle was excellent, and the particle exhibited its full-discharge capacity up to a high rate of 30 C (5 nA). The discharge reaction of the single particle was not controlled by the solid-state diffusion of Li +, but by the charge transfer process at a rate lower than 30 C. The discharge capacity of the particle measured at a high rate of 300 C (50 nA) was 0.12 nA h, which was more than 75% of the full capacity of a single particle.

  18. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Replicon Particles Can Induce Rapid Protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Dias, Camila C. A.; Moraes, Mauro P.; Weiss, Marcelo; Perez-Martin, Eva; Owens, Gary; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt; de los Santos, Teresa; Grubman, Marvin J.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that delivery of the porcine type I interferon gene (poIFN-α/β) with a replication-defective human adenovirus vector (adenovirus 5 [Ad5]) can sterilely protect swine challenged with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 1 day later. However, the need of relatively high doses of Ad5 limits the applicability of such a control strategy in the livestock industry. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) empty replicon particles (VRPs) can induce rapid protection of mice a...

  19. Binding of human papilloma virus L1 virus-like particles to dendritic cells is mediated through heparan sulfates and induces immune activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Witte, Lot; Zoughlami, Younes; Aengeneyndt, Birgit; David, Guido; van Kooyk, Yvette; Gissmann, Lutz; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2007-01-01

    Immunization using human papilloma virus (HPV)-L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) induces a robust and effective immune response, which has recently resulted in the implementation of the HPV-L1 VLP vaccination in health programs. However, during infection, HPV can escape immune surveillance leading to

  20. Modelling of flash pyrolysis of a single wood particle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, A.M.C.; Janse, A.M.C.; Westerhout, R.W.J.; Westerhout, R.W.J.; Prins, W.

    2000-01-01

    Reactors for flash pyrolysis of biomass are designed to maximize the yield of bio-oil, at the expense of the by-products gas and char. To understand which chemical and physical factors influence the yield to bio-oil, the flash pyrolysis of a cylindrical wood particle with a maximum diameter of 1000

  1. Single-sheet identification method of heavy charged particles using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The theoretical and experimental investigations of the penetration of charged particles in matter played a very important role in the development of modern physics. Solid state nuclear track detectors have become one of the most important tools for many branches of science and technology. An attempt has been made to ...

  2. Fluorescence preselection of bioaerosol for single-particle mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stowers, M.A.; Van Wuijckhuijse, A.L.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Kientz, C.E.; Ciach, T.

    2006-01-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested a system that preselects the biological fraction of airborne particles from the overall aerosol. The preselection is based on fluorescence emission excited by a continuous 266 nm laser beam. This beam is one of two cw beams used to measure the aerodynamic

  3. Mutations in the Transmembrane Domain and Cytoplasmic Tail of Hendra Virus Fusion Protein Disrupt Virus-Like-Particle Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Sun, Weina; Ray, Greeshma; Schmitt, Phuong Tieu; Webb, Stacy; Gibson, Kathleen; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis; Schmitt, Anthony P

    2017-07-15

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a zoonotic paramyxovirus that causes deadly illness in horses and humans. An intriguing feature of HeV is the utilization of endosomal protease for activation of the viral fusion protein (F). Here we investigated how endosomal F trafficking affects HeV assembly. We found that the HeV matrix (M) and F proteins each induced particle release when they were expressed alone but that their coexpression led to coordinated assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs) that were morphologically and physically distinct from M-only or F-only VLPs. Mutations to the F protein transmembrane domain or cytoplasmic tail that disrupted endocytic trafficking led to failure of F to function with M for VLP assembly. Wild-type F functioned normally for VLP assembly even when its cleavage was prevented with a cathepsin inhibitor, indicating that it is endocytic F trafficking that is important for VLP assembly, not proteolytic F cleavage. Under specific conditions of reduced M expression, we found that M could no longer induce significant VLP release but retained the ability to be incorporated as a passenger into F-driven VLPs, provided that the F protein was competent for endocytic trafficking. The F and M proteins were both found to traffic through Rab11-positive recycling endosomes (REs), suggesting a model in which F and M trafficking pathways converge at REs, enabling these proteins to preassemble before arriving at plasma membrane budding sites. IMPORTANCE Hendra virus and Nipah virus are zoonotic paramyxoviruses that cause lethal infections in humans. Unlike that for most paramyxoviruses, activation of the henipavirus fusion protein occurs in recycling endosomal compartments. In this study, we demonstrate that the unique endocytic trafficking pathway of Hendra virus F protein is required for proper viral assembly and particle release. These results advance our basic understanding of the henipavirus assembly process and provide a novel model for the interplay between

  4. Characterizing uranium oxide reference particles for isotopic abundances and uranium mass by single particle isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraiem, M.; Richter, S.; Erdmann, N.; Kühn, H.; Hedberg, M.; Aregbe, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A method to quantify the U mass in single micron particles by ID-TIMS was developed. ► Well-characterized monodisperse U-oxide particles produced by an aerosol generator were used. ► A linear correlation between the mass of U and the volume of particle(s) was found. ► The method developed is suitable for determining the amount of U in a particulate reference material. - Abstract: Uranium and plutonium particulate test materials are becoming increasingly important as the reliability of measurement results has to be demonstrated to regulatory bodies responsible for maintaining effective nuclear safeguards. In order to address this issue, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in collaboration with the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) has initiated a study to investigate the feasibility of preparing and characterizing a uranium particle reference material for nuclear safeguards, which is finally certified for isotopic abundances and for the uranium mass per particle. Such control particles are specifically required to evaluate responses of instruments based on mass spectrometric detection (e.g. SIMS, TIMS, LA-ICPMS) and to help ensuring the reliability and comparability of measurement results worldwide. In this paper, a methodology is described which allows quantifying the uranium mass in single micron particles by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). This methodology is characterized by substantial improvements recently achieved at IRMM in terms of sensitivity and measurement accuracy in the field of uranium particle analysis by TIMS. The use of monodisperse uranium oxide particles prepared using an aerosol generation technique developed at ITU, which is capable of producing particles of well-characterized size and isotopic composition was exploited. The evidence of a straightforward correlation between the particle volume and the mass of uranium was demonstrated in this study

  5. Analysis of single particle diffusion with transient binding using particle filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jason; Fricks, John

    2016-07-21

    Diffusion with transient binding occurs in a variety of biophysical processes, including movement of transmembrane proteins, T cell adhesion, and caging in colloidal fluids. We model diffusion with transient binding as a Brownian particle undergoing Markovian switching between free diffusion when unbound and diffusion in a quadratic potential centered around a binding site when bound. Assuming the binding site is the last position of the particle in the unbound state and Gaussian observational error obscures the true position of the particle, we use particle filtering to predict when the particle is bound and to locate the binding sites. Maximum likelihood estimators of diffusion coefficients, state transition probabilities, and the spring constant in the bound state are computed with a stochastic Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Homogeneous vs heterogeneous polymerization catalysis revealed by single-particle fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, N Melody; Blum, Suzanne A

    2011-11-16

    A high-sensitivity and high-resolution single-particle fluorescence microscopy technique differentiated between homogeneous and heterogeneous metathesis polymerization catalysis by imaging the location of the early stages of polymerization. By imaging single polymers and single crystals of Grubbs II, polymerization catalysis was revealed to be solely homogeneous rather than heterogeneous or both.

  7. Low aspect ratio micropores for single-particle and single-cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Gaurav; Mulero, Rafael; Ali, Jamel; Darvish, Armin; Kim, Min Jun

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes microparticle and bacterial translocation studies using low aspect ratio solid-state micropores. Micropores, 5 μm in diameter, were fabricated in 200 nm thick free-standing silicon nitride membranes, resulting in pores with an extremely low aspect ratio, nominally 0.04. For microparticle translocation experiments, sulfonated polystyrene microparticles and magnetic microbeads in size range of 1-4 μm were used. Using the microparticle translocation characteristics, we find that particle translocations result in a change only in the pore's geometrical resistance while the access resistance remains constant. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of our micropore to probe high-resolution shape information of translocating analytes using concatenated magnetic microspheres. Distinct current drop peaks were observed for each microsphere of the multibead architecture. For bacterial translocation experiments, nonflagellated Escherichia coli (strain HCB 5) and wild type flagellated Salmonella typhimurium (strain SJW1103) were used. Distinct current signatures for the two bacteria were obtained and this difference in translocation behavior was attributed to different surface protein distributions on the bacteria. Our findings may help in developing low aspect ratio pores for high-resolution microparticle characterization and single-cell analysis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Detection and Sizing of Ti-Containing Particles in Recreational Waters Using Single Particle ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Arjun K; Reed, Robert B; Lee, Sungyun; Bi, Xiangyu; Hanigan, David; Yang, Yu; Ranville, James F; Herckes, Pierre; Westerhoff, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) was used to detect Ti-containing particles in heavily-used bathing areas of a river (Salt River) and five swimming pools. Ti-containing particle concentrations in swimming pools ranged from 2.8 × 10 3 to 4.4 × 10 3 particles/mL and were an order of magnitude lower than those detected in the Salt River. Measurements from the Salt River showed an 80% increase in Ti-containing particle concentration over baseline concentration during peak recreational activity (at 16:00 h) in the river. Cloud point extraction followed by transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed presence of aggregated TiO 2 particles in river samples, showing morphological similarity to particles present in an over-the-counter sunscreen product. The maximum particle mass concentration detected in a sample from the Salt River (659 ng/L) is only slightly lower than the predicted no effect concentration for TiO 2 to aquatic organisms (< 1 μg/L).

  9. Quantification of Lyssavirus-Neutralizing Antibodies Using Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Pseudotype Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Moeschler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is a highly fatal zoonotic disease which is primarily caused by rabies virus (RABV although other members of the genus Lyssavirus can cause rabies as well. As yet, 14 serologically and genetically diverse lyssaviruses have been identified, mostly in bats. To assess the quality of rabies vaccines and immunoglobulin preparations, virus neutralization tests with live RABV are performed in accordance with enhanced biosafety standards. In the present work, a novel neutralization test is presented which takes advantage of a modified vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV from which the glycoprotein G gene has been deleted and replaced by reporter genes. This single-cycle virus was trans-complemented with RABV envelope glycoprotein. Neutralization of this pseudotype virus with RABV reference serum or immune sera from vaccinated mice showed a strong correlation with the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT. Importantly, pseudotype viruses containing the envelope glycoproteins of other lyssaviruses were neutralized by reference serum to a significantly lesser extent or were not neutralized at all. Taken together, a pseudotype virus system has been successfully developed which allows the safe, fast, and sensitive detection of neutralizing antibodies directed against different lyssaviruses.

  10. Induction of long-term protective immune responses by influenza H5N1 virus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Moo Kang

    Full Text Available Recurrent outbreaks of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus pose a threat of eventually causing a pandemic. Early vaccination of the population would be the single most effective measure for the control of an emerging influenza pandemic.Influenza virus-like particles (VLPs produced in insect cell-culture substrates do not depend on the availability of fertile eggs for vaccine manufacturing. We produced VLPs containing influenza A/Viet Nam1203/04 (H5N1 hemagglutinin, neuraminidase, and matrix proteins, and investigated their preclinical immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Mice immunized intranasally with H5N1 VLPs developed high levels of H5N1 specific antibodies and were 100% protected against a high dose of homologous H5N1 virus infection at 30 weeks after immunization. Protection is likely to be correlated with humoral and cellular immunologic memory at systemic and mucosal sites as evidenced by rapid anamnestic responses to re-stimulation with viral antigen in vivo and in vitro.These results provide support for clinical evaluation of H5N1 VLP vaccination as a public health intervention to mitigate a possible pandemic of H5N1 influenza.

  11. Integrated Method for Purification and Single-Particle Characterization of Lentiviral Vector Systems by Size Exclusion Chromatography and Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Susanne; Muzard, Julien; Zaruba, Marianne; Metzner, Christoph

    2017-07-01

    Elements derived from lentiviral particles such as viral vectors or virus-like particles are commonly used for biotechnological and biomedical applications, for example in mammalian protein expression, gene delivery or therapy, and vaccine development. Preparations of high purity are necessary in most cases, especially for clinical applications. For purification, a wide range of methods are available, from density gradient centrifugation to affinity chromatography. In this study we have employed size exclusion columns specifically designed for the easy purification of extracellular vesicles including exosomes. In addition to viral marker protein and total protein analysis, a well-established single-particle characterization technology, termed tunable resistive pulse sensing, was employed to analyze fractions of highest particle load and purity and characterize the preparations by size and surface charge/electrophoretic mobility. With this study, we propose an integrated platform combining size exclusion chromatography and tunable resistive pulse sensing for monitoring production and purification of viral particles.

  12. Glass coated single grid for charged particle acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, B. A.; Nakanishi, S.

    1968-01-01

    Glass coating is used on a single grid accelerator system for ion thrusters. The uniformly thin, smooth, dense, impervious glass coating has a high dielectric strength and is firmly bonded to the accelerator grid.

  13. An instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spherical particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, L; Bao, N; Jiang, Y; Han, K; Zhou, J

    2016-01-01

    It universally exists in moving particular systems that particles can be electrified, in which the particles are chemically identical, just as toner particles, coal dust, and pharmaceutical powders. However, owing to the limit of experimental instruments, so far, there are yet no experiments to illustrate whether a particle can be electrified due to a single collision between two spherical particles, and there are also no experiments to measure the charge carried by a single particle due to a single collision between two particles. So we have developed an instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spheres. The instrument consists of two-sphere collision device, collision charge measurement apparatus, and particles' trajectory tracking system. By using this instrument, we can investigate the collision contact electrification due to a single collision between two spheres and simultaneously record the moving trajectories of spheres after the collision to calculate the rebound angles to identify the contribution of the triboelectrification due to the rubbing between the contact surfaces and the collision contact electrification due to the normal pressure between the contact surfaces.

  14. Comprehensive study of ignition and combustion of single wooden particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam; Yin, Chungen; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    How quickly large biomass particles can ignite and burn out when transported into a pulverized-fuel (pf) furnace and suddenly exposed to a hot gas flow containing oxygen is very important in biomass co-firing design and optimization. In this paper, the ignition and burnout of the largest possible...... for all the test conditions. As the particle is further heated up and the volume-weighted average temperature reaches the onset of rapid decomposition of hemicellulose and cellulose, a secondary homogeneous ignition occurs. The model-predicted ignition delays and burnout times show a good agreement...... with the experimental results. Homogeneous ignition delays are found to scale with specific surface areas while heterogeneous ignition delays show less dependency on the areas. The ignition and burnout are also affected by the process conditions, in which the oxygen concentration is found to have a more pronounced...

  15. A deep convolutional neural network approach to single-particle recognition in cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanan; Ouyang, Qi; Mao, Youdong

    2017-07-21

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has become a mainstream tool for the structural determination of biological macromolecular complexes. However, high-resolution cryo-EM reconstruction often requires hundreds of thousands of single-particle images. Particle extraction from experimental micrographs thus can be laborious and presents a major practical bottleneck in cryo-EM structural determination. Existing computational methods for particle picking often use low-resolution templates for particle matching, making them susceptible to reference-dependent bias. It is critical to develop a highly efficient template-free method for the automatic recognition of particle images from cryo-EM micrographs. We developed a deep learning-based algorithmic framework, DeepEM, for single-particle recognition from noisy cryo-EM micrographs, enabling automated particle picking, selection and verification in an integrated fashion. The kernel of DeepEM is built upon a convolutional neural network (CNN) composed of eight layers, which can be recursively trained to be highly "knowledgeable". Our approach exhibits an improved performance and accuracy when tested on the standard KLH dataset. Application of DeepEM to several challenging experimental cryo-EM datasets demonstrated its ability to avoid the selection of un-wanted particles and non-particles even when true particles contain fewer features. The DeepEM methodology, derived from a deep CNN, allows automated particle extraction from raw cryo-EM micrographs in the absence of a template. It demonstrates an improved performance, objectivity and accuracy. Application of this novel method is expected to free the labor involved in single-particle verification, significantly improving the efficiency of cryo-EM data processing.

  16. Online single particle measurement of fireworks pollution during Chinese New Year in Nanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyan; Xu, Tingting; Lu, Xiaohui; Chen, Hong; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Xin; Mo, Zhaoyu; Chen, Zhiming; Liu, Huilin; Mao, Jingying; Liang, Guiyun

    2017-03-01

    Time-resolved single-particle measurements were conducted during Chinese New Year in Nanning, China. Firework displays resulted in a burst of SO 2 , coarse mode, and accumulation mode (100-500nm) particles. Through single particle mass spectrometry analysis, five different types of particles (fireworks-metal, ash, dust, organic carbon-sulfate (OC-sulfate), biomass burning) with different size distributions were identified as primary emissions from firework displays. The fireworks-related particles accounted for more than 70% of the total analyzed particles during severe firework detonations. The formation of secondary particulate sulfate and nitrate during firework events was investigated on single particle level. An increase of sulfite peak (80SO 3 - ) followed by an increase of sulfate peaks (97HSO 4 - +96SO 4 - ) in the mass spectra during firework displays indicated the aqueous uptake and oxidation of SO 2 on particles. High concentration of gaseous SO 2 , high relative humidity and high particle loading likely promoted SO 2 oxidation. Secondary nitrate formed through gas-phase oxidation of NO 2 to nitric acid, followed by the condensation into particles as ammonium nitrate. This study shows that under worm, humid conditions, both primary and secondary aerosols contribute to the particulate air pollution during firework displays. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Source characterization of urban particles from meat smoking activities in Chongqing, China using single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Wenger, John C; Yang, Fumo; Cao, Junji; Huang, Rujin; Shi, Guangming; Zhang, Shumin; Tian, Mi; Wang, Huanbo

    2017-09-01

    A Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed in the urban area of Chongqing to characterize the particles present during a severe particulate pollution event that occurred in winter 2014-2015. The measurements were made at a time when residents engaged in traditional outdoor meat smoking activities to preserve meat before the Chinese Spring Festival. The measurement period was predominantly characterized by stagnant weather conditions, highly elevated levels of PM 2.5 , and low visibility. Eleven major single particle types were identified, with over 92.5% of the particles attributed to biomass burning emissions. Most of the particle types showed appreciable signs of aging in the stagnant air conditions. To simulate the meat smoking activities, a series of controlled smoldering experiments was conducted using freshly cut pine and cypress branches, both with and without wood logs. SPAMS data obtained from these experiments revealed a number of biomass burning particle types, including an elemental and organic carbon (ECOC) type that proved to be the most suitable marker for meat smoking activities. The traditional activity of making preserved meat in southwestern China is shown here to be a major source of particulate pollution. Improved measures to reduce emissions from the smoking of meat should be introduced to improve air quality in regions where smoking meat activity prevails. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental study on effects of particle shape and operating conditions on combustion characteristics of single biomass particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam; Yin, Chungen; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the ignition, devolatilization, and burnout of single biomass particles of various shapes and sizes under process conditions that are similar to those in an industrial combustor. A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is used to record the whole...

  19. Prospective on multiscale simulation of virus-like particles: Application to computer-aided vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Mansour, Andrew; Sereda, Yuriy V; Yang, Jing; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2015-11-04

    Simulations of virus-like particles needed for computer-aided vaccine design highlight the need for new algorithms that accelerate molecular dynamics. Such simulations via conventional molecular dynamics present a practical challenge due to the millions of atoms involved and the long timescales of the phenomena of interest. These phenomena include structural transitions, self-assembly, and interaction with a cell surface. A promising approach for addressing this challenge is multiscale factorization. The approach is distinct from coarse-graining techniques in that it (1) avoids the need for conjecturing phenomenological governing equations for coarse-grained variables, (2) provides simulations with atomic resolution, (3) captures the cross-talk between disturbances at the atomic and the whole virus-like particle scale, and (4) achieves significant speedup over molecular dynamics. A brief review of multiscale factorization method is provided, as is a prospective on its development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Strong reduction of spectral heterogeneity in gold bipyramids for single-particle and single-molecule plasmon sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, S M E; Verheijen, M A; Prins, M W J; Zijlstra, P

    2016-01-15

    Single metal nanoparticles are attractive biomolecular sensors. Binding of analyte to a functional particle results in a plasmon shift that can be conveniently monitored in a far-field optical microscope. Heterogeneities in spectral properties of individual particles in an ensemble affect the reliability of a single-particle plasmon sensor, especially when plasmon shifts are monitored in real-time using a fixed irradiation wavelength. We compare the spectral heterogeneity of different plasmon sensor geometries (gold nanospheres, nanorods, and bipyramids) and correlate this to their size and aspect-ratio dispersion. We show that gold bipyramids exhibit a strongly reduced heterogeneity in aspect ratio and plasmon wavelength compared to commonly used gold nanorods. We show that this translates into a significantly improved homogeneity of the response to molecular binding without compromising single-molecule sensitivity.

  1. Towards quantitative viromics for both double-stranded and single-stranded DNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Roux

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Viruses strongly influence microbial population dynamics and ecosystem functions. However, our ability to quantitatively evaluate those viral impacts is limited to the few cultivated viruses and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA viral genomes captured in quantitative viral metagenomes (viromes. This leaves the ecology of non-dsDNA viruses nearly unknown, including single-stranded DNA (ssDNA viruses that have been frequently observed in viromes, but not quantified due to amplification biases in sequencing library preparations (Multiple Displacement Amplification, Linker Amplification or Tagmentation. Methods Here we designed mock viral communities including both ssDNA and dsDNA viruses to evaluate the capability of a sequencing library preparation approach including an Adaptase step prior to Linker Amplification for quantitative amplification of both dsDNA and ssDNA templates. We then surveyed aquatic samples to provide first estimates of the abundance of ssDNA viruses. Results Mock community experiments confirmed the biased nature of existing library preparation methods for ssDNA templates (either largely enriched or selected against and showed that the protocol using Adaptase plus Linker Amplification yielded viromes that were ±1.8-fold quantitative for ssDNA and dsDNA viruses. Application of this protocol to community virus DNA from three freshwater and three marine samples revealed that ssDNA viruses as a whole represent only a minor fraction (<5% of DNA virus communities, though individual ssDNA genomes, both eukaryote-infecting Circular Rep-Encoding Single-Stranded DNA (CRESS-DNA viruses and bacteriophages from the Microviridae family, can be among the most abundant viral genomes in a sample. Discussion Together these findings provide empirical data for a new virome library preparation protocol, and a first estimate of ssDNA virus abundance in aquatic systems.

  2. Single-particle characterization of ice-nucleating particles and ice particles residuals sampled by three different techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandler, Konrad; Worringen, Annette; Benker, Nathalie; Dirsch, Thomas; Mertes, Stephan; Schenk, Ludwig; Kästner, Udo; Frank, Fabian; Nillius, Björn; Bundke, Ulrich; Rose, Diana; Curtius, Joachim; Kupiszewski, Piotr; Weingartner, Ernest; Vochezer, Paul; Schneider, Johannes; Schmidt, Susan; Weinbruch, Stephan; Ebert, Martin

    2015-04-01

    During January/February 2013, at the High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch a measurement campaign was carried out, which was centered on atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INP) and ice particle residuals (IPR). Three different techniques for separation of INP and IPR from the non-ice-active particles are compared. The Ice Selective Inlet (ISI) and the Ice Counterflow Virtual Impactor (Ice-CVI) sample ice particles from mixed phase clouds and allow for the analysis of the residuals. The combination of the Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber (FINCH) and the Ice Nuclei Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor (IN-PCVI) provides ice-activating conditions to aerosol particles and extracts the activated INP for analysis. Collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis to determine size, chemical composition and mixing state. All INP/IPR-separating techniques had considerable abundances (median 20 - 70 %) of instrumental contamination artifacts (ISI: Si-O spheres, probably calibration aerosol; Ice-CVI: Al-O particles; FINCH+IN-PCVI: steel particles). Also, potential sampling artifacts (e.g., pure soluble material) occurred with a median abundance of metal oxides were the major INP/IPR particle types separated by all three techniques. Soot was a minor contributor. Lead was detected in less than 10 % of the particles, of which the majority were internal mixtures with other particle types. Sea-salt and sulfates were identified by all three methods as INP/IPR. Most samples showed a maximum of the INP/IPR size distribution at 400 nm geometric diameter. In a few cases, a second super-micron maximum was identified. Soot/carbonaceous material and metal oxides were present mainly in the submicron range. ISI and FINCH yielded silicates and Ca-rich particles mainly with diameters above 1 µm, while the Ice-CVI also separated many submicron IPR. As strictly parallel sampling could not be performed, a part of the discrepancies between

  3. Single-particle characterization of ice-nucleating particles and ice particle residuals sampled by three different techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worringen, A.; Kandler, K.; Benker, N.; Dirsch, T.; Mertes, S.; Schenk, L.; Kästner, U.; Frank, F.; Nillius, B.; Bundke, U.; Rose, D.; Curtius, J.; Kupiszewski, P.; Weingartner, E.; Vochezer, P.; Schneider, J.; Schmidt, S.; Weinbruch, S.; Ebert, M.

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, three different techniques to separate ice-nucleating particles (INPs) as well as ice particle residuals (IPRs) from non-ice-active particles are compared. The Ice Selective Inlet (ISI) and the Ice Counterflow Virtual Impactor (Ice-CVI) sample ice particles from mixed-phase clouds and allow after evaporation in the instrument for the analysis of the residuals. The Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber (FINCH) coupled with the Ice Nuclei Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor (IN-PCVI) provides ice-activating conditions to aerosol particles and extracts the activated particles for analysis. The instruments were run during a joint field campaign which took place in January and February 2013 at the High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch (Switzerland). INPs and IPRs were analyzed offline by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis to determine their size, chemical composition and mixing state. Online analysis of the size and chemical composition of INP activated in FINCH was performed by laser ablation mass spectrometry. With all three INP/IPR separation techniques high abundances (median 20-70%) of instrumental contamination artifacts were observed (ISI: Si-O spheres, probably calibration aerosol; Ice-CVI: Al-O particles; FINCH + IN-PCVI: steel particles). After removal of the instrumental contamination particles, silicates, Ca-rich particles, carbonaceous material and metal oxides were the major INP/IPR particle types obtained by all three techniques. In addition, considerable amounts (median abundance mostly a few percent) of soluble material (e.g., sea salt, sulfates) were observed. As these soluble particles are often not expected to act as INP/IPR, we consider them as potential measurement artifacts. Minor types of INP/IPR include soot and Pb-bearing particles. The Pb-bearing particles are mainly present as an internal mixture with other particle types. Most samples showed a maximum of the INP/IPR size distribution at 200

  4. Comparison of mineral dust and droplet residuals measured with two single particle aerosol mass spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonaschütz, Anna; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Zawadowicz, Maria; Hiranuma, Naruki; Hitzenberger, Regina; Cziczo, Daniel; DeMott, Paul; Möhler, Ottmar

    2017-04-01

    Single Particle mass spectrometers are used to gain information on the chemical composition of individual aerosol particles, aerosol mixing state, and other valuable aerosol characteristics. During the Mass Spectrometry Intercomparison at the Fifth Ice Nucleation (FIN-01) Workshop, the new LAAPTOF single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (AeroMegt GmbH) was conducting simultaneous measurements together with the PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry) instrument. The aerosol particles were sampled from the AIDA chamber during ice cloud expansion experiments. Samples of mineral dust and ice droplet residuals were measured simultaneously. In this work, three expansion experiments are chosen for a comparison between the two mass spectrometers. A fuzzy clustering routine is used to group the spectra. Cluster centers describing the ensemble of particles are compared. First results show that while differences in the peak heights are likely due to the use of an amplifier in PALMS, cluster centers are comparable.

  5. Optical trap for both transparent and absorbing particles in air using a single shaped laser beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Brandon; Pan, Yong-Le

    2015-06-15

    Optical trapping of airborne particles is emerging as an essential tool in applications ranging from online characterization of living cells and aerosols to particle transport and delivery. However, existing optical trapping techniques using a single laser beam can trap only transparent particles (via the radiative pressure force) or absorbing particles (via the photophoretic force), but not particles of either type-limiting the utility of trapping-enabled aerosol characterization techniques. Here, we present the first optical trapping technique capable of trapping both transparent and absorbing particles with arbitrary morphology using a single shaped laser beam. Such a general-purpose optical trapping mechanism could enable new applications such as trapping-enabled aerosol characterization with high specificity.

  6. Single-particle characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) ash particles using low- Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, HeeJin; Ro, Chul-Un

    Environmentally benign treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) ashes has been a worldwide issue since more countries are implementing incineration to reduce waste volume. A single-particle analytical technique, named low- Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low- Z particle EPMA) was applied to characterize MSW fly- and bottom-ash particle samples collected from two municipal incinerators in Korea. According to their chemical composition, many distinctive particle types were identified. For fly ash sample collected in one incinerator (sample S1), where lime slurry injection is used for acid-gas treatment, CaCO 3-containing particles (28.4%) are the most abundantly encountered, followed by carbonaceous (23.6%), SiO 2-containing (13.8%), NaCl-containing (13.1%), and iron-containing (10.5%) particles. For fly ash sample collected at the other incinerator (sample S2), NaCl-containing particles (40.4%) are the most abundantly encountered, followed by iron-containing (29.1%), carbonaceous (11.8%), CaCO 3-containing (2.2%), and SiO 2-containing (7.0%) particles. For bottom ash sample collected at one incinerator (sample S3), iron-containing particles (46.6%) are the most abundantly encountered, followed by CaCO 3-containing (17.3%), carbonaceous (16.6%), and Si and/or Al oxide-containing (15.8%) particles. For bottom ash sample collected in the other incinerator (sample S4), iron-containing particles (63.4%) are also the most abundantly encountered, followed by carbonaceous (14.0%), CaCO 3-containing (10.0%), and Si and/or Al oxide-containing (6.1%) particles. Chemical compositions of the two bottom ash samples are not much different compared to those of the two fly ash samples. It was demonstrated that the single-particle characterization using this low- Z particle EPMA technique provided detailed information on various types of chemical species in the MSW ash samples. In addition, the technique has advantage over conventional analytical techniques in the

  7. Single crystal particles of a mesoporous mixed transition metal oxide with a wormhole structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B; Lu, D; Kondo, J N; Domen, K

    2001-10-21

    A new type of mesoporous mixed transition metal oxide of Nb and Ta (NbTa-TIT-1) has been prepared through a two-step calcination, which consists of single crystal particles with wormhole mesoporous structure.

  8. Optimal Estimation of Diffusion Coefficients from Noisy Time-Lapse-Recorded Single-Particle Trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian Lyngby

    2012-01-01

    Optimal Estimation of Diusion Coecients from Noisy Time-Lapse- Measurements of Single-Particle Trajectories Single-particle tracking techniques allow quantitative measurements of diusion at the single-molecule level. Recorded time-series are mostly short and contain considerable measurement noise....... The standard method for estimating diusion coecients from single-particle trajectories is based on leastsquares tting to the experimentally measured mean square displacements. This method is highly inecient, since it ignores the high correlations inherent in these. We derive the exact maximum likelihood...... parameter values. We extend the methods to particles diusing on a uctuating substrate, e.g., exible or semi exible polymers such as DNA, and show that uctuations induce an important bias in the estimates of diusion coecients if they are not accounted for. We apply the methods to obtain precise estimates...

  9. Single-particle colloid tracking in four dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Stephen M; Hong, Liang; Kim, Minsu; Granick, Steve

    2006-11-21

    Coating a close-packed fluorescent colloid monolayer with a nanometer-thick metal film followed by sonication in liquid produces modulated optical nanoprobes. The metal coating modulates the fluorescence as these structures rotate in suspension, enabling the use of these particles as probes to monitor both rotational and center-of-mass (translational) dynamics in complex environments. Here, we demonstrate methods to simultaneously measure two translational and two rotational degrees of freedom, with excellent agreement to theory. The capability to determine two angles of rotation opens several new avenues of future research.

  10. Single Particle energy levels in ODD-A Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasijo, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Singe particle energies for atomic nuclei with odd-A number of nucleons, i.e. nuclei possessing odd number of protons or odd number of neutrons, were calculated based on Nilsson's theory, and then the diagrams were made. the energy diagram is in the from of plot of energies as function of deformations, entities identifying the deviations from the spherical shape. The energy calculations were done using FORTRAN 77 language of PC (Personal Computer) version with Microsoft Fortran Power Station compiler, which was then combined with WORD version 6.0 and EXCEL version 5.0 of WINDOWS WORKGROUP to make the plot

  11. Single particle aerodynamic relaxation time analyzer. [for aerosol pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Kirsch, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    An instrument employing a laser Doppler velocimeter and a microphone to measure the phase lag of the motion of aerosol particulates relative to the motion of the fluid medium within an acoustic field is described. The relaxation times and aerodynamic diameters of the particles or droplets are determined in real time from the measured values of phase lag; thus, the size analysis is independent of the electrostatic charges and refractive indices of the particulates. The instrument is suitable for analyzing the aerodynamic size spectrum of atmospheric particulate pollutants with aerodynamic diameters ranging from 0.1 to 10.0 microns.

  12. A clustering approach to multireference alignment of single-particle projections in electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Sorzano, C.O.S.; Bilbao-Castro, J.R.; Shkolnisky, Y.; Alcorlo, M.; Melero, R.; Caffarena-Fernández, G.; Li, M.; Xu, G.; Marabini, R.; Carazo, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional analysis of projections of single particles acquired by an electron microscope is a useful tool to help identifying the different kinds of projections present in a dataset and their different projection directions. Such analysis is also useful to distinguish between different kinds of particles or different particle conformations. In this paper we introduce a new algorithm for performing two-dimensional multireference alignment and classification that is based on a Hierarchica...

  13. Production and Evaluation of Virus-Like Particles Displaying Immunogenic Epitopes of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambika Mosale Venkatesh Murthy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS is the most significant infectious disease currently affecting the swine industry worldwide. Several inactivated and modified live vaccines (MLV have been developed to curb PRRSV infections. However, the efficacy and safety of these vaccines are unsatisfactory, and hence, there is a strong demand for the development of new PRRS universal vaccines. Virus-like particle (VLP-based vaccines are gaining increasing acceptance compared to subunit vaccines, as they present the antigens in a more veritable conformation and are readily recognized by the immune system. Hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg has been successfully used as a carrier for more than 100 viral sequences. In this study, hybrid HBcAg VLPs were generated by fusion of the conserved protective epitopes of PRRSV and expressed in E. coli. An optimized purification protocol was developed to obtain hybrid HBcAg VLP protein from the inclusion bodies. This hybrid HBcAg VLP protein self-assembled to 23-nm VLPs that were shown to block virus infection of susceptible cells when tested on MARC 145 cells. Together with the safety of non-infectious and non-replicable VLPs and the low cost of production through E. coli fermentation, this hybrid VLP could be a promising vaccine candidate for PRRS.

  14. Structure of the hepatitis E virus-like particle suggests mechanisms for virus assembly and receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guu, Tom S.Y.; Liu, Zheng; Ye, Qiaozhen; Mata, Douglas A.; Li, Kunpeng; Yin, Changcheng; Zhang, Jingqiang; Tao, Yizhi Jane; (Sun Yat-Sen); (Rice); (Peking)

    2009-08-25

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a small, non-enveloped RNA virus in the family Hepeviridae, is associated with endemic and epidemic acute viral hepatitis in developing countries. Our 3.5-{angstrom} structure of a HEV-like particle (VLP) shows that each capsid protein contains 3 linear domains that form distinct structural elements: S, the continuous capsid; P1, 3-fold protrusions; and P2, 2-fold spikes. The S domain adopts a jelly-roll fold commonly observed in small RNA viruses. The P1 and P2 domains both adopt {beta}-barrel folds. Each domain possesses a potential polysaccharide-binding site that may function in cell-receptor binding. Sugar binding to P1 at the capsid protein interface may lead to capsid disassembly and cell entry. Structural modeling indicates that native T = 3 capsid contains flat dimers, with less curvature than those of T = 1 VLP. Our findings significantly advance the understanding of HEV molecular biology and have application to the development of vaccines and antiviral medications.

  15. Technical Note: The single particle soot photometer fails to reliably detect PALAS soot nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gysel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The single particle soot photometer (SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence (LII for the measurement of atmospheric black carbon (BC particles. The BC mass concentration is obtained by combining quantitative detection of BC mass in single particles with a counting efficiency of 100% above its lower detection limit. It is commonly accepted that a particle must contain at least several tenths of a femtogram BC in order to be detected by the SP2.

    Here we show the result that most BC particles from a PALAS spark discharge soot generator remain undetected by the SP2, even if their BC mass, as independently determined with an aerosol particle mass analyser (APM, is clearly above the typical lower detection limit of the SP2. Comparison of counting efficiency and effective density data of PALAS soot with flame generated soot (combustion aerosol standard burner, CAST, fullerene soot and carbon black particles (Cabot Regal 400R reveals that particle morphology can affect the SP2's lower detection limit. PALAS soot particles are fractal-like agglomerates of very small primary particles with a low fractal dimension, resulting in a very low effective density. Such loosely packed particles behave like "the sum of individual primary particles" in the SP2's laser. Accordingly, most PALAS soot particles remain undetected as the SP2's laser intensity is insufficient to heat the primary particles to their vaporisation temperature because of their small size (Dpp ≈ 5–10 nm. Previous knowledge from pulsed laser-induced incandescence indicated that particle morphology might have an effect on the SP2's lower detection limit, however, an increase of the lower detection limit by a factor of ∼5–10, as reported here for PALAS soot, was not expected.

    In conclusion, the SP2's lower detection limit at a certain laser power depends primarily on the total BC mass per particle for compact particles with sufficiently high effective

  16. The influence of transport phenomena on the fluidized bed combustion of a single carbon particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1990-01-01

    The burning rate and temperature of the carbon particles are known to affect the efficiency of a fluidized bed combustor, and also the emission levels of undesired noxious components. The main results of an extensive study on the fluidized bed combustion behaviour of a single carbon particle [1] are

  17. Efficiencies of dynamic Monte Carlo algorithms for off-lattice particle systems with a single impurity

    KAUST Repository

    Novotny, M.A.

    2010-02-01

    The efficiency of dynamic Monte Carlo algorithms for off-lattice systems composed of particles is studied for the case of a single impurity particle. The theoretical efficiencies of the rejection-free method and of the Monte Carlo with Absorbing Markov Chains method are given. Simulation results are presented to confirm the theoretical efficiencies. © 2010.

  18. Multi-Color Single Particle Tracking with Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Brewer, J. R.; Lagerholm, B. C.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have long promised to revolutionize fluorescence detection to include even applications requiring simultaneous multi-species detection at single molecule sensitivity. Despite the early promise, the unique optical properties of QDs have not yet been fully exploited in e. g...

  19. Role of single-particle and pair condensates in Bose systems with arbitrary intensity of interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Peletminskii

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study a superfluid Bose system with single-particle and pair condensates on the basis of a half-phenomenological theory of a Bose liquid not involving the weakness of interparticle interaction. The coupled equations describing the equilibrium state of such system are derived from the variational principle for entropy. These equations are analyzed at zero temperature both analytically and numerically. It is shown that the fraction of particles in the single-particle and pair condensates essentially depends on the total density of the system. At densities attainable in condensates of alkali-metal atoms, almost all particles are in the single-particle condensate. The pair condensate fraction grows with increasing total density and becomes dominant. It is shown that at density of liquid helium, the single-particle condensate fraction is less than 10% that agrees with experimental data on inelastic neutron scattering, Monte Carlo calculations and other theoretical predictions. The ground state energy, pressure, and compressibility are found for the system under consideration. The spectrum of single-particle excitations is also analyzed.

  20. Tandem fusion of hepatitis B core antigen allows assembly of virus-like particles in bacteria and plants with enhanced capacity to accommodate foreign proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadrien Peyret

    Full Text Available The core protein of the hepatitis B virus, HBcAg, assembles into highly immunogenic virus-like particles (HBc VLPs when expressed in a variety of heterologous systems. Specifically, the major insertion region (MIR on the HBcAg protein allows the insertion of foreign sequences, which are then exposed on the tips of surface spike structures on the outside of the assembled particle. Here, we present a novel strategy which aids the display of whole proteins on the surface of HBc particles. This strategy, named tandem core, is based on the production of the HBcAg dimer as a single polypeptide chain by tandem fusion of two HBcAg open reading frames. This allows the insertion of large heterologous sequences in only one of the two MIRs in each spike, without compromising VLP formation. We present the use of tandem core technology in both plant and bacterial expression systems. The results show that tandem core particles can be produced with unmodified MIRs, or with one MIR in each tandem dimer modified to contain the entire sequence of GFP or of a camelid nanobody. Both inserted proteins are correctly folded and the nanobody fused to the surface of the tandem core particle (which we name tandibody retains the ability to bind to its cognate antigen. This technology paves the way for the display of natively folded proteins on the surface of HBc particles either through direct fusion or through non-covalent attachment via a nanobody.

  1. Minigenomes, transcription and replication competent virus-like particles and beyond: reverse genetics systems for filoviruses and other negative stranded hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenen, Thomas; Groseth, Allison; de Kok-Mercado, Fabian; Kuhn, Jens H; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria

    2011-08-01

    Reverse-genetics systems are powerful tools enabling researchers to study the replication cycle of RNA viruses, including filoviruses and other hemorrhagic fever viruses, as well as to discover new antivirals. They include full-length clone systems as well as a number of life cycle modeling systems. Full-length clone systems allow for the generation of infectious, recombinant viruses, and thus are an important tool for studying the virus replication cycle in its entirety. In contrast, life cycle modeling systems such as minigenome and transcription and replication competent virus-like particle systems can be used to simulate and dissect parts of the virus life cycle outside of containment facilities. Minigenome systems are used to model viral genome replication and transcription, whereas transcription and replication competent virus-like particle systems also model morphogenesis and budding as well as infection of target cells. As such, these modeling systems have tremendous potential to further the discovery and screening of new antivirals targeting hemorrhagic fever viruses. This review provides an overview of currently established reverse genetics systems for hemorrhagic fever-causing negative-sense RNA viruses, with a particular emphasis on filoviruses, and the potential application of these systems for antiviral research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 4-D single particle tracking of synthetic and proteinaceous microspheres reveals preferential movement of nuclear particles along chromatin - poor tracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacher, Christian P; Reichenzeller, Michaela; Athale, Chaitanya; Herrmann, Harald; Eils, Roland

    2004-11-23

    The dynamics of nuclear organization, nuclear bodies and RNPs in particular has been the focus of many studies. To understand their function, knowledge of their spatial nuclear position and temporal translocation is essential. Typically, such studies generate a wealth of data that require novel methods in image analysis and computational tools to quantitatively track particle movement on the background of moving cells and shape changing nuclei. We developed a novel 4-D image processing platform (TIKAL) for the work with laser scanning and wide field microscopes. TIKAL provides a registration software for correcting global movements and local deformations of cells as well as 2-D and 3-D tracking software. With this new tool, we studied the dynamics of two different types of nuclear particles, namely nuclear bodies made from GFP-NLS-vimentin and microinjected 0.1 mum - wide polystyrene beads, by live cell time-lapse microscopy combined with single particle tracking and mobility analysis. We now provide a tool for the automatic 3-D analysis of particle movement in parallel with the acquisition of chromatin density data. Kinetic analysis revealed 4 modes of movement: confined obstructed, normal diffusion and directed motion. Particle tracking on the background of stained chromatin revealed that particle movement is directly related to local reorganization of chromatin. Further a direct comparison of particle movement in the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm exhibited an entirely different kinetic behaviour of vimentin particles in both compartments. The kinetics of nuclear particles were slightly affected by depletion of ATP and significantly disturbed by disruption of actin and microtubule networks. Moreover, the hydration state of the nucleus had a strong impact on the mobility of nuclear bodies since both normal diffusion and directed motion were entirely abolished when cells were challenged with 0.6 M sorbitol. This effect correlated with the compaction of chromatin

  3. Chimeric Hepatitis B core antigen virus-like particles displaying the envelope domain III of dengue virus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Upasana; Tyagi, Poornima; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Khanna, Navin

    2012-07-13

    Dengue is a global public health problem for which no drug or vaccine is available. Currently, there is increasing interest in developing non-replicating dengue vaccines based on a discrete antigenic domain of the major structural protein of dengue viruses (DENVs), known as envelope domain III (EDIII). The use of bio-nanoparticles consisting of recombinant viral structural polypeptides, better known as virus-like particles (VLPs), has emerged as a potential platform technology for vaccine development. This work explores the feasibility of developing nanoparticles based on E. coli-expressed recombinant Hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) designed to display EDIII moiety of DENV on the surface. We designed a synthetic gene construct encoding HBcAg containing an EDIII insert in its c/e1 loop. The fusion antigen HBcAg-EDIII-2 was expressed in E. coli, purified to near homogeneity using Ni+2 affinity chromatography and demonstrated to assemble into discrete 35-40 nm VLPs by electron microscopy. Competitive ELISA analyses showed that the EDIII-2 moieties of the VLPs are accessible to anti-EDIII-2-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, suggesting that they are surface-displayed. The VLPs were highly immunogenic eliciting high titer anti-EDIII-2 antibodies that were able to recognize, bind and neutralize infectious DENV based on ELISA, immunofluorescence and virus-neutralization assays. This work demonstrates that HBcAg-derived nanoparticles can serve as a useful platform for the display of DENV EDIII. The EDIII-displaying nanoparticles may have potential applications in diagnostics/vaccines for dengue.

  4. Chimeric Hepatitis B core antigen virus-like particles displaying the envelope domain III of dengue virus type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Upasana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue is a global public health problem for which no drug or vaccine is available. Currently, there is increasing interest in developing non-replicating dengue vaccines based on a discrete antigenic domain of the major structural protein of dengue viruses (DENVs, known as envelope domain III (EDIII. The use of bio-nanoparticles consisting of recombinant viral structural polypeptides, better known as virus-like particles (VLPs, has emerged as a potential platform technology for vaccine development. This work explores the feasibility of developing nanoparticles based on E. coli-expressed recombinant Hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg designed to display EDIII moiety of DENV on the surface. Findings We designed a synthetic gene construct encoding HBcAg containing an EDIII insert in its c/e1 loop. The fusion antigen HBcAg-EDIII-2 was expressed in E. coli, purified to near homogeneity using Ni+2 affinity chromatography and demonstrated to assemble into discrete 35–40 nm VLPs by electron microscopy. Competitive ELISA analyses showed that the EDIII-2 moieties of the VLPs are accessible to anti-EDIII-2-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, suggesting that they are surface-displayed. The VLPs were highly immunogenic eliciting high titer anti-EDIII-2 antibodies that were able to recognize, bind and neutralize infectious DENV based on ELISA, immunofluorescence and virus-neutralization assays. Conclusion This work demonstrates that HBcAg-derived nanoparticles can serve as a useful platform for the display of DENV EDIII. The EDIII-displaying nanoparticles may have potential applications in diagnostics/vaccines for dengue.

  5. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    Enkephalin, an endogeneous substance in the human brain showing morphine-like biological functions, has been detected at the single molecule level based on the surface-enhanced Raman signal of the ring breathing mode of phenylalanine, which is one building block of the molecule. For enhancing...... the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  6. Development and characterization of a single particle laser ablation mass spectrometer (SPLAM for organic aerosol studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gaie-Levrel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A single particle instrument was developed for real-time analysis of organic aerosol. This instrument, named Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry (SPLAM, samples particles using an aerodynamic lens system for which the theoretical performances were calculated. At the outlet of this system, particle detection and sizing are realized by using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Polystyrene Latex (PSL, sodium chloride (NaCl and dioctylphtalate (DOP particles were used to characterize and calibrate optical detection of SPLAM. The optical detection limit (DL and detection efficiency (DE were determined using size-selected DOP particles. The DE ranges from 0.1 to 90% for 100 and 350 nm DOP particles respectively and the SPLAM instrument is able to detect and size-resolve particles as small as 110–120 nm. During optical detection, particle scattered light from the two diode lasers, is detected by two photomultipliers and the detected signals are used to trigger UV excimer laser (λ = 248 nm used for one-step laser desorption ionization (LDI of individual aerosol particles. The formed ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles. The TOF-MS detection limit for gaseous aromatic compounds was determined to be 0.85 × 10−15 kg (∼4 × 103 molecules. DOP particles were also used to test the overall operation of the instrument. The analysis of a secondary organic aerosol, formed in a smog chamber by the ozonolysis of indene, is presented as a first application of the instrument. Single particle mass spectra were obtained with an effective hit rate of 8%. Some of these mass spectra were found to be very different from one particle to another possibly reflecting chemical differences within the investigated indene SOA particles. Our study shows that an exhaustive statistical analysis, over hundreds of particles

  7. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  8. Single particle studies of black liquor gasification under pressurized conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitty, K.; Backman, R.; Hupa, M.; Backman, P.; Ek, P.; Hulden, S.T.; Kullberg, M.; Sorvari, V.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide experimental data relevant to pressurized black liquor gasification concepts. Specifically, the following two goals will be achieved: Data on swelling, char yields and component release during pressurized pyrolysis of small samples of black liquor will be obtained. The reactivity and physical behavior of single black liquor droplets during simultaneous pyrolysis and gasification will be investigated. The structure and composition of black liquor char during formation and conversion will be studied. (orig.)

  9. Single-particle and collective states in transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhenry, I.; Suomijaervi, T.; Giai, N. van

    1993-01-01

    The possibility to excite collective states in transfer reactions induced by heavy ions is studied. Collective states are described within the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) and the collectivity is defined according to the number of configurations contributing to a given state. The particle transfer is described within the Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA). Calculations are performed for two different stripping reactions: 207 Pb( 20 Ne, 19 Ne) 208 Pb and 59 Co( 20 Ne, 19 F) 60 Ni at 48 MeV/nucleon for which experimental data are available. The calculation shows that a sizeable fraction of collective strength can be excited in these reactions. The comparison with experiment shows that this parameter-free calculation qualitatively explains the data. (author) 19 refs.; 10 figs

  10. Cantilever-based micro-particle filter with simultaneous single particle detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noeth, Nadine-Nicole; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Boisen, Anja

    2011-01-01

    -particles from a liquid. A hole-array is integrated into a micro-cantilever, which is inserted into a microfluidic channel perpendicular to the flow. A metal pad at the apex of the cantilever enables an optical read-out of the deflection of the cantilever. When a micro-particle is too large to pass a hole...... in the cantilever, clogging of the holes increases the flow resistance of the cantilever. This causes a bending of the device, which can be detected by the optical read-out system. By arranging an array of such cantilevers with different hole sizes, separation by size can be achieved. In this paper a proof...

  11. Single molecule experiments challenge the strict wave-particle dualism of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Karl Otto

    2010-01-21

    Single molecule techniques improve our understanding of the photon and light. If the single photon double slit experiment is performed at the "single photon limit" of a multi-atom light source, faint light pulses with more than one photon hamper the interpretation. Single molecules, quantum dots or defect centres in crystals should be used as light source. "Single photon detectors" do not meet their promise-only "photon number resolving single photon detectors" do so. Particularly, the accumulation time argument, the only safe basis for the postulate of a strictly particle like photon, has so far not yet been verified.

  12. Single Molecule Experiments Challenge the Strict Wave-Particle Dualism of Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Otto Greulich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Single molecule techniques improve our understanding of the photon and light. If the single photon double slit experiment is performed at the “single photon limit” of a multi-atom light source, faint light pulses with more than one photon hamper the interpretation. Single molecules, quantum dots or defect centres in crystals should be used as light source. “Single photon detectors” do not meet their promise―only “photon number resolving single photon detectors” do so. Particularly, the accumulation time argument, the only safe basis for the postulate of a strictly particle like photon, has so far not yet been verified.

  13. Sensitive detection of multiple hepatitis A virus genotypes with a single polony-based assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is one of the major causes of non-bacterial gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. HAV is mostly transmitted via direct person-to-person contact, or by consumption of contaminated foods and water. Since only a few viral particles may cause disease, detection of low levels of HA...

  14. Single particle radiation between high spin states in /sup 147/Gd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borggreen, J.; Sletten, G.; Bjoernholm, S.; Pedersen, J.; Del Zoppo, A.; Radford, D.C.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Chowdhury, P.; Emling, H.; Frekers, D.

    1987-05-04

    Transitions above the T/sub 1/2/=550 ns, 8.59 MeV isomer in /sup 147/Gd have been studied using the (/sup 30/Si, 5n) reaction. Results from ..gamma gamma.. coincidence, angular distribution and recoil distance measurements are combined to establish a level scheme up to 16.9 MeV and I approx. = 79/2. Single particle configurations are assigned on the basis of the deformed independent particle model. The single particle nature of the highest spin states and the apparent lack of collectivity is discussed.

  15. Measurement of switching field reduction of single domain particles in a two-dimensional array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vértesy, G.; Pardavi-Horvath, M.

    2001-12-01

    The mechanism of switching of uniaxial, single domain, single crystalline epitaxial garnet particles on a two-dimensional square array was investigated, and the reason for the wide distribution of switching fields was studied. In spite that the particles were found very uniform, the existence of soft magnetic defects, not connected to visible crystalline or manufacturing defects of the material, was found to be responsible for the broad distribution of the switching field, Hc=280±85 Oe, as measured on a large number of individual particles. Very good quantitative correlation was found between the strength of the these defects and the switching field.

  16. Affinity selection of Nipah and Hendra virus-related vaccine candidates from a complex random peptide library displayed on bacteriophage virus-like particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peabody, David S.; Chackerian, Bryce; Ashley, Carlee; Carnes, Eric; Negrete, Oscar

    2017-01-24

    The invention relates to virus-like particles of bacteriophage MS2 (MS2 VLPs) displaying peptide epitopes or peptide mimics of epitopes of Nipah Virus envelope glycoprotein that elicit an immune response against Nipah Virus upon vaccination of humans or animals. Affinity selection on Nipah Virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies using random sequence peptide libraries on MS2 VLPs selected peptides with sequence similarity to peptide sequences found within the envelope glycoprotein of Nipah itself, thus identifying the epitopes the antibodies recognize. The selected peptide sequences themselves are not necessarily identical in all respects to a sequence within Nipah Virus glycoprotein, and therefore may be referred to as epitope mimics VLPs displaying these epitope mimics can serve as vaccine. On the other hand, display of the corresponding wild-type sequence derived from Nipah Virus and corresponding to the epitope mapped by affinity selection, may also be used as a vaccine.

  17. [Analysis of Single Particle Aging and Mixing State at an Agriculture Site (Quzhou) in the North China Plain in Summer Using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zi-long; Zeng, Li-mm; Dong, I-Iua-Bin; Li, Mei; Zhu, Tong

    2016-04-15

    To characterize the size distribution and chemical ompsitins f abiet prtices t a agicuturesit intheNorh o Chinese Plain, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed from June 30 to July 8, 2013. A total of 230,152 particles in the size range of 0.2-2.0 pm were chemically analyzed with both positive and negative ion spectra. The results revealed that aerosol could he classified into eight dominant groups, including elemental carbon (EC, 55.5%), organic carbon (OC, 10.7%), alkalis (Na-K, 17.4%), other metals (1.7%), Fe-rich (6.3%), Pb-rich (3.1%), dust (4.8%), and other (0.8%). The observed eight types of particles contained secondary components such as 46NO2-, 62NO3-, 96SO3-, 96SO4-, 97HSO4-, showing that they probably went through different aging processes. The analysis of particle size distribution showed that 700-800 nm was the peak value of all particles, and that dust and Fe particles were mainly in the coarse size range. EC particles subtype group research revealed EC particles tended to be aging with the above mentioned secondary ions and eventually led to a particle type conversion from EC to the less aging ECN and the more serious aging ECS, the diurnal variation of which was obviously negatively correlated, and there was a possibility of forming OC/EC mixture with the adsorption of secondary organic matter on EC surface.

  18. Effect of particle shape and structure on the results of single-particle light-scattering size analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umhauer, H; Bottlinger, M

    1991-11-20

    To evaluate quantitatively the influence exerted by the shape and structure of nonspherical, nonideal particles on the results of single-particle scattered-light size analysis, measurements were conducted with individual particles of different materials (glass, limestone, and quartz). For this purpose, the particles were suspended in an electrodynamic balance and repeatedly passed through the analyzer's measuring volume with a continually changing random orientation. The scattered-light signal spectra thus obtained specify the probability with which a certain pulse height is induced when the particle passes once through the measuring volume at a given coincidental orientation. The spectra reflect the material-characteristic influence. They allow the loss of resolution of common scattered-light size analyses to be assessed and algorithms (matrices) to be compiled with which the shape and structure influence may be mathematically eliminated. Because a shape and structure independent size parameter is also determined from the individual particles, exact calibration curves can be derived in which the shape and structure influence are incorporated.

  19. Probing the Evaporation Dynamics of Mixed SOA/Squalane Particles Using Size-Resolved Composition and Single-Particle Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ellis Shipley; Saleh, Rawad; Donahue, Neil M

    2015-08-18

    An analysis of the formation and evaporation of mixed-particles containing squalane (a surrogate for hydrophobic primary organic aerosol, POA) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is presented. In these experiments, one material (D62-squalane or SOA from α-pinene + O3) was prepared first to serve as surface area for condensation of the other, forming the mixed-particles. The mixed-particles were then subjected to a heating-ramp from 22 to 44 °C. We were able to determine that (1) almost all of the SOA mass is comprised of material less volatile than D62-squalane; (2) AMS collection efficiency in these mixed-particle systems can be parametrized as a function of the relative mass fraction of the components; and (3) the vast majority of D62-squalane is able to evaporate from the mixed particles, and does so on the same time scale regardless of the order of preparation. We also performed two-population mixing experiments to directly test whether D62-squalane and SOA from α-pinene + O3 form a single solution or two separate phases. We find that these two OA types are immiscible, which informs our inference of the morphology of the mixed-particles. If the morphology is core-shell and dictated by the order of preparation, these data indicate that squalane is able to diffuse relatively quickly through the SOA shell, implying that there are no major diffusion limitations.

  20. Single-Particle Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Utilizing a Femtosecond Desorption and Ionization Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadowicz, Maria A; Abdelmonem, Ahmed; Mohr, Claudia; Saathoff, Harald; Froyd, Karl D; Murphy, Daniel M; Leisner, Thomas; Cziczo, Daniel J

    2015-12-15

    Single-particle time-of-flight mass spectrometry has now been used since the 1990s to determine particle-to-particle variability and internal mixing state. Instruments commonly use 193 nm excimer or 266 nm frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG lasers to ablate and ionize particles in a single step. We describe the use of a femtosecond laser system (800 nm wavelength, 100 fs pulse duration) in combination with an existing single-particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The goal of this project was to determine the suitability of a femtosecond laser for single-particle studies via direct comparison to the excimer laser (193 nm wavelength, ∼10 ns pulse duration) usually used with the instrument. Laser power, frequency, and polarization were varied to determine the effect on mass spectra. Atmospherically relevant materials that are often used in laboratory studies, ammonium nitrate and sodium chloride, were used for the aerosol. Detection of trace amounts of a heavy metal, lead, in an ammonium nitrate matrix was also investigated. The femtosecond ionization had a large air background not present with the 193 nm excimer and produced more multiply charged ions. Overall, we find that femtosecond laser ablation and ionization of aerosol particles is not radically different than that provided by a 193 nm excimer.

  1. The effect of transitional particles driven by single wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Yunqing; Xia Mengfen

    1987-05-01

    The unperturbed separatrix crossing driven by a single wave in a tokamak plasma is discussed. The separatrix crossing is followed by a mixing process, and a small-scale structure occurs in the distribution function in h-ψ plane. The separatrix crossing is a convective process in h-ψ plane, and there is a definite crossing channel. The convective flux and the net flux in h-direction are calculated. The separatrix crossing is accompanied by a radial flux, which is composed of a directional flux and a diffusion flux. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs

  2. Deflection of high energy channeled charged particles by elastically bent silicon single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, W.M.; Kim, I.J.; Pisharodoy, M.; Salman, S.M.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, G.H.; Wijayawardana, R.; Forster, J.S.; Mitchell, I.V.; Baker, S.I.; Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Toohig, T.E.; Avdeichikov, V.V.; Ellison, J.A.; Siffert, P.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment has been carried out to observe the deflection of charged particles by planar channeling in bent single crystals of silicon for protons with energy up to 180 GeV. Anomolous loss of particles from the center point of a three point bending apparatus was observed at high incident particle energy. This effect has been exploited to fashion a 'dechanneling spectrometer' to study dechanneling effects due to centripital displacement of channeled particle trajectories in a bent crystal. The bending losses generally conform to the predictions of calculations based on a classical model. (orig.)

  3. The on-line analysis of aerosol-delivered pharmaceuticals via single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrical, Bradley D; Balaxi, Maria; Fergenson, David

    2015-07-15

    The use of single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was evaluated for the analysis of inhaled pharmaceuticals to determine the mass distribution of the individual active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in both single ingredient and combination drug products. SPAMS is an analytical technique where the individual aerodynamic diameters and chemical compositions of many aerosol particles are determined in real-time. The analysis was performed using a Livermore Instruments SPAMS 3.0, which allowed the efficient analysis of aerosol particles with broad size distributions and can acquire data even under a very large particle load. Data similar to what would normally require roughly three days of experimentation and analysis was collected in a five minute period and analyzed automatically. The results were computed to be comparable to those returned by a typical Next Generation Impactor (NGI) particle size distribution experiment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Tagged particle in single-file diffusion with arbitrary initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cividini, J.; Kundu, A.

    2017-08-01

    We compute the full probability distribution of the positions of a tagged particle exactly for the given arbitrary initial positions of the particles, and for general single-particle propagators. We consider the thermodynamic limit of our exact expressions in quenched and annealed settings. For a particular class of single-particle propagators, the exact formula is expressed in a simple integral form in the quenched case whereas in the annealed case, it is expressed as a simple combination of Bessel functions. In particular, we focus on the step and the power-law initial configurations. In the former case, a drift is induced even when the one-particle propagators are symmetric. On the other hand, in the later case the scaling of the cumulants of the position of the tracer differs from the uniform case. We provide numerical verifications of our results.

  5. Silver nanoflowers for single-particle SERS with 10 pM sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shrawan; Muhammed Ajmal, C; Baik, Seunghyun; Kim, Jeongyong

    2017-11-17

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has received considerable attention as a noninvasive optical sensing technique with ultrahigh sensitivity. While numerous types of metallic particles have been actively investigated as SERS substrates, the development of new SERS agents with high sensitivity and their reliable characterization are still required. Here we report the preparation and characterization of flower-shaped silver (Ag) nanoparticles that exhibit high-sensitivity single-particle SERS performance. Ag nanoflowers (NFs) with bud sizes in the range 220-620 nm were synthesized by the wet synthesis method. The densely packed nanoscale petals with thicknesses in the range 9-22 nm exhibit a large number of hot spots that significantly enhance their plasmonic activity. A single Ag NF particle (530-620 nm) can detect as little as 10 -11 M 4-mercaptobenzoic acid, and thus provides a sensitivity three orders of SERS magnitude greater than that of a spherical Ag nanoparticle. The analytical enhancement factors for single Ag NF particles were found to be as high as 8.0 × 10 9 , providing unprecedented high SERS detectivity at the single particle level. Here we present an unambiguous and systematic assessment of the SERS performances of the Ag NFs and demonstrate that they provide highly sensitive sensing platforms by single SERS particle.

  6. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single-particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Healy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single-particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been determined using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC, organic aerosol (OA, ammonium, nitrate, sulfate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, a thermal–optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC. ATOFMS-derived estimated mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67–0.78, and 10 discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorisation, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulfate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA / EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidised OA (OOA was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the range of primary and secondary organic aerosol mixing states in Paris. Examination of the

  7. Quantitative Evaluation of Protein Heterogeneity within Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bilali, Nabil; Duron, Johanne; Gingras, Diane; Lippé, Roger

    2017-05-15

    Several virulence genes have been identified thus far in the herpes simplex virus 1 genome. It is also generally accepted that protein heterogeneity among virions further impacts viral fitness. However, linking this variability directly with infectivity has been challenging at the individual viral particle level. To address this issue, we resorted to flow cytometry (flow virometry), a powerful approach we recently employed to analyze individual viral particles, to identify which tegument proteins vary and directly address if such variability is biologically relevant. We found that the stoichiometry of the U L 37, ICP0, and VP11/12 tegument proteins in virions is more stable than the VP16 and VP22 tegument proteins, which varied significantly among viral particles. Most interestingly, viruses sorted for their high VP16 or VP22 content yielded modest but reproducible increases in infectivity compared to their corresponding counterparts containing low VP16 or VP22 content. These findings were corroborated for VP16 in short interfering RNA experiments but proved intriguingly more complex for VP22. An analysis by quantitative Western blotting revealed substantial alterations of virion composition upon manipulation of individual tegument proteins and suggests that VP22 protein levels acted indirectly on viral fitness. These findings reaffirm the interdependence of the virion components and corroborate that viral fitness is influenced not only by the genome of viruses but also by the stoichiometry of proteins within each virion. IMPORTANCE The ability of viruses to spread in animals has been mapped to several viral genes, but other factors are clearly involved, including virion heterogeneity. To directly probe whether the latter influences viral fitness, we analyzed the protein content of individual herpes simplex virus 1 particles using an innovative flow cytometry approach. The data confirm that some viral proteins are incorporated in more controlled amounts, while

  8. Mass Spectrometry of Single Particles Levitated in an Electrodynamic Balance: Applications to Laboratory Atmospheric Chemistry Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsall, A.; Krieger, U. K.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic changes to atmospheric aerosol particle composition (e.g., originating from evaporation/condensation, oxidative aging, or aqueous-phase chemical reactions) impact particle properties with importance for understanding particle effects on climate and human health. These changes can take place over the entire lifetime of an atmospheric particle, which can extend over multiple days. Previous laboratory studies of such processes have included analyzing single particles suspended in a levitation device, such as an electrodynamic balance (EDB), an optical levitator, or an acoustic trap, using optical detection techniques. However, studying chemically complex systems can require an analytical method, such as mass spectrometry, that provides more molecular specificity. Existing work coupling particle levitation with mass spectrometry is more limited and largely has consisted of acoustic levitation of millimeter-sized droplets.In this work an EDB has been coupled with a custom-built ionization source and commercial time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MS) as a platform for laboratory atmospheric chemistry research. Single charged particles (radius 10 μm) have been injected into an EDB, levitated for an arbitrarily long period of time, and then transferred to a vaporization-corona discharge ionization region for MS analysis. By analyzing a series of particles of identical composition, residing in the controlled environment of the EDB for varying times, we can trace the chemical evolution of a particle over hours or days, appropriate timescales for understanding transformations of atmospheric particles.To prove the concept of our EDB-MS system, we have studied the evaporation of particles consisting of polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules of mixed chain lengths, used as a benchmark system. Our system can quantify the composition of single particles (see Figure for sample spectrum of a single PEG-200 particle: PEG parent ions labeled with m/z, known PEG fragment ions

  9. Dengue virus capsid protein usurps lipid droplets for viral particle formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo M Samsa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is responsible for the highest rates of disease and mortality among the members of the Flavivirus genus. Dengue epidemics are still occurring around the world, indicating an urgent need of prophylactic vaccines and antivirals. In recent years, a great deal has been learned about the mechanisms of dengue virus genome amplification. However, little is known about the process by which the capsid protein recruits the viral genome during encapsidation. Here, we found that the mature capsid protein in the cytoplasm of dengue virus infected cells accumulates on the surface of ER-derived organelles named lipid droplets. Mutagenesis analysis using infectious dengue virus clones has identified specific hydrophobic amino acids, located in the center of the capsid protein, as key elements for lipid droplet association. Substitutions of amino acid L50 or L54 in the capsid protein disrupted lipid droplet targeting and impaired viral particle formation. We also report that dengue virus infection increases the number of lipid droplets per cell, suggesting a link between lipid droplet metabolism and viral replication. In this regard, we found that pharmacological manipulation of the amount of lipid droplets in the cell can be a means to control dengue virus replication. In addition, we developed a novel genetic system to dissociate cis-acting RNA replication elements from the capsid coding sequence. Using this system, we found that mislocalization of a mutated capsid protein decreased viral RNA amplification. We propose that lipid droplets play multiple roles during the viral life cycle; they could sequester the viral capsid protein early during infection and provide a scaffold for genome encapsidation.

  10. Digital atom interferometer with single particle control on a discretized space-time geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Andreas; Alberti, Andrea; Alt, Wolfgang; Belmechri, Noomen; Hild, Sebastian; Karski, Michał; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2012-06-19

    Engineering quantum particle systems, such as quantum simulators and quantum cellular automata, relies on full coherent control of quantum paths at the single particle level. Here we present an atom interferometer operating with single trapped atoms, where single particle wave packets are controlled through spin-dependent potentials. The interferometer is constructed from a sequence of discrete operations based on a set of elementary building blocks, which permit composing arbitrary interferometer geometries in a digital manner. We use this modularity to devise a space-time analogue of the well-known spin echo technique, yielding insight into decoherence mechanisms. We also demonstrate mesoscopic delocalization of single atoms with a separation-to-localization ratio exceeding 500; this result suggests their utilization beyond quantum logic applications as nano-resolution quantum probes in precision measurements, being able to measure potential gradients with precision 5 x 10(-4) in units of gravitational acceleration g.

  11. Modification of the respiratory syncytial virus f protein in virus-like particles impacts generation of B cell memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Madelyn R; McGinnes-Cullen, Lori W; Kenward, Sarah A; Willems, Kristin N; Woodland, Robert T; Morrison, Trudy G

    2014-09-01

    Immunization with virus-like particles (VLPs) containing the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) core proteins, NP and M, and two chimera proteins (F/F and H/G) containing the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) F- and G-protein ectodomains fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of NDV F and HN proteins, respectively, stimulated durable RSV-neutralizing antibodies, F-protein-specific long-lived, bone marrow-associated plasma cells (LLPCs), and B cell memory, in striking contrast to RSV infection, which did not (M. R. Schmidt, L. W. McGinnes, S. A. Kenward, K. N. Willems, R. T. Woodland, and T. G. Morrison, J. Virol. 86:11654-11662, 2012). Here we report the characterization of a VLP with an RSV F-protein ectodomain fused to the NDV F-protein heptad repeat 2 (HR2), transmembrane, and cytoplasmic domain sequences, creating a chimera with two tandem HR2 domains, one from the RSV F protein and the other from the NDV F-protein ectodomain (F/HR2F). The F/HR2F chimera protein was efficiently assembled into VLPs along with the H/G chimera protein. This VLP (VLP-H/G+F/HR2F) stimulated anti-F-protein and anti-G-protein IgG, durable RSV-neutralizing antibodies, and anti-RSV F-protein-secreting LLPCs. However, the subtypes of anti-F-protein IgG induced were different from those elicited by VLPs containing the F/F chimera (VLP-H/G+F/F). Most importantly, VLP-H/G+F/HR2F did not induce RSV F-protein-specific B cell memory, as shown by the adoptive transfer of B cells from immunized animals to immunodeficient animals. The VLP did, however, induce B cell memory specific to the RSV G protein. Thus, the form of the F protein has a direct role in inducing anti-F-protein B cell memory. The development of vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is hampered by a lack of a clear understanding of the requirements for eliciting protective as well as durable human immune responses to virus antigens. The results of this study indicate that the form of the RSV F protein has a direct

  12. Single particle transfer for quantitative analysis with total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Esaka, Konomi T.; Magara, Masaaki; Sakurai, Satoshi; Usuda, Shigekazu; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    The technique of single particle transfer was applied to quantitative analysis with total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry. The technique was evaluated by performing quantitative analysis of individual Cu particles with diameters between 3.9 and 13.2 μm. The direct quantitative analysis of the Cu particle transferred onto a Si carrier gave a discrepancy between measured and calculated Cu amounts due to the absorption effects of incident and fluorescent X-rays within the particle. By the correction for the absorption effects, the Cu amounts in individual particles could be determined with the deviation within 10.5%. When the Cu particles were dissolved with HNO 3 solution prior to the TXRF analysis, the deviation was improved to be within 3.8%. In this case, no correction for the absorption effects was needed for quantification

  13. Characterization of a Novel Megabirnavirus from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Reveals Horizontal Gene Transfer from Single-Stranded RNA Virus to Double-Stranded RNA Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghong; Wang, Yong; Sun, Xiangzhong; Cheng, Jiasen; Fu, Yanping; Liu, Huiquan; Jiang, Daohong; Ghabrial, Said A; Xie, Jiatao

    2015-08-01

    Mycoviruses have been detected in all major groups of filamentous fungi, and their study represents an important branch of virology. Here, we characterized a novel double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycovirus, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum megabirnavirus 1 (SsMBV1), in an apparently hypovirulent strain (SX466) of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Two similarly sized dsRNA segments (L1- and L2-dsRNA), the genome of SsMBV1, are packaged in rigid spherical particles purified from strain SX466. The full-length cDNA sequence of L1-dsRNA/SsMBV1 comprises two large open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2), which encode a putative coat protein and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp domain clearly indicates that SsMBV1 is related to Rosellinia necatrix megabirnavirus 1 (RnMBV1). L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1 comprises two nonoverlapping ORFs (ORFA and ORFB) encoding two hypothetical proteins with unknown functions. The 5'-terminal regions of L1- and L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1 share strictly conserved sequences and form stable stem-loop structures. Although L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1 is dispensable for replication, genome packaging, and pathogenicity of SsMBV1, it enhances transcript accumulation of L1-dsRNA/SsMBV1 and stability of virus-like particles (VLPs). Interestingly, a conserved papain-like protease domain similar to a multifunctional protein (p29) of Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 was detected in the ORFA-encoded protein of L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1. Phylogenetic analysis based on the protease domain suggests that horizontal gene transfer may have occurred from a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus (hypovirus) to a dsRNA virus, SsMBV1. Our results reveal that SsMBV1 has a slight impact on the fundamental biological characteristics of its host regardless of the presence or absence of L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1. Mycoviruses are widespread in all major fungal groups, and they possess diverse genomes of mostly ssRNA and dsRNA and, recently, circular ssDNA. Here, we have characterized a novel dsRNA virus

  14. Isolation and characterization of a single-stranded DNA virus infecting the marine diatom Chaetoceros sp. strain SS628-11 isolated from western Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Kimura

    Full Text Available Diatoms are significant organisms for primary production in the earth's aquatic environment. Hence, their dynamics are an important focus area in current studies. Viruses are a great concern as potential factors of diatom mortality, along with other physical, chemical, and biological factors. We isolated and characterized a new diatom virus (Csp07DNAV that lyses the marine planktonic diatom Chaetoceros sp. strain SS628-11. This paper examines the physiological, morphological, and genomic characteristics of Csp07DNAV. The virus was isolated from a surface water sample that was collected at Hiroshima Bay, Japan. It was icosahedral, had a diameter of 34 nm, and accumulated in the nuclei of host cells. Rod-shaped virus particles also coexisted in the host nuclei. The latent period and burst size were estimated to be <12 h and 29 infectious units per host cell, respectively. Csp07DNAV had a closed circular single-stranded DNA genome (5,552 nucleotides, which included a double-stranded region and 3 open reading frames. The monophyly of Csp07DNAV and other Bacilladnavirus group single-stranded DNA viruses was supported by phylogenetic analysis that was based on the amino acid sequence of each virus protein. On the basis of these results, we considered Csp07DNAV to be a new member of the genus Bacilladnavirus.

  15. 78 FR 18359 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Papilloma Pseudovirus and Virus-Like Particles as a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... papillomavirus-derived nanoparticles to create particles targeted to solid tumors and distant metastases; and (2... Pseudovirus and Virus-Like Particles as a Delivery System for Human Cancer Therapeutics and Diagnostics AGENCY..., ``Papillomavirus Pseudoviruses for Detection and Therapy of Tumors'' filed May 8, 2007 , U.S. Provisional Patent...

  16. Immunogenic Subviral Particles Displaying Domain III of Dengue 2 Envelope Protein Vectored by Measles Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira S. Harahap-Carrillo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines against dengue virus (DV are commercially nonexistent. A subunit vaccination strategy may be of value, especially if a safe viral vector acts as biologically active adjuvant. In this paper, we focus on an immunoglobulin-like, independently folded domain III (DIII from DV 2 envelope protein (E, which contains epitopes that elicits highly specific neutralizing antibodies. We modified the hepatitis B small surface antigen (HBsAg, S in order to display DV 2 DIII on a virus-like particle (VLP, thus generating the hybrid antigen DIII-S. Two varieties of measles virus (MV vectors were developed to express DIII-S. The first expresses the hybrid antigen from an additional transcription unit (ATU and the second additionally expresses HBsAg from a separate ATU. We found that this second MV vectoring the hybrid VLPs displaying DIII-S on an unmodified HBsAg scaffold were immunogenic in MV-susceptible mice (HuCD46Ge-IFNarko, eliciting robust neutralizing responses (averages against MV (1:1280 NT90, hepatitis B virus (787 mIU/mL, and DV2 (1:160 NT50 in all of the tested animals. Conversely, the MV vector expressing only DIII-S induced immunity against MV alone. In summary, DV2 neutralizing responses can be generated by displaying E DIII on a scaffold of HBsAg-based VLPs, vectored by MV.

  17. Vaccination with dengue virus-like particles induces humoral and cellular immune responses in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Quanfu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of dengue, an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV, has dramatically increased around the world in recent decades and is becoming a severe public health threat. However, there is currently no specific treatment for dengue fever, and licensed vaccine against dengue is not available. Vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs has shown considerable promise for many viral diseases, but the effect of DENV VLPs to induce specific immune responses has not been adequately investigated. Results By optimizing the expression plasmids, recombinant VLPs of four antigenically different DENV serotypes DENV1-4 were successfully produced in 293T cells. The vaccination effect of dengue VLPs in mice showed that monovalent VLPs of each serotype stimulated specific IgG responses and potent neutralizing antibodies against homotypic virus. Tetravalent VLPs efficiently enhanced specific IgG and neutralizing antibodies against all four serotypes of DENV. Moreover, vaccination with monovalent or tetravalent VLPs resulted in the induction of specific cytotoxic T cell responses. Conclusions Mammalian cell expressed dengue VLPs are capable to induce VLP-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and being a promising subunit vaccine candidate for prevention of dengue virus infection.

  18. Single particle detection: Phase control in submicron Hall sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Shelly, Connor; Gallop, John; Kazakova, Olga

    2010-01-01

    We present a phase-sensitive ac-dc Hall magnetometry method which allows a clear and reliable separation of real and parasitic magnetic signals of a very small magnitude. High-sensitivity semiconductor-based Hall crosses are generally accepted as a preferential solution for non-invasive detection of superparamagnetic nanobeads used in molecular biology, nanomedicine, and nanochemistry. However, detection of such small beads is often hindered by inductive pick-up and other spurious signals. The present work demonstrates an unambiguous experimental route for detection of small magnetic moments and provides a simple theoretical background for it. The reliability of the method has been tested for a variety of InSb Hall sensors in the range 600 nm-5 μm. Complete characterization of empty devices, involving Hall coefficients and noise measurements, has been performed and detection of a single FePt bead with diameter of 140 nm and magnetic moment of μ≅10 8 μ B has been achieved with a 600 nm-wide sensor.

  19. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Rosenlund Ahl, Sonja; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens T; Bohr, Tomas

    2015-07-01

    In a thought-provoking paper, Couder and Fort [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 154101 (2006)] describe a version of the famous double-slit experiment performed with droplets bouncing on a vertically vibrated fluid surface. In the experiment, an interference pattern in the single-particle statistics is found even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes place between different classical paths with precise amplitude and phase relations. In the double-slit experiment with walking droplets, these relations are lost since one of the paths is singled out by the droplet. To support our conclusions, we have carried out our own double-slit experiment, and our results, in particular the long and variable slit passage times of the droplets, cast strong doubt on the feasibility of the interference claimed by Couder and Fort. To understand theoretically the limitations of wave-driven particle systems as analogs to quantum mechanics, we introduce a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localized particle that generates a wave while being simultaneously guided by it. We show that the ensuing particle-wave dynamics can capture some characteristics of quantum mechanics such as orbital quantization. However, the particle-wave dynamics can not reproduce quantum mechanics in general, and we show that the single-particle statistics for our model in a double-slit experiment with an additional splitter plate differs qualitatively from that of quantum mechanics.

  20. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Rosenlund Ahl, Sonja; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens T.; Bohr, Tomas

    2015-07-01

    In a thought-provoking paper, Couder and Fort [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 154101 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.154101] describe a version of the famous double-slit experiment performed with droplets bouncing on a vertically vibrated fluid surface. In the experiment, an interference pattern in the single-particle statistics is found even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes place between different classical paths with precise amplitude and phase relations. In the double-slit experiment with walking droplets, these relations are lost since one of the paths is singled out by the droplet. To support our conclusions, we have carried out our own double-slit experiment, and our results, in particular the long and variable slit passage times of the droplets, cast strong doubt on the feasibility of the interference claimed by Couder and Fort. To understand theoretically the limitations of wave-driven particle systems as analogs to quantum mechanics, we introduce a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localized particle that generates a wave while being simultaneously guided by it. We show that the ensuing particle-wave dynamics can capture some characteristics of quantum mechanics such as orbital quantization. However, the particle-wave dynamics can not reproduce quantum mechanics in general, and we show that the single-particle statistics for our model in a double-slit experiment with an additional splitter plate differs qualitatively from that of quantum mechanics.

  1. Functional incorporation of green fluorescent protein into hepatitis B virus envelope particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Carsten; Thome, Nicole; Kluck, Christoph J.; Prange, Reinhild

    2004-01-01

    The envelope of hepatitis B virus (HBV), containing the L, M, and S proteins, is essential for virus entry and maturation. For direct visualization of HBV, we determined whether envelope assembly could accommodate the green fluorescent protein (GFP). While the C-terminal addition of GFP to S trans-dominant negatively inhibited empty envelope particle secretion, the N-terminal GFP fusion to S (GFP.S) was co-integrated into the envelope, giving rise to fluorescent particles. Microscopy and topogenesis analyses demonstrated that the proper intracellular distribution and folding of GFP.S, required for particle export were rescued by interprotein interactions with wild-type S. Thereby, a dual location of GFP, inside and outside the envelope, was observed. GFP.S was also efficiently packaged into the viral envelope, and these GFP-tagged virions retained the capacity for attachment to HBV receptor-positive cells in vitro. Together, GFP-tagged virions should be suitable to monitor HBV uptake and egress in live hepatocytes

  2. Two proteins with reverse transcriptase activities associated with hepatitis B virus-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bavand, M.R.; Laub, O.

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that hepatitis B virus (HBV), despite being a DNA virus, replicates via an RNA intermediate. The HBV life cycle is therefore a permuted version of the RNA retroviral life cycle. Sequence homology between retroviral reverse transcriptase and the putative HBV polymerase gene product suggests the presence of an HBV reverse transcriptase. As yet, there has been no direct evidence that reverse transcriptase activity is present in the viral particle. The authors used activity gel analysis to detect the in situ catalytic activities of DNA polymerases after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophorsis. These studies demonstrated that HBV-like particles secreted by a differentiated human hepatoma cell line tranfected with genomic HBV DNA contain two major polymerase activities which migrate as ∼90- and ∼70-kilodalton (kDa) proteins. This demonstrated, for the first time, that HBV-like particles contain a novel DNA polymerase-reverse transcriptase activity. Furthermore, they propose that the 70-kDa reverse transcriptase may be produced by proteolytic self-cleavage of the 90-kDa precursor protein

  3. Chimeric Rabies Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored GM-CSF Enhances the Immune Response against Rabies Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Kang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rabies remains an important public health threat in most developing countries. To develop a more effective and safe vaccine against rabies, we have constructed a chimeric rabies virus-like particle (VLP, which containing glycoprotein (G and matrix protein (M of rabies virus (RABV Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA strain, and membrane-anchored granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and it was named of EVLP-G. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of EVLP-G against RABV were evaluated by intramuscular administration in a mouse model. The EVLP-G was successfully produced in insect cells by coinfection with three recombinant baculoviruses expressing G, M, and GM-CSF, respectively. The membrane-anchored GM-CSF possesses a strong adjuvant activity. More B cells and dendritic cells (DCs were recruited and/or activated in inguinal lymph nodes in mice immunized with EVLP-G. EVLP-G was found to induce a significantly increased RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody and elicit a larger and broader antibody subclass responses compared with the standard rabies VLP (sRVLP, consisting of G and M. The EVLP-G also elicited significantly more IFN-γ- or IL-4-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than the sRVLP. Moreover, the immune responses induced by EVLP-G protect all vaccinated mice from lethal challenge with RABV. These results suggest that EVLP-G has the potential to be developed as a novel vaccine candidate for the prevention and control of animal rabies.

  4. Bioprocessing of plant-derived virus-like particles of Norwalk virus capsid protein under current Good Manufacture Practice regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Huafang; Chen, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Despite the success in expressing a variety of subunit vaccine proteins in plants and the recent stride in improving vaccine accumulation levels by transient expression systems, there is still no plant-derived vaccine that has been licensed for human use. The lack of commercial success of plant-made vaccines lies in several technical and regulatory barriers that remain to be overcome. These challenges include the lack of scalable downstream processing procedures, the uncertainty of regulatory compliance of production processes, and the lack of demonstration of plant-derived products that meet the required standards of regulatory agencies in identity, purity, potency and safety. In this study, we addressed these remaining challenges and successfully demonstrate the ability of using plants to produce a pharmaceutical grade Norwalk virus (NV) vaccine under current Good Manufacture Practice (cGMP) guidelines at multiple gram scales. Our results demonstrate that an efficient and scalable extraction and purification scheme can established for processing virus-like particles (VLP) of NV capsid protein (NVCP). We successfully operated the upstream and downstream NVCP production processes under cGMP regulations. Furthermore, plant-derived NVCP VLP demonstrates the identity, purity, potency and safety that meet the preset release specifications. This material is being tested in a Phase I human clinical trial. This research provides the first report of producing a plant-derived vaccine at scale under cGMP regulations in an academic setting and an important step for plant-produced vaccines to become a commercial reality. PMID:22134876

  5. Murine polyomavirus-VP1 virus-like particles immunize against some polyomavirus-induced tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzén, Andrea Vlastos; Tegerstedt, Karin; Holländerova, Dana; Forstová, Jitka; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Dalianis, Tina

    2005-01-01

    The ability of murine polyomavirus (MPyV)-VP1 virus-like particles (MPyV-VLPs) to immunize against MPyV tumour outgrowth was investigated. Non-immunized and mice immunized three times were challenged with MPyV or non-MPyV tumours and followed for tumour outgrowth. MPyV-VLP immunization abrogated outgrowth of some, but not all, tested MPyV tumours and delayed the outgrowth of a non-MPyV tumour to some extent. However, when mice were irradiated prior to tumour challenge to avoid an unspecific immune response, protection was MPyV-specific. In conclusion, VLP immunization for prevention of viral infection could also contribute to immune-protection against some tumours induced by the corresponding virus.

  6. In Vivo siRNA Delivery Using JC Virus-like Particles Decreases the Expression of RANKL in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B Hoffmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone remodeling requires a precise balance between formation and resorption. This complex process involves numerous factors that orchestrate a multitude of biochemical events. Among these factors are hormones, growth factors, vitamins, cytokines, and, most notably, osteoprotegerin (OPG and the receptor activator for nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL. Inflammatory cytokines play a major role in shifting the RANKL/OPG balance toward excessive RANKL, resulting in osteoclastogenesis, which in turn initiates bone resorption, which is frequently associated with osteoporosis. Rebalancing RANKL/OPG levels may be achieved through either upregulation of OPG or through transient silencing of RANKL by means of RNA interference. Here, we describe the utilization of a viral capsid-based delivery system for in vivo and in vitro RNAi using synthetic small interfering RNA (siRNA molecules in rat osteoblasts. Polyoma JC virus-derived virus-like particles are capable of delivering siRNAs to target RANKL in osteoblast cells both in vitro and in a rat in vivo system. Expression levels were monitored using quantitative real-time polymerase reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after single and repeated injections over a 14-day period. Our data indicate that this is an efficient and safe route for in vivo delivery of gene modulatory tools to study important molecular factors in a rat osteoporosis model.

  7. Construction of target-specific virus-like particles for the delivery of algicidal compounds to harmful algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Beom Sik; Eom, Chi-Yong; Kim, Wonduck; Kim, Pyoung Il; Ju, Sun Yi; Ryu, Jaewon; Han, Gui Hwan; Oh, Jeong-Il; Cho, Hoon; Baek, Seung Ho; Kim, Gueeda; Kim, Minju; Hyun, Jaekyung; Jin, EonSeon; Kim, Si Wouk

    2015-04-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) can lead to substantial socio-economic losses and extensive damage to aquatic ecosystems, drinking water sources and human health. Common algicidal techniques, including ozonation, ultrasonic treatment and dispersion of algae-killing chemicals, are unsatisfactory both economically and ecologically. This study therefore presents a novel alternative strategy for the efficient control of deleterious algae via the use of host-specific virus-like particles (VLPs) combined with chemically synthesized algicidal compounds. The capsid protein of HcRNAV34, a single-stranded RNA virus that infects the toxic dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa circularisquama, was expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli and then self-assembled into VLPs in vitro. Next, the algicidal compound, thiazolidinedione 49 (TD49), was encapsidated into HcRNAV34 VLPs for specific delivery to H. circularisquama. Consequently, HcRNAV34 VLPs demonstrated the same host selectivity as naturally occurring HcRNAV34 virions, while TD49-encapsidated VLPs showed a more potent target-specific algicidal effect than TD49 alone. These results indicate that target-specific VLPs for the delivery of cytotoxic compounds to nuisance algae might provide a safe, environmentally friendly approach for the management of HABs in aquatic ecosystems. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Morphology of single inhalable particle inside public transit biodiesel fueled bus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandilya, Kaushik K; Kumar, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    In an urban-transit bus, fueled by biodiesel in Toledo, Ohio, single inhalable particle samples in October 2008 were collected and detected by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS). Particle size analysis found bimodal distribution at 0.2 and 0.5 microm. The particle morphology was characterized by 14 different shape clusters: square, pentagon, hexagon, heptagon, octagon, nonagon, decagon, agglomerate, sphere, triangle, oblong, strip, line or stick, and unknown, by quantitative order. The square particles were common in the samples. Round and triangle particles are more, and pentagon, hexagon, heptagon, octagon, nonagon, decagon, strip, line or sticks are less. Agglomerate particles were found in abundance. The surface of most particles was coarse with a fractal edge that can provide a suitable chemical reaction bed in the polluted atmospheric environment. The three sorts of surface patterns of squares were smooth, semi-smooth, and coarse. The three sorts of square surface patterns represented the morphological characteristics of single inhalable particles in the air inside the bus in Toledo. The size and shape distribution results were compared to those obtained for a bus using ultra low sulfur diesel.

  9. Ammonia disinfection of hatchery waste for elimination of single-stranded RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmoth, Eva; Ottoson, Jakob; Albihn, Ann; Belák, Sándor; Vinnerås, Björn

    2011-06-01

    Hatchery waste, an animal by-product of the poultry industry, needs sanitation treatment before further use as fertilizer or as a substrate in biogas or composting plants, owing to the potential presence of opportunistic pathogens, including zoonotic viruses. Effective sanitation is also important in viral epizootic outbreaks and as a routine, ensuring high hygiene standards on farms. This study examined the use of ammonia at different concentrations and temperatures to disinfect hatchery waste. Inactivation kinetics of high-pathogenic avian influenza virus H7N1 and low-pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N3, as representatives of notifiable avian viral diseases, were determined in spiked hatchery waste. Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3, feline coronavirus, and feline calicivirus were used as models for other important avian pathogens, such as Newcastle disease virus, infectious bronchitis virus, and avian hepatitis E virus. Bacteriophage MS2 was also monitored as a stable indicator. Coronavirus was the most sensitive virus, with decimal reduction (D) values of 1.2 and 0.63 h after addition of 0.5% (wt/wt) ammonia at 14 and 25°C, respectively. Under similar conditions, high-pathogenic avian influenza H7N1 was the most resistant, with D values of 3.0 and 1.4 h. MS2 was more resistant than the viruses to all treatments and proved to be a suitable indicator of viral inactivation. The results indicate that ammonia treatment of hatchery waste is efficient in inactivating enveloped and naked single-stranded RNA viruses. Based on the D values and confidence intervals obtained, guidelines for treatment were proposed, and one was successfully validated at full scale at a hatchery, with MS2 added to hatchery waste.

  10. Completely assembled virus particles detected by transmission electron microscopy in proximal and mid-axons of neurons infected with herpes simplex virus type 1, herpes simplex virus type 2 and pseudorabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jialing; Lazear, Helen M; Friedman, Harvey M

    2011-01-05

    The morphology of alphaherpesviruses during anterograde axonal transport from the neuron cell body towards the axon terminus is controversial. Reports suggest that transport of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) nucleocapsids and envelope proteins occurs in separate compartments and that complete virions form at varicosities or axon termini (subassembly transport model), while transport of a related alphaherpesvirus, pseudorabies virus (PRV) occurs as enveloped capsids in vesicles (assembled transport model). Transmission electron microscopy of proximal and mid-axons of primary superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons was used to compare anterograde axonal transport of HSV-1, HSV-2 and PRV. SCG cell bodies were infected with HSV-1 NS and 17, HSV-2 2.12 and PRV Becker. Fully assembled virus particles were detected intracellularly within vesicles in proximal and mid-axons adjacent to microtubules after infection with each virus, indicating that assembled virions are transported anterograde within axons for all three alphaherpesviruses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Completely assembled virus particles detected by transmission electron microscopy in proximal and mid-axons of neurons infected with herpes simplex virus type 1, herpes simplex virus type 2 and pseudorabies virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jialing; Lazear, Helen M.; Friedman, Harvey M.

    2011-01-01

    The morphology of alphaherpesviruses during anterograde axonal transport from the neuron cell body towards the axon terminus is controversial. Reports suggest that transport of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) nucleocapsids and envelope proteins occurs in separate compartments and that complete virions form at varicosities or axon termini (subassembly transport model), while transport of a related alphaherpesvirus, pseudorabies virus (PRV) occurs as enveloped capsids in vesicles (assembled transport model). Transmission electron microscopy of proximal and mid-axons of primary superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons was used to compare anterograde axonal transport of HSV-1, HSV-2 and PRV. SCG cell bodies were infected with HSV-1 NS and 17, HSV-2 2.12 and PRV Becker. Fully assembled virus particles were detected intracellularly within vesicles in proximal and mid-axons adjacent to microtubules after infection with each virus, indicating that assembled virions are transported anterograde within axons for all three alphaherpesviruses.

  12. Analysis of the RNA species isolated from defective particles of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, R; Banerjee, A K

    1976-10-01

    Serial high multiplicity passage of a cloned stock of vesicular stomatitis virus was found to generate defective interfering particles containing three size classes of RNA, with sedimentaiton coefficients of 31 S, 23 S and 19 S. The 31 S and 23 S RNA species were found to be complementary to both the 12 to 18 S and 31 S size classes of VSV mRNAs. The 19 S class of RNA was found to be partially base-paired. All three RNA species were found to contain ppAp at their 5' termini.

  13. G gene-deficient single-round rabies viruses for neuronal circuit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Alexander; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus

    2016-05-02

    Rhabdoviruses like the neurotropic rabies virus are fully amenable to pseudotyping with homologous and heterologous membrane proteins, which is being harnessed for the study of viral envelope proteins, viral retargeting, or immunization purposes. Particularly, pseudotyped delta G rabies viruses are emerging as safe and superb tools for mapping direct synaptic connections and analyzing neuronal circuits in the central and peripheral nervous system, which is a fundamental pillar of modern neuroscience. Such retrograde rabies mono-transsynaptic tracers in combination with optogenetics and modern in vivo imaging methods are opening entirely new avenues of investigation in neuroscience and help in answering major outstanding questions of connectivity and function of the nervous system. Here, we provide a brief overview on the biology and life cycle of rabies virus with emphasis on neuronal infection via axon ends, transport, and transsynaptic transmission of the virus. Pseudotyping of single-round, G-deleted virus with foreign glycoproteins allows to determine tropism and entry route, resulting in either retro- or anterograde labeling of neurons. Pseudotyping in vitro also allows specific targeting of cells that serve as starter cells for transsynaptic tracing, and pseudotyping in situ for a single (mono-transsynaptic) step of transmission to presynaptic neurons. We describe principle and experimental variations for defining "starter" cells for mono-transsynaptic tracing with ΔG rabies virus and outline open questions and limitations of the approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Biomedical and Catalytic Opportunities of Virus-Like Particles in Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, B; Uchida, M; Douglas, T

    2017-01-01

    Within biology, molecules are arranged in hierarchical structures that coordinate and control the many processes that allow for complex organisms to exist. Proteins and other functional macromolecules are often studied outside their natural nanostructural context because it remains difficult to create controlled arrangements of proteins at this size scale. Viruses are elegantly simple nanosystems that exist at the interface of living organisms and nonliving biological machines. Studied and viewed primarily as pathogens to be combatted, viruses have emerged as models of structural efficiency at the nanoscale and have spurred the development of biomimetic nanoparticle systems. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are noninfectious protein cages derived from viruses or other cage-forming systems. VLPs provide incredibly regular scaffolds for building at the nanoscale. Composed of self-assembling protein subunits, VLPs provide both a model for studying materials' assembly at the nanoscale and useful building blocks for materials design. The robustness and degree of understanding of many VLP structures allow for the ready use of these systems as versatile nanoparticle platforms for the conjugation of active molecules or as scaffolds for the structural organization of chemical processes. Lastly the prevalence of viruses in all domains of life has led to unique activities of VLPs in biological systems most notably the immune system. Here we discuss recent efforts to apply VLPs in a wide variety of applications with the aim of highlighting how the common structural elements of VLPs have led to their emergence as paradigms for the understanding and design of biological nanomaterials. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Single particle Green's functions calculation of the electrical conductivity of strong correlated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, W.A.

    A calculation of the electrical conductivity for Hubbard materials is presented which is valid when U/t >> 1 (U being the Coulomb repulsion and t the nearest neighbor hopping energy) for arbitrary electron concentration and temperature. The derivation emploies the single particle Green's functions with real and imaginary times instead of the usual two-particle real time Green's function. The result is compared with the experimental data available for some organic charge transfer salts [pt

  16. A new seniority scheme for non-degenerate single particle orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, T.; Arima, A.

    1978-01-01

    A new method is proposed in the treatment of the seniority scheme. The method enables one to evaluate analytically the contribution from J = 0 Cooper pairs in non-degenerate single-particle orbits to many-body matrix elements. It includes the SU(2) quasi-spin and the BCS approximation as two extreme limits. The effect of particle number conservation is properly taken into account. (Auth.)

  17. Centroids of effective interactions from measured single-particle energies: An application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    Centroids of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction for the mass region A=28--64 are extracted directly from experimental single-particle spectra, by comparing single-particle energies relative to different cores. Uncertainties in the centroids are estimated at approximately 100 keV, except in cases of exceptional fragmentation of the single-particle strength. The use of a large number of inert cores allows the dependence of the interaction on mass or model space to be investigated. The method permits accurate empirical modifications to be made to realistic interactions calculated from bare nucleon-nucleon potentials, which are known to possess defective centroids in many cases. In addition, the centroids can be used as input to the more sophisticated fitting procedures that are employed to produce matrix elements of the effective interaction

  18. Dynamics of Chikungunya Virus Cell Entry Unraveled by Single-Virus Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoornweg, Tabitha E; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Ayala Nuñez, Nilda V; Albulescu, Irina C; van Hemert, Martijn J; Smit, Jolanda M

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen causing major outbreaks in Africa, Asia and the Americas. The cell entry pathway hijacked by CHIKV to infect a cell has been studied before using inhibitory compounds. There has been some debate on the mechanism by which

  19. Giant Polymersome Protocells Dock with Virus Particle Mimics via Multivalent Glycan-Lectin Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubilis, Artur; Abdulkarim, Ali; Eissa, Ahmed M.; Cameron, Neil R.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the low complexity of their components, several simple physical systems, including microspheres, coacervate droplets and phospholipid membrane structures (liposomes), have been suggested as protocell models. These, however, lack key cellular characteristics, such as the ability to replicate or to dock with extracellular species. Here, we report a simple method for the de novo creation of synthetic cell mimics in the form of giant polymeric vesicles (polymersomes), which are capable of behavior approaching that of living cells. These polymersomes form by self-assembly, under electroformation conditions, of amphiphilic, glycosylated block copolymers in aqueous solution. The glycosylated exterior of the resulting polymeric giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) allows their selective interaction with carbohydrate-binding receptor-functionalized particles, in a manner reminiscent of the cell-surface docking of virus particles. We believe that this is the first example of a simple protocell model displaying cell-like behavior through a native receptor-ligand interaction.

  20. Single Particle ICP-MS: Advances toward routine analysis of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño, Manuel D; Olesik, John W; Barber, Angela G; Challis, Katie; Ranville, James F

    2016-07-01

    From its early beginnings in characterizing aerosol particles to its recent applications for investigating natural waters and waste streams, single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) has proven to be a powerful technique for the detection and characterization of aqueous dispersions of metal-containing nanomaterials. Combining the high-throughput of an ensemble technique with the specificity of a single particle counting technique and the elemental specificity of ICP-MS, spICP-MS is capable of rapidly providing researchers with information pertaining to size, size distribution, particle number concentration, and major elemental composition with minimal sample perturbation. Recently, advances in data acquisition, signal processing, and the implementation of alternative mass analyzers (e.g., time-of-flight) has resulted in a wider breadth of particle analyses and made significant progress toward overcoming many of the challenges in the quantitative analysis of nanoparticles. This review provides an overview of spICP-MS development from a niche technique to application for routine analysis, a discussion of the key issues for quantitative analysis, and examples of its further advancement for analysis of increasingly complex environmental and biological samples. Graphical Abstract Single particle ICP-MS workflow for the analysis of suspended nanoparticles.

  1. Impact of KCl impregnation on single particle combustion of wood and torrefied wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Zhimin; Jian, Jie; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2017-01-01

    In this work, single particle combustion of raw and torrefied 4 mm wood particles with different potassium content obtained by KCl impregnation and washing was studied experimentally under a condition of 1225 °C, 3.1% O2 and 26.1% H2O. The ignition time and devolatilization time depended almost......, and unchanged by torrefaction. Compared to the raw wood particle, the char conversion time was increased by torrefaction, decreased by washing, and almost unchanged by KCl impregnation due to its promoting effect on both char yield and reactivity....

  2. A versatile optical microscope for time-dependent single-molecule and single-particle spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Yang, Haw

    2018-03-28

    This work reports the design and implementation of a multi-function optical microscope for time-dependent spectroscopy on single molecules and single nanoparticles. It integrates the now-routine single-object measurements into one standalone platform so that no reconfiguration is needed when switching between different types of sample or spectroscopy modes. The illumination modes include evanescent field through total internal reflection, dark-field illumination, and epi-excitation onto a diffraction-limited spot suitable for confocal detection. The detection modes include spectrally resolved line imaging, wide-field imaging with dual-color capability, and two-color single-element photon-counting detection. The switch between different spectroscopy and data acquisition modes is fully automated and executed through computer programming. The capability of this microscope is demonstrated through selected proof-of-principle experiments.

  3. A versatile optical microscope for time-dependent single-molecule and single-particle spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Yang, Haw

    2018-03-01

    This work reports the design and implementation of a multi-function optical microscope for time-dependent spectroscopy on single molecules and single nanoparticles. It integrates the now-routine single-object measurements into one standalone platform so that no reconfiguration is needed when switching between different types of sample or spectroscopy modes. The illumination modes include evanescent field through total internal reflection, dark-field illumination, and epi-excitation onto a diffraction-limited spot suitable for confocal detection. The detection modes include spectrally resolved line imaging, wide-field imaging with dual-color capability, and two-color single-element photon-counting detection. The switch between different spectroscopy and data acquisition modes is fully automated and executed through computer programming. The capability of this microscope is demonstrated through selected proof-of-principle experiments.

  4. Characterization of biomass combustion at high temperatures based on an upgraded single particle model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jun; Paul, Manosh C.; Younger, Paul L.; Watson, Ian; Hossain, Mamdud; Welch, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • High temperature rapid biomass combustion is studied based on single particle model. • Particle size changes in devolatilization and char oxidation models are addressed. • Time scales of various thermal sub-processes are compared and discussed. • Potential solutions are suggested to achieve better biomass co-firing performances. - Abstract: Biomass co-firing is becoming a promising solution to reduce CO 2 emissions, due to its renewability and carbon neutrality. Biomass normally has high moisture and volatile contents, complicating its combustion behavior, which is significantly different from that of coal. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) combustion model of a single biomass particle is employed to study high-temperature rapid biomass combustion. The two-competing-rate model and kinetics/diffusion model are used to model biomass devolatilization reaction and char burnout process, respectively, in which the apparent kinetics used for those two models were from high temperatures and high heating rates tests. The particle size changes during the devolatilization and char burnout are also considered. The mass loss properties and temperature profile during the biomass devolatilization and combustion processes are predicted; and the timescales of particle heating up, drying, devolatilization, and char burnout are compared and discussed. Finally, the results shed light on the effects of particle size on the combustion behavior of biomass particle

  5. Quantum chaos in nuclear single-particle motion and damping of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Santanu; Mukhopadhyay, Tapan

    1995-01-01

    The spectral statistics of single particle motion in deformed cavities with axial symmetry are presented. The single particle motion in the cavities considered are non-integrable and the systematics of the fluctuation measures of the spectra reveal a transition from regular to chaotic regime in the corresponding classical systems. Quantitative estimate of the degree of chaos enables us to introduce a correction factor to the one-body wall formula for the damping widths of isoscalar giant resonances. The damping widths calculated with this correction factor give much better agreement with experimental values than earlier calculations of one-body damping widths. (author). 21 refs., 5 figs

  6. The application of single particle hydrodynamics in continuum models of multiphase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Rand

    1988-01-01

    A review of the application of single particle hydrodynamics in models for the exchange of interphase momentum in continuum models of multiphase flow is presented. Considered are the equations of motion for a laminar, mechanical two phase flow. Inherent to this theory is a model for the interphase exchange of momentum due to drag between the dispersed particulate and continuous fluid phases. In addition, applications of two phase flow theory to de-mixing flows require the modeling of interphase momentum exchange due to lift forces. The applications of single particle analysis in deriving models for drag and lift are examined.

  7. Preparation of Disease-Related Protein Assemblies for Single Particle Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron Varano, A; Harafuji, Naoe; Dearnaley, William; Guay-Woodford, Lisa; Kelly, Deborah F

    2017-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is a rapidly growing area of structural biology that permits us to decode biological assemblies at the nanoscale. To examine biological materials for single particle EM analysis, purified assemblies must be obtained using biochemical separation techniques. Here, we describe effective methodologies for isolating histidine (his)-tagged protein assemblies from the nucleus of disease-relevant cell lines. We further demonstrate how isolated assemblies are visualized using single particle EM techniques and provide representative results for each step in the process.

  8. Replication-Deficient Particles: New Insights into the Next Generation of Bluetongue Virus Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celma, Cristina C; Stewart, Meredith; Wernike, Kerstin; Eschbaumer, Michael; Gonzalez-Molleda, Lorenzo; Breard, Emmanuel; Schulz, Claudia; Hoffmann, Bernd; Haegeman, Andy; De Clercq, Kris; Zientara, Stephan; van Rijn, Piet A; Beer, Martin; Roy, Polly

    2017-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is endemic in many parts of the world, often causing severe hemorrhagic disease in livestock. To date, at least 27 different serotypes have been recognized. Vaccination against all serotypes is necessary to protect susceptible animals and to prevent onward spread of the virus by insect vectors. In our previous studies, we generated replication-deficient (disabled infectious single-cycle [DISC]) virus strains for a number of serotypes and reported preliminary data on their protective efficacy in animals. In this report, to advance the DISC vaccines to the marketplace, we investigated different parameters of these DISC vaccines. First, we demonstrated the genetic stabilities of these vaccine strains and also the complementing cell line. Subsequently, the optimal storage conditions of vaccines, including additives, temperature, and desiccation, were determined and their protective efficacies in animals confirmed. Furthermore, to test if mixtures of different vaccine strains could be tolerated, we tested cocktails of DISC vaccines in combinations of three or six different serotypes in sheep and cattle, the two natural hosts of BTV. Groups of sheep vaccinated with a cocktail of six different vaccines were completely protected from challenge with individual virulent serotypes, both in early challenge and after 5 months of challenge without any clinical disease. There was no interference in protection between the different vaccines. Protection was also achieved in cattle with a mixture of three vaccine strains, albeit at a lesser level than in sheep. Our data support and validate the suitability of these virus strains as the next-generation vaccines for BTV. Bluetongue (BT) is a debilitating and in many cases lethal disease that affects ruminants of economic importance. Classical vaccines that afford protection against bluetongue virus, the etiological agent, are not free from secondary and undesirable effects. A surge in new approaches to produce

  9. Conformations and membrane-driven self-organization of rodlike fd virus particles on freestanding lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Anastasiia B; Herold, Christoph; Petrov, Eugene P

    2017-10-11

    Membrane-mediated interactions and aggregation of colloidal particles adsorbed to responsive elastic membranes are challenging problems relevant for understanding the microscopic organization and dynamics of biological membranes. We experimentally study the behavior of rodlike semiflexible fd virus particles electrostatically adsorbed to freestanding cationic lipid membranes and find that their behavior can be controlled by tuning the membrane charge and ionic strength of the surrounding medium. Three distinct interaction regimes of rodlike virus particles with responsive elastic membranes can be observed. (i) A weakly charged freestanding cationic lipid bilayer in a low ionic strength medium represents a gentle quasi-2D substrate preserving the integrity, structure, and mechanical properties of the membrane-bound semiflexible fd virus, which under these conditions is characterized by a monomer length of 884 ± 4 nm and a persistence length of 2.5 ± 0.2 μm, in perfect agreement with its properties in bulk media. (ii) An increase in the membrane charge leads to the membrane-driven collapse of fd virus particles on freestanding lipid bilayers and lipid nanotubes into compact globules. (iii) When the membrane charge is low, and the mutual electrostatic repulsion of membrane-bound virus particles is screened to a considerable degree, membrane-driven self-organization of membrane-bound fd virus particles into long linear tip-to-tip aggregates showing dynamic self-assembly/disassembly and quasi-semiflexible behavior takes place. These observations are in perfect agreement with the results of recent theoretical and simulation studies predicting that membrane-mediated interactions can control the behavior of colloidal particles adsorbed on responsive elastic membranes.

  10. Construction of protein-functionalized virus-like particles of parvovirus B19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos-Jaimes, Ismael; Soto-Román, Ricardo Arturo; Gutiérrez-Landa, Isabel Alejandra; Valadez-García, Josefina; Segovia-Trinidad, Carla Lizbeth

    2017-12-10

    Decoration of virus-like particles (VLPs) expands the repertory of functions these particles can display. In the last years, VLPs have successfully been used as scaffolds to present different molecules, frequently through the specific reaction of chemical groups on the surface of the particles, or by protein engineering when the presentation of peptides or proteins is the primary goal. VLPs of parvovirus B19 (B19V), have been previously produced in vitro and its stability and ability to assemble into hybrid particles composed of wild-type and chimeric proteins evidenced their potential as research tools. Herein, we report the presentation of functional proteins on the surface of B19V VLPs, through the fusion of the gene coding for the heterologous protein within the gene coding for the structural protein VP2. Two model proteins were used for the construction of chimeras, a lipase from Bacillus pumilus (BplA) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Both chimeras were folded and successfully assembled in vitro into VLPs. While the BplA chimera exhibited esterase activity, the chimera of EGFP showed no fluorescence. We replaced the EGFP by its fast-folding derivative "super folder GFP" (sfGFP) flanked by larger linkers to increase its movement freedom, which resulted in fluorescent protein able to assemble fluorescent VLPs. These results expand the toolbox for VLP decoration as well as for the construction of new nanobiomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of Hepatitis C Virus Particle Heterogeneity in Immunodeficient Human Liver Chimeric fah-/- MiceSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Andreo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a leading cause of chronic liver diseases and the most common indication for liver transplantation in the United States. HCV particles in the blood of infected patients are characterized by heterogeneous buoyant densities, likely owing to HCV association with lipoproteins. However, clinical isolates are not infectious in vitro and the relative infectivity of the particles with respect to their buoyant density therefore cannot be determined, pointing to the need for better in vivo model systems. Methods: To analyze the evolution of the buoyant density of in vivo–derived infectious HCV particles over time, we infected immunodeficient human liver chimeric fumaryl acetoacetate hydrolase-/- mice with J6/JFH1 and performed ultracentrifugation of infectious mouse sera on isopicnic iodixanol gradients. We also evaluated the impact of a high sucrose diet, which has been shown to increase very-low-density lipoprotein secretion by the liver in rodents, on lipoprotein and HCV particle characteristics. Results: Similar to the severe combined immunodeficiency disease/Albumin-urokinase plasminogen activator human liver chimeric mouse model, density fractionation of infectious mouse serum showed higher infectivity in the low-density fractions early after infection. However, over the course of the infection, viral particle heterogeneity increased and the overall in vitro infectivity diminished without loss of the human liver graft over time. In mice provided with a sucrose-rich diet we observed a minor shift in HCV infectivity toward lower density that correlated with a redistribution of triglycerides and cholesterol among lipoproteins. Conclusions: Our work indicates that the heterogeneity in buoyant density of infectious HCV particles evolves over the course of infection and can be influenced by diet. Keywords: HCV, Lipoprotein, Mouse Model, Human Liver Chimeric Mice

  12. Single-particle characterization of the high-Arctic summertime aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sierau

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle mass-spectrometric measurements were carried out in the high Arctic north of 80° during summer 2008. The campaign took place onboard the icebreaker Oden and was part of the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS. The instrument deployed was an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS that provides information on the chemical composition of individual particles and their mixing state in real time. Aerosols were sampled in the marine boundary layer at stations in the open ocean, in the marginal ice zone, and in the pack ice region. The largest fraction of particles detected for subsequent analysis in the size range of the ATOFMS between approximately 200 and 3000 nm in diameter showed mass-spectrometric patterns, indicating an internal mixing state and a biomass burning and/or biofuel source. The majority of these particles were connected to an air mass layer of elevated particle concentration mixed into the surface mixed layer from the upper part of the marine boundary layer. The second largest fraction was represented by sea salt particles. The chemical analysis of the over-ice sea salt aerosol revealed tracer compounds that reflect chemical aging of the particles during their long-range advection from the marginal ice zone, or open waters south thereof prior to detection at the ship. From our findings we conclude that long-range transport of particles is one source of aerosols in the high Arctic. To assess the importance of long-range particle sources for aerosol–cloud interactions over the inner Arctic in comparison to local and regional biogenic primary aerosol sources, the chemical composition of the detected particles was analyzed for indicators of marine biological origin. Only a minor fraction showed chemical signatures of potentially ocean-derived primary particles of that kind. However, a chemical bias in the ATOFMS's detection capabilities observed during ASCOS might suggest the presence of a particle type of

  13. Measurement of ambient aerosols in northern Mexico City by single particle mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Moffet

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous ambient measurements with aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS were made in an industrial/residential section in the northern part of Mexico City as part of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area-2006 campaign (MCMA-2006. Results are presented for the period of 15–27 March 2006. The submicron size mode contained both fresh and aged biomass burning, aged organic carbon (OC mixed with nitrate and sulfate, elemental carbon (EC, nitrogen-organic carbon, industrial metal, and inorganic NaK inorganic particles. Overall, biomass burning and aged OC particle types comprised 40% and 31%, respectively, of the submicron mode. In contrast, the supermicron mode was dominated by inorganic NaK particle types (42% which represented a mixture of dry lake bed dust and industrial NaK emissions mixed with soot. Additionally, aluminosilicate dust, transition metals, OC, and biomass burning contributed to the supermicron particles. Early morning periods (2–6 a.m. showed high fractions of inorganic particles from industrial sources in the northeast, composed of internal mixtures of Pb, Zn, EC and Cl, representing up to 73% of the particles in the 0.2–3μm size range. A unique nitrogen-containing organic carbon (NOC particle type, peaking in the early morning hours, was hypothesized to be amines from local industrial emissions based on the time series profile and back trajectory analysis. A strong dependence on wind speed and direction was observed in the single particle types that were present during different times of the day. The early morning (3:30–10 a.m. showed the greatest contributions from industrial emissions. During mid to late mornings (7–11 a.m., weak northerly winds were observed along with the most highly aged particles. Stronger winds from the south picked up in the late morning (after 11 a.m., resulting in a decrease in the concentrations of the major aged particle types and an increase in the number fraction of fresh

  14. Detection of Mixtures of Bean and Cowpea Viruses by Using Single ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sensitivity of ELISA to detect bean common mosaic potyvirus (BCMV), cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV), bean yellow mosaic potyvirus (BYMV), cowpea mottle carmovirus (CPMoV), cowpea mosaic como virus (CPMV) and blackeye cowpea mosaic potyvirus (BLCMV) singly or in mixtures was evaluated using ...

  15. Building the Nanoplasmonics Toolbox Through Shape Modeling and Single Particle Optical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Emilie

    Interest in nanotechnology is driven by unprecedented properties tailorability, achievable by controlling particle structure and composition. Unlike bulk components, minute changes in size and shape affect the optical and electronic properties of nanoparticles. Characterization of such structure-function relationships and better understanding of structure control mechanisms is crucial to the development of applications such as plasmonic sensors and devices. The objective of the current research is thus twofold: to theoretically predict and understand how shape is controlled by synthesis conditions, and to experimentally unravel, through single particle studies, how shape, composition, size, and surrounding environment affect plasmonic properties in noble metal particles. Quantitative, predictive rules and fundamental knowledge obtained from this research contributes to the "nanoplasmonics toolbox", a library designed to provide scientists and engineers the tools to create and optimize novel nanotechnology applications. In this dissertation, single particle approaches are developed and used to unravel the effects of size, shape, substrate, aggregation state and surrounding environment on the optical response of metallic nanoparticles. Ag and Au nanocubes on different substrates are first presented, followed by the discussion of the concept of plasmon length, a universal parameter to describe plasmon energy for a variety of particle shapes and plasmon modes. Plasmonic sensing (both refractive index sensing and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy) and polarization effects are then studied at the single particle level. In the last two Chapters, analytical shape models based on the Wulff construction provide unique modeling tools for alloy and kinetically grown nanoparticles. The former reveals a size-dependence of the shape of small alloy particles (such as those used in catalysis) because of surface segregation, while the latter uniquely models the shape of many

  16. Single particle analysis with a 360/sup 0/ light scattering photometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholdi, M.F.

    1979-06-01

    Light scattering by single spherical homogeneous particles in the diameter range 1 to 20 ..mu..m and relative refractive index 1.20 is measured. Particle size of narrowly dispersed populations is determined and a multi-modal dispersion of five components is completely analyzed. A 360/sup 0/ light scattering photometer for analysis of single particles has been designed and developed. A fluid stream containing single particles intersects a focused laser beam at the primary focal point of an ellipsoidal reflector ring. The light scattered at angles theta = 2.5/sup 0/ to 177.5/sup 0/ at phi = 0/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ is reflected onto a circular array of photodiodes. The ellipsoidal reflector is situated in a chamber filled with fluid matching that of the stream to minimize refracting and reflecting interfaces. The detector array consists of 60 photodiodes each subtending 3/sup 0/ in scattering angle on 6/sup 0/ centers around 360/sup 0/. 32 measurements on individual particles can be acquired at rates of 500 particles per second. The intensity and angular distribution of light scattered by spherical particles are indicative of size and relative refractive index. Calculations, using Lorenz--Mie theory, of differential scattering patterns integrated over angle corresponding to the detector geometry determined the instrument response to particle size. From this the expected resolution and experimental procedures are determined.Ultimately, the photometer will be utilized for identification and discrimination of biological cells based on the sensitivity of light scattering to size, shape, refractive index differences, internal granularity, and other internal morphology. This study has demonstrated the utility of the photometer and indicates potential for application to light scattering studies of biological cells.

  17. Immunogenic virus-like particles continuously expressed in mammalian cells as a veterinary rabies vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Diego; Kratje, Ricardo; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Prieto, Claudio

    2015-08-20

    Rabies is one of the most lethal infectious diseases in the world, with a mortality approaching 100%. There are between 60,000 and 70,000 reported annual deaths, but this is probably an underestimation. Despite the fact that there are vaccines available for rabies, there is a real need of developing more efficacious and cheaper vaccines. This is particularly true for veterinary vaccines because dogs are still the main vector for rabies transmission to human beings. In a previous work, we described the development and characterization of rabies virus-like particles (RV-VLPs) expressed in HEK293 cells. We showed that RV-VLPs are able to induce a specific antibodies response. In this work, we show that VLPs are able to protect mice against virus challenge. Furthermore, we developed a VLPs expressing HEK-293 clone (sP2E5) that grows in serum free medium (SFM) reaching high cell densities. sP2E5 was cultured in perfusion mode in a 5 L bioreactor for 20 days, and the RV-VLPs produced were capable of triggering a protective immune response without the need of concentration or adjuvant addition. Further, these VLPs are able to induce the production of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies. These results demonstrate that RV-VLPs are a promising rabies vaccine candidate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential modification of interferon regulatory factor 3 following virus particle entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyce, Ryan S; Collins, Susan E; Mossman, Karen L

    2009-05-01

    Viral infection elicits the activation of numerous cellular signal transduction pathways, leading to the induction of both innate and adaptive immune responses in the host. In particular, interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) has been shown to be essential for the induction of an antiviral response. Current models suggest that virus replication causes phosphorylation of C-terminal serine and threonine residues on IRF3, leading to its dimerization and translocation to the nucleus, where it activates interferon. Upon entry of replication-deficient Newcastle disease virus (NDV) particles, however, we failed to detect IRF3 dimerization or hyperphosphorylation, despite robust interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) and antiviral state induction and confirmation by small interfering RNA knockdown that IRF3 is essential for this response. To further compare the effects of various viruses and their replication status on IRF3 activation and to determine the minimal posttranslational modification required for IRF3 activation, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were employed. However, we failed to identify a minimal posttranslational modification of IRF3 that correlated with downstream biological activity, and the extent of posttranslational modification observed on IRF3 did not correlate with the degree of subsequent ISG induction. Thus, current techniques used to detect IRF3 activation are insufficient to infer its role in mediating downstream biological response induction and should be utilized with caution.

  19. Vaccine delivery system for tuberculosis based on nano-sized hepatitis B virus core protein particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasooraj, Dhananjayan; Kumar, R Ajay; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2013-01-01

    Nano-sized hepatitis B virus core virus-like particles (HBc-VLP) are suitable for uptake by antigen-presenting cells. Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10) is an important vaccine candidate against tuberculosis. The purified antigen shows low immune response without adjuvant and tends to have low protective efficacy. The present study is based on the assumption that expression of these proteins on HBc nanoparticles would provide higher protection when compared to the native antigen alone. The cfp-10 gene was expressed as a fusion on the major immunodominant region of HBc-VLP, and the immune response in Balb/c mice was studied and compared to pure proteins, a mixture of antigens, and fusion protein-VLP, all without using any adjuvant. The humoral, cytokine, and splenocyte cell proliferation responses suggested that the HBc-VLP bearing CFP-10 generated an antigen-specific immune response in a Th1-dependent manner. By virtue of its self-adjuvant nature and ability to form nano-sized particles, HBc-VLPs are an excellent vaccine delivery system for use with subunit protein antigens identified in the course of recent vaccine research.

  20. αEnv-decorated phosphatidylserine liposomes trigger phagocytosis of HIV-virus-like particles in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatica, Andrea; Petazzi, Roberto A; Lehmann, Maik J; Ziomkowska, Joanna; Herrmann, Andreas; Chiantia, Salvatore

    2014-07-01

    Macrophages represent an important cellular target of HIV-1. Interestingly, they are also believed to play a potential role counteracting its infection. However, HIV-1 is known to impair macrophage immune functions such as antibody-mediated phagocytosis. Here, we present immunoliposomes that can bind HIV-1 virus-like particles (HIV-VLPs) while being specifically phagocytosed by macrophages, thus allowing the co-internalization of HIV-VLPs. These liposomes are decorated with anti-Env antibodies and contain phosphatidylserine (PS). PS mediates liposome internalization by macrophages via a mechanism not affected by HIV-1. Hence, PS-liposomes mimic apoptotic cells and are internalized into the macrophages due to specific recognition, carrying the previously bound HIV-VLPs. With a combination of flow cytometry, confocal live-cell imaging and electron microscopy we demonstrate that the PS-immunoliposomes presented here are able to elicit efficient HIV-VLPs phagocytosis by macrophages and might represent a new nanotechnological approach to enhance HIV-1 antigen presentation and reduce the ongoing inflammation processes. This team of authors demonstrate that specific phosphatidylserin immunoliposomes are able to elicit efficient phagocytosis of HIV-virus-like particle by macrophages and might represent a new nanomedicine approach to enhance HIV-1 antigen presentation and reduce ongoing inflammation processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Single Particle Laser Mass Spectrometry Applied to Differential Ice Nucleation Experiments at the AIDA Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallavardin, S. J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Lohmann, U.; Moehler, Ottmar; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Experiments conducted at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located in Karlsruhe, Germany permit investigation of particle properties that affect the nucleation of ice at temperature and water vapor conditions relevant to cloud microphysics and climate issues. Ice clouds were generated by heterogeneous nucleation of Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, and hematite and homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid. Ice crystals formed in the chamber were inertially separated from unactivated, or 'interstitial' aerosol particles with a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), then evaporated. The ice residue (i.e., the aerosol which initiated ice nucleation plus any material which was scavenged from the gas- and/or particle-phase), was chemically characterized at the single particle level using a laser ionization mass spectrometer. In this manner the species that first nucleated ice could be identified out of a mixed aerosol population in the chamber. Bare mineral dust particles were more effective ice nuclei (IN) than similar particles with a coating. Metallic particles from contamination in the chamber initiated ice nucleation before other species but there were few enough that they did not compromise the experiments. Nitrate, sulfate, and organics were often detected on particles and ice residue, evidently from scavenging of trace gas-phase species in the chamber. Hematite was a more effective ice nucleus than illite. Ice residue was frequently larger than unactivated test aerosol due to the formation of aggregates due to scavenging, condensation of contaminant gases, and the predominance of larger aerosol in nucleation

  2. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells can act separately in tumour rejection after immunization with murine pneumotropic virus chimeric Her2/neu virus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Andreasson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immunization with murine pneumotropic virus virus-like particles carrying Her2/neu (Her2MPtVLPs prevents tumour outgrowth in mice when given prophylactically, and therapeutically if combined with the adjuvant CpG. We investigated which components of the immune system are involved in tumour rejection, and whether long-term immunological memory can be obtained. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: During the effector phase in BALB/c mice, only depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ in combination, with or without NK cells, completely abrogated tumour protection. Depletion of single CD4+, CD8+ or NK cell populations only had minor effects. During the immunization/induction phase, combined depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells abolished protection, while depletion of each individual subset had no or negligible effect. When tumour rejection was studied in knock-out mice with a C57Bl/6 background, protection was lost in CD4-/-CD8-/- and CD4-/-, but not in CD8-/- mice. In contrast, when normal C57Bl/6 mice were depleted of different cell types, protection was lost irrespective of whether only CD4+, only CD8+, or CD4+ and CD8+ cells in combination were eradicated. No anti-Her2/neu antibodies were detected but a Her2/neu-specific IFNgamma response was seen. Studies of long-term memory showed that BALB/c mice could be protected against tumour development when immunized together with CpG as long as ten weeks before challenge. CONCLUSION: Her2MPtVLP immunization is efficient in stimulating several compartments of the immune system, and induces an efficient immune response including long-term memory. In addition, when depleting mice of isolated cellular compartments, tumour protection is not as efficiently abolished as when depleting several immune compartments together.

  3. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells can act separately in tumour rejection after immunization with murine pneumotropic virus chimeric Her2/neu virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasson, Kalle; Eriksson, Mathilda; Tegerstedt, Karin; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Dalianis, Tina

    2010-07-19

    Immunization with murine pneumotropic virus virus-like particles carrying Her2/neu (Her2MPtVLPs) prevents tumour outgrowth in mice when given prophylactically, and therapeutically if combined with the adjuvant CpG. We investigated which components of the immune system are involved in tumour rejection, and whether long-term immunological memory can be obtained. During the effector phase in BALB/c mice, only depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ in combination, with or without NK cells, completely abrogated tumour protection. Depletion of single CD4+, CD8+ or NK cell populations only had minor effects. During the immunization/induction phase, combined depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells abolished protection, while depletion of each individual subset had no or negligible effect. When tumour rejection was studied in knock-out mice with a C57Bl/6 background, protection was lost in CD4-/-CD8-/- and CD4-/-, but not in CD8-/- mice. In contrast, when normal C57Bl/6 mice were depleted of different cell types, protection was lost irrespective of whether only CD4+, only CD8+, or CD4+ and CD8+ cells in combination were eradicated. No anti-Her2/neu antibodies were detected but a Her2/neu-specific IFNgamma response was seen. Studies of long-term memory showed that BALB/c mice could be protected against tumour development when immunized together with CpG as long as ten weeks before challenge. Her2MPtVLP immunization is efficient in stimulating several compartments of the immune system, and induces an efficient immune response including long-term memory. In addition, when depleting mice of isolated cellular compartments, tumour protection is not as efficiently abolished as when depleting several immune compartments together.

  4. Preliminary Understanding of Surface Plasmon-Enhanced Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy by Single Particle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Kangshu

    Monitoring chiral optical signals of biomolecules as their conformation changes is an important means to study their structures, properties, and functions. Most measurements, however, are ensemble measurements because chiral optical signals from a single biomolecule is often too weak to be detected. In this dissertation, I present my early attempts to study conformational changes of adsorbed proteins by taking advantage of the enhanced electromagnetic (EM) field around a well-designed plasmonic nanofeature. In particular, I discuss the detection of protein adsorption and denaturation on metallic nanoparticles using single particle scattering and CD spectroscopic imaging. Particles of two distinctively different sizes were compared and two different sample protein molecules were studied. A combination of experimental and computational tools was used to simulate and interpret the collected scattering and CD results. The first chapter provides a brief overview of the state-of-art research in CD spectroscopic studies at the single particle level. Three different means to make particles capable of chiral detection are discussed. Various applications beyond single particle imaging are presented to showcase the potential of the described research project, beyond our immediate goals. The second chapter describes my initial characterization of large, metallic, anisotropic nanorods and the establishment of experimental procedures used later for spectrum reconstruction, data visualization and analysis. The physical shape and structure of the particles were imaged by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the chemical composition by energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), and the optical properties by darkfield microscopy. An experimental protocol was developed to connect information collected from separate techniques for the same particle, with the aims of discovering any possible structural-property correlation. The reproducibility of the single particle imaging method was

  5. Single charging events on colloidal particles in a nonpolar liquid with surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuer, Caspar; Vandewiele, Stijn; Brans, Toon; Strubbe, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan; Beunis, Filip

    2018-01-01

    Electrical charging of colloidal particles in nonpolar liquids due to surfactant additives is investigated intensively, motivated by its importance in a variety of applications. Most methods rely on average electrophoretic mobility measurements of many particles, which provide only indirect information on the charging mechanism. In the present work, we present a method that allows us to obtain direct information on the charging mechanism, by measuring the charge fluctuations on individual particles with a precision higher than the elementary charge using optical trapping electrophoresis. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method by studying the influence of added surfactant OLOA 11000 on the charging of single colloidal PMMA particles in dodecane. The particle charge and the frequency of charging events are investigated both below and above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and with or without applying a DC offset voltage. It is found that at least two separate charging mechanisms are present below the critical micelle concentration. One mechanism is a process where the particle is stripped from negatively charged ionic molecules. An increase in the charging frequency with increased surfactant concentration suggests a second mechanism that involves single surfactant molecules. Above the CMC, neutral inverse micelles can also be involved in the charging process.

  6. Bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy 7. The single particle phase function hockey stick relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Bruce

    2012-11-01

    The measured volume-average single particle angular scattering functions of a large number of types of particle of interest for planetary regoliths in the visible-near-IR wavelength region can be represented to a reasonable approximation by two-parameter, double Henyey-Greenstein functions. When the two parameters of this function are plotted against one another they are found to be inversely correlated and lie within a restricted zone shaped like a hockey stick within the parameter space. The centroid of the zone is a curve that can be represented by a simple empirical equation. The wide variety of types of particles used to construct the plot implies that this equation may represent most of the particles found in regoliths. This means that when modeling the bidirectional reflectance of a regolith it may be possible to reduce the number of parameters necessary to specify the reflectance, and also to characterize the entire single particle phase function from observations at phase angles less than 90°. Even if the hockey stick relation has a finite width, rather than being a line, it restricts the parameter space that must be searched when fitting data. The curve should also be useful for forward modeling particle phase functions.

  7. Comparison of human papillomavirus type 16 L1 chimeric virus-like particles versus L1/L2 chimeric virus-like particles in tumor prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Mark T; Da Silva, Diane M; Potkul, Ronald K; Kast, W Martin

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particles (cVLPs) with the HPV16 E7 antigen fused to either the major capsid protein, L1, or the minor capsid protein, L2, have been used independently to protect against the formation of HPV-induced tumors in animal models. However, the advantages and disadvantages of both types of particles with respect to production and vaccine efficacy have never been analyzed. Therefore, in this study, we compared cVLPs with the HPV16 E7 antigen fused to L1 versus cVLPs with E7 fused to L2 with respect to their ability to protect mice from tumor challenge. The first 57 amino acids of E7 were used to overcome the size limitation and limited VLP production imposed by inserting polypeptides into L1 cVLPs. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with the above cVLPs at various doses. Tumor challenge was then performed with HPV16 E7-positive TC-1 cells. HPV16 L1-E7((1-57)) was superior to HPV16 L1/L2-E7((1-57)) in eliciting tumor protection at equivalent doses, although both types of particles were able to protect mice. Both cVLPs induced a specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to the H2-D(b)-restricted E7 peptide (E7(49-57)) as determined by an ELISPOT assay and tetramer staining; however, immunization with the L1-E7((1-57)) cVLPs resulted in twofold higher CTL precursor frequencies. Our results demonstrate that cVLPs with the antigen fused to L1 are a more efficient vaccine with respect to tumor prevention than cVLPs with the antigen fused to L2. At the same time, however, L1 cVLPs are limited by the size of the antigen that can be incorporated and in the amount of cVLP that can be obtained from cultures when compared to L1/L2 cVLPs. This balances out their superior ability to induce protective immunity. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. DECAY MODES OF HIGH-LYING SINGLE-PARTICLE STATES IN PB-209

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEAUMEL, D; FORTIER, S; GALES, S; GUILLOT, J; LANGEVINJOLIOT, H; LAURENT, H; MAISON, JM; VERNOTTE, J; BORDEWIJK, JA; BRANDENBURG, S; KRASZNAHORKAY, A; CRAWLEY, GM; MASSOLO, CP; RENTERIA, M

    The neutron decay of high-lying single-particle states in Pb-209 excited by means of the (alpha, He-3) reaction has been investigated at 122 MeV incident energy using a multidetector array. The high-spin values of these states, inferred from previous inclusive experiments, are confirmed by the

  9. A new single-particle basis for nuclear many-body calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddu, G.

    2017-10-01

    Predominantly, harmonic oscillator single-particle wave functions are the preferred choice for a basis in ab initio nuclear many-body calculations. These wave-functions, although very convenient in order to evaluate the matrix elements of the interaction in the laboratory frame, have too fast a fall-off at large distances. In the past, as an alternative to the harmonic oscillator, other single-particle wave functions have been proposed. In this work, we propose a new single-particle basis, directly linked to nucleon-nucleon interaction. This new basis is orthonormal and complete, has the proper asymptotic behavior at large distances and does not contain the continuum which would pose severe convergence problems in nuclear many body calculations. We consider the newly proposed NNLO-opt nucleon-nucleon interaction, without any renormalization. We show that, unlike other bases, this single-particle representation has a computational cost similar to the harmonic oscillator basis with the same space truncation and it gives lower energies for 6He and 6Li.

  10. Summary report of the group on single-particle nonlinear dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axinescu, S.; Bartolini, R.; Bazzani, A.

    1996-10-01

    This report summarizes the research on single-particle nonlinear beam dynamics. It discusses the following topics: analytical and semi-analytical tools; early prediction of the dynamic aperture; how the results are commonly presented; Is the mechanism of the dynamic aperture understand; ripple effects; and beam-beam effects

  11. A new Insight Into Microscale Soil Organic Matter Dynamics - From Single Particles to Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, C. W.; Heister, K.; Hillion, F.; Herrmann, A. M.; Koegel-Knabner, I.

    2008-12-01

    Both mineral interactions and the spatial inaccessibility due to aggregation are key-factors affecting the stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM). Knowledge about the factors controlling the preservation of SOM and underlying stabilization mechanisms has improved significantly over the last years. Nevertheless, in situ processes remain almost unclear and are still challenging to evaluate. In the presented work, we studied the alteration of spatial distribution of fresh introduced OM over time on single particles and in intact soil aggregates. Single particles of a fine silt and clay mixture (resin embedded. Samples were then analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS50). We will demonstrate the spatial distribution of OM on single particles and in intact soil aggregates at the microscale by SEM and nanoSIMS. In addition, with the isotopic sensitivity of nanoSIMS, we are able to follow the fate of 13C and 15N, which is expected to be influenced by diffusion, sorption and microbial activity. From these results, we propose how OM in soil can be stabilized on single soil particles and at complex soil aggregates.

  12. Single-particle electron microscopy in the study of membrane protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zorzi, Rita; Mi, Wei; Liao, Maofu; Walz, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Single-particle electron microscopy (EM) provides the great advantage that protein structure can be studied without the need to grow crystals. However, due to technical limitations, this approach played only a minor role in the study of membrane protein structure. This situation has recently changed dramatically with the introduction of direct electron detection device cameras, which allow images of unprecedented quality to be recorded, also making software algorithms, such as three-dimensional classification and structure refinement, much more powerful. The enhanced potential of single-particle EM was impressively demonstrated by delivering the first long-sought atomic model of a member of the biomedically important transient receptor potential channel family. Structures of several more membrane proteins followed in short order. This review recounts the history of single-particle EM in the study of membrane proteins, describes the technical advances that now allow this approach to generate atomic models of membrane proteins and provides a brief overview of some of the membrane protein structures that have been studied by single-particle EM to date. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Single-particle thermal diffusion of charged colloids: Double-layer theory in a temperature gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhont, J.K.G.; Briels, Willem J.

    2008-01-01

    The double-layer contribution to the single-particle thermal diffusion coefficient of charged, spherical colloids with arbitrary double-layer thickness is calculated and compared to experiments. The calculation is based on an extension of the Debye-Hückel theory for the double-layer structure that

  14. Lagrangian single-particle turbulent statistics through the Hilbert-Huang transform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Y.; Biferale, L.; Calzavarini, E.; Sun, Chao; Toschi, F.

    2013-01-01

    The Hilbert-Huang transform is applied to analyze single-particle Lagrangian velocity data from numerical simulations of hydrodynamic turbulence. The velocity trajectory is described in terms of a set of intrinsic mode functions C i (t) and of their instantaneous frequency ω i (t) . On the basis of

  15. Insensitivity of single particle time domain measurements to laser velocimeter 'Doppler ambiguity.'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that single particle time domain measurements in high speed gas flows obtained by a laser velocimeter technique developed for use in wind tunnels are not affected by the so-called 'Doppler ambiguity.' A comparison of hot-wire anemometer and laser velocimeter measurements taken under similar flow conditions is used for the demonstration.

  16. Single particle electron microscopy in combination with mass spectrometry to investigate novel complexes of membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arteni, Ana A.; Nowaczyk, Marc; Lax, Julia; Rögner, Matthias; Boekema, Egbert J.; Kouril, R.; Rogner, M.

    2005-01-01

    Large data sets of molecular projections of the membrane proteins Photosystem I and Photosystem II from cyanobacteria were analyzed by single particle electron microscopy (EM). Analysis resulted in the averaging of 2D projections from the purified complexes but also in the simultaneous detection and

  17. Single-shot LIBS spectral quality for waste particles in open air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, H.; Bakker, M.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the ability of LIBS to produce quality spectra from small particles of concrete demolition waste using single-shot spectra collected in open air. The 2–8?mm materials are rounded river gravel, green glass shards, and plastic flakes. Considered are focal length, air, moisture,

  18. Deformed single-particle levels in the boson-fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.; Shao, B.

    1989-01-01

    Deformed single-particle levels are derived from a boson-fermion Hamiltonian in which the odd fermion occupies several j orbits. The geometric-oriented approach applied to 169 Tm clarified the role of algebraic interactions and provides an intuitive interpretation and guidance to numerical calculations in deformed nuclei

  19. Deformed single-particle levels in the boson-fermion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A.; Shao, B. (Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (US) Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (US))

    1989-11-13

    Deformed single-particle levels are derived from a boson-fermion Hamiltonian in which the odd fermion occupies several {ital j} orbits. The geometric-oriented approach applied to {sup 169}Tm clarified the role of algebraic interactions and provides an intuitive interpretation and guidance to numerical calculations in deformed nuclei.

  20. The online chemical analysis of single particles using aerosol beams and time of flight mass spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, O.; Weiss, M.; Verheijen, P.J.T.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Scarlett, B.

    This paper describes an on-line instrument, capable of measuring the size and chemical composition of single aerosol particles. Possible applications include monitoring aerosol reactors and studying atmospheric chemistry. The main conclusion is that a working prototype has been built and tested. It

  1. Quantification of dermal exposure to nanoparticles from solid nanocomposites by using single particle ICP-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackevica, Aiga; Olsson, Mikael Emil; Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2016-01-01

    was tested by surface wiping followed by analysis using single particle ICP-MS. The nanoparticles were extracted from the wipes by ultrasonication in deionized water, and this technique was tested to be around 60-100% effective for extracting the particles adsorbed to the wipes. The method was optimized......Engineered nanoparticles are used in various applications due to their unique properties, which has led to their widespread use in consumer products. Silver, titanium and copper-based nanoparticles are few of the most commonly used nanomaterials in consumer products, mainly due to their biocidal...... by spiking the wipes with known amounts of nanoparticles and treating them the same way as the experimental samples. Our preliminary results show that single particle ICP-MS has the potential for quantitatively measuring potential dermal exposure to nanoparticles, and when used in combination with other...

  2. Fluorescent detection of single tracks of alpha particles using lithium fluoride crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilski, P., E-mail: pawel.bilski@ifj.edu.pl; Marczewska, B.

    2017-02-01

    Lithium fluoride single crystals were successfully used for fluorescent imaging of single tracks of alpha particles. This was realized with a standard wide-field fluorescent microscope equipped with a 100× objective. Alpha particles create F{sub 2} and F{sub 3}{sup +} color centers in LiF crystals. The subsequent illumination with the blue light (wavelength around 445 nm), excites these centers and produces fluorescence with a broad band peaked at 670 nm. The observed tracks of alpha particles have diameter of about 500 nm. Focusing of the microscope at different depths in a LiF crystal, enables imaging changes of shape and position of tracks, allowing for visualization of their paths. These encouraging results are the first step towards practical application of LiF as fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

  3. Detection of single macromolecules using a cryogenic particle detector coupled to a biopolymer mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twerenbold, Damian; Vuilleumier, Jean-Luc; Gerber, Daniel; Tadsen, Almut; van den Brandt, Ben; Gillevet, Patrick M.

    1996-06-01

    Macromolecules with masses up to 50 kDa have been detected with a cryogenic particle detector in a MALDI time-of-flight biopolymer mass spectrometer. The cryogenic particle detector was a Sn/Sn-ox/Sn tunnel junction operated at a temperature of 0.4 K. A calibration with 6 keV single photons inferred that the delayed detector pulses corresponded to the absorption of the kinetic energy of a single macromolecule. Time-of-flight spectra of lysozyme proteins are presented. The mass resolution is 100 Da at 14 300 Da. The energy sensitive detection mechanism suggests that cryogenic particle detectors have a high and mass independent detection efficiency for macromolecules.

  4. Fatty acid biosynthesis is involved in the production of hepatitis B virus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Hitomi [Laboratory of Human Tumor Viruses, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoecho, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Nio, Yasunori, E-mail: yasunori.nio@takeda.com [Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited, Pharmaceutical Research Division, 26-1, Muraoka-Higashi 2-Chome, Fujisawa, Kanagawa 251-8555 (Japan); Akahori, Yuichi [Laboratory of Human Tumor Viruses, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoecho, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kim, Sulyi [Laboratory of Human Tumor Viruses, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Watashi, Koichi [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo 162-8640 (Japan); Department of Applied Biological Science, Tokyo University of Sciences, Noda 278-8510 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Wakita, Takaji [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo 162-8640 (Japan); Hijikata, Makoto, E-mail: mhijikat@virus.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Human Tumor Viruses, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoecho, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2016-06-17

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) proliferates in hepatocytes after infection, but the host factors that contribute to the HBV lifecycle are poorly understood at the molecular level. We investigated whether fatty acid biosynthesis (FABS), which was recently reported to contribute to the genomic replication of hepatitis C virus, plays a role in HBV proliferation. We examined the effects of inhibitors of the enzymes in the FABS pathway on the HBV lifecycle by using recombinant HBV-producing cultured cells and found that the extracellular HBV DNA level, reflecting HBV particle production, was decreased by treatment with inhibitors suppressed the synthesis of long-chain saturated fatty acids with little cytotoxicity. The reduced HBV DNA level was reversed when palmitic acid, which is the product of fatty acid synthase (FAS) during FABS, was used simultaneously with the inhibitor. We also observed that the amount of intracellular HBV DNA in the cells was increased by FAS inhibitor treatment, suggesting that FABS is associated with HBV particle production but not its genome replication. This suggests that FABS might be a potent target for anti-HBV drug with a mode of action different from current HBV therapy. -- Highlights: •Inhibitors of ACC1 and FAS but not SCD1 decreased production of extracellular HBV DNA. •Products of FABS, long chain fatty acids, increased production of extracellular HBV DNA. •FAS inhibitor increased intracellular levels of HBV DNA and HBcAg. •FABS was suggested to contribute to HBV particle production without significant relation with secretory pathway of the cells.

  5. Structure of the immature HIV-1 capsid in intact virus particles at 8.8 Å resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, Florian K. M.; Hagen, Wim J. H.; Rumlová, Michaela; Ruml, Tomáš; Müller, Barbara; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) assembly proceeds in two stages. First, the 55 kilodalton viral Gag polyprotein assembles into a hexameric protein lattice at the plasma membrane of the infected cell, inducing budding and release of an immature particle. Second, Gag is cleaved by the viral protease, leading to internal rearrangement of the virus into the mature, infectious form. Immature and mature HIV-1 particles are heterogeneous in size and morphology, preventing high-resolution analysis of their protein arrangement in situ by conventional structural biology methods. Here we apply cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging methods to resolve the structure of the capsid lattice within intact immature HIV-1 particles at subnanometre resolution, allowing unambiguous positioning of all α-helices. The resulting model reveals tertiary and quaternary structural interactions that mediate HIV-1 assembly. Strikingly, these interactions differ from those predicted by the current model based on in vitro-assembled arrays of Gag-derived proteins from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. To validate this difference, we solve the structure of the capsid lattice within intact immature Mason-Pfizer monkey virus particles. Comparison with the immature HIV-1 structure reveals that retroviral capsid proteins, while having conserved tertiary structures, adopt different quaternary arrangements during virus assembly. The approach demonstrated here should be applicable to determine structures of other proteins at subnanometre resolution within heterogeneous environments.

  6. Single-pixel interior filling function approach for detecting and correcting errors in particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, Stanislav; Figliozzi, Patrick; Lin, Binhua; Rice, Stuart A; Scherer, Norbert F; Dinner, Aaron R

    2017-01-10

    We present a general method for detecting and correcting biases in the outputs of particle-tracking experiments. Our approach is based on the histogram of estimated positions within pixels, which we term the single-pixel interior filling function (SPIFF). We use the deviation of the SPIFF from a uniform distribution to test the veracity of tracking analyses from different algorithms. Unbiased SPIFFs correspond to uniform pixel filling, whereas biased ones exhibit pixel locking, in which the estimated particle positions concentrate toward the centers of pixels. Although pixel locking is a well-known phenomenon, we go beyond existing methods to show how the SPIFF can be used to correct errors. The key is that the SPIFF aggregates statistical information from many single-particle images and localizations that are gathered over time or across an ensemble, and this information augments the single-particle data. We explicitly consider two cases that give rise to significant errors in estimated particle locations: undersampling the point spread function due to small emitter size and intensity overlap of proximal objects. In these situations, we show how errors in positions can be corrected essentially completely with little added computational cost. Additional situations and applications to experimental data are explored in SI Appendix In the presence of experimental-like shot noise, the precision of the SPIFF-based correction achieves (and can even exceed) the unbiased Cramér-Rao lower bound. We expect the SPIFF approach to be useful in a wide range of localization applications, including single-molecule imaging and particle tracking, in fields ranging from biology to materials science to astronomy.

  7. A clustering approach to multireference alignment of single-particle projections in electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorzano, C O S; Bilbao-Castro, J R; Shkolnisky, Y; Alcorlo, M; Melero, R; Caffarena-Fernández, G; Li, M; Xu, G; Marabini, R; Carazo, J M

    2010-08-01

    Two-dimensional analysis of projections of single-particles acquired by an electron microscope is a useful tool to help identifying the different kinds of projections present in a dataset and their different projection directions. Such analysis is also useful to distinguish between different kinds of particles or different particle conformations. In this paper we introduce a new algorithm for performing two-dimensional multireference alignment and classification that is based on a Hierarchical clustering approach using correntropy (instead of the more traditional correlation) and a modified criterion for the definition of the clusters specially suited for cases in which the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of the differences between classes is low. We show that our algorithm offers an improved sensitivity over current methods in use for distinguishing between different projection orientations and different particle conformations. This algorithm is publicly available through the software package Xmipp. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Single-particle structure determination by correlations of snapshot X-ray diffraction patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodub, D.; Aquila, A.; Bajt, S.; Barthelmess, M.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Coppola, N.; Doak, R. B.; Epp, S. W.; Erk, B.; Foucar, L.; Gumprecht, L.; Hampton, C. Y.; Hartmann, A.; Hartmann, R.; Holl, P.; Kassemeyer, S.; Kimmel, N.; Laksmono, H.; Liang, M.; Loh, N. D.; Lomb, L.; Martin, A. V.; Nass, K.; Reich, C.; Rolles, D.; Rudek, B.; Rudenko, A.; Schulz, J.; Shoeman, R. L.; Sierra, R. G.; Soltau, H.; Steinbrener, J.; Stellato, F.; Stern, S.; Weidenspointner, G.; Frank, M.; Ullrich, J.; Strüder, L.; Schlichting, I.; Chapman, H. N.; Spence, J. C. H.; Bogan, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Diffractive imaging with free-electron lasers allows structure determination from ensembles of weakly scattering identical nanoparticles. The ultra-short, ultra-bright X-ray pulses provide snapshots of the randomly oriented particles frozen in time, and terminate before the onset of structural damage. As signal strength diminishes for small particles, the synthesis of a three-dimensional diffraction volume requires simultaneous involvement of all data. Here we report the first application of a three-dimensional spatial frequency correlation analysis to carry out this synthesis from noisy single-particle femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns of nearly identical samples in random and unknown orientations, collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Our demonstration uses unsupported test particles created via aerosol self-assembly, and composed of two polystyrene spheres of equal diameter. The correlation analysis avoids the need for orientation determination entirely. This method may be applied to the structural determination of biological macromolecules in solution.

  9. Photonic-crystal membranes for optical detection of single nano-particles, designed for biosensor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grepstad, Jon Olav; Kaspar, Peter; Solgaard, Olav; Johansen, Ib-Rune; Sudbø, Aasmund S

    2012-03-26

    A sensor designed to detect bio-molecules is presented. The sensor exploits a planar 2D photonic crystal (PC) membrane with sub-micron thickness and through holes, to induce high optical fields that allow detection of nano-particles smaller than the diffraction limit of an optical microscope. We report on our design and fabrication of a PC membrane with a nano-particle trapped inside. We have also designed and built an imaging system where an optical microscope and a CCD camera are used to take images of the PC membrane. Results show how the trapped nano-particle appears as a bright spot in the image. In a first experimental realization of the imaging system, single particles with a radius of 75 nm can be detected.

  10. Source apportionment of single aerosol particles in the atmosphere of Shanghai city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Zhijun; Lu Rongrong; Guo Panlin; Wang Jiqing; Qiu Huiyuan; Li Xiaolin; Zhu Jieqing

    2001-01-01

    A nuclear microprobe with high spatial resolution and high analytical sensitivity was applied to analyze atmospheric aerosol at five monitoring sites in Shanghai city. Meantime, a new pattern recognition technique, which used the micro-PIXE spectrum of a single aerosol particle as its fingerprint, was developed to identify the origin of the particle. The results showed that the major contributors to the atmosphere pollution were soil dust (31.6%), building dust (30.8%), and the next were vehicle exhaust (13.7%), metallurgic industry excrements (5.6%), oil combustion (5%) and coal combustion (2.3%). Besides these, about 10% of the particles could not be identified. Based on the cluster analysis of these particles, they could be divided into soil dust, building dust and metallurgic industry excrements. Moreover, some new pollution sources from tyres and chemical plants were also revealed

  11. Theoretical and experimental study of single particle tracking in extreme conditions: single photon imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cajgfinger, T.

    2012-10-01

    This manuscript presents my thesis on the high frame rate (500 frames / second) single-photon detector electron-bombarded CMOS (ebCMOS). The first section compares three ultra-sensitive detectors and their methods for improving photon sensitivity: the CMOS low noise (sCMOS), the electron-multiplying CCD (emCCD) with signal multiplication by pixel and the ebCMOS with amplification by applied electric field. The method developed to detect single photon impacts with intra-pixel resolution on the ebCMOS sensor is presented. The second section compares the localization accuracy of these detectors in extreme conditions of very low photon flux (<10 photons/frame). First the theoretical limit is calculated using the Cramer-Rao lower bound for significant parameter sets. An experimental comparison of the detectors is then described. The setup provides one or more point sources controlled in position, signal and background noise. The results allow a comparison of the experimental effectiveness, purity and localization accuracy. The last section describes two experiments with the ebCMOS camera. The first aims at tracking hundreds of quantum dots simultaneously at the Nanoptec center. The second focuses on the swimming of bacteria at the surface at the Joliot Curie Institute. The point sources tracking algorithm using single photons and the Kalman filter implementation developed for these experiments is also described. (author)

  12. Creation of giant two-dimensional crystal of zinc oxide nanodisk by method of single-particle layer of organo-modified inorganic fine particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qi; Honda, Nanami; Uchida, Saki; Hashimoto, Kazuaki; Shibata, Hirobumi; Fujimori, Atsuhiro

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the formation and structure of a single-particle layer of organo-zinc oxide are investigated using surface-pressure-area (π-A) isotherms, out-of-plane X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Further, techniques for achieving the solubilization of inorganic fine particles in general solvents have been proposed, and a single-particle layer has been formed using such an inorganic solution as a "spreading solution" for an interfacial film. Surface modification of ZnO is performed using a long-chain carboxylic acid. Accordingly, a regular arrangement of ZnO can be easily achieved in order to overcome the relatively weak van der Walls interactions between inorganic materials. A condensed Langmuir monolayer of these particles is also formed. A multiparticle layered structure is constructed by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. Out-of-plane XRD measurement results for a single-particle layer of organo-ZnO clearly show a sharp peak at 42 Å. This peak is attributed to the distance between ZnO layers. The AFM image of this single-particle layer of organo-ZnO shows a particle assembly with a uniform height of 60 nm. These aggregated particles form large two-dimensional crystals. In other words, a regular periodic structure along the c-axis and a condensed single-particle layer had been fabricated using Langmuir and LB techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Immune response of gilts to single and double infection with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srijangwad, Anchalee; Stott, Christopher James; Temeeyasen, Gun; Senasuthum, Raweewan; Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Tantituvanont, Angkana; Nilubol, Dachrit

    2017-07-01

    Immune response of gilts following single and double infection with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) at gilt acclimatization and prepartum were investigated. One hundred PEDV-naïve gilts were divided into two groups: negative (Neg) and feedback (FB) groups. Antibody responses in serum, colostrum, and milk samples were measured by IgG/IgA ELISA and virus neutralization assay (VN). Fecal shedding was investigated using RT-PCR. In summary, a single infection at gilt acclimatization resulted in slightly increased serum antibody titers as determined by VN assay and IgG ELISA, but not by IgA ELISA. Viral RNA was detected in fecal samples up to 6 days post-exposure. A double infection at prepartum resulted in significantly increased IgA and VN titers in milk samples compared to the single-infection group. No fecal shedding was detected following the double infection.

  14. Simultaneous diamagnetic and magnetic particle trapping in ferrofluid microflows via a single permanent magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yilong; Kumar, Dhileep Thanjavur; Lu, Xinyu; Kale, Akshay; DuBose, John; Song, Yongxin; Wang, Junsheng; Li, Dongqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2015-01-01

    Trapping and preconcentrating particles and cells for enhanced detection and analysis are often essential in many chemical and biological applications. Existing methods for diamagnetic particle trapping require the placement of one or multiple pairs of magnets nearby the particle flowing channel. The strong attractive or repulsive force between the magnets makes it difficult to align and place them close enough to the channel, which not only complicates the device fabrication but also restricts the particle trapping performance. This work demonstrates for the first time the use of a single permanent magnet to simultaneously trap diamagnetic and magnetic particles in ferrofluid flows through a T-shaped microchannel. The two types of particles are preconcentrated to distinct locations of the T-junction due to the induced negative and positive magnetophoretic motions, respectively. Moreover, they can be sequentially released from their respective trapping spots by simply increasing the ferrofluid flow rate. In addition, a three-dimensional numerical model is developed, which predicts with a reasonable agreement the trajectories of diamagnetic and magnetic particles as well as the buildup of ferrofluid nanoparticles. PMID:26221197

  15. Exploring Electronic Structure and Order in Polymers via Single-Particle Microresonator Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Erik H; Rea, Morgan T; Heylman, Kevin D; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Saikin, Semion K; Thompson, Blaise J; Kohler, Daniel D; Knapper, Kassandra A; Wei, Wei; Pan, Feng; Gopalan, Padma; Wright, John C; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Goldsmith, Randall H

    2018-02-08

    PSS, a transparent electrically conductive polymer, finds widespread use in electronic devices. While empirical efforts have increased conductivity, a detailed understanding of the coupled electronic and morphological landscapes in PEDOT:PSS has lagged due to substantial structural heterogeneity on multiple length-scales. We use an optical microresonator-based absorption spectrometer to perform single-particle measurements, providing a bottom-up examination of electronic structure and morphology ranging from single PEDOT:PSS polymers to nascent films. Using single-particle spectroscopy with complementary theoretical calculations and ultrafast spectroscopy, we demonstrate that PEDOT:PSS displays bulk-like optical response even in single polymers. We find highly ordered PEDOT assemblies with long-range ordering mediated by the insulating PSS matrix and reveal a preferential surface orientation of PEDOT nanocrystallites absent in bulk films with implications for interfacial electronic communication. Our single-particle perspective provides a unique window into the microscopic structure and electronic properties of PEDOT:PSS.

  16. Use of Recombinant Virus Replicon Particles for Vaccination against Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolz, Miriam; Kerber, Sarah; Zimmer, Gert; Pluschke, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, which is most prevalent in rural regions of West African countries. The majority of clinical presentations seen in patients are ulcers on limbs that can be treated by eight weeks of antibiotic therapy. Nevertheless, scarring and permanent disabilities occur frequently and Buruli ulcer still causes high morbidity. A vaccine against the disease is so far not available but would be of great benefit if used for prophylaxis as well as therapy. In the present study, vesicular stomatitis virus-based RNA replicon particles encoding the M. ulcerans proteins MUL2232 and MUL3720 were generated and the expression of the recombinant antigens characterized in vitro. Immunisation of mice with the recombinant replicon particles elicited antibodies that reacted with the endogenous antigens of M. ulcerans cells. A prime-boost immunization regimen with MUL2232-recombinant replicon particles and recombinant MUL2232 protein induced a strong immune response but only slightly reduced bacterial multiplication in a mouse model of M. ulcerans infection. We conclude that a monovalent vaccine based on the MUL2232 antigen will probably not sufficiently control M. ulcerans infection in humans.

  17. Use of Recombinant Virus Replicon Particles for Vaccination against Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Bolz

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer, caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, which is most prevalent in rural regions of West African countries. The majority of clinical presentations seen in patients are ulcers on limbs that can be treated by eight weeks of antibiotic therapy. Nevertheless, scarring and permanent disabilities occur frequently and Buruli ulcer still causes high morbidity. A vaccine against the disease is so far not available but would be of great benefit if used for prophylaxis as well as therapy. In the present study, vesicular stomatitis virus-based RNA replicon particles encoding the M. ulcerans proteins MUL2232 and MUL3720 were generated and the expression of the recombinant antigens characterized in vitro. Immunisation of mice with the recombinant replicon particles elicited antibodies that reacted with the endogenous antigens of M. ulcerans cells. A prime-boost immunization regimen with MUL2232-recombinant replicon particles and recombinant MUL2232 protein induced a strong immune response but only slightly reduced bacterial multiplication in a mouse model of M. ulcerans infection. We conclude that a monovalent vaccine based on the MUL2232 antigen will probably not sufficiently control M. ulcerans infection in humans.

  18. Characterization of self-assembled virus-like particles of Merkel cell polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Iwasaki, Kenji; Katano, Harutaka; Kataoka, Michiyo; Nagata, Noriyo; Kobayashi, Kazumi; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    In our recombinant baculovirus system, VP1 protein of merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), which is implicated as a causative agent in Merkel cell carcinoma, was self-assembled into MCPyV-like particles (MCPyV-LP) with two different sizes in insect cells, followed by being released into the culture medium. DNA molecules of 1.5- to 5-kb, which were derived from host insect cells, were packaged in large, ~50-nm spherical particles but not in small, ~25-nm particles. Structure reconstruction using cryo-electron microscopy showed that large MCPyV-LPs are composed of 72 pentameric capsomeres arranged in a T = 7 icosahedral surface lattice and are 48 nm in diameter. The MCPyV-LPs did not share antigenic determinants with BK- and JC viruses (BKPyV and JCPyV). The VLP-based enzyme immunoassay was applied to investigate age-specific prevalence of MCPyV infection in the general Japanese population aged 1-70 years. While seroprevalence of MCPyV increased with age in children and young individuals, its seropositivity in each age group was lower compared with BKPyV and JCPyV.

  19. Characterization of self-assembled virus-like particles of Merkel cell polyomavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Cheng Li

    Full Text Available In our recombinant baculovirus system, VP1 protein of merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV, which is implicated as a causative agent in Merkel cell carcinoma, was self-assembled into MCPyV-like particles (MCPyV-LP with two different sizes in insect cells, followed by being released into the culture medium. DNA molecules of 1.5- to 5-kb, which were derived from host insect cells, were packaged in large, ~50-nm spherical particles but not in small, ~25-nm particles. Structure reconstruction using cryo-electron microscopy showed that large MCPyV-LPs are composed of 72 pentameric capsomeres arranged in a T = 7 icosahedral surface lattice and are 48 nm in diameter. The MCPyV-LPs did not share antigenic determinants with BK- and JC viruses (BKPyV and JCPyV. The VLP-based enzyme immunoassay was applied to investigate age-specific prevalence of MCPyV infection in the general Japanese population aged 1-70 years. While seroprevalence of MCPyV increased with age in children and young individuals, its seropositivity in each age group was lower compared with BKPyV and JCPyV.

  20. Long-Term Single-Dose Efficacy of a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Based Andes Virus Vaccine in Syrian Hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Prescott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Andes virus (ANDV is highly pathogenic in humans and is the primary etiologic agent of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS in South America. Case-fatality rates are as high as 50% and there are no approved vaccines or specific therapies for infection. Our laboratory has recently developed a replication-competent recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-based vaccine that expressed the glycoproteins of Andes virus in place of the native VSV glycoprotein (G. This vaccine is highly efficacious in the Syrian hamster model of HCPS when given 28 days before challenge with ANDV, or when given around the time of challenge (peri-exposure, and even protects when administered post-exposure. Herein, we sought to test the durability of the immune response to a single dose of this vaccine in Syrian hamsters. This vaccine was efficacious in hamsters challenged intranasally with ANDV 6 months after vaccination (p = 0.025, but animals were not significantly protected following 1 year of vaccination (p = 0.090. The decrease in protection correlated with a reduction of measurable neutralizing antibody responses, and suggests that a more robust vaccination schedule might be required to provide long-term immunity.

  1. Three-Dimensional Localization of Single Molecules for Super-Resolution Imaging and Single-Particle Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Diezmann, Alex; Shechtman, Yoav; Moerner, W E

    2017-06-14

    Single-molecule super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking are two imaging modalities that illuminate the properties of cells and materials on spatial scales down to tens of nanometers or with dynamical information about nanoscale particle motion in the millisecond range, respectively. These methods generally use wide-field microscopes and two-dimensional camera detectors to localize molecules to much higher precision than the diffraction limit. Given the limited total photons available from each single-molecule label, both modalities require careful mathematical analysis and image processing. Much more information can be obtained about the system under study by extending to three-dimensional (3D) single-molecule localization: without this capability, visualization of structures or motions extending in the axial direction can easily be missed or confused, compromising scientific understanding. A variety of methods for obtaining both 3D super-resolution images and 3D tracking information have been devised, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. These include imaging of multiple focal planes, point-spread-function engineering, and interferometric detection. These methods may be compared based on their ability to provide accurate and precise position information on single-molecule emitters with limited photons. To successfully apply and further develop these methods, it is essential to consider many practical concerns, including the effects of optical aberrations, field dependence in the imaging system, fluorophore labeling density, and registration between different color channels. Selected examples of 3D super-resolution imaging and tracking are described for illustration from a variety of biological contexts and with a variety of methods, demonstrating the power of 3D localization for understanding complex systems.

  2. Single particle and molecular assembly analysis of polyribosomes by single- and double-tilt cryo electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasnikov, Alexander G. [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Department of Integrative Structural Biology, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/ Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale INSERM U964/ Université de Strasbourg, 1 rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Afonina, Zhanna A. [Institute of Protein Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142290 Pushchino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Klaholz, Bruno P., E-mail: klaholz@igbmc.fr [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Department of Integrative Structural Biology, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/ Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale INSERM U964/ Université de Strasbourg, 1 rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France)

    2013-03-15

    Cryo electron tomography (cryo-ET) can provide cellular and molecular structural information on various biological samples. However, the detailed interpretation of tomograms reconstructed from single-tilt data tends to suffer from low signal-to-noise ratio and artefacts caused by some systematically missing angular views. While these can be overcome by sub-tomogram averaging, they remain limiting for the analysis of unique structures. Double-tilt ET can improve the tomogram quality by acquiring a second tilt series after an in-plane rotation, but its usage is not widespread yet because it is considered technically demanding and it is rarely used under cryo conditions. Here we show that double-tilt cryo-ET improves the quality of 3D reconstructions so significantly that even single particle analysis can be envisaged despite of the intrinsically low image contrast obtained from frozen-hydrated specimens. This is illustrated by the analysis of eukaryotic polyribosomes in which individual ribosomes were reconstructed using single-tilt, partial and full double-tilt geometries. The improved tomograms favour the faster convergence of iterative sub-tomogram averaging and allow a better 3D classification using multivariate statistical analysis. Our study of single particles and molecular assemblies within polysomes illustrates that the dual-axis approach is particularly useful for cryo applications of ET, both for unique objects and for structures that can be classified and averaged. - Highlights: ► Double-tilt cryo-ET improves 3D reconstructions thus making single particle analysis possible. ► Dual-axis cryo-ET data favour a faster convergence of iterative sub-tomogram averaging. ► Individual ribosomes were reconstructed from single-tilt, partial/ full double-tilt geometries. ► Double-tilt cryo-ET facilitates analysis of larger molecular assemblies such as in cell sections. ► Dual-axis cryo-ET is applicable to unique objects and to structures that can be

  3. The Antiviral Mechanism of an Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein-Specific Single-Domain Antibody Fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanke, Leo; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Brewer, R. Camille; van Diest, Eline; Schmidt, Florian I.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L. (Whitehead); (MIT)

    2016-12-13

    Alpaca-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that target the influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP) can protect cells from infection when expressed in the cytosol. We found that one such VHH, αNP-VHH1, exhibits antiviral activity similar to that of Mx proteins by blocking nuclear import of incoming viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) and viral transcription and replication in the nucleus. We determined a 3.2-Å crystal structure of αNP-VHH1 in complex with influenza A virus NP. The VHH binds to a nonconserved region on the body domain of NP, which has been associated with binding to host factors and serves as a determinant of host range. Several of the NP/VHH interface residues determine sensitivity of NP to antiviral Mx GTPases. The structure of the NP/αNP-VHH1 complex affords a plausible explanation for the inhibitory properties of the VHH and suggests a rationale for the antiviral properties of Mx proteins. Such knowledge can be leveraged for much-needed novel antiviral strategies.

    IMPORTANCEInfluenza virus strains can rapidly escape from protection afforded by seasonal vaccines or acquire resistance to available drugs. Additional ways to interfere with the virus life cycle are therefore urgently needed. The influenza virus nucleoprotein is one promising target for antiviral interventions. We have previously isolated alpaca-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that protect cells from influenza virus infection if expressed intracellularly. We show here that one such VHH exhibits antiviral activities similar to those of proteins of the cellular antiviral defense (Mx proteins). We determined the three-dimensional structure of this VHH in complex with the influenza virus nucleoprotein and identified the interaction site, which overlaps regions that determine sensitivity of the virus to Mx proteins. Our data define a new vulnerability of influenza virus, help us to better understand the cellular antiviral mechanisms, and

  4. The Antiviral Mechanism of an Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein-Specific Single-Domain Antibody Fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Leo; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Brewer, R Camille; van Diest, Eline; Schmidt, Florian I; Schwartz, Thomas U; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2016-12-13

    Alpaca-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that target the influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP) can protect cells from infection when expressed in the cytosol. We found that one such VHH, αNP-VHH1, exhibits antiviral activity similar to that of Mx proteins by blocking nuclear import of incoming viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) and viral transcription and replication in the nucleus. We determined a 3.2-Å crystal structure of αNP-VHH1 in complex with influenza A virus NP. The VHH binds to a nonconserved region on the body domain of NP, which has been associated with binding to host factors and serves as a determinant of host range. Several of the NP/VHH interface residues determine sensitivity of NP to antiviral Mx GTPases. The structure of the NP/αNP-VHH1 complex affords a plausible explanation for the inhibitory properties of the VHH and suggests a rationale for the antiviral properties of Mx proteins. Such knowledge can be leveraged for much-needed novel antiviral strategies. Influenza virus strains can rapidly escape from protection afforded by seasonal vaccines or acquire resistance to available drugs. Additional ways to interfere with the virus life cycle are therefore urgently needed. The influenza virus nucleoprotein is one promising target for antiviral interventions. We have previously isolated alpaca-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that protect cells from influenza virus infection if expressed intracellularly. We show here that one such VHH exhibits antiviral activities similar to those of proteins of the cellular antiviral defense (Mx proteins). We determined the three-dimensional structure of this VHH in complex with the influenza virus nucleoprotein and identified the interaction site, which overlaps regions that determine sensitivity of the virus to Mx proteins. Our data define a new vulnerability of influenza virus, help us to better understand the cellular antiviral mechanisms, and provide a well-characterized tool to

  5. Evidences of Changes in Surface Electrostatic Charge Distribution during Stabilization of HPV16 Virus-Like Particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Vega

    Full Text Available The stabilization of human papillomavirus type 16 virus-like particles has been examined by means of different techniques including dynamic and static light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and electrophoretic mobility. All these techniques provide different and often complementary perspectives about the aggregation process and generation of stabilized virus-like particles after a period of time of 48 hours at a temperature of 298 K. Interestingly, static light scattering results point towards a clear colloidal instability in the initial systems, as suggested by a negative value of the second virial coefficient. This is likely related to small repulsive electrostatic interactions among the particles, and in agreement with relatively small absolute values of the electrophoretic mobility and, hence, of the net surface charges. At this initial stage the small repulsive interactions are not able to compensate binding interactions, which tend to aggregate the particles. As time proceeds, an increase of the size of the particles is accompanied by strong increases, in absolute values, of the electrophoretic mobility and net surface charge, suggesting enhanced repulsive electrostatic interactions and, consequently, a stabilized colloidal system. These results show that electrophoretic mobility is a useful methodology that can be applied to screen the stabilization factors for virus-like particles during vaccine development.

  6. Combining confocal and atomic force microscopy to quantify single-virus binding to mammalian cell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Richard; Delguste, Martin; Koehler, Melanie; Dumitru, Andra C; Laskowski, Pawel R; Müller, Daniel J; Alsteens, David

    2017-11-01

    Over the past five years, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based approaches have evolved into a powerful multiparametric tool set capable of imaging the surfaces of biological samples ranging from single receptors to membranes and tissues. One of these approaches, force-distance curve-based AFM (FD-based AFM), uses a probing tip functionalized with a ligand to image living cells at high-resolution and simultaneously localize and characterize specific ligand-receptor binding events. Analyzing data from FD-based AFM experiments using appropriate probabilistic models allows quantification of the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters that describe the free-energy landscape of the ligand-receptor bond. We have recently developed an FD-based AFM approach to quantify the binding events of single enveloped viruses to surface receptors of living animal cells while simultaneously observing them by fluorescence microscopy. This approach has provided insights into the early stages of the interaction between a virus and a cell. Applied to a model virus, we probed the specific interaction with cells expressing viral cognate receptors and measured the affinity of the interaction. Furthermore, we observed that the virus rapidly established specific multivalent interactions and found that each bond formed in sequence strengthened the attachment of the virus to the cell. Here we describe detailed procedures for probing the specific interactions of viruses with living cells; these procedures cover tip preparation, cell sample preparation, step-by-step FD-based AFM imaging and data analysis. Experienced microscopists should be able to master the entire set of protocols in 1 month.

  7. Characteristics of tyre dust in polluted air: Studies by single particle mass spectrometry (ATOFMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Beddows, David C. S.; Gietl, Johanna K.; Olatunbosun, Oluremi A.; Yang, Xiaoguang; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-09-01

    There is a paucity of quantitative knowledge on the contributions of non-exhaust (abrasion and re-suspension) sources to traffic emissions. Abrasive emissions can be broadly categorised as tyre wear, brake wear and road dust/road surface wear. Current research often considers road dust and tyre dust as externally mixed particles, the former mainly composed of mineral matter and the latter solely composed of mainly organic matter and some trace elements. The aim of this work was to characterise tyre wear from both laboratory and field studies by using Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS). Real-time single particle chemical composition was obtained from a set of rubber tyres rotating on a metal surface. Bimodal particle number size distributions peaking at 35 nm and 85 nm were obtained from SMPS/APS measurements over the range 6-20,000 nm. ATOFMS mass spectra of tyre wear in the particle size range 200-3000 nm diameter show peaks due to exo-sulphur compounds, nitrate, Zn and ions of high molecular weight (m/z > 100) attributed to organic polymers. Two large ATOFMS datasets collected from a number of outdoor studies were examined. The former was constituted of 48 road dust samples collected on the roads of London. The latter consisted of ATOFMS ambient air field studies from Europe, overall composed of more than 2,000,000 single particle mass spectra. The majority (95%) of tyre wear particles present in the road dust samples and atmospheric samples are internally mixed with metals (Li, Na, Ca, Fe, Ti), as well as phosphate. It is concluded that the interaction of tyres with the road surface creates particles internally mixed from two sources: tyre rubber and road surface materials. Measurements of the tyre rubber component alone may underestimate the contribution of tyre wear to concentrations of airborne particulate matter. The results presented are especially relevant for urban aerosol source apportionment and PM2.5 exposure assessment.

  8. Statistical and direct decay of high-lying single-particle excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gales, S.

    1993-01-01

    Transfer reactions induced by hadronic probes at intermediate energies have revealed a rich spectrum of high-lying excitations embedded in the nuclear continuum. The investigation of their decay properties is believed to be a severe test of their microscopic structure as predicted by microscopic nuclear models. In addition the degree of damping of these simple modes in the nuclear continuum can be obtained by means of the measured particle (n,p) decay branching ratios. The neutron and proton decay studies of high-lying single-particle states in heavy nuclei are presented. (author). 13 refs., 9 figs

  9. Raman mapping of mannitol/lysozyme particles produced via spray drying and single droplet drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pekka Pajander, Jari; Matero, Sanni Elina; Sloth, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    -ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) and Raman microscopy. Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis was used for analyzing the Raman microscopy data. RESULTS: XRPD results indicated that a mixture of β-mannitol and α-mannitol was produced in the spray-drying process which was supported by the Raman analysis......, whereas Raman analysis indicated that a mixture of α-mannitol and δ-mannitol was detected in the single particles from DKA. In addition Raman mapping indicated that the presence of lysozyme seemed to favor the appearance of α-mannitol in the particles from DKA evidenced by close proximity of lysozyme...

  10. Measurement of single moving particle temperatures with an FT-IR spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik; Sørensen, L.H.

    1996-01-01

    A conventional scanning FT-IR spectrometer is used to measure the blackbody radiation through a rapidly moving pinhole in an experiment simulating a dying hot particle. The effects and errors from source movements are analyzed and verified through experiments. The importance of the scanning...... by a factor of 2-10 compared with results from a typical two-color pyrometer. A novel method is presented for measuring emission spectra from single moving particles passing the field of view of the spectrometer in a random manner....

  11. Characterization of virus-like particles by atomic force microscopy in ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropesa, Reinier; Ramos, Jorge R.; Falcón, Viviana; Felipe, Ariel

    2013-06-01

    Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) are attractive candidates for vaccine design since they resemble native viroids in size and morphology, but they are non-infectious due to the absence of a viral genome. The visualization of surface morphologies and structures can be used to deepen the understanding of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful tool for the visualization of soft biological samples in a nanoscale resolution. In this work we have investigated the morphology of recombinant surface antigens of hepatitis B (rHBsAg) VLPs from Cuban vaccine against hepatitis B. The rHBsAg VLPs sizes estimated by AFM between 15 and 30 nm are similar to those reported on previous transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies.

  12. Characterization of virus-like particles by atomic force microscopy in ambient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oropesa, Reinier; Ramos, Jorge R; Falcón, Viviana; Felipe, Ariel

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) are attractive candidates for vaccine design since they resemble native viroids in size and morphology, but they are non-infectious due to the absence of a viral genome. The visualization of surface morphologies and structures can be used to deepen the understanding of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful tool for the visualization of soft biological samples in a nanoscale resolution. In this work we have investigated the morphology of recombinant surface antigens of hepatitis B (rHBsAg) VLPs from Cuban vaccine against hepatitis B. The rHBsAg VLPs sizes estimated by AFM between 15 and 30 nm are similar to those reported on previous transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. (paper)

  13. Bacterially produced recombinant influenza vaccines based on virus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Jegerlehner

    Full Text Available Although current influenza vaccines are effective in general, there is an urgent need for the development of new technologies to improve vaccine production timelines, capacities and immunogenicity. Herein, we describe the development of an influenza vaccine technology which enables recombinant production of highly efficient influenza vaccines in bacterial expression systems. The globular head domain of influenza hemagglutinin, comprising most of the protein's neutralizing epitopes, was expressed in E. coli and covalently conjugated to bacteriophage-derived virus-like particles produced independently in E.coli. Conjugate influenza vaccines produced this way were used to immunize mice and found to elicit immune sera with high antibody titers specific for the native influenza hemagglutinin protein and high hemagglutination-inhibition titers. Moreover vaccination with these vaccines induced full protection against lethal challenges with homologous and highly drifted influenza strains.

  14. Electrodynamic balance-mass spectrometry of single particles as a new platform for atmospheric chemistry research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsall, Adam W.; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Keutsch, Frank N.

    2018-01-01

    New analytical techniques are needed to improve our understanding of the intertwined physical and chemical processes that affect the composition of aerosol particles in the Earth's atmosphere, such as gas-particle partitioning and homogenous or heterogeneous chemistry, and their ultimate relation to air quality and climate. We describe a new laboratory setup that couples an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to a mass spectrometer (MS). The EDB stores a single laboratory-generated particle in an electric field under atmospheric conditions for an arbitrarily long length of time. The particle is then transferred via gas flow to an ionization region that vaporizes and ionizes the analyte molecules before MS measurement. We demonstrate the feasibility of the technique by tracking evaporation of polyethylene glycol molecules and finding agreement with a kinetic model. Fitting data to the kinetic model also allows determination of vapor pressures to within a factor of 2. This EDB-MS system can be used to study fundamental chemical and physical processes involving particles that are difficult to isolate and study with other techniques. The results of such measurements can be used to improve our understanding of atmospheric particles.

  15. Single particle electron microscopy reconstruction of the exosome complex using the random conical tilt method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueqi; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2011-03-28

    Single particle electron microscopy (EM) reconstruction has recently become a popular tool to get the three-dimensional (3D) structure of large macromolecular complexes. Compared to X-ray crystallography, it has some unique advantages. First, single particle EM reconstruction does not need to crystallize the protein sample, which is the bottleneck in X-ray crystallography, especially for large macromolecular complexes. Secondly, it does not need large amounts of protein samples. Compared with milligrams of proteins necessary for crystallization, single particle EM reconstruction only needs several micro-liters of protein solution at nano-molar concentrations, using the negative staining EM method. However, despite a few macromolecular assemblies with high symmetry, single particle EM is limited at relatively low resolution (lower than 1 nm resolution) for many specimens especially those without symmetry. This technique is also limited by the size of the molecules under study, i.e. 100 kDa for negatively stained specimens and 300 kDa for frozen-hydrated specimens in general. For a new sample of unknown structure, we generally use a heavy metal solution to embed the molecules by negative staining. The specimen is then examined in a transmission electron microscope to take two-dimensional (2D) micrographs of the molecules. Ideally, the protein molecules have a homogeneous 3D structure but exhibit different orientations in the micrographs. These micrographs are digitized and processed in computers as "single particles". Using two-dimensional alignment and classification techniques, homogenous molecules in the same views are clustered into classes. Their averages enhance the signal of the molecule's 2D shapes. After we assign the particles with the proper relative orientation (Euler angles), we will be able to reconstruct the 2D particle images into a 3D virtual volume. In single particle 3D reconstruction, an essential step is to correctly assign the proper orientation

  16. Tracking the virus-like particles of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus in insect cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ummi Fairuz Hanapi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNv poses a major threat to the prawn industry. Currently, no effective vaccine and treatment are available to prevent the spread of MrNv. Its infection mechanism and localisation in a host cell are also not well characterised. The MrNv capsid protein (MrNvc produced in Escherichia coli self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs resembling the native virus. Thus, fluorescein labelled MrNvc VLPs were employed as a model to study the virus entry and localisation in Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9 cells. Through fluorescence microscopy and sub-cellular fractionation, the MrNvc was shown to enter Sf9 cells, and eventually arrived at the nucleus. The presence of MrNvc within the cytoplasm and nucleus of Sf9 cells was further confirmed by the Z-stack imaging. The presence of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, genistein, methyl-β-cyclodextrin or chlorpromazine (CPZ inhibited the entry of MrNvc into Sf9 cells, but cytochalasin D did not inhibit this process. This suggests that the internalisation of MrNvc VLPs is facilitated by caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The whole internalisation process of MrNvc VLPs into a Sf9 cell was recorded with live cell imaging. We have also identified a potential nuclear localisation signal (NLS of MrNvc through deletion mutagenesis and verified by classical-NLS mapping. Overall, this study provides an insight into the journey of MrNvc VLPs in insect cells.

  17. Tracking the virus-like particles of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus in insect cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanapi, Ummi Fairuz; Yong, Chean Yeah; Goh, Zee Hong; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Yeap, Swee Keong

    2017-01-01

    Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNv) poses a major threat to the prawn industry. Currently, no effective vaccine and treatment are available to prevent the spread of MrNv. Its infection mechanism and localisation in a host cell are also not well characterised. The MrNv capsid protein (MrNvc) produced in Escherichia coli self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) resembling the native virus. Thus, fluorescein labelled MrNvc VLPs were employed as a model to study the virus entry and localisation in Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9 cells. Through fluorescence microscopy and sub-cellular fractionation, the MrNvc was shown to enter Sf9 cells, and eventually arrived at the nucleus. The presence of MrNvc within the cytoplasm and nucleus of Sf9 cells was further confirmed by the Z-stack imaging. The presence of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), genistein, methyl-β-cyclodextrin or chlorpromazine (CPZ) inhibited the entry of MrNvc into Sf9 cells, but cytochalasin D did not inhibit this process. This suggests that the internalisation of MrNvc VLPs is facilitated by caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The whole internalisation process of MrNvc VLPs into a Sf9 cell was recorded with live cell imaging. We have also identified a potential nuclear localisation signal (NLS) of MrNvc through deletion mutagenesis and verified by classical-NLS mapping. Overall, this study provides an insight into the journey of MrNvc VLPs in insect cells. PMID:28194311

  18. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Replicon Particles Can Induce Rapid Protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Dias, Camila C. A.; Moraes, Mauro P.; Weiss, Marcelo; Perez-Martin, Eva; Owens, Gary; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt; de los Santos, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that delivery of the porcine type I interferon gene (poIFN-α/β) with a replication-defective human adenovirus vector (adenovirus 5 [Ad5]) can sterilely protect swine challenged with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 1 day later. However, the need of relatively high doses of Ad5 limits the applicability of such a control strategy in the livestock industry. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) empty replicon particles (VRPs) can induce rapid protection of mice against either homologous or, in some cases, heterologous virus challenge. As an alternative approach to induce rapid protection against FMDV, we have examined the ability of VRPs containing either the gene for green fluorescent protein (VRP-GFP) or poIFN-α (VRP-poIFN-α) to block FMDV replication in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment of swine or bovine cell lines with either VRP significantly inhibited subsequent infection with FMDV as early as 6 h after treatment and for at least 120 h posttreatment. Furthermore, mice pretreated with either 107 or 108 infectious units of VRP-GFP and challenged with a lethal dose of FMDV 24 h later were protected from death. Protection was induced as early as 6 h after treatment and lasted for at least 48 h and correlated with induction of an antiviral response and production of IFN-α. By 6 h after treatment several genes were upregulated, and the number of genes and the level of induction increased at 24 h. Finally, we demonstrated that the chemokine IP-10, which is induced by IFN-α and VRP-GFP, is directly involved in protection against FMDV. PMID:23468490

  19. Application of virus-like particles (VLP) to NMR characterization of viral membrane protein interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antanasijevic, Aleksandar; Kingsley, Carolyn [University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics (United States); Basu, Arnab; Bowlin, Terry L. [Microbiotix Inc. (United States); Rong, Lijun [University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Microbiology and Immunology (United States); Caffrey, Michael, E-mail: caffrey@uic.edu [University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The membrane proteins of viruses play critical roles in the virus life cycle and are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Virus-like particles (VLP) present the possibility to study the biochemical and biophysical properties of viral membrane proteins in their native environment. Specifically, the VLP constructs contain the entire protein sequence and are comprised of native membrane components including lipids, cholesterol, carbohydrates and cellular proteins. In this study we prepare VLP containing full-length hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA) from influenza and characterize their interactions with small molecule inhibitors. Using HA-VLP, we first show that VLP samples prepared using the standard sucrose gradient purification scheme contain significant amounts of serum proteins, which exhibit high potential for non-specific interactions, thereby complicating NMR studies of ligand-target interactions. We then show that the serum contaminants may be largely removed with the addition of a gel filtration chromatography step. Next, using HA-VLP we demonstrate that WaterLOGSY NMR is significantly more sensitive than Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR for the study of ligand interactions with membrane bound targets. In addition, we compare the ligand orientation to HA embedded in VLP with that of recombinant HA by STD NMR. In a subsequent step, using NA-VLP we characterize the kinetic and binding properties of substrate analogs and inhibitors of NA, including study of the H274Y-NA mutant, which leads to wide spread resistance to current influenza antivirals. In summary, our work suggests that VLP have high potential to become standard tools in biochemical and biophysical studies of viral membrane proteins, particularly when VLP are highly purified and combined with control VLP containing native membrane proteins.

  20. Characterizing Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 virus-like particles production in insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, Balaji; Chang, Cindy; Fan, Yuan Y; Lim, Pei-Yin; Cardosa, Jane; Lua, Linda

    2016-02-15

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) are two viruses commonly responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in children. The lack of prophylactic or therapeutic measures against HFMD is a major public health concern. Insect cell-based EV71 and CVA16 virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates against HFMD and are currently under development. In this paper, the influence of insect cell line, incubation temperature, and serial passaging effect and stability of budded virus (BV) stocks on EV71 and CVA16 VLP production was investigated. Enhanced EV71 and CVA16 VLP production was observed in Sf9 cells compared to High Five™ cells. Lowering the incubation temperature from the standard 27°C to 21°C increased the production of both VLPs in Sf9 cells. Serial passaging of CVA16 BV stocks in cell culture had a detrimental effect on the productivity of the structural proteins and the effect was observed with only 5 passages of BV stocks. A 2.7× higher production yield was achieved with EV71 compared to CVA16. High-resolution asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation couple with multi-angle light scattering (AF4-MALS) was used for the first time to characterize EV71 and CVA16 VLPs, displaying an average root mean square radius of 15±1nm and 15.3±5.8 nm respectively. This study highlights the need for different approaches in the design of production process to develop a bivalent EV71 and CVA16 vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of full length Hepatitis C Virus particles of 1a genotype through small interference RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Sidra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV, a member of the Flaviviridae family of viruses, is a major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, the only treatment available consists of a combination of Pegylated interferon alpha (INF-α and ribavirin, but only half of the patients treated show a sufficient antiviral response. Thus there is a great need for the development of new treatments for HCV infections. RNA interference (RNAi represents a new promising approach to develop effective antiviral drugs and has been extremely effective against HCV infection. Results This study was design to assess or explore the silencing effect of small interference RNAs (siRNAs against full length HCV particles of genotype 1a. In the present study six 21-bp siRNAs were designed against different regions of HCV structural genes (Core, E1 and E2. Selected siRNAs were labeled as Csi 301, Csi 29, E1si 52, E1si 192, E2si 86 and E2si 493. Our results demonstrated that siRNAs directed against HCV core gene showed 70% reduction in viral titer in HCV infected liver cells. Moreover, siRNAs against E1 and E2 envelop genes showed a dramatic reduction in HCV viral RNA, E2si 86 exhibited 93% inhibition, while E1si 192, E2si 493 and E1si 52 showed 87%, 80%, and 66% inhibition respectively. No significant inhibition was detected in cells transfected with the negative control siRNA. Conclusion Our results suggested that siRNAs targeted against HCV structural genes efficiently silence full length HCV particles and provide an effective therapeutic option against HCV infection.

  2. Low temperature-dependent salmonid alphavirus glycoprotein processing and recombinant virus-like particle formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W Metz

    Full Text Available Pancreas disease (PD and sleeping disease (SD are important viral scourges in aquaculture of Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout. The etiological agent of PD and SD is salmonid alphavirus (SAV, an unusual member of the Togaviridae (genus Alphavirus. SAV replicates at lower temperatures in fish. Outbreaks of SAV are associated with large economic losses of ~17 to 50 million $/year. Current control strategies rely on vaccination with inactivated virus formulations that are cumbersome to obtain and have intrinsic safety risks. In this research we were able to obtain non-infectious virus-like particles (VLPs of SAV via expression of recombinant baculoviruses encoding SAV capsid protein and two major immunodominant viral glycoproteins, E1 and E2 in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells. However, this was only achieved when a temperature shift from 27°C to lower temperatures was applied. At 27°C, precursor E2 (PE2 was misfolded and not processed by host furin into mature E2. Hence, E2 was detected neither on the surface of infected cells nor as VLPs in the culture fluid. However, when temperatures during protein expression were lowered, PE2 was processed into mature E2 in a temperature-dependent manner and VLPs were abundantly produced. So, temperature shift-down during synthesis is a prerequisite for correct SAV glycoprotein processing and recombinant VLP production.

  3. A Proline-Rich N-Terminal Region of the Dengue Virus NS3 Is Crucial for Infectious Particle Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhard, Leopoldo G; Iglesias, Néstor G; Byk, Laura A; Filomatori, Claudia V; De Maio, Federico A; Gamarnik, Andrea V

    2016-06-01

    Dengue virus is currently the most important insect-borne viral human pathogen. Viral nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is a key component of the viral replication machinery that performs multiple functions during viral replication and participates in antiviral evasion. Using dengue virus infectious clones and reporter systems to dissect each step of the viral life cycle, we examined the requirements of different domains of NS3 on viral particle assembly. A thorough site-directed mutagenesis study based on solvent-accessible surface areas of NS3 revealed that, in addition to being essential for RNA replication, different domains of dengue virus NS3 are critically required for production of infectious viral particles. Unexpectedly, point mutations in the protease, interdomain linker, or helicase domain were sufficient to abolish infectious particle formation without affecting translation, polyprotein processing, or RNA replication. In particular, we identified a novel proline-rich N-terminal unstructured region of NS3 that contains several amino acid residues involved in infectious particle formation. We also showed a new role for the interdomain linker of NS3 in virion assembly. In conclusion, we present a comprehensive genetic map of novel NS3 determinants for viral particle assembly. Importantly, our results provide evidence of a central role of NS3 in the coordination of both dengue virus RNA replication and particle formation. Dengue virus is an important human pathogen, and its prominence is expanding globally; however, basic aspects of its biology are still unclear, hindering the development of effective therapeutic and prophylactic treatments. Little is known about the initial steps of dengue and other flavivirus particle assembly. This process involves a complex interplay between viral and cellular components, making it an attractive antiviral target. Unpredictably, we identified spatially separated regions of the large NS3 viral protein as determinants for

  4. CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells Can Act Separately in Tumour Rejection after Immunization with Murine Pneumotropic Virus Chimeric Her2/neu Virus-Like Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Andreasson, Kalle; Eriksson, Mathilda; Tegerstedt, Karin; Ramqvist, Torbj?rn; Dalianis, Tina

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunization with murine pneumotropic virus virus-like particles carrying Her2/neu (Her2MPtVLPs) prevents tumour outgrowth in mice when given prophylactically, and therapeutically if combined with the adjuvant CpG. We investigated which components of the immune system are involved in tumour rejection, and whether long-term immunological memory can be obtained. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: During the effector phase in BALB/c mice, only depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ in combination, with or...

  5. A novel recombinant virus-like particle vaccine for prevention of porcine parvovirus-induced reproductive failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonis, A.F.G.; Bruschke, C.J.M.; Rueda, P.; Maranga, L.; Casal, J.; Vela, C.; Hilgers, L.A.T.; Belt, P.B.G.M.; Weerdmeester, K.; Carrondo, M.J.; Langeveld, J.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    A novel vaccine against porcine parvovirus (PPV), composed of recombinant virus-like particles (PPV-VLPs) produced with the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) at industrial scale, was tested for its immunogenicity and protective potency. A formulation of submicrogram amounts of PPV-VLPs in

  6. Virus-like particle nanoreactors: programmed en capsulation of the thermostable CelB glycosidase inside the P22 capsid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patterson, D.P.; Schwarz, B.; El-Boubbou, K.; Oost, van der J.; Prevelige, P.E.; Douglas, T.

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembling biological systems hold great potential for the synthetic construction of new active soft nanomaterials. Here we demonstrate the hierarchical bottom-up assembly of bacteriophage P22 virus-like particles (VLPs) that encapsulate the thermostable CelB glycosidase creating catalytically

  7. Sampling and single particle analysis for the chemical characterisation of fine atmospheric particulates: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, Michele; Gasparon, Massimo

    2017-11-01

    To better understand the potential environmental and human health impacts of fine airborne particulate matter (APM), detailed physical and chemical characterisation is required. The only means to accurately distinguish between the multiple compositions in APM is by single particle analysis. A variety of methods and instruments are available, which range from filter-based sample collection for off-line laboratory analysis to on-line instruments that detect the airborne particles and generate size distribution and chemical data in real time. There are many reasons for sampling particulates in the ambient atmosphere and as a consequence, different measurement strategies and sampling devices are used depending on the scientific objectives and subsequent analytical techniques. This review is designed as a guide to some of the techniques available for the sampling and subsequent chemical analysis of individual inorganic particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chaos and nonlinear dynamics of single-particle orbits in a magnetotaillike magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Palmadesso, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The properties of charged-particle motion in Hamiltonian dynamics are studied in a magnetotaillike magnetic field configuration. It is shown by numerical integration of the equation of motion that the system is generally nonintegrable and that the particle motion can be classified into three distinct types of orbits: bounded integrable orbits, unbounded stochastic orbits, and unbounded transient orbits. It is also shown that different regions of the phase space exhibit qualitatively different responses to external influences. The concept of 'differential memory' in single-particle distributions is proposed. Physical implications for the dynamical properties of the magnetotail plasmas and the possible generation of non-Maxwellian features in the distribution functions are discussed.

  9. Blowing Snow and Aerosol Composition: Bulk and Single Particle Measurements in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, P. F.; Giordano, M.

    2017-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that aerosol concentration and composition in the cryosphere is influenced by blowing snow, though the mechanisms remain unclear. Changes in aerosol composition due to blowing snow may significantly alter local and regional aerosol production, processing, transport, and lifetimes in the cryosphere. This presentation will focus on both bulk composition changes and single particle results from deploying an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to the Antarctic sea ice during the 2ODIAC campaign, with a focus on blowing snow events. With this first on-line analysis, blowing snow clearly enhances the submicron sea salt (Na and Cl) concentrations in Antarctic aerosols. These bulk composition changes are shown to be independent from air mass origins. Single particle results from the AMS show a variety of chemical species in addition to sulfates in the submicron aerosol mass. K-means cluster analysis also shows distinct changes in the overall aerosol mass spectra during to blowing snow events.

  10. Single-particle model of a strongly driven, dense, nanoscale quantum ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, C. S.; Rangan, C.

    2018-01-01

    We study the effects of interatomic interactions on the quantum dynamics of a dense, nanoscale, atomic ensemble driven by a strong electromagnetic field. We use a self-consistent, mean-field technique based on the pseudospectral time-domain method and a full, three-directional basis to solve the coupled Maxwell-Liouville equations. We find that interatomic interactions generate a decoherence in the state of an ensemble on a much faster time scale than the excited-state lifetime of individual atoms. We present a single-particle model of the driven, dense ensemble by incorporating interactions into a dephasing rate. This single-particle model reproduces the essential physics of the full simulation and is an efficient way of rapidly estimating the collective dynamics of a dense ensemble.

  11. Detection of charged particles with a methylammonium lead tribromide perovskite single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qiang [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Wei, Haotong; Wei, Wei [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Chuirazzi, William; DeSantis, Dylan [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Huang, Jinsong, E-mail: jhuang2@unl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Cao, Lei, E-mail: cao.152@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2017-03-11

    Methylammonium lead tribromide (MAPbBr{sub 3}) perovskite crystals have attracted significant attention due to their attractive performance in various optoelectronic applications such as solar cells, light-emitting devices, photodetectors, and recently in X-ray detectors. In this study, we demonstrate a possible use of perovskite-based devices for detection of charged particles (which can be applied in basic scientific research, health physics, and environmental analysis) and investigate the mechanism of fundamental charge transport inside perovskite crystals. It was found that inexpensive MAPbBr{sub 3} single crystals could be used for measuring the energy spectrum of charged particles through direct collection of the produced charge. After fitting the plot of the centroid peak position versus voltage with the Hecht equation for single-polarity charge transport, the obtained hole mobility-lifetime product was in the range of (0.4–1.6)×10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/V.

  12. Inequivalence of single-particle and population lifetimes in a cuprate superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuolong [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Sobota, J. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Leuenberger, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); He, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Hashimoto, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lu, D. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Eisaki, H. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan); Kirchmann, P. S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Shen, Z. -X. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We study optimally doped Bi-2212 (Tc=96 K) using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Energy-resolved population lifetimes are extracted and compared with single-particle lifetimes measured by equilibrium photoemission. The population lifetimes deviate from the single-particle lifetimes in the low excitation limit by 1–2 orders of magnitude. Fundamental considerations of electron scattering unveil that these two lifetimes are in general distinct, yet for systems with only electron-phonon scattering they should converge in the low-temperature, low-fluence limit. As a result, the qualitative disparity in our data, even in this limit, suggests that scattering channels beyond electron-phonon interactions play a significant role in the electron dynamics of cuprate superconductors.

  13. The advent of structural biologyin situby single particle cryo-electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaz-Montoya, Jesús G; Ludtke, Steven J

    2017-01-01

    Single particle tomography (SPT), also known as subtomogram averaging, is a powerful technique uniquely poised to address questions in structural biology that are not amenable to more traditional approaches like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and conventional cryoEM single particle analysis. Owing to its potential for in situ structural biology at subnanometer resolution, SPT has been gaining enormous momentum in the last five years and is becoming a prominent, widely used technique. This method can be applied to unambiguously determine the structures of macromolecular complexes that exhibit compositional and conformational heterogeneity, both in vitro and in situ . Here we review the development of SPT, highlighting its applications and identifying areas of ongoing development.

  14. Guidelines for the fitting of anomalous diffusion mean square displacement graphs from single particle tracking experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldad Kepten

    Full Text Available Single particle tracking is an essential tool in the study of complex systems and biophysics and it is commonly analyzed by the time-averaged mean square displacement (MSD of the diffusive trajectories. However, past work has shown that MSDs are susceptible to significant errors and biases, preventing the comparison and assessment of experimental studies. Here, we attempt to extract practical guidelines for the estimation of anomalous time averaged MSDs through the simulation of multiple scenarios with fractional Brownian motion as a representative of a large class of fractional ergodic processes. We extract the precision and accuracy of the fitted MSD for various anomalous exponents and measurement errors with respect to measurement length and maximum time lags. Based on the calculated precision maps, we present guidelines to improve accuracy in single particle studies. Importantly, we find that in some experimental conditions, the time averaged MSD should not be used as an estimator.

  15. Insight into interrelation between single-particle and collective diffusion in binary melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, Elena V.; Evteev, Alexander V.

    2018-01-01

    The interrelation between the kinetics of single-particle (tracer) and collective diffusion in a binary melt is investigated theoretically within the framework of the Mori-Zwanzig formalism of statistical mechanics. An analytical expression for the Onsager coefficient for mass transport and two self-diffusion coefficients of species in a binary melt is derived using analysis based on the generalized Langevin equation. The derived expression naturally accounts for manifestation of microscopic (dynamic) cross-correlation effects in the kinetics of collective diffusion. Hence, it presents an explicit extension of the well-known Darken equation which is currently often used for expressing collective interdiffusion in terms of the two self-diffusion coefficients. An application of our analysis for interpretation of recent experimental data on the interrelation between the kinetics of single-particle and collective diffusion in Al-rich Ni-Al melts is demonstrated.

  16. Estimating the anomalous diffusion exponent for single particle tracking data with measurement errors - An alternative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnecki, Krzysztof; Kepten, Eldad; Garini, Yuval; Sikora, Grzegorz; Weron, Aleksander

    2015-06-11

    Accurately characterizing the anomalous diffusion of a tracer particle has become a central issue in biophysics. However, measurement errors raise difficulty in the characterization of single trajectories, which is usually performed through the time-averaged mean square displacement (TAMSD). In this paper, we study a fractionally integrated moving average (FIMA) process as an appropriate model for anomalous diffusion data with measurement errors. We compare FIMA and traditional TAMSD estimators for the anomalous diffusion exponent. The ability of the FIMA framework to characterize dynamics in a wide range of anomalous exponents and noise levels through the simulation of a toy model (fractional Brownian motion disturbed by Gaussian white noise) is discussed. Comparison to the TAMSD technique, shows that FIMA estimation is superior in many scenarios. This is expected to enable new measurement regimes for single particle tracking (SPT) experiments even in the presence of high measurement errors.

  17. Innovative molecular-based fluorescent nanoparticles for multicolor single particle tracking in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, Jonathan; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Godin, Antoine G; Palayret, Matthieu; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Based on an original molecular-based design, we present bright and photostable fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) showing excellent colloidal stability in various aqueous environments. Complementary near-infrared emitting and green emitting FONs were prepared using a simple, fast and robust protocol. Both types of FONs could be simultaneously imaged at the single-particle level in solution as well as in biological environments using a monochromatic excitation and a dual-color fluorescence microscope. No evidence of acute cytotoxicity was found upon incubation of live cells with mixed solutions of FONs, and both types of nanoparticles were found internalized in the cells where their motion could be simultaneously tracked at video-rate up to minutes. These fluorescent organic nanoparticles open a novel non-toxic alternative to existing nanoparticles for imaging biological structures, compatible with live-cell experiments and specially fitted for multicolor single particle tracking. (paper)

  18. Radiative capture of nucleons at astrophysical energies with single-particle states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.T.; Bertulani, C.A.; Guimaraes, V.

    2010-01-01

    Radiative capture of nucleons at energies of astrophysical interest is one of the most important processes for nucleosynthesis. The nucleon capture can occur either by a compound nucleus reaction or by a direct process. The compound reaction cross sections are usually very small, especially for light nuclei. The direct capture proceeds either via the formation of a single-particle resonance or a non-resonant capture process. In this work we calculate radiative capture cross sections and astrophysical S-factors for nuclei in the mass region A<20 using single-particle states. We carefully discuss the parameter fitting procedure adopted in the simplified two-body treatment of the capture process. Then we produce a detailed list of cases for which the model works well. Useful quantities, such as spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients, are obtained and compared to published data.

  19. Generation and preclinical immunogenicity study of dengue type 2 virus-like particles derived from stably transfected mosquito cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suphatrakul, Amporn; Yasanga, Thippawan; Keelapang, Poonsook; Sriburi, Rungtawan; Roytrakul, Thaneeya; Pulmanausahakul, Rojjanaporn; Utaipat, Utaiwan; Kawilapan, Yanee; Puttikhunt, Chunya; Kasinrerk, Watchara; Yoksan, Sutee; Auewarakul, Prasert; Malasit, Prida; Charoensri, Nicha; Sittisombut, Nopporn

    2015-10-13

    Recent phase IIb/III trials of a tetravalent live attenuated vaccine candidate revealed a need for improvement in the stimulation of protective immunity against diseases caused by dengue type 2 virus (DENV-2). Our attempts to develop particulate antigens for possibly supplementing live attenuated virus preparation involve generation and purification of recombinant DENV-2 virus-like particles (VLPs) derived from stably (prM+E)-expressing mosquito cells. Two VLP preparations generated with either negligible or enhanced prM cleavage exhibited different proportions of spherical particles and tubular particles of variable lengths. In BALB/c mice, VLPs were moderately immunogenic, requiring adjuvants for the induction of strong virus neutralizing antibody responses. VLPs with enhanced prM cleavage induced higher levels of neutralizing antibody than those without, but the stimulatory activity of both VLPs was similar in the presence of adjuvants. Comparison of EDIII-binding antibodies in mice following two adjuvanted doses of these VLPs revealed subtle differences in the stimulation of anti-EDIII binding antibodies. In cynomolgus macaques, VLPs with enhanced prM cleavage augmented strongly neutralizing antibody and EDIII-binding antibody responses in live attenuated virus-primed recipients, suggesting that these DENV-2 VLPs may be useful as the boosting antigen in prime-boost immunization. As the levels of neutralizing antibody induced in macaques with the prime-boost immunization were comparable to those infected with wild type virus, this virus-prime VLP-boost regimen may provide an immunization platform in which a need for robust neutralizing antibody response in the protection against DENV-2-associated illnesses could be tested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification and genetic characterization of a novel circular single-stranded DNA virus in a human upper respiratory tract sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lunbiao; Wu, Binyao; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Guo, Xiling; Ge, Yiyue; Zhao, Kangchen; Qi, Xian; Shi, Zhiyang; Zhu, Fengcai; Sun, Lixin; Zhou, Minghao

    2017-11-01

    Metagenomic analysis through high-throughput sequencing is a tool for detecting both known and novel viruses. Using this technique, a novel circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) virus genome was discovered in respiratory secretions from a febrile traveler. The virus, named human respiratory-associated PSCV-5-like virus (HRAPLV), has a genome comprising 3,018 bases, with two major putative ORFs inversely encoding capsid (Cap) and replicase (Rep) protein and separated by two intergenic regions. One stem-loop structure was predicted in the larger intergenic region (LIR). The predicted amino acid sequences of the Cap and Rep proteins of HRAPLV showed highest identity to those of porcine stool-associated circular virus 5 isolate CP3 (PoSCV 5) (53.0% and 48.9%, respectively). The host tropism of the virus is unknown, and further study is warranted to determine whether this novel virus is associated with human disease.

  1. Characterisation of Black Carbon (BC) mixing state and flux in Beijing using single particle measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rutambhara; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh; Flynn, Michael; Broda, Kurtis; Olfert, Jason; Irwin, Martin; Sun, Yele; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Junfeng; Ge, Xinlei; Langford, Ben; Nemitz, Eiko; Mullinger, Neil

    2017-04-01

    BC is generated by the incomplete combustion of carbonaceous fuels and it is an important component of fine PM2.5. In the atmosphere BC particles have a complex structure and its mixing state has crucial impact on optical properties. Quantifying the sources and emissions of black carbon in urban environments is important and presently uncertain, particularly in megacities undergoing rapid growth and change in emissions. During the winter of 2016 (10th Nov-10th Dec) the BC was characterised as part of a large joint UK-China field experiment in Beijing. This paper focuses on understanding the mixing state of BC as well as identification and quantification of BC sources. We used a combination of a Centrifugal Particle Mass Analyser (CPMA) and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) to uniquely quantify the morphology independent mass of single refractory BC particles and their coating content. The CPMA allows us to select pre-charged aerosol particles according to their mass to charge ratio and the SP2 provides information on the mass of refractory BC through a laser-induced incandescence method. Furthermore, another SP2 was used to measure the BC flux at 100m height using the Eddy Covariance method. We have successfully gathered 4 weeks of continuous measurements which include several severe pollution events in Beijing. Here we present preliminary results, characterising the distribution of coating mass on BC particles in Beijing and linking this to the main sources of BC in the city. We will provide initial estimates of the BC flux over a several kilometre footprint. Such analysis will provide important information for the further investigation of source distribution, emission, lifetime and optical properties of BC under complex environments in Beijing.

  2. Toll-like receptor agonist augments virus-like particle-mediated protection from Ebola virus with transient immune activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A O Martins

    Full Text Available Identifying safe and effective adjuvants is critical for the advanced development of protein-based vaccines. Pattern recognition receptor (PRR agonists are increasingly being explored as potential adjuvants, but there is concern that the efficacy of these molecules may be dependent on potentially dangerous levels of non-specific immune activation. The filovirus virus-like particle (VLP vaccine protects mice, guinea pigs, and nonhuman primates from viral challenge. In this study, we explored the impact of a stabilized dsRNA mimic, polyICLC, on VLP vaccination of C57BL/6 mice and Hartley guinea pigs. We show that at dose levels as low as 100 ng, the adjuvant increased the efficacy of the vaccine in mice. Antigen-specific, polyfunctional CD4 and CD8 T cell responses and antibody responses increased significantly upon inclusion of adjuvant. To determine whether the efficacy of polyICLC correlated with systemic immune activation, we examined serum cytokine levels and cellular activation in the draining lymph node. PolyICLC administration was associated with increases in TNFα, IL6, MCP1, MIP1α, KC, and MIP1β levels in the periphery and with the activation of dendritic cells (DCs, NK cells, and B cells. However, this activation resolved within 24 to 72 hours at efficacious adjuvant dose levels. These studies are the first to examine the polyICLC-induced enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses in the context of non-specific immune activation, and they provide a framework from which to consider adjuvant dose levels.

  3. In Vivo Packaging of mRNA in Yeast-Produced Bacteriophage GA Derived Virus-Like Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ārgule Dagnija

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage GA coat protein formed self-assembly competent virus-like particles (VLPs have been expressed previously in bacterial and yeast cells. On the basis of our previous experiments on the yeast vector pESC-URA / S. cerevisiae system containing two oppositely oriented promoters, new constructions were created with point-mutations in coat protein to mimic phage MS2-like RNA binding characteristics. Simultaneously, the MS2 operator sequence was added to mRNA desired for packaging. After the introduction of single-point mutations (S87N, K55N, R43K and double-point mutations (S87N + K55N and S87N + R43K, the coat protein’s ability to form VLPs was retained, but yield from cells was decreased. Exchange of the 87th Ser to Asn in coat protein sequence in combination with bacteriophage MS2 translational operator provided specific packaging of the gene of interest (GFP. Although non-specific nucleic acid sequences were packaged, the remarkable specificity for packaging of the gene of interest can be achieved using the described approach.

  4. Modified iterated extended Kalman particle filter for single satellite passive tracking

    OpenAIRE

    WU, Panlong; KONG, Jianshou; BO, Yuming

    2013-01-01

    Single satellite-to-satellite passive tracking techniques have great significance in space surveillance systems. A new passive modified iterated extended Kalman particle filter (MIEKPF) using bearings-only measurements in the Earth-Centered Inertial Coordinate System is proposed. The modified iterated extended Kalman filter (MIEKF), with a new maximum likelihood iteration termination criterion, is used to generate the proposal distribution of the MIEKPF. Moreover, a new measurement u...

  5. Single particle 3D reconstruction for 2D crystal images of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Sebastian; Arheit, Marcel; Kowal, Julia; Zeng, Xiangyan; Stahlberg, Henning

    2014-03-01

    In cases where ultra-flat cryo-preparations of well-ordered two-dimensional (2D) crystals are available, electron crystallography is a powerful method for the determination of the high-resolution structures of membrane and soluble proteins. However, crystal unbending and Fourier-filtering methods in electron crystallography three-dimensional (3D) image processing are generally limited in their performance for 2D crystals that are badly ordered or non-flat. Here we present a single particle image processing approach, which is implemented as an extension of the 2D crystallographic pipeline realized in the 2dx software package, for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of membrane proteins. The algorithm presented, addresses the low single-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 2D crystal images by exploiting neighborhood correlation between adjacent proteins in the 2D crystal. Compared with conventional single particle processing for randomly oriented particles, the computational costs are greatly reduced due to the crystal-induced limited search space, which allows a much finer search space compared to classical single particle processing. To reduce the considerable computational costs, our software features a hybrid parallelization scheme for multi-CPU clusters and computer with high-end graphic processing units (GPUs). We successfully apply the new refinement method to the structure of the potassium channel MloK1. The calculated 3D reconstruction shows more structural details and contains less noise than the map obtained by conventional Fourier-filtering based processing of the same 2D crystal images. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantum private comparison with d-level single-particle states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Chao-Hua; Guo, Gong-De; Lin, Song

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a quantum private comparison protocol with d-level single-particle states is proposed. In the protocol, a semi-honest third party is introduced to help two participants compare the size relationship of their secrets without revealing them to any other people. It is shown that the protocol is secure in theory. Moreover, the security of the protocol in real circumstance is also discussed. (paper)

  7. Synthesis of bluetongue virus (BTV) corelike particles by a recombinant baculovirus expressing the two major structural core proteins of BTV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, T J; Roy, P

    1990-04-01

    The L3 and M7 genes of bluetongue virus (BTV), which encode the two major core proteins of the virus (VP3 and VP7, respectively), were inserted into a baculovirus dual-expression transfer vector and a recombinant baculovirus expressing both foreign genes isolated following in vivo recombination with wild-type Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA. Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells infected with the recombinant synthesized large amounts of BTV corelike particles. These particles have been shown to be similar to authentic BTV cores in terms of size, appearance, stoichiometric arrangement of VP3 to VP7 (ratio, 2:15), and the predominance of VP7 on the surface of the particles. In infected insect cells, the corelike particles were observed in paracrystalline arrays. The formation of these structures indicates that neither the BTV double-stranded viral RNA species nor the associated minor core proteins are necessary for assembly of cores in insect cells. Furthermore, the three BTV nonstructural proteins NS1, NS2, and NS3, are not required to assist or direct the formation of empty corelike particles from VP3 and VP7.

  8. Quantification of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV-UG) in single and mixed infected Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) using quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Saadia; Winter, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The quantity of genomic DNA-A and DNA-B of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus Uganda (Uganda variant, EACMV-UG) was analysed using quantitative PCR to assess virus concentrations in plants from susceptible and tolerant cultivars. The concentrations of genome components in absolute and relative quantification experiments in single and mixed viral infections were determined. Virus concentration was much higher in symptomatic leaf tissues compared to non-symptomatic leaves and corresponded with the severity of disease symptoms. In general, higher titres were recorded for EACMV-UG Ca055 compared to ACMV DRC6. The quantitative assessment also showed that the distribution of both viruses in the moderately resistant cassava cv. TMS 30572 was not different from the highly susceptible cv. TME 117. Natural mixed infections with both viruses gave severe disease symptoms. Relative quantification of virus genomes in mixed infections showed higher concentrations of EACMV-UG DNA-A compared to ACMV DNA-A, but a marked reduction of EACMV-UG DNA-B. The higher concentrations of EACMV-UG DNA-B compared to EACMV DNA-A accumulation in single infections were consistent. Since DNA-B is implicated in virus cell-to-cell spread and systemic movement, the abundance of the EACMV-UG DNA-B may be an important factor driving cassava mosaic disease epidemic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mask-based approach to phasing of single-particle diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunin, Vladimir Y; Lunina, Natalia L; Petrova, Tatiana E; Baumstark, Manfred W; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre G

    2016-01-01

    A Monte Carlo-type approach for low- and medium-resolution phasing of single-particle diffraction data is suggested. Firstly, the single-particle phase problem is substituted with the phase problem for an imaginary crystal. A unit cell of this crystal contains a single isolated particle surrounded by a large volume of bulk solvent. The developed phasing procedure then generates a large number of connected and finite molecular masks, calculates their Fourier coefficients, selects the sets with magnitudes that are highly correlated with the experimental values and finally aligns the selected phase sets and calculates the averaged phase values. A test with the known structure of monomeric photosystem II resulted in phases that have 97% correlation with the exact phases in the full 25 Å resolution shell (1054 structure factors) and correlations of 99, 94, 81 and 79% for the resolution shells ∞-60, 60-40, 40-30 and 30-25 Å, respectively. The same procedure may be used for crystallographic ab initio phasing.

  10. Single-particle cryo-EM-Improved ab initio 3D reconstruction with SIMPLE/PRIME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Cyril F; Eager, Michael; Elmlund, Dominika; Elmlund, Hans

    2018-01-01

    Cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single-particle analysis now enables the determination of high-resolution structures of macromolecular assemblies that have resisted X-ray crystallography and other approaches. We developed the SIMPLE open-source image-processing suite for analysing cryo-EM images of single-particles. A core component of SIMPLE is the probabilistic PRIME algorithm for identifying clusters of images in 2D and determine relative orientations of single-particle projections in 3D. Here, we extend our previous work on PRIME and introduce new stochastic optimization algorithms that improve the robustness of the approach. Our refined method for identification of homogeneous subsets of images in accurate register substantially improves the resolution of the cluster centers and of the ab initio 3D reconstructions derived from them. We now obtain maps with a resolution better than 10 Å by exclusively processing cluster centers. Excellent parallel code performance on over-the-counter laptops and CPU workstations is demonstrated. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  11. Automatic CTF correction for single particles based upon multivariate statistical analysis of individual power spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, B; Golas, M M; Stark, H

    2003-06-01

    Three-dimensional electron cryomicroscopy of randomly oriented single particles is a method that is suitable for the determination of three-dimensional structures of macromolecular complexes at molecular resolution. However, the electron-microscopical projection images are modulated by a contrast transfer function (CTF) that prevents the calculation of three-dimensional reconstructions of biological complexes at high resolution from uncorrected images. We describe here an automated method for the accurate determination and correction of the CTF parameters defocus, twofold astigmatism and amplitude-contrast proportion from single-particle images. At the same time, the method allows the frequency-dependent signal decrease (B factor) and the non-convoluted background signal to be estimated. The method involves the classification of the power spectra of single-particle images into groups with similar CTF parameters; this is done by multivariate statistical analysis (MSA) and hierarchically ascending classification (HAC). Averaging over several power spectra generates class averages with enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. The correct CTF parameters can be deduced from these class averages by applying an iterative correlation procedure with theoretical CTF functions; they are then used to correct the raw images. Furthermore, the method enables the tilt axis of the sample holder to be determined and allows the elimination of individual poor-quality images that show high drift or charging effects.

  12. Determining Complex Structures using Docking Method with Single Particle Scattering Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiguang Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein complexes are critical for many molecular functions. Due to intrinsic flexibility and dynamics of complexes, their structures are more difficult to determine using conventional experimental methods, in contrast to individual subunits. One of the major challenges is the crystallization of protein complexes. Using X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs, it is possible to collect scattering signals from non-crystalline protein complexes, but data interpretation is more difficult because of unknown orientations. Here, we propose a hybrid approach to determine protein complex structures by combining XFEL single particle scattering data with computational docking methods. Using simulations data, we demonstrate that a small set of single particle scattering data collected at random orientations can be used to distinguish the native complex structure from the decoys generated using docking algorithms. The results also indicate that a small set of single particle scattering data is superior to spherically averaged intensity profile in distinguishing complex structures. Given the fact that XFEL experimental data are difficult to acquire and at low abundance, this hybrid approach should find wide applications in data interpretations.

  13. Determining Complex Structures using Docking Method with Single Particle Scattering Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxiao; Liu, Haiguang

    2017-01-01

    Protein complexes are critical for many molecular functions. Due to intrinsic flexibility and dynamics of complexes, their structures are more difficult to determine using conventional experimental methods, in contrast to individual subunits. One of the major challenges is the crystallization of protein complexes. Using X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs), it is possible to collect scattering signals from non-crystalline protein complexes, but data interpretation is more difficult because of unknown orientations. Here, we propose a hybrid approach to determine protein complex structures by combining XFEL single particle scattering data with computational docking methods. Using simulations data, we demonstrate that a small set of single particle scattering data collected at random orientations can be used to distinguish the native complex structure from the decoys generated using docking algorithms. The results also indicate that a small set of single particle scattering data is superior to spherically averaged intensity profile in distinguishing complex structures. Given the fact that XFEL experimental data are difficult to acquire and at low abundance, this hybrid approach should find wide applications in data interpretations.

  14. "Depth-profiling" and quantitative characterization of the size, composition, shape, density, and morphology of fine particles with SPLAT, a single-particle mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Yang, Juan; Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A; Imre, Dan

    2008-01-31

    A significant fraction of atmospheric particles are composed of inorganic substances that are mixed or coated with organic compounds. The properties and behavior of these particles depend on the internal composition and arrangement of the specific constituents in each particle. It is important to know which constituent is on the surface and whether it covers the particle surface partially or entirely. We demonstrate here an instrument consisting of an ultrasensitive single-particle mass spectrometer coupled with a differential mobility analyzer to quantitatively measure in real time individual particle composition, size, density, and shape and to determine which substance is on the surface and whether it entirely covers the particle. For this study, we use NaCl particles completely coated with liquid dioctyl phthalate to generate spherical particles, and NaCl particles partially coated with pyrene, a solid poly aromatic hydrocarbon, to produce aspherical particles with pyrene nodules and an exposed NaCl core. We show that the behavior of the mass spectral intensities as a function of laser fluence yields information that can be used to determine the morphological distribution of individual particle constituents.

  15. Raman mapping of mannitol/lysozyme particles produced via spray drying and single droplet drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajander, Jari Pekka; Matero, Sanni; Sloth, Jakob; Wan, Feng; Rantanen, Jukka; Yang, Mingshi

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of a model protein on the solid state of a commonly used bulk agent in spray-dried formulations. A series of lysozyme/mannitol formulations were spray-dried using a lab-scale spray dryer. Further, the surface temperature of drying droplet/particles was monitored using the DRYING KINETICS ANALYZER™ (DKA) with controllable drying conditions mimicking the spray-drying process to estimate the drying kinetics of the lysozyme/mannitol formulations. The mannitol polymorphism and the spatial distribution of lysozyme in the particles were examined using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) and Raman microscopy. Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis was used for analyzing the Raman microscopy data. XRPD results indicated that a mixture of β-mannitol and α-mannitol was produced in the spray-drying process which was supported by the Raman analysis, whereas Raman analysis indicated that a mixture of α-mannitol and δ-mannitol was detected in the single particles from DKA. In addition Raman mapping indicated that the presence of lysozyme seemed to favor the appearance of α-mannitol in the particles from DKA evidenced by close proximity of lysozyme and mannitol in the particles. It suggested that the presence of lysozyme tend to induce metastable solid state forms upon the drying process.

  16. Protein and virus-like particle adsorption on perfusion chromatography media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yige; Simons, Jared; Hooson, Sarah; Abraham, Dicky; Carta, Giorgio

    2013-07-05

    The structural and protein adsorption characteristics of the perfusion chromatography matrix POROS(®) HS 50 are determined. Transmission electron microscopy shows a broad distribution of pore sizes with 100-500nm through-pores transecting a network of much smaller pores formed by aggregates of microgranules about 100nm in size. Dextran standards, proteins, and virus-like particles (VLPs) show size-exclusion behavior consistent with such a bimodal distribution of pore sizes. For non-binding conditions, the trends in height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) as a function of mobile phase velocity and molecular size are consistent with perfusion suggesting that a fraction of the mobile phase between 0.0005 and 0.0008 flows through the particles. This small fraction provides little or no enhancement of intraparticle mass transfer for relatively small proteins (lysozyme and IgG) even at 1000cm/h, but can contribute substantially to transport for large proteins (thyroglobulin) and VLPs. Intraparticle concentration profiles during transient adsorption are determined by confocal microscopy in batch and flow systems. The profiles are spherically symmetrical indicating a dominance of diffusion for smaller proteins in both batch and flow systems but become highly asymmetrical and skewed in the direction of flow for thyroglobulin at 1000cm/h. Estimates of the convective enhancement of intraparticle transport for these conditions based on the confocal measurements are consistent with estimates of the intraparticle Peclet number and previously published models. Adsorption of VLPs, however, was found to be confined to a thin layer on the outer surface of the particles indicting that bound VLPs block access to the underlying pore network and suggesting that pores larger than those present on the resin studies are needed to take advantage of the effects of perfusion for the adsorption of large VLPs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Single-particle measurements of bouncing particles and in situ collection efficiency from an airborne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with light-scattering detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jin; Brock, Charles A.; Murphy, Daniel M.; Sueper, Donna T.; Welti, André; Middlebrook, Ann M.

    2017-10-01

    A light-scattering module was coupled to an airborne, compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (LS-AMS) to investigate collection efficiency (CE) while obtaining nonrefractory aerosol chemical composition measurements during the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) campaign. In this instrument, particles scatter light from an internal laser beam and trigger saving individual particle mass spectra. Nearly all of the single-particle data with mass spectra that were triggered by scattered light signals were from particles larger than ˜ 280 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter. Over 33 000 particles are characterized as either prompt (27 %), delayed (15 %), or null (58 %), according to the time and intensity of their total mass spectral signals. The particle mass from single-particle spectra is proportional to that derived from the light-scattering diameter (dva-LS) but not to that from the particle time-of-flight (PToF) diameter (dva-MS) from the time of the maximum mass spectral signal. The total mass spectral signal from delayed particles was about 80 % of that from prompt ones for the same dva-LS. Both field and laboratory data indicate that the relative intensities of various ions in the prompt spectra show more fragmentation compared to the delayed spectra. The particles with a delayed mass spectral signal likely bounced off the vaporizer and vaporized later on another surface within the confines of the ionization source. Because delayed particles are detected by the mass spectrometer later than expected from their dva-LS size, they can affect the interpretation of particle size (PToF) mass distributions, especially at larger sizes. The CE, measured by the average number or mass fractions of particles optically detected that had measurable mass spectra, varied significantly (0.2-0.9) in different air masses. The measured CE agreed well with a previous parameterization when CE > 0.5 for acidic particles but was sometimes lower than the minimum parameterized CE of 0.5.

  18. A single-stranded RNA copy of the Giardia lamblia virus double-stranded RNA genome is present in the infected Giardia lamblia.

    OpenAIRE

    Furfine, E S; White, T C; Wang, A L; Wang, C C

    1989-01-01

    An isolate of Giardia lamblia infected with the double-stranded RNA virus (GLV) has two major species of RNA that are not present in an uninfected isolate. One of these species is the previously characterized double-stranded RNA genome of GLV (1). The second species of RNA appears to be a full length copy of one strand of the double-stranded RNA genome. This full length single-stranded RNA is not present in viral particles isolated from the growth medium. The cellular concentration of the sin...

  19. Single potassium niobate nano/microsized particles as local mechano-optical Brownian probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Flavio M.; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Magrez, Arnaud; Forró, László; Jeney, Sylvia

    2016-03-01

    Perovskite alkaline niobates, due to their strong nonlinear optical properties, including birefringence and the capability to produce second-harmonic generation (SHG) signals, attract a lot of attention as potential candidates for applications as local nano/microsized mechano-optical probes. Here, we report on an implementation of photonic force microscopy (PFM) to explore the Brownian motion and optical trappability of monocrystalline potassium niobate (KNbO3) nano/microsized particles having sizes within the range of 50 to 750 nm. In particular, we exploit the anisotropic translational diffusive regime of the Brownian motion to quantify thermal fluctuations and optical forces of singly-trapped KNbO3 particles within the optical trapping volume of a PFM microscope. We also show that, under near-infrared (NIR) excitation of the highly focused laser beam of the PFM microscope, a single optically-trapped KNbO3 particle reveals a strong SHG signal manifested by a narrow peak (λem = 532 nm) at half the excitation wavelength (λex = 1064 nm). Moreover, we demonstrate that the thus induced SHG emission can be used as a local light source that is capable of optically exciting molecules of an organic dye, Rose Bengal (RB), which adhere to the particle surface, through the mechanism of luminescence energy transfer (LET).Perovskite alkaline niobates, due to their strong nonlinear optical properties, including birefringence and the capability to produce second-harmonic generation (SHG) signals, attract a lot of attention as potential candidates for applications as local nano/microsized mechano-optical probes. Here, we report on an implementation of photonic force microscopy (PFM) to explore the Brownian motion and optical trappability of monocrystalline potassium niobate (KNbO3) nano/microsized particles having sizes within the range of 50 to 750 nm. In particular, we exploit the anisotropic translational diffusive regime of the Brownian motion to quantify thermal

  20. Amphipathic α-Helices in Apolipoproteins Are Crucial to the Formation of Infectious Hepatitis C Virus Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shota; Ono, Chikako; Shiokawa, Mai; Yamamoto, Satomi; Motomura, Takashi; Okamoto, Toru; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Saito, Izumu; Wakita, Takaji; Koike, Kazuhiko; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and ApoE have been shown to participate in the particle formation and the tissue tropism of hepatitis C virus (HCV), but their precise roles remain uncertain. Here we show that amphipathic α-helices in the apolipoproteins participate in the HCV particle formation by using zinc finger nucleases-mediated apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and/or ApoE gene knockout Huh7 cells. Although Huh7 cells deficient in either ApoB or ApoE gene exhibited slight reduction of particles formation, knockout of both ApoB and ApoE genes in Huh7 (DKO) cells severely impaired the formation of infectious HCV particles, suggesting that ApoB and ApoE have redundant roles in the formation of infectious HCV particles. cDNA microarray analyses revealed that ApoB and ApoE are dominantly expressed in Huh7 cells, in contrast to the high level expression of all of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, including ApoA1, ApoA2, ApoC1, ApoC2 and ApoC3 in human liver tissues. The exogenous expression of not only ApoE, but also other exchangeable apolipoproteins rescued the infectious particle formation of HCV in DKO cells. In addition, expression of these apolipoproteins facilitated the formation of infectious particles of genotype 1b and 3a chimeric viruses. Furthermore, expression of amphipathic α-helices in the exchangeable apolipoproteins facilitated the particle formation in DKO cells through an interaction with viral particles. These results suggest that amphipathic α-helices in the exchangeable apolipoproteins play crucial roles in the infectious particle formation of HCV and provide clues to the understanding of life cycle of HCV and the development of novel anti-HCV therapeutics targeting for viral assembly. PMID:25502789

  1. Reverse Transcriptase-Containing Particles Induced in Rous Sarcoma Virus-Transformed Rat Cells by Arginine Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Moshe; Weinberg, Eynat; Haspel, Osnat; Becker, Yechiel

    1972-01-01

    Incubation of rat cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) in an arginine-deficient medium resulted in accumulation of particles in the culture medium. Such particles did not appear when the transformed rat cells were incubated in a complete medium nor in the medium of primary rat cells which were incubated either in arginine-deficient or complete media. The particles which were released from the arginine-deprived transformed rat cells resemble C-type particles in their properties. These particles band in sucrose gradients at a density of 1.16 g/ml and contain 35S ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules and a reverse transcriptase activity. Analysis of the cytoplasm of transformed and primary rat cells, deprived and undeprived of arginine, revealed the presence of reverse transcriptase-containing particles which banded in sucrose gradients at a density of 1.14 g/ml. These particles differed from the particles released into the medium by the arginine-deprived RSV-transformed rat cells. The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules synthesized in vitro by the reverse transcriptase present in the particles isolated from the medium of arginine-deprived cells hybridized to RSV RNA, whereas the DNA synthesized by the cell-bound enzyme had no homology to RSV RNA. PMID:4116137

  2. Archival Isolates Confirm a Single Topotype of West Nile Virus in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bixing Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus is globally wide-spread and causes significant disease in humans and animals. The evolution of West Nile virus Kunjin subtype in Australia (WNVKUN was investigated using archival samples collected over a period of 50 years. Based on the pattern of fixed amino acid substitutions and time-stamped molecular clock analyses, a single long-term lineage (or topotype was inferred. This implies that a bottleneck exists such that regional strains eventually die out and are replaced with strains from a single source. This was consistent with current hypotheses regarding the distribution of WNVKUN, whereby the virus is enzootic in northern Australia and is disseminated to southern states by water-birds or mosquitoes after flooding associated with above average rainfall. In addition, two previous amino acid changes associated with pathogenicity, an N-Y-S glycosylation motif in the envelope protein and a phenylalanine at amino acid 653 in the RNA polymerase, were both detected in all isolates collected since the 1980s. Changes primarily occurred due to stochastic drift. One fixed substitution each in NS3 and NS5, subtly changed the chemical environment of important functional groups, and may be involved in fine-tuning RNA synthesis. Understanding these evolutionary changes will help us to better understand events such as the emergence of the virulent strain in 2011.

  3. Quantitative estimation of plum pox virus targets acquired and transmitted by a single Myzus persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Aranzazu; Fereres, Alberto; Cambra, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    The viral charge acquired and inoculated by single aphids in a non-circulative transmission is estimated using plum pox virus (PPV). A combination of electrical penetration graph and TaqMan real-time RT-PCR techniques was used to establish the average number of PPV RNA targets inoculated by an aphid in a single probe (26,750), approximately half of the acquired ones. This number of PPV targets is responsible for a systemic infection of 20% on the inoculated receptor plants. No significant differences were found between the number of PPV RNA targets acquired after one and after five intracellular punctures (pd), but the frequency of infected receptor plants was higher after 5 pd. The percentage of PPV-positive leaf discs after just 1 pd of inoculation probe (28%/4,603 targets) was lower than after 5 pd (45.8%/135 x 10(6) targets). The methodology employed could be easily extended to other virus-vector-host combinations to improve the accuracy of models used in virus epidemiology.

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus-like particles activate multiple types of immune cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sailaja, Gangadhara; Skountzou, Ioanna; Quan, Fu-Shi; Compans, Richard W.; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2007-01-01

    The rapid spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) worldwide makes it a high priority to develop an effective vaccine. Since live attenuated or inactivated HIV is not likely to be approved as a vaccine due to safety concerns, HIV virus like particles (VLPs) offer an attractive alternative because they are safe due to the lack of a viral genome. Although HIV VLPs have been shown to induce humoral and cellular immune responses, it is important to understand the mechanisms by which they induce such responses and to improve their immunogenicity. We generated HIV VLPs, and VLPs containing Flt3 ligand (FL), a dendritic cell growth factor, to target VLPs to dendritic cells, and investigated the roles of these VLPs in the initiation of adaptive immune responses in vitro and in vivo. We found that HIV-1 VLPs induced maturation of dendritic cells and monocyte/macrophage populations in vitro and in vivo, with enhanced expression of maturation markers and cytokines. Dendritic cells pulsed with VLPs induced activation of splenocytes resulting in increased production of cytokines. VLPs containing FL were found to increase dendritic cells and monocyte/macrophage populations in the spleen when administered to mice. Administration of VLPs induced acute activation of multiple types of cells including T and B cells as indicated by enhanced expression of the early activation marker CD69 and down-regulation of the homing receptor CD62L. VLPs containing FL were an effective form of antigen in activating immune cells via dendritic cells, and immunization with HIV VLPs containing FL resulted in enhanced T helper type 2-like immune responses

  5. Tetravalent recombinant dengue virus-like particles as potential vaccine candidates: immunological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Zhou, Junmei; Yu, Zhizhun; Fang, Danyun; Fu, Chunyun; Zhu, Xun; He, Zhenjian; Yan, Huijun; Jiang, Lifang

    2014-12-18

    Currently, a licensed vaccine for Dengue Virus (DENV) is not yet available. Virus-like particles (VLP) have shown considerable promise for use as vaccines and have many advantages compared to many other types of viral vaccines. VLPs have been found to have high immunogenic potencies, providing protection against various pathogens. In the current study, four DENV-VLP serotypes were successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris, based on co-expression of the prM and E proteins. The effects of a tetravalent VLP vaccine were also examined. Immunization with purified, recombinant, tetravalent DENV1-4 VLPs induced specific antibodies against all DENV1-4 antigens in mice. The antibody titers were higher after immunization with the tetravalent VLP vaccine compared to titers after immunization with any of the dengue serotype VLPs alone. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) results indicated that sera from VLP immunized mice recognized the native viral antigens. TNF-α and IL-10 were significantly higher in mice immunized with tetravalent DENV-VLP compared to those mice received PBS. The tetravalent VLP appeared to stimulate neutralizing antibodies against each viral serotype, as shown by PRNT50 analysis (1:32 against DENV1 and 2, and 1:16 against DENV3 and 4). The highest titers with the tetravalent VLP vaccine were still a little lower than the monovalent VLP against the corresponding serotype. The protection rates of tetravalent DENV-VLP immune sera against challenges with DENV1 to 4 serotypes in suckling mice were 77, 92, 100, and 100%, respectively, indicating greater protective efficacy compared with monovalent immune sera. Our results provide an important basis for the development of the dengue VLP as a promising non-infectious candidate vaccine for dengue infection.

  6. Single particle characterization of black carbon aerosols at a tropospheric alpine site in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Flynn, M.; Gysel, M.; Targino, A.; Crawford, I.; Bower, K.; Choularton, T.; Jurányi, Z.; Steinbacher, M.; Hüglin, C.; Curtius, J.; Kampus, M.; Petzold, A.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Coe, H.

    2010-08-01

    The refractory black carbon (rBC) mass, size distribution (190-720 nm) and mixing state in sub-micron aerosols were characterized from late February to March 2007 using a single particle incandescence method at the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch (JFJ), Switzerland (46.33° N, 7.59° E, 3580 m a.s.l.). JFJ is a ground based location, which is at times exposed to continental free tropospheric air. A median mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of 10.2±3.2 m2 g-1 at λ=630 nm was derived by comparing single particle incandescence measurements of black carbon mass with continuous measurements of absorption coefficient. This value is comparable with other estimates at this location. The aerosols measured at the site were mostly well mixed and aged during transportation via the free troposphere. Pollutant sources were traced by air mass back trajectories, trace gases concentrations and the mass loading of rBC. In southeasterly wind directions, mixed or convective weather types provided the potential to vent polluted boundary layer air from the southern Alpine area and industrial northern Italy, delivering enhanced rBC mass loading and CN concentrations to the JFJ. The aerosol loadings at this site were also significantly influenced by precipitation, which led to the removal of rBC from the atmosphere. Precipitation events were shown to remove about 65% of the rBC mass from the free tropospheric background reducing the mean loading from 13±5 ng m-3 to 6±2 ng m-3(corrected to standard temperature and pressure). Overall, 40±15% of the observed rBC particles within the detectable size range were mixed with large amounts of non-refractory materials present as a thick coating. The growth of particle size into the accumulation mode was positively linked with the degree of rBC mixing, suggesting the important role of condensable materials in increasing particle size and leading to enhanced internal mixing of these materials with rBC. It is the first time that BC mass

  7. Monitoring processed, mature Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 particles immediately following treatment with a protease inhibitor-containing treatment regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuritzkes Daniel R

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Protease inhibitors (PIs block HIV-1 maturation into an infectious virus particle by inhibiting the protease processing of gag and gag-pol precursor proteins. We have used a simple anti-HIV-1 p24 Western blot to monitor the processing of p55gag precursor into the mature p24 capsid immediately following the first dosage of a PI-containing treatment regimen. Evidence of PI activity was observed in plasma virus as early as 72 hours post treatment-initiation and was predictive of plasma viral RNA decrease at 4 weeks.

  8. Role of the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway in degradation of hepatitis C virus envelope proteins and production of virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohsan; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Masaki, Takahiro; Tomonaga, Mitsunori; Muhammad, Amir; Kato, Takanobu; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Watanabe, Haruo; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2011-10-28

    Viral infections frequently cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in host cells leading to stimulation of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway, which subsequently targets unassembled glycoproteins for ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. However, the role of the ERAD pathway in the viral life cycle is poorly defined. In this paper, we demonstrate that hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection activates the ERAD pathway, which in turn controls the fate of viral glycoproteins and modulates virus production. ERAD proteins, such as EDEM1 and EDEM3, were found to increase ubiquitylation of HCV envelope proteins via direct physical interaction. Knocking down of EDEM1 and EDEM3 increased the half-life of HCV E2, as well as virus production, whereas exogenous expression of these proteins reduced the production of infectious virus particles. Further investigation revealed that only EDEM1 and EDEM3 bind with SEL1L, an ER membrane adaptor protein involved in translocation of ERAD substrates from the ER to the cytoplasm. When HCV-infected cells were treated with kifunensine, a potent inhibitor of the ERAD pathway, the half-life of HCV E2 increased and so did virus production. Kifunensine inhibited the binding of EDEM1 and EDEM3 with SEL1L, thus blocking the ubiquitylation of HCV E2 protein. Chemical inhibition of the ERAD pathway neither affected production of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) nor stability of the JEV envelope protein. A co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that EDEM orthologs do not bind with JEV envelope protein. These findings highlight the crucial role of the ERAD pathway in the life cycle of specific viruses.

  9. Single-step multiplex RT-PCR for simultaneous and colourimetric detection of six RNA viruses in olive trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, E; Olmos, A; Martínez, M C; Gorris, M T; Cambra, M

    2001-07-01

    A single-step multiplex RT-PCR was developed for the simultaneous and colourimetric detection of six RNA viruses (Cucumber mosaic virus, Cherry leaf roll virus, strawberry latent ringspot virus, Arabis mosaic virus, Olive latent-1 virus and Olive latent-2 virus) which infect olive trees. Six compatible primer set for one-step RT-PCR amplification in a single closed-tube and 3' digoxigenin labelled probes were designed in optimal, specific and conserved regions. The method has been assessed with 195 Spanish field olive trees, suggesting that approximately 1.5% of the tested material was infected by Cucumber mosaic virus and 0.5% by Cherry leaf roll virus. This method saves time and reagent costs compared with monospecific RT-PCR which needs several reactions for the same number of tests. Using colourimetric detection, it is possible to analyse many samples, it increases sensitivity 10-fold, and whilst facilitating the interpretation of results, it avoids the use of gels and the toxic ethidium bromide. The method could be used routinely for sanitary and certification programmes.

  10. Single Molecule Study on Polymer-Nanoparticle Interactions: The Particle Shape Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhandong; Zhang, Bin; Song, Yu; Xue, Yurui; Wu, Lixin; Zhang, Wenke

    2017-08-08

    The study on the nanoparticle-polymer interactions is very important for the design/preparation of high performance polymer nanocomposite. Here we present a method to quantify the polymer-particle interaction at single molecule level by using AFM-based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). As a proof-of-concept study, we choose poly-l-lysine (PLL) as the polymer and several different types of polyoxometalates (POM) as the model particles to construct several different polymer nanocomposites and to reveal the binding mode and quantify the binding strength in these systems. Our results reveal that the shape of the nanoparticle and the binding geometry in the composite have significantly influenced the binding strength of the PLL/POM complexes. Our dynamic force spectroscopy studies indicate that the disk-like geometry facilitate the unbinding of PLL/AlMo 6 complexes in shearing mode, while the unzipping mode becomes dominate in spherical PLL-P 8 W 48 system. We have also systematically investigated the effects of charge numbers, particle size, and ionic strength on the binding strength and binding mode of PLL/POM, respectively. Our results show that electrostatic interactions dominate the stability of PLL/POM complexes. These findings provide a way for tuning the mechanical properties of polyelectrolyte-nanoparticle composites.

  11. Shape evolution and single particle luminescence of organometal halide perovskite nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Men, Long; Guo, Yijun; Zhu, Qiaochu; Bhattacharjee, Ujjal; Goodwin, Peter M; Petrich, Jacob W; Smith, Emily A; Vela, Javier

    2015-03-24

    Organometallic halide perovskites CH3NH3PbX3 (X = I, Br, Cl) have quickly become one of the most promising semiconductors for solar cells, with photovoltaics made of these materials reaching power conversion efficiencies of near 20%. Improving our ability to harness the full potential of organometal halide perovskites will require more controllable syntheses that permit a detailed understanding of their fundamental chemistry and photophysics. In this manuscript, we systematically synthesize CH3NH3PbX3 (X = I, Br) nanocrystals with different morphologies (dots, rods, plates or sheets) by using different solvents and capping ligands. CH3NH3PbX3 nanowires and nanorods capped with octylammonium halides show relatively higher photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields and long PL lifetimes. CH3NH3PbI3 nanowires monitored at the single particle level show shape-correlated PL emission across whole particles, with little photobleaching observed and very few off periods. This work highlights the potential of low-dimensional organometal halide perovskite semiconductors in constructing new porous and nanostructured solar cell architectures, as well as in applying these materials to other fields such as light-emitting devices and single particle imaging and tracking.

  12. Wafer level fabrication of single cell dispenser chips with integrated electrodes for particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoendube, Jonas; Yusof, Azmi; Kalkandjiev, Kiril; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the microfabrication and experimental evaluation of a dispenser chip, designed for isolation and printing of single cells by combining impedance sensing and drop-on-demand dispensing. The dispenser chip features 50  ×  55 µm (width × height) microchannels, a droplet generator and microelectrodes for impedance measurements. The chip is fabricated by sandwiching a dry film photopolymer (TMMF) between a silicon and a Pyrex wafer. TMMF has been used to define microfluidic channels, to serve as low temperature (75 °C) bonding adhesive and as etch mask during 300 µm deep HF etching of the Pyrex wafer. Due to the novel fabrication technology involving the dry film resist, it became possible to fabricate facing electrodes at the top and bottom of the channel and to apply electrical impedance sensing for particle detection with improved performance. The presented microchip is capable of dispensing liquid and detecting microparticles via impedance measurement. Single polystyrene particles of 10 µm size could be detected with a mean signal amplitude of 0.39  ±  0.13 V (n=439) at particle velocities of up to 9.6 mm s −1 inside the chip. (paper)

  13. Broadly Neutralizing Activity of Zika Virus-Immune Sera Identifies a Single Viral Serotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Dowd

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemics of Zika virus (ZIKV have been associated with congenital malformation during pregnancy and Guillain-Barré syndrome. There are two ZIKV lineages (African and Asian that share >95% amino acid identity. Little is known regarding the ability of neutralizing antibodies elicited against one lineage to protect against the other. We investigated the breadth of the neutralizing antibody response following ZIKV infection by measuring the sensitivity of six ZIKV strains to neutralization by ZIKV-confirmed convalescent human serum or plasma samples. Contemporary Asian and early African ZIKV strains were similarly sensitive to neutralization regardless of the cellular source of virus. Furthermore, mouse immune serum generated after infection with African or Asian ZIKV strains was capable of neutralizing homologous and heterologous ZIKV strains equivalently. Because our study only defines a single ZIKV serotype, vaccine candidates eliciting robust neutralizing antibody responses should inhibit infection of both ZIKV lineages, including strains circulating in the Americas.

  14. Accuracy of the detection of binding events using 3D single particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carozza, Sara; Culkin, Jamie; van Noort, John

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles can be used as markers to track the position of biomolecules, such as single proteins, inside living cells. The activity of a protein can sometimes be inferred from changes in the mobility of the attached particle. Mean Square Displacement analysis is the most common method to obtain mobility information from trajectories of tracked particles, such as the diffusion coefficient D . However, the precision of D sets a limit to discriminate changes in mobility caused by biological events from changes that reflect the stochasticity inherent to diffusion. This issue is of particular importance in an experiment aiming to quantify dynamic processes. Here, we present simulations and 3D tracking experiments with Gold Nanorods freely diffusing in glycerol solution to establish the best analysis parameters to extract the diffusion coefficient. We applied this knowledge to the detection of a temporary change in diffusion, as it can occur due to the transient binding of a particle to an immobile structure within the cell, and tested its dependence on the magnitude of the change in diffusion and duration of this event. The simulations show that the spatial accuracy of particle tracking generally does not limit the detection of short binding events. Careful analysis of the magnitude of the change in diffusion and the number of frames per binding event is required for accurate quantification of such events.

  15. Refined source apportionment of coal combustion sources by using single particle mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiao; Wang, Haiting; Li, Xiujian; Li, Yue; Wen, Jie; Zhang, Jinsheng; Shi, Xurong; Li, Mei; Wang, Wei; Shi, Guoliang; Feng, Yinchang

    2018-06-15

    In this study, samples of three typical coal combustion source types, including Domestic bulk coal combustion (DBCC), Heat supply station (HSS), and Power plant (PP) were sampled and large sets of their mass spectra were obtained and analyzed by SPAMS during winter in a megacity in China. A primary goal of this study involves determining representative size-resolved single particle mass spectral signatures of three source types that can be used in source apportionment activities. Chemical types describe the majority of the particles of each source type were extracted by ART-2a algorithm with distinct size characteristics, and the corresponding tracer signals were identified. Mass spectral signatures from three source types were different from each other, and the tracer signals were effective in distinguishing different source types. A high size-resolution source apportionment method were proposed in this study through matching sources' mass spectral signatures to particle spectra in a twelve days ambient sampling to source apportion the particles. Contributions of three source types got different size characteristics, as HSS source got higher contribution in smaller sizes, But PP source got higher contributions as size increased. Source contributions were also quantified during two typical haze episodes, and results indicated that HSS source (for central-heating) and DBCC source (for domestic heating and cooking) may contribute evidently to pollution formation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A single-loop recombinant pseudotyped-virus-based assay to detect HIV-1 phenotypic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shouli; Yan, Pingping; Yan, Yansheng; Qiu, Lijun; Xie, Meirong

    2015-06-01

    HIV/AIDS is a leading public health concern throughout the world. Currently, treatment of HIV/AIDS still depends on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART); however, there is increasing evidence showing the emergence of resistance to antiretroviral drugs in HIV-1 strains, making ART less effective over time. Intensive monitoring of HIV-1 drug resistance is therefore of great importance to evaluate the current sensitivity of antiretroviral agents and is urgently needed. The aim of this study was to develop a single-loop recombinant pseudotyped-virus-based assay to detect phenotypic resistance in clinical HIV-1 strains. HIV-1 RNA was extracted from HIV-1-infected human plasma samples, and an approximately 3-kb fragment containing p7/p1/p6 cleavage sites and full-length protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), thermonuclease (TNase), and integrase (1-280 aa) genes was amplified by nested RT-PCR. A retroviral vector was constructed using the HIV-1 infectious molecular clone pLWJ to test antiretroviral drug susceptibility. pLWJ-SV40-Luc contained a luciferase expression cassette inserted within a deleted region of the envelope (env) gene as an indicator gene. Resistance test vectors (RTVs) were constructed by incorporating amplified target genes into pLWJ-SV40-Luc by using ApaI or AgeI and AarI restriction sites and conventional cloning methods. The virus stocks used for drug susceptibility test were produced by co-transfecting 293T cells with RTVs and a plasmid that provided vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G). Viral replication was monitored by measuring luciferase activity in infected target cells at approximately 48 h postinfection. A total of 35 clinical plasma samples from HIV-1-infected humans were tested, and target fragments were successfully amplified from 34 samples (97.1 %) and 33 RTVs were successfully constructed by directional cloning, with an overall success rate of 94.3 %. A clear-cut dose-dependent relationship was detected between

  17. Comparison of perfusion media and monoliths for protein and virus-like particle chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yige; Abraham, Dicky; Carta, Giorgio

    2016-05-20

    Structural and performance characteristics of perfusion chromatography media (POROS HS 20 and 50) and those of a polymethacrylate monolith (CIM SO3-