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Sample records for single virion analyses

  1. Probing the HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking pathway and dimerization by genetic recombination and single virion analyses.

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    Michael D Moore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Once transcribed, the nascent full-length RNA of HIV-1 must travel to the appropriate host cell sites to be translated or to find a partner RNA for copackaging to form newly generated viruses. In this report, we sought to delineate the location where HIV-1 RNA initiates dimerization and the influence of the RNA transport pathway used by the virus on downstream events essential to viral replication. Using a cell-fusion-dependent recombination assay, we demonstrate that the two RNAs destined for copackaging into the same virion select each other mostly within the cytoplasm. Moreover, by manipulating the RNA export element in the viral genome, we show that the export pathway taken is important for the ability of RNA molecules derived from two viruses to interact and be copackaged. These results further illustrate that at the point of dimerization the two main cellular export pathways are partially distinct. Lastly, by providing Gag in trans, we have demonstrated that Gag is able to package RNA from either export pathway, irrespective of the transport pathway used by the gag mRNA. These findings provide unique insights into the process of RNA export in general, and more specifically, of HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking.

  2. Quantitative real-time single particle analysis of virions

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    Heider, Susanne; Metzner, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.metzner@vetmeduni.ac.at

    2014-08-15

    Providing information about single virus particles has for a long time been mainly the domain of electron microscopy. More recently, technologies have been developed—or adapted from other fields, such as nanotechnology—to allow for the real-time quantification of physical virion particles, while supplying additional information such as particle diameter concomitantly. These technologies have progressed to the stage of commercialization increasing the speed of viral titer measurements from hours to minutes, thus providing a significant advantage for many aspects of virology research and biotechnology applications. Additional advantages lie in the broad spectrum of virus species that may be measured and the possibility to determine the ratio of infectious to total particles. A series of disadvantages remain associated with these technologies, such as a low specificity for viral particles. In this review we will discuss these technologies by comparing four systems for real-time single virus particle analysis and quantification. - Highlights: • We introduce four methods for virus particle-based quantification of viruses. • They allow for quantification of a wide range of samples in under an hour time. • The additional measurement of size and zeta potential is possible for some.

  3. Archaeal virus with exceptional virion architecture and the largest single-stranded DNA genome

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    Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Krupovic, Mart; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Sako, Yoshihiko; Forterre, Patrick; Prangishvili, David

    2012-01-01

    Known viruses build their particles using a restricted number of redundant structural solutions. Here, we describe the Aeropyrum coil-shaped virus (ACV), of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, with a virion architecture not previously observed in the viral world. The nonenveloped, hollow, cylindrical virion is formed from a coiling fiber, which consists of two intertwining halves of a single circular nucleoprotein. The virus ACV is also exceptional for its genomic properties. It is the only virus with a single-stranded (ss) DNA genome among the known hyperthermophilic archaeal viruses. Moreover, the size of its circular genome, 24,893 nt, is double that of the largest known ssDNA genome, suggesting an efficient solution for keeping ssDNA intact at 90–95 °C, the optimal temperature range of A. pernix growth. The genome content of ACV is in line with its unique morphology and confirms that ACV is not closely related to any known virus. PMID:22826255

  4. Single-virion sequencing of lamivudine-treated HBV populations reveal population evolution dynamics and demographic history.

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    Zhu, Yuan O; Aw, Pauline P K; de Sessions, Paola Florez; Hong, Shuzhen; See, Lee Xian; Hong, Lewis Z; Wilm, Andreas; Li, Chen Hao; Hue, Stephane; Lim, Seng Gee; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Burkholder, William F; Hibberd, Martin

    2017-10-27

    Viral populations are complex, dynamic, and fast evolving. The evolution of groups of closely related viruses in a competitive environment is termed quasispecies. To fully understand the role that quasispecies play in viral evolution, characterizing the trajectories of viral genotypes in an evolving population is the key. In particular, long-range haplotype information for thousands of individual viruses is critical; yet generating this information is non-trivial. Popular deep sequencing methods generate relatively short reads that do not preserve linkage information, while third generation sequencing methods have higher error rates that make detection of low frequency mutations a bioinformatics challenge. Here we applied BAsE-Seq, an Illumina-based single-virion sequencing technology, to eight samples from four chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients - once before antiviral treatment and once after viral rebound due to resistance. With single-virion sequencing, we obtained 248-8796 single-virion sequences per sample, which allowed us to find evidence for both hard and soft selective sweeps. We were able to reconstruct population demographic history that was independently verified by clinically collected data. We further verified four of the samples independently through PacBio SMRT and Illumina Pooled deep sequencing. Overall, we showed that single-virion sequencing yields insight into viral evolution and population dynamics in an efficient and high throughput manner. We believe that single-virion sequencing is widely applicable to the study of viral evolution in the context of drug resistance and host adaptation, allows differentiation between soft or hard selective sweeps, and may be useful in the reconstruction of intra-host viral population demographic history.

  5. Proteomic characterization of murid herpesvirus 4 extracellular virions.

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    Sarah Vidick

    Full Text Available Gammaherpesvirinae, such as the human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and the Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV are highly prevalent pathogens that have been associated with several neoplastic diseases. As EBV and KSHV are host-range specific and replicate poorly in vitro, animal counterparts such as Murid herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 have been widely used as models. In this study, we used MuHV-4 in order to improve the knowledge about proteins that compose gammaherpesviruses virions. To this end, MuHV-4 extracellular virions were isolated and structural proteins were identified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches. These analyses allowed the identification of 31 structural proteins encoded by the MuHV-4 genome which were classified as capsid (8, envelope (9, tegument (13 and unclassified (1 structural proteins. In addition, we estimated the relative abundance of the identified proteins in MuHV-4 virions by using exponentially modified protein abundance index analyses. In parallel, several host proteins were found in purified MuHV-4 virions including Annexin A2. Although Annexin A2 has previously been detected in different virions from various families, its role in the virion remains controversial. Interestingly, despite its relatively high abundance in virions, Annexin A2 was not essential for the growth of MuHV-4 in vitro. Altogether, these results extend previous work aimed at determining the composition of gammaherpesvirus virions and provide novel insights for understanding MuHV-4 biology.

  6. Open reading frame 94 of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus encodes a novel conserved occlusion-derived virion protein, ODV-EC43

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    Fang, M.; Wang, H.; Yuan, L.; Chen Xinwen,; Vlak, J.M.; Hu, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Open reading frame 94 (Ha94) of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV) is 1086 bp long and a homologue of Autographa californica multiple NPV ORF109. The gene is conserved among all baculoviruses whose genomes have been completely sequenced so far and is thus

  7. Virion-targeted viral inactivation: new therapy against viral infection.

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    Okui, N; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, N; Sakuma, R; Ishikawa, T; Kitamura, T

    2001-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is resistant to all current therapy. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative or additive to current, unsatisfactory AIDS therapy. To develop an antiviral molecule targeting viral integrase (HIV IN), we generated a single-chain antibody, termed scAb, which interacted with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IN and inhibited virus replication at the integration step when expressed intracellularly. To reduce infectivity from within the virus particles, we made expression plasmids (pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-CA, and pC-scAbE-WXXF), which expressed the anti-HIV IN scAb fused to the N-terminus of HIV-1-associated accessory protein R (Vpr), capsid protein (CA), and specific binding motif to Vpr (WXXF), respectively. All fusion proteins were tagged with a nine-amino acid peptide derived from influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) at the C terminus. The fusion molecules, termed scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF, interacted specifically with HIV IN immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane. Immunoblot analysis showed that scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF were incorporated into the virions produced by cotransfection of 293T cells with HIV-1 infectious clone DNA (pLAI) and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF. A multinuclear activation galactosidase indicator (MAGI) assay revealed that the virions released from 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF had as little 1000-fold of the infectivity of the control wild-type virions, which were produced from the 293T cells transfected with pLAI alone. Furthermore, the virions produced from the 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and an scAb expression vector (pC-scAb) showed only 1% of the infectivity of the control HIV-1 in a MAGI assay, although scAb was not incorporated into the virions. In either instance, the total quantity of the progeny virions released from the transfected 293T cells and the patterns of the virion proteins were hardly affected by the presence of

  8. A monoclonal antibody that neutralizes poliovirus by cross-linking virions.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, A A; Brioen, P; Boeyé, A

    1985-01-01

    The neutralization of type 1 poliovirus by monoclonal antibody 35-1f4 was studied. The virions were rapidly linked by antibody into oligomers and larger aggregates, followed by slow redistribution of antibody between the immune complexes. The antibody content and infectivity of immune complexes were determined. Remaining single virions were fully infectious and free of antibody. The oligomers and larger aggregates did not significantly contribute to the residual infectivity, which therefore c...

  9. Protein Expression Analyses at the Single Cell Level

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    Masae Ohno

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The central dogma of molecular biology explains how genetic information is converted into its end product, proteins, which are responsible for the phenotypic state of the cell. Along with the protein type, the phenotypic state depends on the protein copy number. Therefore, quantification of the protein expression in a single cell is critical for quantitative characterization of the phenotypic states. Protein expression is typically a dynamic and stochastic phenomenon that cannot be well described by standard experimental methods. As an alternative, fluorescence imaging is being explored for the study of protein expression, because of its high sensitivity and high throughput. Here we review key recent progresses in fluorescence imaging-based methods and discuss their application to proteome analysis at the single cell level.

  10. Purification of infectious human herpesvirus 6A virions and association of host cell proteins

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    Garoff Henrik

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses that are incorporating host cell proteins might trigger autoimmune diseases. It is therefore of interest to identify possible host proteins associated with viruses, especially for enveloped viruses that have been suggested to play a role in autoimmune diseases, like human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A in multiple sclerosis (MS. Results We have established a method for rapid and morphology preserving purification of HHV-6A virions, which in combination with parallel analyses with background control material released from mock-infected cells facilitates qualitative and quantitative investigations of the protein content of HHV-6A virions. In our iodixanol gradient purified preparation, we detected high levels of viral DNA by real-time PCR and viral proteins by metabolic labelling, silver staining and western blots. In contrast, the background level of cellular contamination was low in the purified samples as demonstrated by the silver staining and metabolic labelling analyses. Western blot analyses showed that the cellular complement protein CD46, the receptor for HHV-6A, is associated with the purified and infectious virions. Also, the cellular proteins clathrin, ezrin and Tsg101 are associated with intact HHV-6A virions. Conclusion Cellular proteins are associated with HHV-6A virions. The relevance of the association in disease and especially in autoimmunity will be further investigated.

  11. Linear Trend in Single-Case Visual and Quantitative Analyses.

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    Manolov, Rumen

    2017-08-01

    The frequently used visual analysis of single-case data focuses on data aspects such as level, trend, variability, overlap, immediacy of effect, and consistency of data patterns; most of these aspects are also commonly quantified besides inspecting them visually. The present text focuses on trend, because even linear trend can be operatively defined in several different ways, while there are also different approaches for controlling for baseline trend. We recommend using a quantitative criterion for choosing a trend line fitting technique and comparing baseline and intervention slopes, instead of detrending. We implement our proposal in a free web-based application created specifically for following the What Works Clearinghouse Standards recommendations for visual analysis. This application is especially destined to applied researchers and provides graphical representation of the data, visual aids, and quantifications of the difference between phases in terms of level, trend, and overlap, as well as two quantifications of the immediate effect. An evaluation of the consistency of effects across replications of the AB sequence is also provided. For methodologists and statisticians, we include formulas and examples of the different straight line fitting and detrending techniques to improve the reproducibility of results and simulations.

  12. Single-stage mass spectrometric analyses of resin bead samples

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    Smith, D. H.; Walker, R. L.; Bertram, L. K.; Carter, J. A.

    1978-10-01

    Plutonium and uranium from dissolver solutions loaded on resin beads can be analyzed on single-stage mass spectrometers with little or no degradation of results provided proper care is exercised with regard to sample handling techniques. Additionally, storage of samples on resin beads is feasible for periods at least as long as six months provided the beads are not exposed to residual HNO/sub 3/ and air; it is probable that beads will retain their integrity much longer than six months when stored under collodion, but as yet no data to support this contention have been collected. Conventional or commercial mass spectrometers can readily be adapted to the resin bead technique by installing a pulse-counting detection system. The cost of such conversion will vary depending on whether or not a data acquisition system will be needed. A reasonable estimate is that the cost will be in the neighborhood of $15,000; this figure includes the price of a multi-channel analyzer to serve as a temporary data storage device, but does not include the cost of a computer. It does not appear that it will be practicable to switch easily back and forth between pulse-counting and current integration modes unless the instrument is provided with a movable Faraday cup. Using the same multiplier in both modes would undoubtedly degrade its performance in each. The requirements of low background counting rates and high gain for pulse counting, and of relatively high signal handling capacity in current integration are mutually incompatible if demanded of the same multiplier.

  13. H1N1 influenza A outbreak among young medical staff members who received single dose of non-adjuvanted split-virion 2009 H1N1 vaccine.

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    Ohara, Mamiko; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Naoto, Hosokawa; Kami, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    We experienced an H1N1 influenza A outbreak among medical staff members who had received a vaccination. To investigate the preventive effects of the H1N1 influenza vaccine on the H1N1 influenza A infection, we examined the data on the medical staff members and patients with confirmed H1N1 influenza A or influenza-like illness retrospectively. Approximately half of the young individuals under 30 years of age developed H1N1 influenza A, while the diagnosis was established in 3% of medical staff over the age of 30 and 0.9% of patients with a median age of 67. The mechanism for association between age and the risk of H1N1 infection is unclear; however, it might have been associated with an age-related increase in the prevalence of neutralizing antibody titers against the 2009 H1N1 influenza A as indicated by previous reports. This study showed that current Japanese H1N1 influenza A vaccine program using one dose of non-adjuvant split-virion 2009 H1N1 vaccine with 7.5 μg hemagglutinin had a limited preventive effect on H1N1 influenza A infection in adults under 30 years of age.

  14. Mixed genotype transmission bodies and virions contribute to the maintenance of diversity in an insect virus

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    Clavijo, Gabriel; Williams, Trevor; Muñoz, Delia; Caballero, Primitivo; López-Ferber, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    An insect nucleopolyhedrovirus naturally survives as a mixture of at least nine genotypes. Infection by multiple genotypes results in the production of virus occlusion bodies (OBs) with greater pathogenicity than those of any genotype alone. We tested the hypothesis that each OB contains a genotypically diverse population of virions. Few insects died following inoculation with an experimental two-genotype mixture at a dose of one OB per insect, but a high proportion of multiple infections were observed (50%), which differed significantly from the frequencies predicted by a non-associated transmission model in which genotypes are segregated into distinct OBs. By contrast, insects that consumed multiple OBs experienced higher mortality and infection frequencies did not differ significantly from those of the non-associated model. Inoculation with genotypically complex wild-type OBs indicated that genotypes tend to be transmitted in association, rather than as independent entities, irrespective of dose. To examine the hypothesis that virions may themselves be genotypically heterogeneous, cell culture plaques derived from individual virions were analysed to reveal that one-third of virions was of mixed genotype, irrespective of the genotypic composition of the OBs. We conclude that co-occlusion of genotypically distinct virions in each OB is an adaptive mechanism that favours the maintenance of virus diversity during insect-to-insect transmission. PMID:19939845

  15. Structural lability of Barley stripe mosaic virus virions.

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    Valentin V Makarov

    Full Text Available Virions of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV were neglected for more than thirty years after their basic properties were determined. In this paper, the physicochemical characteristics of BSMV virions and virion-derived viral capsid protein (CP were analyzed, namely, the absorption and intrinsic fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism spectra, differential scanning calorimetry curves, and size distributions by dynamic laser light scattering. The structural properties of BSMV virions proved to be intermediate between those of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, a well-characterized virus with rigid rod-shaped virions, and flexuous filamentous plant viruses. The BSMV virions were found to be considerably more labile than expected from their rod-like morphology and a distant sequence relation of the BSMV and TMV CPs. The circular dichroism spectra of BSMV CP subunits incorporated into the virions, but not subunits of free CP, demonstrated a significant proportion of beta-structure elements, which were proposed to be localized mostly in the protein regions exposed on the virion outer surface. These beta-structure elements likely formed during virion assembly can comprise the N- and C-terminal protein regions unstructured in the non-virion CP and can mediate inter-subunit interactions. Based on computer-assisted structure modeling, a model for BSMV CP subunit structural fold compliant with the available experimental data was proposed.

  16. Analyse

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    Greve, Bent

    2007-01-01

    Analyse i Politiken om frynsegoder med udgangspunkt i bogen Occupational Welfare - Winners and Losers publiceret på Edward Elgar......Analyse i Politiken om frynsegoder med udgangspunkt i bogen Occupational Welfare - Winners and Losers publiceret på Edward Elgar...

  17. Applying fMRI complexity analyses to the single subject: a case study for proposed neurodiagnostics.

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    Rădulescu, Anca R; Hannon, Emily R

    2017-04-01

    Nonlinear dynamic tools have been statistically validated at the group level to identify subtle differences in system wide regulation of brain meso-circuits, often increasing clinical sensitivity over conventional analyses alone. We explored the feasibility of extracting information at the single-subject level, illustrating two pairs of healthy individuals with psychological differences in stress reactivity. We applied statistical and nonlinear dynamic tools to capture key characteristics of the prefrontal-limbic loop. We compared single subject results with statistical results for the larger group. We concluded that complexity analyses may identify important differences at the single-subject level, supporting their potential towards neurodiagnostic applications.

  18. Kinetics of proton transport into influenza virions by the viral M2 channel.

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    Tijana Ivanovic

    Full Text Available M2 protein of influenza A viruses is a tetrameric transmembrane proton channel, which has essential functions both early and late in the virus infectious cycle. Previous studies of proton transport by M2 have been limited to measurements outside the context of the virus particle. We have developed an in vitro fluorescence-based assay to monitor internal acidification of individual virions triggered to undergo membrane fusion. We show that rimantadine, an inhibitor of M2 proton conductance, blocks the acidification-dependent dissipation of fluorescence from a pH-sensitive virus-content probe. Fusion-pore formation usually follows internal acidification but does not require it. The rate of internal virion acidification increases with external proton concentration and saturates with a pK(m of ∼4.7. The rate of proton transport through a single, fully protonated M2 channel is approximately 100 to 400 protons per second. The saturating proton-concentration dependence and the low rate of internal virion acidification derived from authentic virions support a transporter model for the mechanism of proton transfer.

  19. In a nutshell: structure and assembly of the vaccinia virion.

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    Condit, Richard C; Moussatche, Nissin; Traktman, Paula

    2006-01-01

    Poxviruses comprise a large family of viruses characterized by a large, linear dsDNA genome, a cytoplasmic site of replication and a complex virion morphology. The most notorious member of the poxvirus family is variola, the causative agent of smallpox. The laboratory prototype virus used for the study of poxviruses is vaccinia, the virus that was used as a live, naturally attenuated vaccine for the eradication of smallpox. Both the morphogenesis and structure of poxvirus virions are unique among viruses. Poxvirus virions apparently lack any of the symmetry features common to other viruses such as helical or icosahedral capsids or nucleocapsids. Instead poxvirus virions appear as "brick shaped" or "ovoid" membrane-bound particles with a complex internal structure featuring a walled, biconcave core flanked by "lateral bodies." The virion assembly pathway involves a remarkable fabrication of membrane-containing crescents and immature virions, which evolve into mature virions in a process that is unparalleled in virology. As a result of significant advances in poxvirus genetics and molecular biology during the past 15 years, we can now positively identify over 70 specific gene products contained in poxvirus virions, and we can describe the effects of mutations in over 50 specific genes on poxvirus assembly. This review summarizes these advances and attempts to assemble them into a comprehensible and thoughtful picture of poxvirus structure and assembly.

  20. The T7-Related Pseudomonas putida Phage ϕ15 Displays Virion-Associated Biofilm Degradation Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelissen, Anneleen; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; T'Syen, Jeroen; Van Praet, Helena; Noben, Jean-Paul; Shaburova, Olga V; Krylov, Victor N; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Formation of a protected biofilm environment is recognized as one of the major causes of the increasing antibiotic resistance development and emphasizes the need to develop alternative antibacterial strategies, like phage therapy. This study investigates the in vitro degradation of single-species Pseudomonas putida biofilms, PpG1 and RD5PR2, by the novel phage phi 15, a 'T7-like virus' with a virion-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS) depolymerase. Phage phi 15 forms plaques surrounded by grow...

  1. Polysilicon nanogap lab-on-chip facilitates multiplex analyses with single analyte.

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    Balakrishnan, Sharma Rao; Hashim, U; Gopinath, Subash C B; Poopalan, P; Ramayya, H R; Veeradasan, P; Haarindraprasad, R; Ruslinda, A R

    2016-10-15

    Rationally designed biosensing system supports multiplex analyses is warranted for medical diagnosis to determine the level of analyte interaction. The chemically functionalized novel multi-electrode polysilicon nanogap (PSNG) lab-on-chip is designed in this study, facilitates multiplex analyses for a single analyte. On the fabricated 69nm PSNG, biocompatibility and structural characteristics were verified for the efficient binding of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG). With the assistance of microfluidics, hCG sample was delivered via single-injection to 3-Aminopropyl(triethoxy)silane (APTES) and Glycidoxypropyl(trimethoxy)silane (GPMS) modified PSNG electrodes and the transduced signal was used to investigate the dielectric mechanisms for multiplex analyses. The results from amperometric response and impedance measurement delivered the scale of interaction between anti-hCG antibody and hCG that exhibited 6.5 times higher sensitivity for the chemical linker, APTES than GPMS. Under optimized experimental conditions, APTES and GPMS modified immunosensor has a limit of detection as 0.56mIU/ml and 2.93mIU/ml (at S/N=3), with dissociation constants (Kd) of 5.65±2.5mIU/ml and 7.28±2.6mIU/ml, respectively. These results suggest that multiplex analysis of single target could enhance the accuracy of detection and reliable for real-time comparative analyses. The designed PSNG is simple, feasible, requires low sample consumption and could be applied for any given multiplex analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Methodological quality of meta-analyses of single-case experimental studies.

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    Jamshidi, Laleh; Heyvaert, Mieke; Declercq, Lies; Fernández-Castilla, Belén; Ferron, John M; Moeyaert, Mariola; Beretvas, S Natasha; Onghena, Patrick; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2017-12-28

    Methodological rigor is a fundamental factor in the validity and credibility of the results of a meta-analysis. Following an increasing interest in single-case experimental design (SCED) meta-analyses, the current study investigates the methodological quality of SCED meta-analyses. We assessed the methodological quality of 178 SCED meta-analyses published between 1985 and 2015 through the modified Revised-Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (R-AMSTAR) checklist. The main finding of the current review is that the methodological quality of the SCED meta-analyses has increased over time, but is still low according to the R-AMSTAR checklist. A remarkable percentage of the studies (93.80% of the included SCED meta-analyses) did not even reach the midpoint score (22, on a scale of 0-44). The mean and median methodological quality scores were 15.57 and 16, respectively. Relatively high scores were observed for "providing the characteristics of the included studies" and "doing comprehensive literature search". The key areas of deficiency were "reporting an assessment of the likelihood of publication bias" and "using the methods appropriately to combine the findings of studies". Although the results of the current review reveal that the methodological quality of the SCED meta-analyses has increased over time, still more efforts are needed to improve their methodological quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Aqueous extracts from peppermint, sage and lemon balm leaves display potent anti-HIV-1 activity by increasing the virion density

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    Baumann Ingo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aqueous extracts from leaves of well known species of the Lamiaceae family were examined for their potency to inhibit infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. Results Extracts from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L., peppermint (Mentha × piperita L., and sage (Salvia officinalis L. exhibited a high and concentration-dependent activity against the infection of HIV-1 in T-cell lines, primary macrophages, and in ex vivo tonsil histocultures with 50% inhibitory concentrations as low as 0.004%. The aqueous Lamiaceae extracts did not or only at very high concentrations interfere with cell viability. Mechanistically, extract exposure of free virions potently and rapidly inhibited infection, while exposure of surface-bound virions or target cells alone had virtually no antiviral effect. In line with this observation, a virion-fusion assay demonstrated that HIV-1 entry was drastically impaired following treatment of particles with Lamiaceae extracts, and the magnitude of this effect at the early stage of infection correlated with the inhibitory potency on HIV-1 replication. Extracts were active against virions carrying diverse envelopes (X4 and R5 HIV-1, vesicular stomatitis virus, ecotropic murine leukemia virus, but not against a non-enveloped adenovirus. Following exposure to Lamiaceae extracts, the stability of virions as well as virion-associated levels of envelope glycoprotein and processed Gag protein were unaffected, while, surprisingly, sucrose-density equilibrium gradient analyses disclosed a marked increase of virion density. Conclusion Aqueous extracts from Lamiaceae can drastically and rapidly reduce the infectivity of HIV-1 virions at non-cytotoxic concentrations. An extract-induced enhancement of the virion's density prior to its surface engagement appears to be the most likely mode of action. By harbouring also a strong activity against herpes simplex virus type 2, these extracts may provide a basis

  4. Overcoming confounding plate effects in differential expression analyses of single-cell RNA-seq data.

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    Lun, Aaron T L; Marioni, John C

    2017-07-01

    An increasing number of studies are using single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) to characterize the gene expression profiles of individual cells. One common analysis applied to scRNA-seq data involves detecting differentially expressed (DE) genes between cells in different biological groups. However, many experiments are designed such that the cells to be compared are processed in separate plates or chips, meaning that the groupings are confounded with systematic plate effects. This confounding aspect is frequently ignored in DE analyses of scRNA-seq data. In this article, we demonstrate that failing to consider plate effects in the statistical model results in loss of type I error control. A solution is proposed whereby counts are summed from all cells in each plate and the count sums for all plates are used in the DE analysis. This restores type I error control in the presence of plate effects without compromising detection power in simulated data. Summation is also robust to varying numbers and library sizes of cells on each plate. Similar results are observed in DE analyses of real data where the use of count sums instead of single-cell counts improves specificity and the ranking of relevant genes. This suggests that summation can assist in maintaining statistical rigour in DE analyses of scRNA-seq data with plate effects. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Virion Structure of Iflavirus Slow Bee Paralysis Virus at 2.6-Angstrom Resolution.

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    Kalynych, Sergei; Přidal, Antonín; Pálková, Lenka; Levdansky, Yevgen; de Miranda, Joachim R; Plevka, Pavel

    2016-08-15

    The western honeybee (Apis mellifera) is the most important commercial insect pollinator. However, bees are under pressure from habitat loss, environmental stress, and pathogens, including viruses that can cause lethal epidemics. Slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV) belongs to the Iflaviridae family of nonenveloped single-stranded RNA viruses. Here we present the structure of the SBPV virion determined from two crystal forms to resolutions of 3.4 Å and 2.6 Å. The overall structure of the virion resembles that of picornaviruses, with the three major capsid proteins VP1 to 3 organized into a pseudo-T3 icosahedral capsid. However, the SBPV capsid protein VP3 contains a C-terminal globular domain that has not been observed in other viruses from the order Picornavirales The protruding (P) domains form "crowns" on the virion surface around each 5-fold axis in one of the crystal forms. However, the P domains are shifted 36 Å toward the 3-fold axis in the other crystal form. Furthermore, the P domain contains the Ser-His-Asp triad within a surface patch of eight conserved residues that constitutes a putative catalytic or receptor-binding site. The movements of the domain might be required for efficient substrate cleavage or receptor binding during virus cell entry. In addition, capsid protein VP2 contains an RGD sequence that is exposed on the virion surface, indicating that integrins might be cellular receptors of SBPV. Pollination by honeybees is needed to sustain agricultural productivity as well as the biodiversity of wild flora. However, honeybee populations in Europe and North America have been declining since the 1950s. Honeybee viruses from the Iflaviridae family are among the major causes of honeybee colony mortality. We determined the virion structure of an Iflavirus, slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV). SBPV exhibits unique structural features not observed in other picorna-like viruses. The SBPV capsid protein VP3 has a large C-terminal domain, five of which form

  6. Innate Immune Landscape in Early Lung Adenocarcinoma by Paired Single-Cell Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Yonit; Kobayashi, Soma; Leader, Andrew; Amir, El-Ad David; Elefant, Naama; Bigenwald, Camille; Remark, Romain; Sweeney, Robert; Becker, Christian D; Levine, Jacob H; Meinhof, Klaus; Chow, Andrew; Kim-Shulze, Seunghee; Wolf, Andrea; Medaglia, Chiara; Li, Hanjie; Rytlewski, Julie A; Emerson, Ryan O; Solovyov, Alexander; Greenbaum, Benjamin D; Sanders, Catherine; Vignali, Marissa; Beasley, Mary Beth; Flores, Raja; Gnjatic, Sacha; Pe'er, Dana; Rahman, Adeeb; Amit, Ido; Merad, Miriam

    2017-05-04

    To guide the design of immunotherapy strategies for patients with early stage lung tumors, we developed a multiscale immune profiling strategy to map the immune landscape of early lung adenocarcinoma lesions to search for tumor-driven immune changes. Utilizing a barcoding method that allows a simultaneous single-cell analysis of the tumor, non-involved lung, and blood cells, we provide a detailed immune cell atlas of early lung tumors. We show that stage I lung adenocarcinoma lesions already harbor significantly altered T cell and NK cell compartments. Moreover, we identified changes in tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell (TIM) subsets that likely compromise anti-tumor T cell immunity. Paired single-cell analyses thus offer valuable knowledge of tumor-driven immune changes, providing a powerful tool for the rational design of immune therapies. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein Primary Structure of the Vaccinia Virion at Increased Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Tuan; Mirzakhanyan, Yeva; Moussatche, Nissin; Gershon, Paul David

    2016-11-01

    Here we examine the protein covalent structure of the vaccinia virus virion. Within two virion preparations, >88% of the theoretical vaccinia virus-encoded proteome was detected with high confidence, including the first detection of products from 27 open reading frames (ORFs) previously designated "predicted," "uncharacterized," "inferred," or "hypothetical" polypeptides containing as few as 39 amino acids (aa) and six proteins whose detection required nontryptic proteolysis. We also detected the expression of four short ORFs, each of which was located within an ORF ("ORF-within-ORF"), including one not previously recognized or known to be expressed. Using quantitative mass spectrometry (MS), between 58 and 74 proteins were determined to be packaged. A total of 63 host proteins were also identified as candidates for packaging. Evidence is provided that some portion of virion proteins are "nicked" via a combination of endoproteolysis and concerted exoproteolysis in a manner, and at sites, independent of virus origin or laboratory procedures. The size of the characterized virion phosphoproteome was doubled from 189 (J. Matson, W. Chou, T. Ngo, and P. D. Gershon, Virology 452-453:310-323, 2014, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2014.01.012) to 396 confident, unique phosphorylation sites, 268 of which were within the packaged proteome. This included the unambiguous identification of phosphorylation "hot spots" within virion proteins. Using isotopically enriched ATP, 23 sites of intravirion kinase phosphorylation were detected within nine virion proteins, all at sites already partially occupied within the virion preparations. The clear phosphorylation of proteins RAP94 and RP19 was consistent with the roles of these proteins in intravirion early gene transcription. In a blind search for protein modifications, cysteine glutathionylation and O-linked glycosylation featured prominently. We provide evidence for the phosphoglycosylation of vaccinia virus proteins

  8. UV-Sensitivity of Shiga Toxin-Converting Bacteriophage Virions Φ24B, 933W, P22, P27 and P32

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Bloch

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophages (Stx phages are present as prophages in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC strains. Theses phages can be transmitted to previously non-pathogenic E. coli cells making them potential producers of Shiga toxins, as they bear genes for these toxins in their genomes. Therefore, sensitivity of Stx phage virions to various conditions is important in both natural processes of spreading of these viruses and potential prophylactic control of appearance of novel pathogenic E. coli strains. In this report we provide evidence that virions of Stx phages are significantly more sensitive to UV irradiation than bacteriophage λ. Following UV irradiation of Stx virions at the dose of 50 J/m2, their infectivity dropped by 1–3 log10, depending on the kind of phage. Under these conditions, a considerable release of phage DNA from virions was observed, and electron microscopy analyses indicated a large proportion of partially damaged virions. Infection of E. coli cells with UV-irradiated Stx phages resulted in significantly decreased levels of expression of N and cro genes, crucial for lytic development. We conclude that inactivation of Stx virions caused by relatively low dose of UV light is due to damage of capsids that prevents effective infection of the host cells.

  9. Incorporation of Spike and Membrane Glycoproteins into Coronavirus Virions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujike, Makoto; Taguchi, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    The envelopes of coronaviruses (CoVs) contain primarily three proteins; the two major glycoproteins spike (S) and membrane (M), and envelope (E), a non-glycosylated protein. Unlike other enveloped viruses, CoVs bud and assemble at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). For efficient virion assembly, these proteins must be targeted to the budding site and to interact with each other or the ribonucleoprotein. Thus, the efficient incorporation of viral envelope proteins into CoV virions depends on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions near the ERGIC. The goal of this review is to summarize recent findings on the mechanism of incorporation of the M and S glycoproteins into the CoV virion, focusing on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions. PMID:25855243

  10. Evaluating Young Volcanism at Baitoushan Volcano: Insights From Single Mineral Crystal Sr and Pb Isotope Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, S. L.; Ramos, F. C.; Gill, J. B.

    2008-12-01

    Baitoushan volcano, located along the North-Korea/China border, generated one of the largest caldera- forming rhyolitic eruptions in the northern hemisphere in the last 2000 years. In addition to a large ~1000AD comendite eruption, a pantellerite eruption occurred at ~0AD which left a small pumice deposit. We have evaluated the isotopic signatures of single mineral crystals and pumice fragments from this pantellerite to evaluate the sources, petrogenetic history, timing, and residence of highly alkaline rhyolitic magma at Baitoushan. Single mineral isotope characteristics of this pantellerite are complex. Rb/Sr analyses of whole pumice fragments suggest a pantellerite residence age of ~348ky, similar to residence ages determined for Long Valley Caldera and Valles Caldera. Individual potassium feldspar and clinopyroxene crystals have similarly variable and overlapping 87Sr/86Sr signatures that are different than those of host pumice fragments but similar to crystals erupted in the ~1000AD comendite. These same crystals define a linear trend in 207Pb/204Pb vs 206Pb/204Pb that suggests mixing between host pumice and a second currently unidentified endmember. Results, however, unequivocally demonstrate mixing and undermine any residence age associated with Rb/Sr isotope systematics of pumice fragments. Overall Sr and Pb isotope systematics reflect variable signatures as compared to all other recent eruptive products at Baitoushan and suggest highly variable processes involved in melt production and that select minerals may be shared between different eruptions spanning a 2000 to 4000 year time period.

  11. MPLEx: a Robust and Universal Protocol for Single-Sample Integrative Proteomic, Metabolomic, and Lipidomic Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Sims, Amy C.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Shukla, Anil K.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Baric, Ralph S.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Chia, Nicholas

    2016-05-03

    ABSTRACT

    Integrative multi-omics analyses can empower more effective investigation and complete understanding of complex biological systems. Despite recent advances in a range of omics analyses, multi-omic measurements of the same sample are still challenging and current methods have not been well evaluated in terms of reproducibility and broad applicability. Here we adapted a solvent-based method, widely applied for extracting lipids and metabolites, to add proteomics to mass spectrometry-based multi-omics measurements. Themetabolite,protein, andlipidextraction (MPLEx) protocol proved to be robust and applicable to a diverse set of sample types, including cell cultures, microbial communities, and tissues. To illustrate the utility of this protocol, an integrative multi-omics analysis was performed using a lung epithelial cell line infected with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, which showed the impact of this virus on the host glycolytic pathway and also suggested a role for lipids during infection. The MPLEx method is a simple, fast, and robust protocol that can be applied for integrative multi-omic measurements from diverse sample types (e.g., environmental,in vitro, and clinical).

    IMPORTANCEIn systems biology studies, the integration of multiple omics measurements (i.e., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and lipidomics) has been shown to provide a more complete and informative view of biological pathways. Thus, the prospect of extracting different types of molecules (e.g., DNAs, RNAs, proteins, and metabolites) and performing multiple omics measurements on single samples is very attractive, but such studies are challenging due to the fact that the extraction conditions differ according to the molecule type. Here, we adapted an organic solvent-based extraction method that demonstrated

  12. DNA driven self-assembly of micron-sized rods using DNA-grafted bacteriophage fd virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, R R; Cabanas, R A; Yanagishima, T; Blower, T R; Takahashi, H; Salmond, G P C; Edwardson, J M; Fraden, S; Eiser, E

    2015-03-28

    We have functionalized the sides of fd bacteriophage virions with oligonucleotides to induce DNA hybridization driven self-assembly of high aspect ratio filamentous particles. Potential impacts of this new structure range from an entirely new building block in DNA origami structures, inclusion of virions in DNA nanostructures and nanomachines, to a new means of adding thermotropic control to lyotropic liquid crystal systems. A protocol for producing the virions in bulk is reviewed. Thiolated oligonucleotides are attached to the viral capsid using a heterobifunctional chemical linker. A commonly used system is utilized, where a sticky, single-stranded DNA strand is connected to an inert double-stranded spacer to increase inter-particle connectivity. Solutions of fd virions carrying complementary strands are mixed, annealed, and their aggregation is studied using dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Aggregation is clearly observed on cooling, with some degree of local order, and is reversible when temperature is cycled through the DNA hybridization transition.

  13. The plant host can affect the encapsidation of brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA: BMV virions are surprisingly heterogeneous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Peng; Vaughan, Robert C; Tragesser, Brady; Hoover, Haley; Kao, C Cheng

    2014-03-06

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) packages its genomic and subgenomic RNAs into three separate viral particles. BMV purified from barley, wheat, and tobacco have distinct relative abundances of the encapsidated RNAs. We seek to identify the basis for the host-dependent differences in viral RNA encapsidation. Sequencing of the viral RNAs revealed recombination events in the 3' untranslated region of RNA1 of BMV purified from barley and wheat, but not from tobacco. However, the relative amounts of the BMV RNAs that accumulated in barley and wheat are similar and RNA accumulation is not sufficient to account for the difference in RNA encapsidation. Virions purified from barley and wheat were found to differ in their isoelectric points, resistance to proteolysis, and contacts between the capsid residues and the RNA. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that virions from the three hosts had different post-translational modifications that should impact the physiochemical properties of the virions. Another major source of variation in RNA encapsidation was due to the purification of BMV particles to homogeneity. Highly enriched BMV present in lysates had a surprising range of sizes, buoyant densities, and distinct relative amounts of encapsidated RNAs. These results show that the encapsidated BMV RNAs reflect a combination of host effects on the physiochemical properties of the viral capsids and the enrichment of a subset of virions. The previously unexpected heterogeneity in BMV should influence the timing of the infection and also the host innate immune responses. © 2013.

  14. Mechanism of Human Influenza Virus RNA Persistence and Virion Survival in Feces: Mucus Protects Virions From Acid and Digestive Juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Ryohei; Nakaya, Takaaki; Naito, Yuji; Daidoji, Tomo; Watanabe, Yohei; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Konishi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2017-07-01

    Although viral RNA or infectious virions have been detected in the feces of individuals infected with human influenza A and B viruses (IAV/IBV), the mechanism of viral survival in the gastrointestinal tract remains unclear. We developed a model that attempts to recapitulate the conditions encountered by a swallowed virus. While IAV/IBV are vulnerable to simulated digestive juices (gastric acid and bile/pancreatic juice), highly viscous mucus protects viral RNA and virions, allowing the virus to retain its infectivity. Our results suggest that virions and RNA present in swallowed mucus are not inactivated or degraded by the gastrointestinal environment, allowing their detection in feces. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Damage Analyses of Adhesively Bonded Single Lap Joints Due to Delaminated FRP Composite Adherends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, S. K.

    2009-08-01

    Three-dimensional non-linear Finite Element Analyses (FEA) due to an in-plane loading have been performed to evaluate the out-of-plane normal and shear stresses over the overlap region of a Single Lap Joint (SLJ) on different surfaces. These surfaces have been considered as; (i) two interfacial surfaces between the adherends and the adhesive layer, (ii) the mid-surface of the adhesive layer and (iii) two surfaces beneath the surface ply of both the adherends adjacent to the adhesive layer. The critical locations of onset of adhesion, cohesion and delamination failures on the above mentioned surfaces of the SLJ have been determined using suitable damage criteria. A comparative study due to adhesion, cohesion and delamination failures in the SLJ with Fiber Reinforced Polymeric (FRP) composite adherends have been presented. The effects of simultaneous variations of the delamination positions on the out-of-plane peel and shear stress components have been studied by pre-embedding the delamination damages at the critical locations in both the adherends. It has been observed that the possibilities of onset of cohesion failures in the adhesive layer are higher compared to the adhesion and delamination failures. The detailed analyses showed that secondary peaks of out-of-plane stress components ( σ z , τ yz and τ xz ) on the mid surface of the adhesive layer appeared at the locations closer to the delamination fronts due to pre-embedded delamination damages. The highest stress magnitudes on the overlap edge of the SLJ have been reduced significantly when the centers of the delamination damages are exactly aligned with the overlap ends of the joint. No significant variations of stress magnitudes have been noticed either when the delaminations are pre-embedded outside the overlap regions or when the delamination damages are completely entrapped within the overlap region.

  16. Native hepatitis B virions and capsids visualized by electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Kelly A; Wieland, Stefan F; Whitten-Bauer, Christina; Gerin, John L; Chisari, Francis V; Yeager, Mark

    2006-06-23

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects more than 350 million people, of which one million will die every year. The infectious virion is an enveloped capsid containing the viral polymerase and double-stranded DNA genome. The structure of the capsid assembled in vitro from expressed core protein has been studied intensively. However, little is known about the structure and assembly of native capsids present in infected cells, and even less is known about the structure of mature virions. We used electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) and image analysis to examine HBV virions (Dane particles) isolated from patient serum and capsids positive and negative for HBV DNA isolated from the livers of transgenic mice. Both types of capsids assembled as icosahedral particles indistinguishable from previous image reconstructions of capsids. Likewise, the virions contained capsids with either T = 3 or T = 4 icosahedral symmetry. Projections extending from the lipid envelope were attributed to surface glycoproteins. Their packing was unexpectedly nonicosahedral but conformed to an ordered lattice. These structural features distinguish HBV from other enveloped viruses.

  17. Proteomic analysis of the EhV-86 virion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael J; Howard, Julie A; Lilley, Kathryn S; Wilson, William H

    2008-03-17

    Emiliania huxleyi virus 86 (EhV-86) is the type species of the genus Coccolithovirus within the family Phycodnaviridae. The fully sequenced 407,339 bp genome is predicted to encode 473 protein coding sequences (CDSs) and is the largest Phycodnaviridae sequenced to date. The majority of EhV-86 CDSs exhibit no similarity to proteins in the public databases. Proteomic analysis by 1-DE and then LC-MS/MS determined that the virion of EhV-86 is composed of at least 28 proteins, 23 of which are predicted to be membrane proteins. Besides the major capsid protein, putative function can be assigned to 4 other components of the virion: two lectin proteins, a thioredoxin and a serine/threonine protein kinase. This study represents the first steps toward the identification of the protein components that make up the EhV-86 virion. Aside from the major capsid protein, whose function in the virion is well known and defined, the nature of the other proteins suggest roles involved with viral budding, caspase activation, signalling, anti-oxidation, virus adsorption and host range determination.

  18. Proteomic analysis of the EhV-86 virion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilley Kathryn S

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emiliania huxleyi virus 86 (EhV-86 is the type species of the genus Coccolithovirus within the family Phycodnaviridae. The fully sequenced 407,339 bp genome is predicted to encode 473 protein coding sequences (CDSs and is the largest Phycodnaviridae sequenced to date. The majority of EhV-86 CDSs exhibit no similarity to proteins in the public databases. Results Proteomic analysis by 1-DE and then LC-MS/MS determined that the virion of EhV-86 is composed of at least 28 proteins, 23 of which are predicted to be membrane proteins. Besides the major capsid protein, putative function can be assigned to 4 other components of the virion: two lectin proteins, a thioredoxin and a serine/threonine protein kinase. Conclusion This study represents the first steps toward the identification of the protein components that make up the EhV-86 virion. Aside from the major capsid protein, whose function in the virion is well known and defined, the nature of the other proteins suggest roles involved with viral budding, caspase activation, signalling, anti-oxidation, virus adsorption and host range determination.

  19. Exocytosis of Varicella-Zoster Virus Virions Involves a Convergence of Endosomal and Autophagy Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Erin M; Jarosinski, Keith W; Jackson, Wallen; Carpenter, John E; Grose, Charles

    2016-10-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is an extremely cell-associated herpesvirus with limited egress of viral particles. The induction of autophagy in VZV-infected monolayers is easily detectable; inhibition of autophagy leads to decreased VZV glycoprotein biosynthesis and diminished viral titers. To explain how autophagic flux could exert a proviral effect on the VZV infectious cycle, we postulated that the VZV exocytosis pathway following secondary envelopment may converge with the autophagy pathway. This hypothesis depended on known similarities between VZV gE and autophagy-related (Atg) Atg9/Atg16L1 trafficking pathways. Investigations were carried out with highly purified fractions of VZV virions. When the virion fraction was tested for the presence of autophagy and endosomal proteins, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (MAP1LC3B) and Ras-like GTPase 11 (Rab11) were detected. By two-dimensional (2D) and 3D imaging after immunolabeling, both proteins also colocalized with VZV gE in a proportion of cytoplasmic vesicles. When purified VZV virions were enumerated after immunoelectron microscopy, gold beads were detected on viruses following incubation with antibodies to VZV gE (∼100%), Rab11 (50%), and LC3B (30%). Examination of numerous electron micrographs demonstrated that enveloped virions were housed in single-membraned vesicles; viral particles were not observed in autophagosomes. Taken together, our data suggested that some viral particles after secondary envelopment accumulated in a heterogeneous population of single-membraned vesicular compartments, which were decorated with components from both the endocytic pathway (Rab11) and the autophagy pathway (LC3B). The latter cytoplasmic viral vesicles resembled an amphisome. VZV infection leads to increased autophagic flux, while inhibition of autophagy leads to a marked reduction in virus spread. In this investigation of the proviral role of autophagy, we found evidence for an intersection of viral

  20. Immunogenicity Studies of Bivalent Inactivated Virions of EV71/CVA16 Formulated with Submicron Emulsion Systems

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    Chih-Wei Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed two strategies for preparing candidate vaccines against hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD caused mainly by infections of enterovirus (EV 71 and coxsackievirus (CV A16. We firstly design and optimize the potency of adjuvant combinations of emulsion-based delivery systems, using EV71 candidate vaccine as a model. We then perform immunogenicity studies in mice of EV71/CVA16 antigen combinations formulated with PELC/CpG. A single dose of inactivated EV71 virion (0.2 μg emulsified in submicron particles was found (i to induce potent antigen-specific neutralizing antibody responses and (ii consistently to elicit broad antibody responses against EV71 neutralization epitopes. A single dose immunogenicity study of bivalent activated EV71/CVA16 virion formulated with either Alum or PELC/CpG adjuvant showed that CVA16 antigen failed to elicit CVA16 neutralizing antibody responses and did not affect EV71-specific neutralizing antibody responses. A boosting dose of emulsified EV71/CVA16 bivalent vaccine candidate was found to be necessary to achieve high seroconversion of CVA16-specific neutralizing antibody responses. The current results are important for the design and development of prophylactic vaccines against HFMD and other emerging infectious diseases.

  1. Tagging of the vaccinia virus protein F13 with mCherry causes aberrant virion morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, David C J; Hollinshead, Michael S; Ewles, Helen A; Lee, Stacey-Ann; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2017-09-20

    Vaccinia virus produces two distinct infectious virions; the single-enveloped intracellular mature virus (IMV), which remains in the cell until cell lysis, and the double-enveloped extracellular enveloped virus (EEV), which mediates virus spread. The latter is derived from a triple-enveloped intracellular enveloped virus (IEV) precursor, which is transported to the cell periphery by the kinesin-1 motor complex. This transport involves the viral protein A36 as well as F12 and E2. A36 is an integral membrane protein associated with the outer virus envelope and is the only known direct link between virion and kinesin-1 complex. Yet in the absence of A36 virion egress still occurs on microtubules, albeit at reduced efficiency. In this paper double-fluorescent labelling of the capsid protein A5 and outer-envelope protein F13 was exploited to visualize IEV transport by live-cell imaging in the absence of either A36 or F12. During the generation of recombinant viruses expressing both A5-GFP and F13-mCherry a plaque size defect was identified that was particularly severe in viruses lacking A36. Electron microscopy showed that this phenotype was caused by abnormal wrapping of IMV to form IEV, and this resulted in reduced virus egress to the cell surface. The aberrant wrapping phenotype suggests that the fluorescent fusion protein interferes with an interaction of F13 with the IMV surface that is required for tight association between IMVs and wrapping membranes. The severity of this defect suggests that these viruses are imperfect tools for characterizing virus egress.

  2. Antigenic properties of the human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein gp120 on virions bound to target cells.

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    Meron Mengistu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, undergoes multiple molecular interactions and structural rearrangements during the course of host cell attachment and viral entry, which are being increasingly defined at the atomic level using isolated proteins. In comparison, antigenic markers of these dynamic changes are essentially unknown for single HIV-1 particles bound to target cells. Such markers should indicate how neutralizing and/or non-neutralizing antibodies might interdict infection by either blocking infection or sensitizing host cells for elimination by Fc-mediated effector function. Here we address this deficit by imaging fluorescently labeled CCR5-tropic HIV-1 pseudoviruses using confocal and superresolution microscopy to track the exposure of neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes as they appear on single HIV-1 particles bound to target cells. Epitope exposure was followed under conditions permissive or non-permissive for viral entry to delimit changes associated with virion binding from those associated with post-attachment events. We find that a previously unexpected array of gp120 epitopes is exposed rapidly upon target cell binding. This array comprises both neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes, the latter being hidden on free virions yet capable of serving as potent targets for Fc-mediated effector function. Under non-permissive conditions for viral entry, both neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitope exposures were relatively static over time for the majority of bound virions. Under entry-permissive conditions, epitope exposure patterns changed over time on subsets of virions that exhibited concurrent variations in virion contents. These studies reveal that bound virions are distinguished by a broad array of both neutralizing and non-neutralizing gp120 epitopes that potentially sensitize a freshly engaged target cell for destruction by Fc-mediated effector function and/or for direct neutralization at a post-binding step

  3. Properties of virion transactivator proteins encoded by primate cytomegaloviruses

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    Barry Peter A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a betaherpesvirus that causes severe disease in situations where the immune system is immature or compromised. HCMV immediate early (IE gene expression is stimulated by the virion phosphoprotein pp71, encoded by open reading frame (ORF UL82, and this transactivation activity is important for the efficient initiation of viral replication. It is currently recognized that pp71 acts to overcome cellular intrinsic defences that otherwise block viral IE gene expression, and that interactions of pp71 with the cell proteins Daxx and ATRX are important for this function. A further property of pp71 is the ability to enable prolonged gene expression from quiescent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 genomes. Non-human primate cytomegaloviruses encode homologs of pp71, but there is currently no published information that addresses their effects on gene expression and modes of action. Results The UL82 homolog encoded by simian cytomegalovirus (SCMV, strain Colburn, was identified and cloned. This ORF, named S82, was cloned into an HSV-1 vector, as were those from baboon, rhesus monkey and chimpanzee cytomegaloviruses. The use of an HSV-1 vector enabled expression of the UL82 homologs in a range of cell types, and permitted investigation of their abilities to direct prolonged gene expression from quiescent genomes. The results show that all UL82 homologs activate gene expression, and that neither host cell type nor promoter target sequence has major effects on these activities. Surprisingly, the UL82 proteins specified by non-human primate cytomegaloviruses, unlike pp71, did not direct long term expression from quiescent HSV-1 genomes. In addition, significant differences were observed in the intranuclear localization of the UL82 homologs, and in their effects on Daxx. Strikingly, S82 mediated the release of Daxx from nuclear domain 10 substructures much more rapidly than pp71 or the other proteins tested. All

  4. Development and optimization of SERS-based immuno-nanosensor for single cell analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Honggang; Cullum, Brian M.

    2004-03-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an extremely sensitive and selective spectroscopic technique commonly employed for trace environmental analyses. We are currently developing and optimizing novel SERS based immuno-nanosensors for the monitoring of protein expression within individual living cells. These sensors, based upon antibody bound, silver coated silica nanospheres, can be inserted into individual cells and non-invasively positioned to the subcellular location of interest using optical tweezers. Because a HeNe laser is used for excitation, both photodamage to cells and cellular autofluorescence are minimized. Fabrication of the nanosensors is performed by first depositing a thin layer of silver on silica nanospheres by either homogeneous chemical deposition or vapor deposition. This is followed by binding an antibody against the analyte of interest to the sensor"s surface. In this paper we have investigated and optimized the reduction conditions of a chemical deposition substrate fabrication method and have compared these substrates to three types of vapor deposited substrates: (1) single layer silver film over nanosphere (SFON), (2) dual layer silver film over nanosphere (DUAL-FON) substrates (produced by coating an additional layer of silver film over the SFON), and (3) multilayer silver film over nanosphere (MULTI-FON) substrates (prepared by repeated coatings of several silver films over a SFON). In the case of chemical deposition, parameters optimized included silver nitrate concentration, reaction temperature, and silver coating time of substrates. In general, we have found SFON substrates yield better signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) with less background than the optimized, chemically prepared substrates. Even greater SERS enhancements have been found using multilayered SERS substrates (i.e., DUAL-FON substrates and MULTI-FON substrates). Both the stability and S/N of these substrates are enhanced by using multiple silver layers compared to SFON

  5. Role of Human Cytomegalovirus Tegument Proteins in Virion Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca Marie; Kosuri, Srivenkat; Kerry, Julie Anne

    2014-01-01

    Like other herpesviruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) contains a unique proteinaceous layer between the virion envelope and capsid, termed the tegument. Upon infection, the contents of the tegument layer are delivered to the host cell, along with the capsid and the viral genome, where they facilitate the initial stages of virus replication. The tegument proteins also play important roles in virion assembly and this dual nature makes them attractive potential targets for antiviral therapies. While our knowledge regarding tegument protein function during the initiation of infection has been the subject of intense study, their roles in assembly are much less well understood. In this review, we will focus on recent studies that highlight the functions of HCMV tegument proteins during assembly, and pose key questions for further investigation. PMID:24509811

  6. Gp120 on HIV-1 Virions Lacks O-Linked Carbohydrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Stansell

    Full Text Available As HIV-1-encoded envelope protein traverses the secretory pathway, it may be modified with N- and O-linked carbohydrate. When the gp120s of HIV-1 NL4-3, HIV-1 YU2, HIV-1 Bal, HIV-1 JRFL, and HIV-1 JRCSF were expressed as secreted proteins, the threonine at consensus position 499 was found to be O-glycosylated. For SIVmac239, the corresponding threonine was also glycosylated when gp120 was recombinantly expressed. Similarly-positioned, highly-conserved threonines in the influenza A virus H1N1 HA1 and H5N1 HA1 envelope proteins were also found to carry O-glycans when expressed as secreted proteins. In all cases, the threonines were modified predominantly with disialylated core 1 glycans, together with related core 1 and core 2 structures. Secreted HIV-1 gp140 was modified to a lesser extent with mainly monosialylated core 1 O-glycans, suggesting that the ectodomain of the gp41 transmembrane component may limit the accessibility of Thr499 to glycosyltransferases. In striking contrast to these findings, gp120 on purified virions of HIV-1 Bal and SIV CP-MAC lacked any detectable O-glycosylation of the C-terminal threonine. Our results indicate the absence of O-linked carbohydrates on Thr499 as it exists on the surface of virions and suggest caution in the interpretation of analyses of post-translational modifications that utilize recombinant forms of envelope protein.

  7. Extracting physics of life at the molecular level: A review of single-molecule data analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomb, Warren; Sarkar, Susanta K

    2015-06-01

    Studying individual biomolecules at the single-molecule level has proved very insightful recently. Single-molecule experiments allow us to probe both the equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties as well as make quantitative connections with ensemble experiments and equilibrium thermodynamics. However, it is important to be careful about the analysis of single-molecule data because of the noise present and the lack of theoretical framework for processes far away from equilibrium. Biomolecular motion, whether it is free in solution, on a substrate, or under force, involves thermal fluctuations in varying degrees, which makes the motion noisy. In addition, the noise from the experimental setup makes it even more complex. The details of biologically relevant interactions, conformational dynamics, and activities are hidden in the noisy single-molecule data. As such, extracting biological insights from noisy data is still an active area of research. In this review, we will focus on analyzing both fluorescence-based and force-based single-molecule experiments and gaining biological insights at the single-molecule level. Inherently nonequilibrium nature of biological processes will be highlighted. Simulated trajectories of biomolecular diffusion will be used to compare and validate various analysis techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dense Array of Spikes on HIV-1 Virion Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Armando; Leaman, Daniel P; Kim, Arthur S; Zhang, Lei; Autin, Ludovic; Ingale, Jidnyasa; Gift, Syna K; Truong, Jared; Wyatt, Richard T; Olson, Arthur J; Zwick, Michael B

    2017-07-15

    HIV-1 is rare among viruses for having a low number of envelope glycoprotein (Env) spikes per virion, i.e., ∼7 to 14. This exceptional feature has been associated with avoidance of humoral immunity, i.e., B cell activation and antibody neutralization. Virus-like particles (VLPs) with increased density of Env are being pursued for vaccine development; however, these typically require protein engineering that alters Env structure. Here, we used instead a strategy that targets the producer cell. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to sort for cells that are recognized by trimer cross-reactive broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) and not by nonneutralizing antibodies. Following multiple iterations of FACS, cells and progeny virions were shown to display higher levels of antigenically correct Env in a manner that correlated between cells and cognate virions (P = 0.027). High-Env VLPs, or hVLPs, were shown to be monodisperse and to display more than a 10-fold increase in spikes per particle by electron microscopy (average, 127 spikes; range, 90 to 214 spikes). Sequencing revealed a partial truncation in the C-terminal tail of Env that had emerged in the sort; however, iterative rounds of "cell factory" selection were required for the high-Env phenotype. hVLPs showed greater infectivity than standard pseudovirions but largely similar neutralization sensitivity. Importantly, hVLPs also showed superior activation of Env-specific B cells. Hence, high-Env HIV-1 virions, obtained through selection of producer cells, represent an adaptable platform for vaccine design and should aid in the study of native Env.IMPORTANCE The paucity of spikes on HIV is a unique feature that has been associated with evasion of the immune system, while increasing spike density has been a goal of vaccine design. Increasing the density of Env by modifying it in various ways has met with limited success. Here, we focused instead on the producer cell. Cells that stably express HIV

  9. Multipoint laser Doppler vibrometry with single detector: principles, implementations, and signal analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y; Guo, M; Phua, P B

    2011-04-01

    A 20-point laser Doppler vibrometer with single photodetector is presented for noncontact dynamic measurement. A 5×4 beam array with various frequency shifts is generated by a 1.55 μm distributed feedback laser and four acousto-optic devices, and illuminating different points on vibrating objects. The reflected beams are coupled into a single-mode fiber by a pigtailed collimator and interfere with a reference beam. The signal output from a high-speed photodetector is amplified and then digitized by a high-speed analog-to-digital converter with a sampling rate of 1 gigasample per second (1 GS/s). Several methods are introduced to avoid the cross talk among different frequencies and extract the vibration information of 20 points from a one-dimensional signal. Two signal processing algorithms based on Fourier transform and windowed Fourier transform are illustrated to extract the vibration signals at different points. The experimental results are compared with that from a commercial single-point laser vibrometer. The results show simultaneous vibration measurement can be realized on multiple points using a single laser source and a single photodetector. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  10. Understanding development and stem cells using single cell-based analyses of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pavithra; Tan, Yuqi; Cahan, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, genome-wide profiling approaches have begun to uncover the molecular programs that drive developmental processes. In particular, technical advances that enable genome-wide profiling of thousands of individual cells have provided the tantalizing prospect of cataloging cell type diversity and developmental dynamics in a quantitative and comprehensive manner. Here, we review how single-cell RNA sequencing has provided key insights into mammalian developmental and stem cell biology, emphasizing the analytical approaches that are specific to studying gene expression in single cells. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. The application and performance of single nucleotide polymorphism markers for population genetic analyses of Lepidoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are nucleotide substitution mutations that tend to be at high densities within eukaryotic genomes. The development of assays that detect allelic variation at SNP loci is attractive for genome mapping, population genetics, and phylogeographic applications. A p...

  12. Statistical Reform: Evidence-Based Practice, Meta-Analyses, and Single Subject Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, William R.; Clark, Elaine; Kircher, John C.; Kristjansson, Sean D.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence-based practice approaches to interventions has come of age and promises to provide a new standard of excellence for school psychologists. This article describes several definitions of evidence-based practice and the problems associated with traditional statistical analyses that rely on rejection of the null hypothesis for the…

  13. BST2/CD317 counteracts human coronavirus 229E productive infection by tethering virions at the cell surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shiu-Mei [Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Kuo-Jung [Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chin-Tien, E-mail: chintien@ym.edu.tw [Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-20

    Bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST2), an interferon-inducible antiviral factor, has been shown to block the release of various enveloped viruses from cells. It has also been identified as an innate immune system component. Most enveloped viruses subject to BST2 restriction bud at the plasma membrane. Here we report our findings that (a) the production of human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) progeny viruses, whose budding occurs at the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC), markedly decreases in the presence of BST2; and (b) BST2 knockdown expression results in enhanced HCoV-229E virion production. Electron microscopy analyses indicate that HCoV-229E virions are tethered to cell surfaces or intracellular membranes by BST2. Our results suggest that BST2 exerts a broad blocking effect against enveloped virus release, regardless of whether budding occurs at the plasma membrane or intracellular compartments. - Highlights: • BST2 knockdown expression results in enhanced HCoV-229E egress. • HCoV-229E virions are tethered to cell surfaces or intracellular membranes by BST2. • HCoV-229E infection at high MOI can significantly downregulate HeLa BST2 and rescue HIV-1 egress.

  14. Comprehensive analyses of core–shell InGaN/GaN single nanowire photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Guan, N.; Piazza, V.; Kapoor, A.; Bougerol, C.; Julien, F. H.; Babichev, A. V.; Cavassilas, N.; Bescond, M.; Michelini, F.; Foldyna, M.; Gautier, E.; Durand, C.; Eymery, J.; Tchernycheva, M.

    2017-12-01

    Single nitride nanowire core/shell n-p photodetectors are fabricated and analyzed. Nanowires consisting of an n-doped GaN stem, a radial InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well system and a p-doped GaN external shell were grown by catalyst-free metal–organic vapour phase epitaxy on sapphire substrates. Single nanowires were dispersed and the core and the shell regions were contacted with a metal and an ITO deposition, respectively, defined using electron beam lithography. The single wire photodiodes present a response in the visible to UV spectral range under zero external bias. The detector operation speed has been analyzed under different bias conditions. Under zero bias, the  ‑3 dB cut-off frequency is ~200 Hz for small light modulations. The current generation was modeled using non-equilibrium Green function formalism, which evidenced the importance of phonon scattering for carrier extraction from the quantum wells.

  15. Proteomic analysis of the EhV-86 virion

    OpenAIRE

    Lilley Kathryn S; Howard Julie A; Allen Michael J; Wilson William H

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Emiliania huxleyi virus 86 (EhV-86) is the type species of the genus Coccolithovirus within the family Phycodnaviridae. The fully sequenced 407,339 bp genome is predicted to encode 473 protein coding sequences (CDSs) and is the largest Phycodnaviridae sequenced to date. The majority of EhV-86 CDSs exhibit no similarity to proteins in the public databases. Results Proteomic analysis by 1-DE and then LC-MS/MS determined that the virion of EhV-86 is composed of at least 28 pr...

  16. Impact of theoretical priors in cosmological analyses: The case of single field quintessence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirone, Simone; Martinelli, Matteo; Raveri, Marco; Silvestri, Alessandra

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the impact of general conditions of theoretical stability and cosmological viability on dynamical dark energy models. As a powerful example, we study whether minimally coupled, single field quintessence models that are safe from ghost instabilities, can source the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) expansion history recently shown to be mildly favored by a combination of cosmic microwave background (Planck) and weak lensing (KiDS) data. We find that in their most conservative form, the theoretical conditions impact the analysis in such a way that smooth single field quintessence becomes significantly disfavored with respect to the standard Λ CDM cosmological model. This is due to the fact that these conditions cut a significant portion of the (w0,wa) parameter space for CPL, in particular, eliminating the region that would be favored by weak lensing data. Within the scenario of a smooth dynamical dark energy parametrized with CPL, weak lensing data favors a region that would require multiple fields to ensure gravitational stability.

  17. Potyvirus virion structure shows conserved protein fold and RNA binding site in ssRNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Miguel; Méndez-López, Eduardo; Agirrezabala, Xabier; Cuesta, Rebeca; Lavín, José L; Sánchez-Pina, M Amelia; Aranda, Miguel A; Valle, Mikel

    2017-09-01

    Potyviruses constitute the second largest genus of plant viruses and cause important economic losses in a large variety of crops; however, the atomic structure of their particles remains unknown. Infective potyvirus virions are long flexuous filaments where coat protein (CP) subunits assemble in helical mode bound to a monopartite positive-sense single-stranded RNA [(+)ssRNA] genome. We present the cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) structure of the potyvirus watermelon mosaic virus at a resolution of 4.0 Å. The atomic model shows a conserved fold for the CPs of flexible filamentous plant viruses, including a universally conserved RNA binding pocket, which is a potential target for antiviral compounds. This conserved fold of the CP is widely distributed in eukaryotic viruses and is also shared by nucleoproteins of enveloped viruses with segmented (-)ssRNA (negative-sense ssRNA) genomes, including influenza viruses.

  18. Full-Scale Crash Tests and Analyses of Three High-Wing Single

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin S.; Littell, Justin D.; Stimson, Chad M.; Jackson, Karen E.; Mason, Brian H.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Emergency Locator Transmitter Survivability and Reliability (ELTSAR) project was initiated in 2014 to assess the crash performance standards for the next generation of ELT systems. Three Cessna 172 aircraft have been acquired to conduct crash testing at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility. Testing is scheduled for the summer of 2015 and will simulate three crash conditions; a flare to stall while emergency landing, and two controlled flight into terrain scenarios. Instrumentation and video coverage, both onboard and external, will also provide valuable data of airframe response. Full-scale finite element analyses will be performed using two separate commercial explicit solvers. Calibration and validation of the models will be based on the airframe response under these varying crash conditions.

  19. Protein Composition of the Bovine Herpesvirus 1.1 Virion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Kaley A.; Daugherty, Hillary C.; Ander, Stephanie E.; Jefferson, Victoria A.; Shack, Leslie A.; Pechan, Tibor; Nanduri, Bindu; Meyer, Florencia

    2017-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus (BoHV) type 1 is an important agricultural pathogen that infects cattle and other ruminants worldwide. Acute infection of the oro-respiratory tract leads to immune suppression and allows commensal bacteria to infect an otherwise healthy lower respiratory tract. This condition is known as the Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD). BoHV-1 latently infects the host for life and periodical stress events re-initiate BRD, translating into high morbidity and large economic losses. To gain a better understanding of the biology of BoHV-1 and the disease it causes, we elucidated the protein composition of extracellular virions using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. We detected 33 viral proteins, including the expected proteins of the nucleocapsid and envelope as well as other regulatory proteins present in the viral tegument. In addition to viral proteins, we have also identified packaged proteins of host origin. This constitutes the first proteomic characterization of the BoHV virion. PMID:29056670

  20. NUMERICAL ANALYSES FOR TREATING DIFFUSION IN SINGLE-, TWO-, AND THREE-PHASE BINARY ALLOY SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This package consists of a series of three computer programs for treating one-dimensional transient diffusion problems in single and multiple phase binary alloy systems. An accurate understanding of the diffusion process is important in the development and production of binary alloys. Previous solutions of the diffusion equations were highly restricted in their scope and application. The finite-difference solutions developed for this package are applicable for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries with any diffusion-zone size and any continuous variation of the diffusion coefficient with concentration. Special techniques were included to account for differences in modal volumes, initiation and growth of an intermediate phase, disappearance of a phase, and the presence of an initial composition profile in the specimen. In each analysis, an effort was made to achieve good accuracy while minimizing computation time. The solutions to the diffusion equations for single-, two-, and threephase binary alloy systems are numerically calculated by the three programs NAD1, NAD2, and NAD3. NAD1 treats the diffusion between pure metals which belong to a single-phase system. Diffusion in this system is described by a one-dimensional Fick's second law and will result in a continuous composition variation. For computational purposes, Fick's second law is expressed as an explicit second-order finite difference equation. Finite difference calculations are made by choosing the grid spacing small enough to give convergent solutions of acceptable accuracy. NAD2 treats diffusion between pure metals which form a two-phase system. Diffusion in the twophase system is described by two partial differential equations (a Fick's second law for each phase) and an interface-flux-balance equation which describes the location of the interface. Actual interface motion is obtained by a mass conservation procedure. To account for changes in the thicknesses of the two phases as diffusion

  1. A method for multiple sequential analyses of macrophage functions using a small single cell sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.R.F. Nascimento

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial pathogens such as bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG induce the activation of macrophages. Activated macrophages can be characterized by the increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites, generated via NADPH oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, respectively, and by the increased expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC II. Multiple microassays have been developed to measure these parameters. Usually each assay requires 2-5 x 10(5 cells per well. In some experimental conditions the number of cells is the limiting factor for the phenotypic characterization of macrophages. Here we describe a method whereby this limitation can be circumvented. Using a single 96-well microassay and a very small number of peritoneal cells obtained from C3H/HePas mice, containing as little as <=2 x 10(5 macrophages per well, we determined sequentially the oxidative burst (H2O2, nitric oxide production and MHC II (IAk expression of BCG-activated macrophages. More specifically, with 100 µl of cell suspension it was possible to quantify H2O2 release and nitric oxide production after 1 and 48 h, respectively, and IAk expression after 48 h of cell culture. In addition, this microassay is easy to perform, highly reproducible and more economical.

  2. Cellular proteins associated with the interior and exterior of vesicular stomatitis virus virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan; Hwang, Sun-Il; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2014-01-01

    Virus particles (virions) often contain not only virus-encoded but also host-encoded proteins. Some of these host proteins are enclosed within the virion structure, while others, in the case of enveloped viruses, are embedded in the host-derived membrane. While many of these host protein incorporations are likely accidental, some may play a role in virus infectivity, replication and/or immunoreactivity in the next host. Host protein incorporations may be especially important in therapeutic applications where large numbers of virus particles are administered. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is the prototypic rhabdovirus and a candidate vaccine, gene therapy and oncolytic vector. Using mass spectrometry, we previously examined cell type dependent host protein content of VSV virions using intact ("whole") virions purified from three cell lines originating from different species. Here we aimed to determine the localization of host proteins within the VSV virions by analyzing: i) whole VSV virions; and ii) whole VSV virions treated with Proteinase K to remove all proteins outside the viral envelope. A total of 257 proteins were identified, with 181 identified in whole virions and 183 identified in Proteinase K treated virions. Most of these proteins have not been previously shown to be associated with VSV. Functional enrichment analysis indicated the most overrepresented categories were proteins associated with vesicles, vesicle-mediated transport and protein localization. Using western blotting, the presence of several host proteins, including some not previously shown in association with VSV (such as Yes1, Prl1 and Ddx3y), was confirmed and their relative quantities in various virion fractions determined. Our study provides a valuable inventory of virion-associated host proteins for further investigation of their roles in the replication cycle, pathogenesis and immunoreactivity of VSV.

  3. Cellular proteins associated with the interior and exterior of vesicular stomatitis virus virions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Moerdyk-Schauwecker

    Full Text Available Virus particles (virions often contain not only virus-encoded but also host-encoded proteins. Some of these host proteins are enclosed within the virion structure, while others, in the case of enveloped viruses, are embedded in the host-derived membrane. While many of these host protein incorporations are likely accidental, some may play a role in virus infectivity, replication and/or immunoreactivity in the next host. Host protein incorporations may be especially important in therapeutic applications where large numbers of virus particles are administered. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is the prototypic rhabdovirus and a candidate vaccine, gene therapy and oncolytic vector. Using mass spectrometry, we previously examined cell type dependent host protein content of VSV virions using intact ("whole" virions purified from three cell lines originating from different species. Here we aimed to determine the localization of host proteins within the VSV virions by analyzing: i whole VSV virions; and ii whole VSV virions treated with Proteinase K to remove all proteins outside the viral envelope. A total of 257 proteins were identified, with 181 identified in whole virions and 183 identified in Proteinase K treated virions. Most of these proteins have not been previously shown to be associated with VSV. Functional enrichment analysis indicated the most overrepresented categories were proteins associated with vesicles, vesicle-mediated transport and protein localization. Using western blotting, the presence of several host proteins, including some not previously shown in association with VSV (such as Yes1, Prl1 and Ddx3y, was confirmed and their relative quantities in various virion fractions determined. Our study provides a valuable inventory of virion-associated host proteins for further investigation of their roles in the replication cycle, pathogenesis and immunoreactivity of VSV.

  4. Integrated 'Omics', Targeted Metabolite and Single-cell Analyses of Arctic Snow Algae Functionality and Adaptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Stefanie; Anesio, Alexandre M; Field, Katie; Benning, Liane G

    2015-01-01

    Snow algae are poly-extremophilic microalgae and important primary colonizers and producers on glaciers and snow fields. Depending on their pigmentation they cause green or red mass blooms during the melt season. This decreases surface albedo and thus further enhances snow and ice melting. Although the phenomenon of snow algal blooms has been known for a long time, large aspects of their physiology and ecology sill remain cryptic. This study provides the first in-depth and multi-omics investigation of two very striking adjacent green and red snow fields on a glacier in Svalbard. We have assessed the algal community composition of green and red snow including their associated microbiota, i.e., bacteria and archaea, their metabolic profiles (targeted and non-targeted metabolites) on the bulk and single-cell level, and assessed the feedbacks between the algae and their physico-chemical environment including liquid water content, pH, albedo, and nutrient availability. We demonstrate that green and red snow clearly vary in their physico-chemical environment, their microbial community composition and their metabolic profiles. For the algae this likely reflects both different stages of their life cycles and their adaptation strategies. Green snow represents a wet, carbon and nutrient rich environment and is dominated by the algae Microglena sp. with a metabolic profile that is characterized by key metabolites involved in growth and proliferation. In contrast, the dry and nutrient poor red snow habitat is colonized by various Chloromonas species with a high abundance of storage and reserve metabolites likely to face upcoming severe conditions. Combining a multitude of techniques we demonstrate the power of such complementary approaches in elucidating the function and ecology of extremophiles such as green and red snow algal blooms, which play crucial roles in glacial ecosystems.

  5. Single-subject analyses of magnetoencephalographic evoked responses to the acoustic properties of affective non-verbal vocalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvia, Emilie; Bestelmeyer, Patricia E G; Kotz, Sonja A; Rousselet, Guillaume A; Pernet, Cyril R; Gross, Joachim; Belin, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Magneto-encephalography (MEG) was used to examine the cerebral response to affective non-verbal vocalizations (ANVs) at the single-subject level. Stimuli consisted of non-verbal affect bursts from the Montreal Affective Voices morphed to parametrically vary acoustical structure and perceived emotional properties. Scalp magnetic fields were recorded in three participants while they performed a 3-alternative forced choice emotion categorization task (Anger, Fear, Pleasure). Each participant performed more than 6000 trials to allow single-subject level statistical analyses using a new toolbox which implements the general linear model (GLM) on stimulus-specific responses (LIMO-EEG). For each participant we estimated "simple" models [including just one affective regressor (Arousal or Valence)] as well as "combined" models (including acoustical regressors). Results from the "simple" models revealed in every participant the significant early effects (as early as ~100 ms after onset) of Valence and Arousal already reported at the group-level in previous work. However, the "combined" models showed that few effects of Arousal remained after removing the acoustically-explained variance, whereas significant effects of Valence remained especially at late stages. This study demonstrates (i) that single-subject analyses replicate the results observed at early stages by group-level studies and (ii) the feasibility of GLM-based analysis of MEG data. It also suggests that early modulation of MEG amplitude by affective stimuli partly reflects their acoustical properties.

  6. Single-subject analyses of magnetoencephalographic evoked responses to the acoustic properties of affective non-verbal vocalizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie eSalvia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Magneto-encephalography (MEG was used to examine the cerebral response to affective non-verbal vocalizations (ANVs at the single-subject level. Stimuli consisted of nonverbal affect bursts from the Montreal Affective Voices morphed to parametrically vary acoustical structure and perceived emotional properties. Scalp magnetic fields were recorded in three participants while they performed a 3-alternative forced choice emotion categorization task (Anger, Fear, Pleasure. Each participant performed more than 6000 trials to allow single-subject level statistical analyses using a new toolbox which implements the general linear model (GLM on stimulus-specific responses (LIMO-EEG. For each participant we estimated ‘simple’ models (including just one affective regressor (Arousal or Valence as well as ‘combined’ models (including acoustical regressors. Results from the ‘simple’ models revealed in every participant the significant early effects (as early as ~100 ms after onset of Valence and Arousal already reported at the group-level in previous work. However, the ‘combined’ models showed that few effects of Arousal remained after removing the acoustically-explained variance, whereas significant effects of Valence remained especially at late stages. This study demonstrates (i that single-subject analyses replicate the results observed at early stages by group-level studies and (ii the feasibility of GLM-based analysis of MEG data. It also suggests that early modulation of MEG amplitude by affective stimuli partly reflects their acoustical properties.

  7. Single-Cell Analyses of ESCs Reveal Alternative Pluripotent Cell States and Molecular Mechanisms that Control Self-Renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Papatsenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of gene expression in single mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs cultured in serum and LIF revealed the presence of two distinct cell subpopulations with individual gene expression signatures. Comparisons with published data revealed that cells in the first subpopulation are phenotypically similar to cells isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM. In contrast, cells in the second subpopulation appear to be more mature. Pluripotency Gene Regulatory Network (PGRN reconstruction based on single-cell data and published data suggested antagonistic roles for Oct4 and Nanog in the maintenance of pluripotency states. Integrated analyses of published genomic binding (ChIP data strongly supported this observation. Certain target genes alternatively regulated by OCT4 and NANOG, such as Sall4 and Zscan10, feed back into the top hierarchical regulator Oct4. Analyses of such incoherent feedforward loops with feedback (iFFL-FB suggest a dynamic model for the maintenance of mESC pluripotency and self-renewal.

  8. Microplitis demolitor bracovirus genome segments vary in abundance and are individually packaged in virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Markus H; Inman, Ross B; Strand, Michael R

    2007-03-01

    Polydnaviruses (PDVs) are distinguished by their unique association with parasitoid wasps and their segmented, double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes that are non-equimolar in abundance. Relatively little is actually known, however, about genome packaging or segment abundance of these viruses. Here, we conducted electron microscopy (EM) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies to characterize packaging and segment abundance of Microplitis demolitor bracovirus (MdBV). Like other PDVs, MdBV replicates in the ovaries of females where virions accumulate to form a suspension called calyx fluid. Wasps then inject a quantity of calyx fluid when ovipositing into hosts. The MdBV genome consists of 15 segments that range from 3.6 (segment A) to 34.3 kb (segment O). EM analysis indicated that MdBV virions contain a single nucleocapsid that encapsidates one circular DNA of variable size. We developed a semi-quantitative real-time PCR assay using SYBR Green I. This assay indicated that five (J, O, H, N and B) segments of the MdBV genome accounted for more than 60% of the viral DNAs in calyx fluid. Estimates of relative segment abundance using our real-time PCR assay were also very similar to DNA size distributions determined from micrographs. Analysis of parasitized Pseudoplusia includens larvae indicated that copy number of MdBV segments C, B and J varied between hosts but their relative abundance within a host was virtually identical to their abundance in calyx fluid. Among-tissue assays indicated that each viral segment was most abundant in hemocytes and least abundant in salivary glands. However, the relative abundance of each segment to one another was similar in all tissues. We also found no clear relationship between MdBV segment and transcript abundance in hemocytes and fat body.

  9. The Type and Impact of Evidence Review Group Exploratory Analyses in the NICE Single Technology Appraisal Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Christopher; Kaltenthaler, Eva; Hill-McManus, Daniel; Scope, Alison; Holmes, Michael; Rice, Stephen; Rose, Micah; Tappenden, Paul; Woolacott, Nerys

    2017-06-01

    As part of the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) single technology appraisal process, independent evidence review groups (ERGs) critically appraise a company's submission relating to a specific technology and indication. To explore the type of additional exploratory analyses conducted by ERGs and their impact on the recommendations made by NICE. The 100 most recently completed single technology appraisals with published guidance were selected for inclusion. A content analysis of relevant documents was undertaken to identify and extract relevant data, and narrative synthesis was used to rationalize and present these data. The types of exploratory analysis conducted in relation to companies' models were fixing errors, addressing violations, addressing matters of judgment, and the provision of a new, ERG-preferred base case. Ninety-three of the 100 ERG reports contained at least one of these analyses. The most frequently reported type of analysis in these 93 ERG reports related to the category "Matters of judgment," which was reported in 83 reports (89%). At least one of the exploratory analyses conducted and reported by an ERG is mentioned in 97% of NICE appraisal consultation documents and 94% of NICE final appraisal determinations, and had a clear influence on recommendations in 72% of appraisal consultation documents and 47% of final appraisal determinations. These results suggest that the additional analyses undertaken by ERGs in the appraisal of company submissions are highly influential in the policy-making and decision-making process. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Capillarity-induced disassembly of virions in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Xiaobin; Peng Wenchao; Li Yang; Li Xianyu; Zhang Guoliang; Zhang Fengbao [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Barclay, J Elaine; Evans, David J [Department of Biological Chemistry, John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: fbzhang@tju.edu.cn

    2008-04-23

    Studying the transport and fate of viruses through nanochannels is of great importance. By using the nanochannel of a carbon nanotube (CNT) as an ideal model, we evaluated the possibility of capillarity-induced viral transport through a closely fitting nanochannel and explored the mechanisms involved. It is shown both experimentally and theoretically that Cowpea mosaic virus can enter CNTs by capillarity. However, when introduced into a nanotube the protein capsid may disassemble. During the initial capillary filling stage, anomalous needle-shaped high pressure exists in the centre of the nanotube's entrance. This high pressure, combining with the significant negative pressure within the nanotube, may account for the disassembly of the virions.

  11. Subcellular Localization of HIV-1 gag-pol mRNAs Regulates Sites of Virion Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jordan T; Sherer, Nathan M

    2017-03-15

    Full-length unspliced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNAs serve dual roles in the cytoplasm as mRNAs encoding the Gag and Gag-Pol capsid proteins as well as genomic RNAs (gRNAs) packaged by Gag into virions undergoing assembly at the plasma membrane (PM). Because Gag is sufficient to drive the assembly of virus-like particles even in the absence of gRNA binding, whether viral RNA trafficking plays an active role in the native assembly pathway is unknown. In this study, we tested the effects of modulating the cytoplasmic abundance or distribution of full-length viral RNAs on Gag trafficking and assembly in the context of single cells. Increasing full-length viral RNA abundance or distribution had little-to-no net effect on Gag assembly competency when provided in trans In contrast, artificially tethering full-length viral RNAs or surrogate gag-pol mRNAs competent for Gag synthesis to non-PM membranes or the actin cytoskeleton severely reduced net virus particle production. These effects were explained, in large part, by RNA-directed changes to Gag's distribution in the cytoplasm, yielding aberrant subcellular sites of virion assembly. Interestingly, RNA-dependent disruption of Gag trafficking required either of two cis-acting RNA regulatory elements: the 5' packaging signal (Psi) bound by Gag during genome encapsidation or, unexpectedly, the Rev response element (RRE), which regulates the nuclear export of gRNAs and other intron-retaining viral RNAs. Taken together, these data support a model for native infection wherein structural features of the gag-pol mRNA actively compartmentalize Gag to preferred sites within the cytoplasm and/or PM.IMPORTANCE The spatial distribution of viral mRNAs within the cytoplasm can be a crucial determinant of efficient translation and successful virion production. Here we provide direct evidence that mRNA subcellular trafficking plays an important role in regulating the assembly of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV

  12. Real-time single-molecule co-immunoprecipitation analyses reveal cancer-specific Ras signalling dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Won; Kyung, Taeyoon; Yoo, Janghyun; Kim, Tackhoon; Chung, Chaeuk; Ryu, Ji Young; Lee, Hanki; Park, Kihyun; Lee, Sangkyu; Jones, Walton D.; Lim, Dae-Sik; Hyeon, Changbong; Do Heo, Won; Yoon, Tae-Young

    2013-01-01

    Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) has become a standard technique, but its protein-band output provides only static, qualitative information about protein–protein interactions. Here we demonstrate a real-time single-molecule co-IP technique that generates real-time videos of individual protein–protein interactions as they occur in unpurified cell extracts. By analysing single Ras–Raf interactions with a 50-ms time resolution, we have observed transient intermediates of the protein–protein interaction and determined all the essential kinetic rates. Using this technique, we have quantified the active fraction of native Ras proteins in xenograft tumours, normal tissue and cancer cell lines. We demonstrate that the oncogenic Ras mutations selectively increase the active-Ras fraction by one order of magnitude, without affecting total Ras levels or single-molecule signalling kinetics. Our approach allows us to probe the previously hidden, dynamic aspects of weak protein–protein interactions. It also suggests a path forward towards precision molecular diagnostics at the protein–protein interaction level. PMID:23422673

  13. The vaccinia virus E6 protein influences virion protein localization during virus assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condit, Richard C., E-mail: condit@mgm.ufl.edu; Moussatche, Nissin

    2015-08-15

    Vaccinia virus mutants in which expression of the virion core protein gene E6R is repressed are defective in virion morphogenesis. E6 deficient infections fail to properly package viroplasm into viral membranes, resulting in an accumulation of empty immature virions and large aggregates of viroplasm. We have used immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to assess the intracellular localization of several virion structural proteins and enzymes during E6R mutant infections. We find that during E6R mutant infections virion membrane proteins and virion transcription enzymes maintain a normal localization within viral factories while several major core and lateral body proteins accumulate in aggregated virosomes. The results support a model in which vaccinia virions are assembled from at least three substructures, the membrane, the viroplasm and a “pre-nucleocapsid”, and that the E6 protein is essential for maintaining proper localization of the seven-protein complex and the viroplasm during assembly. - Highlights: • Mutation of E6 disrupts association of viral membranes with viral core proteins • Mutation of E6 does not perturb viral membrane biosynthesis • Mutation of E6 does not perturb localization of viral transcription enzymes • Mutation of E6 causes mis-localization and aggregation of viral core proteins • Vaccinia assembly uses three subassemblies: membranes, viroplasm, prenucleocapsid.

  14. Identification of bacteriophage virion proteins by the ANOVA feature selection and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Feng, Peng-Mian; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2014-08-01

    The bacteriophage virion proteins play extremely important roles in the fate of host bacterial cells. Accurate identification of bacteriophage virion proteins is very important for understanding their functions and clarifying the lysis mechanism of bacterial cells. In this study, a new sequence-based method was developed to identify phage virion proteins. In the new method, the protein sequences were initially formulated by the g-gap dipeptide compositions. Subsequently, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with incremental feature selection (IFS) was used to search for the optimal feature set. It was observed that, in jackknife cross-validation, the optimal feature set including 160 optimized features can produce the maximum accuracy of 85.02%. By performing feature analysis, we found that the correlation between two amino acids with one gap was more important than other correlations for phage virion protein prediction and that some of the 1-gap dipeptides were important and mainly contributed to the virion protein prediction. This analysis will provide novel insights into the function of phage virion proteins. On the basis of the proposed method, an online web-server, PVPred, was established and can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/PVPred). We believe that the PVPred will become a powerful tool to study phage virion proteins and to guide the related experimental validations.

  15. Architects of assembly: roles of Flaviviridae non-structural proteins in virion morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Catherine L; Jones, Christopher T; Rice, Charles M

    2008-09-01

    Viruses of the Flaviviridae family, including hepatitis C, dengue and bovine viral diarrhoea, are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent advances in our understanding of virion assembly have uncovered commonalities among distantly related members of this family. We discuss the emerging hypothesis that physical virion components are not alone in forming the infectious particle, but that non-structural proteins are intimately involved in orchestrating morphogenesis. Pinpointing the roles of Flaviviridae proteins in virion production could reveal new avenues for antiviral therapeutics.

  16. Single subject design: Use of time series analyses in a small cohort to understand adherence with a prescribed fluid restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Higgins, Melinda; Smith, Andrew; Culler, Steven D; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a secondary in-depth analysis of five persons with heart failure randomized to receive an education and behavioral intervention on fluid restriction as part of a larger study. Using a single subject analysis design, time series analyses models were constructed for each of the five patients for a period of 180 days to determine correlations between daily measures of patient reported fluid intake, thoracic impedance, and weights, and relationships between patient reported outcomes of symptom burden and health related quality of life over time. Negative relationships were observed between fluid intake and thoracic impedance, and between impedance and weight, while positive correlations were observed between daily fluid intake and weight. By constructing time series analyses of daily measures of fluid congestion, trends and patterns of fluid congestion emerged which could be used to guide individualized patient care or future research endeavors. Employment of such a specialized analysis technique allows for the elucidation of clinically relevant findings potentially disguised when only evaluating aggregate outcomes of larger studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mapping the small RNA content of simian immunodeficiency virions (SIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Brameier

    Full Text Available Recent evidence indicates that regulatory small non-coding RNAs are not only components of eukaryotic cells and vesicles, but also reside within a number of different viruses including retroviral particles. Using ultra-deep sequencing we have comprehensively analyzed the content of simian immunodeficiency virions (SIV, which were compared to mock-control preparations. Our analysis revealed that more than 428,000 sequence reads matched the SIV mac239 genome sequence. Among these we could identify 12 virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs that were highly abundant. Beside known retrovirus-enriched small RNAs, like 7SL-RNA, tRNA(Lys3 and tRNA(Lys isoacceptors, we also identified defined fragments derived from small ILF3/NF90-associated RNA snaR-A14, that were enriched more than 50 fold in SIV. We also found evidence that small nucleolar RNAs U2 and U12 were underrepresented in the SIV preparation, indicating that the relative number or the content of co-isolated exosomes was changed upon infection. Our comprehensive atlas of SIV-incorporated small RNAs provides a refined picture of the composition of retrovirions, which gives novel insights into viral packaging.

  18. Fusion between perinuclear virions and the outer nuclear membrane requires the fusogenic activity of herpes simplex virus gB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Catherine C; Wisner, Todd W; Hannah, Brian P; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Johnson, David C

    2009-11-01

    Herpesviruses cross nuclear membranes (NMs) in two steps, as follows: (i) capsids assemble and bud through the inner NM into the perinuclear space, producing enveloped virus particles, and (ii) the envelopes of these virus particles fuse with the outer NM. Two herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins, gB and gH (the latter, likely complexed as a heterodimer with gL), are necessary for the second step of this process. Mutants lacking both gB and gH accumulate in the perinuclear space or in herniations (membrane vesicles derived from the inner NM). Both gB and gH/gL are also known to act directly in fusing the virion envelope with host cell membranes during HSV entry into cells, i.e., both glycoproteins appear to function directly in different aspects of the membrane fusion process. We hypothesized that HSV gB and gH/gL also act directly in the membrane fusion that occurs during virus egress from the nucleus. Previous studies of the role of gB and gH/gL in nuclear egress involved HSV gB and gH null mutants that could potentially also possess gross defects in the virion envelope. Here, we produced recombinant HSV-expressing mutant forms of gB with single amino acid substitutions in the hydrophobic "fusion loops." These fusion loops are thought to play a direct role in membrane fusion by insertion into cellular membranes. HSV recombinants expressing gB with any one of four fusion loop mutations (W174R, W174Y, Y179K, and A261D) were unable to enter cells. Moreover, two of the mutants, W174Y and Y179K, displayed reduced abilities to mediate HSV cell-to-cell spread, and W174R and A261D exhibited no spread. All mutant viruses exhibited defects in nuclear egress, enveloped virions accumulated in herniations and in the perinuclear space, and fewer enveloped virions were detected on cell surfaces. These results support the hypothesis that gB functions directly to mediate the fusion between perinuclear virus particles and the outer NM.

  19. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) virion induced cancer and subfertility, two sides of the same coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depuydt, C E; Beert, J; Bosmans, E; Salembier, G

    2016-12-01

    In the natural history of HPV infections, the HPV virions can induce two different pathways, namely the infec- tious virion producing pathway and the clonal transforming pathway. An overview is given of the burden that is associated with HPV infections that can both lead to cervical cancer and/or temporal subfertility. That HPV infections cause serious global health burden due to HPV-associated cancers is common knowledge, but that it is also responsible for a substantial part of idiopathic subfertility is greatly underestimated. The bulk of the detected HPV DNA whether in men or women is however infectious from origin. Because the dissociation between HPV viruses and HPV virions or infection and disease remains difficult for clinicians as well as for HPV detection, we propose a review of the different effects caused by the two different HPV virion induced pathways, and highlight the mechanisms that are responsible for causing transient subfertility and cancer.

  20. Engineering of Baculovirus Vectors for the Manufacture of Virion-Free Biopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marek, M.; Oers, van M.M.; Devaraj, F.F.; Vlak, J.M.; Merten, O.W.

    2011-01-01

    A novel baculovirus-based protein expression strategy was developed to produce recombinant proteins in insect cells without contaminating baculovirus virions. This novel strategy greatly simplifies the downstream processing of biopharmaceuticals produced in insect cells. The formation of these

  1. Endophilins interact with Moloney murine leukemia virus Gag and modulate virion production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Camilli Pietro

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retroviral Gag protein is the central player in the process of virion assembly at the plasma membrane, and is sufficient to induce the formation and release of virus-like particles. Recent evidence suggests that Gag may co-opt the host cell's endocytic machinery to facilitate retroviral assembly and release. Results A search for novel partners interacting with the Gag protein of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV via the yeast two-hybrid protein-protein interaction assay resulted in the identification of endophilin 2, a component of the machinery involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We demonstrate that endophilin interacts with the matrix or MA domain of the Gag protein of Mo-MuLV, but not of human immunodeficiency virus, HIV. Both exogenously expressed and endogenous endophilin are incorporated into Mo-MuLV viral particles. Titration experiments suggest that the binding sites for inclusion of endophilin into viral particles are limited and saturable. Knock-down of endophilin with small interfering RNA (siRNA had no effect on virion production, but overexpression of endophilin and, to a lesser extent, of several fragments of the protein, result in inhibition of Mo-MuLV virion production, but not of HIV virion production. Conclusions This study shows that endophilins interact with Mo-MuLV Gag and affect virion production. The findings imply that endophilin is another component of the large complex that is hijacked by retroviruses to promote virion production.

  2. Cloning, characterization and phylogenetic analyses of members of three major venom families from a single specimen of Walterinnesia aegyptia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yu; Wang, Ying Ming; Tsai, Inn-Ho

    2008-06-01

    Walterinnesia aegyptia is a monotypic elapid snake inhabiting in Africa and Mideast. Although its envenoming is known to cause rapid deaths and paralysis, structural data of its venom proteins are rather limited. Using gel filtration and reverse-phase HPLC, phospholipases A(2) (PLAs), three-fingered toxins (3FTxs), and Kunitz-type protease inhibitors (KIns) were purified from the venom of a single specimen of this species caught in northern Egypt. In addition, specific primers were designed and PCR was carried out to amplify the cDNAs encoding members of the three venom families, respectively, using total cDNA prepared from its venom glands. Complete amino acid sequences of two acidic PLAs, three short chain 3FTxs, and four KIns of this venom species were thus deduced after their cDNAs were cloned and sequenced. They are all novel sequences and match the mass data of purified proteins. For members of each toxin family, protein sequences were aligned and subjected to molecular phylogenetic analyses. The results indicated that the PLAs and a Kunitz inhibitor of W. aegyptia are most similar to those of king cobra venom, and its 3FTxs belongs to either Type I alpha-neurotoxins or weak toxins of orphan-II subtype. It is remarkable that both king cobra and W. aegyptia cause rapid deaths of the victims, and a close evolutionary relationship between them is speculated.

  3. Virion polypeptide heterogeneity among virulent and avirulent strains of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, R; Rosato, R R; Eddy, G A

    1981-01-01

    Comparative analysis of structural virion polypeptides of 24 selected EEE virus strains, representing North and South American types, was performed by one-dimensional discontinuous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The structural proteins of different EEE virus isolates, resolved by this method, exhibited mol.wts. values in the range of 57-60 X 10(3) for (E-1), 51-54 X 10(3) for (E-2) and 35-38 X 10(3) daltons for the core (NP) nucleocapsid. The exception was the South American human lethal virus, TRVL-89287 strain, which was shown to possess only a single envelope glycoprotein. The high molecular weight envelope (E-1) glycoprotein species was absent or co-migrated adjacent to the smaller envelope (E-2) glycoprotein. Results indicated similarities in the core (NP) proteins, however greater variability in the envelope (E-/ and/or E-2) glycoproteins. Based on these variations seven distinct profiles could be observed among the EEE virus strain studied. The classification based on the patterns of structural polypeptides obtained by SDS-PAGE of these strains does not correlate well with any other previously reported in vitro characteristics (antigenic subtypes, HTP elution profiles) nor with the in vivo virulence markers.

  4. Analyses of 32 Loci Clarify Phylogenetic Relationships among Trypanosoma cruzi Lineages and Support a Single Hybridization prior to Human Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-López, Carlos A.; Machado, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetic diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has been traditionally divided in two major groups, T. cruzi I and II, corresponding to discrete typing units TcI and TcII-VI under a recently proposed nomenclature. The two major groups of T. cruzi seem to differ in important biological characteristics, and are thus thought to represent a natural division relevant for epidemiological studies and development of prophylaxis. To understand the potential connection between the different manifestations of Chagas disease and variability of T. cruzi strains, it is essential to have a correct reconstruction of the evolutionary history of T. cruzi. Methodology/Principal Findings Nucleotide sequences from 32 unlinked loci (>26 Kilobases of aligned sequence) were used to reconstruct the evolutionary history of strains representing the known genetic variability of T. cruzi. Thorough phylogenetic analyses show that the original classification of T. cruzi in two major lineages does not reflect its evolutionary history and that there is only strong evidence for one major and recent hybridization event in the history of this species. Furthermore, estimates of divergence times using Bayesian methods show that current extant lineages of T. cruzi diverged very recently, within the last 3 million years, and that the major hybridization event leading to hybrid lineages TcV and TcVI occurred less than 1 million years ago, well before the contact of T. cruzi with humans in South America. Conclusions/Significance The described phylogenetic relationships among the six major genetic subdivisions of T. cruzi should serve as guidelines for targeted epidemiological and prophylaxis studies. We suggest that it is important to reconsider conclusions from previous studies that have attempted to uncover important biological differences between the two originally defined major lineages of T. cruzi especially if those conclusions were obtained from single

  5. Analysis of virion associated host proteins in vesicular stomatitis virus using a proteomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Sun-Il

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is the prototypic rhabdovirus and the best studied member of the order Mononegavirales. There is now compelling evidence that enveloped virions released from infected cells carry numerous host (cellular proteins some of which may play an important role in viral replication. Although several cellular proteins have been previously shown to be incorporated into VSV virions, no systematic study has been done to reveal the host protein composition for virions of VSV or any other member of Mononegavirales. Results Here we used a proteomics approach to identify cellular proteins within purified VSV virions, thereby creating a "snapshot" of one stage of virus/host interaction that can guide future experiments aimed at understanding molecular mechanisms of virus-cell interactions. Highly purified preparations of VSV virions from three different cell lines of human, mouse and hamster origin were analyzed for the presence of cellular proteins using mass spectrometry. We have successfully confirmed the presence of several previously-identified cellular proteins within VSV virions and identified a number of additional proteins likely to also be present within the virions. In total, sixty-four cellular proteins were identified, of which nine were found in multiple preparations. A combination of immunoblotting and proteinase K protection assay was used to verify the presence of several of these proteins (integrin β1, heat shock protein 90 kDa, heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein, annexin 2, elongation factor 1a within the virions. Conclusion This is, to our knowledge, the first systematic study of the host protein composition for virions of VSV or any other member of the order Mononegavirales. Future experiments are needed to determine which of the identified proteins have an interaction with VSV and whether these interactions are beneficial, neutral or antiviral with respect to VSV replication. Identification

  6. Interactions between HIV-1 Gag and Viral RNA Genome Enhance Virion Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilley, Kari A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea; Burdick, Ryan C; Levine, Louis; Li, Kelvin; Rein, Alan; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2017-08-15

    Most HIV-1 virions contain two copies of full-length viral RNA, indicating that genome packaging is efficient and tightly regulated. However, the structural protein Gag is the only component required for the assembly of noninfectious viruslike particles, and the viral RNA is dispensable in this process. The mechanism that allows HIV-1 to achieve such high efficiency of genome packaging when a packageable viral RNA is not required for virus assembly is currently unknown. In this report, we examined the role of HIV-1 RNA in virus assembly and found that packageable HIV-1 RNA enhances particle production when Gag is expressed at levels similar to those in cells containing one provirus. However, such enhancement is diminished when Gag is overexpressed, suggesting that the effects of viral RNA can be replaced by increased Gag concentration in cells. We also showed that the specific interactions between Gag and viral RNA are required for the enhancement of particle production. Taken together, these studies are consistent with our previous hypothesis that specific dimeric viral RNA-Gag interactions are the nucleation event of infectious virion assembly, ensuring that one RNA dimer is packaged into each nascent virion. These studies shed light on the mechanism by which HIV-1 achieves efficient genome packaging during virus assembly.IMPORTANCE Retrovirus assembly is a well-choreographed event, during which many viral and cellular components come together to generate infectious virions. The viral RNA genome carries the genetic information to new host cells, providing instructions to generate new virions, and therefore is essential for virion infectivity. In this report, we show that the specific interaction of the viral RNA genome with the structural protein Gag facilitates virion assembly and particle production. These findings resolve the conundrum that HIV-1 RNA is selectively packaged into virions with high efficiency despite being dispensable for virion assembly

  7. RAB1A promotes Vaccinia virus replication by facilitating the production of intracellular enveloped virions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Featherstone, Rebecca J.; Reynolds, Danielle K.; Brown, Helen K. [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom); James, John; Prescott, Alan [Division of Cell Signalling and Immunology, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Haga, Ismar R. [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Beard, Philippa M., E-mail: pip.beard@roslin.ed.ac.uk [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus with a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle that exploits numerous cellular proteins. This work characterises the role of a proviral cellular protein, the small GTPase RAB1A, in VACV replication. Using siRNA, we identified RAB1A as required for the production of extracellular enveloped virions (EEVs), but not intracellular mature virions (IMVs). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy further refined the role of RAB1A as facilitating the wrapping of IMVs to become intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). This is consistent with the known function of RAB1A in maintenance of ER to Golgi transport. VACV can therefore be added to the growing list of viruses which require RAB1A for optimal replication, highlighting this protein as a broadly proviral host factor. - Highlights: • Characterisation of the role of the small GTPase RAB1A in VACV replication. • RAB1A is not required for production of the primary virion form (IMV). • RAB1A is required for production of processed virion forms (IEVs, CEVs and EEVs). • Consistent with known role of RAB1A in ER to Golgi transport.

  8. Interactions Between HIV-1 Gag and Viral RNA Genome Enhance Virion Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilley, Kari A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    in this process. The mechanism that allows HIV-1 to achieve such high efficiency of genome packaging when a packageable viral RNA is not required for virus assembly is currently unknown. In this report, we examined the role of HIV-1 RNA in virus assembly and found that packageable HIV-1 RNA enhances particle......Most HIV-1 virions contain two copies of full-length viral RNA, indicating that genome packaging is efficient and tightly regulated. However, the structural protein Gag is the only component required for the assembly of noninfectious virus-like particles and the viral RNA is dispensable...... into each nascent virion. These studies shed light on the mechanism by which HIV-1 achieves efficient genome packaging during virus assembly.IMPORTANCE Retrovirus assembly is a well-choreographed event, during which many viral and cellular components come together to generate infectious virions. The viral...

  9. Interactions Between HIV-1 Gag and Viral RNA Genome Enhance Virion Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilley, Kari A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Most HIV-1 virions contain two copies of full-length viral RNA, indicating that genome packaging is efficient and tightly regulated. However, the structural protein Gag is the only component required for the assembly of noninfectious virus-like particles and the viral RNA is dispensable...... in this process. The mechanism that allows HIV-1 to achieve such high efficiency of genome packaging when a packageable viral RNA is not required for virus assembly is currently unknown. In this report, we examined the role of HIV-1 RNA in virus assembly and found that packageable HIV-1 RNA enhances particle...... into each nascent virion. These studies shed light on the mechanism by which HIV-1 achieves efficient genome packaging during virus assembly.IMPORTANCE Retrovirus assembly is a well-choreographed event, during which many viral and cellular components come together to generate infectious virions. The viral...

  10. Analyses of significant features of L-Prolinium Picrate single crystal: An excellent material for non linear optical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thukral, Kanika [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR- National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi, 110012 (India); CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi, 110 012 (India); Vijayan, N., E-mail: nvijayan@nplindia.org [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi, 110 012 (India); Vij, Mahak [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi, 110 012 (India); Nagaraja, C.M. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar, 140001, Punjab (India); Jayaramakrishnan, V. [Centro De Investigations En Optica, Loma del Bosque 115, Colonia Lomas del Campestre, León, Guanajuato, Código Postal, 37150 (Mexico); Jayalakshmy, M.S. [International and Inter University Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala, 686560 (India); Kant, Rajni [Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu Tawi, 180006 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Today the fundamental aspect of the researchers is to explore maximum physical properties of the material for device fabrication. In the present article, single crystal X-ray diffraction has been carried out to verify the formation of the synthesized compound. In addition to that, powder X-ray diffraction has been performed to obtain diffraction pattern of L-Prolinium Picrate single crystal. The strain present inside the single crystal was measured using Hall-Williamson equation from PXRD measurements. The dark current and photon current was obtained from photoconductivity technique whose plot depicted that the sample was negative photoconducting material. Optical homogeneity of the single crystal was analyzed using birefringence technique. Its resistance towards Nd: YAG laser was scrutinized for L-Prolinium Picrate single crystal by applying 1 pulse per second. Different thermal parameters like thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, thermal effusivity and specific heat were computed using photo-pyroelectric technique. Solid state parameters were calculated from Clausius Mossotti relation by taking structural information of the title compound. Also, optical parameters like refractive index, reflectance etc were calculated through UV–Vis–NIR analysis. - Highlights: • An optically transparent L-Prolinium Picrate single crystal was harvested from slow evaporation solution growth technique. • The compound shows negative photoconducting nature. • Its optical homogeneity was analyzed using birefringence. • Single shot of laser was applied to sample to measure laser damage threshold value. • The thermal parameters were computed from Photopyroelectric technique.

  11. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Bialk, Pawel; Sansbury, Brett; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bloh, Kevin; Man, Dula; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2016-01-01

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRIS...

  12. Single-Cell and Single-Cycle Analysis of HIV-1 Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mowgli; Zhang, Fengwen; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle are poorly documented. Viral replication dynamics are typically measured in populations of infected cells, but asynchrony that is introduced during the early steps of HIV-1 replication complicates the measurement of the progression of subsequent steps and can mask replication dynamics and their variation in individual infected cells. We established microscopy-based methods to dynamically measure HIV-1-encoded reporter gene and antiviral gene expression in individual infected cells. We coupled these measurements with conventional analyses to quantify delays in the HIV-1 replication cycle imposed by the biphasic nature of HIV-1 gene expression and by the assembly-inhibiting property of the matrix domain of Gag. We further related the dynamics of restriction factor (APOBEC3G) removal to the dynamics of HIV-1 replication in individual cells. These studies provide a timeline for key events in the HIV-1 replication cycle, and reveal that the interval between the onset of early and late HIV-1 gene expression is only ~3h, but matrix causes a ~6–12h delay in the generation of extracellular virions. Interestingly, matrix delays particle assembly to a time at which APOBEC3G has largely been removed from the cell. Thus, a need to prepare infected cells to be efficient producers of infectious HIV-1 may provide an impetus for programmed delays in HIV-1 virion genesis. Our findings also emphasize the significant heterogeneity in the length of the HIV-1 replication cycle in homogenous cell populations and suggest that a typical infected cell generates new virions for only a few hours at the end of a 48h lifespan. Therefore, small changes in the lifespan of infected cells might have a large effect on viral yield in a single cycle and the overall clinical course in infected individuals. PMID:26086614

  13. The T7-related Pseudomonas putida phage φ15 displays virion-associated biofilm degradation properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneleen Cornelissen

    Full Text Available Formation of a protected biofilm environment is recognized as one of the major causes of the increasing antibiotic resistance development and emphasizes the need to develop alternative antibacterial strategies, like phage therapy. This study investigates the in vitro degradation of single-species Pseudomonas putida biofilms, PpG1 and RD5PR2, by the novel phage ϕ15, a 'T7-like virus' with a virion-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS depolymerase. Phage ϕ15 forms plaques surrounded by growing opaque halo zones, indicative for EPS degradation, on seven out of 53 P. putida strains. The absence of haloes on infection resistant strains suggests that the EPS probably act as a primary bacterial receptor for phage infection. Independent of bacterial strain or biofilm age, a time and dose dependent response of ϕ15-mediated biofilm degradation was observed with generally a maximum biofilm degradation 8 h after addition of the higher phage doses (10(4 and 10(6 pfu and resistance development after 24 h. Biofilm age, an in vivo very variable parameter, reduced markedly phage-mediated degradation of PpG1 biofilms, while degradation of RD5PR2 biofilms and ϕ15 amplification were unaffected. Killing of the planktonic culture occurred in parallel with but was always more pronounced than biofilm degradation, accentuating the need for evaluating phages for therapeutic purposes in biofilm conditions. EPS degrading activity of recombinantly expressed viral tail spike was confirmed by capsule staining. These data suggests that the addition of high initial titers of specifically selected phages with a proper EPS depolymerase are crucial criteria in the development of phage therapy.

  14. Optical manipulation of a single human virus for study of viral-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ximiao; DeSantis, Michael C; Tian, Chunjuan; Cheng, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Although Ashkin and Dziedzic first demonstrated optical trapping of individual tobacco mosaic viruses in suspension as early as 1987, this pioneering work has not been followed up only until recently. Using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as a model virus, we have recently demonstrated that a single HIV-1 virion can be stabled trapped, manipulated and measured in physiological media with high precision. The capability to optically trap a single virion in suspension not only allows us to determine, for the first time, the refractive index of a single virus with high precision, but also quantitate the heterogeneity among individual virions with single-molecule resolution, the results of which shed light on the molecular mechanisms of virion infectivity. Here we report the further development of a set of microscopic techniques to physically deliver a single HIV-1 virion to a single host cell in solution. Combined with simultaneous epifluorescence imaging, the attachment and dissociation events of individual manipulated virions on host cell surface can be measured and the results help us understand the role of diffusion in mediating viral attachment to host cells. The establishment of these techniques opens up new ways for investigation of a wide range of virion-cell interactions, and should be applicable for study of B cell interactions with particulate antigens such as viruses.

  15. The influence of the design matrix on treatment effect estimates in the quantitative analyses of single-subject experimental design research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeyaert, Mariola; Ugille, Maaike; Ferron, John M; Beretvas, S Natasha; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2014-09-01

    The quantitative methods for analyzing single-subject experimental data have expanded during the last decade, including the use of regression models to statistically analyze the data, but still a lot of questions remain. One question is how to specify predictors in a regression model to account for the specifics of the design and estimate the effect size of interest. These quantitative effect sizes are used in retrospective analyses and allow synthesis of single-subject experimental study results which is informative for evidence-based decision making, research and theory building, and policy discussions. We discuss different design matrices that can be used for the most common single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs), namely, the multiple-baseline designs, reversal designs, and alternating treatment designs, and provide empirical illustrations. The purpose of this article is to guide single-subject experimental data analysts interested in analyzing and meta-analyzing SSED data. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. A mixed-methods approach for analysing social support and social anchorage of single mothers’ personal networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lumino, Rosaria; Ragozini, Giancarlo; van Duijn, Marijtje; Vitale, Maria Prosperina

    2017-01-01

    The present paper analyses the relationship among social support and personal networks by focusing on social anchorage, which is a specific dimension of social support conveying to what extent people feel integrated into their personal networks. Specifying when, why, and how personal relationships

  17. Dynamics of HIV-containing compartments in macrophages reveal sequestration of virions and transient surface connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Gaudin

    Full Text Available During HIV pathogenesis, infected macrophages behave as "viral reservoirs" that accumulate and retain virions within dedicated internal Virus-Containing Compartments (VCCs. The nature of VCCs remains ill characterized and controversial. Using wild-type HIV-1 and a replication-competent HIV-1 carrying GFP internal to the Gag precursor, we analyzed the biogenesis and evolution of VCCs in primary human macrophages. VCCs appear roughly 14 hours after viral protein synthesis is detected, initially contain few motile viral particles, and then mature to fill up with virions that become packed and immobile. The amount of intracellular Gag, the proportion of dense VCCs, and the density of viral particles in their lumen increased with time post-infection. In contrast, the secretion of virions, their infectivity and their transmission to T cells decreased overtime, suggesting that HIV-infected macrophages tend to pack and retain newly formed virions into dense compartments. A minor proportion of VCCs remains connected to the plasma membrane overtime. Surprisingly, live cell imaging combined with correlative light and electron microscopy revealed that such connections can be transient, highlighting their dynamic nature. Together, our results shed light on the late phases of the HIV-1 cycle and reveal some of its macrophage specific features.

  18. Electron cryomicroscopy reveals different F1+F2 protein States in intact parainfluenza virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Kai; Schade, Boris; Böttcher, Christoph; Korte, Thomas; Ohlwein, Nina; Baljinnyam, Bolormaa; Veit, Michael; Herrmann, Andreas

    2008-04-01

    Electron cryomicrographs of intact parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) virions revealed two different surface structures, namely, a continuous layer and distinct individual spikes. The structure of these spikes reconstructed from intact virions was compared with known F ectodomain structures and was found to be different from the prefusion PIV5 F0 structure but, surprisingly, very similar to the human PIV3 F postfusion structure. Hence, we conclude that the individual F1+F2 spikes in intact PIV5 virions also correspond to the postfusion state. Since the observed fusion activity of PIV5 virions has to be associated with prefusion F1+F2 proteins, they have necessarily to be localized in the continuous surface structure. The data therefore strongly suggest that the prefusion state of the F1+F2 protein requires stabilization, most probably by the association with hemagglutinin-neuraminidase. The conversion of F1+F2 proteins from the prefusion toward the postfusion state while embedded in the virus membrane is topologically difficult to comprehend on the basis of established models and demands reconsideration of our current understanding.

  19. Identification of two major virion protein genes of white spot syndrome virus of shrimp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M.C.W.; Westenberg, M.; Goodall, S.D.; Vlak, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) is an invertebrate virus, causing considerable mortality in shrimp. Two structural proteins of WSSV were identified. WSSV virions are enveloped nucleocapsids with a bacilliform morphology with an approximate size of 275 x 120 nm, and a tail-like extension at one end.

  20. Human Ubc9 contributes to production of fully infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Tareq; Bohl, Christopher R; Lewis, Gentry L; Wood, Charles; West, John T; Weldon, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    Ubc9 was identified as a cellular protein that interacts with the Gag protein of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. We show here that Ubc9 also interacts with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag protein and that their interaction is important for virus replication. Gag was found to colocalize with Ubc9 predominantly at perinuclear puncta. While cells in which Ubc9 expression was suppressed with RNA interference produced normal numbers of virions, these particles were 8- to 10-fold less infectious than those produced in the presence of Ubc9. The nature of this defect was assayed for dependence on Ubc9 during viral assembly, trafficking, and Env incorporation. The Gag-mediated assembly of virus particles and protease-mediated processing of Gag and Gag-Pol were unchanged in the absence of Ubc9. However, the stability of the cell-associated Env glycoprotein was decreased and Env incorporation into released virions was altered. Interestingly, overexpression of the Ubc9 trans-dominant-negative mutant C93A, which is a defective E2-SUMO-1 conjugase, suggests that this activity may not be required for interaction with Gag, virion assembly, or infectivity. This finding demonstrates that Ubc9 plays an important role in the production of infectious HIV-1 virions.

  1. Envelope protein requirements for the assembly of infectious virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissink, E.H.J.; Kroese, M.V.; Wijk, van H.A.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Meulenberg, J.J.; Rottier, P.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) contain six membrane proteins: the major proteins GP5 and M and the minor proteins GP2a, E, GP3, and GP4. Here, we studied the envelope protein requirements for PRRSV particle formation and infectivity using full-length cDNA

  2. Identification of a novel Lymantria dispar nucleopolyhedrovirus mutant that exhibits abnormal polyhedron formation and virion occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Slavicek; Melissa J. Mercer; Dana Pohlman; Mary Ellen Kelly; David S. Bischoff

    1998-01-01

    In previous studies on the formation of Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus (LdMNPV) few polyhedra (FP) mutants, several polyhedron formation mutants (PFM) were identified that appeared to be unique. These viral mutants are being characterized to investigate the processes of polyhedron formation and virion occlusion. Ld

  3. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T.; Dennison, S. Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  4. Characterization of the Determinants of NS2-3-Independent Virion Morphogenesis of Pestiviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemens, O; Dubrau, D; Tautz, N

    2015-11-01

    A peculiarity of the Flaviviridae is the critical function of nonstructural (NS) proteins for virus particle formation. For pestiviruses, like bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), uncleaved NS2-3 represents an essential factor for virion morphogenesis, while NS3 is an essential component of the viral replicase. Accordingly, in natural pestivirus isolates, processing at the NS2-3 cleavage site is not complete, to allow for virion morphogenesis. Virion morphogenesis of the related hepatitis C virus (HCV) shows a major deviation from that of pestiviruses: while RNA replication also requires free NS3, virion formation does not depend on uncleaved NS2-NS3. Recently, we described a BVDV-1 chimera based on strain NCP7 encompassing the NS2-4B*-coding region of strain Osloss (E. Lattwein, O. Klemens, S. Schwindt, P. Becher, and N. Tautz, J Virol 86:427-437, 2012, doi:10.1128/JVI.06133-11). This chimera allowed for the production of infectious virus particles in the absence of uncleaved NS2-3. The Osloss sequence deviates in the NS2-4B* part from NCP7 in 48 amino acids and also has a ubiquitin insertion between NS2 and NS3. The present study demonstrates that in the NCP7 backbone, only two amino acid exchanges in NS2 (E1576V) and NS3 (V1721A) are sufficient and necessary to allow for efficient NS2-3-independent virion morphogenesis. The adaptation of a bicistronic virus encompassing an internal ribosomal entry site element between the NS2 and NS3 coding sequences to efficient virion morphogenesis led to the identification of additional amino acids in E2, NS2, and NS5B that are critically involved in this process. The surprisingly small requirements for approximating the packaging schemes of pestiviruses and HCV with respect to the NS2-3 region is in favor of a common mechanism in an ancestral virus. For positive-strand RNA viruses, the processing products of the viral polyprotein serve in RNA replication as well as virion morphogenesis. For bovine viral diarrhea virus

  5. Comparative Transcriptomic Analyses of Three Species of Placobdella (Rhynchobdellida: Glossiphoniidae) Confirms a Single Origin of Blood Feeding in Leeches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddall, Mark E; Brugler, Mercer R; Kvist, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    One of the recalcitrant questions regarding the evolutionary history of clitellate annelids involves the feeding preference of the common ancestor of extant rhynchobdellid (proboscis bearing) and arhynchobdellid (jaw bearing) leeches. Whereas early evidence, based on morphological data, pointed towards independent acquisitions of blood feeding in the 2 orders, molecular-based phylogenetic data suggest that the ancestor of modern leeches was a sanguivore. Here, we use a comparative transcriptomic approach in order to increase our understanding of the diversity of anticoagulation factors for 3 species of the genus Placobdella, for which comparative data have been lacking, and inspect these in light of archetypal anticoagulant data for both arhynchobdellid and other rhynchobdellid species. Notwithstanding the varying levels of host specificity displayed by the 3 different species of Placobdella, transcriptomic profiles with respect to anticoagulation factors were largely similar -this despite the fact that Placobdella kwetlumye only retains a single pair of salivary glands, as opposed to the 2 pairs more common in the genus. Results show that 9 different anticoagulant proteins and an additional 5 putative antihemostasis proteins are expressed in salivary secretions of the 3 species. In particular, an ortholog of the archetypal, single-copy, anticoagulant hirudin (not previously available as comparative data for rhynchobdellids) is present in at least 2 of 3 species examined, corroborating the notion of a single origin of blood feeding in the ancestral leech.

  6. Analyses of Short Channel Effects of Single-Gate and Double-Gate Graphene Nanoribbon Field Effect Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojjatollah Sarvari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Short channel effects of single-gate and double-gate graphene nanoribbon field effect transistors (GNRFETs are studied based on the atomistic pz orbital model for the Hamiltonian of graphene nanoribbon using the nonequilibrium Green’s function formalism. A tight-binding Hamiltonian with an atomistic pz orbital basis set is used to describe the atomistic details in the channel of the GNRFETs. We have investigated the vital short channel effect parameters such as Ion and Ioff, the threshold voltage, the subthreshold swing, and the drain induced barrier lowering versus the channel length and oxide thickness of the GNRFETs in detail. The gate capacitance and the transconductance of both devices are also computed in order to calculate the intrinsic cut-off frequency and switching delay of GNRFETs. Furthermore, the effects of doping of the channel on the threshold voltage and the frequency response of the double-gate GNRFET are discussed. We have shown that the single-gate GNRFET suffers more from short channel effects if compared with those of the double-gate structure; however, both devices have nearly the same cut-off frequency in the range of terahertz. This work provides a collection of data comparing different features of short channel effects of the single gate with those of the double gate GNRFETs. The results give a very good insight into the devices and are very useful for their digital applications.

  7. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialk, Pawel; Sansbury, Brett; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bloh, Kevin; Man, Dula; Kmiec, Eric B

    2016-09-09

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRISPR/Cas9 executes double-stranded DNA cleavage efficiently, closure of the broken chromosomes is dynamic, as varying degrees of heterogeneity of the cleavage products appear to accompany the emergence of the corrected base pair. We provide a detailed analysis of allelic variance at and surrounding the target site. In one particular case, we report sequence alteration directed by a distinct member of the same gene family. Our data suggests that single-stranded DNA molecules may influence DNA junction heterogeneity created by CRISPR/Cas9.

  8. Morphometric and molecular analyses for populations of Palaemon longirostris and Palaemon garciacidi (Crustacea, Palaemonidae): Evidence for a single species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartaxana, Alexandra

    2015-03-01

    Authors have disagreed on the taxonomic status of the white prawns along the coasts of the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. The present study compares variation in morphology and mtDNA in populations of white prawns, identified as Palaemon longirostris and P. garciacidi, from the United Kingdom, The Netherlands, France, Spain, Portugal, Morocco and Tunisia. Differences in morphology among populations were tested using a multiple discriminant analyses (DA) on morphometric data. In order to resolve variation in mtDNA, 16S and COI mitochondrial (mt) genes were used. The morphometric analyses do not support their separation into distinct species, since individual prawns could not be assigned unequivocally to one of the various studied populations and a geographic pattern could be detected only in females. Molecular data corroborate the morphological analyses, since no geographic structure was found and the levels of sequence divergence observed among haplotypes from distinct populations (0.1-0.8%) are consistent with other 16S and COI intraspecific divergences of decapod crustaceans. Therefore, findings from this study do not support the distinction of P. longirostris and P. garciacidi as different species.

  9. Exocytosis of Alphaherpesvirus Virions, Light Particles, and Glycoproteins Uses Constitutive Secretory Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B; Scherer, Julian; Enquist, Lynn W

    2016-06-07

    Many molecular and cell biological details of the alphaherpesvirus assembly and egress pathway remain unclear. Recently we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy assay of pseudorabies virus (PRV) exocytosis, based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a virus-encoded pH-sensitive fluorescent probe. Here, we use this assay to distinguish three classes of viral exocytosis in a nonpolarized cell type: (i) trafficking of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane, (ii) exocytosis of viral light particles, and (iii) exocytosis of virions. We find that viral glycoproteins traffic to the cell surface in association with constitutive secretory Rab GTPases and exhibit free diffusion into the plasma membrane after exocytosis. Similarly, both virions and light particles use these same constitutive secretory mechanisms for egress from infected cells. Furthermore, we show that viral light particles are distinct from cellular exosomes. Together, these observations shed light on viral glycoprotein trafficking steps that precede virus particle assembly and reinforce the idea that virions and light particles share a biogenesis and trafficking pathway. The alphaherpesviruses, including the important human pathogens herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, and varicella-zoster virus (VZV), are among the few viruses that have evolved to exploit the mammalian nervous system. These viruses typically cause mild recurrent herpetic or zosteriform lesions but can also cause debilitating herpes encephalitis, more frequently in very young, old, immunocompromised, or nonnatural hosts. Importantly, many of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of viral assembly and egress remain unclear. This study addresses the trafficking of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane, exocytosis of light particles, and exocytosis of virions. Trafficking of glycoproteins affects immune evasion and pathogenesis and may precede virus particle assembly. The release of light

  10. Pox proteomics: mass spectrometry analysis and identification of Vaccinia virion proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vemulapalli Srilakshmi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although many vaccinia virus proteins have been identified and studied in detail, only a few studies have attempted a comprehensive survey of the protein composition of the vaccinia virion. These projects have identified the major proteins of the vaccinia virion, but little has been accomplished to identify the unknown or less abundant proteins. Obtaining a detailed knowledge of the viral proteome of vaccinia virus will be important for advancing our understanding of orthopoxvirus biology, and should facilitate the development of effective antiviral drugs and formulation of vaccines. Results In order to accomplish this task, purified vaccinia virions were fractionated into a soluble protein enriched fraction (membrane proteins and lateral bodies and an insoluble protein enriched fraction (virion cores. Each of these fractions was subjected to further fractionation by either sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electophoresis, or by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. The soluble and insoluble fractions were also analyzed directly with no further separation. The samples were prepared for mass spectrometry analysis by digestion with trypsin. Tryptic digests were analyzed by using either a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight tandem mass spectrometer, a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer, or a quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometer (the latter two instruments were equipped with electrospray ionization sources. Proteins were identified by searching uninterpreted tandem mass spectra against a vaccinia virus protein database created by our lab and a non-redundant protein database. Conclusion Sixty three vaccinia proteins were identified in the virion particle. The total number of peptides found for each protein ranged from 1 to 62, and the sequence coverage of the proteins ranged from 8.2% to 94.9%. Interestingly, two vaccinia open reading frames were confirmed as being expressed

  11. Structure of avian orthoreovirus virion by electron cryomicroscopy and image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Tang, Jinghua; Walker, Stephen B; O'Hara, David; Nibert, Max L; Duncan, Roy; Baker, Timothy S

    2005-12-05

    Among members of the genus Orthoreovirus, family Reoviridae, a group of non-enveloped viruses with genomes comprising ten segments of double-stranded RNA, only the "non-fusogenic" mammalian orthoreoviruses (MRVs) have been studied to date by electron cryomicroscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction. In addition to MRVs, this genus comprises other species that induce syncytium formation in cultured cells, a property shared with members of the related genus Aquareovirus. To augment studies of these "fusogenic" orthoreoviruses, we used electron cryomicroscopy and image reconstruction to analyze the virions of a fusogenic avian orthoreovirus (ARV). The structure of the ARV virion, determined from data at an effective resolution of 14.6 A, showed strong similarities to that of MRVs. Of particular note, the ARV virion has its pentameric lambda-class core turret protein in a closed conformation as in MRVs, not in a more open conformation as reported for aquareovirus. Similarly, the ARV virion contains 150 copies of its monomeric sigma-class core-nodule protein as in MRVs, not 120 copies as reported for aquareovirus. On the other hand, unlike that of MRVs, the ARV virion lacks "hub-and-spokes" complexes within the solvent channels at sites of local sixfold symmetry in the incomplete T=13l outer capsid. In MRVs, these complexes are formed by C-terminal sequences in the trimeric mu-class outer-capsid protein, sequences that are genetically missing from the homologous protein of ARVs. The channel structures and C-terminal sequences of the homologous outer-capsid protein are also genetically missing from aquareoviruses. Overall, the results place ARVs between MRVs and aquareoviruses with respect to the highlighted features.

  12. Plastic bottle oscillator as an on-off-type oscillator: Experiments, modeling, and stability analyses of single and coupled systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohira, Masahiro I.; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Magome, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-02-01

    An oscillatory system called a plastic bottle oscillator is studied, in which the downflow of water and upflow of air alternate periodically in an upside-down plastic bottle containing water. It is demonstrated that a coupled two-bottle system exhibits in- and antiphase synchronization according to the nature of coupling. A simple ordinary differential equation is deduced to interpret the characteristics of a single oscillator. This model is also extended to coupled oscillators, and the model reproduces the essential features of the experimental observations.

  13. Plastic bottle oscillator as an on-off-type oscillator: experiments, modeling, and stability analyses of single and coupled systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohira, Masahiro I; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Magome, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-02-01

    An oscillatory system called a plastic bottle oscillator is studied, in which the downflow of water and upflow of air alternate periodically in an upside-down plastic bottle containing water. It is demonstrated that a coupled two-bottle system exhibits in- and antiphase synchronization according to the nature of coupling. A simple ordinary differential equation is deduced to interpret the characteristics of a single oscillator. This model is also extended to coupled oscillators, and the model reproduces the essential features of the experimental observations.

  14. Analysing the effectiveness of vendor-managed inventory in a single-warehouse, multiple-retailer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Mohd Kamarul Irwan Abdul; Aghezzaf, El-Houssaine; Limère, Veronique; Raa, Birger

    2016-06-01

    This paper considers a two-stage supply chain, consisting of a single warehouse and multiple retailers facing deterministic demands, under a vendor-managed inventory (VMI) policy. It presents a two-phase optimisation approach for coordinating the shipments in this VMI system. The first phase uses direct shipping from the supplier to all retailers to minimise the overall inventory costs. Then, in the second phase, the retailers are clustered using a construction heuristic in order to optimise the transportation costs while satisfying some additional restrictions. The improvement of the system's performance through coordinated VMI replenishments against the system with direct shipping only is shown and discussed in the comparative analysis section.

  15. Single-cell imaging and spectroscopic analyses of Cr(VI) reduction on the surface of bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C; Belchik, Sara M; Fredrickson, Jim; Shi, Liang; Lu, H Peter

    2013-01-22

    We investigate the single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic, highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to less toxic, nonsoluble Cr(2)O(3) nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr(2)O(3) is observed to emerge as nanoparticles adsorbed on the cell surface and its chemical nature is identified by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Co-localization of Cr(2)O(3) and cytochromes by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy suggests a terminal reductase role for MR-1 surface-exposed cytochromes MtrC and OmcA. Our experiments revealed that the cooperation of surface proteins OmcA and MtrC makes the reduction reaction most efficient, and the sequence of the reducing reactivity of MR-1 is wild type > single mutant ΔmtrC or mutant ΔomcA > double mutant (ΔomcA-ΔmtrC). Moreover, our results also suggest that direct microbial Cr(VI) reduction and Fe(II) (hematite)-mediated Cr(VI) reduction mechanisms may coexist in the reduction processes.

  16. Single-Cell Gene Expression Analyses Reveal Heterogeneous Responsiveness of Fetal Innate Lymphoid Progenitors to Notch Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvestre Chea

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available T and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs share some aspects of their developmental programs. However, although Notch signaling is strictly required for T cell development, it is dispensable for fetal ILC development. Constitutive activation of Notch signaling, at the common lymphoid progenitor stage, drives T cell development and abrogates ILC development by preventing Id2 expression. By combining single-cell transcriptomics and clonal culture strategies, we characterize two heterogeneous α4β7-expressing lymphoid progenitor compartments. αLP1 (Flt3+ still retains T cell potential and comprises the global ILC progenitor, while αLP2 (Flt3− consists of ILC precursors that are primed toward the different ILC lineages. Only a subset of αLP2 precursors is sensitive to Notch signaling required for their proliferation. Our study identifies, in a refined manner, the diversity of transitional stages of ILC development, their transcriptional signatures, and their differential dependence on Notch signaling.

  17. Immunoelectron microscopic evidence for Tetherin/BST2 as the physical bridge between HIV-1 virions and the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Hammonds

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin/BST2 was identified in 2008 as the cellular factor responsible for restricting HIV-1 replication at a very late stage in the lifecycle. Tetherin acts to retain virion particles on the plasma membrane after budding has been completed. Infected cells that express large amounts of tetherin display large strings of HIV virions that remain attached to the plasma membrane. Vpu is an HIV-1 accessory protein that specifically counteracts the restriction to virus release contributed by tetherin. Tetherin is an unusual Type II transmembrane protein that contains a GPI anchor at its C-terminus and is found in lipid rafts. The leading model for the mechanism of action of tetherin is that it functions as a direct physical tether bridging virions and the plasma membrane. However, evidence that tetherin functions as a physical tether has thus far been indirect. Here we demonstrate by biochemical and immunoelectron microscopic methods that endogenous tetherin is present on the viral particle and forms a bridge between virion particles and the plasma membrane. Endogenous tetherin was found on HIV particles that were released by partial proteolytic digestion. Immunoelectron microscopy performed on HIV-infected T cells demonstrated that tetherin forms an apparent physical link between virions and connects patches of virions to the plasma membrane. Linear filamentous strands that were highly enriched in tetherin bridged the space between some virions. We conclude that tetherin is the physical tether linking HIV-1 virions and the plasma membrane. The presence of filaments with which multiple molecules of tetherin interact in connecting virion particles is strongly suggested by the morphologic evidence.

  18. The use of exploratory analyses within the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence single technology appraisal process: an evaluation and qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenthaler, Eva; Carroll, Christopher; Hill-McManus, Daniel; Scope, Alison; Holmes, Michael; Rice, Stephen; Rose, Micah; Tappenden, Paul; Woolacott, Nerys

    2016-04-01

    As part of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) single technology appraisal (STA) process, independent Evidence Review Groups (ERGs) critically appraise the company submission. During the critical appraisal process the ERG may undertake analyses to explore uncertainties around the company's model and their implications for decision-making. The ERG reports are a central component of the evidence considered by the NICE Technology Appraisal Committees (ACs) in their deliberations. The aim of this research was to develop an understanding of the number and type of exploratory analyses undertaken by the ERGs within the STA process and to understand how these analyses are used by the NICE ACs in their decision-making. The 100 most recently completed STAs with published guidance were selected for inclusion in the analysis. The documents considered were ERG reports, clarification letters, the first appraisal consultation document and the final appraisal determination. Over 400 documents were assessed in this study. The categories of types of exploratory analyses included fixing errors, fixing violations, addressing matters of judgement and the ERG-preferred base case. A content analysis of documents (documentary analysis) was undertaken to identify and extract relevant data, and narrative synthesis was then used to rationalise and present these data. The level and type of detail in ERG reports and clarification letters varied considerably. The vast majority (93%) of ERG reports reported one or more exploratory analyses. The most frequently reported type of analysis in these 93 ERG reports related to the category 'matters of judgement', which was reported in 83 (89%) reports. The category 'ERG base-case/preferred analysis' was reported in 45 (48%) reports, the category 'fixing errors' was reported in 33 (35%) reports and the category 'fixing violations' was reported in 17 (18%) reports. The exploratory analyses performed were the result of issues

  19. History, mechanisms and clinical value of fibrillation analyses in muscle denervation and reinnervation by Single Fiber Electromyography and Dynamic Echomyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Pond

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This work reviews history, current clinical relevance and future of fibrillation, a functional marker of skeletal muscle denervated fibers. Fibrillations, i.e., spontaneous contraction, in denervated muscle were first described during the nineteenth century. It is known that alterations in membrane potential are responsible for the phenomenon and that they are related to changes in electrophysiological factors, cellular metabolism, cell turnover and gene expression. They are known to inhibit muscle atrophy to some degree and are used to diagnose neural injury and reinnervation that are occurring in patients. Electromyography (EMG is useful in determining progress, prognosis and efficacy of therapeutic interventions and their eventual change. For patients with peripheral nerve injury, and thus without the option of volitional contractions, electrical muscle stimulation may be helpful in preserving the contractility and extensibility of denervated muscle tissue and in retarding/counteracting muscle atrophy. It is obvious from the paucity of recent literature that research in this area has declined over the years. This is likely a consequence of the decrease in funding available for research and the fact that the fibrillations do not appear to cause serious health issues. Nonetheless, further exploration of them as diagnostic tools in long-term denervation is merited, in particular if Single Fiber EMG (SFEMG is combined with Dynamic Echomyography (DyEM, an Ultra Sound muscle approach we recently designed and developed to explore denervated and reinnervating muscles.

  20. Adsorption behavior analyses of several small gas molecules onto Rh-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengping; Jiang, Jimiao

    2017-10-01

    Owing to the excellent adsorption performance, the transition metal-decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have received widespread attention, and consequently have served an increasingly important role in the areas of gas detection and storage recently. Based on density functional theory method, a novel Rh-modified single-walled CNT is proposed in the present work to explore its adsorption behaviors upon some small gas molecules including CO, CO2, CH4, C2H4 and SO2 for the sake of suggesting potentially promising materials in terms of gas adsorbent/sensors. The calculated results indicated that Rh-CNT has good adsorption performance upon CO, C2H4 and SO2 molecules given their large adsorption energies and small adsorption distances while exhibiting insensitivity towards CO2 and CH4 due to their weak interaction basically depending on Van der Waals' force. Our calculations are meaningful for providing experimentalists with strong theoretical foundation in further applications of such novel sensing material.

  1. Time Headway Modelling of Motorcycle-Dominated Traffic to Analyse Traffic Safety Performance and Road Link Capacity of Single Carriageways

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    D. M. Priyantha Wedagama

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop time headway distribution models to analyse traffic safety performance and road link capacities for motorcycle-dominated traffic in Denpasar, Bali. Three road links selected as the case study are Jl. Hayam Wuruk, Jl.Hang Tuah, and Jl. Padma. Data analysis showed that between 55%-80% of motorists in Denpasar during morning and evening peak hours paid less attention to the safe distance with the vehicles in front. The study found that Lognormal distribution models are best to fit time headway data during morning peak hours while either Weibull (3P or Pearson III distributions is for evening peak hours. Road link capacities for mixed traffic predominantly motorcycles are apparently affected by the behaviour of motorists in keeping safe distance with the vehicles in front. Theoretical road link capacities for Jl. Hayam Wuruk, Jl. Hang Tuah and Jl. Padma are 3,186 vehicles/hour, 3,077 vehicles/hour and 1935 vehicles/hour respectively.

  2. A method for analysing phosphatase activity in aquatic bacteria at the single cell level using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, Solange; Gregori, Gerald; Van Wambeke, France; Mauriac, Romain; Nedoma, Jirí

    2008-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that ELF97-phosphate (ELF-P) is a useful tool to detect and quantify phosphatase activity of phytoplankton populations at a single cell level. Recently, it has been successfully applied to marine heterotrophic bacteria in culture samples, the cells exhibiting phosphatase activity being detected using epifluorescence microscopy. Here, we describe a new protocol that enables the detection of ELF alcohol (ELFA), the product of ELF-P hydrolysis, allowing the detection of phosphatase positive bacteria, using flow cytometry. Bacteria from natural samples must be disaggregated and, in oligotrophic waters, concentrated before they can be analyzed by flow cytometry. The best efficiency for disaggregating/separating bacterial cell clumps was obtained by incubating the sample for 30 min with Tween 80 (10 mg l(-1), final concentration). A centrifugation step (20,000 g; 30 min) was required in order to recover all the cells in the pellet (only 7+/-2% of the cells were recovered from the supernatant). The cells and the ELFA precipitates were resistant to these treatments. ELFA-labelled samples were stored in liquid nitrogen for up to four months before counting without any significant loss in total or ELFA-labelled bacterial cell abundance or in the ELFA fluorescence intensity. We describe a new flow cytometry protocol for detecting and discriminating the signals from both ELFA and different counterstains (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and propidium iodide (PI)) necessary to distinguish between ELFA-labelled and non ELFA-labelled heterotrophic bacteria. The method has been successfully applied in both freshwater and marine samples. This method promises to improve our understanding of the physiological response of heterotrophic bacteria to P limitation.

  3. Single-particle Analyses of Compositions, Morphology, and Viscosity of Aerosol Particles Collected During GoAmazon2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, K.; Gong, Z.; Bateman, A. P.; Martin, S. T.; Cirino, G. G.; Artaxo, P.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Single-particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles collected during the GoAmazon2014 campaign. These TEM results indicate aerosol types and mixing states, both of which are important for evaluating particle optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity. The samples were collected at the T3 site, which is located in the Amazon forest with influences from the urban pollution plume from Manaus. Samples were also collected from the T0 site, which is in the middle of the jungle with minimal to no influences of anthropogenic sources. The aerosol particles mainly originated from 1) anthropogenic pollution (e.g., nanosphere soot, sulfate), 2) biogenic emissions (e.g., primary biogenic particles, organic aerosols), and 3) long-range transport (e.g., sea salts). We found that the biogenic organic aerosol particles contain homogeneously distributed potassium. Particle viscosity is important for evaluating gas-particle interactions and atmospheric chemistry for the particles. Viscosity can be estimated from the rebounding behavior at controlled relative humidities, i.e., highly viscous particles display less rebound on a plate than low-viscosity particles. We collected 1) aerosol particles from a plate (non-rebounded), 2) those that had rebounded from the plate and were then captured onto an adjacent sampling plate, and 3) particles from ambient air using a separate impactor sampler. Preliminary results show that more than 90% of non-rebounded particles consisted of nanosphere soot with or without coatings. The coatings mostly consisted of organic matter. Although rebounded particles also contain nanosphere soot (number fraction 64-69%), they were mostly internally mixed with sulfate, organic matter, or their mixtures. TEM tilted images suggested that the rebounded particles were less deformed on the substrate, whereas the non-rebounded particles were more deformed, which could

  4. Mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the fusion peptide of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus F protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ying; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Manli; Yin, Feifei; Deng, Fei; Liu, Maili; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2008-08-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells is normally mediated by fusion between viral and cellular membranes, in which the fusion peptide plays a crucial role. The fusion peptides of group II nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) F proteins are quite conserved, with a hydrophobic region located at the N terminal of the F(1) fragment. For this report, we used mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the structure and function of the fusion peptide of the Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearNPV) F protein (HaF). Five mutations in the fusion peptide of HaF, N(1)G, N(1)L, I(2)N, G(3)L, and D(11)L, were generated separately, and the mutated f genes were transformed into the f-null HearNPV bacmid. The mutations N(1)L, I(2)N, and D(11)L were found to completely abolish the ability of the recombinant bacmids to produce infectious budded virus, while the mutations N(1)G and G(3)L did not. The low-pH-induced envelope fusion assay demonstrated that the N(1)G substitution increased the fusogenicity of HaF, while the G(3)L substitution reduced its fusogenicity. NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of a synthetic fusion peptide of HaF in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles at pH 5.0. The fusion peptide appeared to be an amphiphilic structure composed of a flexible coil in the N terminus from N(1) to N(5), a 3(10)-helix from F(6) to G(8), a turn at S(9), and a regular alpha-helix from V(10) to D(19). The data provide the first NMR structure of a baculovirus fusion peptide and allow us to further understand the relationship of structure and function of the fusion peptide.

  5. Integrated ‘Omics’, Targeted Metabolite and Single-cell Analyses of Arctic Snow Algae Functionality and Adaptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Stefanie; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Field, Katie; Benning, Liane G.

    2015-01-01

    Snow algae are poly-extremophilic microalgae and important primary colonizers and producers on glaciers and snow fields. Depending on their pigmentation they cause green or red mass blooms during the melt season. This decreases surface albedo and thus further enhances snow and ice melting. Although the phenomenon of snow algal blooms has been known for a long time, large aspects of their physiology and ecology sill remain cryptic. This study provides the first in-depth and multi-omics investigation of two very striking adjacent green and red snow fields on a glacier in Svalbard. We have assessed the algal community composition of green and red snow including their associated microbiota, i.e., bacteria and archaea, their metabolic profiles (targeted and non-targeted metabolites) on the bulk and single-cell level, and assessed the feedbacks between the algae and their physico-chemical environment including liquid water content, pH, albedo, and nutrient availability. We demonstrate that green and red snow clearly vary in their physico-chemical environment, their microbial community composition and their metabolic profiles. For the algae this likely reflects both different stages of their life cycles and their adaptation strategies. Green snow represents a wet, carbon and nutrient rich environment and is dominated by the algae Microglena sp. with a metabolic profile that is characterized by key metabolites involved in growth and proliferation. In contrast, the dry and nutrient poor red snow habitat is colonized by various Chloromonas species with a high abundance of storage and reserve metabolites likely to face upcoming severe conditions. Combining a multitude of techniques we demonstrate the power of such complementary approaches in elucidating the function and ecology of extremophiles such as green and red snow algal blooms, which play crucial roles in glacial ecosystems. PMID:26635781

  6. Integrated ‘omics’, targeted metabolite and single-cell analyses of Arctic snow algae functionality and adaptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eLutz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Snow algae are poly-extremophilic microalgae and important primary colonisers and producers on glaciers and snow fields. Depending on their pigmentation they cause green or red mass blooms during the melt season. This decreases surface albedo and thus further enhances snow and ice melting. Although the phenomenon of snow algal blooms has been known for a long time, large aspects of their physiology and ecology sill remain cryptic. This study provides the first in-depth and multi-omics investigation of two very striking adjacent green and red snow fields on a glacier in Svalbard. We have assessed the algal community composition of green and red snow including their associated microbiota, i.e., bacteria and archaea, their metabolic profiles (targeted and non-targeted metabolites on the bulk and single-cell level, and assessed the feedbacks between the algae and their physico-chemical environment including liquid water content, pH, albedo and nutrient availability. We demonstrate that green and red snow clearly vary in their physico-chemical environment, their microbial community composition and their metabolic profiles. For the algae this likely reflects both different stages of their life cycles and their adaptation strategies. Green snow represents a wet, carbon and nutrient rich environment and is dominated by the algae Microglena sp. with a metabolic profile that is characterized by key metabolites involved in growth and proliferation. In contrast, the dry and nutrient poor red snow habitat is colonised by various Chloromonas species with a high abundance of storage and reserve metabolites likely to face upcoming severe conditions. Combining a multitude of techniques we demonstrate the power of such complementary approaches in elucidating the function and ecology of extremophiles such as green and red snow algal blooms, which play crucial roles in glacial ecosystems.

  7. Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Cellular Responses to Entry of Virions: One Kind of Natural Nanobiomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Virions are one kind of nanoscale pathogen and are able to infect living cells of animals, plants, and bacteria. The infection is an intrinsic property of the virions, and the biological process provides a good model for studying how these nanoparticles enter into cells. During the infection, the viruses employ different strategies to which the cells have developed respective responses. For this paper, we chose Bombyx mori cypovirus 1 (BmCPV-1 interactions with midgut cells from silkworm, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS associated coronavirus interactions with Vero E6 cells, as examples to demonstrate the response of eukaryotic cells to two different types of virus from our previous studies. The bacteriophage-bacteria interactions are also introduced to elucidate how the bacteriophage conquers the barrier of cell walls in the prokaryotic cells to transport genome into the host.

  8. Structure of Hepatitis E Virion-Sized Particle Reveals an RNA-Dependent Viral Assembly Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, L.; Wall, J.; Li, T.-C.; Mayazaki, N.; Simon, M. N.; Moore, M.; Wang, C.-Y.; Takeda, N.; Wakita, T.; Miyamura, T.; Cheng, R. H.

    2010-10-22

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) induces acute hepatitis in humans with a high fatality rate in pregnant women. There is a need for anti-HEV research to understand the assembly process of HEV native capsid. Here, we produced a large virion-sized and a small T=1 capsid by expressing the HEV capsid protein in insect cells with and without the N-terminal 111 residues, respectively, for comparative structural analysis. The virion-sized capsid demonstrates a T=3 icosahedral lattice and contains RNA fragment in contrast to the RNA-free T=1 capsid. However, both capsids shared common decameric organization. The in vitro assembly further demonstrated that HEV capsid protein had the intrinsic ability to form decameric intermediate. Our data suggest that RNA binding is the extrinsic factor essential for the assembly of HEV native capsids.

  9. IFITM proteins incorporated into HIV-1 virions impair viral fusion and spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Alex A; Bruel, Timothée; Porrot, Françoise; Mallet, Adeline; Sachse, Martin; Euvrard, Marine; Liang, Chen; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Schwartz, Olivier

    2014-12-10

    The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins protect cells from diverse virus infections by inhibiting virus-cell fusion. IFITM proteins also inhibit HIV-1 replication through mechanisms only partially understood. We show that when expressed in uninfected lymphocytes, IFITM proteins exert protective effects during cell-free virus infection, but this restriction can be overcome upon HIV-1 cell-to-cell spread. However, when present in virus-producing lymphocytes, IFITM proteins colocalize with viral Env and Gag proteins and incorporate into nascent HIV-1 virions to limit entry into new target cells. IFITM in viral membranes is associated with impaired virion fusion, offering additional and more potent defense against virus spread. Thus, IFITM proteins act additively in both productively infected cells and uninfected target cells to inhibit HIV-1 spread, potentially conferring these proteins with greater breadth and potency against enveloped viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Zika virus envelope protein glycan loop regulates virion antigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Leslie; DeMaso, Christina R; Pelc, Rebecca S; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Graham, Barney S; Kuhn, Richard J; Pierson, Theodore C

    2018-01-02

    Because antibodies are an important component of flavivirus immunity, understanding the antigenic structure of flaviviruses is critical. Compared to dengue virus (DENV), the loop containing the single N-linked glycosylation site on Zika virus (ZIKV) envelope (E) proteins extends further towards the DII fusion loop (DII-FL) on neighboring E proteins within E dimers on mature viruses. Although ZIKV is poorly neutralized by DII-FL antibodies, we demonstrated significantly increased neutralization sensitivity of ZIKV particles incorporating the DENV glycan loop. Increased neutralization sensitivity was independent of E protein glycosylation: ZIKV lacking E protein glycans remained poorly neutralized, whereas ZIKV loop chimeras with or without an E protein glycan were potently neutralized. ZIKV particles lacking the E protein glycan were capable of infecting Raji cells expressing the lectin DC-SIGNR, suggesting the prM glycan of partially mature particles can facilitate entry. Our study provides insight into the determinants of ZIKV E protein function and antigenicity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Mamestra Brassicae Nucleopolyhedrovirus Progeny Virions from Two Different Hosts.

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    Dianhai Hou

    Full Text Available Mamestra brassicae nucleopolyhedrovirus (MabrNPV has a wide host range replication in more than one insect species. In this study, a sequenced MabrNPV strain, MabrNPV-CTa, was used to perform proteomic analysis of both BVs and ODVs derived from two infected hosts: Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera exigua. A total of 82 and 39 viral proteins were identified in ODVs and BVs, respectively. And totally, 23 and 76 host proteins were identified as virion-associated with ODVs and BVs, respectively. The host proteins incorporated into the virus particles were mainly involved in cytoskeleton, signaling, vesicle trafficking, chaperone and metabolic systems. Some host proteins, such as actin, cyclophilin A and heat shock protein 70 would be important for viral replication. Several host proteins involved in immune response were also identified in BV, and a C-type lectin protein was firstly found to be associated with BV and its family members have been demonstrated to be involved in entry process of other viruses. This study facilitated the annotation of baculovirus genome, and would help us to understand baculovirus virion structure. Furthermore, the identification of host proteins associated with virions produced in vivo would facilitate investigations on the involvement of intriguing host proteins in virus replication.

  12. Vaccinia virus protein F12 associates with intracellular enveloped virions through an interaction with A36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Sara C; Ward, Brian M

    2009-02-01

    Vaccinia virus is the prototypical member of the family Poxviridae. Three morphologically distinct forms are produced during infection: intracellular mature virions (IMV), intracellular enveloped virions (IEV), and extracellular enveloped virions (EEV). Two viral proteins, F12 and A36, are found exclusively on IEV but not on IMV and EEV. Analysis of membranes from infected cells showed that F12 was only associated with membranes and is not an integral membrane protein. A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed an interaction between amino acids 351 to 458 of F12 and amino acids 91 to 111 of A36. We generated a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses an F12, which lacks residues 351 to 458. Characterization of this recombinant revealed a small-plaque phenotype and a subsequent defect in virus release similar to a recombinant virus that had F12L deleted. In addition, F12 lacking residues 351 to 458 was unable to associate with membranes in infected cells. These results suggest that F12 associates with IEV through an interaction with A36 and that this interaction is critical for the function of F12 during viral egress.

  13. Exocytosis of Alphaherpesvirus Virions, Light Particles, and Glycoproteins Uses Constitutive Secretory Mechanisms

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    Ian B. Hogue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Many molecular and cell biological details of the alphaherpesvirus assembly and egress pathway remain unclear. Recently we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy assay of pseudorabies virus (PRV exocytosis, based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy and a virus-encoded pH-sensitive fluorescent probe. Here, we use this assay to distinguish three classes of viral exocytosis in a nonpolarized cell type: (i trafficking of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane, (ii exocytosis of viral light particles, and (iii exocytosis of virions. We find that viral glycoproteins traffic to the cell surface in association with constitutive secretory Rab GTPases and exhibit free diffusion into the plasma membrane after exocytosis. Similarly, both virions and light particles use these same constitutive secretory mechanisms for egress from infected cells. Furthermore, we show that viral light particles are distinct from cellular exosomes. Together, these observations shed light on viral glycoprotein trafficking steps that precede virus particle assembly and reinforce the idea that virions and light particles share a biogenesis and trafficking pathway.

  14. Bioluminescent virion shells: new tools for quantitation of AAV vector dynamics in cells and live animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asokan, A; Johnson, J S; Li, C; Samulski, R J

    2008-12-01

    Current technologies for visualizing infectious pathways of viruses rely on fluorescent labeling of capsid proteins by chemical conjugation or genetic manipulation. For noninvasive in vivo imaging of such agents in mammalian tissue, we engineered bioluminescent Gaussia luciferase-tagged Adeno-associated viral (gLuc/AAV) vectors. The enzyme was incorporated into recombinant AAV serotypes 1, 2 and 8 capsids by fusing to the N-terminus of the VP2 capsid subunit to yield bioluminescent virion shells. The gLuc/AAV vectors were used to quantify kinetics of cell-surface-binding by AAV2 capsids in vitro. Bioluminescent virion shells displayed an exponential decrease in luminescent signal following cellular uptake in vitro. A similar trend was observed following intramuscular injection in vivo, although the rate of decline in bioluminescent signal varied markedly between AAV serotypes. gLuc/AAV1 and gLuc/AAV8 vectors displayed rapid decrease in bioluminescent signal to background levels within 30 min, whereas the signal from gLuc/AAV2 vectors persisted for over 2 h. Bioluminescent virion shells might be particularly useful in quantifying dynamics of viral vector uptake in cells and peripheral tissues in live animals.

  15. The in situ structural characterization of the influenza A virus matrix M1 protein within a virion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkov, Alexander V; Bogacheva, Elena N; Dolgov, Alexey A; Chulichkov, Alexey L; Knyazev, Denis G; Fedorova, Natalia V; Ksenofontov, Alexander L; Kordyukova, Larisa V; Lukashina, Elena V; Mirsky, Vladimir M; Baratova, Lyudmila A

    2009-01-01

    The first attempt has been made to suggest a model of influenza A virus matrix M1 protein spatial structure and molecule orientation within a virion on the basis of tritium planigraphy data and theoretical prediction results. Limited in situ proteolysis of the intact virions with bromelain and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy study of the M1 protein interaction with lipid coated surfaces were used for independent confirmation of the proposed model.

  16. Single-trait and multi-trait genome-wide association analyses identify novel loci for blood pressure in African-ancestry populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Liang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a leading cause of global disease, mortality, and disability. While individuals of African descent suffer a disproportionate burden of hypertension and its complications, they have been underrepresented in genetic studies. To identify novel susceptibility loci for blood pressure and hypertension in people of African ancestry, we performed both single and multiple-trait genome-wide association analyses. We analyzed 21 genome-wide association studies comprised of 31,968 individuals of African ancestry, and validated our results with additional 54,395 individuals from multi-ethnic studies. These analyses identified nine loci with eleven independent variants which reached genome-wide significance (P < 1.25×10-8 for either systolic and diastolic blood pressure, hypertension, or for combined traits. Single-trait analyses identified two loci (TARID/TCF21 and LLPH/TMBIM4 and multiple-trait analyses identified one novel locus (FRMD3 for blood pressure. At these three loci, as well as at GRP20/CDH17, associated variants had alleles common only in African-ancestry populations. Functional annotation showed enrichment for genes expressed in immune and kidney cells, as well as in heart and vascular cells/tissues. Experiments driven by these findings and using angiotensin-II induced hypertension in mice showed altered kidney mRNA expression of six genes, suggesting their potential role in hypertension. Our study provides new evidence for genes related to hypertension susceptibility, and the need to study African-ancestry populations in order to identify biologic factors contributing to hypertension.

  17. Comparison of the Cowpox Virus and Vaccinia Virus Mature Virion Proteome: Analysis of the Species- and Strain-Specific Proteome.

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    Joerg Doellinger

    Full Text Available Cowpox virus (CPXV causes most zoonotic orthopoxvirus (OPV infections in Europe and Northern as well as Central Asia. The virus has the broadest host range of OPV and is transmitted to humans from rodents and other wild or domestic animals. Increasing numbers of human CPXV infections in a population with declining immunity have raised concerns about the virus' zoonotic potential. While there have been reports on the proteome of other human-pathogenic OPV, namely vaccinia virus (VACV and monkeypox virus (MPXV, the protein composition of the CPXV mature virion (MV is unknown. This study focused on the comparative analysis of the VACV and CPXV MV proteome by label-free single-run proteomics using nano liquid chromatography and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS. The presented data reveal that the common VACV and CPXV MV proteome contains most of the known conserved and essential OPV proteins and is associated with cellular proteins known to be essential for viral replication. While the species-specific proteome could be linked mainly to less genetically-conserved gene products, the strain-specific protein abundance was found to be of high variance in proteins associated with entry, host-virus interaction and protein processing.

  18. Mapping the complete glycoproteome of virion-derived HIV-1 gp120 provides insights into broadly neutralizing antibody binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Maria; Bouché, Laura; Binet, Daniel; O'Connor, Michael-John; Rahman, Dinah; Pang, Poh-Choo; Canis, Kevin; North, Simon J; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F; Bess, Julian W; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Haslam, Stuart M; Dell, Anne; Morris, Howard R

    2016-09-08

    The surface envelope glycoprotein (SU) of Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), gp120(SU) plays an essential role in virus binding to target CD4+ T-cells and is a major vaccine target. Gp120 has remarkably high levels of N-linked glycosylation and there is considerable evidence that this "glycan shield" can help protect the virus from antibody-mediated neutralization. In recent years, however, it has become clear that gp120 glycosylation can also be included in the targets of recognition by some of the most potent broadly neutralizing antibodies. Knowing the site-specific glycosylation of gp120 can facilitate the rational design of glycopeptide antigens for HIV vaccine development. While most prior studies have focused on glycan analysis of recombinant forms of gp120, here we report the first systematic glycosylation site analysis of gp120 derived from virions produced by infected T lymphoid cells and show that a single site is exclusively substituted with complex glycans. These results should help guide the design of vaccine immunogens.

  19. Glycosylation and oligomeric state of envelope protein might influence HIV-1 virion capture by α4β7 integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Subhash; Messina, Emily L; AlSalmi, Wadad; Ananthaswamy, Neeti; Gao, Guofen; Uritskiy, Gherman; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Peachman, Kristina K; Robb, Merlin L; Rao, Mangala; Rao, Venigalla B

    2017-08-01

    The α4ß7 integrin present on host cells recognizes the V1V2 domain of the HIV-1 envelope protein. This interaction might be involved in virus transmission. Administration of α4ß7-specific antibodies inhibit acquisition of SIV in a macaque challenge model. But the molecular details of V1V2: α4ß7 interaction are unknown and its importance in HIV-1 infection remains controversial. Our biochemical and mutational analyses show that glycosylation is a key modulator of V1V2 conformation and binding to α4ß7. Partially glycosylated, but not fully glycosylated, envelope proteins are preferred substrates for α4ß7 binding. Surprisingly, monomers of the envelope protein bound strongly to α4ß7 whereas trimers bound poorly. Our results suggest that a conformationally flexible V1V2 domain allows binding of the HIV-1 virion to the α4ß7 integrin, which might impart selectivity for the poorly glycosylated HIV-1 envelope containing monomers to be more efficiently captured by α4ß7 integrin present on mucosal cells at the time of HIV-1 transmission. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of Distinct Breast Cancer Stem Cell Populations Based on Single-Cell Analyses of Functionally Enriched Stem and Progenitor Pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrap, Nina; Andersson, Daniel; Bom, Eva; Gregersson, Pernilla; Ståhlberg, Anders; Landberg, Göran

    2016-01-12

    The identification of breast cancer cell subpopulations featuring truly malignant stem cell qualities is a challenge due to the complexity of the disease and lack of general markers. By combining extensive single-cell gene expression profiling with three functional strategies for cancer stem cell enrichment including anchorage-independent culture, hypoxia, and analyses of low-proliferative, label-retaining cells derived from mammospheres, we identified distinct stem cell clusters in breast cancer. Estrogen receptor (ER)α+ tumors featured a clear hierarchical organization with switch-like and gradual transitions between different clusters, illustrating how breast cancer cells transfer between discrete differentiation states in a sequential manner. ERα- breast cancer showed less prominent clustering but shared a quiescent cancer stem cell pool with ERα+ cancer. The cellular organization model was supported by single-cell data from primary tumors. The findings allow us to understand the organization of breast cancers at the single-cell level, thereby permitting better identification and targeting of cancer stem cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of Distinct Breast Cancer Stem Cell Populations Based on Single-Cell Analyses of Functionally Enriched Stem and Progenitor Pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Akrap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of breast cancer cell subpopulations featuring truly malignant stem cell qualities is a challenge due to the complexity of the disease and lack of general markers. By combining extensive single-cell gene expression profiling with three functional strategies for cancer stem cell enrichment including anchorage-independent culture, hypoxia, and analyses of low-proliferative, label-retaining cells derived from mammospheres, we identified distinct stem cell clusters in breast cancer. Estrogen receptor (ERα+ tumors featured a clear hierarchical organization with switch-like and gradual transitions between different clusters, illustrating how breast cancer cells transfer between discrete differentiation states in a sequential manner. ERα− breast cancer showed less prominent clustering but shared a quiescent cancer stem cell pool with ERα+ cancer. The cellular organization model was supported by single-cell data from primary tumors. The findings allow us to understand the organization of breast cancers at the single-cell level, thereby permitting better identification and targeting of cancer stem cells.

  2. B-jet and c-jet identification with Neural Networks as well as combination of multivariate analyses for the search for of multivariate analyses for the search for single top-quark production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renz, Manuel; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2008-06-01

    In the first part of this diploma thesis, the current version of the KIT Flavor Separator, a neural network which is able to distinguish between tagged b-quark jets and tagged c/light-quark jets, is presented. In comparison with previous versions four new input variables are utilized and new Monte Carlo samples with a larger number of simulated events are used for the training of the neural network. It is illustrated that the output of the neural network is continuously distributed between 1 and -1, whereas b-quark jets accumulate at 1, however, c-quark jets and light-quark jets have outputs next to -1. To ensure that the network output describes observed events correctly, the shapes of all input variables are compared in simulation and data. Thus the mismodelling of any input variable is excluded. Moreover, the b jet and light jet output distributions are compared with the output of samples of observed events, which are enhanced in the particular flavor. In contrast to previous versions, no b-jet output correction function has to be calculated, because the agreement between simulation and collision data is excellent for b-quark jets. For the light-jet output, correction functions are developed. Different applications of the KIT Flavor Separator are mentioned. For example it provides a precious input to all three CDF single top quark analyses. Furthermore, it is shown that the KIT Flavor Separator is a universal tool, which can be used in every high-p{sub T} analysis that requires the identification of b-quark jets with high efficiency. As it is pointed out, a further application is the estimation of the flavor composition of a given sample of observed events. In addition a neural network, which is able to separate c-quark jets from light-quark jets, is trained. It is shown, that all three flavors can be separated in the c-net-Flavor Separator plane. As a result, the uncertainties on the estimation of the flavor composition in events with one tagged jet are cut

  3. Whole Genome and Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Analyses of Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Associated with an Outbreak Linked to Cheese, United States, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yan; Carleton, Heather; Timme, Ruth; Melka, David; Muruvanda, Tim; Wang, Charles; Kastanis, George; Katz, Lee S.; Turner, Lauren; Fritzinger, Angela; Moore, Terence; Stones, Robert; Blankenship, Joseph; Salter, Monique; Parish, Mickey; Hammack, Thomas S.; Evans, Peter S.; Tarr, Cheryl L.; Allard, Marc W.; Strain, Errol A.; Brown, Eric W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epidemiological findings of a listeriosis outbreak in 2013 implicated Hispanic-style cheese produced by company A, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole genome sequencing (WGS) were performed on clinical isolates and representative isolates collected from company A cheese and environmental samples during the investigation. The results strengthened the evidence for cheese as the vehicle. Surveillance sampling and WGS 3 months later revealed that the equipment purchased by company B from company A yielded an environmental isolate highly similar to all outbreak isolates. The whole genome and core genome multilocus sequence typing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses results were compared to demonstrate the maximum discriminatory power obtained by using multiple analyses, which were needed to differentiate outbreak-associated isolates from a PFGE-indistinguishable isolate collected in a nonimplicated food source in 2012. This unrelated isolate differed from the outbreak isolates by only 7 to 14 SNPs, and as a result, the minimum spanning tree from the whole genome analyses and certain variant calling approach and phylogenetic algorithm for core genome-based analyses could not provide differentiation between unrelated isolates. Our data also suggest that SNP/allele counts should always be combined with WGS clustering analysis generated by phylogenetically meaningful algorithms on a sufficient number of isolates, and the SNP/allele threshold alone does not provide sufficient evidence to delineate an outbreak. The putative prophages were conserved across all the outbreak isolates. All outbreak isolates belonged to clonal complex 5 and serotype 1/2b and had an identical inlA sequence which did not have premature stop codons. IMPORTANCE In this outbreak, multiple analytical approaches were used for maximum discriminatory power. A PFGE-matched, epidemiologically unrelated isolate had high genetic similarity to the outbreak

  4. Essential role of the unordered VP2 n-terminal domain of the parvovirus MVM capsid in nuclear assembly and endosomal enlargement of the virion fivefold channel for cell entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Martinez, Cristina; Grueso, Esther [Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Carroll, Miles [Health Protection Agency, Centre for Emergency Preparedness and Response, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 OJG, Wilts (United Kingdom); Rommelaere, Jean [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Division F010, Im Neuenheimer Feld 242, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Almendral, Jose M., E-mail: jmalmendral@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-10

    The unordered N-termini of parvovirus capsid proteins (Nt) are translocated through a channel at the icosahedral five-fold axis to serve for virus traffick. Heterologous peptides were genetically inserted at the Nt of MVM to study their functional tolerance to manipulations. Insertion of a 5T4-single-chain antibody at VP2-Nt (2Nt) yielded chimeric capsid subunits failing to enter the nucleus. The VEGFR2-binding peptide (V1) inserted at both 2Nt and VP1-Nt efficiently assembled in virions, but V1 disrupted VP1 and VP2 entry functions. The VP2 defect correlated with restricted externalization of V1-2Nt out of the coat. The specific infectivity of MVM and wtVP-pseudotyped mosaic MVM-V1 virions, upon heating and/or partial 2Nt cleavage, demonstrated that some 2Nt domains become intracellularly translocated out of the virus shell and cleaved to initiate entry. The V1 insertion defines a VP2-driven endosomal enlargement of the channel as an essential structural rearrangement performed by the MVM virion to infect.

  5. Surface-exposed adeno-associated virus Vp1-NLS capsid fusion protein rescues infectivity of noninfectious wild-type Vp2/Vp3 and Vp3-only capsids but not that of fivefold pore mutant virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, Joshua C; Johnson, Jarrod S; Gurda-Whitaker, Brittney; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Samulski, R Jude

    2007-08-01

    Over the past 2 decades, significant effort has been dedicated to the development of adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a vector for human gene therapy. However, understanding of the virus with respect to the functional domains of the capsid remains incomplete. In this study, the goal was to further examine the role of the unique Vp1 N terminus, the N terminus plus the recently identified nuclear localization signal (NLS) (J. C. Grieger, S. Snowdy, and R. J. Samulski, J. Virol 80:5199-5210, 2006), and the virion pore at the fivefold axis in infection. We generated two Vp1 fusion proteins (Vp1 and Vp1NLS) linked to the 8-kDa chemokine domain of rat fractalkine (FKN) for the purpose of surface exposure upon assembly of the virion, as previously described (K. H. Warrington, Jr., O. S. Gorbatyuk, J. K. Harrison, S. R. Opie, S. Zolotukhin, and N. Muzyczka, J. Virol 78:6595-6609, 2004). The unique Vp1 N termini were found to be exposed on the surfaces of these capsids and maintained their phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity, as determined by native dot blot Western and PLA2 assays, respectively. Incorporation of the fusions into AAV type 2 capsids lacking a wild-type Vp1, i.e., Vp2/Vp3 and Vp3 capsid only, increased infectivity by 3- to 5-fold (Vp1FKN) and 10- to 100-fold (Vp1NLSFKN), respectively. However, the surface-exposed fusions did not restore infectivity to AAV virions containing mutations at a conserved leucine (Leu336Ala, Leu336Cys, or Leu336Trp) located at the base of the fivefold pore. EM analyses suggest that Leu336 may play a role in global structural changes to the virion directly impacting downstream conformational changes essential for infectivity and not only have local effects within the pore, as previously suggested.

  6. Ebola virion attachment and entry into human macrophages profoundly effects early cellular gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Wahl-Jensen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV infections are associated with high lethality in primates. ZEBOV primarily targets mononuclear phagocytes, which are activated upon infection and secrete mediators believed to trigger initial stages of pathogenesis. The characterization of the responses of target cells to ZEBOV infection may therefore not only further understanding of pathogenesis but also suggest possible points of therapeutic intervention. Gene expression profiles of primary human macrophages exposed to ZEBOV were determined using DNA microarrays and quantitative PCR to gain insight into the cellular response immediately after cell entry. Significant changes in mRNA concentrations encoding for 88 cellular proteins were observed. Most of these proteins have not yet been implicated in ZEBOV infection. Some, however, are inflammatory mediators known to be elevated during the acute phase of disease in the blood of ZEBOV-infected humans. Interestingly, the cellular response occurred within the first hour of Ebola virion exposure, i.e. prior to virus gene expression. This observation supports the hypothesis that virion binding or entry mediated by the spike glycoprotein (GP(1,2 is the primary stimulus for an initial response. Indeed, ZEBOV virions, LPS, and virus-like particles consisting of only the ZEBOV matrix protein VP40 and GP(1,2 (VLP(VP40-GP triggered comparable responses in macrophages, including pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic signals. In contrast, VLP(VP40 (particles lacking GP(1,2 caused an aberrant response. This suggests that GP(1,2 binding to macrophages plays an important role in the immediate cellular response.

  7. The brome mosaic virus 3' untranslated sequence regulates RNA replication, recombination, and virion assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, A L N; Cheng Kao, C

    2015-08-03

    The 3' untranslated region in each of the three genomic RNAs of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is highly homologous and contains a sequence that folds into a tRNA-like structure (TLS). Experiments performed over the past four decades revealed that the BMV 3' TLS regulates many important steps in BMV infection. This review summarizes in vitro and in vivo studies of the roles of the BMV 3' TLS functioning as a minus-strand promoter, in RNA recombination, and to nucleate virion assembly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Initiation and Direction of RNA Transcription by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Virion Transcriptase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Polly; Bishop, D. H. L.

    1973-01-01

    The initiation of RNA transcription by the virion-bound RNA transcriptase of vesicular stomatitis virus has been examined. Multiple initiation sequences have been observed, two of which have been characterized (pppApCpGp... and pppGpCp...) suggestive of a transcription process which can start at different sites along the template RNA. By the use of sequential labeling techniques and exonucleases, it has been determined that there is a 5′ to 3′ direction of product RNA synthesis. PMID:4349490

  9. Human cytomegalovirus exploits interferon-induced transmembrane proteins to facilitate morphogenesis of the virion assembly compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Maorong; Xuan, Baoqin; Shan, Jiaoyu; Pan, Deng; Sun, Yamei; Shan, Zhao; Zhang, Jinping; Yu, Dong; Li, Bin; Qian, Zhikang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) have been identified to be key effector molecules in the host type I interferon defense system. The invasion of host cells by a large range of RNA viruses is inhibited by IFITMs during the entry step. However, the roles of IFITMs in DNA virus infections have not been studied in detail. In this study, we report that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a large human DNA virus, exploits IFITMs to facilitate the formation of the virion assembly compartment (vAC) during infection of human fibroblasts. We found that IFITMs were expressed constitutively in human embryonic lung fibroblasts (MRC5 cells). HCMV infection inhibited IFITM protein accumulation in the later stages of infection. Overexpression of an IFITM protein in MRC5 cells slightly enhanced HCMV production and knockdown of IFITMs by RNA interference reduced the virus titer by about 100-fold on day 8 postinfection, according to the findings of a virus yield assay at a low multiplicity of infection. Virus gene expression and DNA synthesis were not affected, but the typical round structure of the vAC was not formed after the suppression of IFITMs, thereby resulting in defective virion assembly and the production of less infectious virion particles. Interestingly, the replication of herpes simplex virus, a human herpesvirus that is closely related to HCMV, was not affected by the suppression of IFITMs in MRC5 cells. These results indicate that IFITMs are involved in a specific pathway required for HCMV replication. HCMV is known to repurpose the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) viperin and tetherin to facilitate its replication. Our results expand the range of ISGs that can be exploited by HCMV for its replication. This is also the first report of a proviral function of IFITMs in DNA virus replication. In addition, whereas previous studies showed that IFITMs modulate virus entry, which is a very early stage in the virus life cycle, we identified a new

  10. Thermal conversion of filamentous potato virus X into spherical particles with different properties from virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, Nikolai; Ksenofontov, Alexander; Trifonova, Ekaterina; Arkhipenko, Marina; Petrova, Ekaterina; Kondakova, Olga; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail; Atabekov, Joseph; Dobrov, Evgeny; Karpova, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We developed a method for the fast transformation of virions of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in so-called spherical particles (SPs) of different sizes. These SPs turned out to be highly useful for the preparation of different kinds of important biotechnological products. In this communication, we report that a representative of the flexuous helical virus group-potato virus X (PVX), produces SPs as well, but these SPs differ from TMV SPs in several important aspects. PVX SPs may be useful biotechnological devices. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. The Primary Enveloped Virion of Herpes Simplex Virus 1: Its Role in Nuclear Egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, William W; Fontana, Juan; Winkler, Dennis C; Cheng, Naiqian; Heymann, J Bernard; Steven, Alasdair C

    2017-06-13

    Many viruses migrate between different cellular compartments for successive stages of assembly. The HSV-1 capsid assembles in the nucleus and then transfers into the cytoplasm. First, the capsid buds through the inner nuclear membrane, becoming coated with nuclear egress complex (NEC) protein. This yields a primary enveloped virion (PEV) whose envelope fuses with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing the capsid into the cytoplasm. We investigated the associated molecular mechanisms by isolating PEVs from US3-null-infected cells and imaging them by cryo-electron microscopy and tomography. (pUS3 is a viral protein kinase in whose absence PEVs accumulate in the perinuclear space.) Unlike mature extracellular virions, PEVs have very few glycoprotein spikes. PEVs are ~20% smaller than mature virions, and the little space available between the capsid and the NEC layer suggests that most tegument proteins are acquired later in the egress pathway. Previous studies have proposed that NEC is organized as hexamers in honeycomb arrays in PEVs, but we find arrays of heptameric rings in extracts from US3-null-infected cells. In a PEV, NEC contacts the capsid predominantly via the pUL17/pUL25 complexes which are located close to the capsid vertices. Finally, the NEC layer dissociates from the capsid as it leaves the nucleus, possibly in response to pUS3-mediated phosphorylation. Overall, nuclear egress emerges as a process driven by a program of multiple weak interactions. IMPORTANCE On its maturation pathway, the newly formed HSV-1 nucleocapsid must traverse the nuclear envelope, while respecting the integrity of that barrier. Nucleocapsids (125 nm in diameter) are too large to pass through the nuclear pore complexes that conduct most nucleocytoplasmic traffic. It is now widely accepted that the process involves envelopment/de-envelopment of a key intermediate-the primary enveloped virion. In wild-type infections, PEVs are short-lived, which has impeded study. Using a mutant

  12. A Combination of Structural and Empirical Analyses Delineates the Key Contacts Mediating Stability and Affinity Increases in an Optimized Biotherapeutic Single-chain Fv (scFv)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chao; Terraube, Virginie; Tam, Amy Sze Pui; Stochaj, Wayne; Fennell, Brian J.; Lin, Laura; Stahl, Mark; LaVallie, Edward R.; Somers, Will; Finlay, William J. J.; Mosyak, Lydia; Bard, Joel; Cunningham, Orla

    2016-01-01

    Fully-human single-chain Fv (scFv) proteins are key potential building blocks of bispecific therapeutic antibodies, but they often suffer from manufacturability and clinical development limitations such as instability and aggregation. The causes of these scFv instability problems, in proteins that should be theoretically stable, remains poorly understood. To inform the future development of such molecules, we carried out a comprehensive structural analysis of the highly stabilized anti-CXCL13 scFv E10. E10 was derived from the parental 3B4 using complementarity-determining region (CDR)-restricted mutagenesis and tailored selection and screening strategies, and carries four mutations in VL-CDR3. High-resolution crystal structures of parental 3B4 and optimized E10 scFvs were solved in the presence and absence of human CXCL13. In parallel, a series of scFv mutants was generated to interrogate the individual contribution of each of the four mutations to stability and affinity improvements. In combination, these analyses demonstrated that the optimization of E10 was primarily mediated by removing clashes between both the VL and the VH, and between the VL and CXCL13. Importantly, a single, germline-encoded VL-CDR3 residue mediated the key difference between the stable and unstable forms of the scFv. This work demonstrates that, aside from being the critical mediators of specificity and affinity, CDRs may also be the primary drivers of biotherapeutic developability. PMID:26515064

  13. The Observation and Execution of Actions Share Motor and Somatosensory Voxels in all Tested Subjects: Single-Subject Analyses of Unsmoothed fMRI Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keysers, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Many neuroimaging studies of the mirror neuron system (MNS) examine if certain voxels in the brain are shared between action observation and execution (shared voxels, sVx). Unfortunately, finding sVx in standard group analyses is not a guarantee that sVx exist in individual subjects. Using unsmoothed, single-subject analyses we show sVx can be reliably found in all 16 investigated participants. Beside the ventral premotor (BA6/44) and inferior parietal cortex (area PF) where mirror neurons (MNs) have been found in monkeys, sVx were reliably observed in dorsal premotor, supplementary motor, middle cingulate, somatosensory (BA3, BA2, and OP1), superior parietal, middle temporal cortex and cerebellum. For the premotor, somatosensory and parietal areas, sVx were more numerous in the left hemisphere. The hand representation of the primary motor cortex showed a reduced BOLD during hand action observation, possibly preventing undesired overt imitation. This study provides a more detailed description of the location and reliability of sVx and proposes a model that extends the original idea of the MNS to include forward and inverse internal models and motor and sensory simulation, distinguishing the MNS from a more general concept of sVx. PMID:19020203

  14. Target-dependent enrichment of virions determines the reduction of high-throughput sequencing in virus discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi Holm Jensen

    Full Text Available Viral infections cause many different diseases stemming both from well-characterized viral pathogens but also from emerging viruses, and the search for novel viruses continues to be of great importance. High-throughput sequencing is an important technology for this purpose. However, viral nucleic acids often constitute a minute proportion of the total genetic material in a sample from infected tissue. Techniques to enrich viral targets in high-throughput sequencing have been reported, but the sensitivity of such methods is not well established. This study compares different library preparation techniques targeting both DNA and RNA with and without virion enrichment. By optimizing the selection of intact virus particles, both by physical and enzymatic approaches, we assessed the effectiveness of the specific enrichment of viral sequences as compared to non-enriched sample preparations by selectively looking for and counting read sequences obtained from shotgun sequencing. Using shotgun sequencing of total DNA or RNA, viral targets were detected at concentrations corresponding to the predicted level, providing a foundation for estimating the effectiveness of virion enrichment. Virion enrichment typically produced a 1000-fold increase in the proportion of DNA virus sequences. For RNA virions the gain was less pronounced with a maximum 13-fold increase. This enrichment varied between the different sample concentrations, with no clear trend. Despite that less sequencing was required to identify target sequences, it was not evident from our data that a lower detection level was achieved by virion enrichment compared to shotgun sequencing.

  15. Early ERPs to faces and objects are driven by phase, not amplitude spectrum information: evidence from parametric, test-retest, single-subject analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, Magdalena M; Pernet, Cyril R; Rousselet, Guillaume A

    2012-12-14

    One major challenge in determining how the brain categorizes objects is to tease apart the contribution of low-level and high-level visual properties to behavioral and brain imaging data. So far, studies using stimuli with equated amplitude spectra have shown that the visual system relies mostly on localized information, such as edges and contours, carried by phase information. However, some researchers have argued that some event-related potentials (ERP) and blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) categorical differences could be driven by nonlocalized information contained in the amplitude spectrum. The goal of this study was to provide the first systematic quantification of the contribution of phase and amplitude spectra to early ERPs to faces and objects. We conducted two experiments in which we recorded electroencephalograms (EEG) from eight subjects, in two sessions each. In the first experiment, participants viewed images of faces and houses containing original or scrambled phase spectra combined with original, averaged, or swapped amplitude spectra. In the second experiment, we parametrically manipulated image phase and amplitude in 10% intervals. We performed a range of analyses including detailed single-subject general linear modeling of ERP data, test-retest reliability, and unique variance analyses. Our results suggest that early ERPs to faces and objects are due to phase information, with almost no contribution from the amplitude spectrum. Importantly, our results should not be used to justify uncontrolled stimuli; to the contrary, our results emphasize the need for stimulus control (including the amplitude spectrum), parametric designs, and systematic data analyses, of which we have seen far too little in ERP vision research.

  16. Proteomic analysis of the herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 transactivator protein in infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Hyung; Knipe, David M

    2015-06-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 (VP16) tegument protein forms a transactivation complex with the cellular proteins host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) and octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (Oct-1) upon entry into the host cell. VP16 has also been shown to interact with a number of virion tegument proteins and viral glycoprotein H to promote viral assembly, but no comprehensive study of the VP16 proteome has been performed at early times postinfection. We therefore performed a proteomic analysis of VP16-interacting proteins at 3 h postinfection. We confirmed the interaction of VP16 with HCF-1 and a large number of cellular Mediator complex proteins, but most surprisingly, we found that the major viral protein associating with VP16 is the infected cell protein 4 (ICP4) immediate-early (IE) transactivator protein. These results raise the potential for a new function for VP16 in associating with the IE ICP4 and playing a role in transactivation of early and late gene expression, in addition to its well-documented function in transactivation of IE gene expression. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. [Differences in spatial structures of the influenza virus M1 protein in crystal, solution and virion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacheva, E N; Dolgov, A A; Chulichkov, A L; Shishkov, A V; Ksenofontov, A L; Fedorova, N V; Baratova, L A

    2012-01-01

    Spatial structure of the influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8, subtype H1N1) M1 protein in a solution and composition of the virion was studied by tritium planigraphy technique. The special algorithm for modeling of the spatial structure is used to simulate the experiment, as well as a set of algorithms predicting secondary structure and disordered regions in proteins. Tertiary structures were refined using the program Rosetta. To compare the structures in solution and in virion, also used the X-ray diffraction data for NM-domain. The main difference between protein structure in solution and crystal is observed in the contact region of N- and M-domains, which are more densely packed in the crystalline state. Locations include the maximum label is almost identical to the unstructured regions of proteins predicted by bioinformatics analysis. These areas are concentrated in the C-domain and in the loop regions between the M-, N-, and C-domains. Analytical centrifugation and dynamic laser light scattering confirm data of tritium planigraphy. Anomalous hydrodynamic size, and low structuring of the M1 protein in solution were found. The multifunctionality of protein in the cell appears to be associated with its plastic tertiary structure, which provides at the expense of unstructured regions of contact with various molecules-partners.

  18. Orsay virus utilizes ribosomal frameshifting to express a novel protein that is incorporated into virions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hongbing; Franz, Carl J.; Wu, Guang; Renshaw, Hilary; Zhao, Guoyan [Departments of Molecular Microbiology and Pathology and Immunology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Firth, Andrew E. [Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1QP (United Kingdom); Wang, David, E-mail: davewang@borcim.wustl.edu [Departments of Molecular Microbiology and Pathology and Immunology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Orsay virus is the first identified virus that is capable of naturally infecting Caenorhabditis elegans. Although it is most closely related to nodaviruses, Orsay virus differs from nodaviruses in its genome organization. In particular, the Orsay virus RNA2 segment encodes a putative novel protein of unknown function, termed delta, which is absent from all known nodaviruses. Here we present evidence that Orsay virus utilizes a ribosomal frameshifting strategy to express a novel fusion protein from the viral capsid (alpha) and delta ORFs. Moreover, the fusion protein was detected in purified virus fractions, demonstrating that it is most likely incorporated into Orsay virions. Furthermore, N-terminal sequencing of both the fusion protein and the capsid protein demonstrated that these proteins must be translated from a non-canonical initiation site. While the function of the alpha–delta fusion remains cryptic, these studies provide novel insights into the fundamental properties of this new clade of viruses. - Highlights: • Orsay virus encodes a novel fusion protein by a ribosomal frameshifting mechanism. • Orsay capsid and fusion protein is translated from a non-canonical initiation site. • The fusion protein is likely incorporated into Orsay virions.

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef protein modulates the lipid composition of virions and host cell membrane microdomains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geyer Matthias

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Nef protein of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses optimizes viral spread in the infected host by manipulating cellular transport and signal transduction machineries. Nef also boosts the infectivity of HIV particles by an unknown mechanism. Recent studies suggested a correlation between the association of Nef with lipid raft microdomains and its positive effects on virion infectivity. Furthermore, the lipidome analysis of HIV-1 particles revealed a marked enrichment of classical raft lipids and thus identified HIV-1 virions as an example for naturally occurring membrane microdomains. Since Nef modulates the protein composition and function of membrane microdomains we tested here if Nef also has the propensity to alter microdomain lipid composition. Results Quantitative mass spectrometric lipidome analysis of highly purified HIV-1 particles revealed that the presence of Nef during virus production from T lymphocytes enforced their raft character via a significant reduction of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine species and a specific enrichment of sphingomyelin. In contrast, Nef did not significantly affect virion levels of phosphoglycerolipids or cholesterol. The observed alterations in virion lipid composition were insufficient to mediate Nef's effect on particle infectivity and Nef augmented virion infectivity independently of whether virus entry was targeted to or excluded from membrane microdomains. However, altered lipid compositions similar to those observed in virions were also detected in detergent-resistant membrane preparations of virus producing cells. Conclusion Nef alters not only the proteome but also the lipid composition of host cell microdomains. This novel activity represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which Nef could manipulate HIV-1 target cells to facilitate virus propagation in vivo.

  20. An investigation to determine if a single validated density-elasticity relationship can be used for subject specific finite element analyses of human long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Sebastian; Göttlinger, Michael; Augat, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Subject-specific FE-models of human long bones have to predict mechanical parameters with sufficient accuracy to be applicable in a clinical setting. One of the main aspects in subject-specific FE-models of bones regarding accuracy is the modeling of the material inhomogeneity. The goal of this study was therefore to develop FE-models of human femurs and investigate if a single validated density-elasticity relationship can be used for subject specific finite element analyses of human long bones, when the task is to predict the bone's mechanical response to load. To this aim, 23 human cadaver femurs were tested in axial compression with a load of 1000 N. Strains, local displacements, and axial bone stiffness were determined. Subject-specific FE-models were developed for each bone based on quantitative CT-scans. Three different density-elasticity relationships were retrieved from the literature, and were implemented in the FE-models. The predicted mechanical values depended largely on the used equation. The most reasonable equation showed a mean error of -11% in strain prediction, a mean error of -23% in local displacement prediction, and a mean error of +23% in axial stiffness prediction. The scatter of the predictions was very low in all three categories of measurements with a 1.96 standard deviation of about 30% to the mean errors. In conclusion, a framework for subject-specific FE-models was developed that was able to predict surface strains and bone deformation with good accuracy by using a single density-elasticity relationship. However, it was also found that the most appropriate density-elasticity relationship was specimen-specific. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Combination of Structural and Empirical Analyses Delineates the Key Contacts Mediating Stability and Affinity Increases in an Optimized Biotherapeutic Single-chain Fv (scFv).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chao; Terraube, Virginie; Tam, Amy Sze Pui; Stochaj, Wayne; Fennell, Brian J; Lin, Laura; Stahl, Mark; LaVallie, Edward R; Somers, Will; Finlay, William J J; Mosyak, Lydia; Bard, Joel; Cunningham, Orla

    2016-01-15

    Fully-human single-chain Fv (scFv) proteins are key potential building blocks of bispecific therapeutic antibodies, but they often suffer from manufacturability and clinical development limitations such as instability and aggregation. The causes of these scFv instability problems, in proteins that should be theoretically stable, remains poorly understood. To inform the future development of such molecules, we carried out a comprehensive structural analysis of the highly stabilized anti-CXCL13 scFv E10. E10 was derived from the parental 3B4 using complementarity-determining region (CDR)-restricted mutagenesis and tailored selection and screening strategies, and carries four mutations in VL-CDR3. High-resolution crystal structures of parental 3B4 and optimized E10 scFvs were solved in the presence and absence of human CXCL13. In parallel, a series of scFv mutants was generated to interrogate the individual contribution of each of the four mutations to stability and affinity improvements. In combination, these analyses demonstrated that the optimization of E10 was primarily mediated by removing clashes between both the VL and the VH, and between the VL and CXCL13. Importantly, a single, germline-encoded VL-CDR3 residue mediated the key difference between the stable and unstable forms of the scFv. This work demonstrates that, aside from being the critical mediators of specificity and affinity, CDRs may also be the primary drivers of biotherapeutic developability. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Diagnostic single gene analyses beyond Sanger. Economic high-throughput sequencing of small genes involved in congenital coagulation and platelet disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najm, Juliane; Rath, Matthias; Schröder, Winnie; Felbor, Ute

    2017-07-17

    Molecular testing of congenital coagulation and platelet disorders offers confirmation of clinical diagnoses, supports genetic counselling, and enables predictive and prenatal diagnosis. In some cases, genotype-phenotype correlations are important for predicting the clinical course of the disease and adaptation of individualized therapy. Until recently, genotyping has been mainly performed by Sanger sequencing. While next generation sequencing (NGS) enables the parallel analysis of multiple genes, the cost-value ratio of custom-made panels can be unfavorable for analyses of specific small genes. The aim of this study was to transfer genotyping of small genes involved in congenital coagulation and platelet disorders from Sanger sequencing to an NGS-based method. A LR-PCR approach for target enrichment of the entire genomic regions of the genes F7, F10, F11, F12, GATA1, MYH9, TUBB1 and WAS was combined with high-throughput sequencing on a MiSeq platform. NGS detected all variants that had previously been identified by Sanger sequencing. Our results demonstrate that this approach is an accurate and flexible tool for molecular genetic diagnostics of single small genes.

  3. Effect of the deletion of genes encoding proteins of the extracellular virion form of vaccinia virus on vaccine immunogenicity and protective effectiveness in the mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement A Meseda

    Full Text Available Antibodies to both infectious forms of vaccinia virus, the mature virion (MV and the enveloped virion (EV, as well as cell-mediated immune response appear to be important for protection against smallpox. EV virus particles, although more labile and less numerous than MV, are important for dissemination and spread of virus in infected hosts and thus important in virus pathogenesis. The importance of the EV A33 and B5 proteins for vaccine induced immunity and protection in a murine intranasal challenge model was evaluated by deletion of both the A33R and B5R genes in a vaccine-derived strain of vaccinia virus. Deletion of either A33R or B5R resulted in viruses with a small plaque phenotype and reduced virus yields, as reported previously, whereas deletion of both EV protein-encoding genes resulted in a virus that formed small infection foci that were detectable and quantifiable only by immunostaining and an even more dramatic decrease in total virus yield in cell culture. Deletion of B5R, either as a single gene knockout or in the double EV gene knockout virus, resulted in a loss of EV neutralizing activity, but all EV gene knockout viruses still induced a robust neutralizing activity against the vaccinia MV form of the virus. The effect of elimination of A33 and/or B5 on the protection afforded by vaccination was evaluated by intranasal challenge with a lethal dose of either vaccinia virus WR or IHD-J, a strain of vaccinia virus that produces relatively higher amounts of EV virus. The results from multiple experiments, using a range of vaccination doses and virus challenge doses, and using mortality, morbidity, and virus dissemination as endpoints, indicate that the absence of A33 and B5 have little effect on the ability of a vaccinia vaccine virus to provide protection against a lethal intranasal challenge in a mouse model.

  4. Understanding the Process of Envelope Glycoprotein Incorporation into Virions in Simian and Feline Immunodeficiency Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Affranchino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lentiviral envelope glycoproteins (Env mediate virus entry by interacting with specific receptors present at the cell surface, thereby determining viral tropism and pathogenesis. Therefore, Env incorporation into the virions formed by assembly of the viral Gag polyprotein at the plasma membrane of the infected cells is a key step in the replication cycle of lentiviruses. Besides being useful models of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infections in humans and valuable tools for developing AIDS therapies and vaccines, simian and feline immunodeficiency viruses (SIV and FIV, respectively are relevant animal retroviruses; the study of which provides important information on how lentiviral replication strategies have evolved. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the incorporation of the SIV and FIV Env glycoproteins into viral particles.

  5. Electron cryotomography of measles virus reveals how matrix protein coats the ribonucleocapsid within intact virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeroos, Lassi; Huiskonen, Juha T; Ora, Ari; Susi, Petri; Butcher, Sarah J

    2011-11-01

    Measles virus is a highly infectious, enveloped, pleomorphic virus. We combined electron cryotomography with subvolume averaging and immunosorbent electron microscopy to characterize the 3D ultrastructure of the virion. We show that the matrix protein forms helices coating the helical ribonucleocapsid rather than coating the inner leaflet of the membrane, as previously thought. The ribonucleocapsid is folded into tight bundles through matrix-matrix interactions. The implications for virus assembly are that the matrix already tightly interacts with the ribonucleocapsid in the cytoplasm, providing a structural basis for the previously observed regulation of RNA transcription by the matrix protein. Next, the matrix-covered ribonucleocapsids are transported to the plasma membrane, where the matrix interacts with the envelope glycoproteins during budding. These results are relevant to the nucleocapsid organization and budding of other paramyxoviruses, where isolated matrix has been observed to form helices.

  6. Interactions Between HIV-1 Gag and Viral RNA Genome Enhance Virion Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilley, Kari A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    in this process. The mechanism that allows HIV-1 to achieve such high efficiency of genome packaging when a packageable viral RNA is not required for virus assembly is currently unknown. In this report, we examined the role of HIV-1 RNA in virus assembly and found that packageable HIV-1 RNA enhances particle...... production when Gag is expressed at levels similar to those in cells containing one provirus. However, such enhancement is diminished when Gag is overexpressed, suggesting that the effects of viral RNA can be replaced by increased Gag concentration in cells. We also showed that the specific interactions...... between Gag and viral RNA are required for the enhancement of particle production. Taken together, these studies are consistent with our previous hypothesis that specific dimeric viral RNA:Gag interactions are the nucleation event of infectious virion assembly, ensuring that one RNA dimer is packaged...

  7. Localization of the Houdinisome (Ejection Proteins inside the Bacteriophage P22 Virion by Bubblegram Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The P22 capsid is a T=7 icosahedrally symmetric protein shell with a portal protein dodecamer at one 5-fold vertex. Extending outwards from that vertex is a short tail, and putatively extending inwards is a 15-nm-long α-helical barrel formed by the C-terminal domains of portal protein subunits. In addition to the densely packed genome, the capsid contains three “ejection proteins” (E-proteins [gp7, gp16, and gp20] destined to exit from the tightly sealed capsid during the process of DNA delivery into target cells. We estimated their copy numbers by quantitative SDS-PAGE as approximately 12 molecules per virion of gp16 and gp7 and 30 copies of gp20. To localize them, we used bubblegram imaging, an adaptation of cryo-electron microscopy in which gaseous bubbles induced in proteins by prolonged irradiation are used to map the proteins’ locations. We applied this technique to wild-type P22, a triple mutant lacking all three E-proteins, and three mutants each lacking one E-protein. We conclude that all three E-proteins are loosely clustered around the portal axis, in the region displaced radially inwards from the portal crown. The bubblegram data imply that approximately half of the α-helical barrel seen in the portal crystal structure is disordered in the mature virion, and parts of the disordered region present binding sites for E-proteins. Thus positioned, the E-proteins are strategically placed to pass down the shortened barrel and through the portal ring and the tail, as they exit from the capsid during an infection.

  8. Nuclear Factor kappa B is required for the production of infectious human herpesvirus 8 virions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin N Blattman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 infection leads to potent activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFB in primary and transformed cells. We used recombinant HHV8 (rKSHV.219 expressing green fluorescent protein under the constitutive cellular promoter elongation factor 2 and red fluorescent protein under an early HHV8 lytic gene promoter T1.1, to monitor replication during infection of human foreskin fibroblasts (HF, noting changes in NFB activity. In primary HF, NFB levels do not affect HHV8 ability to establish infection or maintain latency. Furthermore, there was no effect on the percent of cells undergoing reactivation from latency, and there were similar numbers of released and cell associated HHV8 viral particles following reactivation in the presence of inhibitors. Reactivation of HHV8 in latently infected HF in the presence of NFB inhibitors resulted in production of viral particles that did not efficiently establish infection, due to deficiencies in binding and/or entry into normally permissive cells. Exogenous expression of glycoprotein M, an envelope protein involved in viral binding and entry was able to partially overcome the deficiency induced by NFB inhibitors. Our data indicate that in primary cells, NFB is not required for infection, establishment of latency, or entry into the lytic cycle, but is required for the expression of virion associated genes involved in the initial steps of virion infectivity. These studies suggest that strategies to inhibit NFB may prevent HHV8 spread and should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for preventing HHV8 associated diseases.

  9. Characterization of isolates of Citrus tristeza virus by sequential analyses of enzyme immunoassays and capillary electrophoresis-single-strand conformation polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardello, G; Raspagliesi, D; Bar-Joseph, M; Catara, A

    2012-05-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the causal agent of tristeza disease, which is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus crops worldwide. This paper describes a method for the rapid detection and genotyping of naturally spreading CTV isolates. This method uses ELISA or dot-blot immunological tests to detect trees infected with CTV. The reaction wells or membrane spots for which there is a positive reaction are sequentially treated by (i) washing and elution of viral RNA from the trapped samples, (ii) one-step synthesis of cDNA and PCR and (iii) automated fluorescence-based capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) analysis of amplification products. Comparative CE-SSCP results are presented for CTV RNA extracted directly from infected leaves and ELISA plates or from membranes. In the analyses of all of these RNA samples, the p18, p27 and p23 CTV genes were targeted for amplification. Specific profiles of forward and reverse strands were obtained from a group of eight CTV isolates collected in Sicily, each with distinct biological characteristics, which were analyzed using the conventional two-step procedure (immunological detection followed by CE-SSCP molecular characterization after RNA isolation) or in a continuous process of ELISA/CE-SSCP or dot-blot/CE-SSCP starting from infected plant material. The combined method is simple, highly sensitive and reproducible, thus allowing the processing of numerous field samples for a variety of epidemiological needs. The sequential processing of an ELISA or dot-blot/ELISA followed by CE-SSCP is expected to allow the rapid detection of recent CTV infections along with the simultaneous characterization of the genetic diversity and structure of the population of newly invading CTV. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nucleotide sequence of the 5'nontranslated and virion polypeptides regions of coxsackievirus B6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S; Tsutsumi, R; Sato, S

    1999-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of coxsackievirus B6 (CVB6) has been determined, and the nucleotides encoding the 5' nontranslated region (5' NTR) and virion polypeptides (VP4, 2, 3 and 1) were compared with other serotype CVBs. An Unweighted Pair-Group Method Analysis (UPGMA) of phylogenetic trees indicated that the 5' NTR of CVB6 locates on an independent branch from the other CVBs. The tree based on the amino acid sequences showed that CVB6 has close correlation with CVB4 in the VP4 and VP2 regions, with CVB1 and CVB5 in the VP3 region, and with CVB5 in the VP1 region. Amino acid sequences of variable regions within the VP2, VP3, and VP1 of CVB6 were unique among CVBs. Thus, by comparison of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of these variable regions, CVB6 can be easily distinguished from other serotypes. In addition, serine, instead of glycine, was found to locate at the amino-terminus of the VP1 region of CVB6, indicating that CVB6 has a unique cleavage site (i.e., glutamine/serine instead of glutamine/glycine) for proteinase 3C of Picornaviridae.

  11. Oligomerization within Virions and Subcellular Localization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Caroline; Schwartz, Olivier; Mammano, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    Previous biochemical and genetic evidence indicated that the functional form of retroviral integrase protein (IN) is a multimer. A direct demonstration of IN oligomerization during the infectious cycle was, however, missing, due to the absence of a sensitive detection method. We describe here the generation of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral clones carrying IN protein tagged with highly antigenic epitopes. In this setting, we could readily visualize IN both in producer cells and in viral particles. More interestingly, we detected IN oligomers, the formation of which was dependent on disulfide bridges and took place inside virions. Additionally, expression of a tagged HIV-1 IN in the absence of other viral components resulted in almost exclusive nuclear accumulation of the protein. Mutation of a conserved cysteine in the proposed dimer interface determined the loss of viral infectivity, associated with a reduction of IN oligomer formation and the redistribution of the mutated protein in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Epitope tagging of HIV-1 IN expressed alone or in the context of a replication-competent viral clone provides powerful tools to validate debated issues on the implication of this enzyme in different steps of the viral cycle. PMID:10233971

  12. Hemozoin as a novel adjuvant for inactivated whole virion influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uraki, Ryuta; Das, Subash C; Hatta, Masato; Kiso, Maki; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Ozawa, Makoto; Coban, Cevayir; Ishii, Ken J; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-15

    Because vaccination is an effective means to protect humans from influenza viruses, extensive efforts have been made to develop not only new vaccines, but also for new adjuvants to enhance the efficacy of existing inactivated vaccines. Here, we examined the adjuvanticity of synthetic hemozoin, a synthetic version of the malarial by-product hemozoin, on the vaccine efficacy of inactivated whole influenza viruses in a mouse model. We found that mice immunized twice with hemozoin-adjuvanted inactivated A/California/04/2009 (H1N1pdm09) or A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) virus elicited higher virus-specific antibody responses than did mice immunized with non-adjuvanted counterparts. Furthermore, mice immunized with hemozoin-adjuvanted inactivated viruses were better protected from lethal challenge with influenza viruses than were mice immunized with non-adjuvanted inactivated vaccines. Our results show that hemozoin improves the immunogenicity of inactivated influenza viruses, and is thus a promising adjuvant for inactivated whole virion influenza vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Visualization of herpes simplex virus type 1 virions using fluorescent colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Lyns; Joshi, Poorval; Dingle, Laura; Huang, Eugene; Grzesik, Peter; Desai, Prashant J

    2017-03-01

    Our laboratory was one of the first to engineer a live fluorescent tag, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), that marked the capsid of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and subsequently maturing virus as the particle made its way to the cell surface. In the present study we sought to increase the repertoire of colors available as fusion to the small capsid protein, VP26, so that they can be used alone or in conjunction with other fluorescent tags (fused to other HSV proteins) to follow the virus as it enters and replicates within the cell. We have now generated viruses expressing VP26 fusions with Cerulean, Venus, mOrange, tdTomato, mCherry, and Dronpa3 fluorescent proteins. These fusions were made in a repaired UL35 gene (VP26) background. These fusions do not affect the replication properties of the virus expressing the fusion polypeptide and the fusion tag was stably associated with intranuclear capsids and mature virions. Of note we could not isolate viruses expressing fusions with fluorescent proteins that have a tendency to dimerize. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The tripartite virions of the brome mosaic virus have distinct physical properties that affect the timing of the infection process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Robert; Tragesser, Brady; Ni, Peng; Ma, Xiang; Dragnea, Bogdan; Kao, C Cheng

    2014-06-01

    The three subsets of virions that comprise the Brome mosaic virus (BMV) were previously thought to be indistinguishable. This work tested the hypothesis that distinct capsid-RNA interactions in the BMV virions allow different rates of viral RNA release. Several results support distinct interactions between the capsid and the BMV genomic RNAs. First, the deletion of the first eight residues of the BMV coat protein (CP) resulted in the RNA1-containing particles having altered morphologies, while those containing RNA2 were unaffected. Second, subsets of the BMV particles separated by density gradients into a pool enriched for RNA1 (B1) and for RNA2 and RNA3/4 (B2.3/4) were found to have different physiochemical properties. Compared to the B2.3/4 particles, the B1 particles were more sensitive to protease digestion and had greater resistivity to nanoindentation by atomic force microscopy and increased susceptibility to nuclease digestion. Mapping studies showed that portions of the arginine-rich N-terminal tail of the CP could interact with RNA1. Mutational analysis in the putative RNA1-contacting residues severely reduced encapsidation of BMV RNA1 without affecting the encapsidation of RNA2. Finally, during infection of plants, the more easily released RNA1 accumulated to higher levels early in the infection. Viruses with genomes packaged in distinct virions could theoretically release the genomes at different times to regulate the timing of gene expression. Using an RNA virus composed of three particles, we demonstrated that the RNA in one of the virions is released more easily than the other two in vitro. The differential RNA release is due to distinct interactions between the viral capsid protein and the RNAs. The ease of RNA release is also correlated with the more rapid accumulation of that RNA in infected plants. Our study identified a novel role for capsid-RNA interactions in the regulation of a viral infection.

  15. Vaccinia Virus Protein F12 Associates with Intracellular Enveloped Virions through an Interaction with A36▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Sara C.; Ward, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Vaccinia virus is the prototypical member of the family Poxviridae. Three morphologically distinct forms are produced during infection: intracellular mature virions (IMV), intracellular enveloped virions (IEV), and extracellular enveloped virions (EEV). Two viral proteins, F12 and A36, are found exclusively on IEV but not on IMV and EEV. Analysis of membranes from infected cells showed that F12 was only associated with membranes and is not an integral membrane protein. A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed an interaction between amino acids 351 to 458 of F12 and amino acids 91 to 111 of A36. We generated a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses an F12, which lacks residues 351 to 458. Characterization of this recombinant revealed a small-plaque phenotype and a subsequent defect in virus release similar to a recombinant virus that had F12L deleted. In addition, F12 lacking residues 351 to 458 was unable to associate with membranes in infected cells. These results suggest that F12 associates with IEV through an interaction with A36 and that this interaction is critical for the function of F12 during viral egress. PMID:19052096

  16. Determination of avian influenza A (H9N2) virions by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry based magnetic immunoassay with gold nanoparticles labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guangyang; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Shi, Kaiwen; Zhang, Xing; Li, Xiaoting; Wu, Qiumei; Pang, Daiwen; Hu, Bin

    2017-12-01

    Avian influenza viruses are the pathogens of global poultry epidemics, and may even cause the human infections. Here, we proposed a novel inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) based immunoassay with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) labeling for the determination of H9N2 virions. Magnetic-beads modified with anti-influenza A H9N2 hemagglutinin mono-antibody (mAb-HA) were utilized for the capture of H9N2 virions in complex matrix; and Au NPs conjugated with mAb-HA were employed for the specific labeling of H9N2 virions for subsequent ICP-MS detection. With a sandwich immunoassay strategy, this method exhibited a high specificity for H9N2 among other influenza A virions such as H1N1 and H3N2. Under the optimized conditions, this method could detect as low as 0.63 ng mL- 1 H9N2 virions with the linear range of 2-400 ng mL- 1, the relative standard deviation for seven replicate detections of H9N2 virions was 7.2% (c = 10 ng mL- 1). The developed method was applied for the detection of H9N2 virions in real-world chicken dung samples, and the recovery for the spiking samples was 91.4-116.9%. This method is simple, rapid, sensitive, selective, reliable and has a good application potential for virions detection in real-world samples.

  17. The Envelope Gene of Hepatitis B Virus Is Implicated in Both Differential Virion Secretion and Genome Replication Capacities between Genotype B and Genotype C Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Haodi; Qin, Yanli; Chen, Chaoyang; Zhang, Fei; Li, Cheng; Zong, Li; Wang, Yongxiang; Zhang, Jiming; Li, Jisu; Wen, Yumei; Tong, Shuping

    2017-03-28

    Chronic infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype C is associated with a prolonged replicative phase and an increased risk of liver cancer, compared with genotype B infection. We previously found lower replication capacity but more efficient virion secretion by genotype C than genotype B isolates. Virion secretion requires interaction between core particles and ENVELOPE proteins. In the present study, chimeric constructs between genotype B and genotype C clones were generated to identify the structural basis for differential virion secretion. In addition to dimeric constructs, we also employed 1.1mer constructs, where the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter drove pregenomic RNA transcription. Through transient transfection experiments in Huh7 cells, we found that exchanging the entire envelope gene or just its S region could enhance virion secretion by genotype B clones while diminishing virion secretion by genotype C. Site-directed mutagenesis established the contribution of genotype-specific divergence at codons 108 and 115 in the preS1 region, as well as codon 126 in the S region, to differential virion secretion. Surprisingly, exchanging the envelope gene or just its S region, but not the core gene or 3' S region, could markedly increase intracellular replicative DNA for genotype C clones but diminish that for genotype B, although the underlying mechanism remains to be clarified.

  18. Phylogenetic and Physicochemical Analyses Enhance the Classification of Rare Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Variants in Type 1 and 2 Long-QT Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giudicessi, John R.; Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Tester, David J.; Alders, Marielle; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Background-Hundreds of nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs) have been identified in the 2 most common long-QT syndrome-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1 and KCNH2). Unfortunately, an approximate to 3% background rate of rare KCNQ1 and KCNH2 nsSNVs amongst healthy individuals complicates the

  19. Modeling Science Achievement Differences between Single-Sex and Coeducational Schools: Analyses from Hong Kong, SAR and New Zealand from TIMSS 1995, 1999, and 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconu, Dana V.

    2012-01-01

    There is a broad interest in narrowing achievement gaps among all groups of students and improving education by scientifically sound methods. On October 25, 2006, the United States Department of Education published new regulations allowing single-sex education in public schools whenever schools think it will improve student achievement. Thus far,…

  20. The Observation and Execution of Actions Share Motor and Somatosensory Voxels in all Tested Subjects : Single-Subject Analyses of Unsmoothed fMRI Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazzola, Valeria; Keysers, Christian

    Many neuroimaging studies of the mirror neuron system (MNS) examine if certain voxels in the brain are shared between action observation and execution (shared voxels, sVx). Unfortunately, finding sVx in standard group analyses is not a guarantee that sVx exist in individual subjects. Using

  1. Single genetic stock of kawakawa Euthynnus affinis (Cantor, 1849) along the Indian coast inferred from sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA D-loop region

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    GirishKumar; Kunal, S.P.; Menezes, M.R.; Meena, R.

    , genetic variation was assessed using sequence analyses of Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region. A 500 bp segment of D-loop region was sequenced in 400 samples collected from eight localities (Veraval (VE), Ratnagiri (RA), Kochi (KO), Kavaratti (KA...

  2. Lytic activity of the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 of Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donovan David M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a food-borne pathogen and the most common cause of infections in hospitalized patients. The increase in the resistance of this pathogen to antibacterials has made necessary the development of new anti-staphylococcal agents. In this context, bacteriophage lytic enzymes such as endolysins and structural peptidoglycan (PG hydrolases have received considerable attention as possible antimicrobials against gram-positive bacteria. Results S. aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 (phiIPLA88 contains a virion-associated muralytic enzyme (HydH5 encoded by orf58, which is located in the morphogenetic module. Comparative bioinformatic analysis revealed that HydH5 significantly resembled other peptidoglycan hydrolases encoded by staphylococcal phages. The protein consists of 634 amino acid residues. Two putative lytic domains were identified: an N-terminal CHAP (cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase domain (135 amino acid residues, and a C-terminal LYZ2 (lysozyme subfamily 2 domain (147 amino acid residues. These domains were also found when a predicted three-dimensional structure of HydH5 was made which provided the basis for deletion analysis. The complete HydH5 protein and truncated proteins containing only each catalytic domain were overproduced in E. coli and purified from inclusion bodies by subsequent refolding. Truncated and full-length HydH5 proteins were all able to bind and lyse S. aureus Sa9 cells as shown by binding assays, zymogram analyses and CFU reduction analysis. HydH5 demonstrated high antibiotic activity against early exponential cells, at 45°C and in the absence of divalent cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+. Thermostability assays showed that HydH5 retained 72% of its activity after 5 min at 100°C. Conclusions The virion-associated PG hydrolase HydH5 has lytic activity against S. aureus, which makes it attractive as antimicrobial for food biopreservation and anti

  3. Enterovirus 71 virion-associated galectin-1 facilitates viral replication and stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Huan Lee

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection causes a myriad of diseases from mild hand-foot-and-mouth disease or herpangina to fatal brain stem encephalitis complicated with pulmonary edema. Several severe EV71 endemics have occurred in Asia-Pacific region, including Taiwan, and have become a serious threat to children's health. EV71 infection is initiated by the attachment of the virion to the target cell surface. Although this process relies primarily upon interaction between viruses and cell surface receptors, soluble factors may also influence the binding of EV71 to host cells. Galectin-1 has been reported to participate in several virus infections, but is not addressed in EV71. In this study, we found that the serum levels of galectin-1 in EV71-infected children were higher than those in non-infected people. In EV71 infected cells, galectin-1 was found to be associated with the EV71 VP1 and VP3 via carbohydrate residues and subsequently released and bound to another cell surface along with the virus. EV71 propagated from galectin-1 knockdown SK-N-SH cells exhibited lower infectivity in cultured cells and less pathogenicity in mice than the virus propagated from parental cells. In addition, this galectin-1-free EV71 virus was sensitive to high temperature and lost its viability after long-term storage, which could be restored following supplement of recombinant galectin-1. Taken together, our findings uncover a new role of galectin-1 in facilitating EV71 virus infection.

  4. Determining the frequency and mechanisms of HIV-1 and HIV-2 RNA copackaging by single-virion analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilley, Kari A; Ni, Na; Nikolaitchik, Olga A

    2011-01-01

    -2 RNA can be copackaged into the same particle. To determine the frequency of HIV-1 and HIV-2 RNA copackaging and to dissect the mechanisms that allow the heterologous RNA copackaging, we directly visualized the RNA content of each particle by using RNA-binding proteins tagged with fluorescent...... proteins to label the viral genomes. We found that when HIV-1 and HIV-2 RNA are present in viral particles at similar ratios, ∼10% of the viral particles encapsidate both HIV-1 and HIV-2 RNAs. Furthermore, heterologous RNA copackaging can be promoted by mutating the 6-nucleotide (6-nt) dimer initiation...... signal (DIS) to discourage RNA homodimerization or to encourage RNA heterodimerization, indicating that HIV-1 and HIV-2 RNA can heterodimerize prior to packaging using the DIS sequences. We also observed that the coassembly of HIV-1 and HIV-2 Gag proteins is not required for the heterologous RNA...

  5. Analyses of Two Aspects of Study Design for Bioassessment With Benthic Macroinvertebrates: Single Versus Multiple Habitat Sampling and Taxonomic Identification Level

    OpenAIRE

    Hiner, Stephen W.

    2003-01-01

    Bioassessment is the concept of evaluating the ecological condition of habitats by surveying the resident assemblages of living organisms. Conducting bioassessment with benthic macroinvertebrates is still evolving and continues to be refined. There are strongly divided opinions about study design, sampling methods, laboratory analyses, and data analysis. Two issues that are currently being debated about study design for bioassessment in streams were examined here: 1) what habitats within stre...

  6. Univariate and multiple linear regression analyses for 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 14 genes predisposing to chronic glomerular diseases and IgA nephropathy in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Sui, Weiguo; Xue, Wen; Wu, Junyong; Chen, Jiejing; Dai, Yong

    2014-09-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is a complex trait regulated by the interaction among multiple physiologic regulatory systems and probably involving numerous genes, which leads to inconsistent findings in genetic studies. One possibility of failure to replicate some single-locus results is that the underlying genetics of IgAN nephropathy is based on multiple genes with minor effects. To learn the association between 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 14 genes predisposing to chronic glomerular diseases and IgAN in Han males, the 23 SNPs genotypes of 21 Han males were detected and analyzed with a BaiO gene chip, and their associations were analyzed with univariate analysis and multiple linear regression analysis. Analysis showed that CTLA4 rs231726 and CR2 rs1048971 revealed a significant association with IgAN. These findings support the multi-gene nature of the etiology of IgAN and propose a potential gene-gene interactive model for future studies.

  7. Transcriptomic responses of the aphid Myzus persicae nicotianae Blackman (Hemiptera: Aphididae to insecticides: Analyses in the single Chilean clone of the tobacco aphid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cabrera-Brandt

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The tobacco aphid Myzus persicae nicotianae Blackman is a subspecies of the highly polyphagous and agricultural pest Myzus persicae (Sulzer. For its control, insecticide applications are widely used, but resistance to numerous molecules has been reported, displaying at least three insecticide resistance mechanisms, including: (i elevated carboxylesterases (E-Carb, (ii modification of the acetylcholinesterase (MACE, and (iii kdr and super-kdr insensitivity mutations. In Chile, populations of the tobacco aphid are characterized by the presence of a single predominant clone, which is also present in high proportions in other countries of the Americas. This aphid clone exhibits low levels of carboxylesterase activity and is kdr susceptible, but the MACE mechanism of insecticide resistance has not been studied. In order to characterize the tobacco aphid in terms of the MACE mechanism and to identify a preliminary group of aphid genes putatively involved in insecticide resistance, a cDNA microarray was used to study the transcriptomic responses when aphids are sprayed with a carbamate insecticide. The single Chilean clone of the tobacco aphid was characterized as MACE susceptible, but we found 38 transcripts significantly regulated by insecticide exposure (13 up- and 25 down-regulated genes. The expression of six of them was validated by qRT-PCR experiments at several time points (6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, and 42 h after insecticide application. This mutational and transcriptomic characterization of the tobacco aphid responding to insecticide spray opens new hypotheses in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying insecticide resistance.

  8. Analysis of the role of the coat protein N-terminal segment in Potato virus X virion stability and functional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashina, Elena; Ksenofontov, Alexander; Fedorova, Natalia; Badun, Gennady; Mukhamedzhanova, Anna; Karpova, Olga; Rodionova, Nina; Baratova, Lyudmila; Dobrov, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that intact Potato virus X (PVX) virions cannot be translated in cell-free systems, but acquire this capacity by the binding of PVX-specific triple gene block protein 1 (TGBp1) or after phosphorylation of the exposed N-terminal segment of intravirus coat protein (CP) by protein kinases. With the help of in vitro mutagenesis, a nonphosphorylatable PVX mutant (denoted ST PVX) was prepared in which all 12 S and T residues in the 20-residue-long N-terminal CP segment were substituted by A or G. Contrary to expectations, ST PVX was infectious, produced normal progeny and was translated in vitro in the absence of any additional factors. We suggest that the N-terminal PVX CP segment somehow participates in virion assembly in vivo and that CP subunits in ST virions may differ in structure from those in the wild-type (UK3 strain). In the present work, to test this suggestion, we performed a comparative tritium planigraphy study of CP structure in UK3 and ST virions. It was found that the profile of tritium incorporation into ST mutant virions in some CP segments differed from that of normal UK3 virions and from UK3 complexed with the PVX movement protein TGBp1. It is proposed that amino acid substitutions in ST CP and the TGBp1-driven remodelling of UK3 virions induce structural alterations in intravirus CPs. These alterations affect the predicted RNA recognition motif of PVX CP, but in different ways: for ST PVX, labelling is increased in α-helices 6 and 7, whereas, in remodelled UK3, labelling is increased in the β-sheet strands β3, β4 and β5. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2011 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  9. WASP-36b: A NEW TRANSITING PLANET AROUND A METAL-POOR G-DWARF, AND AN INVESTIGATION INTO ANALYSES BASED ON A SINGLE TRANSIT LIGHT CURVE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A. M. S.; Anderson, D. R.; Hellier, C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Smalley, B.; Southworth, J. [Astrophysics Group, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Collier Cameron, A. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, Fife, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Gillon, M.; Jehin, E. [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, Allee du 6 Aout, 17 Bat. B5C, Liege 1 (Belgium); Lendl, M.; Queloz, D.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Pepe, F.; Segransan, D.; Udry, S. [Observatoire de Geneve, Universite de Geneve, 51 Chemin des Maillettes, 1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); West, R. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Barros, S. C. C.; Pollacco, D. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University, University Road, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Street, R. A., E-mail: amss@astro.keele.ac.uk [Las Cumbres Observatory, 6740 Cortona Drive Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    We report the discovery, from WASP and CORALIE, of a transiting exoplanet in a 1.54 day orbit. The host star, WASP-36, is a magnitude V = 12.7, metal-poor G2 dwarf (T{sub eff} = 5959 {+-} 134 K), with [Fe/H] =-0.26 {+-} 0.10. We determine the planet to have mass and radius, respectively, 2.30 {+-} 0.07 and 1.28 {+-} 0.03 times that of Jupiter. We have eight partial or complete transit light curves, from four different observatories, which allow us to investigate the potential effects on the fitted system parameters of using only a single light curve. We find that the solutions obtained by analyzing each of these light curves independently are consistent with our global fit to all the data, despite the apparent presence of correlated noise in at least two of the light curves.

  10. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Rab32 Aggregation and Its Implications for Virion Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tu M.; Tran, Si C.; Lim, Yun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular factors for viral propagation. Using high-throughput next-generation sequencing, we analyzed the host transcriptomic changes and identified 30 candidate genes which were upregulated in cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells. Of these candidates, we selected Rab32 for further investigation. Rab32 is a small GTPase that regulates a variety of intracellular membrane-trafficking events in various cell types. In this study, we demonstrated that both mRNA and protein levels of Rab32 were increased in HCV-infected cells. Furthermore, we showed that HCV infection converted the predominantly expressed GTP-bound Rab32 to GDP-bound Rab32, contributing to the aggregation of Rab32 and thus making it less sensitive to cellular degradation machinery. In addition, GDP-bound Rab32 selectively interacted with HCV core protein and deposited core protein into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated Rab32-derived aggregated structures in the perinuclear region, which were likely to be viral assembly sites. Using RNA interference technology, we demonstrated that Rab32 was required for the assembly step but not for other stages of the HCV life cycle. Taken together, these data suggest that HCV may modulate Rab32 activity to facilitate virion assembly. IMPORTANCE Rab32, a member of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, regulates various intracellular membrane-trafficking events in many cell types. In this study, we showed that HCV infection concomitantly increased Rab32 expression at the transcriptional level and altered the balance between GDP- and GTP-bound Rab32 toward production of Rab32-GDP. GDP-bound Rab32 selectively interacted with HCV core protein and enriched core in the ER-associated Rab32-derived aggregated structures that were probably necessary for viral assembly. Indeed, we showed that Rab32 was specifically required for the assembly of HCV. Collectively, our study identifies that Rab32 is a novel

  11. Lymphotropic Virions Affect Chemokine Receptor-Mediated Neural Signaling and Apoptosis: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jialin; Ghorpade, Anuja; Niemann, Douglas; Cotter, Robin L.; Thylin, Michael R.; Epstein, Leon; Swartz, Jennifer M.; Shepard, Robin B.; Liu, Xiaojuan; Nukuna, Adeline; Gendelman, Howard E.

    1999-01-01

    Chemokine receptors pivotal for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in lymphocytes and macrophages (CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4) are expressed on neural cells (microglia, astrocytes, and/or neurons). It is these cells which are damaged during progressive HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system. We theorize that viral coreceptors could effect neural cell damage during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) without simultaneously affecting viral replication. To these ends, we studied the ability of diverse viral strains to affect intracellular signaling and apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition of cyclic AMP, activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and apoptosis were induced by diverse HIV-1 strains, principally in neurons. Virions from T-cell-tropic (T-tropic) strains (MN, IIIB, and Lai) produced the most significant alterations in signaling of neurons and astrocytes. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, induced markedly less neural damage than purified virions. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) strains (ADA, JR-FL, Bal, MS-CSF, and DJV) produced the least neural damage, while 89.6, a dual-tropic HIV-1 strain, elicited intermediate neural cell damage. All T-tropic strain-mediated neuronal impairments were blocked by the CXCR4 antibody, 12G5. In contrast, the M-tropic strains were only partially blocked by 12G5. CXCR4-mediated neuronal apoptosis was confirmed in pure populations of rat cerebellar granule neurons and was blocked by HA1004, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C. Taken together, these results suggest that progeny HIV-1 virions can influence neuronal signal transduction and apoptosis. This process occurs, in part, through CXCR4 and is independent of CD4 binding. T-tropic viruses that traffic in and out of the brain during progressive HIV-1 disease may play an important role in HAD neuropathogenesis. PMID:10482576

  12. Chromium- and copper-induced inhibition of photosynthesis in Euglena gracilis analysed on the single-cell level by fluorescence kinetic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetta, Iara; Küpper, Hendrik

    2009-01-01

    Here, we investigated effects of copper (Cu) and chromium (Cr) toxicity on two contrasting strains of Euglena gracilis, with and without chloroplasts, grown in culture media promoting either phototrophic or heterotrophic growth. This led to insights into Cr/Cu toxicity mechanisms and into the regulation of phototrophic vs heterotrophic metabolism. Our data strongly suggest that in Cu(2+) and Cr(6+) stressed Euglena photosynthesis is the primary target of damage. In the applied light conditions, this was mainly damage to the photosystem II reaction centre, as shown by single-cell measurements of photochemical fluorescence quenching. Respiration and photosynthetic dark reactions were less sensitive. The malfunctioning photosynthesis enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (mainly superoxide), leading to elevated amounts of carotenoid degradation products. At higher metal concentrations in chloroplast-containing cells, but not white cells, this oxidative stress resulted in increased respiratory oxygen uptake, likely by damage to mitochondria. During growth in nutrient solution promoting heterotrophic metabolism, the cells were able to repair the metal-induced damage to photosynthesis, moderating the inhibition of photochemistry. Growth in medium forcing the cells into photosynthesis increased the investment in photosynthetic pigments. Comparison of the two Euglena strains surprisingly showed that the previously metal-resistant strain lost this resistance during culture.

  13. Applying meta-pathway analyses through metagenomics to identify the functional properties of the major bacterial communities of a single spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation process sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illeghems, Koen; Weckx, Stefan; De Vuyst, Luc

    2015-09-01

    A high-resolution functional metagenomic analysis of a representative single sample of a Brazilian spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation process was carried out to gain insight into its bacterial community functioning. By reconstruction of microbial meta-pathways based on metagenomic data, the current knowledge about the metabolic capabilities of bacterial members involved in the cocoa bean fermentation ecosystem was extended. Functional meta-pathway analysis revealed the distribution of the metabolic pathways between the bacterial members involved. The metabolic capabilities of the lactic acid bacteria present were most associated with the heterolactic fermentation and citrate assimilation pathways. The role of Enterobacteriaceae in the conversion of substrates was shown through the use of the mixed-acid fermentation and methylglyoxal detoxification pathways. Furthermore, several other potential functional roles for Enterobacteriaceae were indicated, such as pectinolysis and citrate assimilation. Concerning acetic acid bacteria, metabolic pathways were partially reconstructed, in particular those related to responses toward stress, explaining their metabolic activities during cocoa bean fermentation processes. Further, the in-depth metagenomic analysis unveiled functionalities involved in bacterial competitiveness, such as the occurrence of CRISPRs and potential bacteriocin production. Finally, comparative analysis of the metagenomic data with bacterial genomes of cocoa bean fermentation isolates revealed the applicability of the selected strains as functional starter cultures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Single site-specific integration targeting coupled with embryonic stem cell differentiation provides a high-throughput alternative to in vivo enhancer analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Wilkinson

    2013-10-01

    Comprehensive analysis of cis-regulatory elements is key to understanding the dynamic gene regulatory networks that control embryonic development. While transgenic animals represent the gold standard assay, their generation is costly, entails significant animal usage, and in utero development complicates time-course studies. As an alternative, embryonic stem (ES cells can readily be differentiated in a process that correlates well with developing embryos. Here, we describe a highly effective platform for enhancer assays using an Hsp68/Venus reporter cassette that targets to the Hprt locus in mouse ES cells. This platform combines the flexibility of Gateway® cloning, live cell trackability of a fluorescent reporter, low background and the advantages of single copy insertion into a defined genomic locus. We demonstrate the successful recapitulation of tissue-specific enhancer activity for two cardiac and two haematopoietic enhancers. In addition, we used this assay to dissect the functionality of the highly conserved Ets/Ets/Gata motif in the Scl+19 enhancer, which revealed that the Gata motif is not required for initiation of enhancer activity. We further confirmed that Gata2 is not required for endothelial activity of the Scl+19 enhancer using Gata2−/− Scl+19 transgenic embryos. We have therefore established a valuable toolbox to study gene regulatory networks with broad applicability.

  15. Single site-specific integration targeting coupled with embryonic stem cell differentiation provides a high-throughput alternative to in vivo enhancer analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Adam C; Goode, Debbie K; Cheng, Yi-Han; Dickel, Diane E; Foster, Sam; Sendall, Tim; Tijssen, Marloes R; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Pennacchio, Len A; Kirkpatrick, Aileen M; Göttgens, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of cis-regulatory elements is key to understanding the dynamic gene regulatory networks that control embryonic development. While transgenic animals represent the gold standard assay, their generation is costly, entails significant animal usage, and in utero development complicates time-course studies. As an alternative, embryonic stem (ES) cells can readily be differentiated in a process that correlates well with developing embryos. Here, we describe a highly effective platform for enhancer assays using an Hsp68/Venus reporter cassette that targets to the Hprt locus in mouse ES cells. This platform combines the flexibility of Gateway® cloning, live cell trackability of a fluorescent reporter, low background and the advantages of single copy insertion into a defined genomic locus. We demonstrate the successful recapitulation of tissue-specific enhancer activity for two cardiac and two haematopoietic enhancers. In addition, we used this assay to dissect the functionality of the highly conserved Ets/Ets/Gata motif in the Scl+19 enhancer, which revealed that the Gata motif is not required for initiation of enhancer activity. We further confirmed that Gata2 is not required for endothelial activity of the Scl+19 enhancer using Gata2(-/-) Scl+19 transgenic embryos. We have therefore established a valuable toolbox to study gene regulatory networks with broad applicability.

  16. Quantification of methamphetamine, amphetamine and enantiomers by semi-micro column HPLC with fluorescence detection; applications on abusers' single hair analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dirbashi, O Y; Kuroda, N; Wada, M; Takahashi, M; Nakashima, K

    2000-08-01

    Achiral and chiral semi-micro column high-performance liquid chromatographic methods with fluorescence detection to determine methamphetamine and amphetamine in human hair are described. These compounds were extracted into 5% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in methanol, derivatized with 4-(4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-benzoyl chloride and separated either on a 250 x 1.5 mm i.d. octadecyl-silane (ODS) or a 150 x 2 mm i.d. OD-RH column. Linear calibration curves extending over a wide range of concentration that covers the practical samples were obtained for amphetamine, methamphetamine and their enantiomers (r = 0.999). Resolution values for amphetamine and methamphetamine enantiomers were 3.4 and 1.1, respectively. Intra- and inter-day variations of both the methods were not larger than 8.9% expressed as relative standard deviations (n >/= 5). The limits of detection at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 obtained by both the methods were in the range of 1.0-4.7 fmol/5 microL injection with the achiral method being more sensitive. Abusers' hair samples were analyzed by the two methods and only the S(+)-enantiomers were found in eight Japanese abusers' hair samples. The achiral method was used to study the concentrations of these compounds in single black and white hair strands of abusers. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Use of genomic recursions and algorithm for proven and young animals for single-step genomic BLUP analyses--a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, B O; Lourenco, D A L; Tsuruta, S; Masuda, Y; Aguilar, I; Misztal, I

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine accuracy of genomic selection via single-step genomic BLUP (ssGBLUP) when the direct inverse of the genomic relationship matrix (G) is replaced by an approximation of G(-1) based on recursions for young genotyped animals conditioned on a subset of proven animals, termed algorithm for proven and young animals (APY). With the efficient implementation, this algorithm has a cubic cost with proven animals and linear with young animals. Ten duplicate data sets mimicking a dairy cattle population were simulated. In a first scenario, genomic information for 20k genotyped bulls, divided in 7k proven and 13k young bulls, was generated for each replicate. In a second scenario, 5k genotyped cows with phenotypes were included in the analysis as young animals. Accuracies (average for the 10 replicates) in regular EBV were 0.72 and 0.34 for proven and young animals, respectively. When genomic information was included, they increased to 0.75 and 0.50. No differences between genomic EBV (GEBV) obtained with the regular G(-1) and the approximated G(-1) via the recursive method were observed. In the second scenario, accuracies in GEBV (0.76, 0.51 and 0.59 for proven bulls, young males and young females, respectively) were also higher than those in EBV (0.72, 0.35 and 0.49). Again, no differences between GEBV with regular G(-1) and with recursions were observed. With the recursive algorithm, the number of iterations to achieve convergence was reduced from 227 to 206 in the first scenario and from 232 to 209 in the second scenario. Cows can be treated as young animals in APY without reducing the accuracy. The proposed algorithm can be implemented to reduce computing costs and to overcome current limitations on the number of genotyped animals in the ssGBLUP method. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Allopolyploid speciation and ongoing backcrossing between diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages in the Achillea millefolium species complex: analyses of single-copy nuclear genes and genomic AFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrendorfer Friedrich

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the flowering plants, many polyploid species complexes display evolutionary radiation. This could be facilitated by gene flow between otherwise separate evolutionary lineages in contact zones. Achillea collina is a widespread tetraploid species within the Achillea millefolium polyploid complex (Asteraceae-Anthemideae. It is morphologically intermediate between the relic diploids, A. setacea-2x in xeric and A. asplenifolia-2x in humid habitats, and often grows in close contact with either of them. By analyzing DNA sequences of two single-copy nuclear genes and the genomic AFLP data, we assess the allopolyploid origin of A. collina-4x from ancestors corresponding to A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x, and the ongoing backcross introgression between these diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages. Results In both the ncpGS and the PgiC gene tree, haplotype sequences of the diploid A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x group into two clades corresponding to the two species, though lineage sorting seems incomplete for the PgiC gene. In contrast, A. collina-4x and its suspected backcross plants show homeologous gene copies: sequences from the same tetraploid individual plant are placed in both diploid clades. Semi-congruent splits of an AFLP Neighbor Net link not only A. collina-4x to both diploid species, but some 4x individuals in a polymorphic population with mixed ploidy levels to A. setacea-2x on one hand and to A. collina-4x on the other, indicating allopolyploid speciation as well as hybridization across ploidal levels. Conclusions The findings of this study clearly demonstrate the hybrid origin of Achillea collina-4x, the ongoing backcrossing between the diploid progenitor and their tetraploid progeny lineages. Such repeated hybridizations are likely the cause of the great genetic and phenotypic variation and ecological differentiation of the polyploid taxa in Achillea millefolium agg.

  19. New evidence for chondritic lunar water from combined D/H and noble gas analyses of single Apollo 17 volcanic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füri, Evelyn; Deloule, Etienne; Gurenko, Andrey; Marty, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    In order to assess the proportion of solar, cosmogenic, and indigenous water (hydrogen) trapped in individual Ti-rich lunar volcanic glasses (LVGs) from the 74002 core obtained during the Apollo 17 mission, we coupled ion microprobe measurements of water abundances and D/H ratios with CO2 laser extraction-static mass spectrometry analyses of noble gases (He, Ne, Ar). The large (∼300-400 μm in diameter) LVGs studied here contain a small amount of solar wind (SW) volatiles implanted at the grain surfaces, as indicated by the small concentrations of solar helium and neon that represent ⩽5% of the respective total noble gas abundances. The large proportion of volume-correlated cosmogenic gases reflects an exposure duration of ∼28 Ma, on average, of the glasses at the lunar surface. Hydrogen abundances determined in the grain interiors of glassy and partially-crystalline LVGs are equivalent to between 6.5 and 54.3 ppm H2O. Based on the noble gas exposure ages, the correction of the measured hydrogen isotope composition for in situ production of cosmogenic deuterium by spallation reactions varies between -5‰ to -254‰ for the different grains. Corrected δD values range from +38‰ to +809‰ in the LVGs and are anti-correlated with the water content, consistent with extensive hydrogen isotope fractionation during kinetic H2 loss from a lunar melt with an inferred initial isotope signature of the order of -100‰ and a water content of 100-300 ppm. The detection of water in these primitive lunar melts confirms the presence of a non-anhydrous mantle reservoir within the Moon. Furthermore, our results reveal that the hydrogen isotope composition of water in the melt source of the 74002 LVGs is similar to that of carbonaceous chondrites. These observations indicate that the contribution of deuterium-enriched cometary water to the Earth-Moon system is negligible.

  20. The bovine herpesvirus type 1 UL3.5 open reading frame encodes a virion structural protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, B; Lu, Z; Kutish, G F; Rock, D; Magyar, G; Letchworth, G J

    1998-01-05

    The bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) open reading frame (ORF) UL3.5 is similar to ORFs found in pseudorabies virus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus, equine herpesvirus type 1, and varicella zoster virus, but clearly absent from herpes simplex virus. The published sequence for this ORF predicts a 126-amino-acid (13.2 kDa) protein product with an isoelectric point of 12.3. We confirmed the UL3.5 sequence, expressed the ORF as a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein, and made rabbit antibodies against the purified fusion protein. The antiserum detected a 13-kDa protein in Western blots of MDBK cells infected with BHV-1, but not with other herpesviruses or uninfected cells. The BHV-1 UL3.5 protein was characterized as a component of the virion envelope or tegument because it was expressed as a late protein, it was present in the cytoplasm but not the nucleus of infected cells, and it was removed from purified virions by detergent extraction.

  1. Modeling of Virion Collisions in Cervicovaginal Mucus Reveals Limits on Agglutination as the Protective Mechanism of Secretory Immunoglobulin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alex; McKinley, Scott A; Shi, Feng; Wang, Simi; Mucha, Peter J; Harit, Dimple; Forest, M Gregory; Lai, Samuel K

    2015-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), a dimeric antibody found in high quantities in the gastrointestinal mucosa, is broadly associated with mucosal immune protection. A distinguishing feature of sIgA is its ability to crosslink pathogens, thereby creating pathogen/sIgA aggregates that are too large to traverse the dense matrix of mucin fibers in mucus layers overlying epithelial cells and consequently reducing infectivity. Here, we use modeling to investigate this mechanism of "immune exclusion" based on sIgA-mediated agglutination, in particular the potential use of sIgA to agglutinate HIV in cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) and prevent HIV transmission. Utilizing reported data on HIV diffusion in CVM and semen, we simulate HIV collision kinetics in physiologically-thick mucus layers-a necessary first step for sIgA-induced aggregation. We find that even at the median HIV load in semen of acutely infected individuals possessing high viral titers, over 99% of HIV virions will penetrate CVM and reach the vaginal epithelium without colliding with another virion. These findings imply that agglutination is unlikely to be the dominant mechanism of sIgA-mediated protection against HIV or other sexually transmitted pathogens. Rather, we surmise that agglutination is most effective against pathogens either present at exceedingly high concentrations or that possess motility mechanisms other than Brownian diffusion that significantly enhance encounter rates.

  2. Differential Expression of HERV-K (HML-2 Proviruses in Cells and Virions of the Teratocarcinoma Cell Line Tera-1

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    Neeru Bhardwaj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-K (HML-2 proviruses are among the few endogenous retroviral elements in the human genome that retain coding sequence. HML-2 expression has been widely associated with human disease states, including different types of cancers as well as with HIV-1 infection. Understanding of the potential impact of this expression requires that it be annotated at the proviral level. Here, we utilized the high throughput capabilities of next-generation sequencing to profile HML-2 expression at the level of individual proviruses and secreted virions in the teratocarcinoma cell line Tera-1. We identified well-defined expression patterns, with transcripts emanating primarily from two proviruses located on chromosome 22, only one of which was efficiently packaged. Interestingly, there was a preference for transcripts of recently integrated proviruses, over those from other highly expressed but older elements, to be packaged into virions. We also assessed the promoter competence of the 5’ long terminal repeats (LTRs of expressed proviruses via a luciferase assay following transfection of Tera-1 cells. Consistent with the RNASeq results, we found that the activity of most LTRs corresponded to their transcript levels.

  3. Control of Epstein-Barr virus infection in vitro by T helper cells specific for virion glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Dinesh; Behrends, Uta; Moosmann, Andreas; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W; Mautner, Josef

    2006-04-17

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) establishes lifelong persistent infections in humans by latently infecting B cells, with occasional cycles of reactivation, virus production, and reinfection. Protective immunity against EBV is mediated by T cells, but the role of EBV-specific T helper (Th) cells is still poorly defined. Here, we study the Th response to the EBV lytic cycle proteins BLLF1 (gp350/220), BALF4 (gp110), and BZLF1 and show that glycoprotein-specific Th cells recognize EBV-positive cells directly; surprisingly, a much higher percentage of target cells than those expressing lytic cycle proteins were recognized. Antigen is efficiently transferred to bystander B cells by receptor-mediated uptake of released virions, resulting in recognition of target cells incubated with virus entry before latency is established. Glycoprotein-specific Th cells are cytolytic and inhibit proliferation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and the outgrowth of LCL after infection of primary B cells with EBV. These results establish a novel role for glycoprotein-specific Th cells in the control of EBV infection and identify virion proteins as important immune targets. These findings have implications for the treatment of diseases associated with EBV and potentially other coated viruses infecting MHC class II-positive cells.

  4. A G-quadruplex motif in an envelope gene promoter regulates transcription and virion secretion in HBV genotype B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Banhi; Kandpal, Manish; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2017-09-13

    HBV genotypes differ in pathogenicity. In addition, genotype-specific differences in the regulation of transcription and virus replication exist in HBV, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show the presence of a G-quadruplex motif in the promoter of the preS2/S gene; this G-quadruplex is highly conserved only in HBV genotype B but not in other HBV genotypes. We demonstrate that this G-quadruplex motif forms a hybrid intramolecular G-quadruplex structure. Interestingly, mutations disrupting the G-quadruplex in HBV genotype B reduced the preS2/S promoter activity, leading to reduced hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels. G-quadruplex ligands stabilized the G-quadruplex in genotype B and enhanced the preS2/S promoter activity. Furthermore, mutations disrupting the G-quadruplex in the full-length HBV genotype B constructs were associated with impaired virion secretion. In contrast to typical G-quadruplexes within promoters which are negative regulators of transcription the G-quadruplex in the preS2/S promoter of HBV represents an unconventional positive regulatory element. Our findings highlight (a) G-quadruplex mediated enhancement of transcription and virion secretion in HBV and (b) a yet unknown role for DNA secondary structures in complex genotype-specific regulatory mechanisms in virus genomes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Analysis of virion-incorporated host proteins required for herpes simplex virus type 1 infection through a RNA interference screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Stegen

    Full Text Available Viruses are strictly dependent on cells to propagate and many incorporate host proteins in their viral particles, but the significance of this incorporation is poorly understood. Recently, we performed the first comprehensive characterization of the mature herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in which up to 49 distinct cellular proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. In the present study, we sought to identify if these cellular factors are relevant for the HSV-1 life cycle. To this end, we performed a small interfering RNA functional screen and found that 15 of these host proteins altered HSV-1 proliferation in cell culture, without any significant effect on cell viability. Moreover, the siRNA used had no negative consequences for Adenovirus type 5 propagation (with one exception indicating that the modulation was specific for HSV-1 and not merely due to unhealthy cells. The positive host proteins include several Rab GTPases and other intracellular transport components as well as proteins involved in signal transduction, gene regulation and immunity. Remarkably, in most cases when virions were depleted for one of the above proteins, they replicated more poorly in subsequent infections in wild type cells. This highlights for the first time that both the cellular and virion-associated pools of many of these proteins actively contribute to viral propagation. Altogether, these findings underscore the power and biological relevance of combining proteomics and RNA interference to identify novel host-pathogen interactions.

  6. Features of reovirus outer capsid protein mu1 revealed by electron cryomicroscopy and image reconstruction of the virion at 7.0 Angstrom resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Ji, Yongchang; Zhang, Lan; Harrison, Stephen C; Marinescu, Dan C; Nibert, Max L; Baker, Timothy S

    2005-10-01

    Reovirus is a useful model for addressing the molecular basis of membrane penetration by one of the larger nonenveloped animal viruses. We now report the structure of the reovirus virion at approximately 7.0 A resolution as obtained by electron cryomicroscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction. Several features of the myristoylated outer capsid protein mu1, not seen in a previous X-ray crystal structure of the mu1-sigma3 heterohexamer, are evident in the virion. These features appear to be important for stabilizing the outer capsid, regulating the conformational changes in mu1 that accompany perforation of target membranes, and contributing directly to membrane penetration during cell entry.

  7. Congregation of orthopoxvirus virions in cytoplasmic A-type inclusions is mediated by interactions of a bridging protein (A26p) with a matrix protein (ATIp) and a virion membrane-associated protein (A27p).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Amanda R; Weisberg, Andrea S; Moss, Bernard

    2010-08-01

    Some orthopoxviruses, e.g., the cowpox, ectromelia, and raccoonpox viruses, form large, discrete cytoplasmic inclusions within which mature virions (MVs) are embedded by a process called occlusion. These inclusions, which may protect occluded MVs in the environment, are composed of aggregates of the A-type inclusion protein (ATIp), which is truncated in orthopoxviruses such as vaccinia virus (VACV) and variola virus that fail to form inclusions. In addition to an intact ATIp, occlusion requires the A26 protein (A26p). Although VACV contains a functional A26p, determined by complementation of a cowpox virus occlusion-defective mutant, its role in occlusion was unknown. We found that restoration of the full-length ATI gene was sufficient for VACV inclusion formation and the ensuing occlusion of MVs. A26p was present in inclusions even when virion assembly was inhibited, suggesting a direct interaction of A26p with ATIp. Analysis of a panel of ATIp mutants indicated that the C-terminal repeat region was required for inclusion formation and the N-terminal domain for interaction with A26p and occlusion. A26p is tethered to MVs via interaction with the A27 protein (A27p); A27p was not required for association of A26p with ATIp but was necessary for occlusion. In addition, the C-terminal domain of A26p, which mediates A26p-A27p interactions, was necessary but insufficient for occlusion. Taken together, the data suggest a model for occlusion in which A26p has a bridging role between ATIp and A27p, and A27p provides a link to the MV membrane.

  8. y Human herpesvirus 6 envelope components enriched in lipid rafts: evidence for virion-associated lipid rafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamanishi Koichi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In general, enveloped viruses are highly dependent on their lipid envelope for entry into host cells. Here, we demonstrated that during the course of virus maturation, a significant proportion of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 envelope proteins were selectively concentrated in the detergent-resistant glycosphingolipid- and cholesterol-rich membranes (rafts in HHV-6-infected cells. In addition, the ganglioside GM1, which is known to partition preferentially into lipid rafts, was detected in purified virions, along with viral envelope glycoproteins, gH, gL, gB, gQ1, gQ2 and gO indicating that at least one raft component was included in the viral particle during the assembly process.

  9. Vaccinia protein F12 has structural similarity to kinesin light chain and contains a motor binding motif required for virion export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth W; Hollinshead, Michael; Ferguson, Brian J; Murphy, Brendan J; Carpentier, David C J; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2010-02-26

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) uses microtubules for export of virions to the cell surface and this process requires the viral protein F12. Here we show that F12 has structural similarity to kinesin light chain (KLC), a subunit of the kinesin-1 motor that binds cargo. F12 and KLC share similar size, pI, hydropathy and cargo-binding tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). Moreover, molecular modeling of F12 TPRs upon the crystal structure of KLC2 TPRs showed a striking conservation of structure. We also identified multiple TPRs in VACV proteins E2 and A36. Data presented demonstrate that F12 is critical for recruitment of kinesin-1 to virions and that a conserved tryptophan and aspartic acid (WD) motif, which is conserved in the kinesin-1-binding sequence (KBS) of the neuronal protein calsyntenin/alcadein and several other cellular kinesin-1 binding proteins, is essential for kinesin-1 recruitment and virion transport. In contrast, mutation of WD motifs in protein A36 revealed they were not required for kinesin-1 recruitment or IEV transport. This report of a viral KLC-like protein containing a KBS that is conserved in several cellular proteins advances our understanding of how VACV recruits the kinesin motor to virions, and exemplifies how viruses use molecular mimicry of cellular components to their advantage.

  10. Vaccinia protein F12 has structural similarity to kinesin light chain and contains a motor binding motif required for virion export.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W Morgan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV uses microtubules for export of virions to the cell surface and this process requires the viral protein F12. Here we show that F12 has structural similarity to kinesin light chain (KLC, a subunit of the kinesin-1 motor that binds cargo. F12 and KLC share similar size, pI, hydropathy and cargo-binding tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs. Moreover, molecular modeling of F12 TPRs upon the crystal structure of KLC2 TPRs showed a striking conservation of structure. We also identified multiple TPRs in VACV proteins E2 and A36. Data presented demonstrate that F12 is critical for recruitment of kinesin-1 to virions and that a conserved tryptophan and aspartic acid (WD motif, which is conserved in the kinesin-1-binding sequence (KBS of the neuronal protein calsyntenin/alcadein and several other cellular kinesin-1 binding proteins, is essential for kinesin-1 recruitment and virion transport. In contrast, mutation of WD motifs in protein A36 revealed they were not required for kinesin-1 recruitment or IEV transport. This report of a viral KLC-like protein containing a KBS that is conserved in several cellular proteins advances our understanding of how VACV recruits the kinesin motor to virions, and exemplifies how viruses use molecular mimicry of cellular components to their advantage.

  11. The 5’cap of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) is required for virion attachment to the actin/ER network during early infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nynne Meyn; Tilsner, Jens; Bell, Karen

    and was degraded in the cytoplasm. Removal of the 3’UTR and replicase both inhibited replication but did not prevent granule formation and movement. Dual-labelled TMV virions in which the vRNA and the coat protein were highlighted with different fluorophores showed both fluorescent signals to be initially located...

  12. Herpesvirus gB-induced fusion between the virion envelope and outer nuclear membrane during virus egress is regulated by the viral US3 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisner, Todd W; Wright, Catherine C; Kato, Akihisa; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Mou, Fan; Baines, Joel D; Roller, Richard J; Johnson, David C

    2009-04-01

    Herpesvirus capsids collect along the inner surface of the nuclear envelope and bud into the perinuclear space. Enveloped virions then fuse with the outer nuclear membrane (NM). We previously showed that herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins gB and gH act in a redundant fashion to promote fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM. HSV mutants lacking both gB and gH accumulate enveloped virions in herniations, vesicles that bulge into the nucleoplasm. Earlier studies had shown that HSV mutants lacking the viral serine/threonine kinase US3 also accumulate herniations. Here, we demonstrate that HSV gB is phosphorylated in a US3-dependent manner in HSV-infected cells, especially in a crude nuclear fraction. Moreover, US3 directly phosphorylated the gB cytoplasmic (CT) domain in in vitro assays. Deletion of gB in the context of a US3-null virus did not add substantially to defects in nuclear egress. The majority of the US3-dependent phosphorylation of gB involved the CT domain and amino acid T887, a residue present in a motif similar to that recognized by US3 in other proteins. HSV recombinants lacking gH and expressing either gB substitution mutation T887A or a gB truncated at residue 886 displayed substantial defects in nuclear egress. We concluded that phosphorylation of the gB CT domain is important for gB-mediated fusion with the outer NM. This suggested a model in which the US3 kinase is incorporated into the tegument layer (between the capsid and envelope) in HSV virions present in the perinuclear space. By this packaging, US3 might be brought close to the gB CT tail, leading to phosphorylation and triggering fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM.

  13. HIV-1 gp41-targeting fusion inhibitory peptides enhance the gp120-targeting protein-mediated inactivation of HIV-1 virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qianqian; Wang, Qian; Chen, Weizao; Du, Lanying; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2017-06-21

    Protein- or peptide-based viral inactivators are being developed as novel antiviral drugs with improved efficacy, pharmacokinetics and toxicity profiles because they actively inactivate cell-free human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions before attachment to host cells. By contrast, most clinically used antiviral drugs must penetrate host cells to inhibit viral replication. In this study, we pre-treated HIV-1 particles with a gp120-targeting bispecific multivalent protein, 2Dm2m or 4Dm2m, in the presence or absence of the gp41-targeting HIV-1 fusion inhibitory peptides enfuvirtide (T20), T2635, or sifuvirtide (SFT). HIV-1 virions were separated from the inhibitors using PEG-6000, followed by testing of the residual infectivity of the HIV-1 virions. 2Dm2m and 4Dm2m exhibited significant inactivation activity against all HIV-1 strains tested with EC50 values at the low nanomolar level, whereas none of the gp41-targeting peptides showed inactivation activity at concentrations up to 250 nM. Notably, these three peptides significantly enhanced protein-mediated inactivation against cell-free HIV-1 virions, including HIV-1 laboratory-adapted and primary HIV-1 strains, as well as those resistant to T20 or T2635 and virions released from reactivated latently HIV-1-infected cells. These results indicate that the gp120-targeting bispecific multivalent proteins 2Dm2m and 4Dm2m have potential for further development as HIV-1 inactivator-based antiviral drugs for use in the clinic, either alone or in combination with a gp41-targeting HIV-1 fusion inhibitor such as T20, to treat patients with HIV-1 infection and AIDS.

  14. The UL13 and US3 Protein Kinases of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Cooperate to Promote the Assembly and Release of Mature, Infectious Virions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Gershburg

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 encodes two bona fide serine/threonine protein kinases, the US3 and UL13 gene products. HSV-1 ΔUS3 mutants replicate with wild-type efficiency in cultured cells, and HSV-1 ΔUL13 mutants exhibit <10-fold reduction in infectious viral titers. Given these modest phenotypes, it remains unclear how the US3 and UL13 protein kinases contribute to HSV-1 replication. In the current study, we designed a panel of HSV-1 mutants, in which portions of UL13 and US3 genes were replaced by expression cassettes encoding mCherry protein or green fluorescent protein (GFP, respectively, and analyzed DNA replication, protein expression, and spread of these mutants in several cell types. Loss of US3 function alone had largely negligible effect on viral DNA accumulation, gene expression, virion release, and spread. Loss of UL13 function alone also had no appreciable effects on viral DNA levels. However, loss of UL13 function did result in a measurable decrease in the steady-state levels of two viral glycoproteins (gC and gD, release of total and infectious virions, and viral spread. Disruption of both genes did not affect the accumulation of viral DNA, but resulted in further reduction in gC and gD steady-state levels, and attenuation of viral spread and infectious virion release. These data show that the UL13 kinase plays an important role in the late phase of HSV-1 infection, likely by affecting virion assembly and/or release. Moreover, the data suggest that the combined activities of the US3 and UL13 protein kinases are critical to the efficient assembly and release of infectious virions from HSV-1-infected cells.

  15. Meta-regression analyses, meta-analyses, and trial sequential analyses of the effects of supplementation with beta-carotene, vitamin A, and vitamin E singly or in different combinations on all-cause mortality: do we have evidence for lack of harm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Bjelakovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Evidence shows that antioxidant supplements may increase mortality. Our aims were to assess whether different doses of beta-carotene, vitamin A, and vitamin E affect mortality in primary and secondary prevention randomized clinical trials with low risk of bias. METHODS: The present study is based on our 2012 Cochrane systematic review analyzing beneficial and harmful effects of antioxidant supplements in adults. Using random-effects meta-analyses, meta-regression analyses, and trial sequential analyses, we examined the association between beta-carotene, vitamin A, and vitamin E, and mortality according to their daily doses and doses below and above the recommended daily allowances (RDA. RESULTS: We included 53 randomized trials with low risk of bias (241,883 participants, aged 18 to 103 years, 44.6% women assessing beta-carotene, vitamin A, and vitamin E. Meta-regression analysis showed that the dose of vitamin A was significantly positively associated with all-cause mortality. Beta-carotene in a dose above 9.6 mg significantly increased mortality (relative risk (RR 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.02 to 1.09, I(2 = 13%. Vitamin A in a dose above the RDA (> 800 µg did not significantly influence mortality (RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.19, I(2 = 53%. Vitamin E in a dose above the RDA (> 15 mg significantly increased mortality (RR 1.03, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.05, I(2 = 0%. Doses below the RDAs did not affect mortality, but data were sparse. CONCLUSIONS: Beta-carotene and vitamin E in doses higher than the RDA seem to significantly increase mortality, whereas we lack information on vitamin A. Dose of vitamin A was significantly associated with increased mortality in meta-regression. We lack information on doses below the RDA. BACKGROUND: All essential compounds to stay healthy cannot be synthesized in our body. Therefore, these compounds must be taken through our diet or obtained in other ways [1]. Oxidative stress has been

  16. Transmission dynamics of Trypanosoma cruzi determined by low-stringency single primer polymerase chain reaction and southern blot analyses in four indigenous communities of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ingrid B; Botero, Adriana; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M; Marquez, Edna J; Ortiz, Sylvia; Solari, Aldo; Triana-Chávez, Omar

    2009-09-01

    This study attempted to evaluate the transmission dynamics of Trypanosoma cruzi in four indigenous communities of Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (SNSM), Colombia. Low-stringency single primer-polymerase chain reaction (LSSP-PCR) of the minicircles and Southern blot analyses were used to characterize samples from patients, vectors, and reservoirs in these communities. The LSSP-PCR profiles revealed a high genetic variability but with similarities among the parasites present in the samples of vectors, patients, and reservoirs of the same and different communities. Cluster and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses of data derived from LSSP-PCR and Southern blot suggest a gene flux among populations of T. cruzi circulating in patients, vectors, and reservoirs. The results support the idea that the domestic and wild transmission cycles overlap in the SNSM, with Rhodnius prolixus as the main vector and Triatoma dimidiata playing an important role in the transmission of Chagas disease in this zone, making the vector control strategy by spraying unsuccessful.

  17. FSL constructs: a simple method for modifying cell/virion surfaces with a range of biological markers without affecting their viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Deborah A; Bovin, Nicolai V; Bess, Dan; Henry, Stephen M

    2011-08-05

    The ability to modify/visualize biological surfaces, and then study the modified cell/virion in a range of in vitro and in vivo environments is essential to gaining further insight into the function of specific molecules or the entire entity. Studies of biological surface modification are generally limited to genetic engineering of the organism or the covalent attachment of chemical moieties to the cell surface(1,2). However these traditional techniques expose the cell to chemical reactants, or they require significant manipulation to achieve the desired outcome, making them cumbersome, and they may also inadvertently affect the viability/functionality of the modified cell. A simple method to harmlessly modify the surface of cells is required. Recently a new technology, KODE Technology has introduced a range of novel constructs consisting of three components: a functional head group (F), a spacer (S) and a lipid tail (L) and are known as Function-Spacer-Lipid or FSL constructs3. The spacer (S) is selected to provide a construct that is dispersible in water, yet will spontaneously and stably incorporate into a membrane. FSL construct functional moieties (F) so far include a range of saccharides including blood group-related determinants, sialic acids, hyaluronan polysaccharides, fluorophores, biotin, radiolabels, and a range of peptides(3-12). FSL constructs have been used in modifying embryos, spermatozoa, zebrafish, epithelial/endometrial cells, red blood cells, and virions to create quality controls systems and diagnostic panels, to modify cell adhesion/ interaction/ separation/ immobilization, and for in vitro and in vivo imaging of cells/virions(3-12). The process of modifying cells/virions is generic and extremely simple. The most common procedure is incubation of cells (in lipid free media) with a solution for FSL constructs for 1-2 hours at 37°C(4-10). During the incubation the FSL constructs spontaneously incorporate into the membrane, and the process is

  18. Deletion of the Vaccinia Virus I2 Protein Interrupts Virion Morphogenesis, Leading to Retention of the Scaffold Protein and Mislocalization of Membrane-Associated Entry Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Seong-In; Weisberg, Andrea; Moss, Bernard

    2017-08-01

    The I2L open reading frame of vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes a conserved 72-amino-acid protein with a putative C-terminal transmembrane domain. Previous studies with a tetracycline-inducible mutant demonstrated that I2-deficient virions are defective in cell entry. The purpose of the present study was to determine the step of replication or entry that is affected by loss of the I2 protein. Fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that I2 colocalized with a major membrane protein of immature and mature virions. We generated a cell line that constitutively expressed I2 and allowed construction of the VACV I2L deletion mutant vΔI2. As anticipated, vΔI2 was unable to replicate in cells that did not express I2. Unexpectedly, morphogenesis was interrupted at a stage after immature virion formation, resulting in the accumulation of dense spherical particles instead of brick-shaped mature virions with well-defined core structures. The abnormal particles retained the D13 scaffold protein of immature virions, were severely deficient in the transmembrane proteins that comprise the entry fusion complex (EFC), and had increased amounts of unprocessed membrane and core proteins. Total lysates of cells infected with vΔI2 also had diminished EFC proteins due to instability attributed to their hydrophobicity and failure to be inserted into viral membranes. A similar instability of EFC proteins had previously been found with unrelated mutants blocked earlier in morphogenesis that also accumulated viral membranes retaining the D13 scaffold. We concluded that I2 is required for virion morphogenesis, release of the D13 scaffold, and the association of EFC proteins with viral membranes.IMPORTANCE Poxviruses comprise a large family that infect vertebrates and invertebrates, cause disease in both in humans and in wild and domesticated animals, and are being engineered as vectors for vaccines and cancer therapy. In addition, investigations of poxviruses have provided insights into many

  19. TIM1 (HAVCR1) Is Not Essential for Cellular Entry of Either Quasi-enveloped or Naked Hepatitis A Virions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anshuman; Hirai-Yuki, Asuka; González-López, Olga; Rhein, Bethany; Moller-Tank, Sven; Brouillette, Rachel; Hensley, Lucinda; Misumi, Ichiro; Lovell, William; Cullen, John M.; Whitmire, Jason K.; Maury, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Receptor molecules play key roles in the cellular entry of picornaviruses, and TIM1 (HAVCR1) is widely accepted to be the receptor for hepatitis A virus (HAV), an unusual, hepatotropic human picornavirus. However, its identification as the hepatovirus receptor predated the discovery that hepatoviruses undergo nonlytic release from infected cells as membrane-cloaked, quasi-enveloped HAV (eHAV) virions that enter cells via a pathway distinct from naked, nonenveloped virions. We thus revisited the role of TIM1 in hepatovirus entry, examining both adherence and infection/replication in cells with clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9-engineered TIM1 knockout. Cell culture-derived, gradient-purified eHAV bound Huh-7.5 human hepatoma cells less efficiently than naked HAV at 4°C, but eliminating TIM1 expression caused no difference in adherence of either form of HAV, nor any impact on infection and replication in these cells. In contrast, TIM1-deficient Vero cells showed a modest reduction in quasi-enveloped eHAV (but not naked HAV) attachment and replication. Thus, TIM1 facilitates quasi-enveloped eHAV entry in Vero cells, most likely by binding phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) residues on the eHAV membrane. Both Tim1−/− Ifnar1−/− and Tim4−/− Ifnar1−/− double-knockout mice were susceptible to infection upon intravenous challenge with infected liver homogenate, with fecal HAV shedding and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevations similar to those in Ifnar1−/− mice. However, intrahepatic HAV RNA and ALT elevations were modestly reduced in Tim1−/−Ifnar1−/− mice compared to Ifnar1−/− mice challenged with a lower titer of gradient-purified HAV or eHAV. We conclude that TIM1 is not an essential hepatovirus entry factor, although its PtdSer-binding activity may contribute to the spread of quasi-enveloped virus and liver injury in mice. PMID:28874468

  20. TIM1 (HAVCR1 Is Not Essential for Cellular Entry of Either Quasi-enveloped or Naked Hepatitis A Virions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Das

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Receptor molecules play key roles in the cellular entry of picornaviruses, and TIM1 (HAVCR1 is widely accepted to be the receptor for hepatitis A virus (HAV, an unusual, hepatotropic human picornavirus. However, its identification as the hepatovirus receptor predated the discovery that hepatoviruses undergo nonlytic release from infected cells as membrane-cloaked, quasi-enveloped HAV (eHAV virions that enter cells via a pathway distinct from naked, nonenveloped virions. We thus revisited the role of TIM1 in hepatovirus entry, examining both adherence and infection/replication in cells with clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9-engineered TIM1 knockout. Cell culture-derived, gradient-purified eHAV bound Huh-7.5 human hepatoma cells less efficiently than naked HAV at 4°C, but eliminating TIM1 expression caused no difference in adherence of either form of HAV, nor any impact on infection and replication in these cells. In contrast, TIM1-deficient Vero cells showed a modest reduction in quasi-enveloped eHAV (but not naked HAV attachment and replication. Thus, TIM1 facilitates quasi-enveloped eHAV entry in Vero cells, most likely by binding phosphatidylserine (PtdSer residues on the eHAV membrane. Both Tim1−/− Ifnar1−/− and Tim4−/− Ifnar1−/− double-knockout mice were susceptible to infection upon intravenous challenge with infected liver homogenate, with fecal HAV shedding and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT elevations similar to those in Ifnar1−/− mice. However, intrahepatic HAV RNA and ALT elevations were modestly reduced in Tim1−/−Ifnar1−/− mice compared to Ifnar1−/− mice challenged with a lower titer of gradient-purified HAV or eHAV. We conclude that TIM1 is not an essential hepatovirus entry factor, although its PtdSer-binding activity may contribute to the spread of quasi-enveloped virus and liver injury in mice.

  1. Palmitoylation of the feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein and its effect on fusion activity and envelope incorporation into virions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Paladino, Monica G. [Laboratorio de Virologia, CONICET-Universidad de Belgrano (UB), Villanueva 1324 (C1426BMJ), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Affranchino, Jose L., E-mail: jose.affranchino@comunidad.ub.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Virologia, CONICET-Universidad de Belgrano (UB), Villanueva 1324 (C1426BMJ), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-06-20

    The feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) envelope glycoprotein (Env) possesses a short cytoplasmic domain of 53 amino acids containing four highly conserved cysteines at Env positions 804, 811, 815 and 848. Since palmitoylation of transmembrane proteins occurs at or near the membrane anchor, we investigated whether cysteines 804, 811 and 815 are acylated and analyzed the relevance of these residues for Env functions. Replacement of cysteines 804, 811 and 815 individually or in combination by serine residues resulted in Env glycoproteins that were efficiently expressed and processed. However, mutations C804S and C811S reduced Env fusogenicity by 93% and 84%, respectively, compared with wild-type Env. By contrast, mutant C815S exhibited a fusogenic capacity representing 50% of the wild-type value. Remarkably, the double mutation C804S/C811S abrogated both Env fusion activity and Env incorporation into virions. Finally, by means of Click chemistry assays we demonstrated that the four FIV Env cytoplasmic cysteines are palmitoylated.

  2. Concanavalin A-mediated cell agglutinability induced by Vaccinia virions. [Uv radiation, /sup 125/I tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbuy, G.; Bubel, H.C.

    1978-12-01

    The induction of enhanced concanavalin A (Con A)-mediated cellular agglutinability by purified vaccinia virus was examined quantitatively. Increased HEp-2 cell agglutinability by the lectin occurred within the first hour of infection and persisted without further change throughout the virus infectious cycle. Ultraviolet, but not heat-inactivated, virus was as effective as infectious virus in causing increased Con A agglutinability. Inhibition of viral and host cell protein synthesis by Streptovitacin A failed to alter the lectin response to vaccinia virus infection. Fluorescein-labeled Con A was observed to form clusters and large fluorescent patches on the infected cell surface during the earliest stage of infection. Studies with /sup 125/I-labeled Con A revealed an early but minimal increase in lectin binding to infected cells. After the first hour of infection, no further increase in Con A binding was observed. When cells were exposed to purified vaccinia virus surface tubules increased Con A agglutinability comparable to that obtained with native virus was demonstrated. Con A-mediated agglutinability of cells was temperature-dependent and displayed a higher temperature transition in infected cells. These data suggest that upon contact with the host cell, vaccinia virions or surface tubules induce alterations in the plasma membrane which are reflected in an enhanced agglutinability by Con A.

  3. Features of Reovirus Outer Capsid Protein μ1 Revealed by Electron Cryomicroscopy and Image Reconstruction of the Virion at 7.0 Å Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Ji, Yongchang; Zhang, Lan; Harrison, Stephen C.; Marinescu, Dan C.; Nibert, Max L.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reovirus is a useful model for addressing the molecular basis of membrane penetration by one of the larger nonenveloped animal viruses. We now report the structure of the reovirus virion at 7.0 Å resolution as obtained by electron cryomicroscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction. Several features of the myristoylated outer capsid protein μ1, not seen in a previous X-ray crystal structure of the μ1-σ3 heterohexamer, are evident in the virion. These features appear to be important for stabilizing the outer capsid, regulating the conformational changes in μ1 that accompany perforation of target membranes, and contributing directly to membrane penetration during cell entry. PMID:16216585

  4. Comparison of effects of adjuvants on efficacy of virion envelope herpes simplex virus vaccine against labial infection of BALB/c mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, T A; Hilfenhaus, J; Moser, H; Morahan, P S

    1983-01-01

    A subunit virion envelope vaccine of herpes simplex virus type 1 was evaluated for its ability to protect labially infected mice from development of the primary herpetic lesion, encephalitic death, and latent virus infection in the trigeminal ganglion. Several adjuvants, including aluminum hydroxide and polyriboinosinic acid-polyribocytidylic acid complexed with poly-L-lysine and carboxymethyl cellulose were investigated for their ability to enhance protection of the subunit vaccine and were ...

  5. HIV-1 gp41-targeting fusion inhibitory peptides enhance the gp120-targeting protein-mediated inactivation of HIV-1 virions

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Qianqian; Wang, Qian; Chen, Weizao; Du, Lanying; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2017-01-01

    Protein- or peptide-based viral inactivators are being developed as novel antiviral drugs with improved efficacy, pharmacokinetics and toxicity profiles because they actively inactivate cell-free human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions before attachment to host cells. By contrast, most clinically used antiviral drugs must penetrate host cells to inhibit viral replication. In this study, we pre-treated HIV-1 particles with a gp120-targeting bispecific multivalent protein, 2Dm2m or ...

  6. Comparative Proteomics of Human Monkeypox and Vaccinia Intracellular Mature and Extracellular Enveloped Virions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manes, Nathan P.; Estep, Ryan D.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Clauss, Therese RW; Monroe, Matthew E.; Du, Xiuxia; Adkins, Joshua N.; Wong, Scott; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-03-07

    Orthopoxviruses are the largest and most complex of the animal viruses. In response to the recent emergence of monkeypox in Africa and the threat of smallpox bioterrorism, virulent (monkeypox virus) and benign (vaccinia virus) orthopoxviruses were proteomically compared with the goal of identifying proteins required for pathogenesis. Orthopoxviruses were grown in HeLa cells to two different viral forms (intracellular mature virus and extracellular enveloped virus), purified by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation, denatured using RapiGest™ surfactant, and digested with trypsin. Unfractionated samples and strong cation exchange HPLC fractions were analyzed by reversed-phase LC-MS/MS, and analyses of the MS/MS spectra using SEQUEST® and X! Tandem resulted in the identification of hundreds of monkeypox, vaccinia, and copurified host proteins. The unfractionated samples were additionally analyzed by LC-MS on an LTQ-Orbitrap™, and the accurate mass and elution time tag approach was used to perform quantitative comparisons. Possible pathophysiological roles of differentially expressed orthopoxvirus genes are discussed.

  7. Herpes simplex virus glycoproteins gB and gH function in fusion between the virion envelope and the outer nuclear membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Wisner, Todd W; Webb, Michael; Roller, Richard; Cohen, Gary; Eisenberg, Roselyn; Johnson, David C

    2007-06-12

    Herpesviruses must traverse the nuclear envelope to gain access to the cytoplasm and, ultimately, to exit cells. It is believed that herpesvirus nucleocapsids enter the perinuclear space by budding through the inner nuclear membrane (NM). To reach the cytoplasm these enveloped particles must fuse with the outer NM and the unenveloped capsids then acquire a second envelope in the trans-Golgi network. Little is known about the process by which herpesviruses virions fuse with the outer NM. Here we show that a herpes simplex virus (HSV) mutant lacking both the two putative fusion glycoproteins gB and gH failed to cross the nuclear envelope. Enveloped virions accumulated in the perinuclear space or in membrane vesicles that bulged into the nucleoplasm (herniations). By contrast, mutants lacking just gB or gH showed only minor or no defects in nuclear egress. We concluded that either HSV gB or gH can promote fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM. It is noteworthy that fusion associated with HSV entry requires the cooperative action of both gB and gH, suggesting that the two types of fusion (egress versus entry) are dissimilar processes.

  8. Three-dimensional visualization of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus occlusion-derived virion envelopment process gives new clues as to its mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yang; Li, Kunpeng [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Peiping [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Li, Yinyin; Zhou, Qiang; Yang, Kai [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Qinfen, E-mail: lsszqf@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2015-02-15

    Baculoviruses produce two virion phenotypes, occlusion-derived virion (ODV) and budded virion (BV). ODV envelopment occurs in the nucleus. Morphogenesis of the ODV has been studied extensively; however, the mechanisms underlying microvesicle formation and ODV envelopment in nuclei remain unclear. In this study, we used electron tomography (ET) together with the conventional electron microscopy to study the envelopment of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ODV. Our results demonstrate that not only the inner but also the outer nuclear membrane can invaginate and vesiculate into microvesicles and that intranuclear microvesicles are the direct source of the ODV membrane. Five main events in the ODV envelopment process are summarized, from which we propose a model to explain this process. - Highlights: • Both the inner and outer nuclear membranes could invaginate. • Both the inner and outer nuclear membranes could vesiculate into microvesicles. • Five main events in the ODV envelopment process are summarized. • A model is proposed to explain this ODV envelopment.

  9. Image Restoration and Analysis of Influenza Virions Binding to Membrane Receptors Reveal Adhesion-Strengthening Kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald W Lee

    Full Text Available With the development of single-particle tracking (SPT microscopy and host membrane mimics called supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, stochastic virus-membrane binding interactions can be studied in depth while maintaining control over host receptor type and concentration. However, several experimental design challenges and quantitative image analysis limitations prevent the widespread use of this approach. One main challenge of SPT studies is the low signal-to-noise ratio of SPT videos, which is sometimes inevitable due to small particle sizes, low quantum yield of fluorescent dyes, and photobleaching. These situations could render current particle tracking software to yield biased binding kinetic data caused by intermittent tracking error. Hence, we developed an effective image restoration algorithm for SPT applications called STAWASP that reveals particles with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.2 while preserving particle features. We tested our improvements to the SPT binding assay experiment and imaging procedures by monitoring X31 influenza virus binding to α2,3 sialic acid glycolipids. Our interests lie in how slight changes to the peripheral oligosaccharide structures can affect the binding rate and residence times of viruses. We were able to detect viruses binding weakly to a glycolipid called GM3, which was undetected via assays such as surface plasmon resonance. The binding rate was around 28 folds higher when the virus bound to a different glycolipid called GD1a, which has a sialic acid group extending further away from the bilayer surface than GM3. The improved imaging allowed us to obtain binding residence time distributions that reflect an adhesion-strengthening mechanism via multivalent bonds. We empirically fitted these distributions using a time-dependent unbinding rate parameter, koff, which diverges from standard treatment of koff as a constant. We further explain how to convert these models to fit ensemble-averaged binding data

  10. Formation of orthopoxvirus cytoplasmic A-type inclusion bodies and embedding of virions are dynamic processes requiring microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Amanda R; Moss, Bernard

    2012-05-01

    In cells infected with some orthopoxviruses, numerous mature virions (MVs) become embedded within large, cytoplasmic A-type inclusions (ATIs) that can protect infectivity after cell lysis. ATIs are composed of an abundant viral protein called ATIp, which is truncated in orthopoxviruses such as vaccinia virus (VACV) that do not form ATIs. To study ATI formation and occlusion of MVs within ATIs, we used recombinant VACVs that express the cowpox full-length ATIp or we transfected plasmids encoding ATIp into cells infected with VACV, enabling ATI formation. ATI enlargement and MV embedment required continued protein synthesis and an intact microtubular network. For live imaging of ATIs and MVs, plasmids expressing mCherry fluorescent protein fused to ATIp were transfected into cells infected with VACV expressing the viral core protein A4 fused to yellow fluorescent protein. ATIs appeared as dynamic, mobile bodies that enlarged by multiple coalescence events, which could be prevented by disrupting microtubules. Coalescence of ATIs was confirmed in cells infected with cowpox virus. MVs were predominantly at the periphery of ATIs early in infection. We determined that coalescence contributed to the distribution of MVs within ATIs and that microtubule-disrupting drugs abrogated coalescence-mediated MV embedment. In addition, MVs were shown to move from viral factories at speeds consistent with microtubular transport to the peripheries of ATIs, whereas disruption of microtubules prevented such trafficking. The data indicate an important role for microtubules in the coalescence of ATIs into larger structures, transport of MVs to ATIs, and embedment of MVs within the ATI matrix.

  11. Two potential recombinant rabies vaccines expressing canine parvovirus virion protein 2 induce immunogenicity to canine parvovirus and rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun; Shi, Hehe; Tan, Yeping; Niu, Xuefeng; Long, Teng; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Qin; Wang, Yifei; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-17

    Both rabies virus (RABV) and canine parvovirus (CPV) cause lethal diseases in dogs. In this study, both high egg passage Flury (HEP-Flury) strains of RABV and recombinant RABV carrying double RABV glycoprotein (G) gene were used to express the CPV virion protein 2 (VP2) gene, and were designated rHEP-VP2 and, rHEP-dG-VP2 respectively. The two recombinant RABVs maintained optimal virus titration according to their viral growth kinetics assay compared with the parental strain HEP-Flury. Western blotting indicated that G protein and VP2 were expressed in vitro. The expression of VP2 in Crandell feline kidney cells post-infection by rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay with antibody against VP2. Immunogenicity of recombinant rabies viruses was tested in Kunming mice. Both rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 induced high levels of rabies antibody compared with HEP-Flury. Mice immunized with rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 both had a high level of antibodies against VP2, which can protect against CPV infection. A challenge experiment indicated that more than 80% mice immunized with recombinant RABVs survived after infection of challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24). Together, this study showed that recombinant RABVs expressing VP2 induced protective immune responses to RABV and CPV. Therefore, rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 might be potential combined vaccines for RABV and CPV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Picornavirus RNA is protected from cleavage by ribonuclease during virion uncoating and transfer across cellular and model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Groppelli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Picornaviruses are non-enveloped RNA viruses that enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Because they lack an envelope, picornaviruses face the challenge of delivering their RNA genomes across the membrane of the endocytic vesicle into the cytoplasm to initiate infection. Currently, the mechanism of genome release and translocation across membranes remains poorly understood. Within the enterovirus genus, poliovirus, rhinovirus 2, and rhinovirus 16 have been proposed to release their genomes across intact endosomal membranes through virally induced pores, whereas one study has proposed that rhinovirus 14 releases its RNA following disruption of endosomal membranes. For the more distantly related aphthovirus genus (e.g. foot-and-mouth disease viruses and equine rhinitis A virus acidification of endosomes results in the disassembly of the virion into pentamers and in the release of the viral RNA into the lumen of the endosome, but no details have been elucidated as how the RNA crosses the vesicle membrane. However, more recent studies suggest aphthovirus RNA is released from intact particles and the dissociation to pentamers may be a late event. In this study we have investigated the RNase A sensitivity of genome translocation of poliovirus using a receptor-decorated-liposome model and the sensitivity of infection of poliovirus and equine-rhinitis A virus to co-internalized RNase A. We show that poliovirus genome translocation is insensitive to RNase A and results in little or no release into the medium in the liposome model. We also show that infectivity is not reduced by co-internalized RNase A for poliovirus and equine rhinitis A virus. Additionally, we show that all poliovirus genomes that are internalized into cells, not just those resulting in infection, are protected from RNase A. These results support a finely coordinated, directional model of viral RNA delivery that involves viral proteins and cellular membranes.

  13. Generation of H9 T-cells stably expressing a membrane-bound form of the cytoplasmic tail of the Env-glycoprotein: lack of transcomplementation of defective HIV-1 virions encoding C-terminally truncated Env

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Valerie

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract H9-T-cells do not support the replication of mutant HIV-1 encoding Env protein lacking its long cytoplasmic C-terminal domain (Env-CT. Here we describe the generation of a H9-T-cell population constitutively expressing the HIV-1 Env-CT protein domain anchored in the cellular membrane by it homologous membrane-spanning domain (TMD. We confirmed that the Env-TMD-CT protein was associated with cellular membranes, that its expression did not have any obvious cytotoxic effects on the cells and that it did not affect wild-type HIV-1 replication. However, as measured in both a single-round assay as well as in spreading infections, replication competence of mutant pNL-Tr712, lacking the Env-CT, was not restored in this H9 T-cell population. This means that the Env-CT per se cannot transcomplement the replication block of HIV-1 virions encoding C-terminally truncated Env proteins and suggests that the Env-CT likely exerts its function only in the context of the complete Env protein.

  14. Disassembly and reassembly of human papillomavirus virus-like particles produces more virion-like antibody reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Qinjian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines based on major capsid protein L1 are licensed in over 100 countries to prevent HPV infections. The yeast-derived recombinant quadrivalent HPV L1 vaccine, GARDASIL(R, has played an important role in reducing cancer and genital warts since its introduction in 2006. The L1 proteins self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs. Results VLPs were subjected to post-purification disassembly and reassembly (D/R treatment during bioprocessing to improve VLP immunoreactivity and stability. The post-D/R HPV16 VLPs and their complex with H16.V5 neutralizing antibody Fab fragments were visualized by cryo electron microscopy, showing VLPs densely decorated with antibody. Along with structural improvements, post-D/R VLPs showed markedly higher antigenicity to conformational and neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs H16.V5, H16.E70 and H263.A2, whereas binding to mAbs recognizing linear epitopes (H16.J4, H16.O7, and H16.H5 was greatly reduced. Strikingly, post-D/R VLPs showed no detectable binding to H16.H5, indicating that the H16.H5 epitope is not accessible in fully assembled VLPs. An atomic homology model of the entire HPV16 VLP was generated based on previously determined high-resolution structures of bovine papillomavirus and HPV16 L1 pentameric capsomeres. Conclusions D/R treatment of HPV16 L1 VLPs produces more homogeneous VLPs with more virion-like antibody reactivity. These effects can be attributed to a combination of more complete and regular assembly of the VLPs, better folding of L1, reduced non-specific disulfide-mediated aggregation and increased stability of the VLPs. Markedly different antigenicity of HPV16 VLPs was observed upon D/R treatment with a panel of monoclonal antibodies targeting neutralization sensitive epitopes. Multiple epitope-specific assays with a panel of mAbs with different properties and epitopes are required to gain a better understanding of the immunochemical

  15. Retrograde Transport from Early Endosomes to the trans-Golgi Network Enables Membrane Wrapping and Egress of Vaccinia Virus Virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Gilad; Weisberg, Andrea S; Americo, Jeffrey L; Moss, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    The anterograde pathway, from the endoplasmic reticulum through the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface, is utilized by trans-membrane and secretory proteins. The retrograde pathway, which directs traffic in the opposite direction, is used following endocytosis of exogenous molecules and recycling of membrane proteins. Microbes exploit both routes: viruses typically use the anterograde pathway for envelope formation prior to exiting the cell, whereas ricin and Shiga-like toxins and some nonenveloped viruses use the retrograde pathway for cell entry. Mining a human genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen revealed a need for multiple retrograde pathway components for cell-to-cell spread of vaccinia virus. We confirmed and extended these results while discovering that retrograde trafficking was required for virus egress rather than entry. Retro-2, a specific retrograde trafficking inhibitor of protein toxins, potently prevented spread of vaccinia virus as well as monkeypox virus, a human pathogen. Electron and confocal microscopy studies revealed that Retro-2 prevented wrapping of virions with an additional double-membrane envelope that enables microtubular transport, exocytosis, and actin polymerization. The viral B5 and F13 protein components of this membrane, which are required for wrapping, normally colocalize in the trans-Golgi network. However, only B5 traffics through the secretory pathway, suggesting that F13 uses another route to the trans-Golgi network. The retrograde route was demonstrated by finding that F13 was largely confined to early endosomes and failed to colocalize with B5 in the presence of Retro-2. Thus, vaccinia virus makes novel use of the retrograde transport system for formation of the viral wrapping membrane. Efficient cell-to-cell spread of vaccinia virus and other orthopoxviruses depends on the wrapping of infectious particles with a double membrane that enables microtubular transport, exocytosis, and actin polymerization

  16. Swine adipose stromal cells loaded with recombinant bovine herpesvirus 4 virions expressing a foreign antigen induce potent humoral immune responses in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donofrio, Gaetano; Taddei, Simone; Franceschi, Valentina; Capocefalo, Antonio; Cavirani, Sandro; Martinelli, Nicola; Ottonello, Simone; Ferrari, Maura

    2011-01-29

    Increasingly effective vaccination strategies are needed to counteract the high incidence of contagious diseases associated with intensive swine breeding. Recombinant viral vaccines are a promising new avenue in this direction. Key features of viral vectors suitable for immunoprophylaxis are safety, ease of manipulation and the ability to replicate in a variety of hosts. Most of the above requirements are met by bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4), a non-pathogenic dsDNA virus capable of infecting a broad range of cell types in vitro. Here we report the results of an exploratory study using an engineered BoHV-4 virus (eBoHV-4) expressing two unrelated glycoprotein antigens from bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), to assess the potential of recombinant BoHV-4 as a self-adjuvanted immunogen in pigs. Free eBoHV-4 virions and virions preloaded into homologous swine adipose-derived stromal cells (SADSC) were tested. Neither virus formulation elicited neutralizing anti-BoHV-4 antibodies, nor any disease symptom, yet both induced specific immune responses against the heterologous antigens. However, a much earlier (18 vs 28 days post-infection) and more robust neutralizing response against BVDV and BoHV-1 viruses was elicited by eBoHV-4-preinfected SADSCs compared to free virions. The data validate BoHV-4 as a safe and effective heterologous antigen carrier/producer and identify SADSCs as helpful tools for the formulation of increasingly efficacious recombinant immunogens for pig vaccination. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tritium planigraphy study of structural alterations in the coat protein of Potato virus X induced by binding of its triple gene block 1 protein to virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashina, Elena; Badun, Gennady; Fedorova, Natalia; Ksenofontov, Alexander; Nemykh, Maria; Serebryakova, Marina; Mukhamedzhanova, Anna; Karpova, Olga; Rodionova, Nina; Baratova, Lyudmila; Dobrov, Evgeny

    2009-12-01

    Alterations in Potato virus X (PVX) coat protein structure after binding of the protein, encoded by the first gene of PVX triple gene block (triple gene block 1 protein, TGBp1), to the virions were studied using tritium planigraphy. Previously, it has been shown that TGBp1 molecules interact with the PVX particle end, containing the 5'-terminus of PVX RNA, and that this interaction results in a strong decrease in virion stability and its transformation to a translationally active state. In this work, it has been shown that the interaction of TGBp1 with PVX virions leads to an increase of approximately 50% in tritium label incorporation into the 176-198 segment of the 236-residue-long PVX coat protein subunit, with some decrease in label incorporation into the N-terminal coat protein region. According to the new 'sandwich' variant of our recently proposed model of the three-dimensional structure of the intravirus PVX coat protein, the 176-198 segment is assigned to the beta-sheet region located at the subunit surface, presumably participating in coat protein interactions with the intravirus RNA and/or in protein-protein interactions, whereas the N-terminal coat protein region corresponds to the other part of the same beta-sheet. For the remaining segments of the PVX coat protein subunit, no significant difference between tritium incorporation into untreated and TGBp1-treated PVX was observed. A detailed description of the 'sandwich' version of the intravirus PVX coat protein model is presented.

  18. Vaccinia Virus Uses Retromer-Independent Cellular Retrograde Transport Pathways To Facilitate the Wrapping of Intracellular Mature Virions during Virus Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Kate; Haga, Ismar R.; Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Jasim, Seema; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Gillet, Daniel; Schmitt-John, Thomas; Digard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poxviruses, such as vaccinia virus (VACV), undertake a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle which involves morphogenesis through four distinct virion forms and includes a crucial wrapping step whereby intracellular mature virions (IMVs) are wrapped in two additional membranes to form intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). To determine if cellular retrograde transport pathways are required for this wrapping step, we examined VACV morphogenesis in cells with reduced expression of the tetrameric tethering factor known as the GARP (Golgi-associated retrograde pathway), a central component of retrograde transport. VACV multistep replication was significantly impaired in cells transfected with small interfering RNA targeting the GARP complex and in cells with a mutated GARP complex. Detailed analysis revealed that depletion of the GARP complex resulted in a reduction in the number of IEVs, thereby linking retrograde transport with the wrapping of IMVs. In addition, foci of viral wrapping membrane proteins without an associated internal core accumulated in cells with a mutated GARP complex, suggesting that impaired retrograde transport uncouples nascent IMVs from the IEV membranes at the site of wrapping. Finally, small-molecule inhibitors of retrograde transport strongly suppressed VACV multistep growth in vitro and reduced weight loss and clinical signs in an in vivo murine model of systemic poxviral disease. This work links cellular retrograde transport pathways with the morphogenesis of poxviruses and identifies a panel of novel inhibitors of poxvirus replication. IMPORTANCE Cellular retrograde transport pathways traffic cargo from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network and are a key part of the intracellular membrane network. This work reveals that the prototypic poxvirus vaccinia virus (VACV) exploits cellular retrograde transport pathways to facilitate the wrapping of intracellular mature virions and therefore promote the production of extracellular virus

  19. Vaccinia virus uses retromer-independent cellular retrograde transport pathways to facilitate the wrapping of intracellular mature virions during viral morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Kate; Haga, Ismar R; Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Jasim, Seema; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Gillet, Daniel; Schmitt-John, Thomas; Digard, Paul; Beard, Philippa M

    2016-08-31

    Poxviruses such as Vaccinia virus (VACV) undertake a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle which involves morphogenesis through four distinct virion forms, and includes a crucial "wrapping" step whereby intracellular mature virions (IMVs) are wrapped in two additional membranes to form intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). To determine if cellular retrograde transport pathways were required for this wrapping step we examined VACV morphogenesis in cells with reduced expression of the tetrameric tethering factor complex GARP (Golgi-associated retrograde pathway complex), a central component of retrograde transport. VACV multi-step replication was significantly impaired in cells transfected with siRNA targeting the GARP complex or in cells with a mutated GARP complex. Detailed analysis revealed that depletion of the GARP complex resulted in a reduction in the number of IEVs, thereby linking retrograde transport with the wrapping of IMVs. In addition foci of viral wrapping membrane proteins without an associated internal core accumulated in cells with a mutated GARP complex, suggesting that impaired retrograde transport uncouples nascent IMVs from the IEV membranes at the site of wrapping. Finally, small molecule inhibitors of retrograde transport strongly suppressed VACV multi-step growth in vitro and reduced weight loss and clinical signs in an in vivo murine model of systemic poxviral disease. This work links cellular retrograde transport pathways with morphogenesis of poxviruses and identifies a panel of novel inhibitors of poxvirus replication. Cellular retrograde transport pathways traffic cargo from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network and are a key part of the intracellular membrane network. This work reveals the prototypic poxvirus Vaccinia virus (VACV) exploits cellular retrograde transport pathways to facilitate the wrapping of intracellular mature virions and therefore promote the production of extracellular virus. Inhibition of retrograde transport by

  20. Alpha interferon-induced antiretroviral activities: restriction of viral nucleic acid synthesis and progeny virion production in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected monocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Baca-Regen, L; Heinzinger, N; Stevenson, M; Gendelman, H E

    1994-01-01

    Alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) restricts multiple steps of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) life cycle. A well-described effect of IFN-alpha is in the modulation of viral nucleic acid synthesis. We demonstrate that IFN-alpha influences HIV-1 DNA synthesis principally by reducing the production of late products of reverse transcription. The magnitude of IFN-alpha-induced downregulation of HIV-1 DNA and/or progeny virion production was dependent on the IFN-alpha concentration, the ...

  1. Safety, immunogenicity, and lot-to-lot consistency of a split-virion quadrivalent influenza vaccine in younger and older adults: a phase III randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesay, Sanie; Brzostek, Jerzy; Meyer, Ingo; Donazzolo, Yves; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Rouzier, Régine; Astruc, Béatrice; Szymanski, Henryk; Toursarkissian, Nicole; Vandermeulen, Corinne; Kowalska, Edyta; Van Damme, Pierre; Salamand, Camille; Pepin, Stephanie

    2017-10-02

    Here, we report a randomized multicenter phase III trial assessing the lot-to-lot consistency of the 2014-2015 Northern Hemisphere quadrivalent split-virion inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV4; Sanofi Pasteur) and comparing its immunogenicity and safety with that of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) in younger and older adults (EudraCT no. 2014-000785-21). Younger (18-60 y, n = 1114) and older (>60 y, n = 1111) adults were randomized 2:2:2:1:1 to receive a single dose of one of three lots of IIV4, the licensed IIV3 containing the B Yamagata lineage strain, or an investigational IIV3 containing the B Victoria lineage strain. Post-vaccination (day 21) hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were equivalent for the three IIV4 lots. For the pooled IIV4s vs. IIV3, hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were also non-inferior for the A strains, non-inferior for the B strain when present in the comparator IIV3, and superior for the B strain lineage when absent from the comparator IIV3. For all vaccine strains, seroprotection rates were ≥98% in younger adults and ≥90% in older adults. IIV4 also increased seroneutralizing antibody titers against all three vaccine strains of influenza. All vaccines were well tolerated, with no safety concerns identified. Solicited injection-site reactions were similar for IIV4 and IIV3 and mostly grade 1 and transient. This study showed that in younger and older adults, IIV4 had a similar safety profile as the licensed IIV3 and that including a second B strain lineage in IIV4 provided superior immunogenicity for the added B strain without affecting the immunogenicity of the three IIV3 strains.

  2. Single virus detection by means of atomic force microscopy in combination with advanced image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocklitz, Thomas; Kämmer, Evelyn; Stöckel, Stephan; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Zell, Roland; Deckert, Volker; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    In the present contribution virions of five different virus species, namely Varicella-zoster virus, Porcine teschovirus, Tobacco mosaic virus, Coliphage M13 and Enterobacteria phage PsP3, are investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). From the resulting height images quantitative features like maximal height, area and volume of the viruses could be extracted and compared to reference values. Subsequently, these features were accompanied by image moments, which quantify the morphology of the virions. Both types of features could be utilized for an automatic discrimination of the five virus species. The accuracy of this classification model was 96.8%. Thus, a virus detection on a single-particle level using AFM images is possible. Due to the application of advanced image analysis the morphology could be quantified and used for further analysis. Here, an automatic recognition by means of a classification model could be achieved in a reliable and objective manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A leucine residue in the C terminus of human parainfluenza virus type 3 matrix protein is essential for efficient virus-like particle and virion release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangyuan; Zhang, Shengwei; Ding, Binbin; Yang, Xiaodan; Chen, Longyun; Yan, Qin; Jiang, Yanliang; Zhong, Yi; Chen, Mingzhou

    2014-11-01

    Paramyxovirus particles, like other enveloped virus particles, are formed by budding from membranes of infected cells, and matrix (M) proteins are critical for this process. To identify the M protein important for this process, we have characterized the budding of the human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) M protein. Our results showed that expression of the HPIV3 M protein alone is sufficient to initiate the release of virus-like particles (VLPs). Electron microscopy analysis confirmed that VLPs are morphologically similar to HPIV3 virions. We identified a leucine (L302) residue within the C terminus of the HPIV3 M protein that is critical for M protein-mediated VLP production by regulating the ubiquitination of the M protein. When L302 was mutated into A302, ubiquitination of M protein was defective, the release of VLPs was abolished, and the membrane binding and budding abilities of M protein were greatly weakened, but the ML302A mutant retained oligomerization activity and had a dominant negative effect on M protein-mediated VLP production. Furthermore, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor also inhibited M protein-mediated VLP production and viral budding. Finally, recombinant HPIV3 containing the M(L302A) mutant could not be rescued. These results suggest that L302 acts as a critical regulating signal for the ubiquitination of the HPIV3 M protein and virion release. Human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) is an enveloped virus with a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA genome. It can cause severe respiratory tract diseases, such as bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and croup in infants and young children. However, no valid antiviral therapy or vaccine is currently available. Thus, further elucidation of its assembly and budding will be helpful in the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we show that a leucine residue (L302) located at the C terminus of the HPIV3 M protein is essential for efficient production of virus-like particles (VLPs). Furthermore

  4. Characterization of a single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus of Thysanoplusia orichalcea L. (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, X W; Carner, G R

    2000-05-01

    A single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) isolated from Thysanoplusia orichalcea L. (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) (ThorNPV) in Indonesia has tetrahedral occlusion bodies (OBs) with a width of 1. 22 microm (range = 0.803-1.931 microm). The length of the virion with an envelope averaged 0.29 and 0.23 microm without an envelope. ThorNPV was propagated in Pseudoplusia includens (Walker) and its authenticity was confirmed by sequence analysis of the polyhedrin gene of the ThorNPV produced in T. orichalcea and P. includens. Polyhedrin amino acid sequence analysis revealed that ThorNPV belongs to Group II of baculoviruses and is closely related to Trichoplusia ni single nucleocapsid NPV, sharing 97.6% sequence identity. Infectivity of ThorNPV against third instar P. includens was low, with a LD(50) value of 65,636 OBs/larva. Electron microscopy of infected tissues showed many polyhedra without virions embedded, which might explain the low virulence against P. includens. Differences in virion occlusion rates between individual cells in the same tissue suggested that the inoculum consisted of at least two variants that differed in the gene(s) controlling virion occlusion. In a host range test using the LD(50) value to P. includens against Spodoptera exigua, S. frugiperda, S. eridania, Anticarsia gemmatalis, Helicoverpa zea, Trichoplusia ni, and P. includens, P. includens was the only species infected. The virus infected primarily the fat body, tracheal epithelium, and hypodermis. The genomic size of the ThorNPV is 135 kb. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Loss of the Human Cytomegalovirus US16 Protein Abrogates Virus Entry into Endothelial and Epithelial Cells by Reducing the Virion Content of the Pentamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luganini, Anna; Cavaletto, Noemi; Raimondo, Stefania; Geuna, Stefano; Gribaudo, Giorgio

    2017-06-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US12 gene family encodes a group of predicted seven-transmembrane proteins whose functions have yet to be established. While inactivation of individual US12 members in laboratory strains of HCMV does not affect viral replication in fibroblasts, disruption of the US16 gene in the low-passage-number TR strain prevents viral growth in endothelial and epithelial cells. In these cells, the US16-null viruses fail to express immediate early (IE), early (E), and late (L) viral proteins due to a defect which occurs prior to IE gene expression. Here, we show that this defective phenotype is a direct consequence of deficiencies in the entry of US16-null viruses in these cell types due to an impact on the gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131A (pentamer) complex. Indeed, viral particles released from fibroblasts infected with US16-null viruses were defective for the pentamer, thus preventing entry during infections of endothelial and epithelial cells. A link between pUS16 and the pentamer was further supported by the colocalization of pUS16 and pentamer proteins within the cytoplasmic viral assembly compartment (cVAC) of infected fibroblasts. Deletion of the C-terminal tail of pUS16 reproduced the defective growth phenotype and alteration of virion composition as US16-null viruses. However, the pentamer assembly and trafficking to the cVAC were not affected by the lack of the C terminus of pUS16. Coimmunoprecipitation results then indicated that US16 interacts with pUL130 but not with the mature pentamer or gH/gL/gO. Together, these results suggest that pUS16 contributes to the tropism of HCMV by influencing the content of the pentamer into virions.IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is major pathogen in newborns and immunocompromised individuals. A hallmark of HCMV pathogenesis is its ability to productively replicate in an exceptionally broad range of target cells. The virus infects a variety of cell types by exploiting different forms of the envelope

  6. Potency of whole virus particle and split virion vaccines using dissolving microneedle against challenges of H1N1 and H5N1 influenza viruses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsukasa, Akihiro; Kuruma, Koji; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Hiono, Takahiro; Suzuki, Mizuho; Matsuno, Keita; Kida, Hiroshi; Oyamada, Takayoshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2017-05-15

    Transdermal vaccination using a microneedle (MN) confers enhanced immunity compared with subcutaneous (SC) vaccination. Here we developed a novel dissolving MN patch for the influenza vaccine. The potencies of split virion and whole virus particle (WVP) vaccines prepared from A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) and A/duck/Hokkaido/Vac-3/2007 (H5N1), respectively, were evaluated. MN vaccination induced higher neutralizing antibody responses than SC vaccination in mice. Moreover, MN vaccination with a lower dose of antigens conferred protective immunity against lethal challenges of influenza viruses than SC vaccination in mice. These results suggest that the WVP vaccines administered using MN are an effective combination for influenza vaccine to be further validated in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CD40 ligand (CD154) incorporated into HIV virions induces activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) expression in human B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epeldegui, Marta; Thapa, Dharma R; De la Cruz, Justin; Kitchen, Scott; Zack, Jerome A; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel

    2010-07-06

    Most AIDS-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (AIDS-NHL) arises from errors in immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene (IgH) class switch recombination (CSR) or somatic hypermutation (SHM), events that occur in germinal center (GC) B cells and require the activity of activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Several oncogenic viruses (EBV, HCV, HPV) can induce AID gene (AID) expression, and elevated AID expression is seen in circulating lymphocytes prior to AIDS-NHL diagnosis. Here, we report that HIV produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) induced AID expression in normal human B cells. Since HIV produced in PBMC contains host cell CD40 ligand (CD40L) incorporated into the viral membrane, and CD40L is known to induce AID expression in human B cells, the role of virion-associated CD40L in HIV-induced AID expression was examined. Only viruses expressing functional CD40L were seen to induce AID expression; CD40L-negative HIV did not induce AID expression. The induction of AID expression by CD40L+ HIV was abrogated by addition of blocking anti-CD40L antibody. AID protein was detected in B cells exposed to CD40L+ HIV using intracellular multicolor flow cytometry, with most AID producing B cells expressing the CD71 activation marker on their surface. Therefore, HIV virions that express CD40L induce AID expression in B cells, and this induction appears to be due to a direct interaction between CD40L on these viruses and CD40 on B cells. These findings are consistent with a role for HIV in the direct stimulation of B cells, potentially leading to the accumulation of molecular lesions that have the potential to contribute to the development of NHL.

  8. CD40 ligand (CD154 incorporated into HIV virions induces activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID expression in human B lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Epeldegui

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Most AIDS-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (AIDS-NHL arises from errors in immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene (IgH class switch recombination (CSR or somatic hypermutation (SHM, events that occur in germinal center (GC B cells and require the activity of activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID. Several oncogenic viruses (EBV, HCV, HPV can induce AID gene (AID expression, and elevated AID expression is seen in circulating lymphocytes prior to AIDS-NHL diagnosis. Here, we report that HIV produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC induced AID expression in normal human B cells. Since HIV produced in PBMC contains host cell CD40 ligand (CD40L incorporated into the viral membrane, and CD40L is known to induce AID expression in human B cells, the role of virion-associated CD40L in HIV-induced AID expression was examined. Only viruses expressing functional CD40L were seen to induce AID expression; CD40L-negative HIV did not induce AID expression. The induction of AID expression by CD40L+ HIV was abrogated by addition of blocking anti-CD40L antibody. AID protein was detected in B cells exposed to CD40L+ HIV using intracellular multicolor flow cytometry, with most AID producing B cells expressing the CD71 activation marker on their surface. Therefore, HIV virions that express CD40L induce AID expression in B cells, and this induction appears to be due to a direct interaction between CD40L on these viruses and CD40 on B cells. These findings are consistent with a role for HIV in the direct stimulation of B cells, potentially leading to the accumulation of molecular lesions that have the potential to contribute to the development of NHL.

  9. Hepatitis B Virus Genotype C Isolates with Wild-Type Core Promoter Sequence Replicate Less Efficiently than Genotype B Isolates but Possess Higher Virion Secretion Capacity ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yanli; Tang, Xiaoli; Garcia, Tamako; Hussain, Munira; Zhang, Jiming; Lok, Anna; Wands, Jack; Li, Jisu; Tong, Shuping

    2011-01-01

    Infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype C is associated with a prolonged viremic phase, delayed hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion, and an increased incidence of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma compared with genotype B infection. Genotype C is also associated with the more frequent emergence of core promoter mutations, which increase genome replication and are independently associated with poor clinical outcomes. We amplified full-length HBV genomes from serum samples from Chinese and U. S. patients with chronic HBV infection and transfected circularized genome pools or dimeric constructs of individual clones into Huh7 cells. The two genotypes could be differentiated by Western blot analysis due to the reactivities of M and L proteins toward a monoclonal pre-S2 antibody and slightly different S-protein mobilities. Great variability in replication capacity was observed for both genotypes. The A1762T/G1764A core promoter mutations were prevalent in genotype C isolates and correlated with increased replication capacity, while the A1752G/T mutation frequently found in genotype B isolates correlated with a low replication capacity. Importantly, most genotype C isolates with wild-type core promoter sequence replicated less efficiently than the corresponding genotype B isolates due to less efficient transcription of the 3.5-kb RNA. However, genotype C isolates often displayed more efficient virion secretion. We propose that the low intracellular levels of viral DNA and core protein of wild-type genotype C delay immune clearance and trigger the subsequent emergence of A1762T/G1764A core promoter mutations to upregulate replication; efficient virion secretion compensates for the low replication capacity to ensure the establishment of persistent infection by genotype C. PMID:21775451

  10. Multi-faceted proteomic characterization of host protein complement of Rift Valley fever virus virions and identification of specific heat shock proteins, including HSP90, as important viral host factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Nuss

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever is a potentially fatal disease of humans and domestic animals caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV. Infection with RVFV in ruminants can cause near 100% abortion rates and recent outbreaks in naïve human populations have suggested case fatality rates of greater than thirty percent. To elucidate the roles that host proteins play during RVFV infection, proteomic analysis of RVFV virions was conducted using complementary analytical approaches, followed by functional validation studies of select identified host factors. Coupling the more traditional Gel LC/MS/MS approach (SDS PAGE followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with an alternative technique that preserves protein complexes allowed the protein complement of these viral particles to be thoroughly examined. In addition to viral proteins present within the virions and virion-associated host proteins, multiple macromolecular complexes were identified. Bioinformatic analysis showed that host chaperones were among over-represented protein families associated with virions, and functional experiments using siRNA gene silencing and small molecule inhibitors identified several of these heat shock proteins, including heat shock protein 90 (HSP90, as important viral host factors. Further analysis indicated that HSP inhibition effects occur during the replication/transcription phase of the virus life cycle, leading to significant lowering of viral titers without compromising the functional capacity of released virions. Overall, these studies provide much needed further insight into interactions between RVFV and host cells, increasing our understanding of the infection process and suggesting novel strategies for anti-viral development. In particular, considering that several HSP90 inhibitors have been advancing through clinical trials for cancer treatment, these results also highlight the exciting potential of repurposing HSP90 inhibitors to treat RVF.

  11. Effects of post-Kyoto policy on the Swiss national economy - Analysis using a single-country equilibrium model; Volkswirtschaftliche Auswirkungen der Schweizer Post-Kyoto-Politik - Analyse mit einem dynamischen Gleichgewichtsmodell fuer die Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-08-15

    This final report elaborated for the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN) deals with questions concerning Swiss climate policy after 2012. In 2012, existing climate legislation as defined in CO{sub 2} emission legislation is to be revised and brought in line with European legislation on greenhouse gases. The paper presents and discusses the proposals of the Swiss government that are to make Switzerland climate-neutral. These questions include how high a steering-tax must be in order to provide a 20% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions, which effects on the economy in general (BIP) and on particular sectors are to be expected, how households will be affected and how large the positive secondary side-effects are. The methods used in the study and their limitations are examined. In particular, a dynamic, single-country equilibrium model is introduced and various scenarios are discussed

  12. Whole exome sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses to identify germline alterations in genes associated with testosterone metabolism in a patient with androgen insensitivity syndrome and early-onset colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disciglio, Vittoria; Devecchi, Andrea; Palumbo, Orazio; Carella, Massimo; Penso, Donata; Milione, Massimo; Valle, Giorgio; Pierotti, Marco Alessandro; Vitellaro, Marco; Bertario, Lucio; Canevari, Silvana; Signoroni, Stefano; De Cecco, Loris

    2016-06-07

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), a disorder of sexual development in 46, XY individuals, is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. A variety of tumors have been reported in association with AIS, but no cases with colorectal cancer (CRC) have been described. Here, we present a male patient with AIS who developed multiple early-onset CRCs and his pedigree. His first cousin was diagnosed with AIS and harbored the same AR gene mutation, but with no signs of CRC. The difference in clinical management for the two patients was that testosterone treatment was given to the proband for a much longer time compared with the cousin. The CRC family history was negative, and no germline mutations in well-known CRC-related genes were identified. A single nucleotide polymorphism array revealed a microduplication on chromosome 22q11.22 that encompassed a microRNA potentially related to CRC pathogenesis. In the proband, whole exome sequencing identified a polymorphism in an oncogene and 13 rare loss-of-function variants, of which two were in CRC-related genes and four were in genes associated with other human cancers. By pathway analysis, all inherited germline genetic events were connected in a unique network whose alteration in the proband, together with continuous testosterone stimulation, may have played a role in CRC pathogenesis.

  13. Analytical Bias Exceeding Desirable Quality Goal in 4 out of 5 Common Immunoassays: Results of a Native Single Serum Sample External Quality Assessment Program for Cobalamin, Folate, Ferritin, Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, and Free T4 Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Gunn B B; Rustad, Pål; Berg, Jens P; Aakre, Kristin M

    2016-09-01

    We undertook this study to evaluate method differences for 5 components analyzed by immunoassays, to explore whether the use of method-dependent reference intervals may compensate for method differences, and to investigate commutability of external quality assessment (EQA) materials. Twenty fresh native single serum samples, a fresh native serum pool, Nordic Federation of Clinical Chemistry Reference Serum X (serum X) (serum pool), and 2 EQA materials were sent to 38 laboratories for measurement of cobalamin, folate, ferritin, free T4, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by 5 different measurement procedures [Roche Cobas (n = 15), Roche Modular (n = 4), Abbott Architect (n = 8), Beckman Coulter Unicel (n = 2), and Siemens ADVIA Centaur (n = 9)]. The target value for each component was calculated based on the mean of method means or measured by a reference measurement procedure (free T4). Quality specifications were based on biological variation. Local reference intervals were reported from all laboratories. Method differences that exceeded acceptable bias were found for all components except folate. Free T4 differences from the uncommonly used reference measurement procedure were large. Reference intervals differed between measurement procedures but also within 1 measurement procedure. The serum X material was commutable for all components and measurement procedures, whereas the EQA materials were noncommutable in 13 of 50 occasions (5 components, 5 methods, 2 EQA materials). The bias between the measurement procedures was unacceptably large in 4/5 tested components. Traceability to reference materials as claimed by the manufacturers did not lead to acceptable harmonization. Adjustment of reference intervals in accordance with method differences and use of commutable EQA samples are not implemented commonly. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  14. The CAMAC logic state analyser

    CERN Document Server

    Centro, Sandro

    1981-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. Large electronic experiments using distributed processors for parallel readout and data reduction need to analyse the data acquisition components status and monitor dead time constants of each active readout module and processor. For the UA1 experiment, a microprocessor-based CAMAC logic status analyser (CLSA) has been developed in order to implement these functions autonomously. CLSA is a single unit CAMAC module, able to record, up to 256 times, the logic status of 32 TTL inputs gated by a common clock, internal or external, with a maximum frequency of 2 MHz. The data stored in the internal CLSA memory can be read directly via CAMAC function or preprocessed by CLSA 6800 microprocessor. The 6800 resident firmware (4Kbyte) expands the module features to include an interactive monitor, data recording control, data reduction and histogram accumulation with statistics parameter evaluation. The microprocessor memory and the resident firmware can be externally extended using st...

  15. Sproglig Metode og Analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    le Fevre Jakobsen, Bjarne

    Publikationen indeholder øvematerialer, tekster, powerpointpræsentationer og handouts til undervisningsfaget Sproglig Metode og Analyse på BA og tilvalg i Dansk/Nordisk 2010-2011......Publikationen indeholder øvematerialer, tekster, powerpointpræsentationer og handouts til undervisningsfaget Sproglig Metode og Analyse på BA og tilvalg i Dansk/Nordisk 2010-2011...

  16. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, Kristin N., E-mail: kparent@msu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Gilcrease, Eddie B. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Casjens, Sherwood R., E-mail: sherwood.casjens@path.utah.edu [University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Baker, Timothy S., E-mail: tsb@ucsd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); University of California, San Diego, Division of Biological Sciences, La Jolla, CA, 92093 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  17. Long-term immunogenicity of an inactivated split-virion 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus vaccine with or without aluminum adjuvant in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenting; Zheng, Mei; Zhou, Feng; Chen, Ze

    2015-03-01

    In 2009, a global epidemic of influenza A(H1N1) virus caused the death of tens of thousands of people. Vaccination is the most effective means of controlling an epidemic of influenza and reducing the mortality rate. In this study, the long-term immunogenicity of influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) split vaccine was observed as long as 15 months (450 days) after immunization in a mouse model. Female BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with different doses of aluminum-adjuvanted vaccine. The mice were challenged with a lethal dose (10× 50% lethal dose [LD(50)]) of homologous virus 450 days after immunization. The results showed that the supplemented aluminum adjuvant not only effectively enhanced the protective effect of the vaccine but also reduced the immunizing dose of the vaccine. In addition, the aluminum adjuvant enhanced the IgG antibody level of mice immunized with the H1N1 split vaccine. The IgG level was correlated to the survival rate of the mice. Aluminum-adjuvanted inactivated split-virion 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 vaccine has good immunogenicity and provided long-term protection against lethal influenza virus challenge in mice. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Elimination of contaminating cap genes in AAV vector virions reduces immune responses and improves transgene expression in a canine gene therapy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Halbert, C L; Lee, D; Butts, T; Tapscott, S J; Storb, R; Miller, A D

    2014-04-01

    Animal and human gene therapy studies utilizing AAV vectors have shown that immune responses to AAV capsid proteins can severely limit transgene expression. The main source of capsid antigen is that associated with the AAV vectors, which can be reduced by stringent vector purification. A second source of AAV capsid proteins is that expressed from cap genes aberrantly packaged into AAV virions during vector production. This antigen source can be eliminated by the use of a cap gene that is too large to be incorporated into an AAV capsid, such as a cap gene containing a large intron (captron gene). Here, we investigated the effects of elimination of cap gene transfer and of vector purification by CsCl gradient centrifugation on AAV vector immunogenicity and expression following intramuscular injection in dogs. We found that both approaches reduced vector immunogenicity and that combining the two produced the lowest immune responses and highest transgene expression. This combined approach enabled the use of a relatively mild immunosuppressive regimen to promote robust micro-dystrophin gene expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy-affected dogs. Our study shows the importance of minimizing AAV cap gene impurities and indicates that this improvement in AAV vector production may benefit human applications.

  19. Cleavage of the HPV16 Minor Capsid Protein L2 during Virion Morphogenesis Ablates the Requirement for Cellular Furin during De Novo Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Cruz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Infections by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV are the causative agents for the development of cervical cancer. As with other non-enveloped viruses, HPVs are taken up by the cell through endocytosis following primary attachment to the host cell. Through studies using recombinant pseudovirus particles (PsV, many host cellular proteins have been implicated in the process. The proprotein convertase furin has been demonstrated to cleave the minor capsid protein, L2, post-attachment to host cells and is required for infectious entry by HPV16 PsV. In contrast, using biochemical inhibition by a furin inhibitor and furin-negative cells, we show that tissue-derived HPV16 native virus (NV initiates infection independent of cellular furin. We show that HPV16 L2 is cleaved during virion morphogenesis in differentiated tissue. In addition, HPV45 is also not dependent on cellular furin, but two other alpha papillomaviruses, HPV18 and HPV31, are dependent on the activity of cellular furin for infection.

  20. HIV-1 Infection of T Cells and Macrophages Are Differentially Modulated by Virion-Associated Hck: A Nef-Dependent Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda Tachedjian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The proline repeat motif (PxxP of Nef is required for interaction with the SH3 domains of macrophage-specific Src kinase Hck. However, the implication of this interaction for viral replication and infectivity in macrophages and T lymphocytes remains unclear. Experiments in HIV-1 infected macrophages confirmed the presence of a Nef:Hck complex which was dependent on the Nef proline repeat motif. The proline repeat motif of Nef also enhanced both HIV-1 infection and replication in macrophages, and was required for incorporation of Hck into viral particles. Unexpectedly, wild-type Hck inhibited infection of macrophages, but Hck was shown to enhance infection of primary T lymphocytes. These results indicate that the interaction between Nef and Hck is important for Nef-dependent modulation of viral infectivity. Hck-dependent enhancement of HIV-1 infection of T cells suggests that Nef-Hck interaction may contribute to the spread of HIV-1 infection from macrophages to T cells by modulating events in the producer cell, virion and target cell.

  1. Physicochemical properties of the Ljungan virus prototype virion in different environments: inactivated by heat but resistant to acidic pH, detergents and non-physiological environments such as Virkon-containing solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Jens-Ola; Tolf, Conny; Edman, Kjell-A; Lindberg, A Michael

    2007-01-01

    It is of great importance to know how a virus particle is affected by environmental conditions. Physicochemical properties of the virion will affect the virus viability in different environments, viral transmission between hosts, and will also be important for safe handling of the virus. The physicochemical properties of the Ljungan virus (LV) prototype, 87-012, adapted to grow in cell culture were evaluated using both LV in crude cell extracts and purified virions. Replication of LV was completely inhibited by heat. Titers of LV were unaffected by acidic pH, reduced but not completely abolished by alkaline pH, and unaffected by exposure to the detergents Triton X-100 and SDS. Surprisingly, viable LV was still detected after incubation in the acidic, oxidising and detergent-containing environment produced by the commonly used disinfectant Virkon. In conclusion, LV is resilient to extreme pH, detergents and also to oxidising environments, but is sensitive to heat treatment.

  2. Interferon induction by viruses. VIII. Vesicular stomatitis virus: (+-)DI-011 particles induce interferon in the absence of standard virions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekellick, M.J.; Marcus, P.I.

    1982-02-01

    Evidence was presented that VSV (+-)DI-011 particles, which contain a genome of covalently linked totally self-complementary RNA, were excellent inducers of interferon (IFN) - by virtue of the dsRNA presumed to form within an infected cell, and that one molecule of that dsRNA per cell sufficed to induce a quantum yield of IFN. While the IFN-inducing capacity of (+-)DI-011 particle preparations has been confirmed, some researchers contend that DIP by themselves cannot induce IFN and that induction requires the presence of coinfecting (contaminating) standard VSV PFP. Consequently, we reexamined this question and now report that under five different conditions where the function of contaminating standard virus is reduced markedly, or eliminated, there was no diminution of the interferon-inducing particle (IFP) activity in preparations of (+-)DI-011 particles. Thus, inactivation of contaminating PFP by uv radiation or heat, the elimination (during induction) of cycling infection through the use of anti-serum (in the case of mouse L cells), and the reduction of PFP by four successive velocity sedimentation-gradient purifications had no adverse affect on the IFN-inducing capacity of DI-011 in either ''aged'' primary chick embryo cells or in mouse L(Y) cells. Furthermore, dilutions of DI-011 stocks which precluded the presence of even a single PFP still induced IFN in ''aged'' chick embryo cells. In concert these data demonstrate convincingly that IFN induction by DI-011 particles does not require coinfection with standard virus. It follows that DI-011 particles are intrinsically capable of inducing IFN.

  3. Laser Beam Focus Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2007-01-01

    The quantitative and qualitative description of laser beam characteristics is important for process implementation and optimisation. In particular, a need for quantitative characterisation of beam diameter was identified when using fibre lasers for micro manufacturing. Here the beam diameter limits...... the obtainable features in direct laser machining as well as heat affected zones in welding processes. This paper describes the development of a measuring unit capable of analysing beam shape and diameter of lasers to be used in manufacturing processes. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating...... mechanical wire being swept through the laser beam at varying Z-heights. The reflected signal is analysed and the resulting beam profile determined. The development comprised the design of a flexible fixture capable of providing both rotation and Z-axis movement, control software including data capture...

  4. Meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Maria A.; Luyten, Johannes W.; Scheerens, Jaap; Sleegers, P.J.C.; Scheerens, J

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter results of a research synthesis and quantitative meta-analyses of three facets of time effects in education are presented, namely time at school during regular lesson hours, homework, and extended learning time. The number of studies for these three facets of time that could be used

  5. Contesting Citizenship: Comparative Analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte; Squires, Judith

    2007-01-01

    importance of particularized experiences and multiple ineequality agendas). These developments shape the way citizenship is both practiced and analysed. Mapping neat citizenship modles onto distinct nation-states and evaluating these in relation to formal equality is no longer an adequate approach...

  6. Analysing Access Control Specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, René Rydhof

    2009-01-01

    . Recent events have revealed intimate knowledge of surveillance and control systems on the side of the attacker, making it often impossible to deduce the identity of an inside attacker from logged data. In this work we present an approach that analyses the access control configuration to identify the set...

  7. Chromosome analyses in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann-Berg, N; Bullerdiek, J; Murua Escobar, H; Nolte, I

    2012-01-01

    Cytogenetics is the study of normal and abnormal chromosomes. Every species is characterized by a given number of chromosomes that can be recognized by their specific shape. The chromosomes are arranged according to standard classification schemes for the respective species. While pre- and postnatal chromosome analyses investigate the constitutional karyotype, tumor cytogenetics is focused on the detection of clonal acquired, tumor-associated chromosome aberrations. Cytogenetic investigations in dogs are of great value especially for breeders dealing with fertility problems within their pedigrees, for veterinarians and last but not least for the dog owners. Dogs and humans share a variety of genetic diseases, including cancer. Thus, the dog has become an increasingly important model for genetic diseases. However, cytogenetic analyses of canine cells are complicated by the complex karyotype of the dog. Only just 15 years ago, a standard classification scheme for the complete canine karyotype was established. For chromosome analyses of canine cells the same steps of chromosome preparation are used as in human cytogenetics. There are few reports about cytogenetic changes in non-neoplastic cells, involving predominantly the sex chromosomes. Cytogenetic analyses of different entities of canine tumors revealed that, comparable to human tumors, tumors of the dog are often characterized by clonal chromosome aberrations, which might be used as diagnostic and prognostic markers. The integration of modern techniques (molecular genetic approaches, adaptive computer programs) will facilitate and complete conventional cytogenetic studies. However, conventional cytogenetics is still non-replaceable.

  8. Report sensory analyses veal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, M.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    On behalf of a client of Animal Sciences Group, different varieties of veal were analyzed by both instrumental and sensory analyses. The sensory evaluation was performed with a sensory analytical panel in the period of 13th of May and 31st of May, 2005. The three varieties of veal were: young bull,

  9. Filmstil - teori og analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lennard Højbjerg

    Filmstil påvirker på afgørende vis vores oplevelse af film. Men filmstil, måden, de levende billeder organiserer fortællingen på fylder noget mindre end filmens handling, når vi taler om film. Filmstil - teori og analyse er en rigt eksemplificeret præsentation, kritik og videreudvikling af...

  10. Improved Prefusion Stability, Optimized Codon Usage, and Augmented Virion Packaging Enhance the Immunogenicity of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein in a Vectored-Vaccine Candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Ngwuta, Joan O; Surman, Sonja; Kabatova, Barbora; Liu, Xiang; Lingemann, Matthias; Liu, Xueqiao; Yang, Lijuan; Herbert, Richard; Swerczek, Joanna; Chen, Man; Moin, Syed M; Kumar, Azad; McLellan, Jason S; Kwong, Peter D; Graham, Barney S; Collins, Peter L; Munir, Shirin

    2017-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important viral agent of severe pediatric respiratory tract disease worldwide, but it lacks a licensed vaccine or suitable antiviral drug. A live attenuated chimeric bovine/human parainfluenza virus type 3 (rB/HPIV3) was developed previously as a vector expressing RSV fusion (F) protein to confer bivalent protection against RSV and HPIV3. In a previous clinical trial in virus-naive children, rB/HPIV3 was well tolerated but the immunogenicity of wild-type RSV F was unsatisfactory. We previously modified RSV F with a designed disulfide bond (DS) to increase stability in the prefusion (pre-F) conformation and to be efficiently packaged in the vector virion. Here, we further stabilized pre-F by adding both disulfide and cavity-filling mutations (DS-Cav1), and we also modified RSV F codon usage to have a lower CpG content and a higher level of expression. This RSV F open reading frame was evaluated in rB/HPIV3 in three forms: (i) pre-F without vector-packaging signal, (ii) pre-F with vector-packaging signal, and (iii) secreted pre-F ectodomain trimer. Despite being efficiently expressed, the secreted pre-F was poorly immunogenic. DS-Cav1 stabilized pre-F, with or without packaging, induced higher titers of pre-F specific antibodies in hamsters, and improved the quality of RSV-neutralizing serum antibodies. Codon-optimized RSV F containing fewer CpG dinucleotides had higher F expression, replicated more efficiently in vivo, and was more immunogenic. The combination of DS-Cav1 pre-F stabilization, optimized codon usage, reduced CpG content, and vector packaging significantly improved vector immunogenicity and protective efficacy against RSV. This provides an improved vectored RSV vaccine candidate suitable for pediatric clinical evaluation.IMPORTANCE RSV and HPIV3 are the first and second leading viral causes of severe pediatric respiratory disease worldwide. Licensed vaccines or suitable antiviral drugs are not available. We

  11. The African Swine Fever Virus Virion Membrane Protein pE248R Is Required for Virus Infectivity and an Early Postentry Event ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Irene; Nogal, María L.; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Bustos, María J.; Salas, María L.

    2009-01-01

    The African swine fever virus (ASFV) protein pE248R, encoded by the gene E248R, is a late structural component of the virus particle. The protein contains intramolecular disulfide bonds and has been previously identified as a substrate of the ASFV-encoded redox system. Its amino acid sequence contains a putative myristoylation site and a hydrophobic transmembrane region near its carboxy terminus. We show here that the protein pE248R is myristoylated during infection and associates with the membrane fraction in infected cells, behaving as an integral membrane protein. Furthermore, the protein localizes at the inner envelope of the virus particles in the cytoplasmic factories. The function of the protein pE248R in ASFV replication was investigated by using a recombinant virus that inducibly expresses the gene E248R. Under repressive conditions, the ASFV polyproteins pp220 and pp62 are normally processed and virus particles with morphology indistinguishable from that of those produced in a wild-type infection or under permissive conditions are generated. Moreover, the mutant virus particles can exit the cell as does the parental virus. However, the infectivity of the pE248R-deficient virions was reduced at least 100-fold. An investigation of the defect of the mutant virus indicated that neither virus binding nor internalization was affected by the absence of the protein pE248R, but a cytopathic effect was not induced and early and late gene expression was impaired, indicating that the protein is required for some early postentry event. PMID:19793823

  12. The African swine fever virus virion membrane protein pE248R is required for virus infectivity and an early postentry event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Irene; Nogal, María L; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Bustos, María J; Salas, María L

    2009-12-01

    The African swine fever virus (ASFV) protein pE248R, encoded by the gene E248R, is a late structural component of the virus particle. The protein contains intramolecular disulfide bonds and has been previously identified as a substrate of the ASFV-encoded redox system. Its amino acid sequence contains a putative myristoylation site and a hydrophobic transmembrane region near its carboxy terminus. We show here that the protein pE248R is myristoylated during infection and associates with the membrane fraction in infected cells, behaving as an integral membrane protein. Furthermore, the protein localizes at the inner envelope of the virus particles in the cytoplasmic factories. The function of the protein pE248R in ASFV replication was investigated by using a recombinant virus that inducibly expresses the gene E248R. Under repressive conditions, the ASFV polyproteins pp220 and pp62 are normally processed and virus particles with morphology indistinguishable from that of those produced in a wild-type infection or under permissive conditions are generated. Moreover, the mutant virus particles can exit the cell as does the parental virus. However, the infectivity of the pE248R-deficient virions was reduced at least 100-fold. An investigation of the defect of the mutant virus indicated that neither virus binding nor internalization was affected by the absence of the protein pE248R, but a cytopathic effect was not induced and early and late gene expression was impaired, indicating that the protein is required for some early postentry event.

  13. Varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein I is essential for spread in dorsal root ganglia and facilitates axonal localization of structural virion components in neuronal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Jenna; Steain, Megan; Slobedman, Barry; Abendroth, Allison

    2013-12-01

    Neurons of the sensory ganglia are the major site of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) latency and may undergo productive infection during reactivation. Although the VZV glycoprotein E/glycoprotein I (gE/gI) complex is known to be critical for neurovirulence, few studies have assessed the roles of these proteins during infection of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) due to the high human specificity of the virus. Here, we show that the VZV glycoprotein I gene is an important neurotropic gene responsible for mediating the spread of virus in neuronal cultures and explanted DRG. Inoculation of differentiated SH-SY5Y neuronal cell cultures with a VZV gI gene deletion strain (VZV rOkaΔgI) showed a large reduction in the percentage of cells infected and significantly smaller plaque sizes in a comparison with cultures infected with the parental strain (VZV rOka). In contrast, VZV rOkaΔgI was not significantly attenuated in fibroblast cultures, demonstrating a cell type-specific role for VZV gI. Analysis of rOkaΔgI protein localization by immunofluorescent staining revealed aberrant localization of viral glycoprotein and capsid proteins, with little or no staining present in the axons of differentiated SH-SY5Y cells infected with rOkaΔgI, yet axonal vesicle trafficking was not impaired. Further studies utilizing explanted human DRG indicated that VZV gI is required for the spread of virus within DRG. These data demonstrate a role for VZV gI in the cell-to-cell spread of virus during productive replication in neuronal cells and a role in facilitating the access of virion components to axons.

  14. Amphipathic alpha-helices and putative cholesterol binding domains of the influenza virus matrix M1 protein are crucial for virion structure organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsfasman, Tatyana; Kost, Vladimir; Markushin, Stanislav; Lotte, Vera; Koptiaeva, Irina; Bogacheva, Elena; Baratova, Ludmila; Radyukhin, Victor

    2015-12-02

    The influenza virus matrix M1 protein is an amphitropic membrane-associated protein, forming the matrix layer immediately beneath the virus raft membrane, thereby ensuring the proper structure of the influenza virion. The objective of this study was to elucidate M1 fine structural characteristics, which determine amphitropic properties and raft membrane activities of the protein, via 3D in silico modelling with subsequent mutational analysis. Computer simulations suggest the amphipathic nature of the M1 α-helices and the existence of putative cholesterol binding (CRAC) motifs on six amphipathic α-helices. Our finding explains for the first time many features of this protein, particularly the amphitropic properties and raft/cholesterol binding potential. To verify these results, we generated mutants of the A/WSN/33 strain via reverse genetics. The M1 mutations included F32Y in the CRAC of α-helix 2, W45Y and W45F in the CRAC of α-helix 3, Y100S in the CRAC of α-helix 6, M128A and M128S in the CRAC of α-helix 8 and a double L103I/L130I mutation in both a putative cholesterol consensus motif and the nuclear localisation signal. All mutations resulted in viruses with unusual filamentous morphology. Previous experimental data regarding the morphology of M1-gene mutant influenza viruses can now be explained in structural terms and are consistent with the pivotal role of the CRAC-domains and amphipathic α-helices in M1-lipid interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dropped object protection analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsen, Ingve

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in Offshore structural engineering Impact from dropped object is a typical accident action (NOKSOK N-004, 2013). Hence, the DOP structure is to be analyzed in an accidental limit state (ALS) design practice, which means that a non-linear finite element analysis can be applied. The DOP structure will be based on a typical DOP structure. Several FEM analyses are performed for the DOP structure. Different shapes size and weights and various impact positions are used for si...

  16. Biomass feedstock analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilen, C.; Moilanen, A.; Kurkela, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1996-12-31

    The overall objectives of the project `Feasibility of electricity production from biomass by pressurized gasification systems` within the EC Research Programme JOULE II were to evaluate the potential of advanced power production systems based on biomass gasification and to study the technical and economic feasibility of these new processes with different type of biomass feed stocks. This report was prepared as part of this R and D project. The objectives of this task were to perform fuel analyses of potential woody and herbaceous biomasses with specific regard to the gasification properties of the selected feed stocks. The analyses of 15 Scandinavian and European biomass feed stock included density, proximate and ultimate analyses, trace compounds, ash composition and fusion behaviour in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. The wood-derived fuels, such as whole-tree chips, forest residues, bark and to some extent willow, can be expected to have good gasification properties. Difficulties caused by ash fusion and sintering in straw combustion and gasification are generally known. The ash and alkali metal contents of the European biomasses harvested in Italy resembled those of the Nordic straws, and it is expected that they behave to a great extent as straw in gasification. Any direct relation between the ash fusion behavior (determined according to the standard method) and, for instance, the alkali metal content was not found in the laboratory determinations. A more profound characterisation of the fuels would require gasification experiments in a thermobalance and a PDU (Process development Unit) rig. (orig.) (10 refs.)

  17. Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed.

  18. EEG analyses with SOBI.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-02-01

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  19. Analyse af elbilers forbrug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Torp, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Denne rapport undersøger GPS og CAN bus datagrundlaget opsamlet ved kørsel med elbiler og analysere på elbilers forbrug. Analyserne er baseret på godt 133 millioner GPS og CAN bus målinger opsamlet fra 164 elbiler (Citroen C-Zero, Mitsubishi iMiev og Peugeot Ion) i kalenderåret 2012....... For datagrundlaget kan det konstateres, at der er behov for væsentlige, men simple opstramninger for fremadrettet at gøre det nemmere at anvende GPS/CAN bus data fra elbiler i andre analyser. Brugen af elbiler er sammenlignet med brændstofbiler og konklusionen er, at elbiler generelt kører 10-15 km/t langsommere på...

  20. Vaccinia virus A43R gene encodes an orthopoxvirus-specific late non-virion type-1 membrane protein that is dispensable for replication but enhances intradermal lesion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Cindy L; Moss, Bernard

    2010-01-05

    The vaccinia virus A43R open reading frame encodes a 168-amino acid protein with a predicted N-terminal signal sequence and a C-terminal transmembrane domain. Although A43R is conserved in all sequenced members of the orthopoxvirus genus, no non-orthopoxvirus homolog or functional motif was recognized. Biochemical and confocal microscopic studies indicated that A43 is expressed at late times following viral DNA synthesis and is a type-1 membrane protein with two N-linked oligosaccharide chains. A43 was present in Golgi and plasma membranes but only a trace amount was detected in sucrose gradient purified mature virions and none in CsCl gradient purified enveloped virions. Prevention of A43R expression had no effect on plaque size or virus replication in cell culture and little effect on virulence after mouse intranasal infection. Although the A43 mutant produced significantly smaller lesions in skin of mice than the control, the amounts of virus recovered from the lesions were similar.

  1. The herpes simplex virus 1 virion host shutoff protein enhances translation of viral late mRNAs by preventing mRNA overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauber, Bianca; Saffran, Holly A; Smiley, James R

    2014-09-01

    We recently demonstrated that the virion host shutoff (vhs) protein, an mRNA-specific endonuclease, is required for efficient herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) replication and translation of viral true-late mRNAs, but not other viral and cellular mRNAs, in many cell types (B. Dauber, J. Pelletier, and J. R. Smiley, J. Virol. 85:5363-5373, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00115-11). Here, we evaluated whether the structure of true-late mRNAs or the timing of their transcription is responsible for the poor translation efficiency in the absence of vhs. To test whether the highly structured 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of the true-late gC mRNA is the primary obstacle for translation initiation, we replaced it with the less structured 5'UTR of the γ-actin mRNA. However, this mutation did not restore translation in the context of a vhs-deficient virus. We then examined whether the timing of transcription affects translation efficiency at late times. To this end, we engineered a vhs-deficient virus mutant that transcribes the true-late gene US11 with immediate-early kinetics (IEUS11-ΔSma). Interestingly, IEUS11-ΔSma showed increased translational activity on the US11 transcript at late times postinfection, and US11 protein levels were restored to wild-type levels. These results suggest that mRNAs can maintain translational activity throughout the late stage of infection if they are present before translation factors and/or ribosomes become limiting. Taken together, these results provide evidence that in the absence of the mRNA-destabilizing function of vhs, accumulation of viral mRNAs overwhelms the capacity of the host translational machinery, leading to functional exclusion of the last mRNAs that are made during infection. The process of mRNA translation accounts for a significant portion of a cell's energy consumption. To ensure efficient use of cellular resources, transcription, translation, and mRNA decay are tightly linked and highly regulated. However, during

  2. Hepatitis B Virus Pregenomic RNA Is Present in Virions in Plasma and Is Associated With a Response to Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2a and Nucleos(t)ide Analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, L; Kootstra, Neeltje A; van Dort, Karel A; Takkenberg, R Bart; Reesink, Hendrik W; Zaaijer, Hans L

    2016-01-15

    Treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) with nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs) suppresses hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA production but does not affect the synthesis of the RNA pregenome or HBV messenger RNA. Whether HBV RNA-containing particles continue to be secreted into the bloodstream remains controversial. We developed a sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to quantify the HBV RNA load in a supernatant of NA-treated HepG2-2.2.15 cells and in plasma specimens from 20 patients with CHB who were receiving NA therapy and 86 patients treated with pegylated interferon alfa (Peg-IFN) and adefovir. Treatment of HepG2-2.2.15 cells with NAs for 9 days reduced HBV DNA levels (by 1.98 log10 copies/mL), whereas HBV RNA levels increased (by 0.47 log10 copies/mL; P < .05). During long-term NA treatment of patients with CHB, HBV RNA levels remained higher than HBV DNA levels. Peg-IFN-based treatment induced a stronger decrease in the HBV RNA load than NA monotherapy, and this decline was more pronounced in responders than in nonresponders. In HBV e antigen-negative patients, a lower baseline plasma HBV RNA level was independently associated with response to Peg-IFN and adefovir (odds ratio, 0.44; P = .019). Immunoprecipitation with HBV core antigen-specific antibodies after removal of the HBV surface antigen envelope demonstrated the association of plasma HBV RNA with virions. HBV RNA is present in virions in plasma specimens from patients with CHB. HBV RNA levels vary significantly from those of established viral markers during antiviral treatment, which highlights its potential as an independent marker in the evaluation of patients with CHB. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Kinetic analyses reveal potent and early blockade of hepatitis C virus assembly by NS5A inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGivern, David R; Masaki, Takahiro; Williford, Sara; Ingravallo, Paul; Feng, Zongdi; Lahser, Frederick; Asante-Appiah, Ernest; Neddermann, Petra; De Francesco, Raffaele; Howe, Anita Y; Lemon, Stanley M

    2014-08-01

    All-oral regimens combining different classes of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) are highly effective for treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. NS5A inhibitors will likely form a component of future interferon-sparing treatment regimens. However, despite their potential, the detailed mechanism of action of NS5A inhibitors is unclear. To study their mechanisms, we compared their kinetics of antiviral suppression with those of other classes of DAA, using the hepatitis C virus genotype 1a cell culture-infectious virus H77S.3. We performed detailed kinetic analyses of specific steps in the hepatitis C virus life cycle using cell cultures incubated with protease inhibitors, polymerase inhibitors, or NS5A inhibitors. Assays were designed to measure active viral RNA synthesis and steady-state RNA abundance, polyprotein synthesis, virion assembly, and infectious virus production. Despite their high potency, NS5A inhibitors were slow to inhibit viral RNA synthesis compared with protease or polymerase inhibitors. By 24 hours after addition of an NS5A inhibitor, polyprotein synthesis was reduced <50%, even at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, inhibition of virus release by NS5A inhibitors was potent and rapid, with onset of inhibition as early as 2 hours. Cells incubated with NS5A inhibitors were rapidly depleted of intracellular infectious virus and RNA-containing hepatitis C virus particles, indicating a block in virus assembly. DAAs that target NS5A rapidly inhibit intracellular assembly of genotype 1a virions. They also inhibit formation of functional replicase complexes, but have no activity against preformed replicase, thereby resulting in slow shut-off of viral RNA synthesis. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Method of performing computational aeroelastic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Computational aeroelastic analyses typically use a mathematical model for the structural modes of a flexible structure and a nonlinear aerodynamic model that can generate a plurality of unsteady aerodynamic responses based on the structural modes for conditions defining an aerodynamic condition of the flexible structure. In the present invention, a linear state-space model is generated using a single execution of the nonlinear aerodynamic model for all of the structural modes where a family of orthogonal functions is used as the inputs. Then, static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions are generated using computational interaction between the mathematical model and the linear state-space model for a plurality of periodic points in time.

  5. Conjoint-Analyse und Marktsegmentierung

    OpenAIRE

    Steiner, Winfried J.; Baumgartner, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Die Marktsegmentierung zählt neben der Neuproduktplanung und Preisgestaltung zu den wesentlichen Einsatzgebieten der Conjoint-Analyse. Neben traditionell eingesetzten zweistufigen Vorgehensweisen, bei denen Conjoint-Analyse und Segmentierung in zwei getrennten Schritten erfolgen, stehen heute mit Methoden wie der Clusterwise Regression oder Mixture-Modellen neuere Entwicklungen, die eine simultane Segmentierung und Präferenzschätzung ermöglichen, zur Verfügung. Der Beitrag gibt einen Überblic...

  6. Analyse des Organisations en Afrique

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    de celle-ci pourtenter d'identifier et d'élucider les dynamiques sociales qui s'y déroulent, puis de les examiner en rapport avec les stratégies d'acteurs et le contexte général (l'environnement) dans lequel évolue cette organisation, ... Et son Analyse. L'analyse des organisations est une démarche ancienne dont les ...

  7. Mitogenomic analyses from ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paijmans, Johanna L. A.; Gilbert, Tom; Hofreiter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    analyses (whether using modern or ancient DNA) were largely restricted to the analysis of short fragments of the mitochondrial genome. However, due to many technological advances during the past decade, a growing number of studies have explored the power of complete mitochondrial genome sequences......The analysis of ancient DNA is playing an increasingly important role in conservation genetic, phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, as it allows incorporating extinct species into DNA sequence trees and adds time depth to population genetics studies. For many years, these types of DNA...... (mitogenomes). Such studies were initially limited to analyses of extant organisms, but developments in both DNA sequencing technologies and general methodological aspects related to working with degraded DNA have resulted in complete mitogenomes becoming increasingly popular for ancient DNA studies as well...

  8. Peptides designed to spatially depict the Epstein-Barr virus major virion glycoprotein gp350 neutralization epitope elicit antibodies that block virus-neutralizing antibody 72A1 interaction with the native gp350 molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Jerome E; Coinçon, Mathieu; Leblond, Valérie; Hu, Jing; Fang, Janey M; Sygusch, Jurgen; Alfieri, Caroline

    2015-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the etiologic agent of infectious mononucleosis and the root cause of B-cell lymphoproliferative disease in individuals with a weakened immune system, as well as a principal cofactor in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, various lymphomas, and other cancers. The EBV major virion surface glycoprotein gp350 is viewed as the best vaccine candidate to prevent infectious mononucleosis in healthy EBV-naive persons and EBV-related cancers in at-risk individuals. Previous epitope mapping of gp350 revealed only one dominant neutralizing epitope, which has been shown to be the target of the monoclonal antibody 72A1. Computer modeling of the 72A1 antibody interaction with the gp350 amino terminus was used to identify gp350 amino acids that could form strong ionic, electrostatic, or hydrogen bonds with the 72A1 antibody. Peptide DDRTTLQLAQNPVYIPETYPYIKWDN (designated peptide 2) and peptide GSAKPGNGSYFASVKTEMLGNEID (designated peptide 3) were designed to spatially represent the gp350 amino acids predicted to interact with the 72A1 antibody paratope. Peptide 2 bound to the 72A1 antibody and blocked 72A1 antibody recognition of the native gp350 molecule. Peptide 2 and peptide 3 were recognized by human IgG and shown to elicit murine antibodies that could target gp350 and block its recognition by the 72A1 antibody. This work provides a structural mapping of the interaction between the EBV-neutralizing antibody 72A1 and the major virion surface protein gp350. gp350 mimetic peptides that spatially depict the EBV-neutralizing epitope would be useful as a vaccine to focus the immune system exclusively to this important virus epitope. The production of virus-neutralizing antibodies targeting the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) major surface glycoprotein gp350 is important for the prevention of infectious mononucleosis and EBV-related cancers. The data presented here provide the first in silico map of the gp350 interaction with a virus-blocking monoclonal antibody

  9. Beskrivende analyse af mekaniske systemer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mogens Myrup; Hansen, Claus Thorp

    Descriptive analysis is the activity, where a given product is analysed for obtaining insight into different aspects, leading to an explicit description of each of these aspects. This textbook is worked out for course 72101 Produktanalyse (Analysis of products) given at DTU.......Descriptive analysis is the activity, where a given product is analysed for obtaining insight into different aspects, leading to an explicit description of each of these aspects. This textbook is worked out for course 72101 Produktanalyse (Analysis of products) given at DTU....

  10. An extensible analysable system model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, Rene Rydhof

    2008-01-01

    , this does not hold for real physical systems. Approaches such as threat modelling try to target the formalisation of the real-world domain, but still are far from the rigid techniques available in security research. Many currently available approaches to assurance of critical infrastructure security......Analysing real-world systems for vulnerabilities with respect to security and safety threats is a difficult undertaking, not least due to a lack of availability of formalisations for those systems. While both formalisations and analyses can be found for artificial systems such as software...

  11. Mitogenomic analyses from ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paijmans, Johanna L A; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Hofreiter, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The analysis of ancient DNA is playing an increasingly important role in conservation genetic, phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, as it allows incorporating extinct species into DNA sequence trees and adds time depth to population genetics studies. For many years, these types of DNA analyses (whether using modern or ancient DNA) were largely restricted to the analysis of short fragments of the mitochondrial genome. However, due to many technological advances during the past decade, a growing number of studies have explored the power of complete mitochondrial genome sequences (mitogenomes). Such studies were initially limited to analyses of extant organisms, but developments in both DNA sequencing technologies and general methodological aspects related to working with degraded DNA have resulted in complete mitogenomes becoming increasingly popular for ancient DNA studies as well. To date, at least 124 partially or fully assembled mitogenomes from more than 20 species have been obtained, and, given the rapid progress in sequencing technology, this number is likely to dramatically increase in the future. The increased information content offered by analysing full mitogenomes has yielded major progress with regard to both the phylogenetic positions of extinct species, as well as resolving population genetics questions in both extinct and extant species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Descriptive Analyses of Mechanical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mogens Myrup; Hansen, Claus Thorp

    2003-01-01

    Forord Produktanalyse og teknologianalyse kan gennmføres med et bredt socio-teknisk sigte med henblik på at forstå kulturelle, sociologiske, designmæssige, forretningsmæssige og mange andre forhold. Et delområde heri er systemisk analyse og beskrivelse af produkter og systemer. Nærværende kompend...

  13. Mitogenomic analyses of caniform relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Ulfur; Gullberg, Anette; Janke, Axel; Kullberg, Morgan

    2007-12-01

    Extant members of the order Carnivora split into two basal groups, Caniformia (dog-like carnivorans) and Feliformia (cat-like carnivorans). In this study we address phylogenetic relationships within Caniformia applying various methodological approaches to analyses of complete mitochondrial genomes. Pinnipeds are currently well represented with respect to mitogenomic data and here we add seven mt genomes to the non-pinniped caniform collection. The analyses identified a basal caniform divergence between Cynoidea and Arctoidea. Arctoidea split into three primary groups, Ursidae (including the giant panda), Pinnipedia, and a branch, Musteloidea, which encompassed Ailuridae (red panda), Mephitidae (skunks), Procyonidae (raccoons) and Mustelidae (mustelids). The analyses favored a basal arctoid split between Ursidae and a branch containing Pinnipedia and Musteloidea. Within the Musteloidea there was a preference for a basal divergence between Ailuridae and remaining families. Among the latter, the analyses identified a sister group relationship between Mephitidae and a branch that contained Procyonidae and Mustelidae. The mitogenomic distance between the wolf and the dog was shown to be at the same level as that of basal human divergences. The wolf and the dog are commonly considered as separate species in the popular literature. The mitogenomic result is inconsistent with that understanding at the same time as it provides insight into the time of the domestication of the dog relative to basal human mitogenomic divergences.

  14. Evaluation "Risk analyses of agroparks"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ge, L.

    2011-01-01

    Dit TransForum project richt zich op analyse van de onzekerheden en mogelijkheden van agroparken. Dit heeft geleid tot een risicomodel dat de kwalitatieve en/of kwantitatieve onzekerheden van een agropark project in kaart brengt. Daarmee kunnen maatregelen en managementstrategiën worden

  15. Proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines - but not interferon-β - produced in response to HSV-2 in primary human genital epithelial cells are associated with viral replication and the presence of the virion host shutoff protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Victor H; Nazli, Aisha; Mossman, Karen L; Kaushic, Charu

    2013-09-01

    It is unknown whether viral replication or viral components that subvert innate responses in other cells, specifically the virion host shutoff (VHS) protein, play a role in determining primary genital epithelial cell (GEC) innate antiviral responses. Cultures of primary female GECs were exposed to wildtype (WT), VHS-deleted (vhsB), or UV-inactivated HSV-2. Antiviral pathway induction was evaluated by measuring nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) translocation by immunofluorescent microscopy. Proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and interferon (IFN) were measured by Luminex or ELISA. Biological activity of IFN-β was evaluated via VSV-GFP bioassay, by blocking secreted IFN-β with neutralizing antibodies and by measuring interferon-stimulated genes by RT-PCR. Proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were upregulated in primary GECs in response to replication-competent HSV-2, but suppressed in the presence of the VHS protein. In contrast, upregulation of IFN-β depended on viral replication, but was not affected by VHS. However, the IFN-β produced was biologically active and reduced the viral burden. Viral factors such as replication and the presence of the VHS protein play important roles in regulating innate antiviral responses against HSV-2 from primary GECs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Analysing Terrorism from a Systems Thinking Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Schoenenberger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Given the complexity of terrorism, solutions based on single factors are destined to fail. Systems thinking offers various tools for helping researchers and policy makers comprehend terrorism in its entirety. We have developed a semi-quantitative systems thinking approach for characterising relationships between variables critical to terrorism and their impact on the system as a whole. For a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying terrorism, we present a 16-variable model characterising the critical components of terrorism and perform a series of highly focused analyses. We show how to determine which variables are best suited for government intervention, describing in detail their effects on the key variable—the political influence of a terrorist network. We also offer insights into how to elicit variables that destabilise and ultimately break down these networks. Because we clarify our novel approach with fictional data, the primary importance of this paper lies in the new framework for reasoning that it provides.

  17. Severe accident recriticality analyses (SARA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frid, W.; Højerup, C.F.; Lindholm, I.

    2001-01-01

    Recriticality in a BWR during reflooding of an overheated partly degraded core, i.e. with relocated control rods, has been studied for a total loss of electric power accident scenario. In order to assess the impact of recriticality on reactor safety, including accident management strategies...... three computer codes and to further develop and adapt them for the task. The codes were SIMULATE-3K, APROS and RECRIT. Recriticality analyses were carried out for a number of selected reflooding transients for the Oskarshamn 3 plant in Sweden with SIMULATE-3K and for the Olkiluoto I plant in Finland...... with all three codes. The core initial and boundary conditions prior to recriticality have been studied with the severe accident codes SCDAP/RELAP5, MELCOR and MAAP4. The results of the analyses show that all three codes predict recriticality-both super-prompt power bursts and quasi steady-state power...

  18. Uncertainty in Operational Atmospheric Analyses and Re-Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langland, R.; Maue, R. N.

    2016-12-01

    This talk will describe uncertainty in atmospheric analyses of wind and temperature produced by operational forecast models and in re-analysis products. Because the "true" atmospheric state cannot be precisely quantified, there is necessarily error in every atmospheric analysis, and this error can be estimated by computing differences ( variance and bias) between analysis products produced at various centers (e.g., ECMWF, NCEP, U.S Navy, etc.) that use independent data assimilation procedures, somewhat different sets of atmospheric observations and forecast models with different resolutions, dynamical equations, and physical parameterizations. These estimates of analysis uncertainty provide a useful proxy to actual analysis error. For this study, we use a unique multi-year and multi-model data archive developed at NRL-Monterey. It will be shown that current uncertainty in atmospheric analyses is closely correlated with the geographic distribution of assimilated in-situ atmospheric observations, especially those provided by high-accuracy radiosonde and commercial aircraft observations. The lowest atmospheric analysis uncertainty is found over North America, Europe and Eastern Asia, which have the largest numbers of radiosonde and commercial aircraft observations. Analysis uncertainty is substantially larger (by factors of two to three times) in most of the Southern hemisphere, the North Pacific ocean, and under-developed nations of Africa and South America where there are few radiosonde or commercial aircraft data. It appears that in regions where atmospheric analyses depend primarily on satellite radiance observations, analysis uncertainty of both temperature and wind remains relatively high compared to values found over North America and Europe.

  19. Mitogenomic analyses of eutherian relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, U; Janke, A

    2002-01-01

    Reasonably correct phylogenies are fundamental to the testing of evolutionary hypotheses. Here, we present phylogenetic findings based on analyses of 67 complete mammalian mitochondrial (mt) genomes. The analyses, irrespective of whether they were performed at the amino acid (aa) level or on nucleotides (nt) of first and second codon positions, placed Erinaceomorpha (hedgehogs and their kin) as the sister group of remaining eutherians. Thus, the analyses separated Erinaceomorpha from other traditional lipotyphlans (e.g., tenrecs, moles, and shrews), making traditional Lipotyphla polyphyletic. Both the aa and nt data sets identified the two order-rich eutherian clades, the Cetferungulata (comprising Pholidota, Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, and Cetacea) and the African clade (Tenrecomorpha, Macroscelidea, Tubulidentata, Hyracoidea, Proboscidea, and Sirenia). The study corroborated recent findings that have identified a sister-group relationship between Anthropoidea and Dermoptera (flying lemurs), thereby making our own order, Primates, a paraphyletic assembly. Molecular estimates using paleontologically well-established calibration points, placed the origin of most eutherian orders in Cretaceous times, 70-100 million years before present (MYBP). The same estimates place all primate divergences much earlier than traditionally believed. For example, the divergence between Homo and Pan is estimated to have taken place approximately 10 MYBP, a dating consistent with recent findings in primate paleontology. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Providing traceability for neuroimaging analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchey, Richard; Branson, Andrew; Anjum, Ashiq; Bloodsworth, Peter; Habib, Irfan; Munir, Kamran; Shamdasani, Jetendr; Soomro, Kamran

    2013-09-01

    With the increasingly digital nature of biomedical data and as the complexity of analyses in medical research increases, the need for accurate information capture, traceability and accessibility has become crucial to medical researchers in the pursuance of their research goals. Grid- or Cloud-based technologies, often based on so-called Service Oriented Architectures (SOA), are increasingly being seen as viable solutions for managing distributed data and algorithms in the bio-medical domain. For neuroscientific analyses, especially those centred on complex image analysis, traceability of processes and datasets is essential but up to now this has not been captured in a manner that facilitates collaborative study. Few examples exist, of deployed medical systems based on Grids that provide the traceability of research data needed to facilitate complex analyses and none have been evaluated in practice. Over the past decade, we have been working with mammographers, paediatricians and neuroscientists in three generations of projects to provide the data management and provenance services now required for 21st century medical research. This paper outlines the finding of a requirements study and a resulting system architecture for the production of services to support neuroscientific studies of biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. The paper proposes a software infrastructure and services that provide the foundation for such support. It introduces the use of the CRISTAL software to provide provenance management as one of a number of services delivered on a SOA, deployed to manage neuroimaging projects that have been studying biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. In the neuGRID and N4U projects a Provenance Service has been delivered that captures and reconstructs the workflow information needed to facilitate researchers in conducting neuroimaging analyses. The software enables neuroscientists to track the evolution of workflows and datasets. It also tracks the outcomes of

  1. Single Top-Quark Production at CDF

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    The main challenge of the single top-quark search at the Tevatron is the huge background from W+jets events and QCD events, which makes the use of advanced multivariate techniques essential. The recent single top analyses using either the matrix element method, neural networks, likelihood discriminants or boosted decision trees as well as the combination of the former three analyses will be presented...

  2. Post hoc analyses: after the facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Titte R; Ho, Bing; Kang, Joseph; Kaplan, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Prospective clinical trials are constructed with high levels of internal validity. Sample size and power considerations usually address primary endpoints. Primary endpoints have traditionally included events that are becoming increasingly less common and thus have led to growing use of composite endpoints and noninferiority trial designs in transplantation. This approach may mask real clinical benefit in one or the other domain with regard to either clinically relevant secondary endpoints or other unexpected findings. In addition, endpoints solely chosen based on power considerations are prone to misjudgment of actual treatment effect size as well as consistency of that effect. In the instances where treatment effects may have been underestimated, valuable information may be lost if buried within a composite endpoint. In all these cases, analyses and post hoc analyses of data become relevant in informing practitioners about clinical benefits or safety signals that may not be captured by the primary endpoint. On the other hand, there are many pitfalls in using post hoc determined endpoints. This short review is meant to allow readers to appreciate post hoc analysis not as an entity with a single approach, but rather as an analysis with unique limitations and strengths that often raise new questions to be addressed in further inquiries.

  3. Bragg prism monochromator and analyser for super ultra-small ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    exits the side face in the diffracted beam direction. A judicious choice of the. Bragg reflection, its asymmetry, and the apex angle A for the prism can make. dδH cr /dθ approach −1. The single crystal prism then produces a neutron beam with sub-arcsec collimation. The analyser can likewise be designed to accept an.

  4. Methodological challenges in carbohydrate analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Beth Hall

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates can provide up to 80% of the dry matter in animal diets, yet their specific evaluation for research and diet formulation is only now becoming a focus in the animal sciences. Partitioning of dietary carbohydrates for nutritional purposes should reflect differences in digestion and fermentation characteristics and effects on animal performance. Key challenges to designating nutritionally important carbohydrate fractions include classifying the carbohydrates in terms of nutritional characteristics, and selecting analytical methods that describe the desired fraction. The relative lack of information on digestion characteristics of various carbohydrates and their interactions with other fractions in diets means that fractions will not soon be perfectly established. Developing a system of carbohydrate analysis that could be used across animal species could enhance the utility of analyses and amount of data we can obtain on dietary effects of carbohydrates. Based on quantities present in diets and apparent effects on animal performance, some nutritionally important classes of carbohydrates that may be valuable to measure include sugars, starch, fructans, insoluble fiber, and soluble fiber. Essential to selection of methods for these fractions is agreement on precisely what carbohydrates should be included in each. Each of these fractions has analyses that could potentially be used to measure them, but most of the available methods have weaknesses that must be evaluated to see if they are fatal and the assay is unusable, or if the assay still may be made workable. Factors we must consider as we seek to analyze carbohydrates to describe diets: Does the assay accurately measure the desired fraction? Is the assay for research, regulatory, or field use (affects considerations of acceptable costs and throughput? What are acceptable accuracy and variability of measures? Is the assay robust (enhances accuracy of values? For some carbohydrates, we

  5. Statistical Analyses of Digital Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Tove Faber; Nicolaisen, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    Using statistical methods to analyse digital material for patterns makes it possible to detect patterns in big data that we would otherwise not be able to detect. This paper seeks to exemplify this fact by statistically analysing a large corpus of references in systematic reviews. The aim...... of the analysis is to study the phenomenon of non-citation: Situations where just one (or some) document(s) are cited from a pool of otherwise equally citable documents. The study is based on more than 120,000 cited studies, and a total number of non-cited studies of more than 1.6 million. The number of cited...... 10 years. After 10 years the cited and non-cited studies tend to be more similar in terms of age. Separating the data set into different sub-disciplines reveals that the sub-disciplines vary in terms of age of cited vs. non-cited references. Some fields may be expanding and the number of published...

  6. Health Insurance without Single Crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boone, Jan; Schottmüller, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Standard insurance models predict that people with high risks have high insurance coverage. It is empirically documented that people with high income have lower health risks and are better insured. We show that income differences between risk types lead to a violation of single crossing...... in an insurance model where people choose treatment intensity. We analyse different market structures and show the following: If insurers have market power, the violation of single crossing caused by income differences and endogenous treatment choice can explain the empirically observed outcome. Our results do...

  7. Single-Cell Genomics for Virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Ciuffi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell sequencing technologies, i.e., single cell analysis followed by deep sequencing investigate cellular heterogeneity in many biological settings. It was only in the past year that single-cell sequencing analyses has been applied in the field of virology, providing new ways to explore viral diversity and cell response to viral infection, which are summarized in the present review.

  8. Analysing ESP Texts, but How?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borza Natalia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available English as a second language (ESL teachers instructing general English and English for specific purposes (ESP in bilingual secondary schools face various challenges when it comes to choosing the main linguistic foci of language preparatory courses enabling non-native students to study academic subjects in English. ESL teachers intending to analyse English language subject textbooks written for secondary school students with the aim of gaining information about what bilingual secondary school students need to know in terms of language to process academic textbooks cannot avoiding deal with a dilemma. It needs to be decided which way it is most appropriate to analyse the texts in question. Handbooks of English applied linguistics are not immensely helpful with regard to this problem as they tend not to give recommendation as to which major text analytical approaches are advisable to follow in a pre-college setting. The present theoretical research aims to address this lacuna. Respectively, the purpose of this pedagogically motivated theoretical paper is to investigate two major approaches of ESP text analysis, the register and the genre analysis, in order to find the more suitable one for exploring the language use of secondary school subject texts from the point of view of an English as a second language teacher. Comparing and contrasting the merits and limitations of the two contrastive approaches allows for a better understanding of the nature of the two different perspectives of text analysis. The study examines the goals, the scope of analysis, and the achievements of the register perspective and those of the genre approach alike. The paper also investigates and reviews in detail the starkly different methods of ESP text analysis applied by the two perspectives. Discovering text analysis from a theoretical and methodological angle supports a practical aspect of English teaching, namely making an informed choice when setting out to analyse

  9. HGCal Simulation Analyses for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Sarah Marie

    2015-01-01

    This summer, I approached the topic of fast-timing detection of photons from Higgs decays via simulation analyses, working under the supervision of Dr. Adolf Bornheim of the California Institute of Technology. My specific project focused on simulating the high granularity calorimeter for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. CMS detects particles using calorimeters. The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECal) is arranged cylindrically to form a barrel section and two “endcaps.” Previously, both the barrel and endcap have employed lead tungstate crystal detectors, known as the “shashlik” design. The crystal detectors, however, rapidly degrade from exposure to radiation. This effect is most pronounced in the endcaps. To avoid the high expense of frequently replacing degraded detectors, it was recently decided to eliminate the endcap crystals in favor of an arrangement of silicon detectors known as the “High Granularity Calorimeter” (HGCal), while leaving the barrel detector technology unchanged. T...

  10. Analysing performance through value creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TRIFAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws a parallel between measuring financial performance in 2 variants: the first one using data offered by accounting, which lays emphasis on maximizing profit, and the second one which aims to create value. The traditional approach to performance is based on some indicators from accounting data: ROI, ROE, EPS. The traditional management, based on analysing the data from accounting, has shown its limits, and a new approach is needed, based on creating value. The evaluation of value based performance tries to avoid the errors due to accounting data, by using other specific indicators: EVA, MVA, TSR, CVA. The main objective is shifted from maximizing the income to maximizing the value created for shareholders. The theoretical part is accompanied by a practical analysis regarding the creation of value and an analysis of the main indicators which evaluate this concept.

  11. Retorisk analyse af historiske tekster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Christian Erik J

    2014-01-01

    scholars who identify themselves as rhetoricians tend to define and conduct such an analysis. It is argued that while rhetoricians would sympathize with Skinner’s adoption of speech act theory in his reading of historical documents, they would generally extend their rhetorical readings of such documents......In recent years, rhetoric and the rhetorical tradition has attracted increasing interest from historians, such as, e.g., Quentin Skinner. The paper aims to explain and illustrate what may be understood by a rhetorical analysis (or “rhetorical criticism”) of historical documents, i.e., how those...... to many more features than just the key concepts invoked in them. The paper discusses examples of rhetorical analyses done by prominent contemporary rhetoricians, including Edwin Black, Kenneth Burke, Maurice Charland, and Michael Leff. It relates its view of rhetorical documents to trends in current...

  12. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J.C.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff are developing mathematical models to be used to estimate the radiation dose that individuals may have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. An uncertainty and sensitivity analyses plan is essential to understand and interpret the predictions from these mathematical models. This is especially true in the case of the HEDR models where the values of many parameters are unknown. This plan gives a thorough documentation of the uncertainty and hierarchical sensitivity analysis methods recommended for use on all HEDR mathematical models. The documentation includes both technical definitions and examples. In addition, an extensive demonstration of the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis process is provided using actual results from the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC). This demonstration shows how the approaches used in the recommended plan can be adapted for all dose predictions in the HEDR Project.

  13. Analysing the Wrongness of Killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an in-depth analysis of the wrongness of killing by comparing different versions of three influential views: the traditional view that killing is always wrong; the liberal view that killing is wrong if and only if the victim does not want to be killed; and Don Marquis‟ future...... of value account of the wrongness of killing. In particular, I illustrate the advantages that a basic version of the liberal view and a basic version of the future of value account have over competing alternatives. Still, ultimately none of the views analysed here are satisfactory; but the different...... reasons why those competing views fail provide important insights into the ethics of killing....

  14. Analysing Protocol Stacks for Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Han; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2011-01-01

    We show an approach, CaPiTo, to model service-oriented applications using process algebras such that, on the one hand, we can achieve a certain level of abstraction without being overwhelmed by the underlying implementation details and, on the other hand, we respect the concrete industrial...... standards used for implementing the service-oriented applications. By doing so, we will be able to not only reason about applications at different levels of abstractions, but also to build a bridge between the views of researchers on formal methods and developers in industry. We apply our approach...... to the financial case study taken from Chapter 0-3. Finally, we develop a static analysis to analyse the security properties as they emerge at the level of concrete industrial protocols....

  15. THOR Turbulence Electron Analyser: TEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazakerley, Andrew; Samara, Marilia; Hancock, Barry; Wicks, Robert; Moore, Tom; Rust, Duncan; Jones, Jonathan; Saito, Yoshifumi; Pollock, Craig; Owen, Chris; Rae, Jonny

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The Turbulence Electron Analyser (TEA) will measure the plasma electron populations in the mission's Regions of Interest. It will collect a 3D electron velocity distribution with cadences as short as 5 ms. The instrument will be capable of measuring energies up to 30 keV. TEA consists of multiple electrostatic analyser heads arranged so as to measure electrons arriving from look directions covering the full sky, i.e. 4 pi solid angle. The baseline concept is similar to the successful FPI-DES instrument currently operating on the MMS mission. TEA is intended to have a similar angular resolution, but a larger geometric factor. In comparison to earlier missions, TEA improves on the measurement cadence. For example, MMS FPI-DES routinely operates at 30 ms cadence. The objective of measuring distributions at rates as fast as 5 ms is driven by the mission's scientific requirements to resolve electron gyroscale size structures, where plasma heating and fluctuation dissipation is predicted to occur. TEA will therefore be capable of making measurements of the evolution of distribution functions across thin (a few km) current sheets travelling past the spacecraft at up to 600 km/s, of the Power Spectral Density of fluctuations of electron moments and of distributions fast enough to match frequencies with waves expected to be dissipating turbulence (e.g. with 100 Hz whistler waves). A novel capability to time tag individual electron events during short intervals for the purposes of ground analysis of wave-particle interactions is also planned.

  16. 5-(Perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-arabino-uridine (aUY11), an arabino-based rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitor, targets virion envelope lipids to inhibit fusion of influenza virus, hepatitis C virus, and other enveloped viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Che C; Ustinov, Alexey V; Epand, Raquel F; Epand, Richard M; Korshun, Vladimir A; Schang, Luis M

    2013-04-01

    Entry of enveloped viruses requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Fusion requires the formation of an intermediate stalk structure, in which only the outer leaflets are fused. The stalk structure, in turn, requires the lipid bilayer of the envelope to bend into negative curvature. This process is inhibited by enrichment in the outer leaflet of lipids with larger polar headgroups, which favor positive curvature. Accordingly, phospholipids with such shape inhibit viral fusion. We previously identified a compound, 5-(perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-2'-deoxy-uridine (dUY11), with overall shape and amphipathicity similar to those of these phospholipids. dUY11 inhibited the formation of the negative curvature necessary for stalk formation and the fusion of a model enveloped virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). We proposed that dUY11 acted by biophysical mechanisms as a result of its shape and amphipathicity. To test this model, we have now characterized the mechanisms against influenza virus and HCV of 5-(perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-arabino-uridine (aUY11), which has shape and amphipathicity similar to those of dUY11 but contains an arabino-nucleoside. aUY11 interacted with envelope lipids to inhibit the infectivity of influenza virus, hepatitis C virus (HCV), herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1/2), and other enveloped viruses. It specifically inhibited the fusion of influenza virus, HCV, VSV, and even protein-free liposomes to cells. Furthermore, aUY11 inhibited the formation of negative curvature in model lipid bilayers. In summary, the arabino-derived aUY11 and the deoxy-derived dUY11 act by the same antiviral mechanisms against several enveloped but otherwise unrelated viruses. Therefore, chemically unrelated compounds of appropriate shape and amphipathicity target virion envelope lipids to inhibit formation of the negative curvature required for fusion, inhibiting infectivity by biophysical, not biochemical, mechanisms.

  17. Cyclin F/FBXO1 Interacts with HIV-1 Viral Infectivity Factor (Vif) and Restricts Progeny Virion Infectivity by Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of Vif Protein through SCF(cyclin F) E3 Ligase Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Tracy; Chaudhary, Priyanka; Gupta, Kailash; Islam, Sehbanul; Ghosh, Payel; Santra, Manas Kumar; Mitra, Debashis

    2017-03-31

    Cyclin F protein, also known as FBXO1, is the largest among all cyclins and oscillates in the cell cycle like other cyclins. Apart from being a G2/M cyclin, cyclin F functions as the substrate-binding subunit of SCF(cyclin F) E3 ubiquitin ligase. In a gene expression analysis performed to identify novel gene modulations associated with cell cycle dysregulation during HIV-1 infection in CD4(+) T cells, we observed down-regulation of the cyclin F gene (CCNF). Later, using gene overexpression and knockdown studies, we identified cyclin F as negatively influencing HIV-1 viral infectivity without any significant impact on virus production. Subsequently, we found that cyclin F negatively regulates the expression of viral protein Vif (viral infectivity factor) at the protein level. We also identified a novel host-pathogen interaction between cyclin F and Vif protein in T cells during HIV-1 infection. Mutational analysis of a cyclin F-specific amino acid motif in the C-terminal region of Vif indicated rescue of the protein from cyclin F-mediated down-regulation. Subsequently, we showed that Vif is a novel substrate of the SCF(cyclin F) E3 ligase, where cyclin F mediates the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of Vif through physical interaction. Finally, we showed that cyclin F augments APOBEC3G expression through degradation of Vif to regulate infectivity of progeny virions. Taken together, our results demonstrate that cyclin F is a novel F-box protein that functions as an intrinsic cellular regulator of HIV-1 Vif and has a negative regulatory effect on the maintenance of viral infectivity by restoring APOBEC3G expression. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Technology transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing for pandemic influenza vaccine production in Romania: Preclinical evaluation of split virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine with adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavaru, Crina; Onu, Adrian; Lupulescu, Emilia; Tucureanu, Catalin; Rasid, Orhan; Vlase, Ene; Coman, Cristin; Caras, Iuliana; Ghiorghisor, Alina; Berbecila, Laurentiu; Tofan, Vlad; Bowen, Richard A; Marlenee, Nicole; Hartwig, Airn; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Baldwin, Susan L; Van Hoeven, Neal; Vedvick, Thomas S; Huynh, Chuong; O'Hara, Michael K; Noah, Diana L; Fox, Christopher B

    2016-04-02

    Millions of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine doses containing oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant have been administered in order to enhance and broaden immune responses and to facilitate antigen sparing. Despite the enactment of a Global Action Plan for Influenza Vaccines and a multi-fold increase in production capabilities over the past 10 years, worldwide capacity for pandemic influenza vaccine production is still limited. In developing countries, where routine influenza vaccination is not fully established, additional measures are needed to ensure adequate supply of pandemic influenza vaccines without dependence on the shipment of aid from other, potentially impacted first-world countries. Adaptation of influenza vaccine and adjuvant technologies by developing country influenza vaccine manufacturers may enable antigen sparing and corresponding increases in global influenza vaccine coverage capacity. Following on previously described work involving the technology transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing to a Romanian vaccine manufacturing institute, we herein describe the preclinical evaluation of inactivated split virion H5N1 influenza vaccine with emulsion adjuvant, including immunogenicity, protection from virus challenge, antigen sparing capacity, and safety. In parallel with the evaluation of the bioactivity of the tech-transferred adjuvant, we also describe the impact of concurrent antigen manufacturing optimization activities. Depending on the vaccine antigen source and manufacturing process, inclusion of adjuvant was shown to enhance and broaden functional antibody titers in mouse and rabbit models, promote protection from homologous virus challenge in ferrets, and facilitate antigen sparing. Besides scientific findings, the operational lessons learned are delineated in order to facilitate adaptation of adjuvant technologies by other developing country institutes to enhance global pandemic influenza preparedness.

  19. Systematic derivation of correct variability-aware program analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Jan; Dimovski, Aleksandar S.; Brabrand, Claus

    2015-01-01

    A recent line of work lifts particular verification and analysis methods to Software Product Lines (SPL). In an effort to generalize such case-by-case approaches, we develop a systematic methodology for lifting single-program analyses to SPLs using abstract interpretation. Abstract interpretation...... for lifting analyses and Galois connections. We prove that for analyses developed using our method, the soundness of lifting follows by construction. The resulting variational abstract interpretation is a conceptual framework for understanding, deriving, and validating static analyses for SPLs. Then we show...... how to derive the corresponding variational dataflow equations for an example static analysis, a constant propagation analysis. We also describe how to approximate variability by applying variability-aware abstractions to SPL analysis. Finally, we discuss how to efficiently implement our method...

  20. Genetic analyses of captive Alala (Corvus hawaiiensis) using AFLP analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, Susan I.; Bianchi, Kiara R.

    2006-01-01

    affected by the mutation rate at microsatellite loci, thus introducing a bias. Also, the number of loci that can be studied is frequently limited to fewer than 10. This theoretically represents a maximum of one marker for each of 10 chromosomes. Dominant markers like AFLP allow a larger fraction of the genome to be screened. Large numbers of loci can be screened by AFLP to resolve very small individual differences that can be used for identification of individuals, estimates of pairwise relatedness and, in some cases, for parentage analyses. Since AFLP is a dominant marker (can not distinguish between +/+ homozygote versus +/- heterozygote), it has limitations for parentage analyses. Only when both parents are homozygous for the absence of alleles (-/-) and offspring show a presence (+/+ or +/-) can the parents be excluded. In this case, microsatellites become preferable as they have the potential to exclude individual parents when the other parent is unknown. Another limitation of AFLP is that the loci are generally less polymorphic (only two alleles/locus) than microsatellite loci (often >10 alleles/locus). While generally fewer than 10 highly polymorphic microsatellite loci are enough to exclude and assign parentage, it might require up to 100 or more AFLP loci. While there are pros and cons to different methodologies, the total number of loci evaluated by AFLP generally offsets the limitations imposed due to the dominant nature of this approach and end results between methods are generally comparable. Overall objectives of this study were to evaluate the level of genetic diversity in the captive population of Alala, to compare genetic data with currently available pedigree information, and to determine the extent of relatedness of mating pairs and among founding individuals.

  1. Blast sampling for structural and functional analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Anne; Ripp, Raymond; Garnier, Nicolas; Bettler, Emmanuel; Deléage, Gilbert; Poch, Olivier; Moulinier, Luc

    2007-02-23

    The post-genomic era is characterised by a torrent of biological information flooding the public databases. As a direct consequence, similarity searches starting with a single query sequence frequently lead to the identification of hundreds, or even thousands of potential homologues. The huge volume of data renders the subsequent structural, functional and evolutionary analyses very difficult. It is therefore essential to develop new strategies for efficient sampling of this large sequence space, in order to reduce the number of sequences to be processed. At the same time, it is important to retain the most pertinent sequences for structural and functional studies. An exhaustive analysis on a large scale test set (284 protein families) was performed to compare the efficiency of four different sampling methods aimed at selecting the most pertinent sequences. These four methods sample the proteins detected by BlastP searches and can be divided into two categories: two customisable methods where the user defines either the maximal number or the percentage of sequences to be selected; two automatic methods in which the number of sequences selected is determined by the program. We focused our analysis on the potential information content of the sampled sets of sequences using multiple alignment of complete sequences as the main validation tool. The study considered two criteria: the total number of sequences in BlastP and their associated E-values. The subsequent analyses investigated the influence of the sampling methods on the E-value distributions, the sequence coverage, the final multiple alignment quality and the active site characterisation at various residue conservation thresholds as a function of these criteria. The comparative analysis of the four sampling methods allows us to propose a suitable sampling strategy that significantly reduces the number of homologous sequences required for alignment, while at the same time maintaining the relevant information

  2. Blast sampling for structural and functional analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Anne

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The post-genomic era is characterised by a torrent of biological information flooding the public databases. As a direct consequence, similarity searches starting with a single query sequence frequently lead to the identification of hundreds, or even thousands of potential homologues. The huge volume of data renders the subsequent structural, functional and evolutionary analyses very difficult. It is therefore essential to develop new strategies for efficient sampling of this large sequence space, in order to reduce the number of sequences to be processed. At the same time, it is important to retain the most pertinent sequences for structural and functional studies. Results An exhaustive analysis on a large scale test set (284 protein families was performed to compare the efficiency of four different sampling methods aimed at selecting the most pertinent sequences. These four methods sample the proteins detected by BlastP searches and can be divided into two categories: two customisable methods where the user defines either the maximal number or the percentage of sequences to be selected; two automatic methods in which the number of sequences selected is determined by the program. We focused our analysis on the potential information content of the sampled sets of sequences using multiple alignment of complete sequences as the main validation tool. The study considered two criteria: the total number of sequences in BlastP and their associated E-values. The subsequent analyses investigated the influence of the sampling methods on the E-value distributions, the sequence coverage, the final multiple alignment quality and the active site characterisation at various residue conservation thresholds as a function of these criteria. Conclusion The comparative analysis of the four sampling methods allows us to propose a suitable sampling strategy that significantly reduces the number of homologous sequences required for alignment, while

  3. From joint to single audits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Thinggaard, Frank

    2017-01-01

    This study analyses audit quality differences between audits by a single big audit firm and joint audits with either one or two big audit firms. We exploit the unique situation in Denmark beginning on 1 January 2005, at which time a long-standing mandatory joint audit system for listed companies...... was replaced by a voluntary joint audit system. First, we report the results of a survey of Danish CFOs’ views on and their experiences with the choice of single or joint audits and their perceptions of audit quality. Second, based on data from the mandatory joint audit abolition year and the following two...... years, we test the audit quality differences using abnormal accruals. Most CFOs perceive that audit quality by a single big four audit firm is the same as it is in joint audits with either one or two big four audit firms. The results of our empirical analysis are in line with the perceptions. We find...

  4. Effect of reporting bias on meta-analyses of drug trials: reanalysis of meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Beth; Lundh, Andreas; Bero, Lisa

    2012-01-03

    To investigate the effect of including unpublished trial outcome data obtained from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the results of meta-analyses of drug trials. Reanalysis of meta-analyses. Drug trials with unpublished outcome data for new molecular entities that were approved by the FDA between 2001 and 2002 were identified. For each drug, eligible systematic reviews containing at least one meta-analysis were identified by searches of Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library in November 2010. Selection criteria Eligible systematic reviews were done after FDA approval of the drug, were published in English, and had outcomes and comparators that were the same as those of the trials with unpublished FDA trial outcomes, and the characteristics of participants in the systematic reviews were consistent with the FDA approved indication for the drug. Clinical guidelines, conference proceedings, duplicate systematic reviews, and systematic reviews in which included trials were not referenced or that combined trials across multiple drug classes were excluded. Systematic reviews using non-standard meta-analytic techniques (such as Bayesian or network meta-analyses) and those that used inappropriate or invalid methods for calculation of summary statistics (such as unweighted pooled analyses) were also excluded. Two authors independently extracted data from both the published systematic reviews and the FDA's medical and statistical reviews of the trials submitted to FDA. Summary statistics (risk ratios, odds ratios, or weighted mean differences) for relevant outcomes with and without unpublished FDA trial data. 42 meta-analyses (41 efficacy outcomes, one harm outcome) for nine drugs across six drug classes were reanalysed. Overall, addition of unpublished FDA trial data caused 46% (19/41) of the summary estimates from the meta-analyses to show lower efficacy of the drug, 7% (3/41) to show identical efficacy, and 46% (19/41) to show greater efficacy. The summary

  5. Severe Accident Recriticality Analyses (SARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, W. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Hoejerup, F. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Lindholm, I.; Miettinen, J.; Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Helsinki (Finland); Nilsson, Lars [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Sjoevall, H. [Teoliisuuden Voima Oy (Finland)

    1999-11-01

    Recriticality in a BWR has been studied for a total loss of electric power accident scenario. In a BWR, the B{sub 4}C control rods would melt and relocate from the core before the fuel during core uncovery and heat-up. If electric power returns during this time-window unborated water from ECCS systems will start to reflood the partly control rod free core. Recriticality might take place for which the only mitigating mechanisms are the Doppler effect and void formation. In order to assess the impact of recriticality on reactor safety, including accident management measures, the following issues have been investigated in the SARA project: 1. the energy deposition in the fuel during super-prompt power burst, 2. the quasi steady-state reactor power following the initial power burst and 3. containment response to elevated quasi steady-state reactor power. The approach was to use three computer codes and to further develop and adapt them for the task. The codes were SIMULATE-3K, APROS and RECRIT. Recriticality analyses were carried out for a number of selected reflooding transients for the Oskarshamn 3 plant in Sweden with SIMULATE-3K and for the Olkiluoto 1 plant in Finland with all three codes. The core state initial and boundary conditions prior to recriticality have been studied with the severe accident codes SCDAP/RELAP5, MELCOR and MAAP4. The results of the analyses show that all three codes predict recriticality - both superprompt power bursts and quasi steady-state power generation - for the studied range of parameters, i. e. with core uncovery and heat-up to maximum core temperatures around 1800 K and water flow rates of 45 kg/s to 2000 kg/s injected into the downcomer. Since the recriticality takes place in a small fraction of the core the power densities are high which results in large energy deposition in the fuel during power burst in some accident scenarios. The highest value, 418 cal/g, was obtained with SIMULATE-3K for an Oskarshamn 3 case with reflooding

  6. Potent neutralization of influenza A virus by a single-domain antibody blocking M2 ion channel protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Wei

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus poses serious health threat to humans. Neutralizing antibodies against the highly conserved M2 ion channel is thought to offer broad protection against influenza A viruses. Here, we screened synthetic Camel single-domain antibody (VHH libraries against native M2 ion channel protein. One of the isolated VHHs, M2-7A, specifically bound to M2-expressed cell membrane as well as influenza A virion, inhibited replication of both amantadine-sensitive and resistant influenza A viruses in vitro, and protected mice from a lethal influenza virus challenge. Moreover, M2-7A showed blocking activity for proton influx through M2 ion channel. These pieces of evidence collectively demonstrate for the first time that a neutralizing antibody against M2 with broad specificity is achievable, and M2-7A may have potential for cross protection against a number of variants and subtypes of influenza A viruses.

  7. Ergonomic analyses of downhill skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarys, J P; Publie, J; Zinzen, E

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide electromyographic feedback for (1) pedagogical advice in motor learning, (2) the ergonomics of materials choice and (3) competition. For these purposes: (1) EMG data were collected for the Stem Christie, the Stem Turn and the Parallel Christie (three basic ski initiation drills) and verified for the complexity of patterns; (2) integrated EMG (iEMG) and linear envelopes (LEs) were analysed from standardized positions, motions and slopes using compact, soft and competition skis; (3) in a simulated 'parallel special slalom', the muscular activity pattern and intensity of excavated and flat snow conditions were compared. The EMG data from the three studies were collected on location in the French Alps (Tignes). The analog raw EMG was recorded on the slopes with a portable seven-channel FM recorder (TEAC MR30) and with pre-amplified bipolar surface electrodes supplied with a precision instrumentation amplifier (AD 524, Analog Devices, Norwood, USA). The raw signal was full-wave rectified and enveloped using a moving average principle. This linear envelope was normalized according to the highest peak amplitude procedure per subject and was integrated in order to obtain a reference of muscular intensity. In the three studies and for all subjects (elite skiers: n = 25 in studies 1 and 2, n = 6 in study 3), we found a high level of co-contractions in the lower limb extensors and flexors, especially during the extension phase of the ski movement. The Stem Christie and the Parallel Christie showed higher levels of rhythmic movement (92 and 84%, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Analysis and comparison of energy standards based on a typical single-family house in terms of energy demand and costs over the entire life cycle; Analyse und Vergleich energetischer Standards anhand eines exemplarischen Einfamilienhauses bzgl. Energiebedarf und Kosten ueber den Lebenszyklus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogdt, Frank U.; Kochendoerfer, Bernd; Dittmar, Anika [Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany). Fakultaet VI Planen Bauen Umwelt, Institut fuer Bauingenieurwesen

    2010-10-15

    Over recent years significant progress has been made with regard to sustainable development, particularly for new buildings. Particularly noteworthy are the advancement of renewable energy technologies and new building materials with very low thermal conductivity. In parallel, solutions for lowenergy, passive and even surplus-energy homes were developed and implemented. These building standards are characterised by low heating energy consumption and therefore enable significant energy savings during the building utilisation phase. The question is whether the application of new technologies and building materials results in a partial shift of the total primary energy demand from the utilisation phase to the construction and maintenance phase. It is also questionable, however, what additional investments are required to achieve the savings in operating costs. In order to answer this question a number of different design and construction options for a free-standing single-family house were examined and subjected to a life cycle analysis using the LEGEP software tool. Based on this analysis a number of statements regarding the primary energy demand over the life cycle of the exemplary single-family house and also for the cost trend can be made. However, the results are not universally applicable. They indicate that a holistic analysis is required for each individual case in order to achieve sustainable resource use. [German] Im Kontext einer nachhaltigen Entwicklung konnten in den letzten Jahren vor allem im Neubaubereich eine Reihe von Fortschritten erzielt werden. Besonders hervorzuheben ist die Weiterentwicklung von Technologien zur Nutzung regenerativer Energien und neuer Baustoffe mit besonders geringer Waermeleitfaehigkeit. Parallel wurden Konzepte fuer Niedrigheizenergie- bis hin zu Passiv- und sogar Plusenergiehaeuser entwickelt und umgesetzt. Diese Gebaeudestandards weisen einen geringen Heizenergiebedarf auf und ermoeglichen so erhebliche Energieeinsparungen

  9. Identification and molecular characterization of a single-stranded circular DNA virus with similarities to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hypovirulence-associated DNA virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhenguo; Tang, Yafei; Zhang, Songbai; She, Xiaoman; Lan, Guobing; Varsani, Arvind; He, Zifu

    2014-06-01

    A putative circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) virus was recovered from Hypericum japonicum collected in Vietnam. The viral isolate was tentatively named Hypericum japonicum-associated circular DNA virus (HJasCV). HJasCV shares 58.7-65.4% nucleotide sequence identity with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hypovirulence-associated DNA virus 1 (SsHADV-1) and SsHADV-1-like viruses. Like this group of viruses, the genome of HJasCV (2 200 nt) has two large ORFs, one in the virion-sense and the other in the complementary-sense DNA. The proteins encoded in the virion-sense and complementary-sense ORFs share 39-46 % and 45-67 % amino acid sequence identity with the putative capsid and replication-associated proteins (Reps), respectively, of SsHADV-1 and SsHADV-1-like viruses. The putative Rep of HJasCV contains all of the motifs related to rolling-circle replication. Its 111-bp intergenic region (IR) contains a hairpin structure with a geminivirus-like nonanucleotide sequence, TAATGTTAT, at the apex of the loop. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that HJasCV forms a monophyletic clade with SsHADV-1 and SsHADV-1-like viruses.

  10. Reproducibility of neuroimaging analyses across operating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatard, Tristan; Lewis, Lindsay B; Ferreira da Silva, Rafael; Adalat, Reza; Beck, Natacha; Lepage, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Sherif, Tarek; Deelman, Ewa; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Evans, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging pipelines are known to generate different results depending on the computing platform where they are compiled and executed. We quantify these differences for brain tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness (CT) extraction, using three of the main neuroimaging packages (FSL, Freesurfer and CIVET) and different versions of GNU/Linux. We also identify some causes of these differences using library and system call interception. We find that these packages use mathematical functions based on single-precision floating-point arithmetic whose implementations in operating systems continue to evolve. While these differences have little or no impact on simple analysis pipelines such as brain extraction and cortical tissue classification, their accumulation creates important differences in longer pipelines such as subcortical tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness extraction. With FSL, most Dice coefficients between subcortical classifications obtained on different operating systems remain above 0.9, but values as low as 0.59 are observed. Independent component analyses (ICA) of fMRI data differ between operating systems in one third of the tested subjects, due to differences in motion correction. With Freesurfer and CIVET, in some brain regions we find an effect of build or operating system on cortical thickness. A first step to correct these reproducibility issues would be to use more precise representations of floating-point numbers in the critical sections of the pipelines. The numerical stability of pipelines should also be reviewed.

  11. Network-Based and Binless Frequency Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sybil Derrible

    Full Text Available We introduce and develop a new network-based and binless methodology to perform frequency analyses and produce histograms. In contrast with traditional frequency analysis techniques that use fixed intervals to bin values, we place a range ±ζ around each individual value in a data set and count the number of values within that range, which allows us to compare every single value of a data set with one another. In essence, the methodology is identical to the construction of a network, where two values are connected if they lie within a given a range (±ζ. The value with the highest degree (i.e., most connections is therefore assimilated to the mode of the distribution. To select an optimal range, we look at the stability of the proportion of nodes in the largest cluster. The methodology is validated by sampling 12 typical distributions, and it is applied to a number of real-world data sets with both spatial and temporal components. The methodology can be applied to any data set and provides a robust means to uncover meaningful patterns and trends. A free python script and a tutorial are also made available to facilitate the application of the method.

  12. Fast and accurate methods for phylogenomic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warnow Tandy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species phylogenies are not estimated directly, but rather through phylogenetic analyses of different gene datasets. However, true gene trees can differ from the true species tree (and hence from one another due to biological processes such as horizontal gene transfer, incomplete lineage sorting, and gene duplication and loss, so that no single gene tree is a reliable estimate of the species tree. Several methods have been developed to estimate species trees from estimated gene trees, differing according to the specific algorithmic technique used and the biological model used to explain differences between species and gene trees. Relatively little is known about the relative performance of these methods. Results We report on a study evaluating several different methods for estimating species trees from sequence datasets, simulating sequence evolution under a complex model including indels (insertions and deletions, substitutions, and incomplete lineage sorting. The most important finding of our study is that some fast and simple methods are nearly as accurate as the most accurate methods, which employ sophisticated statistical methods and are computationally quite intensive. We also observe that methods that explicitly consider errors in the estimated gene trees produce more accurate trees than methods that assume the estimated gene trees are correct. Conclusions Our study shows that highly accurate estimations of species trees are achievable, even when gene trees differ from each other and from the species tree, and that these estimations can be obtained using fairly simple and computationally tractable methods.

  13. Automatic incrementalization of Prolog based static analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Michael; Kahl, Matthias; Saha, Diptikalyan

    2007-01-01

    Modem development environments integrate various static analyses into the build process. Analyses that analyze the whole project whenever the project changes are impractical in this context. We present an approach to automatic incrementalization of analyses that are specified as tabled logic...... incrementalizing a broad range of static analyses....

  14. Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

    2009-07-21

    Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma Energy Option Analyses In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribe’s energy vision. The overarching goals of the “first steps” project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the “best fit” energy options. Description of Activities Performed The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor

  15. The herpes simplex virus UL20 protein functions in glycoprotein K (gK intracellular transport and virus-induced cell fusion are independent of UL20 functions in cytoplasmic virion envelopment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousoulas Konstantin G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The HSV-1 UL20 protein (UL20p and glycoprotein K (gK are both important determinants of cytoplasmic virion morphogenesis and virus-induced cell fusion. In this manuscript, we examined the effect of UL20 mutations on the coordinate transport and Trans Golgi Network (TGN localization of UL20p and gK, virus-induced cell fusion and infectious virus production. Deletion of 18 amino acids from the UL20p carboxyl terminus (UL20 mutant 204t inhibited intracellular transport and cell-surface expression of both gK and UL20, resulting in accumulation of UL20p and gK in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER in agreement with the inability of 204t to complement UL20-null virus replication and virus-induced cell fusion. In contrast, less severe carboxyl terminal deletions of either 11 or six amino acids (UL20 mutants 211t and 216t, respectively allowed efficient UL20p and gK intracellular transport, cell-surface expression and TGN colocalization. However, while both 211t and 216t failed to complement for infectious virus production, 216t complemented for virus-induced cell fusion, but 211t did not. These results indicated that the carboxyl terminal six amino acids of UL20p were crucial for infectious virus production, but not involved in intracellular localization of UL20p/gK and concomitant virus-induced cell fusion. In the amino terminus of UL20, UL20p mutants were produced changing one or both of the Y38 and Y49 residues found within putative phosphorylation sites. UL20p tyrosine-modified mutants with both tyrosine residues changed enabled efficient intracellular transport and TGN localization of UL20p and gK, but failed to complement for either infectious virus production, or virus-induced cell fusion. These results show that UL20p functions in cytoplasmic envelopment are separable from UL20 functions in UL20p intracellular transport, cell surface expression and virus-induced cell fusion.

  16. APOBEC3G induces a hypermutation gradient: purifying selection at multiple steps during HIV-1 replication results in levels of G-to-A mutations that are high in DNA, intermediate in cellular viral RNA, and low in virion RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak Vinay K

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Naturally occurring Vif variants that are unable to inhibit the host restriction factor APOBEC3G (A3G have been isolated from infected individuals. A3G can potentially induce G-to-A hypermutation in these viruses, and hypermutation could contribute to genetic variation in HIV-1 populations through recombination between hypermutant and wild-type genomes. Thus, hypermutation could contribute to the generation of immune escape and drug resistant variants, but the genetic contribution of hypermutation to the viral evolutionary potential is poorly understood. In addition, the mechanisms by which these viruses persist in the host despite the presence of A3G remain unknown. Results To address these questions, we generated a replication-competent HIV-1 Vif mutant in which the A3G-binding residues of Vif, Y40RHHY44, were substituted with five alanines. As expected, the mutant was severely defective in an A3G-expressing T cell line and exhibited a significant delay in replication kinetics. Analysis of viral DNA showed the expected high level of G-to-A hypermutation; however, we found substantially reduced levels of G-to-A hypermutation in intracellular viral RNA (cRNA, and the levels of G-to-A mutations in virion RNA (vRNA were even further reduced. The frequencies of hypermutation in DNA, cRNA, and vRNA were 0.73%, 0.12%, and 0.05% of the nucleotides sequenced, indicating a gradient of hypermutation. Additionally, genomes containing start codon mutations and early termination codons within gag were isolated from the vRNA. Conclusion These results suggest that sublethal levels of hypermutation coupled with purifying selection at multiple steps during the early phase of viral replication lead to the packaging of largely unmutated genomes, providing a mechanism by which mutant Vif variants can persist in infected individuals. The persistence of genomes containing mutated gag genes despite this selection pressure indicates that dual

  17. Expected net gain data of low-template DNA analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Gittelson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Low-template DNA analyses are affected by stochastic effects which can produce a configuration of peaks in the electropherogram (EPG that is different from the genotype of the DNA׳s donor. A probabilistic and decision-theoretic model can quantify the expected net gain (ENG of performing a DNA analysis by the difference between the expected value of information (EVOI and the cost of performing the analysis. This article presents data on the ENG of performing DNA analyses of low-template DNA for a single amplification, two replicate amplifications, and for a second replicate amplification given the result of a first analysis. The data were obtained using amplification kits AmpFlSTR Identifiler Plus and Promega׳s PowerPlex 16 HS, an ABI 3130xl genetic sequencer, and Applied Biosystem׳s GeneMapper ID-X software. These data are supplementary to an original research article investigating whether a forensic DNA analyst should perform a single DNA analysis or two replicate analyses from a decision-theoretic point of view, entitled “Low-template DNA: a single DNA analysis or two replicates?” (Gittelson et al., 2016 [1].

  18. Virus de inmunodeficiencia de simios: estudio de la participación del dominio citoplasmático de la glicoproteína viral de envoltura (Env) en la infectividad viral y en la incorporación de Env a viriones

    OpenAIRE

    Celma, Cristina Cecilia del Pilar

    2003-01-01

    En las últimas etapas del ciclo de replicación de los virus de immunodeficiencia de simios (SIV), ocurre el ensamblado de las partículas virales en la membrana plasmática de las células infectadas. Durante la morfogénesis de los viriones se produce la incorporación de la glicoproteína viral de envoltura (Env), proceso que es esencial para la infectividad viral. La glicoproteína Env se sintetiza como un precursor proteico, el cual es clivado en las subunidades de superficie y transmembrana por...

  19. Using Meta-analyses for Comparative Effectiveness Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppar, Todd M.; Phillips, Lorraine J.; Chase, Jo-Ana D.

    2012-01-01

    Comparative effectiveness research seeks to identify the most effective interventions for particular patient populations. Meta-analysis is an especially valuable form of comparative effectiveness research because it emphasizes the magnitude of intervention effects rather than relying on tests of statistical significance among primary studies. Overall effects can be calculated for diverse clinical and patient-centered variables to determine the outcome patterns. Moderator analyses compare intervention characteristics among primary studies by determining if effect sizes vary among studies with different intervention characteristics. Intervention effectiveness can be linked to patient characteristics to provide evidence for patient-centered care. Moderator analyses often answer questions never posed by primary studies because neither multiple intervention characteristics nor populations are compared in single primary studies. Thus meta-analyses provide unique contributions to knowledge. Although meta-analysis is a powerful comparative effectiveness strategy, methodological challenges and limitations in primary research must be acknowledged to interpret findings. PMID:22789450

  20. Genome-Facilitated Analyses of Geomicrobial Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth H. Nealson

    2012-05-02

    This project had the goal(s) of understanding the mechanism(s) of extracellular electron transport (EET) in the microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and a number of other strains and species in the genus Shewanella. The major accomplishments included sequencing, annotation, and analysis of more than 20 Shewanella genomes. The comparative genomics enabled the beginning of a systems biology approach to this genus. Another major contribution involved the study of gene regulation, primarily in the model organism, MR-1. As part of this work, we took advantage of special facilities at the DOE: e.g., the synchrotron radiation facility at ANL, where we successfully used this system for elemental characterization of single cells in different metabolic states (1). We began work with purified enzymes, and identification of partially purified enzymes, leading to initial characterization of several of the 42 c-type cytochromes from MR-1 (2). As the genome became annotated, we began experiments on transcriptome analysis under different conditions of growth, the first step towards systems biology (3,4). Conductive appendages of Shewanella, called bacterial nanowires were identified and characterized during this work (5, 11, 20,21). For the first time, it was possible to measure the electron transfer rate between single cells and a solid substrate (20), a rate that has been confirmed by several other laboratories. We also showed that MR-1 cells preferentially attach to cells at a given charge, and are not attracted, or even repelled by other charges. The interaction with the charged surfaces begins with a stimulation of motility (called electrokinesis), and eventually leads to attachment and growth. One of the things that genomics allows is the comparative analysis of the various Shewanella strains, which led to several important insights. First, while the genomes predicted that none of the strains looked like they should be able to degrade N-acetyl glucosamine (NAG), the monomer

  1. Growth and characterization of propyl-para-hydroxybenzoate single ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Single crystals of propyl--hydroxybenzoate have been grown by slow evaporation solution technique. The structure of the compound was confirmed by FT–IR, FT–Raman spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The crystalline perfection of the grown single crystals has been analysed by high resolution ...

  2. Techniques for Analysing Problems in Engineering Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Uffe

    1998-01-01

    Description of how CPM network can be used for analysing complex problems in engineering projects.......Description of how CPM network can be used for analysing complex problems in engineering projects....

  3. 10 CFR 61.13 - Technical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Technical analyses. 61.13 Section 61.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.13 Technical analyses. The specific technical information must also include the following analyses...

  4. SINGLE TOP PRODUCTION IN ATLAS AND CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Franchini, Matteo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A status review of the newest single top analysis results obtained by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations will be presented. The considered results are from both the LHC data taking at (s) equal to 8 and 13 TeV. The analyses described cover the cross section measurements and the CKM matrix |Vtb| vertex estimation in all the three single top production channels (t-channel, Wt-channel, s-channel) plus the top quark polarization evaluation in the t-channel.

  5. Prospects of Single Tax Payers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tofan Ivan M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article speaks about problem aspects of taxation, which were set by the state for the single tax administering due to permanent and system changes in the tax legislation. It shows the necessity of search for alternative methods of administering in the process of taxation of single tax payers by fiscal services. The goal of the article is the study of prospects of further taxation of entrepreneurs – single tax payers on the basis of analysis of conditions and principles created by the state for the business. The article used methods of system analysis, comparison, forecasting and modelling. It analyses the process of evolution of the simplified taxation system, accounting and reporting from the moment of its adoption until today. The article presents the structure of the quantitative composition of single tax payers depending on the selected groups. It marks out and characterises administrative and fiscal factors that do not facilitate further development of entrepreneurship in Ukraine. In the result of the conducted studies the article outlines problem aspects of organisation of taxation of the small business and offers specific and real ways of their overcoming or partial solution.

  6. HLA region excluded by linkage analyses of early onset periodontitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, C.; Wang, S.; Lopez, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous studies suggested that HLA genes may influence susceptibility to early-onset periodontitis (EOP). Segregation analyses indicate that EOP may be due to a single major gene. We conducted linkage analyses to assess possible HLA effects on EOP. Fifty families with two or more close relatives affected by EOP were ascertained in Virginia and Chile. A microsatellite polymorphism within the HLA region (at the tumor necrosis factor beta locus) was typed using PCR. Linkage analyses used a donimant model most strongly supported by previous studies. Assuming locus homogeneity, our results exclude a susceptibility gene within 10 cM on either side of our marker locus. This encompasses all of the HLA region. Analyses assuming alternative models gave qualitatively similar results. Allowing for locus heterogeneity, our data still provide no support for HLA-region involvement. However, our data do not statistically exclude (LOD <-2.0) hypotheses of disease-locus heterogeneity, including models where up to half of our families could contain an EOP disease gene located in the HLA region. This is due to the limited power of even our relatively large collection of families and the inherent difficulties of mapping genes for disorders that have complex and heterogeneous etiologies. Additional statistical analyses, recruitment of families, and typing of flanking DNA markers are planned to more conclusively address these issues with respect to the HLA region and other candidate locations in the human genome. Additional results for markers covering most of the human genome will also be presented.

  7. Single Audit: Single Audit Act Effectiveness Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Sally

    2002-01-01

    As discussed in the report we are releasing today, our work to review agency actions to ensure that recipients take timely and appropriate corrective actions to fix audit findings contained in single...

  8. Automated Single Cell Data Decontamination Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennessen, Kristin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Pati, Amrita [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Recent technological advancements in single-cell genomics have encouraged the classification and functional assessment of microorganisms from a wide span of the biospheres phylogeny.1,2 Environmental processes of interest to the DOE, such as bioremediation and carbon cycling, can be elucidated through the genomic lens of these unculturable microbes. However, contamination can occur at various stages of the single-cell sequencing process. Contaminated data can lead to wasted time and effort on meaningless analyses, inaccurate or erroneous conclusions, and pollution of public databases. A fully automated decontamination tool is necessary to prevent these instances and increase the throughput of the single-cell sequencing process

  9. Single-cell technologies in environmental omics

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2015-10-22

    Environmental studies are primarily done by culturing isolated microorganisms or by amplifying and sequencing conserved genes. Difficulties understanding the complexity of large numbers of various microorganisms in an environment led to the development of techniques to enrich specific microorganisms for upstream analysis, ultimately leading to single-cell isolation and analyses. We discuss the significance of single-cell technologies in omics studies with focus on metagenomics and metatranscriptomics. We propose that by reducing sample heterogeneity using single-cell genomics, metaomic studies can be simplified.

  10. Single-basined choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossert, W.; Peters, H.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Single-basined preferences generalize single-dipped preferences by allowing for multiple worst elements. These preferences have played an important role in areas such as voting, strategy-proofness and matching problems. We examine the notion of single-basinedness in a choice-theoretic setting. In

  11. Superconducting Single Photon Detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorenbos, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is about the development of a detector for single photons, particles of light. New techniques are being developed that require high performance single photon detection, such as quantum cryptography, single molecule detection, optical radar, ballistic imaging, circuit testing and

  12. Single-Sex Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protheroe, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Although single-sex education was once the norm in the U.S., the practice has largely been confined to private schools for more than a century. However, with the introduction of the final version of the U.S. Department of Education's so-called single-sex regulations in 2006, public schools were allowed greater flexibility to offer single-sex…

  13. Single frequency intracavity SRO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Buchhave, Preben

    2000-01-01

    Summary form only given. A single resonance optical parametric oscillator (SRO) is inserted intracavity to a CW high power, single frequency, and ring Nd:YVO4 laser. We obtain a stable single frequency CW SRO with output at 1.7-1.9 μm (idler) and a resonating signal at 2.3-2.6 μm. The behavior...

  14. Integrated Field Analyses of Thermal Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervais, K.; Young, B.; Ponce-Zepeda, M. M.; Rosove, S.

    2011-12-01

    A group of undergraduate researchers through the SURE internship offered by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) have examined thermal springs in southern Idaho, northern Utah as well as mud volcanoes in the Salton Sea, California. We used an integrated approach to estimate the setting and maximum temperature, including water chemistry, Ipad-based image and data-base management, microbiology, and gas analyses with a modified Giggenbach sampler.All springs were characterized using GISRoam (tmCogent3D). We are performing geothermometry calculations as well as comparisons with temperature gradient data on the results while also analyzing biological samples. Analyses include water temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, and TDS measured in the field. Each sample is sealed and chilled and delivered to a water lab within 12 hours.Temperatures are continuously monitored with the use of Solinst Levelogger Juniors. Through partnership with a local community college geology club, we receive results on a monthly basis and are able to process initial data earlier in order to evaluate data over a longer time span. The springs and mudpots contained microbial organisms which were analyzed using methods of single colony isolation, polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing showing the impact of the organisms on the springs or vice versa. Soon we we will collect gas samples at sites that show signs of gas. This will be taken using a hybrid of the Giggenbach method and our own methods. Drawing gas samples has proven a challenge, however we devised a method to draw out gas samples utilizing the Giggenbach flask, transferring samples to glass blood sample tubes, replacing NaOH in the Giggenbach flask, and evacuating it in the field for multiple samples using a vacuum pump. We also use a floating platform devised to carry and lower a levelogger, to using an in-line fuel filter from a tractor in order to keep mud from contaminating the equipment.The use of raster

  15. Single subject analyses reveal consistent recruitment of frontal operculum in performance monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiez, Céline; Wutte, Magdalena G; Faillenot, Isabelle; Petrides, Michael; Burle, Boris; Procyk, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    There are continuing uncertainties regarding whether performance monitoring recruits the anterior insula (aI) and/or the frontal operculum (fO). The proximity and morphological complexity of these two regions make proper identification and isolation of the loci of activation extremely difficult. The use of group averaging methods in human neuroimaging might contribute to this problem. The result has been heterogeneous labeling of this region as aI, fO, or aI/fO, and a discussion of results oriented towards either cognitive or interoceptive functions depending on labeling. In the present article, we adapted the spatial preprocessing of functional magnetic resonance imaging data to account for group averaging artifacts and performed a subject-by-subject analysis in three performance monitoring tasks. Results show that functional activity related to feedback or action monitoring consistently follows local morphology in this region and demonstrate that the activity is located predominantly in the fO rather than in the aI. From these results, we propose that a full understanding of the respective role of aI and fO would benefit from increased spatial resolution and subject-by-subject analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms in selected nutrient-sensitive genes in weight-regain prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lesli Hingstrup; Ängquist, Lars Henrik; Vimaleswaran, Karani S

    2012-01-01

    Differences in the interindividual response to dietary intervention could be modified by genetic variation in nutrient-sensitive genes.......Differences in the interindividual response to dietary intervention could be modified by genetic variation in nutrient-sensitive genes....

  17. Multiscale Analyses of Surface Failure Mechanism of Single-Crystal Silicon during Micro-Milling Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jinxuan; Bai, Qingshun; Tong, Zhen

    2017-12-13

    This article presents an experimental investigation on ductile-mode micro-milling of monocrystalline silicon using polycrystalline diamond (PCD) end mills. Experimental results indicate that the irregular fluctuation of cutting force always induces machined surface failure, even in ductile mode. The internal mechanism has not been investigated so far. The multiscale discrete dislocation plasticity framework was used to predict the dislocation structure and strain evolution under the discontinuous cutting process. The results showed that a mass of dislocations can be generated and affected in silicon crystal. The dislocation density, multiplication rate, and microstructure strongly depend on the milling conditions. In particular, transient impulse load can provide a great potential for material strength by forming dislocations entanglement structure. The continuous irregular cutting process can induce persistent slip bands (PSBs) in substrate surface, which would result in stress concentration and inhomogeneous deformation within grains.

  18. Multiscale Analyses of Surface Failure Mechanism of Single-Crystal Silicon during Micro-Milling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxuan Bai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an experimental investigation on ductile-mode micro-milling of monocrystalline silicon using polycrystalline diamond (PCD end mills. Experimental results indicate that the irregular fluctuation of cutting force always induces machined surface failure, even in ductile mode. The internal mechanism has not been investigated so far. The multiscale discrete dislocation plasticity framework was used to predict the dislocation structure and strain evolution under the discontinuous cutting process. The results showed that a mass of dislocations can be generated and affected in silicon crystal. The dislocation density, multiplication rate, and microstructure strongly depend on the milling conditions. In particular, transient impulse load can provide a great potential for material strength by forming dislocations entanglement structure. The continuous irregular cutting process can induce persistent slip bands (PSBs in substrate surface, which would result in stress concentration and inhomogeneous deformation within grains.

  19. Influence of laser parameters on selective retinal treatment using single-phase heat transfer analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rupak K; Zhu, Liang; Gopalakrishnan, Pradeep; Kazmierczak, Michael J

    2007-05-01

    Selective thermal treatment to retina is induced by short pulsed lasers to denaturize retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) selectively, while sparing the sensitive photoreceptors. The problem associated with the usage of short pulsed laser is the difficulty in determining the correct dosimetry parameters. This study quantifies the influence of laser parameters over the therapeutic range. The laser-tissue interaction is numerically investigated by analyzing the transient temperature in ocular tissues during the treatment. The rate process analysis for thermal injury is employed to estimate the selective damage of retina. The contours of Arrhenius integral value (Omeg/ Omegamax) presented in this study show both the area and magnitude of damage caused by various laser parameters. Results reveal that the 2 micros pulsed laser with green wavelength and Gaussian profile is relatively more effective for selective retinal treatment. The repetition frequency of 100 Hz is found to produce selectively RPE damage, while higher frequencies produce collateral damage to neural retina and choroid located within 2 microm from the RPE interface.

  20. Design, fabrication and optimization of a multifunctional microfluidic platform for single-cell analyses.

    OpenAIRE

    Benavente Babace, A. (Ainara); Mújica Garmendia, M.(Maite); Perez Lorenzo, E. (Eva)

    2015-01-01

    La manipulación celular es clave en el desarrollo de la investigación y aplicaciones para diagnóstico clínico. Hoy en día, es bien conocido que las células individuales, incluso aquellas con la misma apariencia, pueden mostrar diferentes fenotipos. Estas disparidades hacen que cada célula, aún encontrándose en las mismas condiciones, responda de manera diferente frente a un mismo estímulo. Por lo tanto, el estudio celular a nivel individual proporciona información más preci...

  1. [Anne Arold. Kontrastive Analyse...] / Paul Alvre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alvre, Paul, 1921-2008

    2001-01-01

    Arvustus: Arold, Anne. Kontrastive analyse der Wortbildungsmuster im Deutschen und im Estnischen (am Beispiel der Aussehensadjektive). Tartu, 2000. (Dissertationes philologiae germanicae Universitatis Tartuensis)

  2. Effect Size Calculations and Single Subject Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Melissa L.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared visual analyses with five alternative methods for assessing the magnitude of effect with single subject designs. Each method was successful in detecting intervention effect. When rank ordered, each method was consistent in identifying the participants with the largest effect. We recommend the use of the standard mean difference…

  3. SINGLE: single photon sensitive cryogenic light detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biassoni, Matteo; SINGLE Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Thermal detectors operated at few mK as calorimeters are a powerful tool for the study of rare particle physics processes. In order to implement particle identification, light detection can be effectively performed by means of other thermal detectors operated as light sensors. This configuration can be used also in large scale, thousand-channels setups, but the light sensors must be sensitive enough to detect few, possibly a single, photons. The SINGLE project described here aims at producing silicon based, large area devices that can be operated as thermal detectors with single-photon sensitivity, and demonstrate the reliability of the performance, scalability of the production process and integrability with present and next generation cryogenic experiments for the search for rare events.

  4. Metabolomics Analyses of Cancer Cells in Controlled Microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Avizonis, Daina; St-Pierre, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex and heterogeneous milieu in which cancer cells undergo metabolic reprogramming to fuel their growth. Cancer cell lines grown in vitro using traditional culture methods represent key experimental models to gain a mechanistic understanding of tumor biology. This protocol describes the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to assess metabolic changes in cancer cells grown under varied levels of oxygen and nutrients that may better mimic the tumor microenvironment. Intracellular metabolite changes, metabolite uptake and release, as well as stable isotope ((13)C) tracer analyses are done in a single experimental setup to provide an integrated understanding of metabolic adaptation. Overall, this chapter describes some essential tools and methods to perform comprehensive metabolomics analyses.

  5. 3D analyses of cavitation instabilities accounting for plastic anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2010-01-01

    Full three dimensional cell model analyses are carried out for a solid containing a single small void, in order to determine the critical stress levels for the occurrence of cavitation instabilities. The material models applied are elastic‐viscoplastic, with a small rate‐hardening exponent...... that the quasi‐static solution is well approximated. A special procedure is used to strongly reduce the loading rate a little before the instability occurs. It is found that plastic anisotropy has a significant effect on the level of the critical stress for cavitation instabilities....

  6. Analysing Biochemical Oscillations through Probabilistic Model Checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballarini, Paolo; Mardare, Radu Iulian; Mura, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Analysing Biochemical Oscillations through Probabilistic Model Checking. In Proc. of the Second International Workshop "From Biology To Concurrency" (FBTC 2008), Electronic Notes in Theoretical Computer Science......Analysing Biochemical Oscillations through Probabilistic Model Checking. In Proc. of the Second International Workshop "From Biology To Concurrency" (FBTC 2008), Electronic Notes in Theoretical Computer Science...

  7. New environmental metabarcodes for analysing soil DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epp, Laura S.; Boessenkool, Sanne; Bellemain, Eva P.

    2012-01-01

    Metabarcoding approaches use total and typically degraded DNA from environmental samples to analyse biotic assemblages and can potentially be carried out for any kinds of organisms in an ecosystem. These analyses rely on specific markers, here called metabarcodes, which should be optimized for ta...

  8. Spectral analyses of asteroids' linear features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardo, A.; Palomba, E.; Scully, J. E. C.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Capaccioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Zinzi, A.; Galiano, A.; Ammannito, E.; Filacchione, G.; Ciarniello, M.; Raponi, A.; Zambon, F.; Capria, M. T.; Erard, S.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Leyrat, C.; Dirri, F.; Nardi, L.; Raymond, C. A.

    2017-09-01

    Linear features are commonly found on small bodies and can have a geomorphic or tectonic origin. Generally, these features are studied by means of morphological analyses. Here we propose a spectroscopic analyses of linear features of different asteroids visited by space missions, in order to search for correspondence between spectral properties and origin of linear features.

  9. Random error in cardiovascular meta-analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albalawi, Zaina; McAlister, Finlay A; Thorlund, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cochrane reviews are viewed as the gold standard in meta-analyses given their efforts to identify and limit systematic error which could cause spurious conclusions. The potential for random error to cause spurious conclusions in meta-analyses is less well appreciated. METHODS: We...

  10. Analyse de risques d'installations industrielles

    OpenAIRE

    Pineau, Jean-Philippe

    1995-01-01

    L'analyse de risques industriels a été entreprise de longue date pour des industries où les accidents pouvaient avoir des effets catastrophiques : fabrication des explosifs, exploitation des mines de charbon, chimie, pétrole. Cette analyse a permis de mieux comprendre les phénomènes mis en jeu et leurs conséquences.

  11. Novel Algorithms for Astronomical Plate Analyses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Powerful computers and dedicated software allow effective data mining and scientific analyses in astronomical plate archives. We give and discuss examples of newly developed algorithms for astronomical plate analyses, e.g., searches for optical transients, as well as for major spectral and brightness ...

  12. Creation of a knowledge management system for QT analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornøe, Christoffer W; Garnett, Christine E; Wang, Yaning; Florian, Jeffry; Li, Michael; Gobburu, Jogarao V

    2011-07-01

    An increasing number of thorough QT (TQT) reports are being submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration's interdisciplinary review team for QT (IRT-QT), requiring time-intensive quantitative analyses by a multidisciplinary review team within 45 days. This calls for systematic learning to guide future trials and policies by standardizing and automating the QT analyses to improve review efficiency, provide consistent advice, and enable pooled data analyses to answer key regulatory questions. The QT interval represents the time from initiation of ventricular depolarization to completion of ventricular repolarization recorded by electrocardiograph (ECG) and is used in the proarrhythmic risk assessment. The developed QT knowledge management system is implemented in the R package "QT." Data from 11 crossover TQT studies including time-matched ECGs and pharmacokinetic measurements following single doses of 400 to 1200 mg moxifloxacin were used for the QT analysis example. The automated workflow was divided into 3 components (data management, analysis, and archival). The generated data sets, scripts, tables, and graphs are automatically stored in a queryable repository and summarized in an analysis report. More than 100 TQT studies have been analyzed using the system since 2007. This has dramatically reduced the time needed to review TQT studies and has made the IRT-QT reviews consistent across reviewers. Furthermore, the system enables leveraging prior knowledge through pooled data analyses to answer policy-related questions and to understand the various effects that influence study results.

  13. A review of bioinformatic methods for forensic DNA analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Yuan; Harbison, SallyAnn

    2018-03-01

    Short tandem repeats, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and whole mitochondrial analyses are three classes of markers which will play an important role in the future of forensic DNA typing. The arrival of massively parallel sequencing platforms in forensic science reveals new information such as insights into the complexity and variability of the markers that were previously unseen, along with amounts of data too immense for analyses by manual means. Along with the sequencing chemistries employed, bioinformatic methods are required to process and interpret this new and extensive data. As more is learnt about the use of these new technologies for forensic applications, development and standardization of efficient, favourable tools for each stage of data processing is being carried out, and faster, more accurate methods that improve on the original approaches have been developed. As forensic laboratories search for the optimal pipeline of tools, sequencer manufacturers have incorporated pipelines into sequencer software to make analyses convenient. This review explores the current state of bioinformatic methods and tools used for the analyses of forensic markers sequenced on the massively parallel sequencing (MPS) platforms currently most widely used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY: Single Photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, S

    2000-12-22

    Quantum cryptography offers the potential of totally secure transfer of information, but as Benjamin discusses in this Perspective, its practical implementation hinges on being able to generate single photons (rather than two or more) at a time. Michler et al. show how this condition can be met in a quantum dot microdisk structure. Single molecules were also recently shown to allow controlled single-photon emission.

  15. Single photon quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveratos, Alexios; Brouri, Rosa; Gacoin, Thierry; Villing, André; Poizat, Jean-Philippe; Grangier, Philippe

    2002-10-28

    We report the full implementation of a quantum cryptography protocol using a stream of single photon pulses generated by a stable and efficient source operating at room temperature. The single photon pulses are emitted on demand by a single nitrogen-vacancy color center in a diamond nanocrystal. The quantum bit error rate is less that 4.6% and the secure bit rate is 7700 bits/s. The overall performances of our system reaches a domain where single photons have a measurable advantage over an equivalent system based on attenuated light pulses.

  16. Single-atom nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Prati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Single-Atom Nanoelectronics covers the fabrication of single-atom devices and related technology, as well as the relevant electronic equipment and the intriguing new phenomena related to single-atom and single-electron effects in quantum devices. It also covers the alternative approaches related to both silicon- and carbon-based technologies, also from the point of view of large-scale industrial production. The publication provides a comprehensive picture of the state of the art at the cutting edge and constitutes a milestone in the emerging field of beyond-CMOS technology. Although there are

  17. Single-Phase PLLs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Guerrero, Josep M.; Quintero, Juan Carlos Vasquez

    2017-01-01

    Single-phase phase-locked loops (PLLs) are popular for the synchronization and control of single-phase gridconnected converters. They are also widely used for monitoring and diagnostic purposes in the power and energy areas. In recent years, a large number of single-phase PLLs with different stru......-PLLs). The members of each category are then described and their pros and cons are discussed. This work provides a deep insight into characteristics of different single-phase PLLs and, therefore, can be considered as a reference for researchers and engineers....

  18. Level II Ergonomic Analyses, Dover AFB, DE

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    IERA-RS-BR-TR-1999-0002 UNITED STATES AIR FORCE IERA Level II Ergonomie Analyses, Dover AFB, DE Andrew Marcotte Marilyn Joyce The Joyce...Project (070401881, Washington, DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Level II Ergonomie Analyses, Dover...1.0 INTRODUCTION 1-1 1.1 Purpose Of The Level II Ergonomie Analyses : 1-1 1.2 Approach 1-1 1.2.1 Initial Shop Selection and Administration of the

  19. Comparison with Russian analyses of meteor impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-06-01

    The inversion model for meteor impacts is used to discuss Russian analyses and compare principal results. For common input parameters, the models produce consistent estimates of impactor parameters. Directions for future research are discussed and prioritized.

  20. Cost-Benefit Analyses of Transportation Investments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næss, Petter

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the practice of cost-benefit analyses of transportation infrastructure investment projects from the meta-theoretical perspective of critical realism. Such analyses are based on a number of untenable ontological assumptions about social value, human nature and the natural...... environment. In addition, main input data are based on transport modelling analyses based on a misleading `local ontology' among the model makers. The ontological misconceptions translate into erroneous epistemological assumptions about the possibility of precise predictions and the validity of willingness......-to-pay investigations. Accepting the ontological and epistemological assumptions of cost-benefit analysis involves an implicit acceptance of the ethical and political values favoured by these assumptions. Cost-benefit analyses of transportation investment projects tend to neglect long-term environmental consequences...

  1. Understanding Human Error Based on Automated Analyses

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a report on a continuing study of automated analyses of experiential textual reports to gain insight into the causal factors of human errors in aviation...

  2. Analyse of Maintenance Cost in ST

    CERN Document Server

    Jenssen, B W

    2001-01-01

    An analyse has been carried out in ST concerning the total costs for the division. Even though the target was the maintenance costs in ST, the global budget over has been analysed. This has been done since there is close relation between investments & consolidation and the required level for maintenance. The purpose of the analyse was to focus on maintenance cost in ST as a ratio of total maintenance costs over the replacement value of the equipment, and to make some comparisons with other industries and laboratories. Families of equipment have been defined and their corresponding ratios calculated. This first approach gives us some "quantitative" measurements. This analyse should be combined with performance indicators (more "qualitative" measurements) that are telling us how well we are performing. This will help us in defending our budget, make better priorities, and we will satisfy the requirements from our external auditors.

  3. Interactive graphics for functional data analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Julia; Park, So Young; Staicu, Ana Maria; Goldsmith, Jeff

    Although there are established graphics that accompany the most common functional data analyses, generating these graphics for each dataset and analysis can be cumbersome and time consuming. Often, the barriers to visualization inhibit useful exploratory data analyses and prevent the development of intuition for a method and its application to a particular dataset. The refund.shiny package was developed to address these issues for several of the most common functional data analyses. After conducting an analysis, the plot shiny() function is used to generate an interactive visualization environment that contains several distinct graphics, many of which are updated in response to user input. These visualizations reduce the burden of exploratory analyses and can serve as a useful tool for the communication of results to non-statisticians.

  4. Thermal Analyse sof Cross-Linked Polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Polansky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes results obtained during the structural analyses measurements (Differential Scanning Calorimetry DSC, Thermogravimetry TG, Thermomechanical analysis TMA and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy FT-IR. The samples of cross-linked polyethylene cable insulation were tested via these analyses. The DSC and TG were carried out using simultaneous thermal analyzer TA Instruments SDT Q600 with connection of Fourier transform infrared spectrometer Nicolet 380. Thermomechanical analysis was carried out by TMA Q400EM TA Instruments apparatus.

  5. ANALYSE DES PERCEPTIONS LOCALES ET DES FACTEURS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    (Euphorbiaceae). ANALYSE DES PERCEPTIONS LOCALES ET DES FACTEURS ... Une Analyse en Composantes Principales a été appliquée à la matrice .... valeur de la variable aléatoire normale pour un risque α égal à 0,05. La marge d'erreur d prévue pour tout paramètre à estimer à partir de l'enquête est de 3 %.

  6. A History of Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    A history of the development of rotorcraft comprehensive analyses is presented. Comprehensive analyses are digital computer programs that calculate the aeromechanical behavior of the rotor and aircraft, bringing together the most advanced models of the geometry, structure, dynamics, and aerodynamics available in rotary wing technology. The development of the major codes of the last five decades from industry, government, and universities is described. A number of common themes observed in this history are discussed.

  7. Single gaze gestures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllenbach, Emilie; Lilholm, Martin; Gail, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines gaze gestures and their applicability as a generic selection method for gaze-only controlled interfaces. The method explored here is the Single Gaze Gesture (SGG), i.e. gestures consisting of a single point-to-point eye movement. Horizontal and vertical, long and short SGGs were...

  8. Single-sided NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Casanova, Federico; Blümich, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Single-Sided NMR describes the design of the first functioning single-sided tomograph, the related measurement methods, and a number of applications. One of the key advantages to this method is the speed at which the images are obtained.

  9. Epigenetics reloaded: the single-cell revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bheda, Poonam; Schneider, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Mechanistically, how epigenetic states are inherited through cellular divisions remains an important open question in the chromatin field and beyond. Defining the heritability of epigenetic states and the underlying chromatin-based mechanisms within a population of cells is complicated due to cell heterogeneity combined with varying levels of stability of these states; thus, efforts must be focused toward single-cell analyses. The approaches presented here constitute the forefront of epigenetics research at the single-cell level using classic and innovative methods to dissect epigenetics mechanisms from the limited material available in a single cell. This review further outlines exciting future avenues of research to address the significance of epigenetic heterogeneity and the contributions of microfluidics technologies to single-cell isolation and analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Single-photon imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Seitz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of images is a central capability in almost all scientific and technological domains. In particular, the acquisition of electromagnetic radiation, in the form of visible light, UV, infrared, X-ray, etc. is of enormous practical importance. The ultimate sensitivity in electronic imaging is the detection of individual photons. With this book, the first comprehensive review of all aspects of single-photon electronic imaging has been created. Topics include theoretical basics, semiconductor fabrication, single-photon detection principles, imager design and applications of different spectral domains. Today, the solid-state fabrication capabilities for several types of image sensors has advanced to a point, where uncoooled single-photon electronic imaging will soon become a consumer product. This book is giving a specialist´s view from different domains to the forthcoming “single-photon imaging” revolution. The various aspects of single-photon imaging are treated by internati...

  11. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  12. Single Policy Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronsell, Annica; Manners, Ian James

    2015-01-01

    Single policy studies are the most common form of European Union (EU) research. Single policy studies are widely used to understand the role of the EU in a wide variety of sectors, together with their development over time, and often offer public policy prescriptions. This chapter discusses...... the relevance of single policy studies in EU research and give examples of how such research can be designed and carried out. The chapter reviews three examples of single policy studies using different methods based on EU environmental policy, the EU biofuels directive, and the EU Common Security and Defence...... Policy (CSDP). The examples are illustrative of how single policy studies can be designed to use different approaches in the analysis: multiple streams approach to policy-making; a comparative hypothesis testing; and feminist institutional theory....

  13. Single Parenthood and Children's Reading Performance in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjoon

    2007-01-01

    Using the data from Program for International Student Assessment, I examine the gap in reading performance between 15-year-old students in single-parent and intact families in 5 Asian countries in comparison to the United States. The ordinary least square regression analyses show negligible disadvantages of students with a single parent in Hong…

  14. A single mutation in the envelope protein modulates flavivirus antigenicity, stability, and pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Goo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The structural flexibility or 'breathing' of the envelope (E protein of flaviviruses allows virions to sample an ensemble of conformations at equilibrium. The molecular basis and functional consequences of virus conformational dynamics are poorly understood. Here, we identified a single mutation at residue 198 (T198F of the West Nile virus (WNV E protein domain I-II hinge that regulates virus breathing. The T198F mutation resulted in a ~70-fold increase in sensitivity to neutralization by a monoclonal antibody targeting a cryptic epitope in the fusion loop. Increased exposure of this otherwise poorly accessible fusion loop epitope was accompanied by reduced virus stability in solution at physiological temperatures. Introduction of a mutation at the analogous residue of dengue virus (DENV, but not Zika virus (ZIKV, E protein also increased accessibility of the cryptic fusion loop epitope and decreased virus stability in solution, suggesting that this residue modulates the structural ensembles sampled by distinct flaviviruses at equilibrium in a context dependent manner. Although the T198F mutation did not substantially impair WNV growth kinetics in vitro, studies in mice revealed attenuation of WNV T198F infection. Overall, our study provides insight into the molecular basis and the in vitro and in vivo consequences of flavivirus breathing.

  15. [Biophysics of single molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdiuk, I N; Deriusheva, E I

    2011-01-01

    The modern methods of research of biological molecules whose application led to the development of a new field of science, biophysics of single molecules, are reviewed. The measurement of the characteristics of single molecules enables one to reveal their individual features, and it is just for this reason that much more information can be obtained from one molecule than from the entire ensample of molecules. The high sensitivity of the methods considered in detail makes it possible to come close to the solution of the basic problem of practical importance, namely, the determination of the nucleotide sequence of a single DNA molecule.

  16. Single neuron computation

    CERN Document Server

    McKenna, Thomas M; Zornetzer, Steven F

    1992-01-01

    This book contains twenty-two original contributions that provide a comprehensive overview of computational approaches to understanding a single neuron structure. The focus on cellular-level processes is twofold. From a computational neuroscience perspective, a thorough understanding of the information processing performed by single neurons leads to an understanding of circuit- and systems-level activity. From the standpoint of artificial neural networks (ANNs), a single real neuron is as complex an operational unit as an entire ANN, and formalizing the complex computations performed by real n

  17. From Single Microparticles to Microfluidic Emulsification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinoshita, K.; Ortiz, Elisa Parra; Hussein, Abdirazak

    2016-01-01

    The micropipette manipulation technique is capable of making fundamental single particle measurements and analyses. This information is critical for establishing processing parameters in systems such as microfluidics and homogenization. To demonstrate what can be achieved at the single particle......) micelles was directly visualized microscopically for the first time by the micropipette technique, showing that such micellization could increase the solubility of Ibp from 4 to 80 mM at 100 mM SDS. We also introduce a particular microfluidic device that has recently been used to make PLGA microspheres...

  18. Porosity Evolution in a Creeping Single Crystal (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    mechanism. Our analyses focus on the role of stress state on deformation and void growth in ductile single crystals in the dislocation creep regime. We also...orientation effects on void growth and coalescence in fcc single crystals . International Journal of Plasticity, 22, 921-942. [27] Kysar J.W., Gan Y.X...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2012-0373 POROSITY EVOLUTION IN A CREEPING SINGLE CRYSTAL (PREPRINT) A. Srivastava and A. Needleman University of North

  19. Nonlinear Seismic Response Of Single Piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, R.; Conte, E.; Dente, G.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, a method is proposed to analyse the seismic response of single piles under nonlinear soil condition. It is based on the Winkler foundation model formulated in the time domain, which makes use of p-y curves described by the Ramberg-Osgood relationship. The analyses are performed referring to a pile embedded in two-layer soil profiles with different sharp stiffness contrast. Italian seismic records are used as input motion. The calculated bending moments in the pile are compared to those obtained using other theoretical solutions.

  20. A theoretical framework for analysing preschool teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaiklin, Seth

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a theoretical framework for analysing preschool teaching as a historically-grounded societal practice. The aim is to present a unified framework that can be used to analyse and compare both historical and contemporary examples of preschool teaching practice within and across...... national traditions. The framework has two main components, an analysis of preschool teaching as a practice, formed in relation to societal needs, and an analysis of the categorical relations which necessarily must be addressed in preschool teaching activity. The framework is introduced and illustrated...... through the analysis of one of the earliest recorded examples of preschool education (initiated by J. F. Oberlin in northeastern France in 1767). The general idea of societal need is elaborated as a way of analysing practices, and a general analytic schema is presented for characterising preschool...

  1. Analyses of cavitation instabilities in ductile metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    Cavitation instabilities have been predicted for a single void in a ductile metal stressed under high triaxiality conditions. In experiments for a ceramic reinforced by metal particles a single dominant void has been observed on the fracture surface of some of the metal particles bridging a crack...... for the influence of such size-effects on cavitation instabilities are presented. When a metal contains a distribution of micro voids, and the void spacing compared to void size is not extremely large, the surrounding voids may affect the occurrence of a cavitation instability at one of the voids. This has been...

  2. Single molecule electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyunwook; Reed, Mark A; Lee, Takhee

    2011-04-12

    Single molecule electronic devices in which individual molecules are utilized as active electronic components constitute a promising approach for the ultimate miniaturization and integration of electronic devices in nanotechnology through the bottom-up strategy. Thus, the ability to understand, control, and exploit charge transport at the level of single molecules has become a long-standing desire of scientists and engineers from different disciplines for various potential device applications. Indeed, a study on charge transport through single molecules attached to metallic electrodes is a very challenging task, but rapid advances have been made in recent years. This review article focuses on experimental aspects of electronic devices made with single molecules, with a primary focus on the characterization and manipulation of charge transport in this regime. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Stresses of Single Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Stresses of Single Parenting Page Content Article Body What are some ways ... way. Check your local library for books on parenting. Local hospitals, the YMCA, and church groups often ...

  4. Analyses of hydraulic performance of velocity caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Degn Eskesen, Mark Chr.; Buhrkall, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    The hydraulic performance of a velocity cap has been investigated. Velocity caps are often used in connection with offshore intakes. CFD (computational fluid dynamics) examined the flow through the cap openings and further down into the intake pipes. This was combined with dimension analyses...... in order to analyse the effect of different layouts on the flow characteristics. In particular, flow configurations going all the way through the structure were revealed. A couple of suggestions to minimize the risk for flow through have been tested....

  5. Power System Oscillatory Behaviors: Sources, Characteristics, & Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follum, James D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tuffner, Francis K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dosiek, Luke A. [Union College, Schenectady, NY (United States); Pierre, John W. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2017-05-17

    This document is intended to provide a broad overview of the sources, characteristics, and analyses of natural and forced oscillatory behaviors in power systems. These aspects are necessarily linked. Oscillations appear in measurements with distinguishing characteristics derived from the oscillation’s source. These characteristics determine which analysis methods can be appropriately applied, and the results from these analyses can only be interpreted correctly with an understanding of the oscillation’s origin. To describe oscillations both at their source within a physical power system and within measurements, a perspective from the boundary between power system and signal processing theory has been adopted.

  6. Single Crystal Faceplate Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-25

    7]. Much the research at Allied-Signal, Inc. in garnet layer growth has been involved with the kinetics of crystallization of garnet from LPE melts...acceptable resolution and light output characteristics. Single crystal faceplates being evaluated are composed of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) with an...1.1 Single Crystal Faceplate Developments Allied Signal, Inc. has done extensive development work in epitaxial layering of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG

  7. Subgroup analyses in cost-effectiveness analyses to support health technology assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Christine; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Paget, Marie-Ange; Reid, Carol; Hawkins, Neil

    2014-01-01

    'Success' in drug development is bringing to patients a new medicine that has an acceptable benefit-risk profile and that is also cost-effective. Cost-effectiveness means that the incremental clinical benefit is deemed worth paying for by a healthcare system, and it has an important role in enabling manufacturers to obtain new medicines to patients as soon as possible following regulatory approval. Subgroup analyses are increasingly being utilised by decision-makers in the determination of the cost-effectiveness of new medicines when making recommendations. This paper highlights the statistical considerations when using subgroup analyses to support cost-effectiveness for a health technology assessment. The key principles recommended for subgroup analyses supporting clinical effectiveness published by Paget et al. are evaluated with respect to subgroup analyses supporting cost-effectiveness. A health technology assessment case study is included to highlight the importance of subgroup analyses when incorporated into cost-effectiveness analyses. In summary, we recommend planning subgroup analyses for cost-effectiveness analyses early in the drug development process and adhering to good statistical principles when using subgroup analyses in this context. In particular, we consider it important to provide transparency in how subgroups are defined, be able to demonstrate the robustness of the subgroup results and be able to quantify the uncertainty in the subgroup analyses of cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Consistent Visual Analyses of Intrasubject Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahng, SungWoo; Chung, Kyong-Mee; Gutshall, Katharine; Pitts, Steven C.; Kao, Joyce; Girolami, Kelli

    2010-01-01

    Visual inspection of single-case data is the primary method of interpretation of the effects of an independent variable on a dependent variable in applied behavior analysis. The purpose of the current study was to replicate and extend the results of DeProspero and Cohen (1979) by reexamining the consistency of visual analysis across raters. We…

  9. Isolation of Single-Domain Antibody Fragments That Preferentially Detect Intact (146S Particles of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus for Use in Vaccine Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel M. Harmsen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intact (146S foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDVs can dissociate into specific (12S viral capsid degradation products. FMD vaccines normally consist of inactivated virions. Vaccine quality is dependent on 146S virus particles rather than 12S particles. We earlier isolated two llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs that specifically recognize 146S particles of FMDV strain O1 Manisa and shown their potential use in quality control of FMD vaccines during manufacturing. These 146S-specific VHHs were specific for particular O serotype strains and did not bind strains from other FMDV serotypes. Here, we describe the isolation of 146S-specific VHHs against FMDV SAT2 and Asia 1 strains by phage display selection from llama immune libraries. VHHs that bind both 12S and 146S particles were readily isolated but VHHs that bind specifically to 146S particles could only be isolated by phage display selection using prior depletion for 12S particles. We obtained one 146S-specific VHH—M332F—that binds to strain Asia 1 Shamir and several VHHs that preferentially bind 146S particles of SAT2 strain SAU/2/00, from which we selected VHH M379F for further characterization. Both M332F and M379F did not bind FMDV strains from other serotypes. In a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA employing unlabeled and biotinylated versions of the same VHH M332F showed high specificity for 146S particles but M379F showed lower 146S-specificity with some cross-reaction with 12S particles. These ELISAs could detect 146S particle concentrations as low as 2.3–4.6 µg/l. They can be used for FMD vaccine quality control and research and development, for example, to identify virion stabilizing excipients.

  10. Roux 105 PHONETIC DATA AND PHONOLOGICAL ANALYSES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    it will be demonstrated that a phonological analysis (of the same phenome- non), based on verified phonetic data, ... rectness of phonetic data on which phonological analyses are eventually based. Or, seen from another angle, very seldom ...... An Introduction to Tswana Grammar. Longmans. Daniloff, R. & R. HalIIDlarberg: ...

  11. Quantitative analyses of shrinkage characteristics of neem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantitative analyses of shrinkage characteristics of neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss.) wood were carried out. Forty five wood specimens were prepared from the three ecological zones of north eastern Nigeria, viz: sahel savanna, sudan savanna and guinea savanna for the research. The results indicated that the wood ...

  12. Thermodynamic modeling to analyse composition of carbonaceous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thermodynamic modeling to analyse composition of carbonaceous coatings of MnO and other oxides of manganese grown by MOCVD. SUKANYA DHAR†, A VARADE and S A SHIVASHANKAR. ∗. Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. †Mechanical Engineering Department ...

  13. Comparative sequence analyses of genome and transcriptome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... This work therefore provides a valuable resource to explore the immense research potential of comparative analyses of transcriptome .... species and identified domain architectures that are overrep- resented in elephants. 2. Methods. 2.1 Sample collection, extraction of nucleic acids and next-generation ...

  14. Heritability estimates derived from threshold analyses for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heritability estimates derived from threshold analyses for reproduction and stayability traits in a beef cattle herd. ... South African Journal of Animal Science ... The object of this study was to estimate heritabilities and sire breeding values for stayability and reproductive traits in a composite multibreed beef cattle herd using a ...

  15. Cosmetology: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum Center.

    These task analyses are designed to be used in combination with the "Trade and Industrial Education Service Area Resource" in order to implement competency-based education in the cosmetology program in Virginia. The task analysis document contains the task inventory, suggested task sequence lists, and content outlines for the secondary…

  16. Regression og geometrisk data analyse (2. del)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkkjær, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    Artiklen søger at vise, hvordan regressionsanalyse og geometrisk data analyse kan integreres. Det er interessant, fordi disse metoder ofte opstilles som modsætninger f.eks. som en modsætning mellem beskrivende og forklarende metoder. Artiklens første del bragtes i Praktiske Grunde 3-4 / 2007....

  17. Meta-analyses on viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise L; Gluud, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes the meta-analyses of interventions for viral hepatitis A, B, and C. Some of the interventions assessed are described in small trials with unclear bias control. Other interventions are supported by large, high-quality trials. Although attempts have been made to adjust...

  18. En kvantitativ metode til analyse af radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Lejre

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available I den danske såvel som den internationale radiolitteratur er bud på metoder til analyse af radiomediet sparsomme. Det skyldes formentlig, at radiomediet er svært at analysere, fordi det er et medie, der ikke er visualiseret i form af billeder eller understøttet af printet tekst. Denne artikel har til formål at beskrive en ny kvantitativ metode til analyse af radio, der tager særligt hensyn til radiomediets modalitet – lyd struktureret som et lineært forløb i tid. Metoden understøtter dermed både radiomediet som et medie i tid og som et blindt medie. Metoden er udviklet i forbindelse med en komparativ analyse af kulturprogrammer på P1 og Radio24syv lavet for Danmarks Radio. Artiklen peger på, at metoden er velegnet til analyse af ikke kun radio, men også andre medieplatforme samt forskellige journalistiske stofområder.

  19. Heritability estimates derived from threshold analyses for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    Linear model methodology, such as Henderson's method III, has frequently been used for the analysis of discontinuous as well as continuous data (Olivier et al. 1998). This method of analysing discontinuous data with linear procedures is based on continuous phenotypic distributions and does not take the discontinuity of ...

  20. Uncertainty quantification approaches for advanced reactor analyses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, L. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-24

    The original approach to nuclear reactor design or safety analyses was to make very conservative modeling assumptions so as to ensure meeting the required safety margins. Traditional regulation, as established by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission required conservatisms which have subsequently been shown to be excessive. The commission has therefore moved away from excessively conservative evaluations and has determined best-estimate calculations to be an acceptable alternative to conservative models, provided the best-estimate results are accompanied by an uncertainty evaluation which can demonstrate that, when a set of analysis cases which statistically account for uncertainties of all types are generated, there is a 95% probability that at least 95% of the cases meet the safety margins. To date, nearly all published work addressing uncertainty evaluations of nuclear power plant calculations has focused on light water reactors and on large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) analyses. However, there is nothing in the uncertainty evaluation methodologies that is limited to a specific type of reactor or to specific types of plant scenarios. These same methodologies can be equally well applied to analyses for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and to liquid metal reactors, and they can be applied to steady-state calculations, operational transients, or severe accident scenarios. This report reviews and compares both statistical and deterministic uncertainty evaluation approaches. Recommendations are given for selection of an uncertainty methodology and for considerations to be factored into the process of evaluating uncertainties for advanced reactor best-estimate analyses.

  1. ASCORBIC ACID AND MICROBIOLOGICAL ANALYSES OF EXTRA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    Ascorbic acid and microbiological analyses of extra - cotyledonous deposits of Pride of Barbados. (Caesalpina pulcherrima) stored at various temperatures were investigated. 2,6 - Dichlorophenolindophenol (dye) solution titration method was used in ascorbic acid determination while. Nutrient and Sabouraud agar were ...

  2. The Economic Cost of Homosexuality: Multilevel Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumle, Amanda K.; Poston, Dudley, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This article builds on earlier studies that have examined "the economic cost of homosexuality," by using data from the 2000 U.S. Census and by employing multilevel analyses. Our findings indicate that partnered gay men experience a 12.5 percent earnings penalty compared to married heterosexual men, and a statistically insignificant earnings…

  3. Secundaire analyses organisatiebeleid psychosociale arbeidsbelasting (PSA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, K.O.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2016-01-01

    Hoe het organisatiebeleid rond psychosociale arbeidsbelasting (PSA) eruit ziet anno 2014 en welke samenhang er is met ander beleid en uitkomstmaten, zijn de centrale vragen in dit onderzoek. De resultaten van deze verdiepende analyses kunnen ten goede komen aan de lopende campagne ‘Check je

  4. Chemical Analyses of Silicon Aerogel Samples

    CERN Document Server

    van der Werf, I; De Leo, R; Marrone, S

    2008-01-01

    After five years of operating, two Aerogel counters: A1 and A2, taking data in Hall A at Jefferson Lab, suffered a loss of performance. In this note possible causes of degradation have been studied. In particular, various chemical and physical analyses have been carried out on several Aerogel tiles and on adhesive tape in order to reveal the presence of contaminants.

  5. Three Bibliometric Analyses of Anthropology Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hider, Philip M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes three bibliometric analyses of articles in the United Kingdom anthropology journal, "Man," focusing on forms of materials cited; relative age of cited publications; and presentation history of articles. Discusses the applicability of bibliometric studies to anthropology librarianship, outlining problems and benefits. (AEF)

  6. Hybrid Logical Analyses of the Ambient Calculus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolander, Thomas; Hansen, Rene Rydhof

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, hybrid logic is used to formulate three control flow analyses for Mobile Ambients, a process calculus designed for modelling mobility. We show that hybrid logic is very well-suited to express the semantic structure of the ambient calculus and how features of hybrid logic can...

  7. Microbiological And Physicochemical Analyses Of Oil Contaminated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    Microbiological And Physicochemical Analyses Of Oil Contaminated Soil From Major. Motor Mechanic Workshops In Benin City Metropolis,Edo State, Nigeria. EKHAISE, F O; NKWELLE, J. Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Benin, Edo State, Nigeria. ABSTRACT: The ability of microorganisms ...

  8. Heritability estimates derived from threshold analyses for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The object of this study was to estimate heritabilities and sire breeding values for stayability and reproductive traits in a composite multibreed beef cattle herd using a threshold model. A GFCAT set of programmes was used to analyse reproductive data. Heritabilities and product-moment correlations between.

  9. Comparison of veterinary import risk analyses studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos-de Jong, de C.J.; Conraths, F.J.; Adkin, A.; Jones, E.M.; Hallgren, G.S.; Paisley, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-two veterinary import risk analyses (IRAs) were audited: a) for inclusion of the main elements of risk analysis; b) between different types of IRAs; c) between reviewers' scores. No significant differences were detected between different types of IRAs, although quantitative IRAs and IRAs

  10. Chemical Analyses of Silicon Aerogel Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Werf, I.; Palmisano, F.; De Leo, Raffaele; Marrone, Stefano

    2008-04-01

    After five years of operating, two Aerogel counters: A1 and A2, taking data in Hall A at Jefferson Lab, suffered a loss of performance. In this note possible causes of degradation have been studied. In particular, various chemical and physical analyses have been carried out on several Aerogel tiles and on adhesive tape in order to reveal the presence of contaminants.

  11. Grey literature in meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Vicki S; Valentine, Jeffrey C; Cooper, Harris M; Rantz, Marilyn J

    2003-01-01

    In meta-analysis, researchers combine the results of individual studies to arrive at cumulative conclusions. Meta-analysts sometimes include "grey literature" in their evidential base, which includes unpublished studies and studies published outside widely available journals. Because grey literature is a source of data that might not employ peer review, critics have questioned the validity of its data and the results of meta-analyses that include it. To examine evidence regarding whether grey literature should be included in meta-analyses and strategies to manage grey literature in quantitative synthesis. This article reviews evidence on whether the results of studies published in peer-reviewed journals are representative of results from broader samplings of research on a topic as a rationale for inclusion of grey literature. Strategies to enhance access to grey literature are addressed. The most consistent and robust difference between published and grey literature is that published research is more likely to contain results that are statistically significant. Effect size estimates of published research are about one-third larger than those of unpublished studies. Unfunded and small sample studies are less likely to be published. Yet, importantly, methodological rigor does not differ between published and grey literature. Meta-analyses that exclude grey literature likely (a) over-represent studies with statistically significant findings, (b) inflate effect size estimates, and (c) provide less precise effect size estimates than meta-analyses including grey literature. Meta-analyses should include grey literature to fully reflect the existing evidential base and should assess the impact of methodological variations through moderator analysis.

  12. Toward a unified method for analysing and teaching Human Robot Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Jens Vilhelm

    This abstract aims to present key aspect of a future paper, which outlines the ongoing development ofa unified method for analysing and teaching Human-Robot-Interaction. The paper will propose a novel method for analysing both HRI, interaction with other forms of technologies and fellow humans......, drawing on key theories and methods from both communications- and interaction-theory. The aim is to provide a single unified method for analysing interaction, through means of video analysis and then applying theories, with proven mutual compatibility, to reach a desired granularity of study....

  13. Single-Cell Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emara, Samy; Amer, Sara; Ali, Ahmed; Abouleila, Yasmine; Oga, April; Masujima, Tsutomu

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of a cell is always changing. Cells move, divide, communicate, adapt, and are always reacting to their surroundings non-synchronously. Currently, single-cell metabolomics has become the leading field in understanding the phenotypical variations between them, but sample volumes, low analyte concentrations, and validating gentle sample techniques have proven great barriers toward achieving accurate and complete metabolomics profiling. Certainly, advanced technologies such as nanodevices and microfluidic arrays are making great progress, and analytical techniques, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), are gaining popularity with high-throughput methodology. Nevertheless, live single-cell mass spectrometry (LCSMS) values the sample quality and precision, turning once theoretical speculation into present-day applications in a variety of fields, including those of medicine, pharmaceutical, and agricultural industries. While there is still room for much improvement, it is clear that the metabolomics field is progressing toward analysis and discoveries at the single-cell level.

  14. Single atom microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-12-01

    We show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy operating at low accelerating voltages is able to analyze, simultaneously and with single atom resolution and sensitivity, the local atomic configuration, chemical identities, and optical response at point defect sites in monolayer graphene. Sequential fast-scan annular dark-field (ADF) imaging provides direct visualization of point defect diffusion within the graphene lattice, with all atoms clearly resolved and identified via quantitative image analysis. Summing multiple ADF frames of stationary defects produce images with minimized statistical noise and reduced distortions of atomic positions. Electron energy-loss spectrum imaging of single atoms allows the delocalization of inelastic scattering to be quantified, and full quantum mechanical calculations are able to describe the delocalization effect with good accuracy. These capabilities open new opportunities to probe the defect structure, defect dynamics, and local optical properties in 2D materials with single atom sensitivity.

  15. SINGLE HEATER TEST FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.B. Cho

    1999-05-01

    The Single Heater Test is the first of the in-situ thermal tests conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of its program of characterizing Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the potential site for a proposed deep geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste. The Site Characterization Plan (DOE 1988) contained an extensive plan of in-situ thermal tests aimed at understanding specific aspects of the response of the local rock-mass around the potential repository to the heat from the radioactive decay of the emplaced waste. With the refocusing of the Site Characterization Plan by the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan'' (DOE 1994), a consolidated thermal testing program emerged by 1995 as documented in the reports ''In-Situ Thermal Testing Program Strategy'' (DOE 1995) and ''Updated In-Situ Thermal Testing Program Strategy'' (CRWMS M&O 1997a). The concept of the Single Heater Test took shape in the summer of 1995 and detailed planning and design of the test started with the beginning fiscal year 1996. The overall objective of the Single Heater Test was to gain an understanding of the coupled thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are anticipated to occur in the local rock-mass in the potential repository as a result of heat from radioactive decay of the emplaced waste. This included making a priori predictions of the test results using existing models and subsequently refining or modifying the models, on the basis of comparative and interpretive analyses of the measurements and predictions. A second, no less important, objective was to try out, in a full-scale field setting, the various instruments and equipment to be employed in the future on a much larger, more complex, thermal test of longer duration, such as the Drift Scale Test. This ''shake down'' or trial aspect of the Single Heater Test applied

  16. Fundamental Study of Single Biomass Particle Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam

    with regular shapes (spheres and cylinders) and particles with irregular shapes (almost flake-like). A CAMSIZER analyser (Retsch Technology GMBH) was used to determine the size and shape of the particles via Dynamical Digital Image Processing. The experiments were performed in a single particle reactor under......This thesis is a comprehensive study of single biomass particle combustion. The effect of particle shape and size and operating conditions on biomass conversion characteristics were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experimental samples were divided in two groups: particles......) and varying oxygen concentrations in the 5 to 20% range. A one-dimensional mathematical model was used to simulate all the intraparticle conversion processes (drying, recondensation, devolatilisation, char gasification/oxidation and heat/mass/momentum transfer) within single particles of different shapes...

  17. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  18. Single Cell Oncogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin

    It is believed that cancer originates from a single cell that has gone through generations of evolution of genetic and epigenetic changes that associate with the hallmarks of cancer. In some cancers such as various types of leukemia, cancer is clonal. Yet in other cancers like glioblastoma (GBM), there is tremendous tumor heterogeneity that is likely to be caused by simultaneous evolution of multiple subclones within the same tissue. It is obvious that understanding how a single cell develops into a clonal tumor upon genetic alterations, at molecular and cellular levels, holds the key to the real appreciation of tumor etiology and ultimate solution for therapeutics. Surprisingly very little is known about the process of spontaneous tumorigenesis from single cells in human or vertebrate animal models. The main reason is the lack of technology to track the natural process of single cell changes from a homeostatic state to a progressively cancerous state. Recently, we developed a patented compound, photoactivatable (''caged'') tamoxifen analogue 4-OHC and associated technique called optochemogenetic switch (OCG switch), which we believe opens the opportunity to address this urgent biological as well as clinical question about cancer. We propose to combine OCG switch with genetically engineered mouse models of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and high grade astrocytoma (including GBM) to study how single cells, when transformed through acute loss of tumor suppressor genes PTEN and TP53 and gain of oncogenic KRAS, can develop into tumor colonies with cellular and molecular heterogeneity in these tissues. The abstract is for my invited talk in session ``Beyond Darwin: Evolution in Single Cells'' 3/18/2016 11:15 AM.

  19. Radiation shielding analyses for JT-60SU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Neyatani, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Ishida, S.; Ashida, S.; Sawamura, H.; Tominaga, M.; Nishimura, K. [Computer Software Development Co., Ltd., Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Radiation shielding analyses were done for JT-60 Super Upgrade (JT-60SU) of JAERI in Japan, and are reported here. From a viewpoint of the operation and the maintenance, it is important how accurately to evaluate the nuclear heating rate in the superconducting magnet and the activation of components around the vacuum vessel by irradiation of fusion neutrons. A boot-strapped calculation step was applied to the analyses to reduce the redundancy of the conservative in the results. The nuclear heating rate in the superconducting magnets and the maximum {gamma}-ray dose rate one month after shutdown in the cryostat were within the design limits of 2 mW/cc and 10 {mu}Sv/hr, respectively, in the nuclear shielding for a D-D neutron production rate of 1x10{sup 18} s{sup -1}. (author)

  20. Analyse om udviklingen i familieretlige konflikter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Mai Heide

    2016-01-01

    Formålet med denne analyse er at kortlægge, hvad man ud fra eksisterende datakilder og undersøgelser kan vurdere om omfanget og karakteren af danske skilsmisseforældres familieretlige konflikter i dag. Analysen kan betragtes som et forarbejde til og et grundlag for videre forskning om familieretl......Formålet med denne analyse er at kortlægge, hvad man ud fra eksisterende datakilder og undersøgelser kan vurdere om omfanget og karakteren af danske skilsmisseforældres familieretlige konflikter i dag. Analysen kan betragtes som et forarbejde til og et grundlag for videre forskning om...... familieretlige konflikter. Analysens tre hovedspørgsmål er: 1) Kan man ud fra befolkningsundersøgelser om skilsmisseudviklingen og om skilsmisseforældres konflikter og samarbejde vurdere, om børn i stigende omfang bliver omfattet af familieretlige konflikter? 2) Er der ud fra de familieretlige myndigheders...

  1. Analysing User Lifetime in Voluntary Online Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McHugh, Ronan; Larsen, Birger

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses persuasion in online collaboration projects. It introduces a set of heuristics that can be applied to such projects and combines these with a quantitative analysis of user activity over time. Two example sites are studies, Open Street Map and The Pirate Bay. Results show that ...... that there is a correspondance between some features of site design and user participation patterns in the projects.......This paper analyses persuasion in online collaboration projects. It introduces a set of heuristics that can be applied to such projects and combines these with a quantitative analysis of user activity over time. Two example sites are studies, Open Street Map and The Pirate Bay. Results show...

  2. Pratique de l'analyse fonctionelle

    CERN Document Server

    Tassinari, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Mettre au point un produit ou un service qui soit parfaitement adapté aux besoins et aux exigences du client est indispensable pour l'entreprise. Pour ne rien laisser au hasard, il s'agit de suivre une méthodologie rigoureuse : celle de l'analyse fonctionnelle. Cet ouvrage définit précisément cette méthode ainsi que ses champs d'application. Il décrit les méthodes les plus performantes en termes de conception de produit et de recherche de qualité et introduit la notion d'analyse fonctionnelle interne. Un ouvrage clé pour optimiser les processus de conception de produit dans son entreprise. -- Idées clés, par Business Digest

  3. Analytical method used for PIXE analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassot, E. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Blaise Pascal, 24, Avenue des Landais, F-63177 Aubiere Cedex (France)]. E-mail: chassot@clermont.in2p3.fr; Irigaray, J.L. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Blaise Pascal, 24, Avenue des Landais, F-63177 Aubiere Cedex (France); Terver, S. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Clermont-Ferrand, Service d' Orthopedie et de Traumatologie, Chirurgie Plastique et Reconstructive II, Universite d' Auvergne, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex (France); Vanneuville, G. [Faculte de Medecine, Laboratoire d' Anatomie, Universite d' Auvergne, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex (France)

    2005-04-01

    Some metallic prostheses undergo physico-chemical modifications a few years after their implantation. The organism reaction leads to a corrosion process. Consequently, liberation of metallic debris or wear might be observed. The purpose of our analysis was to determine the importance, in surrounding tissues, of the contamination by metallic elements released from joint prosthesis and to localise it. We analysed two types of samples: the first ones were taken during surgical procedure and the other ones were extracted in post-mortem tissues. PIXE technique (Particles Induced X-ray Emission) with a 50 {mu}m proton beam and 3 MeV of energy is an efficient technique to analyse these tissues. We used it to determine qualitatively and quantitatively trace element contamination, and we have developed an analytical method based on the {chi} {sup 2} distribution to separate the different contributions of the different elements, to detect the possible correlation between these metallic elements.

  4. Introduction à l'analyse fonctionnelle

    CERN Document Server

    Reischer, Corina; Hengartner, Walter

    1981-01-01

    Fruit de la collaboration des professeur Walter Hengarther de l'Université Laval, Marcel Lambert et Corina Reischer de l'Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Introduction à l'analyse fonctionnelle se distingue tant par l'étendue de son contenu que par l'accessibilité de sa présentation. Sans céder quoi que ce soit sur la rigueur, il est parfaitement adapté à un premier cours d'analyse fonctionnelle. Tout en étant d'abord destiné aux étudiants en mathématiques, il pourra certes être utile aux étudiants de second cycle en sciences et en génie.

  5. Using ENSO to analyse Cloud Radiative Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolly, Allison; Huang, Yi

    2017-04-01

    When attempting to diagnose the climate sensitivity, clouds are the cause of much uncertainty as they are highly variable. There exists a discrepancy between climate models and observations on the sign and magnitude of cloud radiative feedback. For example, Dessler (2013) shows that models predict a very strong, positive feedback response to ENSO sea surface temperature anomalies in the central Pacific which is not present in observations. To better understand these discrepancies we are using radiation data from the CERES satellite and ERAi reanalysis data to look at the most recent El Nino events. By looking at temperature and humidity anomalies in the central Pacific which are associated with these events, and using radiative kernels, we can calculate their radiative effects. We extend previous work by not only performing an analysis of TOA but also analysing the surface and atmospheric radiation budgets. Additionally we analyse the latest GCMs (e.g. CMIP5 models) and compare them to observations.

  6. En Billig GPS Data Analyse Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Christiansen, Nick; Larsen, Niels T.

    2011-01-01

    Denne artikel præsenterer en komplet software platform til analyse af GPS data. Platformen er bygget udelukkende vha. open-source komponenter. De enkelte komponenter i platformen beskrives i detaljer. Fordele og ulemper ved at bruge open-source diskuteres herunder hvilke IT politiske tiltage, der...... organisationer med et digitalt vejkort og GPS data begynde at lave trafikanalyser på disse data. Det er et krav, at der er passende IT kompetencer tilstede i organisationen....

  7. Analysing qualitative research data using computer software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLafferty, Ella; Farley, Alistair H

    An increasing number of clinical nurses are choosing to undertake qualitative research. A number of computer software packages are available designed for the management and analysis of qualitative data. However, while it is claimed that the use of these programs is also increasing, this claim is not supported by a search of recent publications. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using computer software packages to manage and analyse qualitative data.

  8. Hitchhikers’ guide to analysing bird ringing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harnos Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the second part of our bird ringing data analyses series (Harnos et al. 2015a in which we continue to focus on exploring data using the R software. We give a short description of data distributions and the measures of data spread and explain how to obtain basic descriptive statistics. We show how to detect and select one and two dimensional outliers and explain how to treat these in case of avian ringing data.

  9. Inelastic and Dynamic Fracture and Stress Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atluri, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    Large deformation inelastic stress analysis and inelastic and dynamic crack propagation research work is summarized. The salient topics of interest in engine structure analysis that are discussed herein include: (1) a path-independent integral (T) in inelastic fracture mechanics, (2) analysis of dynamic crack propagation, (3) generalization of constitutive relations of inelasticity for finite deformations , (4) complementary energy approaches in inelastic analyses, and (5) objectivity of time integration schemes in inelastic stress analysis.

  10. Single port laparoscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Henrik; Istre, Olav

    2012-01-01

    LESS, or laparo-endoscopic single site surgery, is a promising new method in minimally invasive surgery. An increasing number of surgical procedures are being performed using this technique, however, its large-scale adoption awaits results of prospective randomized controlled studies confirming...... potential benefits. Theoretically, cosmetic outcomes, postoperative pain and complication rates could be improved with use of single site surgery. This study describes introduction of the method in a private hospital in Denmark, in which 40 patients have been treated for benign gynecologic conditions...

  11. Rotational distortion in conventional allometric analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Gary C

    2011-08-01

    Three data sets from the recent literature were submitted to new analyses to illustrate the rotational distortion that commonly accompanies traditional allometric analyses and that often causes allometric equations to be inaccurate and misleading. The first investigation focused on the scaling of evaporative water loss to body mass in passerine birds; the second was concerned with the influence of body size on field metabolic rates of rodents; and the third addressed interspecific variation in kidney mass among primates. Straight lines were fitted to logarithmic transformations by Ordinary Least Squares and Generalized Linear Models, and the resulting equations then were re-expressed as two-parameter power functions in the original arithmetic scales. The re-expressed models were displayed on bivariate graphs together with tracings for equations fitted directly to untransformed data by nonlinear regression. In all instances, models estimated by back-transformation failed to describe major features of the arithmetic distribution whereas equations fitted by nonlinear regression performed quite well. The poor performance of equations based on models fitted to logarithms can be traced to the increased weight and leverage exerted in those analyses by observations for small species and to the decreased weight and leverage exerted by large ones. The problem of rotational distortion can be avoided by performing exploratory analysis on untransformed values and by validating fitted models in the scale of measurement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Renforcement de l'analyse sociale et de l'analyse sexospécifique en ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    EGRN dans la région MOAN ... Le projet devrait permettre de constituer une solide base de chercheurs rompus à l'analyse sociale et à l'analyse sexospécifique, d'améliorer les moyens de ... Les chaînes de valeur comme leviers stratégiques.

  13. Genomic analyses of the ancestral Manila family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xuehua; Koster, Kent; Qian, Lishi; Desmond, Edward; Brostrom, Richard; Hou, Shaobin; Douglas, James T

    2017-01-01

    With its airborne transmission and prolonged latency period, Mycobacterium tuberculosis spreads worldwide as one of the most successful bacterial pathogens and continues to kill millions of people every year. M. tuberculosis lineage 1 is inferred to originate ancestrally based on the presence of the 52-bp TbD1 sequence and analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Previously, we briefly reported the complete genome sequencing of M. tuberculosis strains 96121 and 96075, which belong to the ancient Manila family and modern Beijing family respectively. Here we present the comprehensive genomic analyses of the Manila family in lineage 1 compared to complete genomes in lineages 2-4. Principal component analysis of the presence and absence of CRISPR spacers suggests that Manila isolate 96121 is distinctly distant from lineages 2-4. We further identify a truncated whiB5 gene and a putative operon consisting of genes encoding a putative serine/threonine kinase PknH and a putative ABC transporter, which are only found in the genomes of Manila family isolates. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms are uniquely conserved in 38 Manila strains. Moreover, when compared to M. tuberculosis H37Rv, 59 proteins are under positive selection in Manila family isolate 96121 but not in Beijing family isolate 96075. The unique features further serve as biomarkers for Manila strains and may shed light on the limited transmission of this ancestral lineage outside of its Filipino host population.

  14. Whole-Genome Analyses of lung function, height and smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janss, Luc; Sigsgaard, Torben; Sorensen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    A joint analysis of FEV1 (forced expiratory volume after one second) and height is reported using novel methodology, as well as a single-trait analysis of smoking status. A first goal of the study was to incorporate dense genetic marker information in a random regression (Bayesian) model to quant......A joint analysis of FEV1 (forced expiratory volume after one second) and height is reported using novel methodology, as well as a single-trait analysis of smoking status. A first goal of the study was to incorporate dense genetic marker information in a random regression (Bayesian) model...... to quantify the relative contributions of genomic and environmental factors to the relationship between FEV1 and height. Smoking status was analysed using a probit random regression model and a second goal of the study was to estimate the genomic heritability of smoking status. Estimates of genomic...... heritabilities for height and FEV1 are equal to 0.47 and to 0.30, respectively. The estimates of the genomic and environmental correlations between height and FEV1 are 0.78 and 0.34, respectively. The posterior mean of the genomic heritability of smoking status is equal to 0.14 and provides evidence...

  15. Integration efficiency for model reduction in micro-mechanical analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tuijl, Rody A.; Remmers, Joris J. C.; Geers, Marc G. D.

    2017-11-01

    Micro-structural analyses are an important tool to understand material behavior on a macroscopic scale. The analysis of a microstructure is usually computationally very demanding and there are several reduced order modeling techniques available in literature to limit the computational costs of repetitive analyses of a single representative volume element. These techniques to speed up the integration at the micro-scale can be roughly divided into two classes; methods interpolating the integrand and cubature methods. The empirical interpolation method (high-performance reduced order modeling) and the empirical cubature method are assessed in terms of their accuracy in approximating the full-order result. A micro-structural volume element is therefore considered, subjected to four load-cases, including cyclic and path-dependent loading. The differences in approximating the micro- and macroscopic quantities of interest are highlighted, e.g. micro-fluctuations and stresses. Algorithmic speed-ups for both methods with respect to the full-order micro-structural model are quantified. The pros and cons of both classes are thereby clearly identified.

  16. Analysing Vote Counting Algorithms Via Logic - And its Application to the CADE Election Scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten; Beckert, Bernhard; Gore, Rejeev

    2013-01-01

    departs from its specification. When we applied our method and system to analyse the vote counting algorithm used for electing the CADE Board of Trustees, we found that it strictly differs from the standard definition of Single Transferable Vote (STV). We therefore argue that “STV” is a misnomer...... for the CADE algorithm....

  17. Chlorophyll fluorescence and X-ray analyses to characterise and improve paddy rice seed quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, D.S.; Kodde, J.; Groot, S.P.C.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of less-mature seeds or seeds with cracks in a paddy rice seed lot may result in lower seed quality. The potential of chlorophyll fluorescence to provide information on the maturity of single seeds and X-ray analyses to identify seeds with cracks was evaluated in relation to paddy rice

  18. New Blood Pressure-Associated Loci Identified in Meta-Analyses of 475 000 Individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraja, Aldi T.; Cook, James P.; Warren, Helen R.; Surendran, Praveen; Liu, Chunyu; Evangelou, Evangelos; Manning, Alisa K.; Grarup, Niels; Drenos, Fotios; Sim, Xueling; Smith, Albert Vernon; Amin, Najaf; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Fava, Cristiano; Ferreira, Teresa; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Giri, Ayush; Giulianini, Franco; Grove, Megan L.; Guo, Xiuqing; Harris, Sarah E.; Have, Christian T; Havulinna, Aki S; Zhang, He; Jørgensen, Marit E; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Kooperberg, Charles; Linneberg, Allan; Little, Louis; Liu, Yongmei; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Lu, Yingchang; Mägi, Reedik; Mahajan, Anubha; Malerba, Giovanni; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Mei, Hao; Menni, Cristina; Morrison, Alanna C.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmas, Walter R.; Poveda, Alaitz; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rayner, Nigel William; Riaz, Muhammad; Rice, Ken; Richard, Melissa A; Smith, Jennifer A.; Southam, Lorraine; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Tragante, Vinicius; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Varga, Tibor V.; Weiss, Stefan; Yiorkas, Andrianos M; Young, Robin; Zhang, Weihua; Barnes, Michael R; Cabrera, Claudia P; Gao, He; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chambers, John C.; Connell, John M; Christensen, Cramer K; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Dörr, Marcus; Joehanes, Roby; Edwards, Todd L.; Esko, Tõnu; Fornage, Myriam; Franceschini, Nora; Franks, Paul W.; Gambaro, Giovanni; Groop, Leif C.; Hallmans, Göran; Hansen, Torben; Hayward, Caroline; Heikki, Oksa; Ingelsson, Erik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Karpe, Fredrik; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Lind, Lars; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Laakso, Markku; McCarthy, Mark I.; Melander, Olle; Mohlke, Karen L.; Morris, Andrew P.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pedersen, Oluf; Polasek, Ozren; Poulter, Neil R.; Province, Michael A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sever, Peter J; Skaaby, Tea; Stafford, Jeanette M; Starr, John M.; van der Harst, Pim; Van der Meer, Peter; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vergnaud, Anne Claire; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Wilson, James G.; Willer, Cristen J.; Witte, Daniel R; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Saleheen, Danish; Butterworth, Adam S.; Danesh, John; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Wain, Louise V.; Ehret, Georg B.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Elliott, Paul; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Levy, Daniel; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Munroe, Patricia B.; Howson, Joanna M M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies have recently identified >400 loci that harbor DNA sequence variants that influence blood pressure (BP). Our earlier studies identified and validated 56 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) associated with BP from meta-analyses of exome chip genotype data. An

  19. New Blood Pressure-Associated Loci Identified in Meta-Analyses of 475 000 Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraja, Aldi T; Cook, James P; Warren, Helen R

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies have recently identified >400 loci that harbor DNA sequence variants that influence blood pressure (BP). Our earlier studies identified and validated 56 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) associated with BP from meta-analyses of exome chip genotype data....

  20. Single bubble sonoluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenner, Michael P.; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef

    2002-01-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence occurs when an acoustically trapped and periodically driven gas bubble collapses so strongly that the energy focusing at collapse leads to light emission. Detailed experiments have demonstrated the unique properties of this system: the spectrum of the emitted light

  1. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Single cell metabolomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, Matthias; Zenobi, Renato

    Recent discoveries suggest that cells of a clonal population often display multiple metabolic phenotypes at the same time. Motivated by the success of mass spectrometry (MS) in the investigation of population-level metabolomics, the analytical community has initiated efforts towards MS-based single

  3. TRANSVERSITY SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOER,D.

    2001-04-27

    The theoretical aspects of two leading twist transversity single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of transversity.

  4. Single photon and nonlocality

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a paper by Home and Agarwal [1], it is claimed that quantum nonlocality can be revealed in a simple interferometry experiment using only single particles. A critical analysis of the concept of hidden variable used by the authors of [1] shows that the reasoning is not correct.

  5. Single Value Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mader, Angelika H.; Dertien, Edwin Christian; Reidsma, Dennis; Camurri, Antonio; Costa, Cristina

    We live in a world of continuous information overflow, but the quality of information and communication is suffering. Single value devices contribute to information and communication quality by focussing on one explicit, relevant piece of information. The information is decoupled from a computer and

  6. Beyond the Single Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Yekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Teachers of world literature have the opportunity to help students explore the more complex reality behind the stereotypes that they often see in the media. If we don't encourage students to challenge one-dimensional "single stories" that characterize an entire people--whether Muslims, Russians, Mexicans, African Americans, Chinese,…

  7. Single umbilical artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthi Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The umbilical cord usually contains two arteries and one vein. The vein carries the oxygenated blood from the placenta to the fetus. The arteries carry the deoxygenated blood and the waste products from the fetus to the placenta. Occasionally, primary agenesis or secondary atrophy of one of the arteries occurs resulting in single umbilical artery.

  8. Single umbilical artery

    OpenAIRE

    Shanthi Ramesh; Sangeetha Hariprasath; Gunasekaran Anandan; P John Solomon; Vijayakumar, V.

    2015-01-01

    The umbilical cord usually contains two arteries and one vein. The vein carries the oxygenated blood from the placenta to the fetus. The arteries carry the deoxygenated blood and the waste products from the fetus to the placenta. Occasionally, primary agenesis or secondary atrophy of one of the arteries occurs resulting in single umbilical artery.

  9. Single umbilical artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Shanthi; Hariprasath, Sangeetha; Anandan, Gunasekaran; Solomon, P John; Vijayakumar, V

    2015-04-01

    The umbilical cord usually contains two arteries and one vein. The vein carries the oxygenated blood from the placenta to the fetus. The arteries carry the deoxygenated blood and the waste products from the fetus to the placenta. Occasionally, primary agenesis or secondary atrophy of one of the arteries occurs resulting in single umbilical artery.

  10. Single Electrode Heat Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Broers, G. H. J.

    1977-01-01

    The heat evolution at a single irreversibly working electrode is treated onthe basis of the Brønsted heat principle. The resulting equation is analogous to the expression for the total heat evolution in a galvanic cellwith the exception that –DeltaS is substituted by the Peltier entropy, Delta...

  11. Beware the single hit!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The first time that single particle effects from cosmic rays on electronics were observed was in 1991, when one of the instruments aboard an ESA satellite broke down after only five days in space. On 5 July, the TS-LEA group will have completed the installation of monitors that will help to reduce similar dangerous effects on LHC electronics.

  12. Improving Climate Communication through Comprehensive Linguistic Analyses Using Computational Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gann, T. M.; Matlock, T.

    2014-12-01

    An important lesson on climate communication research is that there is no single way to reach out and inform the public. Different groups conceptualize climate issues in different ways and different groups have different values and assumptions. This variability makes it extremely difficult to effectively and objectively communicate climate information. One of the main challenges is the following: How do we acquire a better understanding of how values and assumptions vary across groups, including political groups? A necessary starting point is to pay close attention to the linguistic content of messages used across current popular media sources. Careful analyses of that information—including how it is realized in language for conservative and progressive media—may ultimately help climate scientists, government agency officials, journalists and others develop more effective messages. Past research has looked at partisan media coverage of climate change, but little attention has been given to the fine-grained linguistic content of such media. And when researchers have done detailed linguistic analyses, they have relied primarily on hand-coding, an approach that is costly, labor intensive, and time-consuming. Our project, building on recent work on partisan news media (Gann & Matlock, 2014; under review) uses high dimensional semantic analyses and other methods of automated classification techniques from the field of natural language processing to quantify how climate issues are characterized in media sources that differ according to political orientation. In addition to discussing varied linguistic patterns, we share new methods for improving climate communication for varied stakeholders, and for developing better assessments of their effectiveness.

  13. Stable isotopic analyses in paleoclimatic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wigand, P.E. [Univ. and Community College System of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Most traditional paleoclimatic proxy data have inherent time lags between climatic input and system response that constrain their use in accurate reconstruction of paleoclimate chronology, scaling of its variability, and the elucidation of the processes that determine its impact on the biotic and abiotic environment. With the exception of dendroclimatology, and studies of short-lived organisms and pollen recovered from annually varved lacustrine sediments, significant periods of time ranging from years, to centuries, to millennia may intervene between climate change and its first manifestation in paleoclimatic proxy data records. Reconstruction of past climate through changes in plant community composition derived from pollen sequences and plant remains from ancient woodrat middens, wet environments and dry caves all suffer from these lags. However, stable isotopic analyses can provide more immediate indication of biotic response to climate change. Evidence of past physiological response of organisms to changes in effective precipitation as climate varies can be provided by analyses of the stable isotopic content of plant macrofossils from various contexts. These analyses consider variation in the stable isotopic (hydrogen, oxygen and carbon) content of plant tissues as it reflects (1) past global or local temperature through changes in meteoric (rainfall) water chemistry in the case of the first two isotopes, and (2) plant stress through changes in plant respiration/transpiration processes under differing water availability, and varying atmospheric CO, composition (which itself may actually be a net result of biotic response to climate change). Studies currently being conducted in the Intermountain West indicate both long- and short-term responses that when calibrated with modem analogue studies have the potential of revealing not only the timing of climate events, but their direction, magnitude and rapidity.

  14. Modelling and Analysing Socio-Technical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslanyan, Zaruhi; Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Nielson, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    and assessing attacks. In our work we model all relevant levels of socio-technical systems, and propose evaluation techniques for analysing the security properties of the model. Our approach simplifies the identification of possible attacks and provides qualified assessment and ranking of attacks based...... on the expected impact. We demonstrate our approach on a home-payment system. The system is specifically designed to help elderly or disabled people, who may have difficulties leaving their home, to pay for some services, e.g., care-taking or rent. The payment is performed using the remote control of a television...

  15. Deux perspectives pour analyser les relations professionnelles

    OpenAIRE

    Dunlop, John T.; Whyte, William F.; Mias, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cet article est la traduction d’un article paru dans la revue Industrial and Labor Relations Review, qui fait suite à un débat organisé à l’université de Princeton au début de l’année 1949, entre William Foote Whyte (1914-2000) et John Thomas Dunlop (1914-2003) à propos du cadre d’analyse des relations professionnelles (Industrial Relations), qui font alors l’objet de recherches de plus en plus nombreuses aux Etats-Unis. Cette controverse entre l’un des chefs de file du mouvement des “relatio...

  16. Externalizing Behaviour for Analysing System Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, René Rydhof

    2013-01-01

    , if not impossible task to change behaviours. Especially when considering social engineering or the human factor in general, the ability to use different kinds of behaviours is essential. In this work we present an approach to make the behaviour a separate component in system models, and explore how to integrate...... attackers. Therefore, many attacks are considerably easier to be performed for insiders than for outsiders. However, current models do not support explicit specification of different behaviours. Instead, behaviour is deeply embedded in the analyses supported by the models, meaning that it is a complex...

  17. Analysing human genomes at different scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Siyang

    genotypes in the Danish Genetics of Overweight Young Adults (GOYA) obesity cohort and prove the clinical usage of the Danish reference panel in genomewide association studies. In the second project, we have collected ultra-low depth sequencing data of more than 140, 000 Chinese pregnant women. We developed...... and applied novel methods to analysing the data that are accumulating rapidly and now reach millions of sample scale. We show that we are able to discover mutations with allele frequencies down to around 0.2% and to explore fine-scale population structure and ancestry across the 31 administrative divisions...

  18. Visuelle Analyse von Eye-Tracking-Daten

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xuemei

    2011-01-01

    Eye-Tracking ist eine der am häufigsten eingesetzten Techniken zur Analyse der Mensch-Computer-Interaktion sowie zur Untersuchung der Perzeption. Die erfassten Eye-Tracking-Daten werden meist mit Heat-Maps oder Scan-Paths analysiert, um die Usability der getesteten Anwendung zu ermitteln oder auf höhere kognitive Prozesse zu schließen. Das Ziel dieser Diplomarbeit ist die Entwicklung neuer Visualisierungstechniken für Eye-Tracking-Daten beziehungsweise die Entwicklung eines Studienkonzepts...

  19. En analyse av Yoga-kundalini-upanisad

    OpenAIRE

    Martinsen, Fred

    2006-01-01

    Avhandlingen En analyse av Yoga-kundalini-upanisad bygger på den indiske asketen Narayanaswamy Aiyers engelske oversettelse av Yoga-kundalini-upanisad, utgitt i Thirty Minor Upanisad-s, Including the Yoga Upanisad-s (Oklahoma, Santarasa Publications, 1980). Denne hinduistiske teksten er omtalt som en av de 21 yoga-upanishadene, den åttisjette av de 108 klassiske upanishadene, og utgjør en del av tekstkorpuset Krsna-Yajurveda. Teksten fungerer som en manual i øvelser fra disiplinene hathayoga,...

  20. 75 FR 9247 - Single Family Mortgage Insurance Premium, Single Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Single Family Mortgage Insurance Premium, Single Family AGENCY: Office of the Chief... the Single Family Premium Collection Subsystem-Upfront (SFPCS-U) to remit the upfront premium to... manage and process upfront single family mortgage insurance premium collections and corrections to submit...

  1. Secondary bending effects in progressively damaged single-lap, single-bolt composite joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Libin; Xin, An; Liu, Fengrui; Zhang, Jianyu; Hu, Ning

    Static tensile experiments and progressive failure simulations of single-bolt, single- and double-lap joints were carried out to comparatively investigate secondary bending effects, which present significant eccentric-loading phenomena in single-lap joints but are almost non-existent in symmetric double-lap joints. Progressive damage models of single-lap and double-lap joints were established, from which the numerical predictions were found to be in good agreement with the experimental outcomes. Experimental macro-scope failure patterns and seven numerical micro-scope failure modes obtained from the progressive damage analyses were presented for the two types of joints. The effects of secondary bending on the mechanical degradation and failure mechanism of single-lap joints were revealed. Some characterizations of secondary bending in the joints, such as a characterized parameter on the AGARD points, joint deformations and contact states, were quantitatively traced during the total progressive damage process. All these characterizations increased the understanding of the effects of secondary bending on the failure process of a single-bolt, single-lap joint.

  2. Physicochemical characterisation of rVIII-SingleChain, a novel recombinant single-chain factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidbauer, Stefan; Witzel, Reinhild; Robbel, Lars; Sebastian, Petra; Grammel, Nicolas; Metzner, Hubert J; Schulte, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    rVIII-SingleChain is a novel recombinant single-chain factor VIII (FVIII) construct, comprising covalently bonded heavy and light chains. Post-translational modifications of FVIII affect physicochemical parameters, including hydrophobicity and charge. The most relevant post-translational modifications of FVIII products are N-glycosylation of asparagine residues and tyrosine sulphations. Here, the physicochemical properties, thrombin cleavage products and post-translational modifications of rVIII-SingleChain were investigated and compared against commercially available recombinant FVIII (rFVIII) products with a predominant two-chain structure (B-domain deleted rFVIII and full-length rFVIII). rVIII-SingleChain was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and purified by chromatographic methods. Physicochemical properties of rVIII-SingleChain or thrombin-derived cleavage products were assessed using size-exclusion chromatography, reversed-phase chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Analysis of the respective carbohydrate structures was performed after release of N-glycans by PNGase F followed by fluorescence labelling and high-performance liquid chromatography. Proteolysis by trypsin generated the corresponding peptides, which were analysed for sulphated tyrosines by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation time of flight-mass spectrometry. rVIII-SingleChain was shown to be of high purity and homogeneity, and presented a well-defined single-chain molecule with predominant β-sheet conformation. The coagulation-relevant thrombin-activation products of rVIII-SingleChain were comparable with those obtained by activation of commercially available rFVIII products. rVIII-SingleChain post-translational modifications were similar to other CHO cell-derived rFVIII products for N-glycopattern and tyrosine sulphation. In conclusion, rVIII-SingleChain is of high homogeneity and purity, and provides an expected cleavage pattern on

  3. Fractal and multifractal analyses of bipartite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jian; Yu, Zu-Guo; Xie, Xian-Hua

    2017-03-01

    Bipartite networks have attracted considerable interest in various fields. Fractality and multifractality of unipartite (classical) networks have been studied in recent years, but there is no work to study these properties of bipartite networks. In this paper, we try to unfold the self-similarity structure of bipartite networks by performing the fractal and multifractal analyses for a variety of real-world bipartite network data sets and models. First, we find the fractality in some bipartite networks, including the CiteULike, Netflix, MovieLens (ml-20m), Delicious data sets and (u, v)-flower model. Meanwhile, we observe the shifted power-law or exponential behavior in other several networks. We then focus on the multifractal properties of bipartite networks. Our results indicate that the multifractality exists in those bipartite networks possessing fractality. To capture the inherent attribute of bipartite network with two types different nodes, we give the different weights for the nodes of different classes, and show the existence of multifractality in these node-weighted bipartite networks. In addition, for the data sets with ratings, we modify the two existing algorithms for fractal and multifractal analyses of edge-weighted unipartite networks to study the self-similarity of the corresponding edge-weighted bipartite networks. The results show that our modified algorithms are feasible and can effectively uncover the self-similarity structure of these edge-weighted bipartite networks and their corresponding node-weighted versions.

  4. Hitchhikers’ guide to analysing bird ringing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harnos Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bird ringing datasets constitute possibly the largest source of temporal and spatial information on vertebrate taxa available on the globe. Initially, the method was invented to understand avian migration patterns. However, data deriving from bird ringing has been used in an array of other disciplines including population monitoring, changes in demography, conservation management and to study the effects of climate change to name a few. Despite the widespread usage and importance, there are no guidelines available specifically describing the practice of data management, preparation and analyses of ringing datasets. Here, we present the first of a series of comprehensive tutorials that may help fill this gap. We describe in detail and through a real-life example the intricacies of data cleaning and how to create a data table ready for analyses from raw ringing data in the R software environment. Moreover, we created and present here the R package; ringR, designed to carry out various specific tasks and plots related to bird ringing data. Most methods described here can also be applied to a wide range of capture-recapture type data based on individual marking, regardless to taxa or research question.

  5. Autisme et douleur – analyse bibliographique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Amandine; Rattaz, Cécile; Pry, René; Baghdadli, Amaria

    2010-01-01

    La présente analyse bibliographique a pour objectif de réaliser un bilan des travaux publiés dans le champ de la douleur et de l’autisme. L’article aborde, dans un premier temps, les études publiées concernant les modes d’expression de la douleur observés dans cette population. Différentes hypothèses permettant d’expliquer les particularités expressives des personnes avec autisme sont ensuite passées en revue : excès d’endorphines, particularités dans le traitement sensoriel, déficit sociocommunicatif. Cette analyse bibliographique aborde, pour terminer, la question de l’évaluation et de la prise en compte de la douleur chez les personnes avec autisme. Les auteurs concluent à l’absence d’homogénéité des résultats des études publiées et au besoin de poursuivre les recherches afin de parvenir à des données consensuelles sur un domaine d’étude encore peu exploité au plan scientifique. Sur un plan clinique, l’approfondissement des connaissances dans ce domaine devrait permettre de mettre au point des outils d’évaluation de la douleur et d’ainsi en assurer une meilleure prise en charge au quotidien. PMID:20808970

  6. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion damage that has been found in a number of nuclear power plant containment structures can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. This has prompted concerns regarding the capacity of corroded containments to withstand accident loadings. To address these concerns, finite element analyses have been performed for a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment structure. Using ABAQUS, the pressure capacity was calculated for a typical vessel with no corrosion damage. Multiple analyses were then performed with the location of the corrosion and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis. Using a strain-based failure criterion, a {open_quotes}lower bound{close_quotes}, {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes}, and {open_quotes}upper bound{close_quotes} failure level was predicted for each case. These limits were established by: determining the amount of variability that exists in material properties of typical containments, estimating the amount of uncertainty associated with the level of modeling detail and modeling assumptions, and estimating the effect of corrosion on the material properties.

  7. CHEMICAL ANALYSES OF SODIUM SYSTEMS FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, W. O.; Yunker, W. H.; Scott, F. A.

    1970-06-01

    BNWL-1407 summarizes information gained from the Chemical Analyses of Sodium Systems Program pursued by Battelle- Northwest over the period from July 1967 through June 1969. Tasks included feasibility studies for performing coulometric titration and polarographic determinations of oxygen in sodium, and the development of new separation techniques for sodium impurities and their subsequent analyses. The program was terminated ahead of schedule so firm conclusions were not obtained in all areas of the work. At least 40 coulometric titrations were carried out and special test cells were developed for coulometric application. Data indicated that polarographic measurements are theoretically feasible, but practical application of the method was not verified. An emission spectrographic procedure for trace metal impurities was developed and published. Trace metal analysis by a neutron activation technique was shown to be feasible; key to the success of the activation technique was the application of a new ion exchange resin which provided a sodium separation factor of 10{sup 11}. Preliminary studies on direct scavenging of trace metals produced no conclusive results.

  8. Waste Stream Analyses for Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. R. Soelberg

    2010-08-01

    A high-level study was performed in Fiscal Year 2009 for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) to provide information for a range of nuclear fuel cycle options (Wigeland 2009). At that time, some fuel cycle options could not be adequately evaluated since they were not well defined and lacked sufficient information. As a result, five families of these fuel cycle options are being studied during Fiscal Year 2010 by the Systems Analysis Campaign for the DOE NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program. The quality and completeness of data available to date for the fuel cycle options is insufficient to perform quantitative radioactive waste analyses using recommended metrics. This study has been limited thus far to qualitative analyses of waste streams from the candidate fuel cycle options, because quantitative data for wastes from the front end, fuel fabrication, reactor core structure, and used fuel for these options is generally not yet available.

  9. Analyser Framework to Verify Software Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Andreas Rasenack

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, it is important for software companies to build software systems in a short time-interval, to reduce costs and to have a good market position. Therefore well organized and systematic development approaches are required. Reusing software components, which are well tested, can be a good solution to develop software applications in effective manner. The reuse of software components is less expensive and less time consuming than a development from scratch. But it is dangerous to think that software components can be match together without any problems. Software components itself are well tested, of course, but even if they composed together problems occur. Most problems are based on interaction respectively communication. Avoiding such errors a framework has to be developed for analysing software components. That framework determines the compatibility of corresponding software components. The promising approach discussed here, presents a novel technique for analysing software components by applying an Abstract Syntax Language Tree (ASLT. A supportive environment will be designed that checks the compatibility of black-box software components. This article is concerned to the question how can be coupled software components verified by using an analyzer framework and determines the usage of the ASLT. Black-box Software Components and Abstract Syntax Language Tree are the basis for developing the proposed framework and are discussed here to provide the background knowledge. The practical implementation of this framework is discussed and shows the result by using a test environment.

  10. Sensitivity in risk analyses with uncertain numbers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, W. Troy; Ferson, Scott

    2006-06-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a study of how changes in the inputs to a model influence the results of the model. Many techniques have recently been proposed for use when the model is probabilistic. This report considers the related problem of sensitivity analysis when the model includes uncertain numbers that can involve both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty and the method of calculation is Dempster-Shafer evidence theory or probability bounds analysis. Some traditional methods for sensitivity analysis generalize directly for use with uncertain numbers, but, in some respects, sensitivity analysis for these analyses differs from traditional deterministic or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. A case study of a dike reliability assessment illustrates several methods of sensitivity analysis, including traditional probabilistic assessment, local derivatives, and a ''pinching'' strategy that hypothetically reduces the epistemic uncertainty or aleatory uncertainty, or both, in an input variable to estimate the reduction of uncertainty in the outputs. The prospects for applying the methods to black box models are also considered.

  11. Bioinformatics tools for analysing viral genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, R J; Gu, Q; Hughes, J; Maabar, M; Modha, S; Vattipally, S B; Wilkie, G S; Davison, A J

    2016-04-01

    The field of viral genomics and bioinformatics is experiencing a strong resurgence due to high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technology, which enables the rapid and cost-effective sequencing and subsequent assembly of large numbers of viral genomes. In addition, the unprecedented power of HTS technologies has enabled the analysis of intra-host viral diversity and quasispecies dynamics in relation to important biological questions on viral transmission, vaccine resistance and host jumping. HTS also enables the rapid identification of both known and potentially new viruses from field and clinical samples, thus adding new tools to the fields of viral discovery and metagenomics. Bioinformatics has been central to the rise of HTS applications because new algorithms and software tools are continually needed to process and analyse the large, complex datasets generated in this rapidly evolving area. In this paper, the authors give a brief overview of the main bioinformatics tools available for viral genomic research, with a particular emphasis on HTS technologies and their main applications. They summarise the major steps in various HTS analyses, starting with quality control of raw reads and encompassing activities ranging from consensus and de novo genome assembly to variant calling and metagenomics, as well as RNA sequencing.

  12. Single frequency semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Zujie; Chen, Gaoting; Qu, Ronghui

    2017-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the single frequency semiconductor laser, which is widely used in many vital advanced technologies, such as the laser cooling of atoms and atomic clock, high-precision measurements and spectroscopy, coherent optical communications, and advanced optical sensors. It presents both the fundamentals and characteristics of semiconductor lasers, including basic F-P structure and monolithic integrated structures; interprets laser noises and their measurements; and explains mechanisms and technologies relating to the main aspects of single frequency lasers, including external cavity lasers, frequency stabilization technologies, frequency sweeping, optical phase locked loops, and so on. It paints a clear, physical picture of related technologies and reviews new developments in the field as well. It will be a useful reference to graduate students, researchers, and engineers in the field.

  13. Watching single molecules dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  14. Single Bunch Monopole Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podobedov, B.; Heifets, S.; /SLAC

    2005-09-12

    We study single bunch stability with respect to monopole longitudinal oscillations in electron storage rings. Our analysis is different from the standard approach based on the linearized Vlasov equation. Rather, we reduce the full nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation to a Schroedinger-like equation which is subsequently analyzed by perturbation theory. We show that the Haissinski solution [3] may become unstable with respect to monopole oscillations and derive a stability criterion in terms of the ring impedance.

  15. Single port access adrenalectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, Sean A; Curcillo, Paul G; Ginsberg, Phillip C; Saba, Salim C; Jaffe, Jamison S; Harmon, Justin D

    2008-08-01

    To report the first single port access (SPA) adrenalectomy to minimize patient discomfort through a less invasive procedure. We performed the first SPA in a 63-year-old, otherwise healthy Caucasian female who had a 4.5-cm left adrenal mass that was incidentally discovered on computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis. Through a 2-cm single longitudinal supraumbilical incision extended down to the abdominal fascia, three 5-mm ports were placed through separate facial entry points, to make a triangular port arrangement. The adrenal vein was identified and ligated using hemoclips. The remainder of the dissection was done using hemocoagulation. The adrenal gland was extracted via an EndoCatch bag device by removing one 5-mm port and upsizing to a 12-mm port. We report on the first SPA adrenalectomy. Although this technology is still in its infancy, the use of a single port for surgery provides a means to provide a potentially better patient outcome with a less invasive procedure.

  16. Uniform Single Valued Neutrosophic Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Broumi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new concept named the uniform single valued neutrosophic graph. An illustrative example and some properties are examined. Next, we develop an algorithmic approach for computing the complement of the single valued neutrosophic graph. A numerical example is demonstrated for computing the complement of single valued neutrosophic graphs and uniform single valued neutrosophic graph.

  17. Pathway analyses implicate glial cells in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laramie E Duncan

    Full Text Available The quest to understand the neurobiology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is ongoing with multiple lines of evidence indicating abnormalities of glia, mitochondria, and glutamate in both disorders. Despite high heritability estimates of 81% for schizophrenia and 75% for bipolar disorder, compelling links between findings from neurobiological studies, and findings from large-scale genetic analyses, are only beginning to emerge.Ten publically available gene sets (pathways related to glia, mitochondria, and glutamate were tested for association to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using MAGENTA as the primary analysis method. To determine the robustness of associations, secondary analyses were performed with: ALIGATOR, INRICH, and Set Screen. Data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC were used for all analyses. There were 1,068,286 SNP-level p-values for schizophrenia (9,394 cases/12,462 controls, and 2,088,878 SNP-level p-values for bipolar disorder (7,481 cases/9,250 controls.The Glia-Oligodendrocyte pathway was associated with schizophrenia, after correction for multiple tests, according to primary analysis (MAGENTA p = 0.0005, 75% requirement for individual gene significance and also achieved nominal levels of significance with INRICH (p = 0.0057 and ALIGATOR (p = 0.022. For bipolar disorder, Set Screen yielded nominally and method-wide significant associations to all three glial pathways, with strongest association to the Glia-Astrocyte pathway (p = 0.002.Consistent with findings of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia by other methods of study, the Glia-Oligodendrocyte pathway was associated with schizophrenia in our genomic study. These findings suggest that the abnormalities of myelination observed in schizophrenia are at least in part due to inherited factors, contrasted with the alternative of purely environmental causes (e.g. medication effects or lifestyle. While not the primary purpose of our study

  18. Power Spectrum Analyses of Nuclear Decay Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Javorsek, D; Lasenby, R N; Lasenby, A N; Buncher, J B; Fischbach, E; Gruenwald, J T; Hoft, A W; Horan, T J; Jenkins, J H; Kerford, J L; Lee, R H; Longman, A; Mattes, J J; Morreale, B L; Morris, D B; Mudry, R N; Newport, J R; O'Keefe, D; Petrelli, M A; Silver, M A; Stewart, C A; Terry, B; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2010.06.011

    2010-01-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: 32Si and 36Cl decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. All three data sets exhibit the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additional spectral comparisons of the data to local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and their reciprocals were performed. No common phases were found between the factors investigated and those exhibited by the nuclear decay data. This suggests that either a combination of factors was responsible, or that, if it was a single factor, its effects on the decay rate experiments are n...

  19. Department of Energy's team's analyses of Soviet designed VVERs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-09-01

    This document provides Appendices A thru K of this report. The topics discussed respectively are: radiation induced embrittlement and annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels; loss of coolant accident blowdown analyses; LOCA blowdown response analyses; non-seismic structural response analyses; seismic analyses; S'' seal integrity; reactor transient analyses; fire protection; aircraft impacts; and boric acid induced corrosion. (FI).

  20. Mediation Analyses in the Real World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Theis; Starkopf, Liis

    2016-01-01

    -code in their publications, thereby shortening the road from reading their paper to employing the considered methods on one’s own data. In this commentary, we will try to follow up on these developments by providing a snapshot of how applied mediation analysis was actually conducted in 2015. While we do not expect to find...... it simultaneously ensures that the comparison is based on properties, which matter in actual applications, and makes the comparison accessible for a broader audience. In a wider context, the choice to stay close to real-life problems mirrors a general trend within the literature on mediation analysis namely to put...... applications using the inverse odds ration approach, as it simply has not had enough time to move from theoretical concept to published applied paper, we do expect to be able to judge the willingness of authors and journals to employ the causal inference-based approach to mediation analyses. Our hope...