WorldWideScience

Sample records for single transistor synapses

  1. Nanogranular SiO{sub 2} proton gated silicon layer transistor mimicking biological synapses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, M. J.; Huang, G. S., E-mail: gshuang@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: pfeng@nju.edu.cn; Guo, Q. L.; Tian, Z. A.; Li, G. J.; Mei, Y. F. [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Feng, P., E-mail: gshuang@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: pfeng@nju.edu.cn; Shao, F.; Wan, Q. [School of Electronic Science and Engineering and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-06-20

    Silicon on insulator (SOI)-based transistors gated by nanogranular SiO{sub 2} proton conducting electrolytes were fabricated to mimic synapse behaviors. This SOI-based device has both top proton gate and bottom buried oxide gate. Electrical transfer properties of top proton gate show hysteresis curves different from those of bottom gate, and therefore, excitatory post-synaptic current and paired pulse facilitation (PPF) behavior of biological synapses are mimicked. Moreover, we noticed that PPF index can be effectively tuned by the spike interval applied on the top proton gate. Synaptic behaviors and functions, like short-term memory, and its properties are also experimentally demonstrated in our device. Such SOI-based electronic synapses are promising for building neuromorphic systems.

  2. Nanogranular SiO2 proton gated silicon layer transistor mimicking biological synapses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, M. J.; Huang, G. S.; Guo, Q. L.; Tian, Z. A.; Li, G. J.; Mei, Y. F.; Feng, P.; Shao, F.; Wan, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon on insulator (SOI)-based transistors gated by nanogranular SiO 2 proton conducting electrolytes were fabricated to mimic synapse behaviors. This SOI-based device has both top proton gate and bottom buried oxide gate. Electrical transfer properties of top proton gate show hysteresis curves different from those of bottom gate, and therefore, excitatory post-synaptic current and paired pulse facilitation (PPF) behavior of biological synapses are mimicked. Moreover, we noticed that PPF index can be effectively tuned by the spike interval applied on the top proton gate. Synaptic behaviors and functions, like short-term memory, and its properties are also experimentally demonstrated in our device. Such SOI-based electronic synapses are promising for building neuromorphic systems.

  3. Artificial Synapses Based on in-Plane Gate Organic Electrochemical Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chuan; Sun, Jia; Kong, Ling-An; Gou, Guangyang; Yang, Junliang; He, Jun; Gao, Yongli; Wan, Qing

    2016-10-05

    Realization of biological synapses using electronic devices is regarded as the basic building blocks for neuromorphic engineering and artificial neural network. With the advantages of biocompatibility, low cost, flexibility, and compatible with printing and roll-to-roll processes, the artificial synapse based on organic transistor is of great interest. In this paper, the artificial synapse simulation by ion-gel gated organic field-effect transistors (FETs) with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) active channel is demonstrated. Key features of the synaptic behaviors, such as paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), short-term plasticity (STP), self-tuning, the spike logic operation, spatiotemporal dentritic integration, and modulation are successfully mimicked. Furthermore, the interface doping processes of electrolyte ions between the active P3HT layer and ion gels is comprehensively studied for confirming the operating processes underlying the conductivity and excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) variations in the organic synaptic devices. This study represents an important step toward building future artificial neuromorphic systems with newly emerged ion gel gated organic synaptic devices.

  4. Single-transistor-clocked flip-flop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Peiyi; Darwish, Tarek; Bayoumi, Magdy

    2005-08-30

    The invention provides a low power, high performance flip-flop. The flip-flop uses only one clocked transistor. The single clocked transistor is shared by the first and second branches of the device. A pulse generator produces a clock pulse to trigger the flip-flop. In one preferred embodiment the device can be made as a static explicit pulsed flip-flop which employs only two clocked transistors.

  5. A 2-transistor/1-resistor artificial synapse capable of communication and stochastic learning in neuromorphic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongqiang; Ambrogio, Stefano; Balatti, Simone; Ielmini, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Resistive (or memristive) switching devices based on metal oxides find applications in memory, logic and neuromorphic computing systems. Their small area, low power operation, and high functionality meet the challenges of brain-inspired computing aiming at achieving a huge density of active connections (synapses) with low operation power. This work presents a new artificial synapse scheme, consisting of a memristive switch connected to 2 transistors responsible for gating the communication and learning operations. Spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is achieved through appropriate shaping of the pre-synaptic and the post synaptic spikes. Experiments with integrated artificial synapses demonstrate STDP with stochastic behavior due to (i) the natural variability of set/reset processes in the nanoscale switch, and (ii) the different response of the switch to a given stimulus depending on the initial state. Experimental results are confirmed by model-based simulations of the memristive switching. Finally, system-level simulations of a 2-layer neural network and a simplified STDP model show random learning and recognition of patterns.

  6. Scaling Beyond Moore: Single Electron Transistor and Single Atom Transistor Integration on CMOS

    OpenAIRE

    Deshpande , Veeresh

    2012-01-01

    Continuous scaling of MOSFET dimensions has led us to the era of nanoelectronics. Multigate FET (MuGFET) architecture with 'nanowire channel'is being considered as one feasible enabler of MOSFET scaling to end-of-roadmap. Alongside classical CMOS or Moore's law scaling, many novel device proposals exploiting nanoscale phenomena have been made. Single Electron Transistor (SET), with its unique 'Coulomb Blockade' phenomena, and Single Atom Transistor (SAT), as an ultimately scaled transistor, a...

  7. Artificial neuron synapse transistor based on silicon nanomembrane on plastic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minjie; Huang, Gaoshan; Feng, Ping; Guo, Qinglei; Shao, Feng; Tian, Ziao; Li, Gongjin; Wan, Qing; Mei, Yongfeng

    2017-06-01

    Silicon nanomembrane (SiNM) transistors gated by chitosan membrane were fabricated on plastic substrate to mimic synapse behaviors. The device has both a bottom proton gate (BG) and multiple side gates (SG). Electrical transfer properties of BG show hysteresis curves different from those of typical SiO2 gate dielectric. Synaptic behaviors and functions by linear accumulation and release of protons have been mimicked on this device: excitatory post-synaptic current (EPSC) and paired pulse facilitation behavior of biological synapses were mimicked and the paired-pulse facilitation index could be effectively tuned by the spike interval applied on the BG. Synaptic behaviors and functions, including short-term memory and long-term memory, were also experimentally demonstrated in BG mode. Meanwhile, spiking logic operation and logic modulation were realized in SG mode. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51322201), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (No. 20120071110025), and Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (No. 14JC1400200).

  8. Single-dopant resonance in a single-electron transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Golovach, V. N.; Jehl, X.; Houzet, M.; Pierre, M.; Roche, B.; Sanquer, M.; Glazman, L. I.

    2011-01-01

    Single dopants in semiconductor nanostructures have been studied in great details recently as they are good candidates for quantum bits, provided they are coupled to a detector. Here we report coupling of a single As donor atom to a single-electron transistor (SET) in a silicon nanowire field-effect transistor. Both capacitive and tunnel coupling are achieved, the latter resulting in a dramatic increase of the conductance through the SET, by up to one order of magnitude. The experimental resu...

  9. Single-dopant resonance in a single-electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovach, V. N.; Jehl, X.; Houzet, M.; Pierre, M.; Roche, B.; Sanquer, M.; Glazman, L. I.

    2011-02-01

    Single dopants in semiconductor nanostructures have been studied in great detail recently as they are good candidates for quantum bits, provided they are coupled to a detector. Here we report the coupling of a single As donor atom to a single-electron transistor (SET) in a silicon nanowire field-effect transistor. Both capacitive and tunnel coupling are achieved, the latter resulting in a dramatic increase of the conductance through the SET, by up to one order of magnitude. The experimental results are well explained by the rate-equation theory developed in parallel with the experiment.

  10. Light Emitting Transistors of Organic Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2009-03-01

    Organic light emitting transistors (OLETs) are attracting considerable interest as a novel function of organic field effect transistors (OFETs). Besides a smallest integration of light source and current switching devices, OLETs offer a new opportunity in the fundamental research on organic light emitting devices. The OLET device structure allows us to use organic single crystals, in contrast to the organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), the research of which have been conducted predominantly on polycrystalline or amorphous thin films. In the case of OFETs, use of single crystals have produced a significant amount of benefits in the studies of pursuit for the highest performance limit of FETs, intrinsic transport mechanism in organic semiconductors, and application of the single crystal transistors. The study on OLETs have been made predominantly on polycrystalline films or multicomponent heterojunctions, and single crystal study is still limited to tetracene [1] and rubrene [2], which are materials with relatively high mobility, but with low photoluminescence efficiency. In this paper, we report fabrication of single crystal OLETs of several kinds of highly luminescent molecules, emitting colorful light, ranging from blue to red. Our strategy is single crystallization of monomeric or oligomeric molecules, which are known to have a very high photoluminescence efficiency. Here we report the result on single crystal LETs of rubrene (red), 4,4'-bis(diphenylvinylenyl)-anthracene (green), 1,4-bis(5-phenylthiophene-2-yl)benzene (AC5) (green), and 1,3,6,8-tetraphenylpyrene (TPPy) (blue), all of which displayed ambipolar transport as well as peculiar movement of voltage controlled movement of recombination zone, not only from the surface of the crystal but also from the edges of the crystals, indicting light confinement inside the crystal. Realization of ambipolar OLET with variety of single crystals indicates that the fabrication method is quite versatile to various light

  11. Single electron transistor in pure silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Binhui

    As promising candidates for spin qubits, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have attracted tremendous research efforts. Currently most advanced progress is from GaAs QDs. Compared to GaAs, lateral QDs in 28silicon are expected to have a spin coherence time orders of magnitude longer, because 28Si has zero nuclear spin, and there is no hyperfine interaction between electron spins and nuclear spins. We have developed enhancement mode metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) single electron transistors (SETs) using pure silicon wafers with a bi-layer gated configuration. In an MOS-SET, the top gate is used to induce a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), just as in an MOS field effect transistor. The side gates deplete the 2DEG into a QD and two point contact channels; one connects the QD to the source reservoir, and the other connects the QD to the drain reservoir. We have systematically investigated the MOS-SETs at 4.2 K, and separately in a dilution refrigerator with a base temperature of 10 mK. The data show that there is an intrinsic QD in each point contact channel due to the local potential fluctuations in these SETs. However, after scaling down the SETs, we have found that the intrinsic QDs can be removed and the electrostatically defined dots dominate the device behavior, but these devices currently only work in the many-electron regime. In order to realize single electron confinement, it is necessary to continue scaling down the device and improving the interface quality. To explore the spin dynamics in silicon, we have investigated a single intrinsic QD by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the sample surface. The magnetic field dependence of the ground-state and excited-state energy levels of the QD mostly can be explained by the Zeeman effect, with no obvious orbital effect up to 9 T. The two-electron singlet-triplet (ST) transition is first time directly observed in a silicon QD by excitation spectroscopy. In this ST transition, electron-electron Coulomb

  12. Asymmetric tunable tunneling magnetoresistance in single-electron transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Pirmann, M; Schön, G

    2000-01-01

    We show that the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of a ferromagnetic single-electron transistor in the sequential tunneling regime shows asymmetric Coulomb blockade oscillations as a function of gate voltage if the individual junction-TMRs differ. The relative amplitude of these oscillations grows significantly if the bias voltage is increased, becoming as large as 30% when the bias voltage is comparable to the charging energy of the single-electron transistor. This might be useful for potential applications requiring a tunable TMR.

  13. Freestanding Artificial Synapses Based on Laterally Proton-Coupled Transistors on Chitosan Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang Hui; Zhu, Li Qiang; Feng, Ping; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2015-10-07

    Freestanding synaptic transistors are fabricated on solution-processed chitosan membranes. A short-term memory to long-term memory transition is observed due to proton-related electrochemical doping under repeated pulse stimulus. Moreover, freestanding artificial synaptic devices with multiple presynaptic inputs are investigated, and spiking logic operation and logic modulation are realized. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Single- and double-island ferromagnetic single-electron transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnas, J.; Weymann, I.; Wisniewska, J.; Kowalik, M.; Kunert, H.W.

    2006-01-01

    Electronic transport in a ferromagnetic single-electron transistor has been considered theoretically in the sequential tunneling regime. The device consists of two external leads and one or two islands as the central part, connected to the leads by tunneling barriers. External gates are additionally attached to the islands. Generally, the two external electrodes and the islands can be ferromagnetic with arbitrary orientation of the corresponding magnetic moments. We have carried out detailed theoretical analysis of the current-voltage characteristics and spin-valve magnetoresistance in the limit of fast spin relaxation on the islands. Asymmetry in tunneling probabilities of spin-majority and spin-minority electrons leads to interesting features in the transport characteristics, like for instance magnetoresistance oscillations with the bias and gate voltages, negative differential resistance, and others

  15. Single-molecule probes in organic field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolet, Aurélien Armel Louis

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to study charge transport phenomena in organic materials. This is done optically by means of single-molecule spectroscopy in a field-effect transistor based on a molecular crystal. We present (in Chapter 2) a fundamental requirement for single-molecule spectroscopy

  16. Novel Spiking Neuron-Astrocyte Networks based on nonlinear transistor-like models of tripartite synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Gaetano; Tedesco, Luciano; Lanata, Antonio; De Rossi, Danilo; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a novel and efficient computational implementation of a Spiking Neuron-Astrocyte Network (SNAN) is reported. Neurons are modeled according to the Izhikevich formulation and the neuron-astrocyte interactions are intended as tripartite synapsis and modeled with the previously proposed nonlinear transistor-like model. Concerning the learning rules, the original spike-timing dependent plasticity is used for the neural part of the SNAN whereas an ad-hoc rule is proposed for the astrocyte part. SNAN performances are compared with a standard spiking neural network (SNN) and evaluated using the polychronization concept, i.e., number of co-existing groups that spontaneously generate patterns of polychronous activity. The astrocyte-neuron ratio is the biologically inspired value of 1.5. The proposed SNAN shows higher number of polychronous groups than SNN, remarkably achieved for the whole duration of simulation (24 hours).

  17. Transistors-From Point Contact to Single Electron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 12. Transistors – From Point Contact to Single Electron. D N Bose. General Article Volume 2 Issue 12 December 1997 pp 39-54. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/12/0039-0054 ...

  18. Metal-nanoparticle single-electron transistors fabricated using electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolotin, K I; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Pasupathy, A N

    2004-01-01

    We have fabricated single-electron transistors from individual metal nanoparticles using a geometry that provides improved coupling between the particle and the gate electrode. This is accomplished by incorporating a nanoparticle into a gap created between two electrodes using electromigration, all...

  19. Low-frequency noise in single electron tunneling transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavkhelidze, A.N.; Mygind, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    The noise in current biased aluminium single electron tunneling (SET) transistors has been investigated in the frequency range of 5 mHz shielding including resistive coaxial lines, that prevents spurious electromagnetic radiation and especially high energy......, we find the same input charge noise, typically QN = 5 × 10–4 e/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz, with and without the HF shielding. At lower frequencies, the noise is due to charge trapping, and the voltage noise pattern superimposed on the V(Vg) curve (voltage across transistor versus gate voltage) strongly depends...

  20. Reconfigurable Boolean logic using magnetic single-electron transistors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fernando Gonzalez-Zalba

    Full Text Available We propose a novel hybrid single-electron device for reprogrammable low-power logic operations, the magnetic single-electron transistor (MSET. The device consists of an aluminium single-electron transistor with a GaMnAs magnetic back-gate. Changing between different logic gate functions is realized by reorienting the magnetic moments of the magnetic layer, which induces a voltage shift on the Coulomb blockade oscillations of the MSET. We show that we can arbitrarily reprogram the function of the device from an n-type SET for in-plane magnetization of the GaMnAs layer to p-type SET for out-of-plane magnetization orientation. Moreover, we demonstrate a set of reprogrammable Boolean gates and its logical complement at the single device level. Finally, we propose two sets of reconfigurable binary gates using combinations of two MSETs in a pull-down network.

  1. Reconfigurable Boolean Logic Using Magnetic Single-Electron Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Zalba, M. Fernando; Ciccarelli, Chiara; Zarbo, Liviu P.; Irvine, Andrew C.; Campion, Richard C.; Gallagher, Bryan L.; Jungwirth, Tomas; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Wunderlich, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel hybrid single-electron device for reprogrammable low-power logic operations, the magnetic single-electron transistor (MSET). The device consists of an aluminium single-electron transistor with a GaMnAs magnetic back-gate. Changing between different logic gate functions is realized by reorienting the magnetic moments of the magnetic layer, which induces a voltage shift on the Coulomb blockade oscillations of the MSET. We show that we can arbitrarily reprogram the function of the device from an n-type SET for in-plane magnetization of the GaMnAs layer to p-type SET for out-of-plane magnetization orientation. Moreover, we demonstrate a set of reprogrammable Boolean gates and its logical complement at the single device level. Finally, we propose two sets of reconfigurable binary gates using combinations of two MSETs in a pull-down network. PMID:25923789

  2. Spin-Dependent Quasiparticle Transport in Aluminum Single Electron Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, A. J.; Andresen, S. E.; Brenner, R.; Clark, R. G.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the effect of Zeeman-splitting on quasiparticle transport in normal-superconducting-normal (NSN) aluminum single electron transistors (SETs). In the above-gap transport the interplay of Coulomb blockade and Zeeman-splitting leads to spin-dependence of the sequential tunneling. This creates regimes where either one or both spin species can tunnel onto or off the island. At lower biases, spin-dependence of the single quasiparticle state is studied and operation of the device as a...

  3. Bipolar single-wall carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Babic, Bakir; Iqbal, Mahdi; Schonenberger, Christian

    2002-01-01

    We use a simultaneous flow of ethylene and hydrogen gases to grow single wall carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition. Strong coupling to the gate is inferred from transport measurements for both metallic and semiconducting tubes. At low-temperatures, our samples act as single-electron transistors where the transport mechanism is mainly governed by Coulomb blockade. The measurements reveal very rich quantized energy level spectra spanning from valence to conduction band. The Coulomb dia...

  4. Organic field-effect transistors using single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tatsuo; Takeya, Jun

    2009-04-01

    Organic field-effect transistors using small-molecule organic single crystals are developed to investigate fundamental aspects of organic thin-film transistors that have been widely studied for possible future markets for 'plastic electronics'. In reviewing the physics and chemistry of single-crystal organic field-effect transistors (SC-OFETs), the nature of intrinsic charge dynamics is elucidated for the carriers induced at the single crystal surfaces of molecular semiconductors. Materials for SC-OFETs are first reviewed with descriptions of the fabrication methods and the field-effect characteristics. In particular, a benchmark carrier mobility of 20-40 cm 2 Vs -1 , achieved with thin platelets of rubrene single crystals, demonstrates the significance of the SC-OFETs and clarifies material limitations for organic devices. In the latter part of this review, we discuss the physics of microscopic charge transport by using SC-OFETs at metal/semiconductor contacts and along semiconductor/insulator interfaces. Most importantly, Hall effect and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements reveal that interface charge transport in molecular semiconductors is properly described in terms of band transport and localization by charge traps.

  5. Organic field-effect transistors using single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Hasegawa and Jun Takeya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic field-effect transistors using small-molecule organic single crystals are developed to investigate fundamental aspects of organic thin-film transistors that have been widely studied for possible future markets for 'plastic electronics'. In reviewing the physics and chemistry of single-crystal organic field-effect transistors (SC-OFETs, the nature of intrinsic charge dynamics is elucidated for the carriers induced at the single crystal surfaces of molecular semiconductors. Materials for SC-OFETs are first reviewed with descriptions of the fabrication methods and the field-effect characteristics. In particular, a benchmark carrier mobility of 20–40 cm2 Vs−1, achieved with thin platelets of rubrene single crystals, demonstrates the significance of the SC-OFETs and clarifies material limitations for organic devices. In the latter part of this review, we discuss the physics of microscopic charge transport by using SC-OFETs at metal/semiconductor contacts and along semiconductor/insulator interfaces. Most importantly, Hall effect and electron spin resonance (ESR measurements reveal that interface charge transport in molecular semiconductors is properly described in terms of band transport and localization by charge traps.

  6. Gain Dependence of the Noise in the Single Electron Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Starmark, B.; Henning, Torsten; Korotkov, A. N.; Claeson, T.; Delsing, P.

    1998-01-01

    An extensive investigation of low frequency noise in single electron transistors as a function of gain is presented. Comparing the output noise with gain for a large number of bias points, it is found that the noise is dominated by external charge noise. For low gains we find an additional noise contribution which is compared to a model including resistance fluctuations. We conclude that this excess noise is not only due to resistance fluctuations. For one sample, we find a record low minimum...

  7. Short-term plasticity and long-term potentiation mimicked in single inorganic synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Takeo; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Terabe, Kazuya; Gimzewski, James K.; Aono, Masakazu

    2011-08-01

    Memory is believed to occur in the human brain as a result of two types of synaptic plasticity: short-term plasticity (STP) and long-term potentiation (LTP; refs , , , ). In neuromorphic engineering, emulation of known neural behaviour has proven to be difficult to implement in software because of the highly complex interconnected nature of thought processes. Here we report the discovery of a Ag2S inorganic synapse, which emulates the synaptic functions of both STP and LTP characteristics through the use of input pulse repetition time. The structure known as an atomic switch, operating at critical voltages, stores information as STP with a spontaneous decay of conductance level in response to intermittent input stimuli, whereas frequent stimulation results in a transition to LTP. The Ag2S inorganic synapse has interesting characteristics with analogies to an individual biological synapse, and achieves dynamic memorization in a single device without the need of external preprogramming. A psychological model related to the process of memorizing and forgetting is also demonstrated using the inorganic synapses. Our Ag2S element indicates a breakthrough in mimicking synaptic behaviour essential for the further creation of artificial neural systems that emulate characteristics of human memory.

  8. Single-layer MoS2 transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radisavljevic, B; Radenovic, A; Brivio, J; Giacometti, V; Kis, A

    2011-03-01

    Two-dimensional materials are attractive for use in next-generation nanoelectronic devices because, compared to one-dimensional materials, it is relatively easy to fabricate complex structures from them. The most widely studied two-dimensional material is graphene, both because of its rich physics and its high mobility. However, pristine graphene does not have a bandgap, a property that is essential for many applications, including transistors. Engineering a graphene bandgap increases fabrication complexity and either reduces mobilities to the level of strained silicon films or requires high voltages. Although single layers of MoS(2) have a large intrinsic bandgap of 1.8 eV (ref. 16), previously reported mobilities in the 0.5-3 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) range are too low for practical devices. Here, we use a halfnium oxide gate dielectric to demonstrate a room-temperature single-layer MoS(2) mobility of at least 200 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), similar to that of graphene nanoribbons, and demonstrate transistors with room-temperature current on/off ratios of 1 × 10(8) and ultralow standby power dissipation. Because monolayer MoS(2) has a direct bandgap, it can be used to construct interband tunnel FETs, which offer lower power consumption than classical transistors. Monolayer MoS(2) could also complement graphene in applications that require thin transparent semiconductors, such as optoelectronics and energy harvesting.

  9. Monitoring single-synapse glutamate release and presynaptic calcium concentration in organised brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Thomas P; Zheng, Kaiyu; Tyurikova, Olga; Reynolds, James P; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2017-06-01

    Brain function relies in large part on Ca 2+ -dependent release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate from neuronal axons. Establishing the causal relationship between presynaptic Ca 2+ dynamics and probabilistic glutamate release is therefore a fundamental quest across neurosciences. Its progress, however, has hitherto depended primarily on the exploration of either cultured nerve cells or giant central synapses accessible to direct experimental probing in situ. Here we show that combining patch-clamp with time-resolved imaging of Ca 2+ -sensitive fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (Tornado-FLIM) enables readout of single spike-evoked presynaptic Ca 2+ concentration dynamics, with nanomolar sensitivity, in individual neuronal axons in acute brain slices. In parallel, intensity Tornado imaging of a locally expressed extracellular optical glutamate sensor iGluSnFr provides direct monitoring of single-quantum, single-synapse glutamate releases in situ. These two methods pave the way for simultaneous registration of presynaptic Ca 2+ dynamics and transmitter release in an intact brain at the level of individual synapses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Effects of dynamic synapses on noise-delayed response latency of a single neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuntarla, M.; Ozer, M.; Ileri, U.; Calim, A.; Torres, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    The noise-delayed decay (NDD) phenomenon emerges when the first-spike latency of a periodically forced stochastic neuron exhibits a maximum for a particular range of noise intensity. Here, we investigate the latency response dynamics of a single Hodgkin-Huxley neuron that is subject to both a suprathreshold periodic stimulus and a background activity arriving through dynamic synapses. We study the first-spike latency response as a function of the presynaptic firing rate f . This constitutes a more realistic scenario than previous works, since f provides a suitable biophysically realistic parameter to control the level of activity in actual neural systems. We first report on the emergence of classical NDD behavior as a function of f for the limit of static synapses. Second, we show that when short-term depression and facilitation mechanisms are included at the synapses, different NDD features can be found due to their modulatory effect on synaptic current fluctuations. For example, an intriguing double NDD (DNDD) behavior occurs for different sets of relevant synaptic parameters. Moreover, depending on the balance between synaptic depression and synaptic facilitation, single NDD or DNDD can prevail, in such a way that synaptic facilitation favors the emergence of DNDD whereas synaptic depression favors the existence of single NDD. Here we report the existence of the DNDD effect in the response latency dynamics of a neuron.

  11. Intrinsic magnetic refrigeration of a single electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, C.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Ferguson, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we show that aluminium doped with low concentrations of magnetic impurities can be used to fabricate quantum devices with intrinsic cooling capabilities. We fabricate single electron transistors made of aluminium doped with 2% Mn by using a standard multi angle evaporation technique and show that the quantity of metal used to fabricate the devices generates enough cooling power to achieve a drop of 160 mK in the electron temperature at the base temperature of our cryostat (300 mK). The cooling mechanism is based on the magneto-caloric effect from the diluted Mn moments.

  12. Intrinsic magnetic refrigeration of a single electron transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, C.; Ferguson, A. J.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we show that aluminium doped with low concentrations of magnetic impurities can be used to fabricate quantum devices with intrinsic cooling capabilities. We fabricate single electron transistors made of aluminium doped with 2% Mn by using a standard multi angle evaporation technique and show that the quantity of metal used to fabricate the devices generates enough cooling power to achieve a drop of 160 mK in the electron temperature at the base temperature of our cryostat (300 mK). The cooling mechanism is based on the magneto-caloric effect from the diluted Mn moments

  13. Effects of overheating in a single-electron transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korotkov, A. N.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm; Vasenko, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    Heating of a single-electron transistor (SET) caused by the current flowing through it is considered. The current and the temperature increase should be calculated self-consistently taking into account various paths of the heat drain. Even if there is no heat drain from the central electrode...... of the SET due to transfer of phonons, the temperature of this electrode remains finite because electron tunneling decreases the temperature difference between the central and outer electrodes. Overheating effects can cause hysteresis in the I-V curve of the SET in the vicinity of the Coulomb blockade...

  14. Single-event burnout of power bipolar junction transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titus, J.L.; Johnson, G.H.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Galloway, K.F.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental evidence of single-event burnout of power bipolar junctions transistors (BJTs) is reported for the first time. Several commercial power BJTs were characterized in a simulated cosmic ray environment using mono-energetic ions at the tandem Van de Graaff accelerator facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Most of the device types exposed to this simulated environment exhibited burnout behavior. In this paper the experimental technique, data, and results are presented, while a qualitative model is used to help explain those results and trends observed in this experiment

  15. Single electron transistor with P-type sidewall spacer gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Han; Li, Dong Hua; Lee, Joung-Eob; Kang, Kwon-Chil; Kim, Kyungwan; Park, Byung-Gook

    2011-07-01

    A single-electron transistor (SET) is one of the promising solutions to overcome the scaling limit of the Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET). Up to now, various kinds of SETs are being proposed and SETs with a dual gate (DG) structure using an electrical potential barrier have been demonstrated for room temperature operation. To operate DG-SETs, however, extra bias of side gates is necessary. It causes new problems that the electrode for side gates and the extra bias for electrical barrier increase the complexity in circuit design and operation power consumption, respectively. For the reason, a new mechanism using work function (WF) difference is applied to operate a SET at room temperature by three electrodes. Its structure consists of an undoped active region, a control gate, n-doped source/drain electrodes, and metal/silicide or p-type silicon side gates, and a SET with metal/silicide gates or p-type silicon gates forms tunnel barriers induced by work function between an undoped channel and grounded side gates. Via simulation, the effectiveness of the new mechanism is confirmed through various silicide materials that have different WF values. Furthermore, by considering the realistic conditions of the fabrication process, SET with p-type sidewall spacer gates was designed, and its brief fabrication process was introduced. The characteristics of its electrical barrier and the controllability of its control gate were also confirmed via simulation. Finally, a single-hole transistor with n-type sidewall spacer gates was designed.

  16. Coulomb blockade in a Si channel gated by an Al single-electron transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, L.; Brown, K. R.; Kane, B. E.

    2007-01-01

    We incorporate an Al-AlO_x-Al single-electron transistor as the gate of a narrow (~100 nm) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Near the MOSFET channel conductance threshold, we observe oscillations in the conductance associated with Coulomb blockade in the channel, revealing the formation of a Si single-electron transistor. Abrupt steps present in sweeps of the Al transistor conductance versus gate voltage are correlated with single-electron charging events in the Si t...

  17. Spin-gating of a conventional aluminum single electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbo, Liviu P.; Ciccarelli, Chiara; Irvine, Andy; Wunderlich, Jörg; Champion, Richard; Gallagher, Brian; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Ferguson, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    We report the realization of a single electron transistor in which electron transport from an aluminum source electrode to an aluminum drain electrode via an aluminum island is controlled by spins in a capacitively coupled magnetic gate electrode. The origin of the effect is in the change of the chemical potential on the gate, formed by the ferromagnetic semiconductor GaMnAs, with changing the direction of the magnetization. In agreement with experimental observations, microscopically calculated anisotropies of the chemical potential with respect to the magnetization orientation are of the order of 10μV which is comparable to the electrical gate voltages required to control the on and off state of the single electron transistor. Our phenomenon belongs to the family of anisotropic magnetoresistance effects which can be observed in ohmic, tunneling or other device geometries. In our case, the entire phenomenon is coded in the dependence of the chemical potential on the spin orientation which allowed us to remove the spin functionality from all current contacts and channels and place it in the capacitively coupled gate electrode. Our spintronic device therefore operates without spin current.

  18. Electrical coupling of single cardiac rat myocytes to field-effect and bipolar transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Thomas; Issing, Matthias; Arnold, Rüdiger; Müller, Bernt

    2002-12-01

    A novel bipolar transistor for extracellular recording the electrical activity of biological cells is presented, and the electrical behavior compared with the field-effect transistor (FET). Electrical coupling is examined between single cells separated from the heart of adults rats (cardiac myocytes) and both types of transistors. To initiate a local extracellular voltage, the cells are periodically stimulated by a patch pipette in voltage clamp and current clamp mode. The local extracellular voltage is measured by the planar integrated electronic sensors: the bipolar and the FET. The small signal transistor currents correspond to the local extracellular voltage. The two types of sensor transistors used here were developed and manufactured in the laboratory of our institute. The manufacturing process and the interfaces between myocytes and transistors are described. The recordings are interpreted by way of simulation based on the point-contact model and the single cardiac myocyte model.

  19. A simple and controlled single electron transistor based on doping modulation in silicon nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Hofheinz, M.; Jehl, X.; Sanquer, M.; Molas, G.; Vinet, M.; Deleonibus, S.

    2006-01-01

    A simple and highly reproducible single electron transistor (SET) has been fabricated using gated silicon nanowires. The structure is a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor made on silicon-on-insulator thin films. The channel of the transistor is the Coulomb island at low temperature. Two silicon nitride spacers deposited on each side of the gate create a modulation of doping along the nanowire that creates tunnel barriers. Such barriers are fixed and controlled, like in metallic...

  20. Kondo effect in single-molecule magnet transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Leuenberger, Michael; Mucciolo, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    We present a careful and thorough microscopic derivation of the anisotropic Kondo Hamiltonian for single-molecule magnet (SMM) transistors. When the molecule is strongly coupled to metallic leads, we show that by applying a transverse magnetic field it is possible to topologically induce or quench the Kondo effect in the conductance of a SMM with either an integer or a half-integer spin S>1/2. This topological Kondo effect is due to the Berry-phase interference between multiple quantum tunneling paths of the spin. We calculate the renormalized Berry-phase oscillations of the two Kondo peaks as a function of a transverse magnetic field by means of the poor man's scaling approach. We illustrate our findings with the SMM Ni4, which we propose as a possible candidate for the experimental observation of the conductance oscillations.

  1. Enhancement mode single electron transistor in pure silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Binhui; Yang, C. H.; Jones, G. M.; Yang, M. J.

    2007-03-01

    Solid state implementations of lateral qubits offer the advantage of being scalable and can be easily integrated by existing main stream IC technologies. In addition, the two Zeeman states of an electron spin in a quantum dot (QD) provide a promising candidate for a qubit. Spins in lateral QDs in the GaAs/AlGaAs single electron transistors (SETs) have been intensively investigated. In contrast, Si provides a number of advantages, including long spin coherence time, large g-factor, and small spin-orbit coupling effect. We have demonstrated Si SET in the few electron regime.* In this talk, we will report the isolation of a single electron in a Si QD using a fabrication technique that incorporates the standard Al/SiO2/Si system with an enhancement mode SET structure. Our SET is built in highly resistive Si substrates with bilayer gates. The high purity Si minimizes the potential disorder from impurities. The top gate induces 2D electrons, and several side gates help define the tunneling barriers, fine tune the shape of the QD, and control the number of electrons in it. We will discuss the operating principle, computer simulation, and low temperature transport data. *APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS 89, 073106 (2006)

  2. Towards parallel fabrication of single electron transistors using carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Muhammad R; Joung, Daeha; Khondaker, Saiful I

    2015-06-07

    Single electron transistors (SETs) are considered to be promising building blocks for post CMOS era electronic devices, however, a major bottleneck for practical realization of SET based devices is a lack of a parallel fabrication approach. Here, we have demonstrated a technique for the scalable fabrication of SETs using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The approach is based on the integration of solution processed individual SWNTs via dielectrophoresis (DEP) at the selected position of the circuit with a 100 nm channel length, where the metal-SWNT Schottky contact works as a tunnel barrier. Measurements carried out at a low temperature (4.2 K) show that the majority of the devices with a contact resistance (RT) > 100 kΩ display SET behavior. For the devices with 100 kΩ 1 MΩ) multiple QD behavior was observed. From the transport study of 50 SWNT devices, a total of 38 devices show SET behavior giving a yield of 76%. The results presented here are a significant step forward for the practical realization of SET based devices.

  3. Single-electron transistors fabricated with sidewall spacer patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byung-Gook; Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Kyung Rok; Song, Ki-Whan; Lee, Jong Duk

    2003-09-01

    We have implemented a sidewall spacer patterning method for novel dual-gate single-electron transistor (DGSET) and metal-oxide-semiconductor-based SET (MOSET) based on the uniform SOI wire, using conventional lithography and processing technology. A 30 nm wide silicon quantum wire is defined by a sidewall spacer patterning method, and depletion gates for two tunnel junctions of the DGSET are formed by the doped polycrystalline silicon sidewall. The fabricated DGSET and MOSET show clear single-electron tunneling phenomena at liquid nitrogen temperature and insensitivity of the Coulomb oscillation period to gate bias conditions. On the basis of the phase control capability of the sidewall depletion gates, we have proposed a complementary self-biasing method, which enables the SET/CMOS hybrid multi-valued logic (MVL) to operate perfectly well at high temperature, where the peak-to-valley current ratio of Coulomb oscillation severely decreases. The suggested scheme is evaluated by SPICE simulation with an analytical DGSET model, and it is confirmed that even DGSETs with a large Si island can be utilized efficiently in the multi-valued logic.

  4. Probing Spin Accumulation induced Magnetocapacitance in a Single Electron Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Teik-Hui; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2015-09-08

    The interplay between spin and charge in solids is currently among the most discussed topics in condensed matter physics. Such interplay gives rise to magneto-electric coupling, which in the case of solids was named magneto-electric effect, as predicted by Curie on the basis of symmetry considerations. This effect enables the manipulation of magnetization using electrical field or, conversely, the manipulation of electrical polarization by magnetic field. The latter is known as the magnetocapacitance effect. Here, we show that non-equilibrium spin accumulation can induce tunnel magnetocapacitance through the formation of a tiny charge dipole. This dipole can effectively give rise to an additional serial capacitance, which represents an extra charging energy that the tunneling electrons would encounter. In the sequential tunneling regime, this extra energy can be understood as the energy required for a single spin to flip. A ferromagnetic single-electron-transistor with tunable magnetic configuration is utilized to demonstrate the proposed mechanism. It is found that the extra threshold energy is experienced only by electrons entering the islands, bringing about asymmetry in the measured Coulomb diamond. This asymmetry is an unambiguous evidence of spin accumulation induced tunnel magnetocapacitance, and the measured magnetocapacitance value is as high as 40%.

  5. Complementary Self-Biased Logics Based on Single-Electron Transistor (SET)/CMOS Hybrid Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ki-Whan; Lee, Yong Kyu; Sim, Jae Sung; Kim, Kyung Rok; Lee, Jong Duk; Park, Byung-Gook; You, Young Sub; Park, Joo-On; Jin, You Seung; Kim, Young-Wug

    2005-04-01

    We propose a complementary self-biasing method which enables the single-electron transistor (SET)/complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) hybrid multi-valued logics (MVLs) to operate well at high temperatures, where the peak-to-valley current ratio (PVCR) of the Coulomb oscillation markedly decreases. The new architecture is implemented with a few transistors by utilizing the phase control capability of the sidewall depletion gates in dual-gate single-electron transistors (DGSETs). The suggested scheme is evaluated by a SPICE simulation with an analytical DGSET model. Furthermore, we have developed a new process technology for the SET/CMOS hybrid systems. We have confirmed that both of the fabricated devices, namely, SET and CMOS transistors, exhibit the ideal characteristics for the complementary self-biasing scheme: the SET shows clear Coulomb oscillations with a 100 mV period and the CMOS transistors show a high voltage gain.

  6. Neural Circuitry Based on Single Electron Transistors and Single Electron Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïmen BOUBAKER

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose and explain a neural circuitry based on single electron transistors ‘SET’ which can be used in classification and recognition. We implement, after that, a Winner-Take-All ‘WTA’ neural network with lateral inhibition architecture. The original idea of this work is reflected, first, in the proposed new single electron memory ‘SEM’ design by hybridising two promising Single Electron Memory ‘SEM’ and the MTJ/Ring memory and second, in modeling and simulation results of neural memory based on SET. We prove the charge storage in quantum dot in two types of memories.

  7. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Detection Using Au-Decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keum-Ju Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that Au-cluster-decorated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs may be used to discriminate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP. Nanoscale Au clusters were formed on the side walls of carbon nanotubes in a transistor geometry using electrochemical deposition. The effect of Au cluster decoration appeared as hole doping when electrical transport characteristics were examined. Thiolated single-stranded probe peptide nucleic acid (PNA was successfully immobilized on Au clusters decorating single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT-FETs, resulting in a conductance decrease that could be explained by a decrease in Au work function upon adsorption of thiolated PNA. Although a target single-stranded DNA (ssDNA with a single mismatch did not cause any change in electrical conductance, a clear decrease in conductance was observed with matched ssDNA, thereby showing the possibility of SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism detection using Au-cluster-decorated SWNT-FETs. However, a power to discriminate SNP target is lost in high ionic environment. We can conclude that observed SNP discrimination in low ionic environment is due to the hampered binding of SNP target on nanoscale surfaces in low ionic conditions.

  8. Effects of breathing and oblong mode phonons on transport properties in a single-electron transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Norihiko; Wybourne, Martin N

    2010-02-17

    We investigate theoretically the transport characteristics of a single-electron transistor affected by the dynamic deformation of the device configuration due to phonons. By considering changes in capacitances and tunnel resistances caused by the breathing and oblong vibrations of the island that forms part of the transistor, we formulate the electron-phonon interaction peculiar to the device and derive its transport properties by means of the master equation. For a single electron transistor with a gold nanoparticle island of radius 1 nm, we demonstrate the contribution to the transport properties that originates from tunneling channels associated with THz phonon emission and absorption.

  9. Single molecule transistor based nanopore for the detection of nicotine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    A nanopore based detection methodology was proposed and investigated for the detection of Nicotine. This technique uses a Single Molecular Transistor working as a nanopore operational in the Coulomb Blockade regime. When the Nicotine molecule is pulled through the nanopore area surrounded by the Source(S), Drain (D), and Gate electrodes, the charge stability diagram can detect the presence of the molecule and is unique for a specific molecular structure. Due to the weak coupling between the different electrodes which is set by the nanopore size, the molecular energy states stay almost unaffected by the electrostatic environment that can be realised from the charge stability diagram. Identification of different orientation and position of the Nicotine molecule within the nanopore area can be made from specific regions of overlap between different charge states on the stability diagram that could be used as an electronic fingerprint for detection. This method could be advantageous and useful to detect the presence of Nicotine in smoke which is usually performed using chemical chromatography techniques.

  10. Single molecule transistor based nanopore for the detection of nicotine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, S. J., E-mail: ray.sjr@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Technical University of Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-28

    A nanopore based detection methodology was proposed and investigated for the detection of Nicotine. This technique uses a Single Molecular Transistor working as a nanopore operational in the Coulomb Blockade regime. When the Nicotine molecule is pulled through the nanopore area surrounded by the Source(S), Drain (D), and Gate electrodes, the charge stability diagram can detect the presence of the molecule and is unique for a specific molecular structure. Due to the weak coupling between the different electrodes which is set by the nanopore size, the molecular energy states stay almost unaffected by the electrostatic environment that can be realised from the charge stability diagram. Identification of different orientation and position of the Nicotine molecule within the nanopore area can be made from specific regions of overlap between different charge states on the stability diagram that could be used as an electronic fingerprint for detection. This method could be advantageous and useful to detect the presence of Nicotine in smoke which is usually performed using chemical chromatography techniques.

  11. Poly-silicon quantum-dot single-electron transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kwon-Chil; Lee, Joung-Eob; Lee, Jung-Han; Lee, Jong-Ho; Shin, Hyung-Cheol; Park, Byung-Gook

    2012-01-01

    For operation of a single-electron transistors (SETs) at room temperature, we proposed a fabrication method for a SET with a self-aligned quantum dot by using polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si). The self-aligned quantum dot is formed by the selective etching of a silicon nanowire on a planarized surface and the subsequent deposition and etch-back of poly-silicon or chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). The two tunneling barriers of the SET are fabricated by thermal oxidation. Also, to decrease the leakage current and control the gate capacitance, we deposit a hard oxide mask layer. The control gate is formed by using an electron beam and photolithography on chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Owing to the small capacitance of the narrow control gate due to the tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) hard mask, we observe clear Coulomb oscillation peaks and differential trans-conductance curves at room temperature. The clear oscillation period of the fabricated SET is 2.0 V.

  12. Photonic transistor and router using a single quantum-dot-confined spin in a single-sided optical microcavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C Y

    2017-03-28

    The future Internet is very likely the mixture of all-optical Internet with low power consumption and quantum Internet with absolute security guaranteed by the laws of quantum mechanics. Photons would be used for processing, routing and com-munication of data, and photonic transistor using a weak light to control a strong light is the core component as an optical analogue to the electronic transistor that forms the basis of modern electronics. In sharp contrast to previous all-optical tran-sistors which are all based on optical nonlinearities, here I introduce a novel design for a high-gain and high-speed (up to terahertz) photonic transistor and its counterpart in the quantum limit, i.e., single-photon transistor based on a linear optical effect: giant Faraday rotation induced by a single electronic spin in a single-sided optical microcavity. A single-photon or classical optical pulse as the gate sets the spin state via projective measurement and controls the polarization of a strong light to open/block the photonic channel. Due to the duality as quantum gate for quantum information processing and transistor for optical information processing, this versatile spin-cavity quantum transistor provides a solid-state platform ideal for all-optical networks and quantum networks.

  13. Ultra-Low Power Optical Transistor Using a Single Quantum Dot Embedded in a Photonic Wire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, H.A.; Grange, T.; Malik, N.S.

    2017-01-01

    Using a single InAs quantum dot embedded in a GaAs photonic wire, we realize a giant non-linearity between two optical modes to experimentally demonstrate an all-optical transistor triggered by 10 photons.......Using a single InAs quantum dot embedded in a GaAs photonic wire, we realize a giant non-linearity between two optical modes to experimentally demonstrate an all-optical transistor triggered by 10 photons....

  14. Radio-frequency reflectometry on an undoped AlGaAs/GaAs single electron transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacLeod, S. J.; See, A. M.; Keane, Z. K.

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency reflectometry is demonstrated in a sub-micron undoped AlGaAs/GaAs device. Undoped single electron transistors (SETs) are attractive candidates to study single electron phenomena, due to their charge stability and robust electronic properties after thermal cycling. However, these d......Radio frequency reflectometry is demonstrated in a sub-micron undoped AlGaAs/GaAs device. Undoped single electron transistors (SETs) are attractive candidates to study single electron phenomena, due to their charge stability and robust electronic properties after thermal cycling. However...

  15. Simple and controlled single electron transistor based on doping modulation in silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofheinz, M.; Jehl, X.; Sanquer, M.; Molas, G.; Vinet, M.; Deleonibus, S.

    2006-10-01

    A simple and highly reproducible single electron transistor (SET) has been fabricated using gated silicon nanowires. The structure is a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor made on silicon-on-insulator thin films. The channel of the transistor is the Coulomb island at low temperature. Two silicon nitride spacers deposited on each side of the gate create a modulation of doping along the nanowire that creates tunnel barriers. Such barriers are fixed and controlled, like in metallic SETs. The period of the Coulomb oscillations is set by the gate capacitance of the transistor and therefore controlled by lithography. The source and drain capacitances have also been characterized. This design could be used to build more complex SET devices.

  16. Continuous-Wave Single-Photon Transistor Based on a Superconducting Circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriienko, Oleksandr; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2016-01-01

    We propose a microwave frequency single-photon transistor which can operate under continuous wave probing and represents an efficient single microwave photon detector. It can be realized using an impedance matched system of a three level artificial ladder-type atom coupled to two microwave cavities...... and the appearance of a photon flux leaving the second cavity through a separate input-output port. The proposal does not require time variation of the probe signals, thus corresponding to a passive version of a single-photon transistor. The resulting device is robust to qubit dephasing processes, possesses low dark...

  17. The effect of STDP temporal kernel structure on the learning dynamics of single excitatory and inhibitory synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotam Luz

    Full Text Available Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP is characterized by a wide range of temporal kernels. However, much of the theoretical work has focused on a specific kernel - the "temporally asymmetric Hebbian" learning rules. Previous studies linked excitatory STDP to positive feedback that can account for the emergence of response selectivity. Inhibitory plasticity was associated with negative feedback that can balance the excitatory and inhibitory inputs. Here we study the possible computational role of the temporal structure of the STDP. We represent the STDP as a superposition of two processes: potentiation and depression. This allows us to model a wide range of experimentally observed STDP kernels, from Hebbian to anti-Hebbian, by varying a single parameter. We investigate STDP dynamics of a single excitatory or inhibitory synapse in purely feed-forward architecture. We derive a mean-field-Fokker-Planck dynamics for the synaptic weight and analyze the effect of STDP structure on the fixed points of the mean field dynamics. We find a phase transition along the Hebbian to anti-Hebbian parameter from a phase that is characterized by a unimodal distribution of the synaptic weight, in which the STDP dynamics is governed by negative feedback, to a phase with positive feedback characterized by a bimodal distribution. The critical point of this transition depends on general properties of the STDP dynamics and not on the fine details. Namely, the dynamics is affected by the pre-post correlations only via a single number that quantifies its overlap with the STDP kernel. We find that by manipulating the STDP temporal kernel, negative feedback can be induced in excitatory synapses and positive feedback in inhibitory. Moreover, there is an exact symmetry between inhibitory and excitatory plasticity, i.e., for every STDP rule of inhibitory synapse there exists an STDP rule for excitatory synapse, such that their dynamics is identical.

  18. Ambipolar Cu- and Fe-phthalocyanine single-crystal field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, R.W.I.; Stassen, A.F.; Craciun, M.F.; Mulder, C.L.; Molinari, A.; Rogge, S.; Morpurgo, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    We report the observation of ambipolar transport in field-effect transistors fabricated on single crystals of copper- and iron-phthalocyanine, using gold as a high work-function metal for the fabrication of source and drain electrodes. In these devices, the room-temperature mobility of holes reaches

  19. Controlled tunnel-coupled ferromagnetic electrodes for spin injection in organic single-crystal transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, W.J.M.; Craciun, M.F.; Lemmens, J.H.J.; Arkenbout, A.H.; Palstra, T.T.M.; Morpurgo, A.F.; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard

    2010-01-01

    We report on single-crystal rubrene field-effect transistors (FETs) with ferromagnetic Co electrodes, tunnel-coupled to the conduction channel via an Al2O3 tunnel barrier. Magnetic and electronic characterization shows that the Al2O3 film not only protects the Co from undesired oxidation, but also

  20. Controlled tunnel-coupled ferromagnetic electrodes for spin injection in organic single-crystal transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, W. J. M.; Craciun, M. F.; Lemmens, J. H. J.; Arkenbout, A. H.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Morpurgo, A. F.; van der Wiel, W. G.

    We report on single-crystal rubrene. eld-effect transistors (FETs) with ferromagnetic Co electrodes, tunnel-coupled to the conduction channel via an Al(2)O(3) tunnel barrier. Magnetic and electronic characterization shows that the Al(2)O(3) film not only protects the Co from undesired oxidation, but

  1. Ternary logic implemented on a single dopant atom field effect silicon transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, M.; Mol, J.A.; Verduijn, J.; Lansbergen, G.P.; Rogge, S.; Levine, R.D.; Remacle, F.

    2010-01-01

    We provide an experimental proof of principle for a ternary multiplier realized in terms of the charge state of a single dopant atom embedded in a fin field effect transistor (Fin-FET). Robust reading of the logic output is made possible by using two channels to measure the current flowing through

  2. Multiple forms of metaplasticity at a single hippocampal synapse during late postnatal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G. McHail

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metaplasticity refers to adjustment in the requirements for induction of synaptic plasticity based on the prior history of activity. Numerous forms of developmental metaplasticity are observed at Schaffer collateral synapses in the rat hippocampus at the end of the third postnatal week. Emergence of spatial learning and memory at this developmental stage suggests possible involvement of metaplasticity in the final maturation of the hippocampus. Three distinct metaplastic phenomena are apparent. (1 As transmitter release probability increases with increasing age, presynaptic potentiation is reduced. (2 Alterations in the composition and channel conductance properties of AMPARs facilitate the induction of postsynaptic potentiation with increasing age. (3 Low frequency stimulation inhibits subsequent induction of potentiation in animals older but not younger than 3 weeks of age. Thus, many forms of plasticity expressed at SC-CA1 synapses are different in rats younger and older than 3 weeks of age, illustrating the complex orchestration of physiological modifications that underlie the maturation of hippocampal excitatory synaptic transmission. This review paper describes three late postnatal modifications to synaptic plasticity induction in the hippocampus and attempts to relate these metaplastic changes to developmental alterations in hippocampal network activity and the maturation of contextual learning.

  3. Molecular electronics: the single molecule switch and transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Geskin, Victor; Heimbuch, Rene; Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected

  4. Resonant tunnelling features in a suspended silicon nanowire single-hole transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llobet, Jordi; Pérez-Murano, Francesc, E-mail: francesc.perez@csic.es, E-mail: z.durrani@imperial.ac.uk [Institut de Microelectrònica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Krali, Emiljana; Wang, Chen; Jones, Mervyn E.; Durrani, Zahid A. K., E-mail: francesc.perez@csic.es, E-mail: z.durrani@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Arbiol, Jordi [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA) and Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); CELLS-ALBA Synchrotron Light Facility, 08290 Cerdanyola, Catalonia (Spain)

    2015-11-30

    Suspended silicon nanowires have significant potential for a broad spectrum of device applications. A suspended p-type Si nanowire incorporating Si nanocrystal quantum dots has been used to form a single-hole transistor. Transistor fabrication uses a novel and rapid process, based on focused gallium ion beam exposure and anisotropic wet etching, generating <10 nm nanocrystals inside suspended Si nanowires. Electrical characteristics at 10 K show Coulomb diamonds with charging energy ∼27 meV, associated with a single dominant nanocrystal. Resonant tunnelling features with energy spacing ∼10 meV are observed, parallel to both diamond edges. These may be associated either with excited states or hole–acoustic phonon interactions, in the nanocrystal. In the latter case, the energy spacing corresponds well with reported Raman spectroscopy results and phonon spectra calculations.

  5. Coulomb Blockade Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect in a (Ga,Mn)As Single-Electron Transistor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Kaestner, B.; Irvine, A.C.; Shick, Alexander; Stone, N.; Wang, K. Y.; Rana, U.; Giddings, A.D.; Foxon, C. T.; Campion, R. P.; Williams, D.A.; Gallagher, B. L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 7 (2006), 077201/1-077201/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0575; GA MŠk LC510 Grant - others:EPSRC(GB) GR/S81407/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : anisotropic magnetoresistance * Coulomb blockade * single electron transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.072, year: 2006

  6. Nanopore extended field-effect transistor for selective single-molecule biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ren; Zhang, Yanjun; Nadappuram, Binoy Paulose; Akpinar, Bernice; Klenerman, David; Ivanov, Aleksandar P; Edel, Joshua B; Korchev, Yuri

    2017-09-19

    There has been a significant drive to deliver nanotechnological solutions to biosensing, yet there remains an unmet need in the development of biosensors that are affordable, integrated, fast, capable of multiplexed detection, and offer high selectivity for trace analyte detection in biological fluids. Herein, some of these challenges are addressed by designing a new class of nanoscale sensors dubbed nanopore extended field-effect transistor (nexFET) that combine the advantages of nanopore single-molecule sensing, field-effect transistors, and recognition chemistry. We report on a polypyrrole functionalized nexFET, with controllable gate voltage that can be used to switch on/off, and slow down single-molecule DNA transport through a nanopore. This strategy enables higher molecular throughput, enhanced signal-to-noise, and even heightened selectivity via functionalization with an embedded receptor. This is shown for selective sensing of an anti-insulin antibody in the presence of its IgG isotype.Efficient detection of single molecules is vital to many biosensing technologies, which require analytical platforms with high selectivity and sensitivity. Ren et al. combine a nanopore sensor and a field-effect transistor, whereby gate voltage mediates DNA and protein transport through the nanopore.

  7. Electrochemical Single-Molecule Transistors with Optimized Gate Coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, Henrry M.; Catarelli, Samantha; Cea, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    . These data are rationalized in terms of a two-step electrochemical model for charge transport across the redox bridge. In this model the gate coupling in the ionic liquid is found to be fully effective with a modeled gate coupling parameter, ξ, of unity. This compares to a much lower gate coupling parameter......Electrochemical gating at the single molecule level of viologen molecular bridges in ionic liquids is examined. Contrary to previous data recorded in aqueous electrolytes, a clear and sharp peak in the single molecule conductance versus electrochemical potential data is obtained in ionic liquids...

  8. Manipulation of organic polyradicals in a single-molecule transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fock, J.; Leijnse, M.; Jennum, K.; Zyazin, A.S.; Paaske, J.; Hedegard, P.; Brondsted Nielsen, M.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by cotunneling spectroscopy of spin-states in a single OPE5-based molecule, we investigate the prospects for electric control of magnetism in purely organic molecules contacted in a three-terminal geometry. Using the gate electrode, the molecule is reversibly switched between three

  9. Reconfigurable Boolean logic using magnetic single-electron transistors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gonzalez-Zalba, M.F.; Ciccarelli, C.; Zarbo, Liviu; Irvine, A.C.; Campion, R.C.; Gallagher, B. L.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Ferguson, A.J.; Wunderlich, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 4 (2015), e0125142 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : single-electron transitor * reconfigurable logic * ferromagnetic semiconductor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  10. A Single Polyaniline Nanofiber Field Effect Transistor and Its Gas Sensing Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dajing; Lei, Sheng; Chen, Yuquan

    2011-01-01

    A single polyaniline nanofiber field effect transistor (FET) gas sensor fabricated by means of electrospinning was investigated to understand its sensing mechanisms and optimize its performance. We studied the morphology, field effect characteristics and gas sensitivity of conductive nanofibers. The fibers showed Schottky and Ohmic contacts based on different electrode materials. Higher applied gate voltage contributes to an increase in gas sensitivity. The nanofiber transistor showed a 7% reversible resistance change to 1 ppm NH3 with 10 V gate voltage. The FET characteristics of the sensor when exposed to different gas concentrations indicate that adsorption of NH3 molecules reduces the carrier mobility in the polyaniline nanofiber. As such, nanofiber-based sensors could be promising for environmental and industrial applications. PMID:22163969

  11. Single-Atom Transistor as a Precise Magnetic Field Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachymski, Krzysztof; Wasak, Tomasz; Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Julienne, Paul S.; Negretti, Antonio; Calarco, Tommaso

    2018-01-01

    Feshbach resonances, which allow for tuning the interactions of ultracold atoms with an external magnetic field, have been widely used to control the properties of quantum gases. We propose a scheme for using scattering resonances as a probe for external fields, showing that by carefully tuning the parameters it is possible to reach a 10-5 G (or nT) level of precision with a single pair of atoms. We show that, for our collisional setup, it is possible to saturate the quantum precision bound with a simple measurement protocol.

  12. Spin-dependent quasiparticle transport in aluminum single-electron transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, A J; Andresen, S E; Brenner, R; Clark, R G

    2006-08-25

    We investigate the effect of Zeeman splitting on quasiparticle transport in normal-superconducting-normal (NSN) aluminum single-electron transistors (SETs). In the above-gap transport, the interplay of Coulomb blockade and Zeeman splitting leads to spin-dependence of the sequential tunneling. This creates regimes where either one or both spin species can tunnel onto or off the island. At lower biases, spin-dependence of the single quasiparticle state is studied, and operation of the device as a bipolar spin filter is suggested.

  13. Single-Molecule Transistor from Graphene Nanoelectrodes and Novel Functional Materials From Self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qizhi

    This thesis introduces a new strategy to fabricate single molecular transistor by utilizing the covalent chemistry to reconnect the molecule with the electroburnt graphene nanogap. We studied the effect of coupling chemistry and molecular length on the efficiency of reconnection between the molecule and the graphene. With this technique, we are also able to observe the Coulomb Blockade phenomenon, which is a characteristics of single-electron transistors. The high yield and versatility of this approach augur well for creating a new generation of sensors, switches, and other functional devices using graphene contacts. This thesis also introduces a new type of organic single-crystal p-n heterojunction inspired from the ball-and-socket shape-complementarity between fullerene and contorted dibenzotetrathienocoronene (c-DBTTC). We studied the influence of temperature, pressure, and time on the self-assembly process of contorted dibenzotetrathienocoronene on the as-grown fullerene crystals. We also utilized fluorescence microscopy to investigate the charge transfer in this type of p-n heterojunction. Finally, this thesis introduces one-dimensional and two-dimensional programming in solid-state materials from superatom macrocycles. We find that the linkers that bridges the two superatoms determine the distance and electronic coupling between the two superatoms in the macrocycle, which in turn determines the way they self-assembled in the solid-state materials. The thesis is composed of four chapters. The first chapter introduces why we are in terested in molecular transistors and new functional materials, and what has been done so far. The second chapter described the approach we developed to assemble single molecule into circuits with graphene electrodes. The third chapter details the method to fabricate the organic single-crystal C60-DBTTC p-n heterojunction, which is of great importance to understand their charge transfer process. The last chapter introduced a new

  14. Probing the Quantum States of a Single Atom Transistor at Microwave Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tettamanzi, Giuseppe Carlo; Hile, Samuel James; House, Matthew Gregory; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y

    2017-03-28

    The ability to apply gigahertz frequencies to control the quantum state of a single P atom is an essential requirement for the fast gate pulsing needed for qubit control in donor-based silicon quantum computation. Here, we demonstrate this with nanosecond accuracy in an all epitaxial single atom transistor by applying excitation signals at frequencies up to ≈13 GHz to heavily phosphorus-doped silicon leads. These measurements allow the differentiation between the excited states of the single atom and the density of states in the one-dimensional leads. Our pulse spectroscopy experiments confirm the presence of an excited state at an energy ≈9 meV, consistent with the first excited state of a single P donor in silicon. The relaxation rate of this first excited state to the ground state is estimated to be larger than 2.5 GHz, consistent with theoretical predictions. These results represent a systematic investigation of how an atomically precise single atom transistor device behaves under radio frequency excitations.

  15. Research Update: Molecular electronics: The single-molecule switch and transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Sotthewes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected to macroscopic leads and how the transport properties of the molecule can be measured. Based on this knowledge we have realized two single-molecule devices: a molecular switch and a molecular transistor. The switch can be opened and closed at will by carefully adjusting the separation between the electrical contacts and the voltage drop across the contacts. This single-molecular switch operates in a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures all the way up to room temperature. Via mechanical gating, i.e., compressing or stretching of the octanethiol molecule, by varying the contact's interspace, we are able to systematically adjust the conductance of the electrode-octanethiol-electrode junction. This two-terminal single-molecule transistor is very robust, but the amplification factor is rather limited.

  16. Electrostatic melting in a single-molecule field-effect transistor with applications in genomic identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernick, Sefi; Trocchia, Scott M.; Warren, Steven B.; Young, Erik F.; Bouilly, Delphine; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Nuckolls, Colin; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2017-05-01

    The study of biomolecular interactions at the single-molecule level holds great potential for both basic science and biotechnology applications. Single-molecule studies often rely on fluorescence-based reporting, with signal levels limited by photon emission from single optical reporters. The point-functionalized carbon nanotube transistor, known as the single-molecule field-effect transistor, is a bioelectronics alternative based on intrinsic molecular charge that offers significantly higher signal levels for detection. Such devices are effective for characterizing DNA hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics and enabling emerging applications in genomic identification. In this work, we show that hybridization kinetics can be directly controlled by electrostatic bias applied between the device and the surrounding electrolyte. We perform the first single-molecule experiments demonstrating the use of electrostatics to control molecular binding. Using bias as a proxy for temperature, we demonstrate the feasibility of detecting various concentrations of 20-nt target sequences from the Ebolavirus nucleoprotein gene in a constant-temperature environment.

  17. Impedance of the single-electron transistor at radio-frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, C; Ferguson, A J

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally characterize the impedance of a single-electron transistor (SET) at an excitation frequency comparable to the electron tunnel rate. In contrast to usual radio-frequency-SET operations, the excitation signal is applied to the gate of the device. At zero source-drain bias, the SET displays both resistive (Sisyphus resistance) and reactive (tunnelling capacitance) components to its impedance. We study the bias dependence of the complex impedance, investigating its response as the electron tunnel rate becomes large with respect to the driving frequency. The experimental data are compared with values calculated from a master equation model.

  18. Impedance of the single-electron transistor at radio-frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, C.; Ferguson, A. J.

    2011-09-01

    We experimentally characterize the impedance of a single-electron transistor (SET) at an excitation frequency comparable to the electron tunnel rate. In contrast to usual radio-frequency-SET operations, the excitation signal is applied to the gate of the device. At zero source-drain bias, the SET displays both resistive (Sisyphus resistance) and reactive (tunnelling capacitance) components to its impedance. We study the bias dependence of the complex impedance, investigating its response as the electron tunnel rate becomes large with respect to the driving frequency. The experimental data are compared with values calculated from a master equation model.

  19. Impedance of the single-electron transistor at radio-frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciccarelli, C; Ferguson, A J, E-mail: cc538@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: ajf1006@cam.ac.uk [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    We experimentally characterize the impedance of a single-electron transistor (SET) at an excitation frequency comparable to the electron tunnel rate. In contrast to usual radio-frequency-SET operations, the excitation signal is applied to the gate of the device. At zero source-drain bias, the SET displays both resistive (Sisyphus resistance) and reactive (tunnelling capacitance) components to its impedance. We study the bias dependence of the complex impedance, investigating its response as the electron tunnel rate becomes large with respect to the driving frequency. The experimental data are compared with values calculated from a master equation model.

  20. A graphene quantum dot with a single electron transistor as an integrated charge sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-Jun; Cao, Gang; Tu, Tao; Li, Hai-Ou; Zhou, Cheng; Hao, Xiao-Jie; Su, Zhan; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2010-12-01

    A quantum dot (QD) with an integrated charge sensor is becoming a common architecture for a spin or charge based solid state qubit. To implement such a structure in graphene, we have fabricated a twin-dot structure in which the larger dot serves as a single electron transistor (SET) to read out the charge state of the nearby gate controlled small QD. A high SET sensitivity of 10-3e/√Hz allowed us to probe Coulomb charging as well as excited state spectra of the QD, even in the regime where the current through the QD is too small to be measured by conventional transport means.

  1. Design of a Negative Differential Resistance Circuit Element Using Single-Electron Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, D. C.; Heij, C. P.; Hadley, P.; Mooij, J. E.

    1998-03-01

    Electronic circuit elements displaying negative differential resistance (NDR), such as tunnel diodes, have a wide variety of device applications, including oscillators, amplifiers, logic, and memory. We present a two-terminal device using two single-electron transistors (SET's) that demonstrates an NDR profile tuneable with gate voltages. If the capacitive coupling between the SET's is sufficiently larger than the junction capacitances, the device exhibits multiply-peaked NDR, allowing its use as a multi-valued digital element. We will also report recent experimental progress in measurements of such a device, fabricated using standard Al tunnel junctions, but with an additional overlap capacitor to allow the required inter-SET coupling.

  2. Fabrication of double-dot single-electron transistor in silicon nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Mingyu; Kaizawa, Takuya; Arita, Masashi [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo, 060-0814 (Japan); Fujiwara, Akira; Ono, Yukinori [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi, 243-0198 (Japan); Inokawa, Hiroshi [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka Univ., 3-5-1, Johoku, Hamamatsu, 432-8011 (Japan); Choi, Jung-Bum [Physics and Research Institute of NanoScience and Technology, Chungbuk National Univ., Cheongju, Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Takahashi, Yasuo, E-mail: y-taka@nano.ist.hokudai.ac.j [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo, 060-0814 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    We propose a simple method for fabricating Si single-electron transistors (SET) with coupled dots by means of a pattern-dependent-oxidation (PADOX) method. The PADOX method is known to convert a small one-dimensional Si wire formed on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate into a SET automatically. We fabricated a double-dot Si SET when we oxidized specially designed Si nanowires formed on SOI substrates. We analyzed the measured electrical characteristics by fitting the measurement and simulation results and confirmed the double-dot formation and the position of the two dots in the Si wire.

  3. Ordinary and extraordinary Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance in (Ga,Mn)As single electron transistor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Novák, Vít; Irvine, A.C.; Kaestner, B.; Shick, Alexander; Foxon, C. T.; Campion, R. P.; Williams, D.A.; Gallagher, B. L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 144, - (2007), s. 536-541 ISSN 0038-1098 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0575; GA ČR GA202/04/1519; GA MŠk LC510; GA ČR GEFON/06/E001; GA ČR GEFON/06/E002 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 015728 - NANOSPIN Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : ferromagnetic semiconductors * magnetoresistance * single-electron transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.535, year: 2007

  4. Microwave-induced co-tunneling in single electron tunneling transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnaes, M.; Savolainen, M.; Manscher, M.

    2002-01-01

    on rubber bellows. Cross-talk was minimized by using individual coaxial lines between the sample and the room temperature electronics: The co-tunneling experiments were performed at zero DC bias current by measuring the voltage response to a very small amplitude 2 Hz current modulation with the gate voltage......The influence of microwaves on the co-tunneling in single electron tunneling transistors has been investigated as function of frequency and power in the temperature range from 150 to 500 mK. All 20 low frequency connections and the RF line were filtered, and the whole cryostat was suspended...

  5. Thickness-dependent electron mobility of single and few-layer MoS2 thin-film transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Heon Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the dependence of electron mobility on the thickness of MoS2 nanosheets by fabricating bottom-gate single and few-layer MoS2 thin-film transistors with SiO2 gate dielectrics and Au electrodes. All the fabricated MoS2 transistors showed on/off-current ratio of ∼107 and saturated output characteristics without high-k capping layers. As the MoS2 thickness increased from 1 to 6 layers, the field-effect mobility of the fabricated MoS2 transistors increased from ∼10 to ∼18 cm2V−1s−1. The increased subthreshold swing of the fabricated transistors with MoS2 thickness suggests that the increase of MoS2 mobility with thickness may be related to the dependence of the contact resistance and the dielectric constant of MoS2 layer on its thickness.

  6. Terahertz light-emitting graphene-channel transistor toward single-mode lasing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Deepika

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A distributed feedback dual-gate graphene-channel field-effect transistor (DFB-DG-GFET was fabricated as a current-injection terahertz (THz light-emitting laser transistor. We observed a broadband emission in a 1–7.6-THz range with a maximum radiation power of ~10 μW as well as a single-mode emission at 5.2 THz with a radiation power of ~0.1 μW both at 100 K when the carrier injection stays between the lower cutoff and upper cutoff threshold levels. The device also exhibited peculiar nonlinear threshold-like behavior with respect to the current-injection level. The LED-like broadband emission is interpreted as an amplified spontaneous THz emission being transcended to a single-mode lasing. Design constraints on waveguide structures for better THz photon field confinement with higher gain overlapping as well as DFB cavity structures with higher Q factors are also addressed towards intense, single-mode continuous wave THz lasing at room temperature.

  7. One-step formation of a single atomic-layer transistor by the selective fluorination of a graphene film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kuan-I; Liao, Jia-Hong; Huang, Chi-Hsien; Hsu, Chang-Lung; Zhang, Wenjing; Lu, Ang-Yu; Li, Lain-Jong; Lai, Chao-Sung; Su, Ching-Yuan

    2014-03-12

    In this study, the scalable and one-step fabrication of single atomic-layer transistors is demonstrated by the selective fluorination of graphene using a low-damage CF4 plasma treatment, where the generated F-radicals preferentially fluorinated the graphene at low temperature (semiconductor/insulator can be directly formed in a single layer of graphene using a one-step fluorination process by introducing a Au thin-film as a buffer layer. With this heterojunction structure, it would be possible to fabricate transistors in a single graphene film via a one-step fluorination process, in which pristine graphene, partial F-graphene, and highly F-graphene serve as the source/drain contacts, the channel, and the channel isolation in a transistor, respectively. The demonstrated graphene transistor exhibits an on-off ratio above 10, which is 3-fold higher than that of devices made from pristine graphene. This efficient transistor fabrication method produces electrical heterojunctions of graphene over a large area and with selective patterning, providing the potential for the integration of electronics down to the single atomic-layer scale. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. High-Precision Displacement Sensing of Monolithic Piezoelectric Disk Resonators Using a Single-Electron Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Santos, J. T.; Sillanpää, M. A.

    2018-02-01

    A single-electron transistor (SET) can be used as an extremely sensitive charge detector. Mechanical displacements can be converted into charge, and hence, SETs can become sensitive detectors of mechanical oscillations. For studying small-energy oscillations, an important approach to realize the mechanical resonators is to use piezoelectric materials. Besides coupling to traditional electric circuitry, the strain-generated piezoelectric charge allows for measuring ultrasmall oscillations via SET detection. Here, we explore the usage of SETs to detect the shear-mode oscillations of a 6-mm-diameter quartz disk resonator with a resonance frequency around 9 MHz. We measure the mechanical oscillations using either a conventional DC SET, or use the SET as a homodyne or heterodyne mixer, or finally, as a radio-frequency single-electron transistor (RF-SET). The RF-SET readout is shown to be the most sensitive method, allowing us to measure mechanical displacement amplitudes below 10^{-13} m. We conclude that a detection based on a SET offers a potential to reach the sensitivity at the quantum limit of the mechanical vibrations.

  9. A radio-frequency single-electron transistor based on an InAs/InP heterostructure nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Henrik A.; Duty, Tim; Abay, Simon

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate radio frequency single-electron transistors fabricated from epitaxially grown InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires. Two sets of double-barrier wires with different barrier thicknesses were grown. The wires were suspended 15 nm above a metal gate electrode. Electrical measurements...... on a high-resistance nanowire showed regularly spaced Coulomb oscillations at a gate voltage from −0.5 to at least 1.8 V. The charge sensitivity was measured to 32 µerms Hz−1/2 at 1.5 K. A low-resistance single-electron transistor showed regularly spaced oscillations only in a small gate-voltage region just...

  10. Single-Molecule Electrochemical Transistor Utilizing a Nickel-Pyridyl Spinterface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooke, Richard J.; Jin, Chengjun; Szumski, Doug S.

    2015-01-01

    Using a scanning tunnelling microscope break-junction technique, we produce 4,4′-bipyridine (44BP) single-molecule junctions with Ni and Au contacts. Electrochemical control is used to prevent Ni oxidation and to modulate the conductance of the devices via nonredox gating - the first time this has...... been shown using non-Au contacts. Remarkably the conductance and gain of the resulting Ni-44BP-Ni electrochemical transistors is significantly higher than analogous Au-based devices. Ab-initio calculations reveal that this behavior arises because charge transport is mediated by spin-polarized Ni d......-electrons, which hybridize strongly with molecular orbitals to form a "spinterface". Our results highlight the important role of the contact material for single-molecule devices and show that it can be varied to provide control of charge and spin transport....

  11. Spearhead Nanometric Field-Effect Transistor Sensors for Single-Cell Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Ainara López; Ali, Tayyibah; Shevchuk, Andrew; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Novak, Pavel; Edwards, Christopher; Lab, Max; Gopal, Sahana; Chiappini, Ciro; Anand, Uma; Magnani, Luca; Coombes, R. Charles; Gorelik, Julia; Matsue, Tomokazu; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Klenerman, David; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Korchev, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Nanometric field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors are made on the tip of spear-shaped dual carbon nanoelectrodes derived from carbon deposition inside double-barrel nanopipettes. The easy fabrication route allows deposition of semiconductors or conducting polymers to comprise the transistor channel. A channel from electrodeposited poly pyrrole (PPy) exhibits high sensitivity toward pH changes. This property is exploited by immobilizing hexokinase on PPy nano-FETs to give rise to a selective ATP biosensor. Extracellular pH and ATP gradients are key biochemical constituents in the microenvironment of living cells; we monitor their real-time changes in relation to cancer cells and cardiomyocytes. The highly localized detection is possible because of the high aspect ratio and the spear-like design of the nano-FET probes. The accurately positioned nano-FET sensors can detect concentration gradients in three-dimensional space, identify biochemical properties of a single living cell, and after cell membrane penetration perform intracellular measurements. PMID:26816294

  12. Current Analysis and Modeling of Fullerene Single-Electron Transistor at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem Hosseini, Vahideh; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Afrang, Saeid; Ismail, Razali

    2017-07-01

    Single-electron transistors (SETs) are interesting electronic devices that have become key elements in modern nanoelectronic systems. SETs operate quickly because they use individual electrons, with the number transferred playing a key role in their switching behavior. However, rapid transmission of electrons can cause their accumulation at the island, affecting the I- V characteristic. Selection of fullerene as a nanoscale zero-dimensional material with high stability, and controllable size in the fabrication process, can overcome this charge accumulation issue and improve the reliability of SETs. Herein, the current in a fullerene SET is modeled and compared with experimental data for a silicon SET. Furthermore, a weaker Coulomb staircase and improved reliability are reported. Moreover, the applied gate voltage and fullerene diameter are found to be directly associated with the I- V curve, enabling the desired current to be achieved by controlling the fullerene diameter.

  13. Measurement of quantum noise in a single-electron transistor near the quantum limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, W. W.; Ji, Z.; Pan, Feng; Stettenheim, Joel; Blencowe, M. P.; Rimberg, A. J.

    2009-09-01

    Quantum measurement has challenged physicists for almost a century. Classically, there is no lower bound on the noise a measurement may add. Quantum mechanically, however, measuring a system necessarily perturbs it. When applied to electrical amplifiers, this means that improved sensitivity requires increased backaction that itself contributes noise. The result is a strict quantum limit on added amplifier noise. To approach this limit, a quantum-limited amplifier must possess an ideal balance between sensitivity and backaction; furthermore, its noise must dominate that of subsequent classical amplifiers. Here, we report the first complete and quantitative measurement of the quantum noise of a superconducting single-electron transistor (S-SET) near a double Cooper-pair resonance predicted to have the right combination of sensitivity and backaction. A simultaneous measurement of our S-SET's charge sensitivity indicates that it operates within a factor of 3.6 of the quantum limit, a fourfold improvement over the nearest comparable results.

  14. Random telegraph signals by alkanethiol-protected Au nanoparticles in chemically assembled single-electron transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Shinya; Azuma, Yasuo; Tanaka, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Smith, Luke W.; Smith, Charles G.; Majima, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    We have studied random telegraph signals (RTSs) in a chemically assembled single-electron transistor (SET) at temperatures as low as 300 mK. The RTSs in the chemically assembled SET were investigated by measuring the source–drain current, using a histogram of the RTS dwell time, and calculating the power spectrum density of the drain current–time characteristics. It was found that the dwell time of the RTS was dependent on the drain voltage of the SET, but was independent of the gate voltage. Considering the spatial structure of the chemically assembled SET, the origin of the RTS is attributed to the trapped charges on an alkanethiol-protected Au nanoparticle positioned near the SET. These results are important as they will help to realize stable chemically assembled SETs in practical applications

  15. Ultraclean individual suspended single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siyu; Zhang, Jian; Nshimiyimana, Jean Pierre; Chi, Xiannian; Hu, Xiao; Wu, Pei; Liu, Jia; Wang, Gongtang; Sun, Lianfeng

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we report an effective technique of fabricating ultraclean individual suspended single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) transistors. The surface tension of molten silver is utilized to suspend an individual SWNT between a pair of Pd electrodes during annealing treatment. This approach avoids the usage and the residues of organic resist attached to SWNTs, resulting ultraclean SWNT devices. And the resistance per micrometer of suspended SWNTs is found to be smaller than that of non-suspended SWNTs, indicating the effect of the substrate on the electrical properties of SWNTs. The ON-state resistance (˜50 kΩ), mobility of 8600 cm2 V-1 s-1 and large on/off ratio (˜105) of semiconducting suspended SWNT devices indicate its advantages and potential applications.

  16. Single trap dynamics in electrolyte-gated Si-nanowire field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pud, S.; Gasparyan, F.; Petrychuk, M.; Li, J.; Offenhäusser, A.; Vitusevich, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid-gated silicon nanowire (NW) field effect transistors (FETs) are fabricated and their transport and dynamic properties are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Random telegraph signal (RTS) fluctuations were registered in the nanolength channel FETs and used for the experimental and theoretical analysis of transport properties. The drain current and the carrier interaction processes with a single trap are analyzed using a quantum-mechanical evaluation of carrier distribution in the channel and also a classical evaluation. Both approaches are applied to treat the experimental data and to define an appropriate solution for describing the drain current behavior influenced by single trap resulting in RTS fluctuations in the Si NW FETs. It is shown that quantization and tunneling effects explain the behavior of the electron capture time on the single trap. Based on the experimental data, parameters of the single trap were determined. The trap is located at a distance of about 2 nm from the interface Si/SiO2 and has a repulsive character. The theory of dynamic processes in liquid-gated Si NW FET put forward here is in good agreement with experimental observations of transport in the structures and highlights the importance of quantization in carrier distribution for analyzing dynamic processes in the nanostructures.

  17. Low Temperature Characterization of PMOS-type Gate-all-around Silicon nanowire FETs as single-hole-transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, B. H.; Hwang, S. W.; Lee, Y. Y.; Son, M. H.; Ahn, D.; Cho, K. H.; Yeo, K. H.; Kim, D.-W.; Jin, G. Y.; Park, D.

    2011-12-01

    We report the single hole tunneling characteristics observed from a PMOS-type gate-all-around silicon nanowire field-effect-transistor with the radius 5 nm and the length 44 nm. The total capacitance of the quantum dot obtained from the measured Coulomb oscillations and Coulomb diamonds matches with the ideal capacitance of the silicon cylinder. It suggests that the observed single hole tunneling is originated from the fabricated structure.

  18. Radio frequency single electron transistors: readout for a solid state quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehler, T.M.; Reilly, D.J.; Starrett, R.P.; Brenner, R.; Hamilton, A.R.; Clark, R.G.; Court, N.A.; Dzurak, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Quantum computers promise unprecedented computational power if they can be scaled to a large number of qubits. Essential to the operation of such a machine is readout: the determination of the final quantum state of the system. In the case of the silicon based solid state architecture proposed by Kane, readout is achieved by determining the direction of a single electron spin via the detection of a spin dependent tunneling event. This requires a highly sensitive electrometer that can detect the motion of a single electron in a timescale less than the spin relaxation time. The Radio Frequency Single Electron Transistor (RF-SET) is a device that possesses both the charge sensitivity (oq ∼ 10 -6 / √Hz), approaching the quantum limit) and fast response required to perform readout in such a system. Here we describe the fabrication and operation of transmission mode RF-SETs and discuss the application of these novel electrometers in the readout of a solid state quantum computer

  19. Strong suppression of shot noise in a feedback-controlled single-electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Timo; Strasberg, Philipp; Bayer, Johannes C.; Rugeramigabo, Eddy P.; Brandes, Tobias; Haug, Rolf J.

    2017-03-01

    Feedback control of quantum mechanical systems is rapidly attracting attention not only due to fundamental questions about quantum measurements, but also because of its novel applications in many fields in physics. Quantum control has been studied intensively in quantum optics but progress has recently been made in the control of solid-state qubits as well. In quantum transport only a few active and passive feedback experiments have been realized on the level of single electrons, although theoretical proposals exist. Here we demonstrate the suppression of shot noise in a single-electron transistor using an exclusively electronic closed-loop feedback to monitor and adjust the counting statistics. With increasing feedback response we observe a stronger suppression and faster freezing of charge current fluctuations. Our technique is analogous to the generation of squeezed light with in-loop photodetection as used in quantum optics. Sub-Poisson single-electron sources will pave the way for high-precision measurements in quantum transport similar to optical or optomechanical equivalents.

  20. Electrical properties of single CuO nanowires for device fabrication: Diodes and field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florica, Camelia; Costas, Andreea; Boni, Andra Georgia; Negrea, Raluca; Preda, Nicoleta, E-mail: nicol@infim.ro, E-mail: encu@infim.ro; Pintilie, Lucian; Enculescu, Ionut, E-mail: nicol@infim.ro, E-mail: encu@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, Bucharest, Magurele 077125 (Romania); Ion, Lucian [Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Atomistilor Street 103, Magurele, Ilfov 77125 (Romania)

    2015-06-01

    High aspect ratio CuO nanowires are synthesized by a simple and scalable method, thermal oxidation in air. The structural, morphological, optical, and electrical properties of the semiconducting nanowires were studied. Au-Ti/CuO nanowire and Pt/CuO nanowire electrical contacts were investigated. A dominant Schottky mechanism was evidenced in the Au-Ti/CuO nanowire junction and an ohmic behavior was observed for the Pt/CuO nanowire junction. The Pt/CuO nanowire/Pt structure allows the measurements of the intrinsic transport properties of the single CuO nanowires. It was found that an activation mechanism describes the behavior at higher temperatures, while a nearest neighbor hopping transport mechanism is characteristic at low temperatures. This was also confirmed by four-probe resistivity measurements on the single CuO nanowires. By changing the metal/semiconductor interface, devices such as Schottky diodes and field effect transistors based on single CuO p-type nanowire semiconductor channel are obtained. These devices are suitable for being used in various electronic circuits where their size related properties can be exploited.

  1. Single-crystalline Ni2Ge/Ge/Ni2Ge nanowire heterostructure transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Xiu, Faxian; Hong, Augustin J; Chen, Shengyu; Wang, Minsheng; Zeng, Caifu; Yang, Hong-Jie; Tuan, Hsing-Yu; Tsai, Cho-Jen; Chen, Lih Juann; Wang, Kang L

    2010-12-17

    In this study, we report on the formation of a single-crystalline Ni(2)Ge/Ge/Ni(2)Ge nanowire heterostructure and its field effect characteristics by controlled reaction between a supercritical fluid-liquid-solid (SFLS) synthesized Ge nanowire and Ni metal contacts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies reveal a wide temperature range to convert the Ge nanowire to single-crystalline Ni(2)Ge by a thermal diffusion process. The maximum current density of the fully germanide Ni(2)Ge nanowires exceeds 3.5 × 10(7) A cm(-2), and the resistivity is about 88 μΩ cm. The in situ reaction examined by TEM shows atomically sharp interfaces for the Ni(2)Ge/Ge/Ni(2)Ge heterostructure. The interface epitaxial relationships are determined to be [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Back-gate field effect transistors (FETs) were also fabricated using this low resistivity Ni(2)Ge as source/drain contacts. Electrical measurements show a good p-type FET behavior with an on/off ratio over 10(3) and a one order of magnitude improvement in hole mobility from that of SFLS-synthesized Ge nanowire.

  2. Low-Voltage Organic Single-Crystal Field-Effect Transistor with Steep Subthreshold Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fangxu; Sun, Lingjie; Han, Jiangli; Li, Baili; Yu, Xi; Zhang, Xiaotao; Ren, Xiaochen; Hu, Wenping

    2018-03-06

    Anodization is a promising technique to form high- k dielectrics for low-power organic field-effect transistor (OFET) applications. However, the surface quality of the dielectric, which is mainly inherited from the metal electrode, can be improved further than other fabrication techniques, such as sol-gel. In this study, we applied the template stripping method to fabricate a low-power single-crystalline OFET based on the anodized AlO x dielectric. We found that the template stripping method largely improves the surface roughness of the deposited Al and allows for the formation of a high-quality AlO x high- k dielectric by anodization. The ultraflat AlO x /SAM dielectric combined with a single-crystal 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA) semiconductor produced a nearly defect-free interface with a steep subthreshold swing (SS) of 66 mV/decade. The current device is a promising candidate for future ultralow-power applications. Other than metal deposition, template stripping could provide a general approach to improve thin-film quality for many other types of materials and processes.

  3. Nanoampere charge pump by single-electron ratchet using silicon nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Akira; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Ono, Yukinori

    2008-01-01

    Nanoampere single-electron pumping is presented at 20K using a single-electron ratchet comprising silicon nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. The ratchet features an asymmetric potential with a pocket that captures single electrons from the source and ejects them to the drain. Directional single-electron transfer is achieved by applying one ac signal with the frequency up to 2.3GHz. We find anomalous shapes of current steps which can be ascribed to nonadiabatic electron capture.

  4. Experimental Observation of Quantum Confinement Effect in and Silicon Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors and Single-Electron/Hole Transistors Operating at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryota; Nozue, Motoki; Saraya, Takuya; Hiramoto, Toshiro

    2013-10-01

    The quantum confinement effect (QCE) in ultranarrow silicon nanowire channel field-effect transistors (FETs) as well as single-electron/hole transistors (SET/SHTs) operating at room temperature is intensively investigated for the optimization of device design and fabrication. By adopting a “shared channel” structure with the directions of and , a carrier-dependent QCE is systematically examined. It is found that nanowire pFETs exhibit a smaller threshold voltage (Vth) variability due to a weaker QCE, while nFETs and n/pFETs show comparable Vth variabilities coming from the QCE. It is also found that only SETs exhibit clear Coulomb oscillations in the case of the channel, suggesting the formation of higher tunnel barriers than SHTs. On the other hand, SHTs show undesirable multidot behavior in spite of their comparable QCEs for electrons and holes. It is concluded that -directed nanowire channel SETs and n/pFETs are suitable for the integration of CMOS and SETs.

  5. A radio frequency single-electron transistor based on an InAs/InP heterostructure nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Henrik A; Duty, Tim; Abay, Simon; Wilson, Chris; Wagner, Jakob B; Thelander, Claes; Delsing, Per; Samuelson, Lars

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate radio frequency single-electron transistors fabricated from epitaxially grown InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires. Two sets of double-barrier wires with different barrier thicknesses were grown. The wires were suspended 15 nm above a metal gate electrode. Electrical measurements on a high-resistance nanowire showed regularly spaced Coulomb oscillations at a gate voltage from -0.5 to at least 1.8 V. The charge sensitivity was measured to 32 microe rms Hz(-1/2) at 1.5 K. A low-resistance single-electron transistor showed regularly spaced oscillations only in a small gate-voltage region just before carrier depletion. This device had a charge sensitivity of 2.5 microe rms Hz(-1/2). At low frequencies this device showed a typical 1/f noise behavior, with a level extrapolated to 300 microe rms Hz(-1/2) at 10 Hz.

  6. Passivated graphene transistors fabricated on a millimeter-sized single-crystal graphene film prepared with chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Meng-Yu; Lee, Si-Chen; Lin, Shih-Yen; Wang, Cheng-Hung; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we first investigate the effects of partial pressures and flow rates of precursors on the single-crystal graphene growth using chemical vapor depositions on copper foils. These factors are shown to be critical to the growth rate, seeding density and size of graphene single crystals. The prepared graphene films in millimeter sizes are then bubbling transferred to silicon-dioxide/silicon substrates for high-mobility graphene transistor fabrications. After high-temperature annealing and hexamethyldisilazane passivation, the water attachment is removed from the graphene channel. The elimination of uncontrolled doping and enhancement of carrier mobility accompanied by these procedures indicate that they are promising for fabrications of graphene transistors. (paper)

  7. Probing quantum Hall states with single-electron transistors at high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Martin; Yankowitz, Matthew; Forsythe, Carlos; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Dean, Cory

    The sequence of fractional quantum Hall states in graphene is not yet fully understood, largely due to disorder-induced limitations of conventional transport studies. Measurements of magnetotransport in other 2D crystals are further complicated by the difficulties in making ohmic contact to the materials. On the other hand, bulk electronic compressibility can provide clear signatures of the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, does not require ohmic contact, and can be localized to regions of low disorder. The single-electron transistor (SET) is a suitable tool for such experiments due to its small size and high charge sensitivity, which allow electric fields penetrating the 2D electron system to be detected locally and with high fidelity. Here we report studies of exfoliated 2D van der Waals materials fully encapsulated in flakes of hexagonal boron nitride. SETs are fabricated lithographically on top of the encapsulation, yielding a structure which lends itself to experiments at high electric and magnetic fields. We demonstrate the method on monolayer graphene, where we observe fractional quantum Hall states at all filling factors ν = n / 3 up to n = 17 and extract their associated energy gaps for magnetic fields up to 31 tesla.

  8. Solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube transistor arrays for wearable display backplanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong-Cheol Kang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube thin-film transistor (SWCNT-TFT arrays with polymeric gate dielectrics on the polymeric substrates for wearable display backplanes, which can be directly attached to the human body. The optimized SWCNT-TFTs without any buffer layer on flexible substrates exhibit a linear field-effect mobility of 1.5cm2/V-s and a threshold voltage of around 0V. The statistical plot of the key device metrics extracted from 35 SWCNT-TFTs which were fabricated in different batches at different times conclusively support that we successfully demonstrated high-performance solution-processed SWCNT-TFT arrays which demand excellent uniformity in the device performance. We also investigate the operational stability of wearable SWCNT-TFT arrays against an applied strain of up to 40%, which is the essential for a harsh degree of strain on human body. We believe that the demonstration of flexible SWCNT-TFT arrays which were fabricated by all solution-process except the deposition of metal electrodes at process temperature below 130oC can open up new routes for wearable display backplanes.

  9. Density-Functional Theory description of transport in the single-electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Krissia; Oliveira, Luiz N.

    The Kondo effect governs the low-temperature transport properties of the single electron transistor (SET), a quantum dot bridging two electron gases. In the weak coupling limit, for odd dot occupation, the gate-potential profile of the conductance approaches a step, known as the Kondo plateau. The plateau and other SET properties being well understood on the basis of the Anderson model, more realistic (i. e., DFT) descriptions of the device are now desired. This poses a challenge, since the SET is strongly correlated. DFT computations that reproduce the conductance plateau have been reported, e. g., by, which rely on the exact functional provided by the Bethe-Ansatz solution for the Anderson model. Here, sticking to DFT tradition, we employ a functional derived from a homogeneous system: the parametrization of the Lieb-Wu solution for the Hubbard model due to. Our computations reproduce the plateau and yield other results in accurate agreement with the exact diagonalization of the Anderson Hamiltonian. The prospects for extensions to realistic descriptions of two-dimensional nanostructured devices will be discussed. Luiz N. Oliveira thanks CNPq (312658/2013-3) and Krissia Zawadzki thanks CNPq (140703/2014-4) for financial support.

  10. Solution-processed zinc oxide nanoparticles/single-walled carbon nanotubes hybrid thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangmei; Sun, Jia; Qian, Chuan; Hu, Xiaotao; Wu, Han; Huang, Yulan; Yang, Junliang

    2016-09-01

    Solution-processed thin-film transistors (TFTs) are the essential building blocks for manufacturing the low-cost and large-area consumptive electronics. Herein, solution-processed TFTs based on the composites of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were fabricated by the methods of spin-coating and doctor-blading. Through controlling the weight of SWCNTs, the ZnO/SWCNTs TFTs fabricated by spin-coating demonstrated a field-effect mobility of 4.7 cm2/Vs and a low threshold voltage of 0.8 V, while the TFTs devices fabricated by doctor-blading technique showed reasonable electrical performance with a mobility of 0.22 cm2/Vs. Furthermore, the ion-gel was used as an efficient electrochemical gate dielectric because of its large electric double-layer capacitance. The operating voltage of all the TFTs devices is as low as 4.0 V. The research suggests that ZnO/SWCNTs TFTs have the potential applications in low-cost, large-area and flexible consumptive electronics, such as chemical-biological sensors and smart label.

  11. Solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube transistor arrays for wearable display backplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Ha, Tae-Jun

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube thin-film transistor (SWCNT-TFT) arrays with polymeric gate dielectrics on the polymeric substrates for wearable display backplanes, which can be directly attached to the human body. The optimized SWCNT-TFTs without any buffer layer on flexible substrates exhibit a linear field-effect mobility of 1.5cm2/V-s and a threshold voltage of around 0V. The statistical plot of the key device metrics extracted from 35 SWCNT-TFTs which were fabricated in different batches at different times conclusively support that we successfully demonstrated high-performance solution-processed SWCNT-TFT arrays which demand excellent uniformity in the device performance. We also investigate the operational stability of wearable SWCNT-TFT arrays against an applied strain of up to 40%, which is the essential for a harsh degree of strain on human body. We believe that the demonstration of flexible SWCNT-TFT arrays which were fabricated by all solution-process except the deposition of metal electrodes at process temperature below 130oC can open up new routes for wearable display backplanes.

  12. All-Printed Thin-Film Transistor Based on Purified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Linear Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiru Gu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an all-printed thin-film transistor (TFT on a polyimide substrate with linear transconductance response. The TFT is based on our purified single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT solution that is primarily consists of semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs with low metal impurities. The all-printed TFT exhibits a high ON/OFF ratio of around 103 and bias-independent transconductance over a certain gate bias range. Such bias-independent transconductance property is different from that of conventional metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs due to the special band structure and the one-dimensional (1D quantum confined density of state (DOS of CNTs. The bias-independent transconductance promises modulation linearity for analog electronics.

  13. Correlation between crystal structure and mobility in organic field-effect transistors based on single crystals of tetrathiafulvalene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Torrent, Marta; Hadley, Peter; Bromley, Stefan T; Ribas, Xavi; Tarrés, Judit; Mas, Montserrat; Molins, Elies; Veciana, Jaume; Rovira, Concepció

    2004-07-14

    Recently, it was reported that crystals of the organic material dithiophene-tetrathiafulvalene (DT-TTF) have a high field-effect charge carrier mobility of 1.4 cm(2)/(V x s). These crystals were formed by a simple drop-casting method, making this material interesting to investigate for possible applications in low-cost electronics. Here, organic single-crystal field-effect transistors based on materials related to DT-TTF are presented and a clear correlation between the crystal structure and the electrical characteristics is observed. The observed relationship between the mobilities in the different crystal structures is strongly corroborated by calculations of both the molecular reorganization energies and the maximum intermolecular transfer integrals. The most suitable materials described here exhibit mobilities that are among the highest reported for organic field-effect transistors and that are the highest reported for solution-processed materials.

  14. Hysteresis in single-layer MoS2 field effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Late, Dattatray J; Liu, Bin; Matte, H S S Ramakrishna; Dravid, Vinayak P; Rao, C N R

    2012-06-26

    Field effect transistors using ultrathin molybdenum disulfide (MoS(2)) have recently been experimentally demonstrated, which show promising potential for advanced electronics. However, large variations like hysteresis, presumably due to extrinsic/environmental effects, are often observed in MoS(2) devices measured under ambient environment. Here, we report the origin of their hysteretic and transient behaviors and suggest that hysteresis of MoS(2) field effect transistors is largely due to absorption of moisture on the surface and intensified by high photosensitivity of MoS(2). Uniform encapsulation of MoS(2) transistor structures with silicon nitride grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is effective in minimizing the hysteresis, while the device mobility is improved by over 1 order of magnitude.

  15. Electro-oxidized epitaxial graphene channel field-effect transistors with single-walled carbon nanotube thin film gate electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Palanisamy; Itkis, Mikhail E; Bekyarova, Elena; Wang, Feihu; Niyogi, Sandip; Chi, Xiaoliu; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt; Haddon, Robert C

    2010-10-20

    We report the effect of electrochemical oxidation in nitric acid on the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene (EG) grown on silicon carbide substrates; we demonstrate the availability of an additional reaction channel in EG, which is not present in graphite but which facilitates the introduction of the reaction medium into the graphene galleries during electro-oxidation. The device performance of the chemically processed graphene was studied by patterning the EG wafers with two geometrically identical macroscopic channels; the electro-oxidized channel showed a logarithmic increase of resistance with decreasing temperature, which is ascribed to the scattering of charge carriers in a two-dimensional electronic gas, rather than the presence of an energy gap at the Fermi level. Field-effect transistors were fabricated on the electro-oxidized and pristine graphene channels using single-walled carbon nanotube thin film top gate electrodes, thereby allowing the study of the effect of oxidative chemistry on the transistor performance of EG. The electro-oxidized channel showed higher values for the on-off ratio and the mobility of the graphene field-effect transistor, which we ascribe to the availability of high-quality internal graphene layers after electro-oxidation of the more defective top layers. Thus, the present oxidative process provides a clear contrast with previously demonstrated covalent chemistry in which sp(3) hybridized carbon atoms are introduced into the graphitic transport layer of the lattice by carbon-carbon bond formation, thereby opening an energy gap.

  16. High-performance partially aligned semiconductive single-walled carbon nanotube transistors achieved with a parallel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yilei; Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2013-09-09

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are widely thought to be a strong contender for next-generation printed electronic transistor materials. However, large-scale solution-based parallel assembly of SWNTs to obtain high-performance transistor devices is challenging. SWNTs have anisotropic properties and, although partial alignment of the nanotubes has been theoretically predicted to achieve optimum transistor device performance, thus far no parallel solution-based technique can achieve this. Herein a novel solution-based technique, the immersion-cum-shake method, is reported to achieve partially aligned SWNT networks using semiconductive (99% enriched) SWNTs (s-SWNTs). By immersing an aminosilane-treated wafer into a solution of nanotubes placed on a rotary shaker, the repetitive flow of the nanotube solution over the wafer surface during the deposition process orients the nanotubes toward the fluid flow direction. By adjusting the nanotube concentration in the solution, the nanotube density of the partially aligned network can be controlled; linear densities ranging from 5 to 45 SWNTs/μm are observed. Through control of the linear SWNT density and channel length, the optimum SWNT-based field-effect transistor devices achieve outstanding performance metrics (with an on/off ratio of ~3.2 × 10(4) and mobility 46.5 cm(2) /Vs). Atomic force microscopy shows that the partial alignment is uniform over an area of 20 × 20 mm(2) and confirms that the orientation of the nanotubes is mostly along the fluid flow direction, with a narrow orientation scatter characterized by a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of parallel process is large-scale applicable and exploits the anisotropic properties of the SWNTs, presenting a viable path forward for industrial adoption of SWNTs in printed, flexible, and large-area electronics. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The effects of changing the electrodes temperature on the tunnel magnetoresistance in the ferromagnetic single electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, N.; Pourali, N.; Kavaz, E.

    2018-01-01

    Ferromagnetic single electron transistor with electrodes having different temperatures is investigated and the effects of changing electrodes temperature on TMR of system are studied. A modified orthodox theory is used to study the system and to calculate the electron tunneling transition rate. The results show that the temperature of electrodes can be an effective tool to control and tune the tunnel magnetoresistance of FM-SET. Also, the effects of parameters such as resistance ratio of junctions, magnetic polarization and spin relaxation time on the behaviour of the system are studied.

  18. X-ray Nanodiffraction on a Single SiGe Quantum Dot inside a Functioning Field-Effect Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    For advanced electronic, optoelectronic, or mechanical nanoscale devices a detailed understanding of their structural properties and in particular the strain state within their active region is of utmost importance. We demonstrate that X-ray nanodiffraction represents an excellent tool to investigate the internal structure of such devices in a nondestructive way by using a focused synchotron X-ray beam with a diameter of 400 nm. We show results on the strain fields in and around a single SiGe island, which serves as stressor for the Si-channel in a fully functioning Si–metal–oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor. PMID:21627099

  19. Enrichment of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by carbothermic reaction for use in all-nanotube field effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shisheng; Liu, Chang; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Sun, Dong-Ming; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-11-27

    Selective removal of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and consequent enrichment of semiconducting SWCNTs were achieved through an efficient carbothermic reaction with a NiO thin film at a relatively low temperature of 350 °C. All-SWCNT field effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated with the aid of a patterned NiO mask, in which the as-grown SWCNTs behaving as source/drain electrodes and the remaining semiconducting SWCNTs that survive in the carbothermic reaction as a channel material. The all-SWCNT FETs demonstrate improved current ON/OFF ratios of ∼10(3).

  20. Tunneling spectroscopy of a germanium quantum dot in single-hole transistors with self-aligned electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G-L; Kuo, David M T; Lai, W-T; Li, P-W

    2007-01-01

    We have fabricated a Ge quantum dot (QD) (∼10 nm) single-hole transistor with self-aligned electrodes using thermal oxidation of a SiGe-on-insulator nanowire based on FinFET technology. This fabricated device exhibits clear Coulomb blockade oscillations with large peak-to-valley ratio (PVCR) of 250-750 and negative differential conductance with PVCR of ∼12 at room temperature. This reveals that the gate-induced tunneling barrier lowering is effectively suppressed due to the self-aligned electrode structure. The magnitude of tunneling current spectra also reveals the coupling strengths between the energy levels of the Ge QD and electrodes

  1. Coulomb blockade anisotropic magnetoresistance and voltage controlled magnetic switching in a ferromagnetic GaMnAs single electron transistor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Irvine, A.C.; Kaestner, B.; Shick, Alexander; Campion, R. P.; Williams, D.A.; Gallagher, B. L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 310, - (2007), s. 1883-1888 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0575; GA MŠk LC510; GA ČR GEFON/06/E002 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 015728 - NANOSPIN Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : ferromagnetic semiconductors * magnetoresistance * single-electron transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.704, year: 2007

  2. In Silico Modeling of Indigo and Tyrian Purple Single-Electron Nano-Transistors Using Density Functional Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shityakov, Sergey; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola; Broscheit, Jens-Albert

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and implement an in silico model of indigoid-based single-electron transistor (SET) nanodevices, which consist of indigoid molecules from natural dye weakly coupled to gold electrodes that function in a Coulomb blockade regime. The electronic properties of the indigoid molecules were investigated using the optimized density-functional theory (DFT) with a continuum model. Higher electron transport characteristics were determined for Tyrian purple, consistent with experimentally derived data. Overall, these results can be used to correctly predict and emphasize the electron transport functions of organic SETs, demonstrating their potential for sustainable nanoelectronics comprising the biodegradable and biocompatible materials.

  3. Modeling and the analysis of control logic for a digital PWM controller based on a nano electronic single electron transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathnakannan Kailasam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the modelling and the analysis of control logic for a Nano-Device- based PWM controller. A comprehensive simple SPICE schematic model for Single Electron transistor has been proposed. The operation of basic Single Electron Transistor logic gates and SET flip flops were successfully designed and their performances analyzed. The proposed design for realizing the logic gates and flip-flops is used in constructing the PWM controller utilized for switching the buck converter circuit. The output of the converter circuit is compared with reference voltage, and when the error voltage and the reference are matched the latch is reset so as to generate the PWM signal. Due to the simplicity and accuracy of the compact model, the simulation time and speed are much faster, which makes it potentially applicable in large-scale circuit simulation. This study confirms that the SET-based PWM controller is small in size, consumes ultra low power and operates at high speeds without compromising any performance. In addition these devices are capable of measuring charges of extremely high sensitivity.

  4. Fabrication and Characterization of a Single Hole Transistor in p-type GaAs/AlGaAs Heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tracy, Lisa A [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reno, John L. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hargett, Terry W. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Most spin qubit research to date has focused on manipulating single electron spins in quantum dots. However, hole spins are predicted to have some advantages over electron spins, such as reduced coupling to host semiconductor nuclear spins and the ability to control hole spins electrically using the large spin-orbit interaction. Building on recent advances in fabricating high-mobility 2D hole systems in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures at Sandia, we fabricate and characterize single hole transistors in GaAs. We demonstrate p-type double quantum dot devices with few-hole occupation, which could be used to study the physics of individual hole spins and control over coupling between hole spins, looking towards eventual applications in quantum computing. Intentionally left blank

  5. Polarization-Dependent Photoinduced Bias-Stress Effect in Single-Crystal Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Ho; Najafov, Hikmet; Kharlamov, Nikolai; Kuznetsov, Denis V; Didenko, Sergei I; Cho, Kilwon; Briseno, Alejandro L; Podzorov, Vitaly

    2017-10-04

    Photoinduced charge transfer between semiconductors and gate dielectrics can occur in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) operating under illumination, leading to a pronounced bias-stress effect in devices that are normally stable while operating in the dark. Here, we report an observation of a polarization-dependent photoinduced bias-stress effect in two prototypical single-crystal OFETs, based on rubrene and tetraphenylbis(indolo{1,2-a})quinolin. We find that the decay rate of the source-drain current in these OFETs under illumination is a periodic function of the polarization angle of incident photoexcitation with respect to the crystal axes, with a periodicity of π. The angular positions of maxima and minima of the bias-stress rate match those of the optical absorption coefficient of the corresponding crystals. The analysis of the effect shows that it stems from a charge transfer of "hot" holes, photogenerated in the crystal within a very short thermalization length (≪μm) from the semiconductor-dielectric interface. The observed phenomenon is a type of intrinsic structure-property relationship, revealing how molecular packing affects parameter drift in organic transistors under illumination. We also demonstrate that a photoinduced charge transfer in OFETs can be used for recording rewritable accumulation channels with an optically defined geometry and resolution, which can be used in a number of potential applications.

  6. Experimental synchronization of chaos in a large ring of mutually coupled single-transistor oscillators: Phase, amplitude, and clustering effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, Ludovico

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, experimental evidence of multiple synchronization phenomena in a large (n = 30) ring of chaotic oscillators is presented. Each node consists of an elementary circuit, generating spikes of irregular amplitude and comprising one bipolar junction transistor, one capacitor, two inductors, and one biasing resistor. The nodes are mutually coupled to their neighbours via additional variable resistors. As coupling resistance is decreased, phase synchronization followed by complete synchronization is observed, and onset of synchronization is associated with partial synchronization, i.e., emergence of communities (clusters). While component tolerances affect community structure, the general synchronization properties are maintained across three prototypes and in numerical simulations. The clusters are destroyed by adding long distance connections with distant notes, but are otherwise relatively stable with respect to structural connectivity changes. The study provides evidence that several fundamental synchronization phenomena can be reliably observed in a network of elementary single-transistor oscillators, demonstrating their generative potential and opening way to potential applications of this undemanding setup in experimental modelling of the relationship between network structure, synchronization, and dynamical properties.

  7. Heterostructured semiconductor single-walled carbon nanotube films for solution-processed high-performance field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Noh-Hwal; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Jeong, Seung-Hyeon; Khim, Dongyoon; Kim, Yun Ho; Yoo, Sungmi; Noh, Yong-Young; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we report a simple and effective method to simultaneously achieve a high charge-carrier mobility and low off current in conjugated polymer-wrapped semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (s-SWNT) transistors by applying a SWNT bilayer. To achieve the high mobility and low off current, highly purified and less purified s-SWNTs are successively coated to form the semiconducting layer consisting of poly (3-dodecylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3DDT)-wrapped high-pressure carbon mono oxide (HiPCO) SWNT (P3DDT-HiPCO) and poly (9, 9-di-n-dodecylfluorene) (PFDD)-wrapped plasma discharge (PD) SWNT (PFDD-PD). The SWNT transistors with bilayer SWNT networked film showed highly improved hole field-effect mobility (6.18 ± 0.85 cm2V-1s-1 average), on/off current ratio (107), and off current (˜1 pA). Thus, the combination of less purified PFDD-PD (98%-99%) charge-injection layer and highly purified s-P3DDT-HiPCO (>99%) charge-transport layer as the bi-layered semiconducting film achieved high mobility and low off current simultaneously.

  8. Growth of segmented gold nanorods with nanogaps by the electrochemical wet etching technique for single-electron transistor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Nguyen Van; Kumar, Sanjeev; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2009-03-01

    The growth of multisegment nanorods comprising gold (Au) and sacrificial silver (Ag) segments (Au-Ag-Au or Au-Ag-Au-Ag-Au) using the electrochemical wet etching method is reported. The nanorods were fabricated using an alumina template of thickness 100 µm and pore size of 200 nm. A variety of nanorods from single to seven segments comprising alternate Au and Ag segments were fabricated with better control of growth rate. The multisegment nanorods were selectively etched by removing the Ag segments to create gaps in the fabricated nanorods. A careful investigation led to the creation of a wide variety of nanogaps in the fabricated multisegment nanorods. The size of the nanogap was controlled by the passage of current through the electrochemical process, and size below 10 nm was achievable at exchanged charges of ~1 mC. A further lowering in the size of nanogaps was achieved by diluting the silver plating solution and a segmented nanorod with nanogap (Au-nanogap-Au) of 3.8 nm at exchanged charges of 0.2 mC was successfully created. In addition, segmented nanorods with two or more nanogaps (Au-nanogap-Au-nanogap-Ag) placed symmetrically and asymmetrically on either side of the central Au segments were also created. A prototype of a single-electron transistor device based on segmented nanorods with two nanogaps is proposed. The results obtained could form the basis for the realization of quantum tunneling devices where the barrier thickness is very critical and demands values less than 5 nm. The encouraging results show the promise of multisegment nanorods for fabricating devices working at the de Broglie wavelength such as single-electron transistors.

  9. Colloidal Quantum Dot Inks for Single-Step-Fabricated Field-Effect Transistors: The Importance of Postdeposition Ligand Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazs, Daniel M; Rizkia, Nisrina; Fang, Hong-Hua; Dirin, Dmitry N; Momand, Jamo; Kooi, Bart J; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2018-02-14

    Colloidal quantum dots are a class of solution-processed semiconductors with good prospects for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. Removal of the surfactant, so-called ligand exchange, is a crucial step in making the solid films conductive, but performing it in solid state introduces surface defects and cracks in the films. Hence, the formation of thick, device-grade films have only been possible through layer-by-layer processing, limiting the technological interest for quantum dot solids. Solution-phase ligand exchange before the deposition allows for the direct deposition of thick, homogeneous films suitable for device applications. In this work, fabrication of field-effect transistors in a single step is reported using blade-coating, an upscalable, industrially relevant technique. Most importantly, a postdeposition washing step results in device properties comparable to the best layer-by-layer processed devices, opening the way for large-scale fabrication and further interest from the research community.

  10. Single photon sources in 4H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Y.; Umeda, T.; Okamoto, M.; Kosugi, R.; Harada, S.; Haruyama, M.; Kada, W.; Hanaizumi, O.; Onoda, S.; Ohshima, T.

    2018-01-01

    We present single photon sources (SPSs) embedded in 4H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). They are formed in the SiC/SiO2 interface regions of wet-oxidation C-face 4H-SiC MOSFETs and were not found in other C-face and Si-face MOSFETs. Their bright room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) was observed in the range from 550 to 750 nm and revealed variable multi-peak structures as well as variable peak shifts. We characterized a wide variety of their PL spectra as the inevitable variation of local atomic structures at the interface. Their polarization dependence indicates that they are formed at the SiC side of the interface. We also demonstrate that it is possible to switch on/off the SPSs by a bias voltage of the MOSFET.

  11. Fabrication of metallic single electron transistors featuring plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasian, Golnaz

    The continuing increase of the device density in integrated circuits (ICs) gives rise to the high level of power that is dissipated per unit area and consequently a high temperature in the circuits. Since temperature affects the performance and reliability of the circuits, minimization of the energy consumption in logic devices is now the center of attention. According to the International Technology Roadmaps for Semiconductors (ITRS), single electron transistors (SETs) hold the promise of achieving the lowest power of any known logic device, as low as 1x10-18 J per switching event. Moreover, SETs are the most sensitive electrometers to date, and are capable of detecting a fraction of an electron charge. Despite their low power consumption and high sensitivity for charge detection, room temperature operation of these devices is quite challenging mainly due to lithographical constraints in fabricating structures with the required dimensions of less than 10 nm. Silicon based SETs have been reported to operate at room temperature. However, they all suffer from significant variation in batch-to-batch performance, low fabrication yield, and temperature-dependent tunnel barrier height. In this project, we explored the fabrication of SETs featuring metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junctions. While Si-based SETs suffer from undesirable effect of dopants that result in irregularities in the device behavior, in metal-based SETs the device components (tunnel barrier, island, and the leads) are well-defined. Therefore, metal SETs are potentially more predictable in behavior, making them easier to incorporate into circuits, and easier to check against theoretical models. Here, the proposed fabrication method takes advantage of unique properties of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). Chemical mechanical polishing provides a path for tuning the dimensions of the tunnel junctions, surpassing the limits imposed by electron beam

  12. Changes in electrical properties of MOS transistor induced by single 14 MeV neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, F. A.; Chee, F. P.; Abu Hassan, H.; Saafie, S.; Afishah, A.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron radiation causes significant changes in the characteristics of MOS devices by the creation of oxide-trapped charge and interface traps. The degradation of the current gain of the GF4936 dual n-channel depletion mode MOS transistor, caused by neutron displacement defects, was measured using in-situ method during neutron irradiation. The average degradation of the gain current is 35 mA at maximum fluence of 2.0 × 10 10 n/cm2 while with an average of 25 mA at minimum fluence of 5.0 × 10 8 n/cm 2 . The change in channel current gain increased proportionally with neutron fluence, meanwhile drain saturation current decreased proportionally with the neutron fluence

  13. Changes in electrical properties of MOS transistor induced by single 14 MeV neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, F. A., E-mail: haider@salam.uitm.edu.my; Chee, F. P., E-mail: fpchee06@ums.edu.my; Abu Hassan, H. [School of Physics and Materials, Faculty of Applied Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Saafie, S.; Afishah, A. [Physics with Electronic Department, Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, University of Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Neutron radiation causes significant changes in the characteristics of MOS devices by the creation of oxide-trapped charge and interface traps. The degradation of the current gain of the GF4936 dual n-channel depletion mode MOS transistor, caused by neutron displacement defects, was measured using in-situ method during neutron irradiation. The average degradation of the gain current is 35 mA at maximum fluence of 2.0 × 10{sup 10} n/cm2 while with an average of 25 mA at minimum fluence of 5.0 × 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}. The change in channel current gain increased proportionally with neutron fluence, meanwhile drain saturation current decreased proportionally with the neutron fluence.

  14. Single Event Gate Rupture in 130-nm CMOS Transistor Arrays Subjected to X-Ray Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestri, M; Gerardin, Simone; Faccio, Federico; Paccagnella, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    We present new experimental results on heavy ion-induced gate rupture on deep submicron CMOS transistor arrays. Through the use of dedicated test structures, composed by a large number of 130-nm MOSFETs connected in parallel, we show the response to heavy ion irradiation under high stress voltages of devices previously irradiated with X-rays. We found only a slight impact on gate rupture critical voltage at a LET of 32 MeV cm(2) mg(-1) for devices previously irradiated up to 3 Mrad(SiO2), and practically no change for 100 Mrad(SiO2) irradiation, dose of interest for the future super large hadron collider (SLHC).

  15. The immunological synapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemmensen, Thomas; Pedersen, Lars Ostergaard; Geisler, Carsten

    2003-01-01

    . A distinct 3-dimensional supramolecular structure at the T cell/APC interface has been suggested to be involved in the information transfer. Due to its functional analogy to the neuronal synapse, the structure has been termed the "immunological synapse" (IS). Here, we review molecular aspects concerning...

  16. Highly Sensitive Ammonia Gas Sensor Based on Single-Crystal Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) Organic Field Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Seohyun; Park, Yoonkyung; Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Sung, Myung Mo

    2017-11-28

    A highly sensitive organic field-effect transistor (OFET)-based sensor for ammonia in the range of 0.01 to 25 ppm was developed. The sensor was fabricated by employing an array of single-crystal poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nanowires as the organic semiconductor (OSC) layer of an OFET with a top-contact geometry. The electrical characteristics (field-effect mobility, on/off current ratio) of the single-crystal P3HT nanowire OFET were about 2 orders of magnitude larger than those of the P3HT thin film OFET with the same geometry. The P3HT nanowire OFET showed excellent sensitivity to ammonia, about 3 times higher than that of the P3HT thin film OFET at 25 ppm ammonia. The ammonia response of the OFET was reversible and was not affected by changes in relative humidity from 45 to 100%. The high ammonia sensitivity of the P3HT nanowire OFET is believed to result from the single crystal nature and high surface/volume ratio of the P3HT nanowire used in the OSC layer.

  17. Analyses of Short Channel Effects of Single-Gate and Double-Gate Graphene Nanoribbon Field Effect Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojjatollah Sarvari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Short channel effects of single-gate and double-gate graphene nanoribbon field effect transistors (GNRFETs are studied based on the atomistic pz orbital model for the Hamiltonian of graphene nanoribbon using the nonequilibrium Green’s function formalism. A tight-binding Hamiltonian with an atomistic pz orbital basis set is used to describe the atomistic details in the channel of the GNRFETs. We have investigated the vital short channel effect parameters such as Ion and Ioff, the threshold voltage, the subthreshold swing, and the drain induced barrier lowering versus the channel length and oxide thickness of the GNRFETs in detail. The gate capacitance and the transconductance of both devices are also computed in order to calculate the intrinsic cut-off frequency and switching delay of GNRFETs. Furthermore, the effects of doping of the channel on the threshold voltage and the frequency response of the double-gate GNRFET are discussed. We have shown that the single-gate GNRFET suffers more from short channel effects if compared with those of the double-gate structure; however, both devices have nearly the same cut-off frequency in the range of terahertz. This work provides a collection of data comparing different features of short channel effects of the single gate with those of the double gate GNRFETs. The results give a very good insight into the devices and are very useful for their digital applications.

  18. Multiple Schottky Barrier-Limited Field-Effect Transistors on a Single Silicon Nanowire with an Intrinsic Doping Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreda, Jorge L; Keiper, Timothy D; Zhang, Mei; Xiong, Peng

    2017-04-05

    In comparison to conventional (channel-limited) field-effect transistors (FETs), Schottky barrier-limited FETs possess some unique characteristics which make them attractive candidates for some electronic and sensing applications. Consequently, modulation of the nano Schottky barrier at a metal-semiconductor interface promises higher performance for chemical and biomolecular sensor applications when compared to conventional FETs with ohmic contacts. However, the fabrication and optimization of devices with a combination of ideal ohmic and Schottky contacts as the source and drain, respectively, present many challenges. We address this issue by utilizing Si nanowires (NWs) synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition process which yields a pronounced doping gradient along the length of the NWs. Devices with a series of metal contacts on a single Si NW are fabricated in a single lithography and metallization process. The graded doping profile of the NW is manifested in monotonic increases in the channel and junction resistances and variation of the nature of the contacts from ohmic to Schottky of increasing effective barrier height along the NW. Hence multiple single Schottky junction-limited FETs with extreme asymmetry and high reproducibility are obtained on an individual NW. A definitive correlation between increasing Schottky barrier height and enhanced gate modulation is revealed. Having access to systematically varying Schottky barrier contacts on the same NW device provides an ideal platform for identifying optimal device characteristics for sensing and electronic applications.

  19. Paired-pulse facilitation achieved in protonic/electronic hybrid indium gallium zinc oxide synaptic transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Li Qiang, E-mail: guoliqiang@ujs.edu.cn; Ding, Jian Ning; Huang, Yu Kai [Micro/Nano Science & Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Zhu, Li Qiang, E-mail: lqzhu@nimte.ac.cn [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Neuromorphic devices with paired pulse facilitation emulating that of biological synapses are the key to develop artificial neural networks. Here, phosphorus-doped nanogranular SiO{sub 2} electrolyte is used as gate dielectric for protonic/electronic hybrid indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) synaptic transistor. In such synaptic transistors, protons within the SiO{sub 2} electrolyte are deemed as neurotransmitters of biological synapses. Paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) behaviors for the analogous information were mimicked. The temperature dependent PPF behaviors were also investigated systematically. The results indicate that the protonic/electronic hybrid IGZO synaptic transistors would be promising candidates for inorganic synapses in artificial neural network applications.

  20. Silicon nanowire transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Bindal, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the n and p-channel Silicon Nanowire Transistor (SNT) designs with single and dual-work functions, emphasizing low static and dynamic power consumption. The authors describe a process flow for fabrication and generate SPICE models for building various digital and analog circuits. These include an SRAM, a baseband spread spectrum transmitter, a neuron cell and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in the digital domain, as well as high bandwidth single-stage and operational amplifiers, RF communication circuits in the analog domain, in order to show this technology’s true potential for the next generation VLSI. Describes Silicon Nanowire (SNW) Transistors, as vertically constructed MOS n and p-channel transistors, with low static and dynamic power consumption and small layout footprint; Targets System-on-Chip (SoC) design, supporting very high transistor count (ULSI), minimal power consumption requiring inexpensive substrates for packaging; Enables fabrication of different types...

  1. Electric-Field Control of Interfering Transport Pathways in a Single-Molecule Anthraquinone Transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, Max; Thijssen, Jos M.; Valkenier, Hennie; Hummelen, Jan C.; van der Zant, Herre S. J.

    It is understood that molecular conjugation plays an important role in charge transport through single-molecule junctions. Here, we investigate electron transport through an anthraquinone based single-molecule three-terminal device. With the use of an electric-field induced by a gate electrode, the

  2. Single-crystal C60 needle/CuPc nanoparticle double floating-gate for low-voltage organic transistors based non-volatile memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsuan-Chun; Lu, Chien; Liu, Cheng-Liang; Chen, Wen-Chang

    2015-01-07

    Low-voltage organic field-effect transistor memory devices exhibiting a wide memory window, low power consumption, acceptable retention, endurance properties, and tunable memory performance are fabricated. The performance is achieved by employing single-crystal C60 needles and copper phthalocyanine nanoparticles to produce an ambipolar (hole/electron) trapping effect in a double floating-gate architecture. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. High performance of low band gap polymer-based ambipolar transistor using single-layer graphene electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Yong; Kang, Woonggi; Kang, Boseok; Cha, Wonsuk; Son, Seon Kyoung; Yoon, Youngwoon; Kim, Hyunjung; Kang, Youngjong; Ko, Min Jae; Son, Hae Jung; Cho, Kilwon; Cho, Jeong Ho; Kim, BongSoo

    2015-03-18

    Bottom-contact bottom-gate organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are fabricated using a low band gap pDTTDPP-DT polymer as a channel material and single-layer graphene (SLG) or Au source/drain electrodes. The SLG-based ambipolar OFETs significantly outperform the Au-based ambipolar OFETs, and thermal annealing effectively improves the carrier mobilities of the pDTTDPP-DT films. The difference is attributed to the following facts: (i) the thermally annealed pDTTDPP-DT chains on the SLG assume more crystalline features with an edge-on orientation as compared to the polymer chains on the Au, (ii) the morphological features of the thermally annealed pDTTDPP-DT films on the SLG electrodes are closer to the features of those on the gate dielectric layer, and (iii) the SLG electrode provides a flatter, more hydrophobic surface that is favorable for the polymer crystallization than the Au. In addition, the preferred carrier transport in each electrode-based OFET is associated with the HOMO/LUMO alignment relative to the Fermi level of the employed electrode. All of these experimental results consistently explain why the carrier mobilities of the SLG-based OFET are more than 10 times higher than those of the Au-based OTFT. This work demonstrates the strong dependence of ambipolar carrier transport on the source/drain electrode and annealing temperature.

  4. Electron and heat transport in porphyrin-based single-molecule transistors with electro-burnt graphene electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatef Sadeghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the charge and thermal transport properties of a porphyrin-based single-molecule transistor with electro-burnt graphene electrodes (EBG using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method and density functional theory. The porphyrin-based molecule is bound to the EBG electrodes by planar aromatic anchor groups. Due to the efficient π–π overlap between the anchor groups and graphene and the location of frontier orbitals relative to the EBG Fermi energy, we predict HOMO-dominated transport. An on–off ratio as high as 150 is predicted for the device, which could be utilized with small gate voltages in the range of ±0.1 V. A positive thermopower of +280 μV/K is predicted for the device at the theoretical Fermi energy. The sign of the thermopower could be changed by tuning the Fermi energy. By gating the junction and changing the Fermi energy by +10 meV, this can be further enhanced to +475 μV/K. Although the electrodes and molecule are symmetric, the junction itself can be asymmetric due to different binding configurations at the electrodes. This can lead to rectification in the current–voltage characteristic of the junction.

  5. An Air-Stable DPP-thieno-TTF Copolymer for Single-Material Solar Cell Devices and Field Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Sasikumar; Cortizo-Lacalle, Diego; Rossbauer, Stephan; Hunter, Simon; Kanibolotsky, Alexander L; Inigo, Anto R; Lane, Paul A; Anthopoulos, Thomas D; Skabara, Peter J

    2015-12-30

    Following an approach developed in our group to incorporate tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) units into conjugated polymeric systems, we have studied a low band gap polymer incorporating TTF as a donor component. This polymer is based on a fused thieno-TTF unit that enables the direct incorporation of the TTF unit into the polymer, and a second comonomer based on the diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) molecule. These units represent a donor-acceptor copolymer system, p(DPP-TTF), showing strong absorption in the UV-visible region of the spectrum. An optimized p(DPP-TTF) polymer organic field effect transistor and a single material organic solar cell device showed excellent performance with a hole mobility of up to 5.3 × 10(-2) cm(2)/(V s) and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.3%, respectively. Bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices of p(DPP-TTF) blended with phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) exhibited a PCE of 1.8%.

  6. Single electron transistors with hydrogen treatment of ALD SiO2 in nanoscale metal-insulator-metal tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasian, Golnaz; McConnell, Michael S.; Orlov, Alexei O.; Nazarov, Alexei N.; Snider, Gregory L.

    2017-05-01

    Over the past five years, fabrication of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) single electron transistors (SET) featuring atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ultrathin tunnel barrier dielectrics (SiO2, Al2O3) has been reported. However, the performance of fabricated devices was significantly compromised by the presence of native metal oxide and problems associated with the nucleation of ALD dielectrics on metal substrates. To overcome the difficulty of dielectric ALD nucleation on metal substrates, we recently developed a fabrication technique in which the native metal oxide naturally forming in the presence of the ALD oxidant precursor is first used to promote the nucleation of ALD dielectrics, and then is chemically reduced by forming gas anneal (FGA) at temperatures near 400 °C. However, despite the elimination of native oxide, low temperature characterization of the devices fabricated using FGA reveals excess ‘switching’ noise of a very large magnitude resulting from charged defects within the junctions. It has been previously reported that remote hydrogen plasma (RHP) treatment of SiO2 thin films effectively eradicates fabrication defects. This work reports a comparative study of Ni-based MIM SET treated with FGA and/or RHP. We show that, using a combination of FGA and RHP treatments, it is possible to obtain MIM junctions free of switching noise and without a detectable contribution of native oxide.

  7. Characteristics of a single-channel superconducting flux flow transistor fabricated by an AFM modification technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seokcheol; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2007-01-01

    The demand for high performance, integrity, and miniaturization in the area of electronic and mechanic devices has drawn interest in the fabrication of nanostructures. However, it is difficult to fabricate the channel with nano-scale using a conventional photography techniques. AFM anodization technique is a maskless process and effective method to overcome the difficulty in fabricating a nano-scale channel. In this paper, we first present a new fabrication of a single-channel SFFT using a selective oxidation process induced by an AFM probe. The modified channel was investigated by electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) to find the compositional variation of the transformed region. In order to confirm the operation of a single-channel SFFT, we measured the voltage-current characteristics at the temperature of liquid nitrogen by an I-V automatic measurement system. Our results indicate that the single-channel SFFT having effect as a weak link is effectively fabricated by an AFM lithography process

  8. Electric-Field Control of Interfering Transport Pathways in a Single-Molecule Anthraquinone Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, Max; Thijssen, Jos M.; Valkenier, Hennie; Hummelen, Jan C.; Zant, Herre S. J. van der

    2015-08-01

    It is understood that molecular conjugation plays an important role in charge transport through single-molecule junctions. Here, we investigate electron transport through an anthraquinone based single-molecule three-terminal device. With the use of an electric-field induced by a gate electrode, the molecule is reduced resulting into a ten-fold increase in the off-resonant differential conductance. Theoretical calculations link the change in differential conductance to a reduction-induced change in conjugation, thereby lifting destructive interference of transport pathways.

  9. Transistor properties of exfoliated single crystals of 2 H -Mo (Se1-xT ex ) 2(0 ≤x ≤1 )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, Eri; Miao, Xiao; Ota, Hiromi; Goto, Hidenori; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2017-06-01

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated using exfoliated single crystals of Mo (Se1-xT ex) 2 with an x range of 0 to 1, and the transistor properties fully investigated at 295 K in four-terminal measurement mode. The chemical composition and crystal structure of exfoliated single crystals were identified by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), single-crystal x-ray diffraction, and Raman scattering, suggesting the 2 H - structure in all Mo (Se1-xT ex) 2 . The lattice constants of a and c increase monotonically with increasing x , indicating the substitution of Se by Te. When x 0.4 . In contrast, the polarity of a thick single-crystal Mo (Se1-xT ex) 2 FET did not change despite an increase in x . The change of polarity in a thin single-crystal FET was well explained by the variation of electronic structure. The absence of such change in the thick single-crystal FET can be reasonably interpreted based on the large bulk conduction due to naturally accumulated electrons. The μ value in the thin single-crystal FET showed a parabolic variation, with a minimum μ at around x =0.4 , which probably originates from the disorder of the single crystal caused by the partial replacement of Se by Te, i.e., a disorder that may be due to ionic size difference of Se and Te.

  10. Rapid detection of single E. coli bacteria using a graphene-based field-effect transistor device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Bhawana; Zhou, Guihua; Chang, Jingbo; Pu, Haihui; Jin, Bing; Sui, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Xiaochen; Yang, Ching-Hong; Magruder, Matthew; Chen, Junhong

    2018-07-01

    Contamination of surface and drinking water due to the presence of Escherichia coli bacteria is a major cause of water-borne disease outbreak. To address unmet challenges for practical pathogen detection in contaminated samples, we report fabrication of thermally reduced graphene oxide-based field-effect transistor (rGO FET) passivated with an ultrathin layer of Al 2 O 3 for real-time detection of E. coli bacteria. The sensor could detect a single E. coli cell within 50 s in a 1 µL sample volume. The ultrathin layer of Al 2 O 3 acted as a barrier between rGO and potential interferents present in the sample. E. coli specific antibodies anchored on gold nanoparticles acted as probes for selective capture of E. coli. The high density of negative charge on the surface of E. coli cells strongly modulates the concentration of majority charge carriers in the rGO monolayer, thereby allowing real-time monitoring of E. coli concentration in a given sample. With a low detection limit of single cell, the FET sensor had a linear range of 1-100 CFU in 1 µL volume of sample (i.e., 10 3 to 10 5 CFU/ mL). The biosensor with good selectivity and rapid detection was further successfully demonstrated for E. coli sensing in river water. The rGO-based FET sensor provides a low cost and label-free approach, and can be mass produced for detection of a broad spectrum of pathogens in water or other liquid media. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Unijunction transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of unijunction transistors can be modified by irradiation with electron beams in excess of 400 KeV and at a dose rate of 10 13 to 10 16 e/cm 2 . Examples are given of the effect of exposing the emitter-base junctions of transistors to such lattice defect causing radiation for a time sufficient to change the valley current of the transistor. (U.K.)

  12. Extraction of contact resistance and channel parameters from the electrical characteristics of a single bottom-gate/top-contact organic transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagaki, Shunsuke; Yamada, Hirofumi; Noda, Kei

    2016-03-01

    A parameter extraction procedure for staggered-type organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), in which only the electrical characteristics of a single device are needed, was newly considered. The existing differential method and the transition voltage method for evaluating contact and channel parameters in OFETs were complementarily combined. The calibration of the total resistance between the source and the drain was also incorporated to compensate discrepancies in the total resistances calculated from output and transfer characteristics, caused by the existence of nonignorable contact resistance and carrier traps. By using our proposed method, gate-voltage-dependent contact resistance and channel mobility in the linear regime were evaluated for bottom-gate/top-contact pentacene thin-film transistors, and the channel-length dependence of these parameters was investigated. A series of results of parameter extraction confirm the validity of our proposed method, which is advantageous in avoiding the influences of characteristic variations that are frequently observed in practical OFET devices.

  13. Multi-valued logic circuits using hybrid circuit consisting of three gates single-electron transistors (TG-SETs) and MOSFETs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, SeungJun; Yu, YunSeop; Choi, JungBum

    2008-10-01

    New multi-valued logic (MVL) families using the hybrid circuits consisting of three gates single-electron transistors (TG-SETs) and a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) are proposed. The use of SETs offers periodic literal characteristics due to Coulomb oscillation of SET, which allows a realization of binary logic (BL) circuits as well as multi-valued logic (MVL) circuits. The basic operations of the proposed MVL families are successfully confirmed through SPICE circuit simulation based on the physical device model of a TG-SET. The proposed MVL circuits are found to be much faster, but much larger power consumption than a previously reported MVL, and they have a trade-off between speed and power consumption. As an example to apply the newly developed MVL families, a half-adder is introduced.

  14. Charge transport across a single-Cooper-pair transistor coupled to a resonant transmission line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaekangas, Juha [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Pashkin, Yuri [NEC Nano Electronics Research Laboratories, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8501 (Japan); Thuneberg, Erkki [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    We have investigated charge transport in ultrasmall superconducting single and double Josephson junctions coupled to a transmission-line resonator. The microstrip resonator is naturally formed by the on-chip leads and the sample holder. We observe equidistant peaks in the transport characteristics of both types of devices and attribute them to the process involving simultaneous tunneling of Cooper pairs and photon emission into the resonator. The experimental data is well reproduced with the orthodox model of Cooper pair tunneling that accounts for the microwave photon emission into the resonator.

  15. A bionics chemical synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanapitak, Surachoke; Toumazou, Christofer

    2013-06-01

    Implementation of the current mode CMOS circuit for chemical synapses (AMPA and NMDA receptors) with dynamic change of glutamate as the neurotransmitter input is presented in this paper. Additionally, circuit realisation for receptor GABA(A) and GABA(B) with an electrical signal which symbolises γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) perturbation is introduced. The chemical sensor for glutamate sensing is the modified ISFET with enzyme (glutamate oxidase) immobilisation. The measured results from these biomimetics chemical synapse circuits closely match with the simulation result from the mathematical model. The total power consumption of the whole chip (four chemical synapse circuits and all auxiliary circuits) is 168.3 μW. The total chip area is 3 mm(2) in 0.35-μm AMS CMOS technology.

  16. Electronic readout of a single nuclear spin using a molecular spin transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R.; Klyastskaya, S.; Ruben, M.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Balestro, F.

    2012-02-01

    Quantum control of individual spins in condensed matter devices is an emerging field with a wide range of applications ranging from nanospintronics to quantum computing [1,2]. The electron, with its spin and orbital degrees of freedom, is conventionally used as carrier of the quantum information in the devices proposed so far. However, electrons exhibit a strong coupling to the environment leading to reduced relaxation and coherence times. Indeed quantum coherence and stable entanglement of electron spins are extremely difficult to achieve. We propose a new approach using the nuclear spin of an individual metal atom embedded in a single-molecule magnet (SMM). In order to perform the readout of the nuclear spin, the quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM) of the magnetic moment of the SMM in a transitor-like set-up is electronically detected. Long spin lifetimes of an individual nuclear spin were observed and the relaxation characteristics were studied. The manipulation of the nuclear spin state of individual atoms embedded in magnetic molecules opens a completely new world, where quantum logic may be integrated.[4pt] [1] L. Bogani, W. Wernsdorfer, Nature Mat. 7, 179 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Urdampilleta, S. Klyatskaya, J.P. Cleuziou, M. Ruben, W. Wernsdorfer, Nature Mat. 10, 502 (2011).

  17. Superconducting transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, K.E.

    1978-01-01

    A three film superconducting tunneling device, analogous to a semiconductor transistor, is presented, including a theoretical description and experimental results showing a current gain of four. Much larger current gains are shown to be feasible. Such a development is particularly interesting because of its novelty and the striking analogies with the semiconductor junction transistor

  18. A New Analytical Subthreshold Behavior Model for Single-Halo, Dual-Material Gate Silicon-on-Insulator Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Te-Kuang

    2008-11-01

    On the basis of the exact solution of the two-dimensional Poisson equation, a new analytical subthreshold behavior model consisting of the two-dimensional potential, threshold voltage, and subthreshold current for the single-halo, dual-material gate (SHDMG) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) is developed. The model is verified by the good agreement with a numerical simulation using the device simulator MEDICI. The model not only offers a physical insight into device physics but is also an efficient device model for the circuit simulation.

  19. High-Performance Flexible Thin-Film Transistors Based on Single-Crystal-like Silicon Epitaxially Grown on Metal Tape by Roll-to-Roll Continuous Deposition Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Yao, Yao; Dutta, Pavel; Galstyan, Eduard; Shervin, Shahab; Lee, Keon-Hwa; Pouladi, Sara; Sun, Sicong; Li, Yongkuan; Rathi, Monika; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2016-11-02

    Single-crystal-like silicon (Si) thin films on bendable and scalable substrates via direct deposition are a promising material platform for high-performance and cost-effective devices of flexible electronics. However, due to the thick and unintentionally highly doped semiconductor layer, the operation of transistors has been hampered. We report the first demonstration of high-performance flexible thin-film transistors (TFTs) using single-crystal-like Si thin films with a field-effect mobility of ∼200 cm 2 /V·s and saturation current, I/l W > 50 μA/μm, which are orders-of-magnitude higher than the device characteristics of conventional flexible TFTs. The Si thin films with a (001) plane grown on a metal tape by a "seed and epitaxy" technique show nearly single-crystalline properties characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The realization of flexible and high-performance Si TFTs can establish a new pathway for extended applications of flexible electronics such as amplification and digital circuits, more than currently dominant display switches.

  20. Single-electron effects in non-overlapped multiple-gate silicon-on-insulator metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W; Su, P

    2009-02-11

    This paper systematically presents controlled single-electron effects in multiple-gate silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) with various gate lengths, fin widths, gate bias and temperature. Our study indicates that using the non-overlapped gate to source/drain structure as an approach to the single-electron transistor (SET) in MOSFETs is promising. Combining the advantage of gate control and the constriction of high source/drain resistances, single-electron effects are further enhanced using the multiple-gate architecture. From the presented results, downsizing multiple-gate SOI MOSFETs is needed for future room-temperature SET applications. Besides, the tunnel barriers and access resistances may need to be further optimized. Since the Coulomb blockade oscillation can be achieved in state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices, it is beneficial to build SETs in low-power CMOS circuits for ultra-high-density purposes.

  1. Solution-processed single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors and bootstrapped inverters for disintegratable, transient electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Sung Hun; Shin, Jongmin; Cho, In-Tak; Lee, Jong-Ho; Han, Sang Youn; Lee, Dong Joon; Lee, Chi Hwan; Rogers, John A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents materials, device designs, and physical/electrical characteristics of a form of nanotube electronics that is physically transient, in the sense that all constituent elements dissolve and/or disperse upon immersion into water. Studies of contact effects illustrate the ability to use water soluble metals such as magnesium for source/drain contacts in nanotube based field effect transistors. High mobilities and on/off ratios in transistors that use molybdenum, silicon nitride, and silicon oxide enable full swing characteristics for inverters at low voltages (∼5 V) and with high gains (∼30). Dissolution/disintegration tests of such systems on water soluble sheets of polyvinyl alcohol demonstrate physical transience within 30 min.

  2. Inversion gate capacitance of undoped single-gate and double-gate field-effect transistor geometries in the extreme quantum limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, Amlan, E-mail: amajumd@us.ibm.com [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    We present first-principle analytical derivations and numerically modeled data to show that the gate capacitance per unit gate area C{sub G} of extremely thin undoped-channel single-gate and double-gate field-effect transistor geometries in the extreme quantum limit with single-subband occupancy can be written as 1/C{sub G} = 1/C{sub OX} + N{sub G}/C{sub DOS} + N{sub G}/ηC{sub WF}, where N{sub G} is the number of gates, C{sub OX} is the oxide capacitance per unit area, C{sub DOS} is the density-of-states capacitance per unit area, C{sub WF} is the wave function spreading capacitance per unit area, and η is a constant on the order of 1.

  3. Single carrier trapping and de-trapping in scaled silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuo; Khaled Husain, Muhammad; Yoshimoto, Hiroyuki; Tani, Kazuki; Sasago, Yoshitaka; Hisamoto, Digh; Fletcher, Jonathan David; Kataoka, Masaya; Tsuchiya, Yoshishige; Saito, Shinichi

    2017-07-01

    The scaling of Silicon (Si) technology is approaching the physical limit, where various quantum effects such as direct tunnelling and quantum confinement are observed, even at room temperatures. We have measured standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (CMOSFETs) with wide and short channels at low temperatures to observe single electron/hole characteristics due to local structural disturbances such as roughness and defects. In fact, we observed Coulomb blockades in sub-threshold regimes of both p-type and n-type Si CMOSFETs, showing the presence of quantum dots in the channels. The stability diagrams for the Coulomb blockade were explained by the potential minima due to poly-Si grains. We have also observed sharp current peaks at narrow bias windows at the edges of the Coulomb diamonds, showing resonant tunnelling of single carriers through charge traps.

  4. The sticky synapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owczarek, Sylwia Elzbieta; Kristiansen, Lars Villiam; Hortsch, Michael

    NCAM-type proteins modulate multiple neuronal functions, including the outgrowth and guidance of neurites, the formation, maturation, and plasticity of synapses, and the induction of both long-term potentiation and long-term depression. The ectodomains of NCAM proteins have a basic structure...... signal transduction. A central feature of the synaptic function of NCAM proteins is the regulation of their extracellular interactions by adhesion-modulating glycoepitopes, their removal from the cell surface by endocytosis, and the elimination of their adhesion-mediating interactions by the proteolytic...

  5. Effects of Ambient Air and Temperature on Ionic Gel Gated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistor and Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaping; Zhou, Lili

    2015-10-21

    Single-walled carbon nanotube thin-film transistor (SWCNT TFT) and circuits were fabricated by fully inkjet printing gold nanoparticles as source/drain electrodes, semiconducting SWCNT thin films as channel materials, PS-PMMA-PS/EMIM TFSI composite gel as gate dielectrics, and PEDOT/PSS as gate electrodes. The ionic gel gated SWCNT TFT shows reversible conversion from p-type transistor behavior in air to ambipolar features under vacuum due to reversible oxygen doping in semiconducting SWCNT thin films. The threshold voltages of ionic gel gated SWCNT TFT and inverters are largely shifted to the low value (0.5 V for p-region and 1.0 V for n-region) by vacuum annealing at 140 °C to exhausively remove water that is incorporated in the ionic gel as floating gates. The vacuum annealed ionic gel gated SWCNT TFT shows linear temperature dependent transconductances and threshold voltages for both p- and n-regions. The strong temperature dependent transconductances (0.08 μS/K for p-region, 0.4 μS/K for n-region) indicate their potential application in thermal sensors. In the other hand, the weak temperature dependent threshold voltages (-1.5 mV/K for p-region, -1.1 mV/K for n-region) reflect their excellent thermal stability.

  6. Contact effects analyzed by a parameter extraction method based on a single bottom-gate/top-contact organic thin-film transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagaki, Shunsuke; Yamada, Hirofumi; Noda, Kei

    2018-03-01

    Contact effects in organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) were examined by using our previously proposed parameter extraction method from the electrical characteristics of a single staggered-type device. Gate-voltage-dependent contact resistance and channel mobility in the linear regime were evaluated for bottom-gate/top-contact (BGTC) pentacene TFTs with active layers of different thicknesses, and for pentacene TFTs with contact-doped layers prepared by coevaporation of pentacene and tetrafluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ). The extracted parameters suggested that the influence of the contact resistance becomes more prominent with the larger active-layer thickness, and that contact-doping experiments give rise to a drastic decrease in the contact resistance and a concurrent considerable improvement in the channel mobility. Additionally, the estimated energy distributions of trap density in the transistor channel probably reflect the trap filling with charge carriers injected into the channel regions. The analysis results in this study confirm the effectiveness of our proposed method, with which we can investigate contact effects and circumvent the influences of characteristic variations in OTFT fabrication.

  7. A facile and low-cost length sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by precipitation and applications for thin-film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Hui; Chen, Haitian; Khripin, Constantine Y; Liu, Bilu; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Zhou, Chongwu; Zheng, Ming

    2016-02-14

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their combinations. Polyelectrolytes such as polymethacrylate (PMAA) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) are found to be especially effective on cholate and deoxycholate dispersed SWCNTs. By adding PMAA to these nanotube dispersions in a stepwise fashion, we have achieved nanotube precipitation in a length-dependent order: first nanotubes with an average length of 650 nm, and then successively of 450 nm, 350 nm, and 250 nm. A similar effect of nanotube length sorting has also been observed for PSS. To demonstrate the utility of the length fractionation, the 650 nm-long nanotube fraction was subjected to an aqueous two-phase separation to obtain semiconducting enriched nanotubes. Thin-film transistors fabricated with the resulting semiconducting SWCNTs showed a carrier mobility up to 18 cm(2) (V s)(-1) and an on/off ratio up to 10(7). Our result sheds new light on the phase behavior of aqueous nanotube dispersions under high concentrations of polymers and salts, and offers a facile, low-cost, and scalable method to produce length sorted semiconducting nanotubes for macroelectronics applications.

  8. A shared synapse architecture for efficient FPGA implementation of autoencoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Morie, Takashi; Tamukoh, Hakaru

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a shared synapse architecture for autoencoders (AEs), and implements an AE with the proposed architecture as a digital circuit on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). In the proposed architecture, the values of the synapse weights are shared between the synapses of an input and a hidden layer, and between the synapses of a hidden and an output layer. This architecture utilizes less of the limited resources of an FPGA than an architecture which does not share the synapse weights, and reduces the amount of synapse modules used by half. For the proposed circuit to be implemented into various types of AEs, it utilizes three kinds of parameters; one to change the number of layers' units, one to change the bit width of an internal value, and a learning rate. By altering a network configuration using these parameters, the proposed architecture can be used to construct a stacked AE. The proposed circuits are logically synthesized, and the number of their resources is determined. Our experimental results show that single and stacked AE circuits utilizing the proposed shared synapse architecture operate as regular AEs and as regular stacked AEs. The scalability of the proposed circuit and the relationship between the bit widths and the learning results are also determined. The clock cycles of the proposed circuits are formulated, and this formula is used to estimate the theoretical performance of the circuit when the circuit is used to construct arbitrary networks.

  9. Three-dimensional simulation of fabrication process-dependent effects on single event effects of SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jin-Xin; Guo Bao-Long; Wu Xian-Xiang; He Chao-Hui; Li Pei; Guo Hong-Xia

    2017-01-01

    The fabrication process dependent effects on single event effects (SEEs) are investigated in a commercial silicon–germanium heterojunction bipolar transistor (SiGe HBT) using three-dimensional (3D) TCAD simulations. The influences of device structure and doping concentration on SEEs are discussed via analysis of current transient and charge collection induced by ions strike. The results show that the SEEs representation of current transient is different from representation of the charge collection for the same process parameters. To be specific, the area of C/S junction is the key parameter that affects charge collection of SEE. Both current transient and charge collection are dependent on the doping of collector and substrate. The base doping slightly influences transient currents of base, emitter, and collector terminals. However, the SEEs of SiGe HBT are hardly affected by the doping of epitaxial base and the content of Ge. (paper)

  10. Effect of supply voltage and body-biasing on single-event transient pulse quenching in bulk fin field-effect-transistor process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jun-Ting; Chen Shu-Ming; Chen Jian-Jun; Huang Peng-Cheng; Song Rui-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Charge sharing is becoming an important topic as the feature size scales down in fin field-effect-transistor (FinFET) technology. However, the studies of charge sharing induced single-event transient (SET) pulse quenching with bulk FinFET are reported seldomly. Using three-dimensional technology computer aided design (3DTCAD) mixed-mode simulations, the effects of supply voltage and body-biasing on SET pulse quenching are investigated for the first time in bulk FinFET process. Research results indicate that due to an enhanced charge sharing effect, the propagating SET pulse width decreases with reducing supply voltage. Moreover, compared with reverse body-biasing (RBB), the circuit with forward body-biasing (FBB) is vulnerable to charge sharing and can effectively mitigate the propagating SET pulse width up to 53% at least. This can provide guidance for radiation-hardened bulk FinFET technology especially in low power and high performance applications. (paper)

  11. Synchronization, non-linear dynamics and low-frequency fluctuations: Analogy between spontaneous brain activity and networked single-transistor chaotic oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, Ludovico; Chiesa, Pietro; Tabarelli, Davide; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Jovicich, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the topographical relationship between functional connectivity (intended as inter-regional synchronization), spectral and non-linear dynamical properties across cortical areas of the healthy human brain is considered. Based upon functional MRI acquisitions of spontaneous activity during wakeful idleness, node degree maps are determined by thresholding the temporal correlation coefficient among all voxel pairs. In addition, for individual voxel time-series, the relative amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and the correlation dimension (D2), determined with respect to Fourier amplitude and value distribution matched surrogate data, are measured. Across cortical areas, high node degree is associated with a shift towards lower frequency activity and, compared to surrogate data, clearer saturation to a lower correlation dimension, suggesting presence of non-linear structure. An attempt to recapitulate this relationship in a network of single-transistor oscillators is made, based on a diffusive ring (n = 90) with added long-distance links defining four extended hub regions. Similarly to the brain data, it is found that oscillators in the hub regions generate signals with larger low-frequency cycle amplitude fluctuations and clearer saturation to a lower correlation dimension compared to surrogates. The effect emerges more markedly close to criticality. The homology observed between the two systems despite profound differences in scale, coupling mechanism and dynamics appears noteworthy. These experimental results motivate further investigation into the heterogeneity of cortical non-linear dynamics in relation to connectivity and underline the ability for small networks of single-transistor oscillators to recreate collective phenomena arising in much more complex biological systems, potentially representing a future platform for modelling disease-related changes.

  12. Synchronization, non-linear dynamics and low-frequency fluctuations: Analogy between spontaneous brain activity and networked single-transistor chaotic oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minati, Ludovico; Chiesa, Pietro; Tabarelli, Davide; Jovicich, Jorge; D'Incerti, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the topographical relationship between functional connectivity (intended as inter-regional synchronization), spectral and non-linear dynamical properties across cortical areas of the healthy human brain is considered. Based upon functional MRI acquisitions of spontaneous activity during wakeful idleness, node degree maps are determined by thresholding the temporal correlation coefficient among all voxel pairs. In addition, for individual voxel time-series, the relative amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and the correlation dimension (D 2 ), determined with respect to Fourier amplitude and value distribution matched surrogate data, are measured. Across cortical areas, high node degree is associated with a shift towards lower frequency activity and, compared to surrogate data, clearer saturation to a lower correlation dimension, suggesting presence of non-linear structure. An attempt to recapitulate this relationship in a network of single-transistor oscillators is made, based on a diffusive ring (n = 90) with added long-distance links defining four extended hub regions. Similarly to the brain data, it is found that oscillators in the hub regions generate signals with larger low-frequency cycle amplitude fluctuations and clearer saturation to a lower correlation dimension compared to surrogates. The effect emerges more markedly close to criticality. The homology observed between the two systems despite profound differences in scale, coupling mechanism and dynamics appears noteworthy. These experimental results motivate further investigation into the heterogeneity of cortical non-linear dynamics in relation to connectivity and underline the ability for small networks of single-transistor oscillators to recreate collective phenomena arising in much more complex biological systems, potentially representing a future platform for modelling disease-related changes

  13. Effect of electrode design on crosstalk between neighboring organic field-effect transistors based on one single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengjie; Tang, Qingxin; Tong, Yanhong; Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhou, Shujun; Liu, Yichun

    2018-03-01

    The design of high-integration organic circuits must be such that the interference between neighboring devices is eliminated. Here, rubrene crystals were used to study the effect of the electrode design on crosstalk between neighboring organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Results show that a decreased source/drain interval and gate electrode width can decrease the diffraction distance of the current, and therefore can weaken the crosstalk. In addition, the inherent low carrier concentration in organic semiconductors can create a high-resistance barrier at the space between gate electrodes of neighboring devices, limiting or even eliminating the crosstalk as a result of the gate electrode width being smaller than the source/drain electrode width.

  14. Alzheimer's disease: synapses gone cold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyman Bradley T

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by insidious cognitive decline and memory dysfunction. Synapse loss is the best pathological correlate of cognitive decline in AD and mounting evidence suggests that AD is primarily a disease of synaptic dysfunction. Soluble oligomeric forms of amyloid beta (Aβ, the peptide that aggregates to form senile plaques in the brain of AD patients, have been shown to be toxic to neuronal synapses both in vitro and in vivo. Aβ oligomers inhibit long-term potentiation (LTP and facilitate long-term depression (LTD, electrophysiological correlates of memory formation. Furthermore, oligomeric Aβ has also been shown to induce synapse loss and cognitive impairment in animals. The molecular underpinnings of these observations are now being elucidated, and may provide clear therapeutic targets for effectively treating the disease. Here, we review recent findings concerning AD pathogenesis with a particular focus on how Aβ impacts synapses.

  15. Junctionless Cooper pair transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arutyunov, K. Yu., E-mail: konstantin.yu.arutyunov@jyu.fi [National Research University Higher School of Economics , Moscow Institute of Electronics and Mathematics, 101000 Moscow (Russian Federation); P.L. Kapitza Institute for Physical Problems RAS , Moscow 119334 (Russian Federation); Lehtinen, J.S. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., Centre for Metrology MIKES, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Junctionless Cooper pair box. • Quantum phase slips. • Coulomb blockade and gate modulation of the Coulomb gap. - Abstract: Quantum phase slip (QPS) is the topological singularity of the complex order parameter of a quasi-one-dimensional superconductor: momentary zeroing of the modulus and simultaneous 'slip' of the phase by ±2π. The QPS event(s) are the dynamic equivalent of tunneling through a conventional Josephson junction containing static in space and time weak link(s). Here we demonstrate the operation of a superconducting single electron transistor (Cooper pair transistor) without any tunnel junctions. Instead a pair of thin superconducting titanium wires in QPS regime was used. The current–voltage characteristics demonstrate the clear Coulomb blockade with magnitude of the Coulomb gap modulated by the gate potential. The Coulomb blockade disappears above the critical temperature, and at low temperatures can be suppressed by strong magnetic field.

  16. Stochastic resonance in small-world neuronal networks with hybrid electrical–chemical synapses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jiang; Guo, Xinmeng; Yu, Haitao; Liu, Chen; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Chen, Yingyuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •We study stochastic resonance in small-world neural networks with hybrid synapses. •The resonance effect depends largely on the probability of chemical synapse. •An optimal chemical synapse probability exists to evoke network resonance. •Network topology affects the stochastic resonance in hybrid neuronal networks. - Abstract: The dependence of stochastic resonance in small-world neuronal networks with hybrid electrical–chemical synapses on the probability of chemical synapse and the rewiring probability is investigated. A subthreshold periodic signal is imposed on one single neuron within the neuronal network as a pacemaker. It is shown that, irrespective of the probability of chemical synapse, there exists a moderate intensity of external noise optimizing the response of neuronal networks to the pacemaker. Moreover, the effect of pacemaker driven stochastic resonance of the system depends largely on the probability of chemical synapse. A high probability of chemical synapse will need lower noise intensity to evoke the phenomenon of stochastic resonance in the networked neuronal systems. In addition, for fixed noise intensity, there is an optimal chemical synapse probability, which can promote the propagation of the localized subthreshold pacemaker across neural networks. And the optimal chemical synapses probability turns even larger as the coupling strength decreases. Furthermore, the small-world topology has a significant impact on the stochastic resonance in hybrid neuronal networks. It is found that increasing the rewiring probability can always enhance the stochastic resonance until it approaches the random network limit

  17. Diversity of Spine Synapses in Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Xian; Mattson, Mark P.; Yao, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Here we examine the structure of the various types of spine synapses throughout the animal kingdom. Based on available evidence, we suggest that there are two major categories of spine synapses: invaginating and non-invaginating, with distributions that vary among different groups of animals. In the simplest living animals with definitive nerve cells and synapses, the cnidarians and ctenophores, most chemical synapses do not form spine synapses. But some cnidarians have invaginating spine synapses, especially in photoreceptor terminals of motile cnidarians with highly complex visual organs, and also in some mainly sessile cnidarians with rapid prey capture reflexes. This association of invaginating spine synapses with complex sensory inputs is retained in the evolution of higher animals in photoreceptor terminals and some mechanoreceptor synapses. In contrast to invaginating spine synapse, non-invaginating spine synapses have been described only in animals with bilateral symmetry, heads and brains, associated with greater complexity in neural connections. This is apparent already in the simplest bilaterians, the flatworms, which can have well-developed non-invaginating spine synapses in some cases. Non-invaginating spine synapses diversify in higher animal groups. We also discuss the functional advantages of having synapses on spines and more specifically, on invaginating spines. And finally we discuss pathologies associated with spine synapses, concentrating on those systems and diseases where invaginating spine synapses are involved. PMID:27230661

  18. Controlled Growth of Large-Area Aligned Single-Crystalline Organic Nanoribbon Arrays for Transistors and Light-Emitting Diodes Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Liang; Dai, Gaole; Deng, Wei; Zhang, Xiujuan; Jie, Jiansheng; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2017-10-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on organic micro-/nanocrystals have been widely reported with charge carrier mobility exceeding 1.0 cm2 V-1 s-1, demonstrating great potential for high-performance, low-cost organic electronic applications. However, fabrication of large-area organic micro-/nanocrystal arrays with consistent crystal growth direction has posed a significant technical challenge. Here, we describe a solution-processed dip-coating technique to grow large-area, aligned 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl) anthracene (BPEA) and 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-PEN) single-crystalline nanoribbon arrays. The method is scalable to a 5 × 10 cm2 wafer substrate, with around 60% of the wafer surface covered by aligned crystals. The quality of crystals can be easily controlled by tuning the dip-coating speed. Furthermore, OFETs based on well-aligned BPEA and TIPS-PEN single-crystalline nanoribbons were constructed. By optimizing channel lengths and using appropriate metallic electrodes, the BPEA and TIPS-PEN-based OFETs showed hole mobility exceeding 2.0 cm2 V-1 s-1 (average mobility 1.2 cm2 V-1 s-1) and 3.0 cm2 V-1 s-1 (average mobility 2.0 cm2 V-1 s-1), respectively. They both have a high on/off ratio ( I on/ I off) > 109. The performance can well satisfy the requirements for light-emitting diodes driving.

  19. Magnetic bipolar transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Fabian, Jaroslav; Zutic, Igor; Sarma, S. Das

    2003-01-01

    A magnetic bipolar transistor is a bipolar junction transistor with one or more magnetic regions, and/or with an externally injected nonequilibrium (source) spin. It is shown that electrical spin injection through the transistor is possible in the forward active regime. It is predicted that the current amplification of the transistor can be tuned by spin.

  20. Test Equipment Specifications Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Didiek Andiana Ramadan; Drs. Linga Hermanto, MMSI Drs. Linga Hermanto, MMSI

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we design a test apparatus Transistor Specification. Specification is atype of transistor is a transistor and common emitter current reinforcement value ( βDC ). The system will provide information in the form of an LED display emits greenlight when the tested types of NPN transistor and the second LED emits blue lightwhen the tested types of PNP transistors.To test the value of β, whose value is proportional to the display used by the collectorcurrent Ic.

  1. Synaptic Plasticity and Learning Behaviors Mimicked in Single Inorganic Synapses of Pt/HfOx/ZnOx/TiN Memristive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lai-Guo; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Yan; Cao, Yan-Qiang; Li, Ai-Dong; Wu, Di

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a kind of new memristor with the simple structure of Pt/HfOx/ZnOx/TiN was fabricated completely via combination of thermal-atomic layer deposition (TALD) and plasma-enhanced ALD (PEALD). The synaptic plasticity and learning behaviors of Pt/HfOx/ZnOx/TiN memristive system have been investigated deeply. Multilevel resistance states are obtained by varying the programming voltage amplitudes during the pulse cycling. The device conductance can be continuously increased or decreased from cycle to cycle with better endurance characteristics up to about 3 × 103 cycles. Several essential synaptic functions are simultaneously achieved in such a single double-layer of HfOx/ZnOx device, including nonlinear transmission properties, such as long-term plasticity (LTP), short-term plasticity (STP), and spike-timing-dependent plasticity. The transformation from STP to LTP induced by repetitive pulse stimulation is confirmed in Pt/HfOx/ZnOx/TiN memristive device. Above all, simple structure of Pt/HfOx/ZnOx/TiN by ALD technique is a kind of promising memristor device for applications in artificial neural network.

  2. High-sensitivity pH sensor using separative extended-gate field-effect transistors with single-walled carbon-nanotube networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Ju-Young; Cho, Won-Ju

    2018-04-01

    We fabricate high-sensitivity pH sensors using single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWCNT) network thin-film transistors (TFTs). The sensing and transducer parts of the pH sensor are composed of separative extended-sensing gates (ESGs) with SnO2 ion-sensitive membranes and double-gate structure TFTs with thin SWCNT network channels of ∼1 nm and AlO x top-gate insulators formed by the solution-deposition method. To prevent thermal process-induced damages on the SWCNT channel layer due to the post-deposition annealing process and improve the electrical characteristics of the SWCNT-TFTs, microwave irradiation is applied at low temperatures. As a result, a pH sensitivity of 7.6 V/pH, far beyond the Nernst limit, is obtained owing to the capacitive coupling effect between the top- and bottom-gate insulators of the SWCNT-TFTs. Therefore, double-gate structure SWCNT-TFTs with separated ESGs are expected to be highly beneficial for high-sensitivity disposable biosensor applications.

  3. N-Type 2D Organic Single Crystals for High-Performance Organic Field-Effect Transistors and Near-Infrared Phototransistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Ren, Xiaochen; Xu, Chunhui; Fu, Beibei; Wang, Ruihao; Zhang, Xiaotao; Li, Rongjin; Li, Hongxiang; Dong, Huanli; Zhen, Yonggang; Lei, Shengbin; Jiang, Lang; Hu, Wenping

    2018-03-07

    Organic field-effect transistors and near-infrared (NIR) organic phototransistors (OPTs) have attracted world's attention in many fields in the past decades. In general, the sensitivity, distinguishing the signal from noise, is the key parameter to evaluate the performance of NIR OPTs, which is decided by responsivity and dark current. 2D single crystal films of organic semiconductors (2DCOS) are promising functional materials due to their long-range order in spite of only few molecular layers. Herein, for the first time, air-stable 2DCOS of n-type organic semiconductors (a furan-thiophene quinoidal compound, TFT-CN) with strong absorbance around 830 nm, by the facile drop-casting method on the surface of water are successfully prepared. Almost millimeter-sized TFT-CN 2DCOS are obtained and their thickness is below 5 nm. A competitive field-effect electron mobility (1.36 cm 2 V -1 s -1 ) and high on/off ratio (up to 10 8 ) are obtained in air. Impressively, the ultrasensitive NIR phototransistors operating at the off-state exhibit a very low dark current of ≈0.3 pA and an ultrahigh detectivity (D*) exceeding 6 × 10 14 Jones because the devices can operate in full depletion at the off-state, superior to the majority of the reported organic-based NIR phototransistors. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Nonvolatile ferroelectric memory based on PbTiO3 gated single-layer MoS2 field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun Wook; Son, Jong Yeog

    2018-01-01

    We fabricated ferroelectric non-volatile random access memory (FeRAM) based on a field effect transistor (FET) consisting of a monolayer MoS2 channel and a ferroelectric PbTiO3 (PTO) thin film of gate insulator. An epitaxial PTO thin film was deposited on a Nb-doped SrTiO3 (Nb:STO) substrate via pulsed laser deposition. A monolayer MoS2 sheet was exfoliated from a bulk crystal and transferred to the surface of the PTO/Nb:STO. Structural and surface properties of the PTO thin film were characterized by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy, respectively. Raman spectroscopy analysis was performed to identify the single-layer MoS2 sheet on the PTO/Nb:STO. We obtained mobility value (327 cm2/V·s) of the MoS2 channel at room temperature. The MoS2-PTO FeRAM FET showed a wide memory window with 17 kΩ of resistance variation which was attributed to high remnant polarization of the epitaxially grown PTO thin film. According to the fatigue resistance test for the FeRAM FET, however, the resistance states gradually varied during the switching cycles of 109. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. High-voltage (100 V ChipfilmTM single-crystal silicon LDMOS transistor for integrated driver circuits in flexible displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Burghartz

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available System-in-Foil (SiF is an emerging field of large-area polymer electronics that employs new materials such as conductive polymers and electrophoretic micro-capsules (E-Ink along with ultra-thin and thus flexible chips. In flexible displays, the integration of gate and source drivers onto the flexible part increases the yield and enhances the reliability of the system. In this work we propose a high-voltage ChipfilmTM lateral diffused MOS transistor (LDMOS structure on ultra-thin single-crystalline silicon chips. The fabrication process is compatible with CMOS standard processing. This LDMOS structure proves to be well suited for providing adequately large switching voltages in spite of the thin (<10 μm substrate. A breakdown voltage of more than 100 volts with drain-to-source saturation current Ids(sat≈85 μA/μm for N-LDMOS and Ids(sat≈20 μA/μm for P-LDMOS is predicted through process and device simulations.

  6. The four-gate transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojarradi, M. M.; Cristoveanu, S.; Allibert, F.; France, G.; Blalock, B.; Durfrene, B.

    2002-01-01

    The four-gate transistor or G4-FET combines MOSFET and JFET principles in a single SOI device. Experimental results reveal that each gate can modulate the drain current. Numerical simulations are presented to clarify the mechanisms of operation. The new device shows enhanced functionality, due to the combinatorial action of the four gates, and opens rather revolutionary applications.

  7. Tunneling field effect transistor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to the state-of-the art in tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs). Readers will learn the TFETs physics from advanced atomistic simulations, the TFETs fabrication process and the important roles that TFETs will play in enabling integrated circuit designs for power efficiency. · Provides comprehensive reference to tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs); · Covers all aspects of TFETs, from device process to modeling and applications; · Enables design of power-efficient integrated circuits, with low power consumption TFETs.

  8. Synapse Pathology in Psychiatric and Neurologic Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Spronsen (Myrrhe); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractInhibitory and excitatory synapses play a fundamental role in information processing in the brain. Excitatory synapses usually are situated on dendritic spines, small membrane protrusions that harbor glutamate receptors and postsynaptic density components and help transmit electrical

  9. Transistor Clamped Five-Level Inverter using Non-Inverting Double Reference Single Carrier PWM Technique for photovoltaic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhaskar, Mahajan Sagar; Padmanaban, Sanjeevikumar; Fedák, Viliam

    2017-01-01

    supplies or capacitor banks. To design the proposed five level inverter five numbers of power control switches and eight diodes are required. The proposed inverter circuitry is investigated by using Non-Inverting Double Reference Single Carrier PWM (NIDRSC PWM) Technique in terms of harmonics content...

  10. General derivation of the Green's functions for the atomic approach of the Anderson model: application to a single electron transistor (SET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglio, M. E.; Lobo, T.; Figueira, M. S.

    2012-09-01

    We consider the cumulant expansion of the periodic Anderson model (PAM) in the case of a finite electronic correlation U, employing the hybridization as perturbation, and obtain a formal expression of the exact one-electron Green's function (GF). This expression contains effective cumulants that are as difficult to calculate as the original GF, and the atomic approach consists in substituting the effective cumulants by the ones that correspond to the atomic case, namely by taking a conduction band of zeroth width and local hybridization. In a previous work (T. Lobo, M. S. Figueira, and M. E. Foglio, Nanotechnology 21, 274007 (2010), 10.1088/0957-4484/21/27/274007) we developed the atomic approach by considering only one variational parameter that is used to adjust the correct height of the Kondo peak by imposing the satisfaction of the Friedel sum rule. To obtain the correct width of the Kondo peak in the present work, we consider an additional variational parameter that guarantees this quantity. The two constraints now imposed on the formalism are the satisfaction of the Friedel sum rule and the correct Kondo temperature. In the first part of the work, we present a general derivation of the method for the single impurity Anderson model (SIAM), and we calculate several density of states representative of the Kondo regime for finite correlation U, including the symmetrical case. In the second part, we apply the method to study the electronic transport through a quantum dot (QD) embedded in a quantum wire (QW), which is realized experimentally by a single electron transistor (SET). We calculate the conductance of the SET and obtain a good agreement with available experimental and theoretical results.

  11. High-performance thin-film-transistors based on semiconducting-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes processed by electrical-breakdown strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aïssa, B., E-mail: aissab@emt.inrs.ca [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (QEERI), Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Nedil, M. [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT, 675, 1" è" r" e Avenue, Val d’Or, Québec J9P 1Y3 (Canada); Habib, M.A. [Computer Sciences and Engineering Department, Yanbu University College, P.O. Box 30031 (Saudi Arabia); Abdul-Hafidh, E.H. [High Energy Physics Department, Yanbu University College, P.O. Box 30031 (Saudi Arabia); Rosei, F. [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We selectively burn metallic single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by electrical breakdown. • We successfully achieve a semiconducting enriched-SWCNT in TFT configuration. • High performance, like On/Off of 10{sup 5} and a subthreshold swing of 165 mV/decades were obtained. • After PMMA coating, the SWCNT–TFTs were found stables for more than 4 months. - Abstract: Over the past two decades, among remarkable variety of nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) remain the most intriguing and uniquely well suited materials for applications in high-performance electronics. The most advanced technologies require the ability to form purely semiconducting SWCNTs. Here, we report on our strategy based on the well known progressive electrical breakdown process that offer this capability and serves as highly efficient means for selectively removing metallic carbon nanotubes from electronically heterogeneous random networks, deposited on silicon substrates in a thin film transistor (TFT) configuration. We demonstrate the successful achievement of semiconducting enriched-SWCNT networks in TFT scheme that reach On/Off switching ratios of ∼100,000, on-conductance of 20 μS, and a subthreshold swing of less than 165 mV/decades. The obtained TFT devices were then protected with thin film poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to keep the percolation level of the SWCNTs network spatially and temporally stable, while protecting it from atmosphere exchanges. TFT devices were found to be air-stable and maintained their excellent characteristics in ambient atmosphere for more than 4 months. This approach could work as a platform for future nanotube-based nanoelectronics.

  12. Invaginating Structures in Mammalian Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, Ronald S.; Wang, Ya-Xian; Mattson, Mark P.; Yao, Pamela J.

    2018-01-01

    Invaginating structures at chemical synapses in the mammalian nervous system exist in presynaptic axon terminals, postsynaptic spines or dendrites, and glial processes. These invaginating structures can be divided into three categories. The first category includes slender protrusions invaginating into axonal terminals, postsynaptic spines, or glial processes. Best known examples of this category are spinules extending from postsynaptic spines into presynaptic terminals in forebrain synapses. Another example of this category are protrusions from inhibitory presynaptic terminals invaginating into postsynaptic neuronal somas. Regardless of the direction and location, the invaginating structures of the first category do not have synaptic active zones within the invagination. The second category includes postsynaptic spines invaginating into presynaptic terminals, whereas the third category includes presynaptic terminals invaginating into postsynaptic spines or dendrites. Unlike the first category, the second and third categories have active zones within the invagination. An example of the second category are mossy terminal synapses of the hippocampal CA3 region, in which enlarged spine-like structures invaginate partly or entirely into mossy terminals. An example of the third category is the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) where substantial invaginations of the presynaptic terminals invaginate into the muscle fibers. In the retina, rod and cone synapses have invaginating processes from horizontal and bipolar cells. Because horizontal cells act both as post and presynaptic structures, their invaginating processes represent both the second and third category. These invaginating structures likely play broad yet specialized roles in modulating neuronal cell signaling.

  13. Neuromuscular NMDA Receptors Modulate Developmental Synapse Elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personius, Kirkwood E; Slusher, Barbara S; Udin, Susan B

    2016-08-24

    At birth, each mammalian skeletal muscle fiber is innervated by multiple motor neurons, but in a few weeks, all but one of those axons retracts (Redfern, 1970) and differential activity between inputs controls this phenomenon (Personius and Balice-Gordon, 2001; Sanes and Lichtman, 2001; Personius et al., 2007; Favero et al., 2012). Acetylcholine, the primary neuromuscular transmitter, has long been presumed to mediate this activity-dependent process (O'Brien et al., 1978), but glutamatergic transmission also occurs at the neuromuscular junction (Berger et al., 1995; Grozdanovic and Gossrau, 1998; Mays et al., 2009). To test the role of neuromuscular NMDA receptors, we assessed their contribution to muscle calcium fluxes in mice and tested whether they influence removal of excess innervation at the end plate. Developmental synapse pruning was slowed by reduction of NMDA receptor activation or expression and by reduction of glutamate production. Conversely, pruning is accelerated by application of exogenous NMDA. We also found that NMDA induced increased muscle calcium only during the first 2 postnatal weeks. Therefore, neuromuscular NMDA receptors play previously unsuspected roles in neuromuscular activity and synaptic pruning during development. In normal adult muscle, each muscle fiber is innervated by a single axon, but at birth, fibers are multiply innervated. Elimination of excess connections requires neural activity; because the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a cholinergic synapse, acetylcholine has been assumed to be the critical mediator of activity. However, glutamate receptors are also expressed at the NMJ. We found that axon removal in mice is slowed by pharmacological and molecular manipulations that decrease signaling through neuromuscular NMDA receptors, whereas application of exogenous NMDA at the NMJ accelerates synapse elimination and increases muscle calcium levels during the first 2 postnatal weeks. Therefore, neuromuscular NMDA receptors play

  14. Peripheral synapses and giant neurons in whip spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foelix, Rainer; Troyer, David; Igelmund, Peter

    2002-08-15

    Among invertebrates the synapses between neurons are generally restricted to ganglia, i.e., to the central nervous system (CNS). As an exception, synapses occur in the sensory nerves of arachnid legs, indicating that some nervous integration is already taking place far out in the periphery. In the antenniform legs of whip spiders (Amblypygi), a very special synaptic circuit is present. These highly modified legs contain several large interneurons (giant neurons) that receive mechanosensory input from 700-1,500 tarsal bristles. Some of the sensory cell axons contact a giant neuron at its short, branched dendrite, a few at the soma, but most synapse onto the long giant axon. The fine structure of these synapses resembles that of typical chemical synapses in other arthropods. Although thousands of sensory fibers converge on a single giant neuron, there is no reduction in the actual number of sensory fibers, because these afferent fibers continue their course to the CNS after having made several en passant synapses onto the giant neuron. Touching a single tarsal bristle is sufficient to elicit action potentials in a giant neuron. Owing to the large diameter of the giant axon (10-20 microm), the action potentials reach the CNS within 55 ms, at conduction velocities of up to 7 m/s. However, mechanical stimulation of the tarsal bristles does not elicit a fast escape response, in contrast to giant fiber systems in earthworms, certain insects, and crayfishes. A quick escape is observed in whip spiders, but only after stimulation of the filiform hairs (trichobothria) on the regular walking legs. Although the giant fiber system in the antenniform legs undoubtedly provides a fast sensory pathway, its biological significance is not clearly understood at the moment. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Inorganic proton conducting electrolyte coupled oxide-based dendritic transistors for synaptic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chang Jin; Zhu, Li Qiang; Zhou, Ju Mei; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-05-07

    Ionic/electronic hybrid devices with synaptic functions are considered to be the essential building blocks for neuromorphic systems and brain-inspired computing. Here, artificial synapses based on indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) transistors gated by nanogranular SiO2 proton-conducting electrolyte films are fabricated on glass substrates. Spike-timing dependent plasticity and paired-pulse facilitation are successfully mimicked in an individual bottom-gate transistor. Most importantly, dynamic logic and dendritic integration established by spatiotemporally correlated spikes are also mimicked in dendritic transistors with two in-plane gates as the presynaptic input terminals.

  16. Distribution and structure of efferent synapses in the chicken retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, SH; Nacsa, N; Blankenship, T; Fitzgerald, PG; Weller, C; Vaney, DI; Wilson, M

    2012-01-01

    The visual system of birds includes an efferent projection from a visual area, the isthmooptic nucleus in the midbrain, back to the retina. Using a combination of anterograde labeling of efferent fibers, reconstruction of dye-filled neurons, NADPH-diaphorase staining, and transmission electron microscopy we have examined the distribution of efferent fibers and their synaptic structures in the chicken retina. We show that efferent fibers terminate strictly within the ventral retina. In 2 completely mapped retinas, only 2 fibers from a total of 15,359 terminated in the dorsal retina. The major synapse made by each efferent fiber is with a single Efferent Target Amacrine Cell (TC). This synapse consists of 5-25 boutons of 2μm diameter, each with multiple active zones, pressed into the TC soma or synapsing with a basketwork of rudimentary TC dendrites in the inner nuclear layer (INL). This basketwork, which is sheathed by Muller cells processes, defines a private neuropil in the INL within which TCs were also seen to receive input from retinal neurons. In addition to the major synapse, efferent fibers typically produce several very thin processes that terminate nearby in single small boutons and for which the soma of a local amacrine cell is one of the likely postsynaptic partners. A minority of efferent fibers also give rise to a thicker process terminating in a strongly diaphorase positive ball about 5μm in diameter. PMID:19439107

  17. Broad Beam and Ion Microprobe Studies of Single-Event Upsets in High Speed 0.18micron Silicon Germanium Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors and Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Robert A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Pickel, Jim; Carts, Martin A.; Irwin, TIm; Niu, Guofu; Cressler, John; Krithivasan, Ramkumar; Fritz, Karl; Riggs, Pam

    2003-01-01

    SiGe based technology is widely recognized for its tremendous potential to impact the high speed microelectronic industry, and therefore the space industry, by monolithic incorporation of low power complementary logic with extremely high speed SiGe Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor (HBT) logic. A variety of studies have examined the ionizing dose, displacement damage and single event characteristics, and are reported. Accessibility to SiGe through an increasing number of manufacturers adds to the importance of understanding its intrinsic radiation characteristics, and in particular the single event effect (SEE) characteristics of the high bandwidth HBT based circuits. IBM is now manufacturing in its 3rd generation of their commercial SiGe processes, and access is currently available to the first two generations (known as and 6HP) through the MOSIS shared mask services with anticipated future release of the latest (7HP) process. The 5 HP process is described and is characterized by a emitter spacing of 0.5 micron and a cutoff frequency ff of 50 GHz, whereas the fully scaled 7HP HBT employs a 0.18 micron emitter and has an fT of 120 GHz. Previous investigations have the examined SEE response of 5 HP HBT circuits through both circuit testing and modeling. Charge collection modeling studies in the 5 H P process have also been conducted, but to date no measurements have been reported of charge collection in any SiGe HBT structures. Nor have circuit models for charge collection been developed in any version other than the 5 HP HBT structure. Our investigation reports the first indications of both charge collection and circuit response in IBM s 7HP-based SiGe process. We compare broad beam heavy ion SEU test results in a fully function Pseudo-Random Number (PRN) sequence generator up to frequencies of 12 Gbps versus effective LET, and also report proton test results in the same circuit. In addition, we examine the charge collection characteristics of individual 7HP HBT

  18. Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Wakayama

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors (OFETs is reviewed. Photoactive OFETs are divided into light-emitting (LE and light-receiving (LR OFETs. In the first part, LE-OFETs are reviewed from the viewpoint of the evolution of device structures. Device performances have improved in the last decade with the evolution of device structures from single-layer unipolar to multi-layer ambipolar transistors. In the second part, various kinds of LR-OFETs are featured. These are categorized according to their functionalities: phototransistors, non-volatile optical memories, and photochromism-based transistors. For both, various device configurations are introduced: thin-film based transistors for practical applications, single-crystalline transistors to investigate fundamental physics, nanowires, multi-layers, and vertical transistors based on new concepts.

  19. Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, Yutaka; Hayakawa, Ryoma; Seo, Hoon-Seok

    2014-04-01

    Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) is reviewed. Photoactive OFETs are divided into light-emitting (LE) and light-receiving (LR) OFETs. In the first part, LE-OFETs are reviewed from the viewpoint of the evolution of device structures. Device performances have improved in the last decade with the evolution of device structures from single-layer unipolar to multi-layer ambipolar transistors. In the second part, various kinds of LR-OFETs are featured. These are categorized according to their functionalities: phototransistors, non-volatile optical memories, and photochromism-based transistors. For both, various device configurations are introduced: thin-film based transistors for practical applications, single-crystalline transistors to investigate fundamental physics, nanowires, multi-layers, and vertical transistors based on new concepts.

  20. Organization of central synapses by adhesion molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Tallafuss, Alexandra; Constable, John R.L.; Washbourne, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Synapses are the primary means for transmitting information from one neuron to the next. They are formed during development of the nervous system, and formation of appropriate synapses is crucial for establishment of neuronal circuits that underlie behavior and cognition. Understanding how synapses form and are maintained will allow us to address developmental disorders such as autism, mental retardation and possibly also psychological disorders. A number of biochemical and proteomic studies ...

  1. Spin gated transistors for reprogrammable logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, Chiara; Gonzalez-Zalba, Fernando; Irvine, Andrew; Campion, Richard; Zarbo, Liviu; Gallagher, Brian; Ferguson, Andrew; Jungwirth, Tomas; Wunderlich, Joerg; Institute of Physics ASCR Collaboration; University of Nottingham Collaboration; Hitachi Cambridge Laboratory Team; Institute of Physics ASCR Collaboration; University of Nottingham Collaboration; University of Cambridge Team

    2014-03-01

    In spin-orbit coupled magnetic materials the chemical potential depends on the orientation of the magnetisation. By making the gate of a field effect transistor magnetic, it is possible to tune the channel conductance not only electrically but also magnetically. We show that these magnetic transistor can be used to realise non-volatile reprogrammable Boolean logic. The non-volatile reconfigurable capability resides in the magnetization-dependent band structure of the magnetic stack. A change in magnetization orientation produces a change in the electrochemical potential, which induces a charge accumulation in the correspondent gate electrode. This is readily sensed by a field-effect device such as standard field-effect transistors or more exotic single-electron transistors. We propose circuits for low power consumption applications that can be magnetically switched between NAND and OR logic functions and between NOR and AND logic functions.

  2. A transistor based on 2D material and silicon junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghoek; Lee, Seunghyun

    2017-07-01

    A new type of graphene-silicon junction transistor based on bipolar charge-carrier injection was designed and investigated. In contrast to many recent studies on graphene field-effect transistor (FET), this device is a new type of bipolar junction transistor (BJT). The transistor fully utilizes the Fermi level tunability of graphene under bias to increase the minority-carrier injection efficiency of the base-emitter junction in the BJT. Single-layer graphene was used to form the emitter and the collector, and a p-type silicon was used as the base. The output of this transistor was compared with a metal-silicon junction transistor ( i.e. surface-barrier transistor) to understand the difference between a graphene-silicon junction and metal-silicon Schottky junction. A significantly higher current gain was observed in the graphene-silicon junction transistor as the base current was increased. The graphene-semiconductor heterojunction transistor offers several unique advantages, such as an extremely thin device profile, a low-temperature (transistor current gain ( β) of 33.7 and a common-emitter amplifier voltage gain of 24.9 were achieved.

  3. Nanoscale Vacuum Channel Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Woo; Moon, Dong-Il; Meyyappan, M

    2017-04-12

    Vacuum tubes that sparked the electronics era had given way to semiconductor transistors. Despite their faster operation and better immunity to noise and radiation compared to the transistors, the vacuum device technology became extinct due to the high power consumption, integration difficulties, and short lifetime of the vacuum tubes. We combine the best of vacuum tubes and modern silicon nanofabrication technology here. The surround gate nanoscale vacuum channel transistor consists of sharp source and drain electrodes separated by sub-50 nm vacuum channel with a source to gate distance of 10 nm. This transistor performs at a low voltage (3 microamperes). The nanoscale vacuum channel transistor can be a possible alternative to semiconductor transistors beyond Moore's law.

  4. Face classification using electronic synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Peng; Wu, Huaqiang; Gao, Bin; Eryilmaz, Sukru Burc; Huang, Xueyao; Zhang, Wenqiang; Zhang, Qingtian; Deng, Ning; Shi, Luping; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Qian, He

    2017-05-01

    Conventional hardware platforms consume huge amount of energy for cognitive learning due to the data movement between the processor and the off-chip memory. Brain-inspired device technologies using analogue weight storage allow to complete cognitive tasks more efficiently. Here we present an analogue non-volatile resistive memory (an electronic synapse) with foundry friendly materials. The device shows bidirectional continuous weight modulation behaviour. Grey-scale face classification is experimentally demonstrated using an integrated 1024-cell array with parallel online training. The energy consumption within the analogue synapses for each iteration is 1,000 × (20 ×) lower compared to an implementation using Intel Xeon Phi processor with off-chip memory (with hypothetical on-chip digital resistive random access memory). The accuracy on test sets is close to the result using a central processing unit. These experimental results consolidate the feasibility of analogue synaptic array and pave the way toward building an energy efficient and large-scale neuromorphic system.

  5. Ambipolar MoS2 Thin Flake Transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yijin; Ye, Jianting; Matsuhashi, Yusuke; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    Field effect transistors (FETs) made of thin flake single crystals isolated from layered materials have attracted growing interest since the success of graphene. Here, we report the fabrication of an electric double layer transistor (EDLT, a FET gated by ionic liquids) using a thin flake of MoS2, a

  6. Light-emitting ambipolar organic heterostructure field-effect transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rost, Constance; Karg, Siegfried; Riess, Walter; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Murgia, Mauro; Muccini, Michele

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated ambipolar charge injection and transport in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) as prerequisites for a light-emitting organic field-effect transistor (LEOFET). OFETs containing a single material as active layer generally function either as a p- or an n-channel device.

  7. Organization of central synapses by adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallafuss, Alexandra; Constable, John R L; Washbourne, Philip

    2010-07-01

    Synapses are the primary means for transmitting information from one neuron to the next. They are formed during the development of the nervous system, and the formation of appropriate synapses is crucial for the establishment of neuronal circuits that underlie behavior and cognition. Understanding how synapses form and are maintained will allow us to address developmental disorders such as autism, mental retardation and possibly also psychological disorders. A number of biochemical and proteomic studies have revealed a diverse and vast assortment of molecules that are present at the synapse. It is now important to untangle this large array of proteins and determine how it assembles into a functioning unit. Here we focus on recent reports describing how synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with and organize the presynaptic and postsynaptic specializations of both excitatory and inhibitory central synapses. © The Authors (2010). Journal Compilation © Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. High-voltage (100 V) ChipfilmTM single-crystal silicon LDMOS transistor for integrated driver circuits in flexible displays

    OpenAIRE

    J. N. Burghartz; H. Richter; A. Asif

    2009-01-01

    System-in-Foil (SiF) is an emerging field of large-area polymer electronics that employs new materials such as conductive polymers and electrophoretic micro-capsules (E-Ink) along with ultra-thin and thus flexible chips. In flexible displays, the integration of gate and source drivers onto the flexible part increases the yield and enhances the reliability of the system. In this work we propose a high-voltage ChipfilmTM lateral diffused MOS transistor (LDMOS) structur...

  9. Optical reading of field-effect transistors by phase-space absorption quenching in a single InGaAs quantum well conducting channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemla, D. S.; Bar-Joseph, I.; Klingshirn, C.; Miller, D. A. B.; Kuo, J. M.

    1987-03-01

    Absorption switching in a semiconductor quantum well by electrically varying the charge density in the quantum well conducting channel of a selectively doped heterostructure transistor is reported for the first time. The phase-space absorption quenching (PAQ) is observed at room temperature in an InGaAs/InAlAs grown on InP FET, and it shows large absorption coefficient changes with relatively broad spectral bandwidth. This PAQ is large enough to be used for direct optical determination of the logic state of the FET.

  10. Sub-second photonic processing of solution-deposited single layer and heterojunction metal oxide thin-film transistors using a high-power xenon flash lamp

    KAUST Repository

    Tetzner, Kornelius

    2017-11-01

    We report the fabrication of solution-processed In2O3 and In2O3/ZnO heterojunction thin-film transistors (TFTs) where the precursor materials were converted to their semiconducting state using high power light pulses generated by a xenon flash lamp. In2O3 TFTs prepared on glass substrates exhibited low-voltage operation (≤2 V) and a high electron mobility of ∼6 cm2 V−1 s−1. By replacing the In2O3 layer with a photonically processed In2O3/ZnO heterojunction, we were able to increase the electron mobility to 36 cm2 V−1 s−1, while maintaining the low-voltage operation. Although the level of performance achieved in these devices is comparable to control TFTs fabricated via thermal annealing at 250 °C for 1 h, the photonic treatment approach adopted here is extremely rapid with a processing time of less than 18 s per layer. With the aid of a numerical model we were able to analyse the temperature profile within the metal oxide layer(s) upon flashing revealing a remarkable increase of the layer\\'s surface temperature to ∼1000 °C within ∼1 ms. Despite this, the backside of the glass substrate remains unchanged and close to room temperature. Our results highlight the applicability of the method for the facile manufacturing of high performance metal oxide transistors on inexpensive large-area substrates.

  11. EDITORIAL: Reigniting innovation in the transistor Reigniting innovation in the transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-09-01

    sensitive to gases such as CO, opening opportunities for applications in sensing using one-dimensional nanostructure transistors [12]. The pyroelectric transistor reported in this issue represents an intriguing development for device applications of this versatile and ubiquitous electronics component [3]. As the researchers point out, 'By combining the photocurrent feature and optothermal gating effect, the wide range of response to light covering ultraviolet and infrared radiation can lead to new nanoscale optoelectronic devices that are suitable for remote or wireless applications.' In nanotechnology research and development, often the race is on to achieve reliable device behaviour in the smallest possible systems. But sometimes it is the innovations in the approach used that revolutionize technology in industry. The pyroelectric transistor reported in this issue is a neat example of the ingenious innovations in this field of research. While in research the race is never really over, as this work demonstrates the journey itself remains an inspiration. References [1] Bardeen J and Brattain W H 1948 The transistor, a semi-conductor triode Phys. Rev 74 230-1 [2] Shockley W B, Bardeen J and Brattain W H 1956 The nobel prize in physics www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1956/# [3] Hsieh C-Y, Lu M-L, Chen J-Y, Chen Y-T, Chen Y-F, Shih W Y and Shih W-H 2012 Single ZnO nanowire-PZT optothermal field effect transistors Nanotechnology 23 355201 [4] Tans S J, Verschueren A R M and Dekker C 1998 Room-temperature transistor based on a single carbon nanotube Nature 393 49-52 [5] Cui Y, Zhong Z, Wang D, Wang W U and Lieber C M 2003 High performance silicon nanowire field effect transistors Nano Lett. 3 149-52 [6]Stafford C A, Cardamone D M and Mazumdar S 2007 The quantum interference effect transistor Nanotechnology 18 424014 [7] Garnier F, Hajlaoui R, Yassar A and Srivastava P 1994 All-polymer field-effect transistor realized by printing techniques Science 265 1684-6 [8

  12. A new measure for the strength of electrical synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie S Haas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrical synapses, like chemical synapses, mediate intraneuronal communication. Electrical synapses are typically quantified by subthreshold measurements of coupling, which fall short in describing their impact on spiking activity in coupled neighbors. Here we describe a novel measurement for electrical synapse strength that directly evaluates the effect of synaptically transmitted activity on spike timing. This method, also applicable to neurotransmitter-based synapses, communicates the considerable strength of electrical synapses. For electrical synapses measured in rodent slices of the thalamic reticular nucleus, spike timing is modulated by tens of ms by activity in a coupled neighbor.

  13. Ballistic Phosphorene Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-19

    satisfactory. W911NF-14-1-0572 -II 66414-EL-II.3 TO:(1) Electronics Division (Qiu, Joe) TITLE: Final Report: Ballistic Phosphorene Transistor (x) Material... Transistor ” as a STIP award for the period 09/1/2014 through 5/31/2015. The ARO program director responsible for the grant is Dr. Joe Qiu. The PI is Prof...UU 19-11-2015 1-Sep-2014 31-May-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Ballistic Phosphorene Transistor The views

  14. Neurobeachin regulates neurotransmitter receptor trafficking to synapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, R.; Lauks, J.; Jung, S; Cooke, N.E.; de Wit, H.; Brose, N.; Kilimann, M.W.; Verhage, M.; Rhee, J.

    2013-01-01

    The surface density of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses is a key determinant of synaptic efficacy. Synaptic receptor accumulation is regulated by the transport, postsynaptic anchoring, and turnover of receptors, involving multiple trafficking, sorting, motor, and scaffold proteins. We found

  15. The Diversity of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki eKubota

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. However, it has become clear that synaptic inhibition in the cortex is much more diverse and complicated. Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. Each distinct non-pyramidal cell subtype has its own independent inhibitory function. Secondly, the inhibitory synapses innervate different neuronal domains, such as axons, spines, dendrites and soma, and their IPSP size is not uniform. Thus cortical inhibition is highly complex, with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological modes. Moreover, the functional significance of the various inhibitory synapse innervation styles and their unique structural dynamic behaviors differ from those of excitatory synapses. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the inhibitory mechanisms of the cortical microcircuit.

  16. Synapse proteomics: current status and quantitative applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, K.W.; Jimenez, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical synapses are key organelles for neurotransmission. The coordinated actions of protein networks in diverse synaptic subdomains drive the sequential molecular events of transmitter release from the presynaptic bouton, activation of transmitter receptors located in the postsynaptic density and

  17. Comparative anatomy of phagocytic and immunological synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence eNiedergang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of phagocytic cups and immunological synapses are crucial events of the innate and adaptive immune responses, respectively. They are triggered by distinct immune receptors and performed by different cell types. However, growing experimental evidence shows that a very close series of molecular and cellular events control these two processes. Thus, the tight and dynamic interplay between receptor signaling, actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, and targeted vesicle traffic are all critical features to build functional phagosomes and immunological synapses. Interestingly, both phagocytic cups and immunological synapses display particular spatial and temporal patterns of receptors and signaling molecules, leading to the notion of phagocytic synapse. Here we discuss both types of structures, their organization and the mechanisms by which they are generated and regulated.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Synaptic Transistor Network for Pattern Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungho; Yoon, Jinsu; Kim, Hee-Dong; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2015-11-18

    Inspired by the human brain, a neuromorphic system combining complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and adjustable synaptic devices may offer new computing paradigms by enabling massive neural-network parallelism. In particular, synaptic devices, which are capable of emulating the functions of biological synapses, are used as the essential building blocks for an information storage and processing system. However, previous synaptic devices based on two-terminal resistive devices remain challenging because of their variability and specific physical mechanisms of resistance change, which lead to a bottleneck in the implementation of a high-density synaptic device network. Here we report that a three-terminal synaptic transistor based on carbon nanotubes can provide reliable synaptic functions that encode relative timing and regulate weight change. In addition, using system-level simulations, the developed synaptic transistor network associated with CMOS circuits can perform unsupervised learning for pattern recognition using a simplified spike-timing-dependent plasticity scheme.

  19. Prevention of Noise Damage to Cochlear Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    neurotrophic factor CNTF in promoting synapse regeneration. KEYWORDS Anandamide Auditory Brainstem Response Calcium Ion Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptors...excitotoxic trauma (kainic acid) in vitro? f) Does CNTF promote synapse regeneration in vitro as does NT-3? W81XWH-14-1-0494 Annual Progress Report 29... CNTF ) is expressed in the organ of Corti at high levels, comparable to NT-3. We have also found that CNTF is approximately as effective as NT-3 in

  20. Defects of the Glycinergic Synapse in Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Hirata, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Glycine mediates fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. Physiological importance of the glycinergic synapse is well established in the brainstem and the spinal cord. In humans, the loss of glycinergic function in the spinal cord and brainstem leads to hyperekplexia, which is characterized by an excess startle reflex to sudden acoustic or tactile stimulation. In addition, glycinergic synapses in this region are also involved in the regulation of respiration and locomotion, and in the nocicepti...

  1. Regulation of dopamine D1 receptor dynamics within the postsynaptic density of hippocampal glutamate synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Ladepeche

    Full Text Available Dopamine receptor potently modulates glutamate signalling, synaptic plasticity and neuronal network adaptations in various pathophysiological processes. Although key intracellular signalling cascades have been identified, the cellular mechanism by which dopamine and glutamate receptor-mediated signalling interplay at glutamate synapse remain poorly understood. Among the cellular mechanisms proposed to aggregate D1R in glutamate synapses, the direct interaction between D1R and the scaffold protein PSD95 or the direct interaction with the glutamate NMDA receptor (NMDAR have been proposed. To tackle this question we here used high-resolution single nanoparticle imaging since it provides a powerful way to investigate at the sub-micron resolution the dynamic interaction between these partners in live synapses. We demonstrate in hippocampal neuronal networks that dopamine D1 receptors (D1R laterally diffuse within glutamate synapses, in which their diffusion is reduced. Disrupting the interaction between D1R and PSD95, through genetical manipulation and competing peptide, did not affect D1R dynamics in glutamatergic synapses. However, preventing the physical interaction between D1R and the GluN1 subunit of NMDAR abolished the synaptic stabilization of diffusing D1R. Together, these data provide direct evidence that the interaction between D1R and NMDAR in synapses participate in the building of the dopamine-receptor-mediated signalling, and most likely to the glutamate-dopamine cross-talk.

  2. Spiking Neural P Systems With Scheduled Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarle, Francis George C; Adorna, Henry N; Jiang, Min; Zeng, Xiangxiang

    2017-12-01

    Spiking neural P systems (SN P systems) are models of computation inspired by biological spiking neurons. SN P systems have neurons as spike processors, which are placed on the nodes of a directed and static graph (the edges in the graph are the synapses). In this paper, we introduce a variant called SN P systems with scheduled synapses (SSN P systems). SSN P systems are inspired and motivated by the structural dynamism of biological synapses, while incorporating ideas from nonstatic (i.e., dynamic) graphs and networks. In particular, synapses in SSN P systems are available only at specific durations according to their schedules. The SSN P systems model is a response to the problem of introducing durations to synapses of SN P systems. Since SN P systems are in essence static graphs, it is natural to consider them for dynamic graphs also. We introduce local and global schedule types, also taking inspiration from the above-mentioned sources. We prove that SSN P systems are computationally universal as number generators and acceptors for both schedule types, under a normal form (i.e., a simplifying set of restrictions). The introduction of synapse schedules for either schedule type proves useful in programming the system, despite restrictions in the normal form.

  3. Vertical organic transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted.

  4. High Accuracy Transistor Compact Model Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hembree, Charles E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mar, Alan [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robertson, Perry J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Typically, transistors are modeled by the application of calibrated nominal and range models. These models consists of differing parameter values that describe the location and the upper and lower limits of a distribution of some transistor characteristic such as current capacity. Correspond- ingly, when using this approach, high degrees of accuracy of the transistor models are not expected since the set of models is a surrogate for a statistical description of the devices. The use of these types of models describes expected performances considering the extremes of process or transistor deviations. In contrast, circuits that have very stringent accuracy requirements require modeling techniques with higher accuracy. Since these accurate models have low error in transistor descriptions, these models can be used to describe part to part variations as well as an accurate description of a single circuit instance. Thus, models that meet these stipulations also enable the calculation of quantifi- cation of margins with respect to a functional threshold and uncertainties in these margins. Given this need, new model high accuracy calibration techniques for bipolar junction transis- tors have been developed and are described in this report.

  5. Intégration de transistor mono-électronique et transistor à atome unique sur CMOS

    OpenAIRE

    Deshpande, Veeresh

    2012-01-01

    Continuous scaling of MOSFET dimensions has led us to the era of nanoelectronics. Multigate FET (MuGFET) architecture with ‘nanowire channel' is being considered as one feasible enabler of MOSFET scaling to end-of-roadmap. Alongside classical CMOS or Moore's law scaling, many novel device proposals exploiting nanoscale phenomena have been made either. Single Electron Transistor (SET), with its unique ‘Coulomb Blockade' phenomena, and Single Atom Transistor (SAT), as an ultimately scaled trans...

  6. Transistor-based interface circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubman, Matthew S [Richland, WA

    2004-02-24

    Among the embodiments of the present invention is an apparatus that includes a transistor, a servo device, and a current source. The servo device is operable to provide a common base mode of operation of the transistor by maintaining an approximately constant voltage level at the transistor base. The current source is operable to provide a bias current to the transistor. A first device provides an input signal to an electrical node positioned between the emitter of the transistor and the current source. A second device receives an output signal from the collector of the transistor.

  7. The artificial synapse chip: From proteins to prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Mark Charles

    Most retinal prostheses use an electric field to stimulate retinal circuitry, yet information transfer in the retina is primarily through neurotransmitters. To address this difference, this thesis describes a proof of concept retinal interface based on localized chemical delivery. This system, the Artificial Synapse Chip, is based on a 5 mum aperture in a silicon nitride membrane overlying a microfluidic channel. The effectiveness of this interface is demonstrated by ejecting bradykinin on cultured excitable cells. Even with manual fluidic control, the relationship between the extent of stimulation and concentration is linear, providing enough control to limit stimulation to individual cells. A neurotransmitter-based prosthesis will require advanced fluidic control. This thesis reports the use of electroosmosis to eject or withdraw fluid from an aperture in a channel wall. This effect is demonstrated experimentally, and numerically, using a finite-element method. Our primary device is a prototype interface with four individually addressable apertures in a 2 x 2 array. Using this array, we demonstrate stimulation of both PC12 and retinal ganglion cells. This demonstration of localized chemical stimulation of excitable cells illustrates the potential of this technology for retinal prostheses. As a final application of the Artificial Synapse Chip, we applied the concept to lipid bilayer membranes and membrane-bound proteins. Not only are membrane-bound proteins crucial to the function of biological synapses, but also are important from a technological point of view. In this thesis, we use a Langmuir-Blodgett technique to producing lipid bilayers across apertures in a modified version of the Artificial Synapse Chip. These bilayers display many of the same properties as bilayers across apertures in Teflon films. In addition, these bilayers remain unbroken at transmembrane potentials over +/-400 mV, higher than Teflon-supported bilayers. We also demonstrate single

  8. Multiassociative Memory: Recurrent Synapses Increase Storage Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauy, Marcelo Matheus; Meier, Florian; Steger, Angelika

    2017-05-01

    The connection density of nearby neurons in the cortex has been observed to be around 0.1, whereas the longer-range connections are present with much sparser density (Kalisman, Silberberg, & Markram, 2005 ). We propose a memory association model that qualitatively explains these empirical observations. The model we consider is a multiassociative, sparse, Willshaw-like model consisting of binary threshold neurons and binary synapses. It uses recurrent synapses for iterative retrieval of stored memories. We quantify the usefulness of recurrent synapses by simulating the model for small network sizes and by doing a precise mathematical analysis for large network sizes. Given the network parameters, we can determine the precise values of recurrent and afferent synapse densities that optimize the storage capacity of the network. If the network size is like that of a cortical column, then the predicted optimal recurrent density lies in a range that is compatible with biological measurements. Furthermore, we show that our model is able to surpass the standard Willshaw model in the multiassociative case if the information capacity is normalized per strong synapse or per bits required to store the model, as considered in Knoblauch, Palm, and Sommer ( 2010 ).

  9. Glutamate synapses in human cognitive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Lenora; Chiu, Shu-Ling; Sharma, Kamal; Huganir, Richard L

    2015-07-08

    Accumulating data, including those from large genetic association studies, indicate that alterations in glutamatergic synapse structure and function represent a common underlying pathology in many symptomatically distinct cognitive disorders. In this review, we discuss evidence from human genetic studies and data from animal models supporting a role for aberrant glutamatergic synapse function in the etiology of intellectual disability (ID), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and schizophrenia (SCZ), neurodevelopmental disorders that comprise a significant proportion of human cognitive disease and exact a substantial financial and social burden. The varied manifestations of impaired perceptual processing, executive function, social interaction, communication, and/or intellectual ability in ID, ASD, and SCZ appear to emerge from altered neural microstructure, function, and/or wiring rather than gross changes in neuron number or morphology. Here, we review evidence that these disorders may share a common underlying neuropathy: altered excitatory synapse function. We focus on the most promising candidate genes affecting glutamatergic synapse function, highlighting the likely disease-relevant functional consequences of each. We first present a brief overview of glutamatergic synapses and then explore the genetic and phenotypic evidence for altered glutamate signaling in ID, ASD, and SCZ.

  10. Diode, transistor & fet circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    2013-01-01

    Diode, Transistor and FET Circuits Manual is a handbook of circuits based on discrete semiconductor components such as diodes, transistors, and FETS. The book also includes diagrams and practical circuits. The book describes basic and special diode characteristics, heat wave-rectifier circuits, transformers, filter capacitors, and rectifier ratings. The text also presents practical applications of associated devices, for example, zeners, varicaps, photodiodes, or LEDs, as well as it describes bipolar transistor characteristics. The transistor can be used in three basic amplifier configuration

  11. Cell Biology of Astrocyte-Synapse Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Nicola J; Eroglu, Cagla

    2017-11-01

    Astrocytes, the most abundant glial cells in the mammalian brain, are critical regulators of brain development and physiology through dynamic and often bidirectional interactions with neuronal synapses. Despite the clear importance of astrocytes for the establishment and maintenance of proper synaptic connectivity, our understanding of their role in brain function is still in its infancy. We propose that this is at least in part due to large gaps in our knowledge of the cell biology of astrocytes and the mechanisms they use to interact with synapses. In this review, we summarize some of the seminal findings that yield important insight into the cellular and molecular basis of astrocyte-neuron communication, focusing on the role of astrocytes in the development and remodeling of synapses. Furthermore, we pose some pressing questions that need to be addressed to advance our mechanistic understanding of the role of astrocytes in regulating synaptic development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transistor scaling with novel materials

    OpenAIRE

    Meikei Ieong; Vijay Narayanan; Dinkar Singh; Anna Topol; Victor Chan; Zhibin Ren

    2006-01-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistor scaling will continue for at least another decade. However, innovation in transistor structures and integration of novel materials are needed to sustain this performance trend. Here we discuss the challenges and opportunities of transistor scaling for the next five to ten years.

  13. Functional hallmarks of GABAergic synapse maturation and the diverse roles of neurotrophins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie eGrantyn

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional impairment of the adult brain can result from deficits in the ontogeny of GABAergic synaptic transmission. Gene defects underlying autism spectrum disorders, Rett’s syndrome or some forms of epilepsy, but also a diverse set of syndromes accompanying perinatal trauma, hormonal imbalances, intake of sleep-inducing or mood-improving drugs or, quite common, alcohol intake during pregnancy can alter GABA signaling early in life. The search for therapeutically relevant endogenous molecules or exogenous compounds able to alleviate the consequences of dysfunction of GABAergic transmission in the embryonic or postnatal brain requires a clear understanding of its site- and state-dependent development. At the level of single synapses, it is necessary to discriminate between presynaptic and postsynaptic alterations, and to define parameters that can be regarded as both suitable and accessible for the quantification of developmental changes. Here we focus on the performance of GABAergic synapses in two brain structures, the hippocampus and the superior colliculus, describe some novel aspects of neurotrophin effects during the development of GABAergic synaptic transmission and examine the applicability of the following rules: 1 Synaptic transmission starts with GABA, 2 Nascent/immature GABAergic synapses operate in a ballistic mode (multivesicular release, 3 Immature synaptic terminals release vesicles with higher probability than mature synapses, 4 Immature GABAergic synapses are prone to paired pulse and tetanic depression, 5 Synapse maturation is characterized by an increasing dominance of synchronous over asynchronous release, 6 In immature neurons GABA acts as a depolarizing transmitter, 7 Synapse maturation implies IPSC shortening due to an increase in alpha1 subunit expression, 8 Extrasynaptic (tonic conductances can inhibit the development of synaptic (phasic GABA actions.

  14. Three-terminal ferroelectric synapse device with concurrent learning function for artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishitani, Y.; Kaneko, Y.; Ueda, M.; Fujii, E. [Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, Panasonic Corporation, Seika, Kyoto 619-0237 (Japan); Morie, T. [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Wakamatsu-ku, Kitakyushu 808-0196 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    Spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP) is demonstrated in a synapse device based on a ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistor (FeFET). STDP is a key of the learning functions observed in human brains, where the synaptic weight changes only depending on the spike timing of the pre- and post-neurons. The FeFET is composed of the stacked oxide materials with ZnO/Pr(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT)/SrRuO{sub 3}. In the FeFET, the channel conductance can be altered depending on the density of electrons induced by the polarization of PZT film, which can be controlled by applying the gate voltage in a non-volatile manner. Applying a pulse gate voltage enables the multi-valued modulation of the conductance, which is expected to be caused by a change in PZT polarization. This variation depends on the height and the duration of the pulse gate voltage. Utilizing these characteristics, symmetric and asymmetric STDP learning functions are successfully implemented in the FeFET-based synapse device by applying the non-linear pulse gate voltage generated from a set of two pulses in a sampling circuit, in which the two pulses correspond to the spikes from the pre- and post-neurons. The three-terminal structure of the synapse device enables the concurrent learning, in which the weight update can be performed without canceling signal transmission among neurons, while the neural networks using the previously reported two-terminal synapse devices need to stop signal transmission for learning.

  15. Quantum Thermal Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulain, Karl; Drevillon, Jérémie; Ezzahri, Younès; Ordonez-Miranda, Jose

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrate that a thermal transistor can be made up with a quantum system of three interacting subsystems, coupled to a thermal reservoir each. This thermal transistor is analogous to an electronic bipolar one with the ability to control the thermal currents at the collector and at the emitter with the imposed thermal current at the base. This is achieved by determining the heat fluxes by means of the strong-coupling formalism. For the case of three interacting spins, in which one of them is coupled to the other two, that are not directly coupled, it is shown that high amplification can be obtained in a wide range of energy parameters and temperatures. The proposed quantum transistor could, in principle, be used to develop devices such as a thermal modulator and a thermal amplifier in nanosystems.

  16. Experience-Dependent Regulation of Presynaptic NMDARs Enhances Neurotransmitter Release at Neocortical Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Wen, Jing A.; Parekh, Puja K.; Barth, Alison L.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory experience can selectively alter excitatory synaptic strength at neocortical synapses. The rapid increase in synaptic strength induced by selective whisker stimulation (single-row experience/SRE, where all but one row of whiskers has been removed from the mouse face) is due, at least in part, to the trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs)…

  17. Localization of mineralocorticoid receptors at mammalian synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M Prager

    Full Text Available In the brain, membrane associated nongenomic steroid receptors can induce fast-acting responses to ion conductance and second messenger systems of neurons. Emerging data suggest that membrane associated glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors may directly regulate synaptic excitability during times of stress when adrenal hormones are elevated. As the key neuron signaling interface, the synapse is involved in learning and memory, including traumatic memories during times of stress. The lateral amygdala is a key site for synaptic plasticity underlying conditioned fear, which can both trigger and be coincident with the stress response. A large body of electrophysiological data shows rapid regulation of neuronal excitability by steroid hormone receptors. Despite the importance of these receptors, to date, only the glucocorticoid receptor has been anatomically localized to the membrane. We investigated the subcellular sites of mineralocorticoid receptors in the lateral amygdala of the Sprague-Dawley rat. Immunoblot analysis revealed the presence of mineralocorticoid receptors in the amygdala. Using electron microscopy, we found mineralocorticoid receptors expressed at both nuclear including: glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and extra nuclear sites including: presynaptic terminals, neuronal dendrites, and dendritic spines. Importantly we also observed mineralocorticoid receptors at postsynaptic membrane densities of excitatory synapses. These data provide direct anatomical evidence supporting the concept that, at some synapses, synaptic transmission is regulated by mineralocorticoid receptors. Thus part of the stress signaling response in the brain is a direct modulation of the synapse itself by adrenal steroids.

  18. Otanps synapse linear relation multiplier circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chible, H.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a four quadrant VLSI analog multiplier will be proposed, in order to be used in the implementation of the neurons and synapses modules of the artificial neural networks. The main characteristics of this multiplier are the small silicon area and the low power consumption and the high value of the weight input voltage. (author)

  19. Intercellular protein-protein interactions at synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofei; Hou, Dongmei; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Chen

    2014-06-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions through which neurons send nerve impulses to communicate with other neurons or excitable cells. The appropriate formation of synapses, both spatially and temporally, is essential for brain function and depends on the intercellular protein-protein interactions of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) at synaptic clefts. The CAM proteins link pre- and post-synaptic sites, and play essential roles in promoting synapse formation and maturation, maintaining synapse number and type, accumulating neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels, controlling neuronal differentiation, and even regulating synaptic plasticity directly. Alteration of the interactions of CAMs leads to structural and functional impairments, which results in many neurological disorders, such as autism, Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the functions of CAMs during development and in the mature neural system, as well as in the pathogenesis of some neurological disorders. Here, we review the function of the major classes of CAMs, and how dysfunction of CAMs relates to several neurological disorders.

  20. Spin-torque transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, G.E.W.; Brataas, A.; Tserkovnyak, Y.; Van Wees, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    A magnetoelectronic thin-film transistor is proposed that can display negative differential resistance and gain. The working principle is the modulation of the soure–drain current in a spin valve by the magnetization of a third electrode, which is rotated by the spin-torque created by a control spin

  1. Defects of the Glycinergic Synapse in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Hirata, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Glycine mediates fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. Physiological importance of the glycinergic synapse is well established in the brainstem and the spinal cord. In humans, the loss of glycinergic function in the spinal cord and brainstem leads to hyperekplexia, which is characterized by an excess startle reflex to sudden acoustic or tactile stimulation. In addition, glycinergic synapses in this region are also involved in the regulation of respiration and locomotion, and in the nociceptive processing. The importance of the glycinergic synapse is conserved across vertebrate species. A teleost fish, the zebrafish, offers several advantages as a vertebrate model for research of glycinergic synapse. Mutagenesis screens in zebrafish have isolated two motor defective mutants that have pathogenic mutations in glycinergic synaptic transmission: bandoneon (beo) and shocked (sho). Beo mutants have a loss-of-function mutation of glycine receptor (GlyR) β-subunit b, alternatively, sho mutant is a glycinergic transporter 1 (GlyT1) defective mutant. These mutants are useful animal models for understanding of glycinergic synaptic transmission and for identification of novel therapeutic agents for human diseases arising from defect in glycinergic transmission, such as hyperekplexia or glycine encephalopathy. Recent advances in techniques for genome editing and for imaging and manipulating of a molecule or a physiological process make zebrafish more attractive model. In this review, we describe the glycinergic defective zebrafish mutants and the technical advances in both forward and reverse genetic approaches as well as in vivo visualization and manipulation approaches for the study of the glycinergic synapse in zebrafish. PMID:27445686

  2. Visualizing the distribution of synapses from individual neurons in the mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Li

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Proper function of the mammalian brain relies on the establishment of highly specific synaptic connections among billions of neurons. To understand how complex neural circuits function, it is crucial to precisely describe neuronal connectivity and the distributions of synapses to and from individual neurons.In this study, we present a new genetic synaptic labeling method that relies on expression of a presynaptic marker, synaptophysin-GFP (Syp-GFP in individual neurons in vivo. We assess the reliability of this method and use it to analyze the spatial patterning of synapses in developing and mature cerebellar granule cells (GCs. In immature GCs, Syp-GFP is distributed in both axonal and dendritic regions. Upon maturation, it becomes strongly enriched in axons. In mature GCs, we analyzed synapses along their ascending segments and parallel fibers. We observe no differences in presynaptic distribution between GCs born at different developmental time points and thus having varied depths of projections in the molecular layer. We found that the mean densities of synapses along the parallel fiber and the ascending segment above the Purkinje cell (PC layer are statistically indistinguishable, and higher than previous estimates. Interestingly, presynaptic terminals were also found in the ascending segments of GCs below and within the PC layer, with the mean densities two-fold lower than that above the PC layer. The difference in the density of synapses in these parts of the ascending segment likely reflects the regional differences in postsynaptic target cells of GCs.The ability to visualize synapses of single neurons in vivo is valuable for studying synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity within individual neurons as well as information flow in neural circuits.

  3. Preferential loss of dorsal-hippocampus synapses underlies memory impairments provoked by short, multimodal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maras, P M; Molet, J; Chen, Y; Rice, C; Ji, S G; Solodkin, A; Baram, T Z

    2014-07-01

    The cognitive effects of stress are profound, yet it is unknown if the consequences of concurrent multiple stresses on learning and memory differ from those of a single stress of equal intensity and duration. We compared the effects on hippocampus-dependent memory of concurrent, hours-long light, loud noise, jostling and restraint (multimodal stress) with those of restraint or of loud noise alone. We then examined if differences in memory impairment following these two stress types might derive from their differential impact on hippocampal synapses, distinguishing dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Mice exposed to hours-long restraint or loud noise were modestly or minimally impaired in novel object recognition, whereas similar-duration multimodal stress provoked severe deficits. Differences in memory were not explained by differences in plasma corticosterone levels or numbers of Fos-labeled neurons in stress-sensitive hypothalamic neurons. However, although synapses in hippocampal CA3 were impacted by both restraint and multimodal stress, multimodal stress alone reduced synapse numbers severely in dorsal CA1, a region crucial for hippocampus-dependent memory. Ventral CA1 synapses were not significantly affected by either stress modality. Probing the basis of the preferential loss of dorsal synapses after multimodal stress, we found differential patterns of neuronal activation by the two stress types. Cross-correlation matrices, reflecting functional connectivity among activated regions, demonstrated that multimodal stress reduced hippocampal correlations with septum and thalamus and increased correlations with amygdala and BST. Thus, despite similar effects on plasma corticosterone and on hypothalamic stress-sensitive cells, multimodal and restraint stress differ in their activation of brain networks and in their impact on hippocampal synapses. Both of these processes might contribute to amplified memory impairments following short, multimodal stress.

  4. Preferential loss of dorsal-hippocampus synapses underlies memory impairments provoked by short, multimodal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maras, P M; Molet, J; Chen, Y; Rice, C; Ji, S G; Solodkin, A; Baram, T Z

    2014-01-01

    The cognitive effects of stress are profound, yet it is unknown if the consequences of concurrent multiple stresses on learning and memory differ from those of a single stress of equal intensity and duration. We compared the effects on hippocampus-dependent memory of concurrent, hours-long light, loud noise, jostling and restraint (multimodal stress) with those of restraint or of loud noise alone. We then examined if differences in memory impairment following these two stress types might derive from their differential impact on hippocampal synapses, distinguishing dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Mice exposed to hours-long restraint or loud noise were modestly or minimally impaired in novel object recognition, whereas similar-duration multimodal stress provoked severe deficits. Differences in memory were not explained by differences in plasma corticosterone levels or numbers of Fos-labeled neurons in stress-sensitive hypothalamic neurons. However, although synapses in hippocampal CA3 were impacted by both restraint and multimodal stress, multimodal stress alone reduced synapse numbers severely in dorsal CA1, a region crucial for hippocampus-dependent memory. Ventral CA1 synapses were not significantly affected by either stress modality. Probing the basis of the preferential loss of dorsal synapses after multimodal stress, we found differential patterns of neuronal activation by the two stress types. Cross-correlation matrices, reflecting functional connectivity among activated regions, demonstrated that multimodal stress reduced hippocampal correlations with septum and thalamus and increased correlations with amygdala and BST. Thus, despite similar effects on plasma corticosterone and on hypothalamic stress-sensitive cells, multimodal and restraint stress differ in their activation of brain networks and in their impact on hippocampal synapses. Both of these processes might contribute to amplified memory impairments following short, multimodal stress. PMID:24589888

  5. Bipolar junction transistor models for circuit simulation of cosmic-ray-induced soft errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benumof, R.; Zoutendyk, J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines bipolar junction transistor models suitable for calculating the effects of large excursions of some of the variables determining the operation of a transistor. Both the Ebers-Moll and Gummel-Poon models are studied, and the junction and diffusion capacitances are evaluated on the basis of the latter model. The most interesting result of this analysis is that a bipolar junction transistor when struck by a cosmic particle may cause a single event upset in an electronic circuit if the transistor is operated at a low forward base-emitter bias.

  6. TRANSISTOR HIGH VOLTAGE POWER SUPPLY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, G.E.

    1958-07-15

    High voltage, direct current power supplies are described for use with battery powered nuclear detection equipment. The particular advantages of the power supply described, are increased efficiency and reduced size and welght brought about by the use of transistors in the circuit. An important feature resides tn the employment of a pair of transistors in an alternatefiring oscillator circuit having a coupling transformer and other circuit components which are used for interconnecting the various electrodes of the transistors.

  7. Organic electrochemical transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Rivnay, Jonathan

    2018-01-16

    Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) make effective use of ion injection from an electrolyte to modulate the bulk conductivity of an organic semiconductor channel. The coupling between ionic and electronic charges within the entire volume of the channel endows OECTs with high transconductance compared with that of field-effect transistors, but also limits their response time. The synthetic tunability, facile deposition and biocompatibility of organic materials make OECTs particularly suitable for applications in biological interfacing, printed logic circuitry and neuromorphic devices. In this Review, we discuss the physics and the mechanism of operation of OECTs, focusing on their identifying characteristics. We highlight organic materials that are currently being used in OECTs and survey the history of OECT technology. In addition, form factors, fabrication technologies and applications such as bioelectronics, circuits and memory devices are examined. Finally, we take a critical look at the future of OECT research and development.

  8. Mesoscopic photon heat transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojanen, T.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir-Wingreen-Landauer-typ......We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir......-Wingreen-Landauer-type of conductance formula, which gives the photonic heat current through an arbitrary circuit element coupled to two dissipative reservoirs at finite temperatures. As an illustration we present an exact solution for the case when the intermediate circuit can be described as an electromagnetic resonator. We discuss...

  9. Metatronic transistor amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettiar, Uday K.; Engheta, Nader

    2015-10-01

    Utilizing the notion of metamaterials, in recent years the concept of a circuit and lumped circuit elements have been extended to the optical domains, providing the paradigm of optical metatronics, i.e., metamaterial-inspired optical nanocircuitry, as a powerful tool for design and study of more complex systems at the nanoscale. In this paper we present a design for a new metatronic element, namely, a metatronic transistor that functions as an amplifier. As shown by our analytical and numerical paper here, this metatronic transistor provides gain as well as isolation between the input and output ports of such two-port device. The cascadability and fan-out aspects of this element are also explored.

  10. Organic electrochemical transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivnay, Jonathan; Inal, Sahika; Salleo, Alberto; Owens, Róisín M.; Berggren, Magnus; Malliaras, George G.

    2018-02-01

    Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) make effective use of ion injection from an electrolyte to modulate the bulk conductivity of an organic semiconductor channel. The coupling between ionic and electronic charges within the entire volume of the channel endows OECTs with high transconductance compared with that of field-effect transistors, but also limits their response time. The synthetic tunability, facile deposition and biocompatibility of organic materials make OECTs particularly suitable for applications in biological interfacing, printed logic circuitry and neuromorphic devices. In this Review, we discuss the physics and the mechanism of operation of OECTs, focusing on their identifying characteristics. We highlight organic materials that are currently being used in OECTs and survey the history of OECT technology. In addition, form factors, fabrication technologies and applications such as bioelectronics, circuits and memory devices are examined. Finally, we take a critical look at the future of OECT research and development.

  11. Ion bipolar junction transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated.

  12. Polarization induced doped transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  13. Prevention of Noise Damage to Cochlear Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    difference We therefore conclude that it is more likely that female hormones are protecting against susceptibility as opposed to male hormones...of synapse counts among all experimental conditions, those in A as well as saline/vehicle and systemic 4 mg/Kg IEM-1460 (IEMs4mg). There is no... animals at the approximate level of the animals ’ ears. The variation of the noise level across the animals ’ ears and across time is ə dB

  14. Memory and learning behaviors mimicked in nanogranular SiO2-based proton conductor gated oxide-based synaptic transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chang Jin; Zhu, Li Qiang; Zhou, Ju Mei; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2013-11-07

    In neuroscience, signal processing, memory and learning function are established in the brain by modifying ionic fluxes in neurons and synapses. Emulation of memory and learning behaviors of biological systems by nanoscale ionic/electronic devices is highly desirable for building neuromorphic systems or even artificial neural networks. Here, novel artificial synapses based on junctionless oxide-based protonic/electronic hybrid transistors gated by nanogranular phosphorus-doped SiO2-based proton-conducting films are fabricated on glass substrates by a room-temperature process. Short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) are mimicked by tuning the pulse gate voltage amplitude. The LTM process in such an artificial synapse is due to the proton-related interfacial electrochemical reaction. Our results are highly desirable for building future neuromorphic systems or even artificial networks via electronic elements.

  15. Highly stable carbon nanotube top-gate transistors with tunable threshold voltage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Cobb, B.; Breemen, A. van; Gelinck, G.H.; Bao, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-nanotube top-gate transistors with fluorinated dielectrics are presented. With PTrFE as the dielectric, the devices have absent or small hysteresis at different sweep rates and excellent bias-stress stability under ambient conditions. Ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) transistors

  16. CNS Neurons Deposit Laminin α5 to Stabilize Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell H. Omar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Synapses in the developing brain are structurally dynamic but become stable by early adulthood. We demonstrate here that an α5-subunit-containing laminin stabilizes synapses during this developmental transition. Hippocampal neurons deposit laminin α5 at synapses during adolescence as connections stabilize. Disruption of laminin α5 in neurons causes dramatic fluctuations in dendritic spine head size that can be rescued by exogenous α5-containing laminin. Conditional deletion of laminin α5 in vivo increases dendritic spine size and leads to an age-dependent loss of synapses accompanied by behavioral defects. Remaining synapses have larger postsynaptic densities and enhanced neurotransmission. Finally, we provide evidence that laminin α5 acts through an integrin α3β1-Abl2 kinase-p190RhoGAP signaling cascade and partners with laminin β2 to regulate dendritic spine density and behavior. Together, our results identify laminin α5 as a stabilizer of dendritic spines and synapses in the brain and elucidate key cellular and molecular mechanisms by which it acts. : In the developing brain, synaptic structure transitions from dynamic to stable by early adulthood. Omar et al. identify a laminin molecule deposited at synapses in the brain that is essential for dendritic spine structural regulation and synapse stability between early postnatal development and adulthood. Keywords: extracellular matrix, ECM, synapse maturation, adhesion, Lama5, Lamb2, synapse loss, stability, structural plasticity, motility

  17. Pass-transistor asynchronous sequential circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Sterling R.; Maki, Gary K.

    1989-01-01

    Design methods for asynchronous sequential pass-transistor circuits, which result in circuits that are hazard- and critical-race-free and which have added degrees of freedom for the input signals, are discussed. The design procedures are straightforward and easy to implement. Two single-transition-time state assignment methods are presented, and hardware bounds for each are established. A surprising result is that the hardware realizations for each next state variable and output variable is identical for a given flow table. Thus, a state machine with N states and M outputs can be constructed using a single layout replicated N + M times.

  18. Synapse-specific and compartmentalized expression of presynaptic homeostatic potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiling; Goel, Pragya; Chen, Catherine; Angajala, Varun; Chen, Xun; Dickman, Dion K

    2018-04-05

    Postsynaptic compartments can be specifically modulated during various forms of synaptic plasticity, but it is unclear whether this precision is shared at presynaptic terminals. Presynaptic Homeostatic Plasticity (PHP) stabilizes neurotransmission at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, where a retrograde enhancement of presynaptic neurotransmitter release compensates for diminished postsynaptic receptor functionality. To test the specificity of PHP induction and expression, we have developed a genetic manipulation to reduce postsynaptic receptor expression at one of the two muscles innervated by a single motor neuron. We find that PHP can be induced and expressed at a subset of synapses, over both acute and chronic time scales, without influencing transmission at adjacent release sites. Further, homeostatic modulations to CaMKII, vesicle pools, and functional release sites are compartmentalized and do not spread to neighboring pre- or post-synaptic structures. Thus, both PHP induction and expression mechanisms are locally transmitted and restricted to specific synaptic compartments. © 2018, Li et al.

  19. Cyano-substituted oligo(p-phenylene vinylene) single-crystal with balanced hole and electron injection and transport for ambipolar field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jian; Tang, Jia; Xu, Yuanxiang; Liu, Liqun; Wang, Yan; Xie, Zengqi; Ma, Yuguang

    2015-02-07

    High and balanced hole and electron mobilities were achieved in OFETs based on the high photoluminescence of a 1,4-bis(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl)benzene single-crystal with symmetric electrodes. For electron and hole, the operation voltage in the OFETs based on symmetric gold electrodes was 30 and -20 V, respectively. The accumulation threshold voltage is low enough for the OFETs to operate in an ambipolar model with the source/drain voltage (Vds) around 50 V despite the high injection barrier. The highest electron and hole mobility was 0.745 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 0.239 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and the current density reached 90.7 and 27.4 A cm(-2), respectively with an assumed 10 nm accumulation layer. The high mobility comes from the strong π-π interactions. In addition, the highly ordered hydrogen bonding matrix may create an efficient route to pump the charge to the inner layer which can improve the injection ability.

  20. New players tip the scales in the balance between excitatory and inhibitory synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Husseini Alaa

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Synaptogenesis is a highly controlled process, involving a vast array of players which include cell adhesion molecules, scaffolding and signaling proteins, neurotransmitter receptors and proteins associated with the synaptic vesicle machinery. These molecules cooperate in an intricate manner on both the pre- and postsynaptic sides to orchestrate the precise assembly of neuronal contacts. This is an amazing feat considering that a single neuron receives tens of thousands of synaptic inputs but virtually no mismatch between pre- and postsynaptic components occur in vivo. One crucial aspect of synapse formation is whether a nascent synapse will develop into an excitatory or inhibitory contact. The tight control of a balance between the types of synapses formed regulates the overall neuronal excitability, and is thus critical for normal brain function and plasticity. However, little is known about how this balance is achieved. This review discusses recent findings which provide clues to how neurons may control excitatory and inhibitory synapse formation, with focus on the involvement of the neuroligin family and PSD-95 in this process.

  1. Vertical Ge/Si Core/Shell Nanowire Junctionless Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Cai, Fuxi; Otuonye, Ugo; Lu, Wei D

    2016-01-13

    Vertical junctionless transistors with a gate-all-around (GAA) structure based on Ge/Si core/shell nanowires epitaxially grown and integrated on a ⟨111⟩ Si substrate were fabricated and analyzed. Because of efficient gate coupling in the nanowire-GAA transistor structure and the high density one-dimensional hole gas formed in the Ge nanowire core, excellent P-type transistor behaviors with Ion of 750 μA/μm were obtained at a moderate gate length of 544 nm with minimal short-channel effects. The experimental data can be quantitatively modeled by a GAA junctionless transistor model with few fitting parameters, suggesting the nanowire transistors can be fabricated reliably without introducing additional factors that can degrade device performance. Devices with different gate lengths were readily obtained by tuning the thickness of an etching mask film. Analysis of the histogram of different devices yielded a single dominate peak in device parameter distribution, indicating excellent uniformity and high confidence of single nanowire operation. Using two vertical nanowire junctionless transistors, a PMOS-logic inverter with near rail-to-rail output voltage was demonstrated, and device matching in the logic can be conveniently obtained by controlling the number of nanowires employed in different devices rather than modifying device geometry. These studies show that junctionless transistors based on vertical Ge/Si core/shell nanowires can be fabricated in a controlled fashion with excellent performance and may be used in future hybrid, high-performance circuits where bottom-up grown nanowire devices with different functionalities can be directly integrated with an existing Si platform.

  2. Microglia-Synapse Pathways: Promising Therapeutic Strategy for Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingdun; Wang, Haitao

    2017-01-01

    The main hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are extracellular deposits of amyloid plaques and intracellular accumulation of hyperphosphorylated neurofibrillary tangles (tau). However, the mechanisms underlying these neuropathological changes remain largely unclear. To date, plenty of studies have shown that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of AD, and the microglia-synapse pathways have been repeatedly identified as the crucial factor in the disease process. In this review, evidences from microglia and synapse studies are presented, and the role of microglia in the pathogenesis of AD, the contributing factors to synapse dysfunction, and the role and mechanisms of microglia-synapse pathways will be discussed. PMID:28473983

  3. How synapses can enhance sensibility of a neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protachevicz, P. R.; Borges, F. S.; Iarosz, K. C.; Caldas, I. L.; Baptista, M. S.; Viana, R. L.; Lameu, E. L.; Macau, E. E. N.; Batista, A. M.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we study the dynamic range in a neural network modelled by cellular automaton. We consider deterministic and non-deterministic rules to simulate electrical and chemical synapses. Chemical synapses have an intrinsic time-delay and are susceptible to parameter variations guided by learning Hebbian rules of behaviour. The learning rules are related to neuroplasticity that describes change to the neural connections in the brain. Our results show that chemical synapses can abruptly enhance sensibility of the neural network, a manifestation that can become even more predominant if learning rules of evolution are applied to the chemical synapses.

  4. Spin Hall effect transistor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wunderlich, Joerg; Park, B.G.; Irvine, A.C.; Zarbo, Liviu; Rozkotová, E.; Němec, P.; Novák, Vít; Sinova, Jairo; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 330, č. 6012 (2010), s. 1801-1804 ISSN 0036-8075 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100652; GA MŠk LC510 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 215368 - SemiSpinNet Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0801 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : spin Hall effect * spintronics * spin transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 31.364, year: 2010

  5. Triheteromeric NMDA Receptors at Hippocampal Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Kenneth R.; McGinley, Matthew J.; Westbrook, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptors are composed of two GluN1 (N1) and two GluN2 (N2) subunits. Constituent N2 subunits control the pharmacological and kinetic characteristics of the receptor. NMDA receptors in hippocampal or cortical neurons are often thought of as diheteromeric, i.e., containing only one type of N2 subunit. However, triheteromeric receptors with more than one type of N2 subunit also have been reported and the relative contribution of di- and triheteromeric NMDA receptors at synapses has been difficult to assess. Because wild-type hippocampal principal neurons express N1, N2A and N2B, we used cultured hippocampal principal neurons from N2A and N2B-knockout mice as templates for diheteromeric synaptic receptors. Summation of N1/N2B and N1/N2A excitatory postsynaptic currents could not account for the deactivation kinetics of wild-type excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) however. To make a quantitative estimate of NMDA receptor subtypes at wild-type synapses, we used the deactivation kinetics, as well as the effects of the competitive antagonist NVP-AAM077. Our results indicate that three types of NMDA receptors contribute to the wild-type EPSC, with at least two-thirds being triheteromeric receptors. Functional isolation of synaptic triheteromeric receptors revealed deactivation kinetics and pharmacology distinct from either diheteromeric receptor subtype. Because of differences in open probability, synaptic triheteromeric receptors outnumbered N1/N2A receptors by 5.8 to 1 and N1/N2B receptors by 3.2 to 1. Our results suggest that triheteromeric NMDA receptors must be either preferentially assembled or preferentially localized at synapses. PMID:23699525

  6. Transistor and memory devices based on novel organic and biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jia-Hung

    Organic semiconductor devices have aroused considerable interest because of the enormous potential in many technological applications. Organic electroluminescent devices have been extensively applied in display technology. Rapid progress has also been made in transistor and memory devices. This thesis considers aspects of the transistor based on novel organic single crystals and memory devices using hybrid nanocomposites comprising polymeric/inorganic nanoparticles, and biomolecule/quantum dots. Organic single crystals represent highly ordered structures with much less imperfections compared to amorphous thin films for probing the intrinsic charge transport in transistor devices. We demonstrate that free-standing, thin organic single crystals with natural flexing ability can be fabricated as flexible transistors. We study the surface properties of the organic crystals to determine a nearly perfect surface leading to high performance transistors. The flexible transistors can maintain high performance under reversible bending conditions. Because of the high quality crystal technique, we further develop applications on organic complementary circuits and organic single crystal photovoltaics. In the second part, two aspects of memory devices are studied. We examine the charge transfer process between conjugated polymers and metal nanoparticles. This charge transfer process is essential for the conductance switching in nanoseconds to induce the memory effect. Under the reduction condition, the charge transfer process is eliminated as well as the memory effect, raising the importance of coupling between conjugated systems and nanoparticle accepters. The other aspect of memory devices focuses on the interaction of virus biomolecules with quantum dots or metal nanoparticles in the devices. We investigate the impact of memory function on the hybrid bio-inorganic system. We perform an experimental analysis of the charge storage activation energy in tobacco mosaic virus with

  7. Low-voltage protonic/electronic hybrid indium zinc oxide synaptic transistors on paper substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Guodong; Wan, Changjin; Wan, Qing; Zhou, Jumei; Zhu, Liqiang

    2014-01-01

    Low-voltage (1.5 V) indium zinc oxide (IZO)-based electric-double-layer (EDL) thin-film transistors (TFTs) gated by nanogranular proton conducting SiO 2 electrolyte films are fabricated on paper substrates. Both enhancement-mode and depletion-mode operation are obtained by tuning the thickness of the IZO channel layer. Furthermore, such flexible IZO protonic/electronic hybrid EDL TFTs can be used as artificial synapses, and synaptic stimulation response and short-term synaptic plasticity function are demonstrated. The protonic/electronic hybrid EDL TFTs on paper substrates proposed here are promising for low-power flexible paper electronics, artificial synapses and bioelectronics. (paper)

  8. Oxide-based synaptic transistors gated by solution-processed gelatin electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yinke; Sun, Jia; Qian, Chuan; Kong, Ling-An; Gou, Guangyang; Li, Hongjian

    2017-04-01

    In human brain, a large number of neurons are connected via synapses. Simulation of the synaptic behaviors using electronic devices is the most important step for neuromorphic systems. In this paper, proton conducting gelatin electrolyte-gated oxide field-effect transistors (FETs) were used for emulating synaptic functions, in which the gate electrode is regarded as pre-synaptic neuron and the channel layer as the post-synaptic neuron. In analogy to the biological synapse, a potential spike can be applied at the gate electrode and trigger ionic motion in the gelatin electrolyte, which in turn generates excitatory post-synaptic current (EPSC) in the channel layer. Basic synaptic behaviors including spike time-dependent EPSC, paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), self-adaptation, and frequency-dependent synaptic transmission were successfully mimicked. Such ionic/electronic hybrid devices are beneficial for synaptic electronics and brain-inspired neuromorphic systems.

  9. Silicon synaptic transistor for hardware-based spiking neural network and neuromorphic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungjin; Hwang, Sungmin; Park, Jungjin; Park, Byung-Gook

    2017-10-01

    Brain-inspired neuromorphic systems have attracted much attention as new computing paradigms for power-efficient computation. Here, we report a silicon synaptic transistor with two electrically independent gates to realize a hardware-based neural network system without any switching components. The spike-timing dependent plasticity characteristics of the synaptic devices are measured and analyzed. With the help of the device model based on the measured data, the pattern recognition capability of the hardware-based spiking neural network systems is demonstrated using the modified national institute of standards and technology handwritten dataset. By comparing systems with and without inhibitory synapse part, it is confirmed that the inhibitory synapse part is an essential element in obtaining effective and high pattern classification capability.

  10. Monolithic metal oxide transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongsuk; Park, Won-Yeong; Kang, Moon Sung; Yi, Gi-Ra; Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-04-28

    We devised a simple transparent metal oxide thin film transistor architecture composed of only two component materials, an amorphous metal oxide and ion gel gate dielectric, which could be entirely assembled using room-temperature processes on a plastic substrate. The geometry cleverly takes advantage of the unique characteristics of the two components. An oxide layer is metallized upon exposure to plasma, leading to the formation of a monolithic source-channel-drain oxide layer, and the ion gel gate dielectric is used to gate the transistor channel effectively at low voltages through a coplanar gate. We confirmed that the method is generally applicable to a variety of sol-gel-processed amorphous metal oxides, including indium oxide, indium zinc oxide, and indium gallium zinc oxide. An inverter NOT logic device was assembled using the resulting devices as a proof of concept demonstration of the applicability of the devices to logic circuits. The favorable characteristics of these devices, including (i) the simplicity of the device structure with only two components, (ii) the benign fabrication processes at room temperature, (iii) the low-voltage operation under 2 V, and (iv) the excellent and stable electrical performances, together support the application of these devices to low-cost portable gadgets, i.e., cheap electronics.

  11. Independent origins of neurons and synapses: insights from ctenophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Leonid L; Kohn, Andrea B

    2016-01-05

    There is more than one way to develop neuronal complexity, and animals frequently use different molecular toolkits to achieve similar functional outcomes. Genomics and metabolomics data from basal metazoans suggest that neural signalling evolved independently in ctenophores and cnidarians/bilaterians. This polygenesis hypothesis explains the lack of pan-neuronal and pan-synaptic genes across metazoans, including remarkable examples of lineage-specific evolution of neurogenic and signalling molecules as well as synaptic components. Sponges and placozoans are two lineages without neural and muscular systems. The possibility of secondary loss of neurons and synapses in the Porifera/Placozoa clades is a highly unlikely and less parsimonious scenario. We conclude that acetylcholine, serotonin, histamine, dopamine, octopamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were recruited as transmitters in the neural systems in cnidarian and bilaterian lineages. By contrast, ctenophores independently evolved numerous secretory peptides, indicating extensive adaptations within the clade and suggesting that early neural systems might be peptidergic. Comparative analysis of glutamate signalling also shows numerous lineage-specific innovations, implying the extensive use of this ubiquitous metabolite and intercellular messenger over the course of convergent and parallel evolution of mechanisms of intercellular communication. Therefore: (i) we view a neuron as a functional character but not a genetic character, and (ii) any given neural system cannot be considered as a single character because it is composed of different cell lineages with distinct genealogies, origins and evolutionary histories. Thus, when reconstructing the evolution of nervous systems, we ought to start with the identification of particular cell lineages by establishing distant neural homologies or examples of convergent evolution. In a corollary of the hypothesis of the independent origins of neurons, our analyses

  12. Sequences Flanking the Gephyrin-Binding Site of GlyRβ Tune Receptor Stabilization at Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewald, Nora; Jan, Audric; Salvatico, Charlotte; Kress, Vanessa; Renner, Marianne; Triller, Antoine; Specht, Christian G; Schwarz, Guenter

    2018-01-01

    The efficacy of synaptic transmission is determined by the number of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses. Their recruitment depends upon the availability of postsynaptic scaffolding molecules that interact with specific binding sequences of the receptor. At inhibitory synapses, gephyrin is the major scaffold protein that mediates the accumulation of heteromeric glycine receptors (GlyRs) via the cytoplasmic loop in the β-subunit (β-loop). This binding involves high- and low-affinity interactions, but the molecular mechanism of this bimodal binding and its implication in GlyR stabilization at synapses remain unknown. We have approached this question using a combination of quantitative biochemical tools and high-density single molecule tracking in cultured rat spinal cord neurons. The high-affinity binding site could be identified and was shown to rely on the formation of a 3 10 -helix C-terminal to the β-loop core gephyrin-binding motif. This site plays a structural role in shaping the core motif and represents the major contributor to the synaptic confinement of GlyRs by gephyrin. The N-terminal flanking sequence promotes lower affinity interactions by occupying newly identified binding sites on gephyrin. Despite its low affinity, this binding site plays a modulatory role in tuning the mobility of the receptor. Together, the GlyR β-loop sequences flanking the core-binding site differentially regulate the affinity of the receptor for gephyrin and its trapping at synapses. Our experimental approach thus bridges the gap between thermodynamic aspects of receptor-scaffold interactions and functional receptor stabilization at synapses in living cells.

  13. Cell adhesion and matricellular support by astrocytes of the tripartite synapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillen, Anne E J; Burbach, J Peter H; Hol, Elly M

    2018-01-01

    Astrocytes contribute to the formation, function, and plasticity of synapses. Their processes enwrap the neuronal components of the tripartite synapse, and due to this close interaction they are perfectly positioned to modulate neuronal communication. The interaction between astrocytes and synapses

  14. Copper atomic-scale transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqing Xie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated copper as a working material for metallic atomic-scale transistors and confirmed that copper atomic-scale transistors can be fabricated and operated electrochemically in a copper electrolyte (CuSO4 + H2SO4 in bi-distilled water under ambient conditions with three microelectrodes (source, drain and gate. The electrochemical switching-on potential of the atomic-scale transistor is below 350 mV, and the switching-off potential is between 0 and −170 mV. The switching-on current is above 1 μA, which is compatible with semiconductor transistor devices. Both sign and amplitude of the voltage applied across the source and drain electrodes (Ubias influence the switching rate of the transistor and the copper deposition on the electrodes, and correspondingly shift the electrochemical operation potential. The copper atomic-scale transistors can be switched using a function generator without a computer-controlled feedback switching mechanism. The copper atomic-scale transistors, with only one or two atoms at the narrowest constriction, were realized to switch between 0 and 1G0 (G0 = 2e2/h; with e being the electron charge, and h being Planck’s constant or 2G0 by the function generator. The switching rate can reach up to 10 Hz. The copper atomic-scale transistor demonstrates volatile/non-volatile dual functionalities. Such an optimal merging of the logic with memory may open a perspective for processor-in-memory and logic-in-memory architectures, using copper as an alternative working material besides silver for fully metallic atomic-scale transistors.

  15. TPM analyses reveal that FtsK contributes both to the assembly and the activation of the XerCD-dif recombination synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diagne, Cheikh Tidiane; Salhi, Maya; Crozat, Estelle; Salomé, Laurence; Cornet, Francois; Rousseau, Philippe; Tardin, Catherine

    2014-02-01

    Circular chromosomes can form dimers during replication and failure to resolve those into monomers prevents chromosome segregation, which leads to cell death. Dimer resolution is catalysed by a highly conserved site-specific recombination system, called XerCD-dif in Escherichia coli. Recombination is activated by the DNA translocase FtsK, which is associated with the division septum, and is thought to contribute to the assembly of the XerCD-dif synapse. In our study, direct observation of the assembly of the XerCD-dif synapse, which had previously eluded other methods, was made possible by the use of Tethered Particle Motion, a single molecule approach. We show that XerC, XerD and two dif sites suffice for the assembly of XerCD-dif synapses in absence of FtsK, but lead to inactive XerCD-dif synapses. We also show that the presence of the γ domain of FtsK increases the rate of synapse formation and convert them into active synapses where recombination occurs. Our results represent the first direct observation of the formation of the XerCD-dif recombination synapse and its activation by FtsK.

  16. Programmable automated transistor test system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, L.V.; Sundberg, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes a programmable automated transistor test system (PATTS) and its utilization to evaluate bipolar transistors and Darlingtons, and such MOSFET and special types as can be accommodated with the PATTS base-drive. An application of a pulsed power technique at low duty cycles in a non-destructive test is used to examine the dynamic switching characteristic curves of power transistors. Data collection, manipulation, storage, and output are operator interactive but are guided and controlled by the system software. In addition a library of test data is established on disks, tapes, and hard copies for future reference

  17. Rhythmic changes in synapse numbers in Drosophila melanogaster motor terminals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Ruiz

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the morphology of the neuromuscular junction of the flight motor neuron MN5 in Drosophila melanogaster undergoes daily rhythmical changes, with smaller synaptic boutons during the night, when the fly is resting, than during the day, when the fly is active. With electron microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, we searched for a rhythmic change in synapse numbers in this neuron, both under light:darkness (LD cycles and constant darkness (DD. We expected the number of synapses to increase during the morning, when the fly has an intense phase of locomotion activity under LD and DD. Surprisingly, only our DD data were consistent with this hypothesis. In LD, we found more synapses at midnight than at midday. We propose that under LD conditions, there is a daily rhythm of formation of new synapses in the dark phase, when the fly is resting, and disassembly over the light phase, when the fly is active. Several parameters appeared to be light dependent, since they were affected differently under LD or DD. The great majority of boutons containing synapses had only one and very few had either two or more, with a 70∶25∶5 ratio (one, two and three or more synapses in LD and 75∶20∶5 in DD. Given the maintenance of this proportion even when both bouton and synapse numbers changed with time, we suggest that there is a homeostatic mechanism regulating synapse distribution among MN5 boutons.

  18. Transistor-like behavior of transition metal complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Guckian, A; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    scanning tunneling microscope (in situ STM). This configuration resembles a single-molecule transistor, where the reference electrode corresponds to the gate electrode. It operates at room temperature in a condensed matter (here aqueous) environment. Amplification on-off ratios up to 50 are found when...

  19. Electronic properties of germanane field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madhushankar, B.N.; Kaverzin, A.; Giousis, T.; Potsi, G.; Gournis, D.; Rudolf, P.; Blake, G.R.; van der Wal, C.H.; van Wees, B.J.

    2017-01-01

    A new two dimensional (2D) material—germanane—has been synthesised recently with promising electrical and optical properties. In this paper we report the first realisation of germanane field-effect transistors fabricated from multilayer single crystal flakes. Our germanane devices show transport in

  20. Microwave flexible transistors on cellulose nanofibrillated fiber substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung-Hun Seo; Tzu-Hsuan Chang; Jaeseong Lee; Ronald Sabo; Weidong Zhou; Zhiyong Cai; Shaoqin Gong; Zhenqiang Ma

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate microwave flexible thin-film transistors (TFTs) on biodegradable substrates towards potential green portable devices. The combination of cellulose nanofibrillated fiber (CNF) substrate, which is a biobased and biodegradable platform, with transferrable single crystalline Si nanomembrane (Si NM), enables the realization of truly...

  1. Transistors - From Point Contact to Single Electron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    development of the energy band theory of solids by Wilson. ... Davydov developed bis theory independently. All these theories had shortcomings as pointed out by Sab. The correct theory of metal-semiconductor diodes based on thermionic emission of majority carriers .... watches and other portable consumer applications.

  2. Microwave Enhanced Cotunneling in SET Transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manscher, Martin; Savolainen, M.; Mygind, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    Cotunneling in single electron tunneling (SET) devices is an error process which may severely limit their electronic and metrologic applications. Here is presented an experimental investigation of the theory for adiabatic enhancement of cotunneling by coherent microwaves. Cotunneling in SET...... transistors has been measured as function of temperature, gate voltage, frequency, and applied microwave power. At low temperatures and applied power levels, including also sequential tunneling, the results can be made consistent with theory using the unknown damping in the microwave line as the only free...

  3. Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Wakayama, Yutaka; Hayakawa, Ryoma; Seo, Hoon-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) is reviewed. Photoactive OFETs are divided into light-emitting (LE) and light-receiving (LR) OFETs. In the first part, LE-OFETs are reviewed from the viewpoint of the evolution of device structures. Device performances have improved in the last decade with the evolution of device structures from single-layer unipolar to multi-layer ambipolar transistors. In the second part, various kinds of LR-OFETs are featured. These ar...

  4. Transistor device for multi-bit non-volatile storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, S.G.; Jalil, M.B.A.; Kumar, Vimal; Liew, Thomas; Teo, K.L.; Chong, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a transistor model that incorporates multiple storage elements within a single transistor device. This device is thus smaller in size compared to the magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) with the same number of storage bits. The device model can function in both the current as well as voltage detection mode. Simulations were carried out at higher temperature, taking into consideration the spread of electron density above the Fermi level. We found that linear detection of conductance variation with the stored binary value can be achieved for a 3-bit storage device up to a temperature of 350 K

  5. Reconfigurable quadruple quantum dots in a silicon nanowire transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betz, A. C., E-mail: ab2106@cam.ac.uk; Broström, M.; Gonzalez-Zalba, M. F. [Hitachi Cambridge Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Tagliaferri, M. L. V. [Laboratorio MDM, CNR-IMM, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universit di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Vinet, M. [CEA/LETI-MINATEC, CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Sanquer, M. [SPSMS, UMR-E CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Ferguson, A. J. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-16

    We present a reconfigurable metal-oxide-semiconductor multi-gate transistor that can host a quadruple quantum dot in silicon. The device consists of an industrial quadruple-gate silicon nanowire field-effect transistor. Exploiting the corner effect, we study the versatility of the structure in the single quantum dot and the serial double quantum dot regimes and extract the relevant capacitance parameters. We address the fabrication variability of the quadruple-gate approach which, paired with improved silicon fabrication techniques, makes the corner state quantum dot approach a promising candidate for a scalable quantum information architecture.

  6. Reconfigurable quadruple quantum dots in a silicon nanowire transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betz, A. C.; Broström, M.; Gonzalez-Zalba, M. F.; Tagliaferri, M. L. V.; Vinet, M.; Sanquer, M.; Ferguson, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a reconfigurable metal-oxide-semiconductor multi-gate transistor that can host a quadruple quantum dot in silicon. The device consists of an industrial quadruple-gate silicon nanowire field-effect transistor. Exploiting the corner effect, we study the versatility of the structure in the single quantum dot and the serial double quantum dot regimes and extract the relevant capacitance parameters. We address the fabrication variability of the quadruple-gate approach which, paired with improved silicon fabrication techniques, makes the corner state quantum dot approach a promising candidate for a scalable quantum information architecture.

  7. Reduced cortical distribution volume of iodine-123 iomazenil in Alzheimer's disease as a measure of loss of synapses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soricelli, A; Postiglione, A; Grivet-Fojaja, M R

    1996-01-01

    indiscriminately to affect all cortical neurons, albeit more so in some areas than in others. In this pilot study we measured Vd in six patients with probable AD and in five age-matched controls using a brain-dedicated single-photon emission tomography scanner allowing all cortical levels to be sampled......Iodine-123 labelled iomazenil (IMZ) is a specific tracer for the GABAA receptor, the dominant inhibitory synapse of the brain. The cerebral distribution volume (Vd) of IMZ may be taken as a quantitative measure of these synapses in Alzheimer's disease (AD), where synaptic loss tends...

  8. Synaptotagmin 7 confers frequency invariance onto specialized depressing synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turecek, Josef; Jackman, Skyler L.; Regehr, Wade G.

    2017-11-01

    At most synapses in the brain, short-term plasticity dynamically modulates synaptic strength. Rapid frequency-dependent changes in synaptic strength have key roles in sensory adaptation, gain control and many other neural computations. However, some auditory, vestibular and cerebellar synapses maintain constant strength over a wide range of firing frequencies, and as a result efficiently encode firing rates. Despite its apparent simplicity, frequency-invariant transmission is difficult to achieve because of inherent synaptic nonlinearities. Here we study frequency-invariant transmission at synapses from Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nuclei and at vestibular synapses in mice. Prolonged activation of these synapses leads to initial depression, which is followed by steady-state responses that are frequency invariant for their physiological activity range. We find that synaptotagmin 7 (Syt7), a calcium sensor for short-term facilitation, is present at both synapses. It was unclear why a sensor for facilitation would be present at these and other depressing synapses. We find that at Purkinje cell and vestibular synapses, Syt7 supports facilitation that is normally masked by depression, which can be revealed in wild-type mice but is absent in Syt7 knockout mice. In wild-type mice, facilitation increases with firing frequency and counteracts depression to produce frequency-invariant transmission. In Syt7-knockout mice, Purkinje cell and vestibular synapses exhibit conventional use-dependent depression, weakening to a greater extent as the firing frequency is increased. Presynaptic rescue of Syt7 expression restores both facilitation and frequency-invariant transmission. Our results identify a function for Syt7 at synapses that exhibit overall depression, and demonstrate that facilitation has an unexpected and important function in producing frequency-invariant transmission.

  9. Nonlinear Synapses for Large-Scale Models: An Efficient Representation Enables Complex Synapse Dynamics Modeling in Large-Scale Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eHu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical synapses are comprised of a wide collection of intricate signaling pathways involving complex dynamics. These mechanisms are often reduced to simple spikes or exponential representations in order to enable computer simulations at higher spatial levels of complexity. However, these representations cannot capture important nonlinear dynamics found in synaptic transmission. Here, we propose an input-output (IO synapse model capable of generating complex nonlinear dynamics while maintaining low computational complexity. This IO synapse model is an extension of a detailed mechanistic glutamatergic synapse model capable of capturing the input-output relationships of the mechanistic model using the Volterra functional power series. We demonstrate that the IO synapse model is able to successfully track the nonlinear dynamics of the synapse up to the third order with high accuracy. We also evaluate the accuracy of the IO synapse model at different input frequencies and compared its performance with that of kinetic models in compartmental neuron models. Our results demonstrate that the IO synapse model is capable of efficiently replicating complex nonlinear dynamics that were represented in the original mechanistic model and provide a method to replicate complex and diverse synaptic transmission within neuron network simulations.

  10. Nanowire transistors physics of devices and materials in one dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Colinge, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    From quantum mechanical concepts to practical circuit applications, this book presents a self-contained and up-to-date account of the physics and technology of nanowire semiconductor devices. It includes a unified account of the critical ideas central to low-dimensional physics and transistor physics which equips readers with a common framework and language to accelerate scientific and technological developments across the two fields. Detailed descriptions of novel quantum mechanical effects such as quantum current oscillations, the metal-to-semiconductor transition and the transition from classical transistor to single-electron transistor operation are described in detail, in addition to real-world applications in the fields of nanoelectronics, biomedical sensing techniques, and advanced semiconductor research. Including numerous illustrations to help readers understand these phenomena, this is an essential resource for researchers and professional engineers working on semiconductor devices and materials in ...

  11. John Bardeen and transistor physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Howard R.

    2001-01-01

    John Bardeen and Walter Brattain invented the point-contact semiconductor amplifier (transistor action) in polycrystalline germanium (also observed in polycrystalline silicon) on Dec. 15, 1947, for which they received a patent on Oct. 3, 1950. Bill Shockley was not a co-patent holder on Bardeen and Brattain's point-contact semiconductor amplifier patent since Julius Lilienfeld had already received a patent in 1930 for what would have been Shockley's contribution; namely, the field-effect methodology. Shockley received patents for both his minority-carrier injection concept and junction transistor theory, however, and deservedly shared the Nobel prize with Bardeen and Brattain for his seminal contributions of injection, p-n junction theory and junction transistor theory. We will review the events leading up to the invention of Bardeen and Brattain's point-contact semiconductor amplifier during the magic month of November 17-December 16, 1947 and the invention of Shockley's junction semiconductor amplifier during his magic month of December 24, 1947-January 23, 1948. It was during the course of Bardeen and Brattain's research in November, 1947 that Bardeen also patented the essence of the MOS transistor, wherein the induced minority carriers were confined to the inversion layer enroute to the collector. C. T. Sah has described this device as a sourceless MOS transistor. Indeed, John Bardeen, co-inventor of the point-contact semiconductor amplifier and inventor of the MOS transistor, may rightly be called the father of modern electronics.

  12. Astrocytic Gliotransmitter: Diffusion Dynamics and Induction of Information Processing on Tripartite Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Jia; Du, Meng-Meng; Wang, Rong; Lei, Jin-Zhi; Wu, Ying

    Astrocytes have important functions in the central nervous system (CNS) and are significant in our understanding of the neuronal network. Astrocytes modulate neuronal firings at both single cell level of tripartite synapses and the neuron-glial network level. Astrocytes release adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and glutamate into the neuron-glial network. These gliotransmitters diffuse over the network to form long distance signals to regulate neuron firings. In this paper, we study a neuron-glial network model that includes a diffusion of astrocytic ATP and glutamate to investigate how long distance diffusion of the gliotransmitters affects the information processing in a neuronal network. We find that gliotransmitters diffusion can compensate for the failure of information processing of interneuron network firings induced by defectively coupled synapses. Moreover, we find that calcium waves in astrocyte network and firings in interneuron network are both sensitive to the glutamate diffusion rate and feedback intensities of astrocytes on interneurons.

  13. Recruitment of dynein to the Jurkat immunological synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Jeffrey; Kim, Soo Jin; Tan, Sarah; Ligon, Lee A.; Holzbaur, Erika L. F.; Kuhn, Jeffrey; Poenie, Martin

    2006-10-01

    Binding of T cells to antigen-presenting cells leads to the formation of the immunological synapse, translocation of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) to the synapse, and focused secretion of effector molecules. Here, we show that upon activation of Jurkat cells microtubules project from the MTOC to a ring of the scaffolding protein ADAP, localized at the synapse. Loss of ADAP, but not lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1, leads to a severe defect in MTOC polarization at the immunological synapse. The microtubule motor protein cytoplasmic dynein clusters into a ring at the synapse, colocalizing with the ADAP ring. ADAP coprecipitates with dynein from activated Jurkat cells, and loss of ADAP prevents MTOC translocation and the specific recruitment of dynein to the synapse. These results suggest a mechanism that links signaling through the T cell receptor to translocation of the MTOC, in which the minus end-directed motor cytoplasmic dynein, localized at the synapse through an interaction with ADAP, reels in the MTOC, allowing for directed secretion along the polarized microtubule cytoskeleton. microtubules | T cell polarization | -catenin | PLAC-24

  14. Recruitment of activation receptors at inhibitory NK cell immune synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Schleinitz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell activation receptors accumulate by an actin-dependent process at cytotoxic immune synapses where they provide synergistic signals that trigger NK cell effector functions. In contrast, NK cell inhibitory receptors, including members of the MHC class I-specific killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR family, accumulate at inhibitory immune synapses, block actin dynamics, and prevent actin-dependent phosphorylation of activation receptors. Therefore, one would predict inhibition of actin-dependent accumulation of activation receptors when inhibitory receptors are engaged. By confocal imaging of primary human NK cells in contact with target cells expressing physiological ligands of NK cell receptors, we show here that this prediction is incorrect. Target cells included a human cell line and transfected Drosophila insect cells that expressed ligands of NK cell activation receptors in combination with an MHC class I ligand of inhibitory KIR. The two NK cell activation receptors CD2 and 2B4 accumulated and co-localized with KIR at inhibitory immune synapses. In fact, KIR promoted CD2 and 2B4 clustering, as CD2 and 2B4 accumulated more efficiently at inhibitory synapses. In contrast, accumulation of KIR and of activation receptors at inhibitory synapses correlated with reduced density of the integrin LFA-1. These results imply that inhibitory KIR does not prevent CD2 and 2B4 signaling by blocking their accumulation at NK cell immune synapses, but by blocking their ability to signal within inhibitory synapses.

  15. Logarithmic current-measuring transistor circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Kristian Søe

    1967-01-01

    Describes two transistorized circuits for the logarithmic measurement of small currents suitable for nuclear reactor instrumentation. The logarithmic element is applied in the feedback path of an amplifier, and only one dual transistor is used as logarithmic diode and temperature compensating...... transistor. A simple one-amplifier circuit is compared with a two-amplifier system. The circuits presented have been developed in connexion with an amplifier using a dual m.o.s. transistor input stage with diode-protected gates....

  16. Individual SnO2 nanowire transistors fabricated by the gold microwire mask method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jia; Tang Qingxin; Lu Aixia; Jiang Xuejiao; Wan Qing

    2009-01-01

    A gold microwire mask method is developed for the fabrication of transistors based on single lightly Sb-doped SnO 2 nanowires. Damage of the nanowire's surface can be avoided without any thermal annealing and surface modification, which is very convenient for the fundamental electrical and photoelectric characterization of one-dimensional inorganic nanomaterials. Transport measurements of the individual SnO 2 nanowire devices demonstrate the high-performance n-type field effect transistor characteristics without significant hysteresis in the transfer curves. The current on/off ratio and the subthreshold swing of the nanowire transistors are found to be 10 6 and 240 mV/decade, respectively.

  17. Role of neuron-glia interactions in developmental synapse elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terni, Beatrice; López-Murcia, Francisco José; Llobet, Artur

    2017-03-01

    During the embryonic development of the nervous system there is a massive formation of synapses. However, the exuberant connectivity present after birth must be pruned during postnatal growth to optimize the function of neuronal circuits. Whilst glial cells play a fundamental role in the formation of early synaptic contacts, their contribution to developmental modifications of established synapses is not well understood. The present review aims to highlight the various roles of glia in the developmental refinement of embryonic synaptic connectivity. We summarize recent evidences linking secretory abilities of glial cells to the disassembly of synaptic contacts that are complementary of a well-established phagocytic role. Considering a theoretical framework, it is discussed how release of glial molecules could be relevant to the developmental refinement of synaptic connectivity. Finally, we propose a three-stage model of synapse elimination in which neurons and glia are functionally associated to timely eliminate synapses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Silent Synapse-Based Circuitry Remodeling in Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to cocaine, and likely other drugs of abuse, generates α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor-silent glutamatergic synapses in the nucleus accumbens. These immature synaptic contacts evolve after drug withdrawal to redefine the neurocircuital properties. These results raise at least three critical questions: (1) what are the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate drug-induced generation of silent synapses; (2) how are neurocircuits remodeled upon generation and evolution of drug-generated silent synapses; and (3) what behavioral consequences are produced by silent synapse-based circuitry remodeling? This short review analyzes related experimental results, and extends them to some speculations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  19. Changes in rat hippocampal CA1 synapses following imipramine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Madsen, Torsten M; Wegener, Gregers

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity in hippocampus is hypothesized to play an important role in both the pathophysiology of depressive disorders and the treatment. In this study, we investigated the consequences of imipramine treatment on neuroplasticity (including neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and remodelling...... and number of neurons of hippocampal subregions following imipramine treatment were found. However, the number and percentage of CA1 asymmetric spine synapses increased significantly and, conversely, the percentage of asymmetric shaft synapses significantly decreased in the imipramine treated group. Our...

  20. Magnetic Vortex Based Transistor Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D.; Barman, S.; Barman, A.

    2014-01-01

    Transistors constitute the backbone of modern day electronics. Since their advent, researchers have been seeking ways to make smaller and more efficient transistors. Here, we demonstrate a sustained amplification of magnetic vortex core gyration in coupled two and three vortices by controlling their relative core polarities. This amplification is mediated by a cascade of antivortex solitons travelling through the dynamic stray field. We further demonstrated that the amplification can be controlled by switching the polarity of the middle vortex in a three vortex sequence and the gain can be controlled by the input signal amplitude. An attempt to show fan–out operation yielded gain for one of the symmetrically placed branches which can be reversed by switching the core polarity of all the vortices in the network. The above observations promote the magnetic vortices as suitable candidates to work as stable bipolar junction transistors (BJT). PMID:24531235

  1. Transistor challenges - A DRAM perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faul, Juergen W.; Henke, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    Key challenges of the transistor scaling from a DRAM perspective will be reviewed. Both, array transistors as well as DRAM support devices face challenges that differ essentially from high performance logic device scaling. As a major difference, retention time and standby current requirements characterize special boundary conditions in the DRAM device design. Array device scaling is determined by a chip size driven aggressive node scaling. To continue scaling, major innovations need to be introduced into state-of-the-art planar array transistors. Alternatively, non planar device concepts will have to be evaluated. Support device design for DRAMs is driven by today's market demand for increased chip performances at little to no extra cost. Major innovations are required to continue that path. Besides this strive for performance increase, special limitations for 'on pitch' circuits at the array edge will come up due to the aggressive cell size scaling

  2. Magnetic Vortex Based Transistor Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D.; Barman, S.; Barman, A.

    2014-02-01

    Transistors constitute the backbone of modern day electronics. Since their advent, researchers have been seeking ways to make smaller and more efficient transistors. Here, we demonstrate a sustained amplification of magnetic vortex core gyration in coupled two and three vortices by controlling their relative core polarities. This amplification is mediated by a cascade of antivortex solitons travelling through the dynamic stray field. We further demonstrated that the amplification can be controlled by switching the polarity of the middle vortex in a three vortex sequence and the gain can be controlled by the input signal amplitude. An attempt to show fan-out operation yielded gain for one of the symmetrically placed branches which can be reversed by switching the core polarity of all the vortices in the network. The above observations promote the magnetic vortices as suitable candidates to work as stable bipolar junction transistors (BJT).

  3. Calcium channel-dependent molecular maturation of photoreceptor synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawal Zabouri

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown the importance of calcium channels in the development and/or maturation of synapses. The Ca(V1.4(α(1F knockout mouse is a unique model to study the role of calcium channels in photoreceptor synapse formation. It features abnormal ribbon synapses and aberrant cone morphology. We investigated the expression and targeting of several key elements of ribbon synapses and analyzed the cone morphology in the Ca(V1.4(α(1F knockout retina. Our data demonstrate that most abnormalities occur after eye opening. Indeed, scaffolding proteins such as Bassoon and RIM2 are properly targeted at first, but their expression and localization are not maintained in adulthood. This indicates that either calcium or the Ca(V1.4 channel, or both are necessary for the maintenance of their normal expression and distribution in photoreceptors. Other proteins, such as Veli3 and PSD-95, also display abnormal expression in rods prior to eye opening. Conversely, vesicle related proteins appear normal. Our data demonstrate that the Ca(V1.4 channel is important for maintaining scaffolding proteins in the ribbon synapse but less vital for proteins related to vesicular release. This study also confirms that in adult retinae, cones show developmental features such as sprouting and synaptogenesis. Overall we present evidence that in the absence of the Ca(V1.4 channel, photoreceptor synapses remain immature and are unable to stabilize.

  4. A light-stimulated synaptic transistor with synaptic plasticity and memory functions based on InGaZnOx–Al2O3 thin film structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H. K.; Chen, T. P.; Liu, P.; Zhang, Q.; Hu, S. G.; Liu, Y.; Lee, P. S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a synaptic transistor based on the indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO)–aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) thin film structure, which uses ultraviolet (UV) light pulses as the pre-synaptic stimulus, has been demonstrated. The synaptic transistor exhibits the behavior of synaptic plasticity like the paired-pulse facilitation. In addition, it also shows the brain's memory behaviors including the transition from short-term memory to long-term memory and the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve. The synapse-like behavior and memory behaviors of the transistor are due to the trapping and detrapping processes of the holes, which are generated by the UV pulses, at the IGZO/Al 2 O 3 interface and/or in the Al 2 O 3 layer.

  5. A light-stimulated synaptic transistor with synaptic plasticity and memory functions based on InGaZnOx-Al2O3 thin film structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. K.; Chen, T. P.; Liu, P.; Hu, S. G.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Lee, P. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a synaptic transistor based on the indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO)-aluminum oxide (Al2O3) thin film structure, which uses ultraviolet (UV) light pulses as the pre-synaptic stimulus, has been demonstrated. The synaptic transistor exhibits the behavior of synaptic plasticity like the paired-pulse facilitation. In addition, it also shows the brain's memory behaviors including the transition from short-term memory to long-term memory and the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve. The synapse-like behavior and memory behaviors of the transistor are due to the trapping and detrapping processes of the holes, which are generated by the UV pulses, at the IGZO/Al2O3 interface and/or in the Al2O3 layer.

  6. Enhanced transconductance in a double-gate graphene field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Byeong-Woon; Yeom, Hye-In; Kim, Daewon; Kim, Choong-Ki; Lee, Dongil; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2018-03-01

    Multi-gate transistors, such as double-gate, tri-gate and gate-all-around transistors are the most advanced Si transistor structure today. Here, a genuine double-gate transistor with a graphene channel is experimentally demonstrated. The top and bottom gates of the double-gate graphene field-effect transistor (DG GFET) are electrically connected so that the conductivity of the graphene channel can be modulated simultaneously by both the top and bottom gate. A single-gate graphene field-effect transistor (SG GFET) with only the top gate is also fabricated as a control device. For systematical analysis, the transfer characteristics of both GFETs were measured and compared. Whereas the maximum transconductance of the SG GFET was 17.1 μS/μm, that of the DG GFET was 25.7 μS/μm, which is approximately a 50% enhancement. The enhancement of the transconductance was reproduced and comprehensively explained by a physics-based compact model for GFETs. The investigation of the enhanced transfer characteristics of the DG GFET in this work shows the possibility of a multi-gate architecture for high-performance graphene transistor technology.

  7. CMOS-based carbon nanotube pass-transistor logic integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Zhang, Zhiyong; Liang, Shibo; Pei, Tian; Wang, Sheng; Li, Yan; Zhou, Weiwei; Liu, Jie; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2012-01-01

    Field-effect transistors based on carbon nanotubes have been shown to be faster and less energy consuming than their silicon counterparts. However, ensuring these advantages are maintained for integrated circuits is a challenge. Here we demonstrate that a significant reduction in the use of field-effect transistors can be achieved by constructing carbon nanotube-based integrated circuits based on a pass-transistor logic configuration, rather than a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor configuration. Logic gates are constructed on individual carbon nanotubes via a doping-free approach and with a single power supply at voltages as low as 0.4 V. The pass-transistor logic configurarion provides a significant simplification of the carbon nanotube-based circuit design, a higher potential circuit speed and a significant reduction in power consumption. In particular, a full adder, which requires a total of 28 field-effect transistors to construct in the usual complementary metal-oxide semiconductor circuit, uses only three pairs of n- and p-field-effect transistors in the pass-transistor logic configuration. PMID:22334080

  8. Analysing organic transistors based on interface approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Yuto; Mori, Takehiko

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-dependent characteristics of organic transistors are analysed thoroughly using interface approximation. In contrast to amorphous silicon transistors, it is characteristic of organic transistors that the accumulation layer is concentrated on the first monolayer, and it is appropriate to consider interface charge rather than band bending. On the basis of this model, observed characteristics of hexamethylenetetrathiafulvalene (HMTTF) and dibenzotetrathiafulvalene (DBTTF) transistors with various surface treatments are analysed, and the trap distribution is extracted. In turn, starting from a simple exponential distribution, we can reproduce the temperature-dependent transistor characteristics as well as the gate voltage dependence of the activation energy, so we can investigate various aspects of organic transistors self-consistently under the interface approximation. Small deviation from such an ideal transistor operation is discussed assuming the presence of an energetically discrete trap level, which leads to a hump in the transfer characteristics. The contact resistance is estimated by measuring the transfer characteristics up to the linear region

  9. Flexible black phosphorus ambipolar transistors, circuits and AM demodulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weinan; Yogeesh, Maruthi N; Yang, Shixuan; Aldave, Sandra H; Kim, Joon-Seok; Sonde, Sushant; Tao, Li; Lu, Nanshu; Akinwande, Deji

    2015-03-11

    High-mobility two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors are desirable for high-performance mechanically flexible nanoelectronics. In this work, we report the first flexible black phosphorus (BP) field-effect transistors (FETs) with electron and hole mobilities superior to what has been previously achieved with other more studied flexible layered semiconducting transistors such as MoS2 and WSe2. Encapsulated bottom-gated BP ambipolar FETs on flexible polyimide afforded maximum carrier mobility of about 310 cm(2)/V·s with field-effect current modulation exceeding 3 orders of magnitude. The device ambipolar functionality and high-mobility were employed to realize essential circuits of electronic systems for flexible technology including ambipolar digital inverter, frequency doubler, and analog amplifiers featuring voltage gain higher than other reported layered semiconductor flexible amplifiers. In addition, we demonstrate the first flexible BP amplitude-modulated (AM) demodulator, an active stage useful for radio receivers, based on a single ambipolar BP transistor, which results in audible signals when connected to a loudspeaker or earphone. Moreover, the BP transistors feature mechanical robustness up to 2% uniaxial tensile strain and up to 5000 bending cycles.

  10. Supervised Learning Using Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity of Memristive Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitani, Yu; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Ueda, Michihito

    2015-12-01

    We propose a supervised learning model that enables error backpropagation for spiking neural network hardware. The method is modeled by modifying an existing model to suit the hardware implementation. An example of a network circuit for the model is also presented. In this circuit, a three-terminal ferroelectric memristor (3T-FeMEM), which is a field-effect transistor with a gate insulator composed of ferroelectric materials, is used as an electric synapse device to store the analog synaptic weight. Our model can be implemented by reflecting the network error to the write voltage of the 3T-FeMEMs and introducing a spike-timing-dependent learning function to the device. An XOR problem was successfully demonstrated as a benchmark learning by numerical simulations using the circuit properties to estimate the learning performance. In principle, the learning time per step of this supervised learning model and the circuit is independent of the number of neurons in each layer, promising a high-speed and low-power calculation in large-scale neural networks.

  11. Coding deficits in noise-induced hidden hearing loss may stem from incomplete repair of ribbon synapses in the cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan eShi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has shown that noise-induced damage to the synapse between inner hair cells (IHCs and type I afferent auditory nerve fibers (ANFs may occur in the absence of permanent threshold shift (PTS, and that synapses connecting IHCs with low spontaneous rate (SR ANFs are disproportionately affected. Due to the functional importance of low-SR ANF units for temporal processing and signal coding in noisy backgrounds, deficits in cochlear coding associated with noise-induced damage may result in significant difficulties with temporal processing and hearing in noise (i.e., hidden hearing loss. However, significant noise-induced coding deficits have not been reported at the single unit level following the loss of low-SR units. We have found evidence to suggest that some aspects of neural coding are not significantly changed with the initial loss of low-SR ANFs, and that further coding deficits arise in association with the subsequent reestablishment of the synapses. This suggests that synaptopathy in hidden hearing loss may be the result of insufficient repair of disrupted synapses, and not simply due to the loss of low-SR units. These coding deficits include decreases in driven spike rate for intensity coding as well as several aspects of temporal coding: spike latency, peak-to-sustained spike ratio and the recovery of spike rate as a function of click-interval.

  12. A High-Voltage Level Tolerant Transistor Circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annema, Anne J.; Geelen, Godefridus Johannes Gertrudis Maria

    2001-01-01

    A high-voltage level tolerant transistor circuit, comprising a plurality of cascoded transistors, including a first transistor (T1) operatively connected to a high-voltage level node (3) and a second transistor (T2) operatively connected to a low-voltage level node (2). The first transistor (T1)

  13. One-Transistor-One-Transistor (1T1T) Optoelectronic Nonvolatile MoS2Memory Cell with Nondestructive Read-Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dain; Kim, Seongchan; Kim, Yeontae; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2017-08-09

    Taking advantage of the superlative optoelectronic properties of single-layer MoS 2 , we developed a one-transistor-one-transistor (1T1T)-type MoS 2 optoelectronic nonvolatile memory cell. The 1T1T memory cell consisted of a control transistor (CT) and a memory transistor (MT), in which the drain electrode of the MT was connected electrically to the gate electrode of the CT, whereas the source electrode of the CT was connected electrically to the gate electrode of the MT. Single-layer MoS 2 films were utilized as the channel materials in both transistors, and gold nanoparticles acted as the floating gates in the MT. This 1T1T device architecture allowed for a nondestructive read-out operation in the memory because the writing (programming or erasing) and read-out processes were operated separately. The switching of the CT could be controlled by light illumination as well as the applied gate voltage due to the strong light absorption induced by the direct band gap of single-layer MoS 2 (∼1.8 eV). The resulting MoS 2 1T1T memory cell exhibited excellent memory performance, including a large programming/erasing current ratio (over 10 6 ), multilevel data storage (over 6 levels), cyclic endurance (200 cycles), and stable retention (10 3 s).

  14. InP Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor Amplifiers to 255 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radisic, Vesna; Sawdai, Donald; Scott, Dennis; Deal, William; Dang, Linh; Li, Danny; Cavus, Abdullah; To, Richard; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Two single-stage InP heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) amplifiers operate at 184 and 255 GHz, using Northrop Grumman Corporation s InP HBT MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) technology. At the time of this reporting, these are reported to be the highest HBT amplifiers ever created. The purpose of the amplifier design is to evaluate the technology capability for high-frequency designs and verify the model for future development work.

  15. Coupling between electrolyte and organic semiconductor in electrolyte-gated organic field effect transistors (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscarini, Fabio; Di Lauro, Michele; Berto, Marcello; Bortolotti, Carlo A.; Geerts, Yves H.; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2016-11-01

    Organic field effect transistors (OFET) operated in aqueous environments are emerging as ultra-sensitive biosensors and transducers of electrical and electrochemical signals from a biological environment. Their applications range from detection of biomarkers in bodily fluids to implants for bidirectional communication with the central nervous system. They can be used in diagnostics, advanced treatments and theranostics. Several OFET layouts have been demonstrated to be effective in aqueous operations, which are distinguished either by their architecture or by the respective mechanism of doping by the ions in the electrolyte solution. In this work we discuss the unification of the seemingly different architectures, such as electrolyte-gated OFET (EGOFET), organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) and dual-gate ion-sensing FET. We first demonstrate that these architectures give rise to the frequency-dependent response of a synapstor (synapse-like transistor), with enhanced or depressed modulation of the output current depending on the frequency of the time-dependent gate voltage. This behavior that was reported for OFETs with embedded metal nanoparticles shows the existence of a capacitive coupling through an equivalent network of RC elements. Upon the systematic change of ions in the electrolyte and the morphology of the charge transport layer, we show how the time scale of the synapstor is changed. We finally show how the substrate plays effectively the role of a second bottom gate, whose potential is actually fixed by the pH/composition of the electrolyte and the gate voltage applied.

  16. Individual SWCNT based ionic field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Pei; He, Jin; Park, Jae Hyun; Krstic, Predrag; Lindsay, Stuart

    2011-03-01

    Here we report that the ionic current through a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) can be effectively gated by a perpendicular electrical field from a top gate electrode, working as ionic field effect transistor. Both our experiment and simulation confirms that the electroosmotic current (EOF) is the main component in the ionic current through the SWCNT and is responsible for the gating effect. We also studied the gating efficiency as a function of solution concentration and pH and demonstrated that the device can work effectively in the physiological relevant condition. This work opens the door to use CNT based nanofluidics for ion and molecule manipulation. This work was supported by the DNA Sequencing Technology Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute (1RC2HG005625-01, 1R21HG004770-01), Arizona Technology Enterprises and the Biodesign Institute.

  17. On the resemblance of synapse formation and CNS myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, R G; Lyons, D A

    2014-09-12

    The myelination of axons in the central nervous system (CNS) is essential for nervous system formation, function and health. CNS myelination continues well into adulthood, but not all axons become myelinated. Unlike the peripheral nervous system, where we know of numerous axon-glial signals required for myelination, we have a poor understanding of the nature or identity of such molecules that regulate which axons are myelinated in the CNS. Recent studies have started to elucidate cell behavior during myelination in vivo and indicate that the choice of which axons are myelinated is made prior to myelin sheath generation. Here we propose that interactions between axons and the exploratory processes of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) lead to myelination and may be similar to those between dendrites and axons that prefigure and lead to synapse formation. Indeed axons and OPCs form synapses with striking resemblance to those of neurons, suggesting a similar mode of formation. We discuss families of molecules with specific functions at different stages of synapse formation and address studies that implicate the same factors during axon-OPC synapse formation and myelination. We also address the possibility that the function of such synapses might directly regulate the myelinating behavior of oligodendrocyte processes in vivo. In the future it may be of benefit to consider these similarities when taking a candidate-based approach to dissect mechanisms of CNS myelination. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fundamental Molecules and Mechanisms for Forming and Maintaining Neuromuscular Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijbers, Maartje G.; Remedio, Leonor

    2018-01-01

    The neuromuscular synapse is a relatively large synapse with hundreds of active zones in presynaptic motor nerve terminals and more than ten million acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in the postsynaptic membrane. The enrichment of proteins in presynaptic and postsynaptic membranes ensures a rapid, robust, and reliable synaptic transmission. Over fifty years ago, classic studies of the neuromuscular synapse led to a comprehensive understanding of how a synapse looks and works, but these landmark studies did not reveal the molecular mechanisms responsible for building and maintaining a synapse. During the past two-dozen years, the critical molecular players, responsible for assembling the specialized postsynaptic membrane and regulating nerve terminal differentiation, have begun to be identified and their mechanism of action better understood. Here, we describe and discuss five of these key molecular players, paying heed to their discovery as well as describing their currently understood mechanisms of action. In addition, we discuss the important gaps that remain to better understand how these proteins act to control synaptic differentiation and maintenance. PMID:29415504

  19. The presynaptic machinery at the synapse of C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahorro, Fernando; Izquierdo, Patricia G

    2018-03-12

    Synapses are specialized contact sites that mediate information flow between neurons and their targets. Important physical interactions across the synapse are mediated by synaptic adhesion molecules. These adhesions regulate formation of synapses during development and play a role during mature synaptic function. Importantly, genes regulating synaptogenesis and axon regeneration are conserved across the animal phyla. Genetic screens in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have identified a number of molecules required for synapse patterning and assembly. C. elegans is able to survive even with its neuronal function severely compromised. This is in comparison with Drosophila and mice where increased complexity makes them less tolerant to impaired function. Although this fact may reflect differences in the function of the homologous proteins in the synapses between these organisms, the most likely interpretation is that many of these components are equally important, but not absolutely essential, for synaptic transmission to support the relatively undemanding life style of laboratory maintained C. elegans. Here, we review research on the major group of synaptic proteins, involved in the presynaptic machinery in C. elegans, showing a strong conservation between higher organisms and highlight how C. elegans can be used as an informative tool for dissecting synaptic components, based on a simple nervous system organization.

  20. Silicon-on-insulator field effect transistor with improved body ties for rad-hard applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Draper, Bruce L.; Dodd, Paul E.

    2001-01-01

    A silicon-on-insulator (SOI) field-effect transistor (FET) and a method for making the same are disclosed. The SOI FET is characterized by a source which extends only partially (e.g. about half-way) through the active layer wherein the transistor is formed. Additionally, a minimal-area body tie contact is provided with a short-circuit electrical connection to the source for reducing floating body effects. The body tie contact improves the electrical characteristics of the transistor and also provides an improved single-event-upset (SEU) radiation hardness of the device for terrestrial and space applications. The SOI FET also provides an improvement in total-dose radiation hardness as compared to conventional SOI transistors fabricated without a specially prepared hardened buried oxide layer. Complementary n-channel and p-channel SOI FETs can be fabricated according to the present invention to form integrated circuits (ICs) for commercial and military applications.

  1. High-performance radio frequency transistors based on diameter-separated semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yu; Che, Yuchi; Zhou, Chongwu, E-mail: chongwuz@usc.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Seo, Jung-Woo T.; Hersam, Mark C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Gui, Hui [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

    2016-06-06

    In this paper, we report the high-performance radio-frequency transistors based on the single-walled semiconducting carbon nanotubes with a refined average diameter of ∼1.6 nm. These diameter-separated carbon nanotube transistors show excellent transconductance of 55 μS/μm and desirable drain current saturation with an output resistance of ∼100 KΩ μm. An exceptional radio-frequency performance is also achieved with current gain and power gain cut-off frequencies of 23 GHz and 20 GHz (extrinsic) and 65 GHz and 35 GHz (intrinsic), respectively. These radio-frequency metrics are among the highest reported for the carbon nanotube thin-film transistors. This study provides demonstration of radio frequency transistors based on carbon nanotubes with tailored diameter distributions, which will guide the future application of carbon nanotubes in radio-frequency electronics.

  2. P-type Cu2O/SnO bilayer thin film transistors processed at low temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Jawhari, Hala A.

    2013-10-09

    P-type Cu2O/SnO bilayer thin film transistors (TFTs) with tunable performance were fabricated using room temperature sputtered copper and tin oxides. Using Cu2O film as capping layer on top of a SnO film to control its stoichiometry, we have optimized the performance of the resulting bilayer transistor. A transistor with 10 nm/15 nm Cu2O to SnO thickness ratio (25 nm total thickness) showed the best performance using a maximum process temperature of 170 C. The bilayer transistor exhibited p-type behavior with field-effect mobility, on-to-off current ratio, and threshold voltage of 0.66 cm2 V-1 s-1, 1.5×10 2, and -5.2 V, respectively. The advantages of the bilayer structure relative to single layer transistor are discussed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. Spatially restricted actin-regulatory signaling contributes to synapse morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Daniel A.; Cahill, Michael E.; Tulisiak, Christopher T.; Geinisman, Yuri; Penzes, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton in dendritic spines is organized into microdomains, but how signaling molecules that regulate actin are spatially governed is incompletely understood. Here we examine how the localization of the RacGEF kalirin-7, a well-characterized regulator of actin in spines, varies as a function of postsynaptic density (PSD) area and spine volume. Using serial section electron microscopy (EM), we find that extrasynaptic, but not synaptic, expression of kalirin-7 varies directly with synapse size and spine volume. Moreover, we find that overall expression levels of kalirin-7 differ in spines bearing perforated and non-perforated synapses, due primarily to extrasynaptic pools of kalirin-7 expression in the former. Overall, our findings indicate that kalirin-7 is differentially compartmentalized in spines as a function of both synapse morphology and spine size. PMID:22458534

  4. Dynamic mobility of functional GABAA receptors at inhibitory synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Philip; Mortensen, Martin; Hosie, Alastair M; Smart, Trevor G

    2005-07-01

    Importing functional GABAA receptors into synapses is fundamental for establishing and maintaining inhibitory transmission and for controlling neuronal excitability. By introducing a binding site for an irreversible inhibitor into the GABAA receptor alpha1 subunit channel lining region that can be accessed only when the receptor is activated, we have determined the dynamics of receptor mobility between synaptic and extrasynaptic locations in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We demonstrate that the cell surface GABAA receptor population shows no fast recovery after irreversible inhibition. In contrast, after selective inhibition, the synaptic receptor population rapidly recovers by the import of new functional entities within minutes. The trafficking pathways that promote rapid importation of synaptic receptors do not involve insertion from intracellular pools, but reflect receptor diffusion within the plane of the membrane. This process offers the synapse a rapid mechanism to replenish functional GABAA receptors at inhibitory synapses and a means to control synaptic efficacy.

  5. An NMDA Receptor-Dependent Mechanism Underlies Inhibitory Synapse Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinglong Gu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the mammalian brain, GABAergic synaptic transmission provides inhibitory balance to glutamatergic excitatory drive and controls neuronal output. The molecular mechanisms underlying the development of GABAergic synapses remain largely unclear. Here, we report that NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (NMDARs in individual immature neurons are the upstream signaling molecules essential for GABAergic synapse development, which requires signaling via Calmodulin binding motif in the C0 domain of the NMDAR GluN1 subunit. Interestingly, in neurons lacking NMDARs, whereas GABAergic synaptic transmission is strongly reduced, the tonic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors is increased, suggesting a compensatory mechanism for the lack of synaptic inhibition. These results demonstrate a crucial role for NMDARs in specifying the development of inhibitory synapses, and suggest an important mechanism for controlling the establishment of the balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition in the developing brain.

  6. Learning through ferroelectric domain dynamics in solid-state synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyn, Sören; Grollier, Julie; Lecerf, Gwendal; Xu, Bin; Locatelli, Nicolas; Fusil, Stéphane; Girod, Stéphanie; Carrétéro, Cécile; Garcia, Karin; Xavier, Stéphane; Tomas, Jean; Bellaiche, Laurent; Bibes, Manuel; Barthélémy, Agnès; Saïghi, Sylvain; Garcia, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    In the brain, learning is achieved through the ability of synapses to reconfigure the strength by which they connect neurons (synaptic plasticity). In promising solid-state synapses called memristors, conductance can be finely tuned by voltage pulses and set to evolve according to a biological learning rule called spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). Future neuromorphic architectures will comprise billions of such nanosynapses, which require a clear understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for plasticity. Here we report on synapses based on ferroelectric tunnel junctions and show that STDP can be harnessed from inhomogeneous polarization switching. Through combined scanning probe imaging, electrical transport and atomic-scale molecular dynamics, we demonstrate that conductance variations can be modelled by the nucleation-dominated reversal of domains. Based on this physical model, our simulations show that arrays of ferroelectric nanosynapses can autonomously learn to recognize patterns in a predictable way, opening the path towards unsupervised learning in spiking neural networks.

  7. Neuromorphic function learning with carbon nanotube based synapses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gacem, Karim; Filoramo, Arianna; Derycke, Vincent; Retrouvey, Jean-Marie; Chabi, Djaafar; Zhao, Weisheng; Klein, Jacques-Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The principle of using nanoscale memory devices as artificial synapses in neuromorphic circuits is recognized as a promising way to build ground-breaking circuit architectures tolerant to defects and variability. Yet, actual experimental demonstrations of the neural network type of circuits based on non-conventional/non-CMOS memory devices and displaying function learning capabilities remain very scarce. We show here that carbon-nanotube-based memory elements can be used as artificial synapses, combined with conventional neurons and trained to perform functions through the application of a supervised learning algorithm. The same ensemble of eight devices can notably be trained multiple times to code successively any three-input linearly separable Boolean logic function despite device-to-device variability. This work thus represents one of the very few demonstrations of actual function learning with synapses based on nanoscale building blocks. The potential of such an approach for the parallel learning of multiple and more complex functions is also evaluated. (paper)

  8. Microglial interactions with synapses are modulated by visual experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Ève Tremblay

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are the immune cells of the brain. In the absence of pathological insult, their highly motile processes continually survey the brain parenchyma and transiently contact synaptic elements. Aside from monitoring, their physiological roles at synapses are not known. To gain insight into possible roles of microglia in the modification of synaptic structures, we used immunocytochemical electron microscopy, serial section electron microscopy with three-dimensional reconstructions, and two-photon in vivo imaging to characterize microglial interactions with synapses during normal and altered sensory experience, in the visual cortex of juvenile mice. During normal visual experience, most microglial processes displayed direct apposition with multiple synapse-associated elements, including synaptic clefts. Microglial processes were also distinctively surrounded by pockets of extracellular space. In terms of dynamics, microglial processes localized to the vicinity of small and transiently growing dendritic spines, which were typically lost over 2 d. When experience was manipulated through light deprivation and reexposure, microglial processes changed their morphology, showed altered distributions of extracellular space, displayed phagocytic structures, apposed synaptic clefts more frequently, and enveloped synapse-associated elements more extensively. While light deprivation induced microglia to become less motile and changed their preference of localization to the vicinity of a subset of larger dendritic spines that persistently shrank, light reexposure reversed these behaviors. Taken together, these findings reveal different modalities of microglial interactions with synapses that are subtly altered by sensory experience. These findings suggest that microglia may actively contribute to the experience-dependent modification or elimination of a specific subset of synapses in the healthy brain.

  9. Neuroglial plasticity at striatal glutamatergic synapses in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M Villalba

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Striatal dopamine denervation is the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Another major pathological change described in animal models and PD patients is a significant reduction in the density of dendritic spines on medium spiny striatal projection neurons. Simultaneously, the ultrastructural features of the neuronal synaptic elements at the remaining corticostriatal and thalamostriatal glutamatergic axo-spinous synapses undergo complex ultrastructural remodeling consistent with increased synaptic activity (Villalba et al., 2011. The concept of tripartite synapses (TS was introduced a decade ago, according to which astrocytes process and exchange information with neuronal synaptic elements at glutamatergic synapses (Araque et al., 1999a. Although there has been compelling evidence that astrocytes are integral functional elements of tripartite glutamatergic synaptic complexes in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, their exact functional role, degree of plasticity and preponderance in other CNS regions remain poorly understood. In this review, we discuss our recent findings showing that neuronal elements at cortical and thalamic glutamatergic synapses undergo significant plastic changes in the striatum of MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys. We also present new ultrastructural data that demonstrate a significant expansion of the astrocytic coverage of striatal TS synapses in the parkinsonian state, providing further evidence for ultrastructural compensatory changes that affect both neuronal and glial elements at TS. Together with our limited understanding of the mechanisms by which astrocytes respond to changes in neuronal activity and extracellular transmitter homeostasis, the role of both neuronal and glial components of excitatory synapses must be considered, if one hopes to take advantage of glia-neuronal communication knowledge to better understand the pathophysiology of striatal processing in parkinsonism, and develop new PD

  10. Power transistor module for high current applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cilyo, F.F.

    1975-01-01

    One of the parts needed for the control system of the 400-GeV accelerator at Fermilab was a power transistor with a safe operating area of 1800A at 50V, dc current gain of 100,000 and 20 kHz bandwidth. Since the commercially available discrete devices and power hybrid packages did not meet these requirements, a power transistor module was developed which performed satisfactorily. By connecting 13 power transistors in parallel, with due consideration for network and heat dissipation problems, and by driving these 13 with another power transistor, a super power transistor is made, having an equivalent current, power, and safe operating area capability of 13 transistors. For higher capabilities, additional modules can be conveniently added. (auth)

  11. Field Effect Transistor in Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    significant alteration in transport behaviour of these molecular junctions. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Theory , Nanoscale, Field Effect Transistor (FET), Devices...Density Functional Theory (DFT), Non-equilibrium Green Function 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES     13...Keep in mind the amount of funding you received relative to the amount of effort you put into the report. References: 1. J. R. Heath and M

  12. High current transistor pulse generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1991-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current trapezoidally shaped pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in the capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of Darlington transistors. A combination of diodes and Darlington transistors is used to obtain trapezoidal or triangular shaped current pulses into an inductive load and to recover the remaining energy in the same capacitor bank without reversing capacitor voltage. The transistors work in the switch mode, and the power losses are low. The rack mounted pulse generators presently used at SLAC contain a 660 microfarad storage capacitor bank and can deliver 400 amps at 800 volts into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The pulse generators are used in several different power systems, including pulse to pulse bipolar power supplies and in application with current pulses distributed into different inductive loads. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled by the central computer system through a specially developed multichannel controller. Several years of operation with the pulse generators have proven their consistent performance and reliability.

  13. High current transistor pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1991-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current trapezoidally shaped pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in the capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of Darlington transistors. A combination of diodes and Darlington transistors is used to obtain trapezoidal or triangular shaped current pulses into an inductive load and to recover the remaining energy in the same capacitor bank without reversing capacitor voltage. The transistors work in the switch mode, and the power losses are low. The rack mounted pulse generators presently used at SLAC contain a 660 microfarad storage capacitor bank and can deliver 400 amps at 800 volts into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The pulse generators are used in several different power systems, including pulse to pulse bipolar power supplies and in application with current pulses distributed into different inductive loads. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled by the central computer system through a specially developed multichannel controller. Several years of operation with the pulse generators have proven their consistent performance and reliability. 8 figs

  14. Flexible Sensory Platform Based on Oxide-based Neuromorphic Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Zhu, Li Qiang; Feng, Ping; Wan, Chang Jin; Liu, Yang Hui; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2015-12-11

    Inspired by the dendritic integration and spiking operation of a biological neuron, flexible oxide-based neuromorphic transistors with multiple input gates are fabricated on flexible plastic substrates for pH sensor applications. When such device is operated in a quasi-static dual-gate synergic sensing mode, it shows a high pH sensitivity of ~105 mV/pH. Our results also demonstrate that single-spike dynamic mode can remarkably improve pH sensitivity and reduce response/recover time and power consumption. Moreover, we find that an appropriate negative bias applied on the sensing gate electrode can further enhance the pH sensitivity and reduce the power consumption. Our flexible neuromorphic transistors provide a new-concept sensory platform for biochemical detection with high sensitivity, rapid response and ultralow power consumption.

  15. Graphene-graphite oxide field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Brian; Mendez, Anthony; Schmidgall, Emma; Bockrath, Marc

    2012-03-14

    Graphene's high mobility and two-dimensional nature make it an attractive material for field-effect transistors. Previous efforts in this area have used bulk gate dielectric materials such as SiO(2) or HfO(2). In contrast, we have studied the use of an ultrathin layered material, graphene's insulating analogue, graphite oxide. We have fabricated transistors comprising single or bilayer graphene channels, graphite oxide gate insulators, and metal top-gates. The graphite oxide layers show relatively minimal leakage at room temperature. The breakdown electric field of graphite oxide was found to be comparable to SiO(2), typically ~1-3 × 10(8) V/m, while its dielectric constant is slightly higher, κ ≈ 4.3. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  16. Solution-processed ambipolar organic field-effect transistors and inverters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, E J; de Leeuw, D M; Setayesh, S; van Veenendaal, E; Huisman, B H; Blom, P W M; Hummelen, J C; Scherf, U; Kadam, J; Klapwijk, T M

    2003-10-01

    There is ample evidence that organic field-effect transistors have reached a stage where they can be industrialized, analogous to standard metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) transistors. Monocrystalline silicon technology is largely based on complementary MOS (CMOS) structures that use both n-type and p-type transistor channels. This complementary technology has enabled the construction of digital circuits, which operate with a high robustness, low power dissipation and a good noise margin. For the design of efficient organic integrated circuits, there is an urgent need for complementary technology, where both n-type and p-type transistor operation is realized in a single layer, while maintaining the attractiveness of easy solution processing. We demonstrate, by using solution-processed field-effect transistors, that hole transport and electron transport are both generic properties of organic semiconductors. This ambipolar transport is observed in polymers based on interpenetrating networks as well as in narrow bandgap organic semiconductors. We combine the organic ambipolar transistors into functional CMOS-like inverters.

  17. Cell Adhesion, the Backbone of the Synapse: “Vertebrate” and “Invertebrate” Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Giagtzoglou, Nikolaos; Ly, Cindy V.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2009-01-01

    Synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions that mediate neuronal communication. The number, type, and connectivity patterns of synapses determine the formation, maintenance, and function of neural circuitries. The complexity and specificity of synaptogenesis relies upon modulation of adhesive properties, which regulate contact initiation, synapse formation, maturation, and functional plasticity. Disruption of adhesion may result in structural and functional imbalance that may lead to neu...

  18. Remodeling of Hippocampal Synapses After Hippocampus-Dependent Associative Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geinisman, Yuri; Disterhoft, John F.; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen G.; McEchron, Matthew D.; Persina, Inna S.; Power, John M.; Zee, Eddy A. van der; West, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether hippocampus-dependent associative learning involves changes in the number and/or structure of hippocampal synapses. A behavioral paradigm of trace eyeblink conditioning was used. Young adult rabbits were given daily 80 trial sessions to a criterion of

  19. Ultralow power artificial synapses using nanotextured magnetic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michael L.; Donnelly, Christine A.; Russek, Stephen E.; Baek, Burm; Pufall, Matthew R.; Hopkins, Peter F.; Dresselhaus, Paul D.; Benz, Samuel P.; Rippard, William H.

    2018-01-01

    Neuromorphic computing promises to markedly improve the efficiency of certain computational tasks, such as perception and decision-making. Although software and specialized hardware implementations of neural networks have made tremendous accomplishments, both implementations are still many orders of magnitude less energy efficient than the human brain. We demonstrate a new form of artificial synapse based on dynamically reconfigurable superconducting Josephson junctions with magnetic nanoclusters in the barrier. The spiking energy per pulse varies with the magnetic configuration, but in our demonstration devices, the spiking energy is always less than 1 aJ. This compares very favorably with the roughly 10 fJ per synaptic event in the human brain. Each artificial synapse is composed of a Si barrier containing Mn nanoclusters with superconducting Nb electrodes. The critical current of each synapse junction, which is analogous to the synaptic weight, can be tuned using input voltage spikes that change the spin alignment of Mn nanoclusters. We demonstrate synaptic weight training with electrical pulses as small as 3 aJ. Further, the Josephson plasma frequencies of the devices, which determine the dynamical time scales, all exceed 100 GHz. These new artificial synapses provide a significant step toward a neuromorphic platform that is faster, more energy-efficient, and thus can attain far greater complexity than has been demonstrated with other technologies. PMID:29387787

  20. A recipe for ridding synapses of the ubiquitous AMPA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrigiano, Gina G

    2002-12-01

    Getting AMPA receptors into and out of synapses represents an important mechanism for changing synaptic strength, but the signals that target AMPA receptors for removal from the synaptic membrane are incompletely understood. A recent study in Ceanorhabditis elegans suggests that ubiquitination of AMPA receptors is one important signal that targets these receptors for endocytosis.

  1. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen E Flores

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter Ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons.

  2. Sleep: The hebbian reinforcement of the local inhibitory synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzet, Claude

    2015-09-01

    Sleep is ubiquitous among the animal realm, and represents about 30% of our lives. Despite numerous efforts, the reason behind our need for sleep is still unknown. The Theory of neuronal Cognition (TnC) proposes that sleep is the period of time during which the local inhibitory synapses (in particular the cortical ones) are replenished. Indeed, as long as the active brain stays awake, hebbian learning guarantees that efficient inhibitory synapses lose their efficiency – just because they are efficient at avoiding the activation of the targeted neurons. Since hebbian learning is the only known mechanism of synapse modification, it follows that to replenish the inhibitory synapses' efficiency, source and targeted neurons must be activated together. This is achieved by a local depolarization that may travel (wave). The period of time during which such slow waves are experienced has been named the "slow-wave sleep" (SWS). It is cut into several pieces by shorter periods of paradoxical sleep (REM) which activity resembles that of the awake state. Indeed, SWS – because it only allows local neural activation – decreases the excitatory long distance connections strength. To avoid losing the associations built during the awake state, these long distance activations are played again during the REM sleep. REM and SWS sleeps act together to guarantee that when the subject awakes again, his inhibitory synaptic efficiency is restored and his (excitatory) long distance associations are still there. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. N-CADHERIN PRODOMAIN CLEAVAGE REGULATES SYNAPSE FORMATION IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latefi, Nazlie S.; Pedraza, Liliana; Schohl, Anne; Li, Ziwei; Ruthazer, Edward S.

    2009-01-01

    Cadherins are initially synthesized bearing a prodomain that is thought to limit adhesion during early stages of biosynthesis. Functional cadherins lack this prodomain, raising the intriguing possibility that cells may utilize prodomain cleavage as a means to temporally or spatially regulate adhesion after delivery of cadherin to the cell surface. In support of this idea, immunostaining for the prodomain of zebrafish N-cadherin revealed enriched labeling at neuronal surfaces at the soma and along axonal processes. To determine whether post-translational cleavage of the prodomain affects synapse formation, we imaged Rohon-Beard cells in zebrafish embryos expressing GFP-tagged wild-type N-cadherin (NCAD-GFP) or a GFP-tagged N-cadherin mutant expressing an uncleavable prodomain (PRON-GFP) rendering it non-adhesive. NCAD-GFP accumulated at synaptic microdomains in a developmentally regulated manner, and its overexpression transiently accelerated synapse formation. PRON-GFP was much more diffusely distributed along the axon and its overexpression delayed synapse formation. Our results support the notion that N-cadherin serves to stabilize pre- to postsynaptic contacts early in synapse development and suggests that regulated cleavage of the N-cadherin prodomain may be a mechanism by which the kinetics of synaptogenesis are regulated. PMID:19365814

  4. Analog Memristive Synapse in Spiking Networks Implementing Unsupervised Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covi, Erika; Brivio, Stefano; Serb, Alexander; Prodromakis, Themis; Fanciulli, Marco; Spiga, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Emerging brain-inspired architectures call for devices that can emulate the functionality of biological synapses in order to implement new efficient computational schemes able to solve ill-posed problems. Various devices and solutions are still under investigation and, in this respect, a challenge is opened to the researchers in the field. Indeed, the optimal candidate is a device able to reproduce the complete functionality of a synapse, i.e., the typical synaptic process underlying learning in biological systems (activity-dependent synaptic plasticity). This implies a device able to change its resistance (synaptic strength, or weight) upon proper electrical stimuli (synaptic activity) and showing several stable resistive states throughout its dynamic range (analog behavior). Moreover, it should be able to perform spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP), an associative homosynaptic plasticity learning rule based on the delay time between the two firing neurons the synapse is connected to. This rule is a fundamental learning protocol in state-of-art networks, because it allows unsupervised learning. Notwithstanding this fact, STDP-based unsupervised learning has been proposed several times mainly for binary synapses rather than multilevel synapses composed of many binary memristors. This paper proposes an HfO2-based analog memristor as a synaptic element which performs STDP within a small spiking neuromorphic network operating unsupervised learning for character recognition. The trained network is able to recognize five characters even in case incomplete or noisy images are displayed and it is robust to a device-to-device variability of up to ±30%. PMID:27826226

  5. New views of the human NK cell immunological synapse: recent advances enabled by super- and high- resolution imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M. Mace

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging technology has undergone rapid growth with the development of super resolution microscopy, which enables resolution below the diffraction barrier of light (~200 nm. In addition, new techniques for single molecule imaging are being added to the cell biologist’s arsenal. Immunologists have exploited these techniques to advance understanding of NK biology, particularly that of the immune synapse. The immune synapse’s relatively small size and complex architecture combined with its exquisitely controlled signaling milieu have made it a challenge to visualize. In this review we highlight and discuss new insights into NK cell immune synapse formation and regulation revealed by cutting edge imaging techniques, including super resolution microscopy and high resolution total internal reflection microscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer.

  6. Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors : Sensing Simplicity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mescher, M.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are structures made from silicon with at least one spatial dimension in the nanometer regime (1-100 nm). From these nanowires, silicon nanowire field-effect transistors can be constructed. Since their introduction in 2001 silicon nanowire field-effect transistors have been studied

  7. Ultrasmall transistor-based light sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    With Jensen, Per Baunegaard; Tavares, Luciana; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Dette projekt fokuserer på at udvikle transistor baserede nanofiber lyskilder med det overordnede mål at udvikle effektive og nano skalerede flerfarvede lyskilder integreret on-chip.......Dette projekt fokuserer på at udvikle transistor baserede nanofiber lyskilder med det overordnede mål at udvikle effektive og nano skalerede flerfarvede lyskilder integreret on-chip....

  8. Operation and modeling of the MOS transistor

    CERN Document Server

    Tsividis, Yannis

    2011-01-01

    Operation and Modeling of the MOS Transistor has become a standard in academia and industry. Extensively revised and updated, the third edition of this highly acclaimed text provides a thorough treatment of the MOS transistor - the key element of modern microelectronic chips.

  9. Ferroelectric transistor memory arrays on flexible foils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, A. van; Kam, B.; Cobb, B.; Rodriguez, F.G.; Heck, G. van; Myny, K.; Marrani, A.; Vinciguerra, V.; Gelinck, G.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we successfully fabricated and operated passive matrix P(VDF-TrFE) transistor arrays, i.e. memory arrays in which no pass-transistors or other additional electronic components are used. Because of the smaller cell, a higher integration density is possible. We demonstrate arrays up to

  10. The spinvalve transistor: technologies and progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodder, J.C.; Monsma, D.J.; Vlutters, R.; Shimatsu, T.; Shimatsu, T.

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes the necessary technologies needed for realising a RT operating spin-valve transistor (SVT) which is in fact a magnetic controlled metal base transistor. The preparation of a 350×350 μm2 SVT consisting of an Si emitter and collector and Co/Cu/Co GMR multilayer are described. The

  11. Floating-Emitter Solar-Cell Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, C. T.; Cheng, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual transistor embedded in photovoltaic diode promises to increase efficiency to more than 20 percent. Solar-cell transistor has front-surface contact, rear contact, and floating emitter. Variety of other contact and junction configurations possible, but do not offer ease of fabrication in combination with high performance.

  12. Spike-timing dependent plasticity in a transistor-selected resistive switching memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrogio, S; Balatti, S; Nardi, F; Facchinetti, S; Ielmini, D

    2013-01-01

    In a neural network, neuron computation is achieved through the summation of input signals fed by synaptic connections. The synaptic activity (weight) is dictated by the synchronous firing of neurons, inducing potentiation/depression of the synaptic connection. This learning function can be supported by the resistive switching memory (RRAM), which changes its resistance depending on the amplitude, the pulse width and the bias polarity of the applied signal. This work shows a new synapse circuit comprising a MOS transistor as a selector and a RRAM as a variable resistance, displaying spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) similar to the one originally experienced in biological neural networks. We demonstrate long-term potentiation and long-term depression by simulations with an analytical model of resistive switching. Finally, the experimental demonstration of the new STDP scheme is presented. (paper)

  13. Universal power transistor base drive control unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Allan R.; Gritter, David J.

    1988-01-01

    A saturation condition regulator system for a power transistor which achieves the regulation objectives of a Baker clamp but without dumping excess base drive current into the transistor output circuit. The base drive current of the transistor is sensed and used through an active feedback circuit to produce an error signal which modulates the base drive current through a linearly operating FET. The collector base voltage of the power transistor is independently monitored to develop a second error signal which is also used to regulate base drive current. The current-sensitive circuit operates as a limiter. In addition, a fail-safe timing circuit is disclosed which automatically resets to a turn OFF condition in the event the transistor does not turn ON within a predetermined time after the input signal transition.

  14. Magnetoamplification in a bipolar magnetic junction transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaraju, N; Peters, J A; Wessels, B W

    2010-09-10

    We have demonstrated the first bipolar magnetic junction transistor using a dilute magnetic semiconductor. For an InMnAs p-n-p transistor magnetoamplification is observed at room temperature. The observed magnetoamplification is attributed to the magnetoresistance of the magnetic semiconductor InMnAs heterojunction. The magnetic field dependence of the transistor characteristics confirm that the magnetoamplification results from the junction magnetoresistance. To describe the experimentally observed transistor characteristics, we propose a modified Ebers-Moll model that includes a series magnetoresistance attributed to spin-selective conduction. The capability of magnetic field control of the amplification in an all-semiconductor transistor at room temperature potentially enables the creation of new computer logic architecture where the spin of the carriers is utilized.

  15. High Sensitivity Magnetic Field Sensors Based on Nano-Polysilicon Thin-Film Transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiao-Feng; Wen Dian-Zhong; Zhuang Cui-Cui; Liu Gang; Wang Zhi-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A high-sensitivity magnetic field sensor based on the nano-polysilicon thin film transistors is proposed to adopt the nano-polysilicon thin films and the nano-polysilicon/single silicon heterojunction interfaces as the sensing layers. By using CMOS technology, the fabrication of the nano-polysilicon thin film transistors with Hall probes can be achieved on the 〈100〉 high resistivity single silicon substrates, in which the thicknesses of the nano-polysilicon thin films are 120 nm and the length width ratio of the channel is 320 μm/80 μm. When V DS = 5.0 V, the magnetic sensitivity and linearity is 264 mV/T and 0.23%f.s. (full scale), respectively. The experimental results show that the magnetic sensors based on nano-polysilicon thin film transistors with Hall probes exhibit high sensitivity

  16. Nanofluidic diode and bipolar transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiguji, Hirofumi; Oka, Yukiko; Shirono, Katsuhiro

    2005-11-01

    Theoretical modeling of ionic distribution and transport in a nanochannel containing a surface charge on its wall, 30 nm high and 5 microm long, suggests that ionic current can be controlled by locally modifying the surface charge density through a gate electrode, even if the electrical double layers are not overlapped. When the surface charge densities at the right and left halves of a channel are the same absolute value but of different signs, this could form the basis of a nanofluidic diode. When the surface charge density at the middle part of a channel is modified, this could form the basis of a nanofluidic bipolar transistor.

  17. Interdigitated Extended Gate Field Effect Transistor Without Reference Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ghusoon M.

    2017-02-01

    An interdigitated extended gate field effect transistor (IEGFET) has been proposed as a modified pH sensor structure of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET). The reference electrode and the extended gate in the conventional device have been replaced by a single interdigitated extended gate. A metal-semiconductor-metal interdigitated extended gate containing two multi-finger Ni electrodes based on zinc oxide (ZnO) thin film as a pH-sensitive membrane. ZnO thin film was grown on a p-type Si (100) substrate by the sol-gel technique. The fabricated extended gate is connected to a commercial metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor device in CD4007UB. The experimental data show that this structure has real time and linear pH voltage and current sensitivities in a concentration range between pH 4 and 11. The voltage and current sensitivities are found to be about 22.4 mV/pH and 45 μA/pH, respectively. Reference electrode elimination makes the IEGFET device simple to fabricate, easy to carry out the measurements, needing a small volume of solution to test and suitable for disposable biosensor applications. Furthermore, this uncomplicated structure could be extended to fabricate multiple ions microsensors and lab-on-chip devices.

  18. Polymer-electrolyte-gated nanowire synaptic transistors for neuromorphic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Can; Sun, Jia; Gou, Guangyang; Kong, Ling-An; Qian, Chuan; Dai, Guozhang; Yang, Junliang; Guo, Guang-hua

    2017-09-01

    Polymer-electrolytes are formed by dissolving a salt in polymer instead of water, the conducting mechanism involves the segmental motion-assisted diffusion of ion in the polymer matrix. Here, we report on the fabrication of tin oxide (SnO2) nanowire synaptic transistors using polymer-electrolyte gating. A thin layer of poly(ethylene oxide) and lithium perchlorate (PEO/LiClO4) was deposited on top of the devices, which was used to boost device performances. A voltage spike applied on the in-plane gate attracts ions toward the polymer-electrolyte/SnO2 nanowire interface and the ions are gradually returned after the pulse is removed, which can induce a dynamic excitatory postsynaptic current in the nanowire channel. The SnO2 synaptic transistors exhibit the behavior of short-term plasticity like the paired-pulse facilitation and self-adaptation, which is related to the electric double-effect regulation. In addition, the synaptic logic functions and the logical function transformation are also discussed. Such single SnO2 nanowire-based synaptic transistors are of great importance for future neuromorphic devices.

  19. Tribotronic Transistor Array as an Active Tactile Sensing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi Wei; Pang, Yaokun; Zhang, Limin; Lu, Cunxin; Chen, Jian; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-12-27

    Large-scale tactile sensor arrays are of great importance in flexible electronics, human-robot interaction, and medical monitoring. In this paper, a flexible 10 × 10 tribotronic transistor array (TTA) is developed as an active tactile sensing system by incorporating field-effect transistor units and triboelectric nanogenerators into a polyimide substrate. The drain-source current of each tribotronic transistor can be individually modulated by the corresponding external contact, which has induced a local electrostatic potential to act as the conventional gate voltage. By scaling down the pixel size from 5 × 5 to 0.5 × 0.5 mm 2 , the sensitivities of single pixels are systematically investigated. The pixels of the TTA show excellent durability, independence, and synchronicity, which are suitable for applications in real-time tactile sensing, motion monitoring, and spatial mapping. The integrated tribotronics provides an unconventional route to realize an active tactile sensing system, with prospective applications in wearable electronics, human-machine interfaces, fingerprint identification, and so on.

  20. Electrical/optical dual-function redox potential transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunpu; Wang, Wensi; Xu, Ju; Chu, Daping; Shen, Z. John; Roy, Saibal

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new type of transistors, the electrical/optical “dual-function redox-potential transistors”, which is solution processable and environmentally stable. This device consists of vertically staked electrodes that act as gate, emitter and collector. It can perform as a normal transistor, whilst one electrode which is sensitised by dye enables to generate photocurrent when illuminated. Solution processable oxide-nanoparticles were used to form various functional layers, which allow an electrolyte to penetrate through and, consequently, the current between emitter and collector can be controlled by the gate potential modulated distribution of ions. The result here shows that the device performs with high ON-current under low driving voltage (transistor performance can readily be controlled by photo-illumination. Such device with combined optical and electrical functionalities allows single device to perform the tasks that are usually done by a circuit/system with multiple optical and electrical components, and it is promising for various applications. PMID:24310311

  1. Conformal transistor arrays based on solution-processed organic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhang, Bing; Tang, Qingxin; Ding, Xueyan; Wang, Shuya; Zhou, Yuying; Tong, Yanhong; Liu, Yichun

    2017-11-13

    Conformal transistor array based on solution-processed organic crystals, which can provide sensory and scanning features for monitoring, biofeedback, and tracking of physiological function, presents one of the most promising technologies for future large-scale low-cost wearable and implantable electronics. However, it is still a huge challenge for the integration of solution-processed organic crystals into conformal FETs owing to a generally existing swelling phenomenon of the elastic materials and the lack of the corresponding device fabrication technology. Here, we present a promising route to fabricate a conformal field-effect transistor (FET) array based on solution-processed TIPS-pentacene single-crystal micro/nanowire array. By simply drop-casting the organic solution on an anti-solvent photolithography-compatible electrode with bottom-contact coplanar configuration, the transistor array can be formed and can conform onto uneven objects. Excellent electrical properties with device yield as high as 100%, field-effect mobility up to 0.79 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , low threshold voltage, and good device uniformity are demonstrated. The results open up the capability of solution-processed organic crystals for conformal electronics, suggesting their substantial promise for next-generation wearable and implantable electronics.

  2. A light-stimulated synaptic transistor with synaptic plasticity and memory functions based on InGaZnO{sub x}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. K.; Chen, T. P., E-mail: echentp@ntu.edu.sg; Liu, P.; Zhang, Q. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Hu, S. G. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Liu, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Lee, P. S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2016-06-28

    In this work, a synaptic transistor based on the indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO)–aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin film structure, which uses ultraviolet (UV) light pulses as the pre-synaptic stimulus, has been demonstrated. The synaptic transistor exhibits the behavior of synaptic plasticity like the paired-pulse facilitation. In addition, it also shows the brain's memory behaviors including the transition from short-term memory to long-term memory and the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve. The synapse-like behavior and memory behaviors of the transistor are due to the trapping and detrapping processes of the holes, which are generated by the UV pulses, at the IGZO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface and/or in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer.

  3. Piccolo Promotes Vesicle Replenishment at a Fast Central Auditory Synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvi Butola

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Piccolo and Bassoon are the two largest cytomatrix of the active zone (CAZ proteins involved in scaffolding and regulating neurotransmitter release at presynaptic active zones (AZs, but have long been discussed as being functionally redundant. We employed genetic manipulation to bring forth and segregate the role of Piccolo from that of Bassoon at central auditory synapses of the cochlear nucleus—the endbulbs of Held. These synapses specialize in high frequency synaptic transmission, ideally poised to reveal even subtle deficits in the regulation of neurotransmitter release upon molecular perturbation. Combining semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and in vitro and in vivo electrophysiology we first studied signal transmission in Piccolo-deficient mice. Our analysis was not confounded by a cochlear deficit, as a short isoform of Piccolo (“Piccolino” present at the upstream ribbon synapses of cochlear inner hair cells (IHC, is unaffected by the mutation. Disruption of Piccolo increased the abundance of Bassoon at the AZs of endbulbs, while that of RIM1 was reduced and other CAZ proteins remained unaltered. Presynaptic fiber stimulation revealed smaller amplitude of the evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSC, while eEPSC kinetics as well as miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs remained unchanged. Cumulative analysis of eEPSC trains indicated that the reduced eEPSC amplitude of Piccolo-deficient endbulb synapses is primarily due to a reduced readily releasable pool (RRP of synaptic vesicles (SV, as was corroborated by a reduction of vesicles at the AZ found on an ultrastructural level. Release probability seemed largely unaltered. Recovery from short-term depression was slowed. We then performed a physiological analysis of endbulb synapses from mice which, in addition to Piccolo deficiency, lacked one functional allele of the Bassoon gene. Analysis of the double-mutant endbulbs revealed an increase in release probability

  4. BN / Graphene / BN RF Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Taychatanapat, Thiti; Hsu, Allen; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Palacios, Tomas

    2011-03-01

    In this work we demonstrate the first BN/graphene/BN transistor for high frequency RF applications. This sandwich structure allows a significant improvement in the mobility of graphene, which reaches more than 18,000 cm2 /Vs at room temperature. Graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) have been fabricated with LDS = 800 nm and LG = 300 nm. The minimum conduction point of these devices is very close to zero, a result of the negligible substrate doping to the graphene. A current density in excess of 1 A/mm and DC transconductance above 200 mS/mm are achieved for both electron and hole conductions. RF characterization is performed for the first time on this device structure and initial results show a current-gain cut-off frequency fT = 10 GHz. These experimental results have been combined with simulations of the small-signal model to study the scaling potential of these GFETs for high frequency applications. The impact of the access resistances (Rs , Rd) , the capacitances (Cgs , Cgd , Cds) , and the transconductance (g m) on the frequency performance of the GFETs has also been studied. Finally, the fabricated devices have been compared to GFETs fabricated with Si O2 substrate and Al 2 O3 gate dielectrics. The improved performance obtained by the BN/graphene/BN structure is very promising to enable the next generation of high frequency RF electronics.

  5. Voltage regulator for battery power source. [using a bipolar transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, J. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A bipolar transistor in series with the battery as the control element also in series with a zener diode and a resistor is used to maintain a predetermined voltage until the battery voltage decays to very nearly the predetermined voltage. A field effect transistor between the base of the bipolar transistor and a junction between the zener diode and resistor regulates base current of the bipolar transistor, thereby regulating the conductivity of the bipolar transistor for control of the output voltage.

  6. A Neuron- and a Synapse Chip for Artificial Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansner, John; Lehmann, Torsten

    1992-01-01

    A cascadable, analog, CMOS chip set has been developed for hardware implementations of artificial neural networks (ANN's):I) a neuron chip containing an array of neurons with hyperbolic tangent activation functions and adjustable gains, and II) a synapse chip (or a matrix-vector multiplier) where...... the matrix is stored on-chip as differential voltages on capacitors. In principal any ANN configuration can be made using these chips. A neuron array of 4 neurons and a 4 × 4 matrix-vector multiplier has been fabricated in a standard 2.4 ¿m CMOS process for test purposes. The propagation time through...... the synapse and neuron chips is less than 4 ¿s and the weight matrix has a 10 bit resolution....

  7. Autaptic effects on synchrony of neurons coupled by electrical synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngtae

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we numerically study the effects of a special synapse known as autapse on synchronization of population of Morris-Lecar (ML) neurons coupled by electrical synapses. Several configurations of the ML neuronal populations such as a pair or a ring or a globally coupled network with and without autapses are examined. While most of the papers on the autaptic effects on synchronization have used networks of neurons of same spiking rate, we use the network of neurons of different spiking rates. We find that the optimal autaptic coupling strength and the autaptic time delay enhance synchronization in our neural networks. We use the phase response curve analysis to explain the enhanced synchronization by autapses. Our findings reveal the important relationship between the intraneuronal feedback loop and the interneuronal coupling.

  8. Astrocytosis in parkinsonism: considering tripartite striatal synapses in physiopathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Giselle; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Canron, Marie-Helene; Li, Qin; Véga, Céline; Marais, Sebastien; Baufreton, Jérôme; Vital, Anne; Oliet, Stéphane H R; Bezard, Erwan

    2014-01-01

    The current concept of basal ganglia organization and function in physiological and pathophysiological conditions excludes the most numerous cells in the brain, i.e., the astrocytes, present with a ratio of 10:1 neuron. Their role in neurodegenerative condition such as Parkinson's disease (PD) remains to be elucidated. Before embarking into physiological investigations of the yet-to-be-identified "tripartite" synapses in the basal ganglia in general and the striatum in particular, we therefore characterized anatomically the PD-related modifications in astrocytic morphology, the changes in astrocytic network connections and the consequences on the spatial relationship between astrocytic processes and asymmetric synapses in normal and PD-like conditions in experimental and human PD. Our results unravel a dramatic regulation of striatal astrocytosis supporting the hypothesis of a key role in (dys) regulating corticostriatal transmission. Astrocytes and their various properties might thus represent a therapeutic target in PD.

  9. Astrocytosis in parkinsonism: considering tripartite striatal synapses in physiopathology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle eCharron

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The current concept of basal ganglia organization and function in physiological and pathophysiological conditions excludes the most numerous cells in the brain, i.e. the astrocytes, present with a ratio of 10:1 neuron. Their role in neurodegenerative condition such as Parkinson’s disease (PD remains to be elucidated. Before embarking into physiological investigations of the yet-to-be-identified tripartite synapses in the basal ganglia in general and the striatum in particular, we therefore characterized anatomically the PD-related modifications in astrocytic morphology, the changes in astrocytic network connections and the consequences on the spatial relationship between astrocytic processes and asymmetric synapses in normal and PD-like conditions in experimental and human PD. Our results unravel a dramatic regulation of striatal astrocytosis supporting the hypothesis of a key role in (dysregulating corticostriatal transmission. Astrocytes and their various properties might thus represent a therapeutic target in PD.

  10. Microorganism and Fungi Drive Evolution of Plant Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantisek eBaluska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the course of plant evolution, there is an obvious trend toward an increased complexity of plant bodies, as well as an increased sophistication of plant behavior and communication. Phenotypic plasticity of plants is based on the polar auxin transport machinery that is directly linked with plant sensory systems impinging on plant behavior and adaptive responses. Similar to the emergence and evolution of eukaryotic cells, evolution of land plants was also shaped and driven by infective and symbiotic microorganisms. These microorganisms are the driving force behind the evolution of plant synapses and other neuronal aspects of higher plants; this is especially pronounced in the root apices. Plant synapses allow synaptic cell-cell communication and coordination in plants, as well as sensory-motor integration in root apices searching for water and mineral nutrition. These neuronal aspects of higher plants are closely linked with their unique ability to adapt to environmental changes.

  11. Microorganism and filamentous fungi drive evolution of plant synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In the course of plant evolution, there is an obvious trend toward an increased complexity of plant bodies, as well as an increased sophistication of plant behavior and communication. Phenotypic plasticity of plants is based on the polar auxin transport machinery that is directly linked with plant sensory systems impinging on plant behavior and adaptive responses. Similar to the emergence and evolution of eukaryotic cells, evolution of land plants was also shaped and driven by infective and symbiotic microorganisms. These microorganisms are the driving force behind the evolution of plant synapses and other neuronal aspects of higher plants; this is especially pronounced in the root apices. Plant synapses allow synaptic cell-cell communication and coordination in plants, as well as sensory-motor integration in root apices searching for water and mineral nutrition. These neuronal aspects of higher plants are closely linked with their unique ability to adapt to environmental changes.

  12. Process for forming synapses in neural networks and resistor therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chi Y.

    1996-01-01

    Customizable neural network in which one or more resistors form each synapse. All the resistors in the synaptic array are identical, thus simplifying the processing issues. Highly doped, amorphous silicon is used as the resistor material, to create extremely high resistances occupying very small spaces. Connected in series with each resistor in the array is at least one severable conductor whose uppermost layer has a lower reflectivity of laser energy than typical metal conductors at a desired laser wavelength.

  13. Temporal coding at the immature depolarizing GABAergic synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzel Valeeva

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the developing hippocampus, GABA exerts depolarizing and excitatory actions and contributes to the generation of neuronal network driven Giant Depolarizing Potentials (GDPs. Here, we studied spike time coding at immature GABAergic synapses and its impact on synchronization of the neuronal network during GDPs in the neonatal (postnatal days P2-6 rat hippocampal slices. Using extracellular recordings, we found that the delays of action potentials (APs evoked by synaptic activation of GABA(A receptors are long (mean, 65 ms and variable (within a time window of 10-200 ms. During patch-clamp recordings, depolarizing GABAergic responses were mainly subthreshold and their amplification by persistent sodium conductance was required to trigger APs. AP delays at GABAergic synapses shortened and their variability reduced with an increase in intracellular chloride concentration during whole-cell recordings. Negative shift of the GABA reversal potential (EGABA with low concentrations of bumetanide, or potentiation of GABA(A receptors with diazepam reduced GDPs amplitude, desynchronized neuronal firing during GDPs and slowed down GDPs propagation. Partial blockade of GABA(A receptors with bicuculline increased neuronal synchronization and accelerated GDPs propagation. We propose that spike-timing at depolarizing GABA synapses is determined by intracellular chloride concentration. At physiological levels of intracellular chloride GABAergic depolarization does not reach the action potential threshold and amplification of GABAergic responses by non-inactivating sodium conductance is required for postsynaptic AP initiation. Slow and variable excitation at GABAergic synapse determines the level of neuronal synchrony and the rate of GDPs propagation in the developing hippocampus.

  14. Studying the Dynamics of TCR Internalization at the Immune Synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja, Enrique; Alarcón, Balbino; Oeste, Clara L

    2017-01-01

    Establishing a stable interaction between a T cell and an antigen presenting cell (APC) involves the formation of an immune synapse (IS). It is through this structure that the T cell can integrate all the signals provided by the APC. The IS also serves as a mechanism for TCR downregulation through internalization. Here, we describe methods for visualizing MHC-engaged T cell receptor (TCR) internalization from the IS in human cell lines and mouse primary T cells by confocal fluorescence microscopy techniques.

  15. Storage capacity of attractor neural networks with depressing synapses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Joaquin J.; Pantic, Lovorka; Kappen, Hilbert J.

    2002-01-01

    We compute the capacity of a binary neural network with dynamic depressing synapses to store and retrieve an infinite number of patterns. We use a biologically motivated model of synaptic depression and a standard mean-field approach. We find that at T=0 the critical storage capacity decreases with the degree of the depression. We confirm the validity of our main mean-field results with numerical simulations

  16. Astrocytosis in parkinsonism: considering tripartite striatal synapses in physiopathology?

    OpenAIRE

    Charron, Giselle; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Canron, Marie-Helene; Li, Qin; Véga, Céline; Marais, Sebastien; Baufreton, Jérôme; Vital, Anne; Oliet, Stéphane H. R.; Bezard, Erwan

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The current concept of basal ganglia organization and function in physiological and pathophysiological conditions excludes the most numerous cells in the brain, i.e., the astrocytes, present with a ratio of 10:1 neuron. Their role in neurodegenerative condition such as Parkinson's disease (PD) remains to be elucidated. Before embarking into physiological investigations of the yet-to-be-identified " tripartite " synapses in the basal ganglia in general and the striatum ...

  17. The State of Synapses in Fragile X Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Brad E.; Huber, Kimberly M.

    2009-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation and a leading genetic cause of autism. There is increasing evidence in both FXS and other forms of autism that alterations in synapse number, structure and function are associated and contribute to these prevalent diseases. FXS is caused by loss of function of the Fmr1 gene which encodes the RNA binding protein, FMRP. Therefore, FXS is a tractable model to understand synaptic dysfunction in cognitive disorders. FMRP is...

  18. An Exclusion Zone for Ca2+ Channels around Docked Vesicles Explains Release Control by Multiple Channels at a CNS Synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Daniel; Babai, Norbert; Kochubey, Olexiy; Han, Yunyun; Markram, Henry; Schürmann, Felix; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    The spatial arrangement of Ca2+ channels and vesicles remains unknown for most CNS synapses, despite of the crucial importance of this geometrical parameter for the Ca2+ control of transmitter release. At a large model synapse, the calyx of Held, transmitter release is controlled by several Ca2+ channels in a "domain overlap" mode, at least in young animals. To study the geometrical constraints of Ca2+ channel placement in domain overlap control of release, we used stochastic MCell modelling, at active zones for which the position of docked vesicles was derived from electron microscopy (EM). We found that random placement of Ca2+ channels was unable to produce high slope values between release and presynaptic Ca2+ entry, a hallmark of domain overlap, and yielded excessively large release probabilities. The simple assumption that Ca2+ channels can be located anywhere at active zones, except below a critical distance of ~ 30 nm away from docked vesicles ("exclusion zone"), rescued high slope values and low release probabilities. Alternatively, high slope values can also be obtained by placing all Ca2+ channels into a single supercluster, which however results in significantly higher heterogeneity of release probabilities. We also show experimentally that high slope values, and the sensitivity to the slow Ca2+ chelator EGTA-AM, are maintained with developmental maturation of the calyx synapse. Taken together, domain overlap control of release represents a highly organized active zone architecture in which Ca2+ channels must obey a certain distance to docked vesicles. Furthermore, domain overlap can be employed by near-mature, fast-releasing synapses.

  19. An Exclusion Zone for Ca2+ Channels around Docked Vesicles Explains Release Control by Multiple Channels at a CNS Synapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Keller

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The spatial arrangement of Ca2+ channels and vesicles remains unknown for most CNS synapses, despite of the crucial importance of this geometrical parameter for the Ca2+ control of transmitter release. At a large model synapse, the calyx of Held, transmitter release is controlled by several Ca2+ channels in a "domain overlap" mode, at least in young animals. To study the geometrical constraints of Ca2+ channel placement in domain overlap control of release, we used stochastic MCell modelling, at active zones for which the position of docked vesicles was derived from electron microscopy (EM. We found that random placement of Ca2+ channels was unable to produce high slope values between release and presynaptic Ca2+ entry, a hallmark of domain overlap, and yielded excessively large release probabilities. The simple assumption that Ca2+ channels can be located anywhere at active zones, except below a critical distance of ~ 30 nm away from docked vesicles ("exclusion zone", rescued high slope values and low release probabilities. Alternatively, high slope values can also be obtained by placing all Ca2+ channels into a single supercluster, which however results in significantly higher heterogeneity of release probabilities. We also show experimentally that high slope values, and the sensitivity to the slow Ca2+ chelator EGTA-AM, are maintained with developmental maturation of the calyx synapse. Taken together, domain overlap control of release represents a highly organized active zone architecture in which Ca2+ channels must obey a certain distance to docked vesicles. Furthermore, domain overlap can be employed by near-mature, fast-releasing synapses.

  20. Synapse-specific astrocyte gating of amygdala-related behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Fernandez, Mario; Jamison, Stephanie; Robin, Laurie M; Zhao, Zhe; Martin, Eduardo D; Aguilar, Juan; Benneyworth, Michael A; Marsicano, Giovanni; Araque, Alfonso

    2017-11-01

    The amygdala plays key roles in fear and anxiety. Studies of the amygdala have largely focused on neuronal function and connectivity. Astrocytes functionally interact with neurons, but their role in the amygdala remains largely unknown. We show that astrocytes in the medial subdivision of the central amygdala (CeM) determine the synaptic and behavioral outputs of amygdala circuits. To investigate the role of astrocytes in amygdala-related behavior and identify the underlying synaptic mechanisms, we used exogenous or endogenous signaling to selectively activate CeM astrocytes. Astrocytes depressed excitatory synapses from basolateral amygdala via A 1 adenosine receptor activation and enhanced inhibitory synapses from the lateral subdivision of the central amygdala via A 2A receptor activation. Furthermore, astrocytic activation decreased the firing rate of CeM neurons and reduced fear expression in a fear-conditioning paradigm. Therefore, we conclude that astrocyte activity determines fear responses by selectively regulating specific synapses, which indicates that animal behavior results from the coordinated activity of neurons and astrocytes.

  1. The space where aging acts: focus on the GABAergic synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozycka, Aleksandra; Liguz-Lecznar, Monika

    2017-08-01

    As it was established that aging is not associated with massive neuronal loss, as was believed in the mid-20th Century, scientific interest has addressed the influence of aging on particular neuronal subpopulations and their synaptic contacts, which constitute the substrate for neural plasticity. Inhibitory neurons represent the most complex and diverse group of neurons, showing distinct molecular and physiological characteristics and possessing a compelling ability to control the physiology of neural circuits. This review focuses on the aging of GABAergic neurons and synapses. Understanding how aging affects synapses of particular neuronal subpopulations may help explain the heterogeneity of aging-related effects. We reviewed the literature concerning the effects of aging on the numbers of GABAergic neurons and synapses as well as aging-related alterations in their presynaptic and postsynaptic components. Finally, we discussed the influence of those changes on the plasticity of the GABAergic system, highlighting our results concerning aging in mouse somatosensory cortex and linking them to plasticity impairments and brain disorders. We posit that aging-induced impairments of the GABAergic system lead to an inhibitory/excitatory imbalance, thereby decreasing neuron's ability to respond with plastic changes to environmental and cellular challenges, leaving the brain more vulnerable to cognitive decline and damage by synaptopathic diseases. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Microglia actively regulate the number of functional synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungmin Ji

    Full Text Available Microglia are the immunocompetent cells of the central nervous system. In the physiological setting, their highly motile processes continually survey the local brain parenchyma and transiently contact synaptic elements. Although recent work has shown that the interaction of microglia with synapses contributes to synaptic remodeling during development, the role of microglia in synaptic physiology is just starting to get explored. To assess this question, we employed an electrophysiological approach using two methods to manipulate microglia in culture: organotypic hippocampal brain slices in which microglia were depleted using clodronate liposomes, and cultured hippocampal neurons to which microglia were added. We show here that the frequency of excitatory postsynaptic current increases in microglia-depleted brain slices, consistent with a higher synaptic density, and that this enhancement ensures from the loss of microglia since it is reversed when the microglia are replenished. Conversely, the addition of microglia to neuronal cultures decreases synaptic activity and reduces the density of synapses, spine numbers, surface expression of AMPA receptor (GluA1, and levels of synaptic adhesion molecules. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that non-activated microglia acutely modulate synaptic activity by regulating the number of functional synapses in the central nervous system.

  3. TFH-derived dopamine accelerates productive synapses in germinal centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Ilenia; Saliba, David; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Bustamante, Sonia; Canete, Pablo F; Gonzalez-Figueroa, Paula; McNamara, Hayley A; Valvo, Salvatore; Grimbaldeston, Michele; Sweet, Rebecca A; Vohra, Harpreet; Cockburn, Ian A; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Dustin, Michael L; Doglioni, Claudio; Vinuesa, Carola G

    2017-07-20

    Protective high-affinity antibody responses depend on competitive selection of B cells carrying somatically mutated B-cell receptors by follicular helper T (T FH ) cells in germinal centres. The rapid T-B-cell interactions that occur during this process are reminiscent of neural synaptic transmission pathways. Here we show that a proportion of human T FH cells contain dense-core granules marked by chromogranin B, which are normally found in neuronal presynaptic terminals storing catecholamines such as dopamine. T FH cells produce high amounts of dopamine and release it upon cognate interaction with B cells. Dopamine causes rapid translocation of intracellular ICOSL (inducible T-cell co-stimulator ligand, also known as ICOSLG) to the B-cell surface, which enhances accumulation of CD40L and chromogranin B granules at the human T FH cell synapse and increases the synapse area. Mathematical modelling suggests that faster dopamine-induced T-B-cell interactions increase total germinal centre output and accelerate it by days. Delivery of neurotransmitters across the T-B-cell synapse may be advantageous in the face of infection.

  4. Synapse geometry and receptor dynamics modulate synaptic strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Freche

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission relies on several processes, such as the location of a released vesicle, the number and type of receptors, trafficking between the postsynaptic density (PSD and extrasynaptic compartment, as well as the synapse organization. To study the impact of these parameters on excitatory synaptic transmission, we present a computational model for the fast AMPA-receptor mediated synaptic current. We show that in addition to the vesicular release probability, due to variations in their release locations and the AMPAR distribution, the postsynaptic current amplitude has a large variance, making a synapse an intrinsic unreliable device. We use our model to examine our experimental data recorded from CA1 mice hippocampal slices to study the differences between mEPSC and evoked EPSC variance. The synaptic current but not the coefficient of variation is maximal when the active zone where vesicles are released is apposed to the PSD. Moreover, we find that for certain type of synapses, receptor trafficking can affect the magnitude of synaptic depression. Finally, we demonstrate that perisynaptic microdomains located outside the PSD impacts synaptic transmission by regulating the number of desensitized receptors and their trafficking to the PSD. We conclude that geometrical modifications, reorganization of the PSD or perisynaptic microdomains modulate synaptic strength, as the mechanisms underlying long-term plasticity.

  5. Remote tactile sensing system integrated with magnetic synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sunjong; Jung, Youngdo; Kim, Seonggi; Kim, SungJoon; Hu, Xinghao; Lim, Hyuneui; Kim, CheolGi

    2017-12-05

    Mechanoreceptors in a fingertip convert external tactile stimulations into electrical signals, which are transmitted by the nervous system through synaptic transmitters and then perceived by the brain with high accuracy and reliability. Inspired by the human synapse system, this paper reports a robust tactile sensing system consisting of a remote touch tip and a magnetic synapse. External pressure on the remote touch tip is transferred in the form of air pressure to the magnetic synapse, where its variation is converted into electrical signals. The developed system has high sensitivity and a wide dynamic range. The remote sensing system demonstrated tactile capabilities over wide pressure range with a minimum detectable pressure of 6 Pa. In addition, it could measure tactile stimulation up to 1,000 Hz without distortion and hysteresis, owing to the separation of the touching and sensing parts. The excellent performance of the system in terms of surface texture discrimination, heartbeat measurement from the human wrist, and satisfactory detection quality in water indicates that it has considerable potential for various mechanosensory applications in different environments.

  6. Basic matrix algebra and transistor circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Zelinger, G

    1963-01-01

    Basic Matrix Algebra and Transistor Circuits deals with mastering the techniques of matrix algebra for application in transistors. This book attempts to unify fundamental subjects, such as matrix algebra, four-terminal network theory, transistor equivalent circuits, and pertinent design matters. Part I of this book focuses on basic matrix algebra of four-terminal networks, with descriptions of the different systems of matrices. This part also discusses both simple and complex network configurations and their associated transmission. This discussion is followed by the alternative methods of de

  7. Wide-bandwidth charge sensitivity with a radio-frequency field-effect transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishiguchi, K.; Yamaguchi, H.; Fujiwara, A.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Steele, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate high-speed charge detection at room temperature with single-electron resolution by using a radio-frequency field-effect transistor (RF-FET). The RF-FET combines a nanometer-scale silicon FET with an impedance-matching circuit composed of an inductor and capacitor. Driving the RF-FET

  8. Probing spin-polarized tunneling at high bias and temperature with a magnetic tunnel transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, B.G.; Banerjee, T.; Min, B.C.; Sanderink, Johannes G.M.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic tunnel transistor (MTT) is a three terminal hybrid device that consists of a tunnel emitter, a ferromagnetic (FM) base, and a semiconductor collector. In the MTT with a FM emitter and a single FM base, spin-polarized hot electrons are injected into the base by tunneling. After

  9. Air-Stable Complementary-like Circuits Based on Organic ; Ambipolar Transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anthopoulos, T.D.; Setayesh, S.; Smits, E.; Cölle, M; Cantatore, E.; Boer, B. de; Blom, P.W.M.; Leeuw, D.M. de

    2005-01-01

    To date there are two demonstrated technologies for the fabrication of organic integrated circuits: the unipolar and the complementary technology. Unipolar architectures consist of p-channel organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), which are simple to fabricate since they require a single,

  10. Graphene electrodes for n-type organic field-effect transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Henrik Hartmann; Boggild, P.

    2010-01-01

    field-effect transistor configuration (OFET). Single tip tungsten as well as microscale multi-point probes were used to electrically contact individual devices, making permanent connections unnecessary. The device platform has been tested with a thin film of para-hexaphenylene (p6P...

  11. Charge collection mechanisms in MOS/SOI transistors irradiated by energetic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musseau, O.; Leray, J.L.; Ferlet, V.; Umbert, A.; Coic, Y.M.; Hesto, P.

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated with both experimental and numerical methods (Monte Carlo and drift-diffusion models) various charge collection mechanisms in NMOS/SOI transistors irradiated by single energetic heavy ions. Our physical interpretations of data emphasize the influence of various parasitic structures of the device. Two charge collection mechanisms are detailed: substrate funneling in buried MOS capacitor and latching of the parasitic bipolar transistor. Based on carrier transport and charge collection, the sensitivity of future scaled down CMOS/SOI technologies is finally discussed

  12. Effect of the metal work function on the electrical properties of carbon nanotube network transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Ko, Dae Young; Kil, Joon Pyo; Lee, Jung Wha; Park, Wan Jun

    2012-01-01

    A nearly perfect semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube random network thin film transistor array was fabricated, and its reproducible transport properties were investigated. The effects of the metal work function for both the source and the drain on the electrical properties of the transistors were systematically investigated. Three different metal electrodes, Al, Ti, and Pd, were employed. As the metal work function increased, p-type behavior became dominant, and the field effect hole mobility dramatically increased. Also, the Schottky barrier of the Ti-nanotube contact was invariant to the molecular adsorption of species in air.

  13. Untangling the two-way signalling route from synapses to the nucleus, and from the nucleus back to the synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Mio; Fujii, Hajime; Kim, Ryang; Kawashima, Takashi; Okuno, Hiroyuki; Bito, Haruhiko

    2014-01-05

    During learning and memory, it has been suggested that the coordinated electrical activity of hippocampal neurons translates information about the external environment into internal neuronal representations, which then are stored initially within the hippocampus and subsequently into other areas of the brain. A widely held hypothesis posits that synaptic plasticity is a key feature that critically modulates the triggering and the maintenance of such representations, some of which are thought to persist over time as traces or tags. However, the molecular and cell biological basis for these traces and tags has remained elusive. Here, we review recent findings that help clarify some of the molecular and cellular mechanisms critical for these events, by untangling a two-way signalling crosstalk route between the synapses and the neuronal soma. In particular, a detailed interrogation of the soma-to-synapse delivery of immediate early gene product Arc/Arg3.1, whose induction is triggered by heightened synaptic activity in many brain areas, teases apart an unsuspected 'inverse' synaptic tagging mechanism that likely contributes to maintaining the contrast of synaptic weight between strengthened and weak synapses within an active ensemble.

  14. Resolving dynamics of cell signaling via real-time imaging of the immunological synapse.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Mark A.; Pfeiffer, Janet R. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Wilson, Bridget S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Thomas, James L. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Lidke, Keith A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Spendier, Kathrin (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Oliver, Janet M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Carroll-Portillo, Amanda (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Aaron, Jesse S.; Mirijanian, Dina T.; Carson, Bryan D.; Burns, Alan Richard; Rebeil, Roberto

    2009-10-01

    This highly interdisciplinary team has developed dual-color, total internal reflection microscopy (TIRF-M) methods that enable us to optically detect and track in real time protein migration and clustering at membrane interfaces. By coupling TIRF-M with advanced analysis techniques (image correlation spectroscopy, single particle tracking) we have captured subtle changes in membrane organization that characterize immune responses. We have used this approach to elucidate the initial stages of cell activation in the IgE signaling network of mast cells and the Toll-like receptor (TLR-4) response in macrophages stimulated by bacteria. To help interpret these measurements, we have undertaken a computational modeling effort to connect the protein motion and lipid interactions. This work provides a deeper understanding of the initial stages of cellular response to external agents, including dynamics of interaction of key components in the signaling network at the 'immunological synapse,' the contact region of the cell and its adversary.

  15. Lateral power transistors in integrated circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Erlbacher, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    This book details and compares recent advancements in the development of novel lateral power transistors (LDMOS devices) for integrated circuits in power electronic applications. It includes the state-of-the-art concept of double-acting RESURF topologies.

  16. Graphene Field Effect Transistors for Radiation Detection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is propose to develop Graphene Field Effect Transistor based Radiation Sensors (GFET-RS) for NASA Manned Spaceflight Missions anticipated in next several...

  17. Modeling of strain effects on the device behaviors of ferroelectric memory field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Feng; Hu, Guangda; Wu, Weibing; Yang, Changhong; Wu, Haitao; Tang, Minghua

    2013-01-01

    The influence of strains on the channel current–gate voltage behaviors and memory windows of ferroelectric memory field-effect transistors (FeMFETs) were studied using an improved model based on the Landau–Devonshire theory. ‘Channel potential–gate voltage’ ferroelectric polarization and silicon surface potential diagrams were constructed for strained single-domain BaTiO 3 FeMFETs. The compressive strains can increase (or decrease) the amplitude of transistor currents and enlarge memory windows. However, tensile strains only decrease the maximum value of transistor currents and compress memory windows. Mismatch strains were found to have a significant influence on the electrical behaviors of the devices, therefore, they must be considered in FeMFET device designing. (fast track communication)

  18. Exploring graphene field effect transistor devices to improve spectral resolution of semiconductor radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Richard Karl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen Wayne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Jeffrey B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hamilton, Allister B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Graphene, a planar, atomically thin form of carbon, has unique electrical and material properties that could enable new high performance semiconductor devices. Graphene could be of specific interest in the development of room-temperature, high-resolution semiconductor radiation spectrometers. Incorporating graphene into a field-effect transistor architecture could provide an extremely high sensitivity readout mechanism for sensing charge carriers in a semiconductor detector, thus enabling the fabrication of a sensitive radiation sensor. In addition, the field effect transistor architecture allows us to sense only a single charge carrier type, such as electrons. This is an advantage for room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors, which often suffer from significant hole trapping. Here we report on initial efforts towards device fabrication and proof-of-concept testing. This work investigates the use of graphene transferred onto silicon and silicon carbide, and the response of these fabricated graphene field effect transistor devices to stimuli such as light and alpha radiation.

  19. Individual SnO{sub 2} nanowire transistors fabricated by the gold microwire mask method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Jia; Tang Qingxin; Lu Aixia; Jiang Xuejiao; Wan Qing [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, and State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China)], E-mail: wanqing7686@hotmail.com

    2009-06-24

    A gold microwire mask method is developed for the fabrication of transistors based on single lightly Sb-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowires. Damage of the nanowire's surface can be avoided without any thermal annealing and surface modification, which is very convenient for the fundamental electrical and photoelectric characterization of one-dimensional inorganic nanomaterials. Transport measurements of the individual SnO{sub 2} nanowire devices demonstrate the high-performance n-type field effect transistor characteristics without significant hysteresis in the transfer curves. The current on/off ratio and the subthreshold swing of the nanowire transistors are found to be 10{sup 6} and 240 mV/decade, respectively.

  20. Self-consistent depth profiling and imaging of GaN-based transistors using ion microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo-Cubero, A., E-mail: andres.redondo@uam.es [IPFN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 2686-953 Bobadela (Portugal); Departamento de Física Aplicada y Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Corregidor, V. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 2686-953 Bobadela (Portugal); Vázquez, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Alves, L.C. [C2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 2686-953 Bobadela (Portugal)

    2015-04-01

    Using an ion microprobe, a comprehensive lateral and in-depth characterization of a single GaN-based high electron mobility transistor is carried out by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in combination with particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Elemental distribution was obtained for every individual section of the device (wafer, gate and source contact), identifying the basic constituents of the transistor (including the detection of the passivant layer) and checking its homogeneity. A self-consistent analysis of each individual regions of the transistor was carried out with a simultaneous fit of RBS and PIXE spectra with two different beam conditions. Following this approach, the quantification of the atomic content and the layer thicknesses was successfully achieved overcoming the mass-depth ambiguity of certain elements.

  1. Enhancement of minority carrier injection in ambipolar carbon nanotube transistors using double-gate structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bongjun; Liang, Kelly; Dodabalapur, Ananth, E-mail: ananth.dodabalapur@engr.utexas.edu [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Geier, Michael L.; Hersam, Mark C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2016-07-11

    We show that double-gate ambipolar thin-film transistors can be operated to enhance minority carrier injection. The two gate potentials need to be significantly different for enhanced injection to be observed. This enhancement is highly beneficial in devices such as light-emitting transistors where balanced electron and hole injections lead to optimal performance. With ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube semiconductors, we demonstrate that higher ambipolar currents are attained at lower source-drain voltages, which is desired for portable electronic applications, by employing double-gate structures. In addition, when the two gates are held at the same potential, the expected advantages of the double-gate transistors such as enhanced on-current are also observed.

  2. Breakdown of transistors in Marx bank circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Amitabh

    2000-09-01

    We reconsider the mode of operation of a Marx bank circuit and analyze the secondary breakdown of transistors with shorted emitter-base. The mechanism of breakdown of the transistor when a fast rising voltage pulse is applied across is investigated. The device exhibits chaotic behavior at the breakdown point where it can go into two possible modes of breakdown. A new explanation for the working of the circuit consistent with the experimental observations is proposed.

  3. Bipolar transistor in VESTIC technology: prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzwiński, Piotr; Kuźmicz, Wiesław; Domański, Krzysztof; Tomaszewski, Daniel; Głuszko, Grzegorz

    2016-12-01

    VESTIC technology is an alternative for traditional CMOS technology. This paper presents first measurement data of prototypes of VES-BJT: bipolar transistors in VESTIC technology. The VES-BJT is a bipolar transistor on the SOI substrate with symmetric lateral structure and both emitter and collector made of polysilicon. The results indicate that VES-BJT can be a device with useful characteristics. Therefore, VESTIC technology has the potential to become a new BiCMOS-type technology with some unique properties.

  4. Simulation of 50-nm Gate Graphene Nanoribbon Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Nanmeni Bondja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to simulate the steady-state and small-signal behavior of GNR MOSFETs (graphene nanoribbon metal-semiconductor-oxide field-effect transistor is presented. GNR material parameters and a method to account for the density of states of one-dimensional systems like GNRs are implemented in a commercial device simulator. This modified tool is used to calculate the current-voltage characteristics as well the cutoff frequency fT and the maximum frequency of oscillation fmax of GNR MOSFETs. Exemplarily, we consider 50-nm gate GNR MOSFETs with N = 7 armchair GNR channels and examine two transistor configurations. The first configuration is a simplified MOSFET structure with a single GNR channel as usually studied by other groups. Furthermore, and for the first time in the literature, we study in detail a transistor structure with multiple parallel GNR channels and interribbon gates. It is shown that the calculated fT of GNR MOSFETs is significantly lower than that of GFETs (FET with gapless large-area graphene channel with comparable gate length due to the mobility degradation in GNRs. On the other hand, GNR MOSFETs show much higher fmax compared to experimental GFETs due the semiconducting nature of the GNR channels and the resulting better saturation of the drain current. Finally, it is shown that the gate control in FETs with multiple parallel GNR channels is improved while the cutoff frequency is degraded compared to single-channel GNR MOSFETs due to parasitic capacitances of the interribbon gates.

  5. Temas de Física para Ingeniería: El transistor de unión

    OpenAIRE

    Beléndez Vázquez, Augusto; Pastor Antón, Carlos; Martín García, Agapito

    1990-01-01

    El transistor de unión bipolar. Tensiones y corrientes en el transistor. El transistor como amplificador. El transistor como conmutador. Transistores unipolares o de efecto de campo. El tiristor. Microelectrónica y circuitos integrados.

  6. Visualization of HIV T Cell Virological Synapses and Virus-Containing Compartments by Three-Dimensional Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Eng, Edward T.; Law, Kenneth; Gordon, Ronald E.; Rice, William J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Virological synapses (VS) are adhesive structures that form between infected and uninfected cells to enhance the spread of HIV-1. During T cell VS formation, viral proteins are actively recruited to the site of cell-cell contact where the viral material is efficiently translocated to target cells into heterogeneous, protease-resistant, antibody-inaccessible compartments. Using correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM), we define the membrane topography of the virus-containing compartments (VCC) where HIV is found following VS-mediated transfer. Focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) and serial sectioning transmission electron microscopy (SS-TEM) were used to better resolve the fluorescent Gag-containing structures within the VCC. We found that small punctate fluorescent signals correlated with single viral particles in enclosed vesicular compartments or surface-localized virus particles and that large fluorescent signals correlated with membranous Gag-containing structures with unknown pathological function. CLEM imaging revealed distinct pools of newly deposited viral proteins within endocytic and nonendocytic compartments in VS target T cells. IMPORTANCE This study directly correlates individual virus-associated objects observed in light microscopy with ultrastructural features seen by electron microscopy in the HIV-1 virological synapse. This approach elucidates which infection-associated ultrastructural features represent bona fide HIV protein complexes. We define the morphology of some HIV cell-to-cell transfer intermediates as true endocytic compartments and resolve unique synapse-associated viral structures created by transfer across virological synapses. PMID:27847357

  7. Unjuk Kerja Catu Daya 12 Volt 2a Dengan Pass Element Transistor Npn Dan Pnp

    OpenAIRE

    Fathoni, Fathoni

    2010-01-01

    Transistor pelewat (pass element transistor) yang dipasang pada rangkain catu daya yang menggunakan IC regulator 3 terminal adalah untuk booster arus output. Ada dua cara pemasangan transistor pelewat yang umum digunakan, yaitu dengan transistor pnp dan npn. Transistor pnp dipasang dengan basis transistor yang terhubung pada input IC regulator sedangkan transistor npn dipasang dengan basis transistor yang terhubung pada output IC regulator.Untuk mengetahui unjuk kerja dari kedua ...

  8. Effects of curcumin on synapses in APPswe/PS1dE9 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yingkun; Wang, Pengwen; Wei, Peng; Feng, Huili; Ren, Ying; Yang, Jinduo; Rao, Yingxue; Shi, Jing; Tian, Jinzhou

    2016-06-01

    Significant losses of synapses have been demonstrated in studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but structural and functional changes in synapses that depend on alterations of the postsynaptic density (PSD) area occur prior to synaptic loss and play a crucial role in the pathology of AD. Evidence suggests that curcumin can ameliorate the learning and memory deficits of AD. To investigate the effects of curcumin on synapses, APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice (an AD model) were used, and the ultra-structures of synapses and synapse-associated proteins were observed. Six months after administration, few abnormal synapses were observed upon electron microscopy in the hippocampal CA1 areas of the APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice. The treatment of the mice with curcumin resulted in improvements in the quantity and structure of the synapses. Immunohistochemistry and western blot analyses revealed that the expressions of PSD95 and Shank1 were reduced in the hippocampal CA1 areas of the APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice, but curcumin treatment increased the expressions of these proteins. Our findings suggest that curcumin improved the structure and function of the synapses by regulating the synapse-related proteins PSD95 and Shank1. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Mammalian Cochlear Hair Cell Regeneration and Ribbon Synapse Reformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair cells (HCs are the sensory preceptor cells in the inner ear, which play an important role in hearing and balance. The HCs of organ of Corti are susceptible to noise, ototoxic drugs, and infections, thus resulting in permanent hearing loss. Recent approaches of HCs regeneration provide new directions for finding the treatment of sensor neural deafness. To have normal hearing function, the regenerated HCs must be reinnervated by nerve fibers and reform ribbon synapse with the dendrite of spiral ganglion neuron through nerve regeneration. In this review, we discuss the research progress in HC regeneration, the synaptic plasticity, and the reinnervation of new regenerated HCs in mammalian inner ear.

  10. Development of solution-gated graphene transistor model for biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Hediyeh; Yusof, Rubiyah; Rahmani, Rasoul; Hosseinpour, Hoda; Ahmadi, Mohammad T.

    2014-02-01

    The distinctive properties of graphene, characterized by its high carrier mobility and biocompatibility, have stimulated extreme scientific interest as a promising nanomaterial for future nanoelectronic applications. In particular, graphene-based transistors have been developed rapidly and are considered as an option for DNA sensing applications. Recent findings in the field of DNA biosensors have led to a renewed interest in the identification of genetic risk factors associated with complex human diseases for diagnosis of cancers or hereditary diseases. In this paper, an analytical model of graphene-based solution gated field effect transistors (SGFET) is proposed to constitute an important step towards development of DNA biosensors with high sensitivity and selectivity. Inspired by this fact, a novel strategy for a DNA sensor model with capability of single-nucleotide polymorphism detection is proposed and extensively explained. First of all, graphene-based DNA sensor model is optimized using particle swarm optimization algorithm. Based on the sensing mechanism of DNA sensors, detective parameters ( I ds and V gmin) are suggested to facilitate the decision making process. Finally, the behaviour of graphene-based SGFET is predicted in the presence of single-nucleotide polymorphism with an accuracy of more than 98% which guarantees the reliability of the optimized model for any application of the graphene-based DNA sensor. It is expected to achieve the rapid, quick and economical detection of DNA hybridization which could speed up the realization of the next generation of the homecare sensor system.

  11. Ionic PN and PNP junctions -- Diodes and Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Eric; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Apel, Pavel; Siwy, Zuzanna

    2008-03-01

    There are well-known devices for controlling the transport of electrons, but very few control ions in a solution. We have prepared ionic diodes and transistors that function in a similar manner to their semiconductor analogues. Ionic PN junctions were created by surface patterning single conical nanopores in polymer films, so that the pore walls are split into two sections: one with positive charge, and the other with negative. These diodes can achieve rectification degrees of several hundreds. Ionic PNP junctions were created by surface patterning single double-conical nanopores in polymer films with tip diameter between 2 and 6 nm, so that the pore walls are split into three sections: the two areas near the large pore openings which are positively charged, while the center of the pore, near the pore tip, is negatively charged. This device works in a similar fashion to a semiconducting BJT transistor, and we show that we can control the electric potential chemically in a manner sufficient to gate the ion current through the device.

  12. A compound memristive synapse model for statistical learning through STDP in spiking neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eBill

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Memristors have recently emerged as promising circuit elements to mimic the function of biological synapses in neuromorphic computing. The fabrication of reliable nanoscale memristive synapses, that feature continuous conductance changes based on the timing of pre- and postsynaptic spikes, has however turned out to be challenging. In this article, we propose an alternative approach, the compound memristive synapse, that circumvents this problem by the use of memristors with binary memristive states. A compound memristive synapse employs multiple bistable memristors in parallel to jointly form one synapse, thereby providing a spectrum of synaptic efficacies. We investigate the computational implications of synaptic plasticity in the compound synapse by integrating the recently observed phenomenon of stochastic filament formation into an abstract model of stochastic switching. Using this abstract model, we first show how standard pulsing schemes give rise to spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP with a stabilizing weight dependence in compound synapses. In a next step, we study unsupervised learning with compound synapses in networks of spiking neurons organized in a winner-take-all architecture. Our theoretical analysis reveals that compound-synapse STDP implements generalized Expectation-Maximization in the spiking network. Specifically, the emergent synapse configuration represents the most salient features of the input distribution in a Mixture-of-Gaussians generative model. Furthermore, the network’s spike response to spiking input streams approximates a well-defined Bayesian posterior distribution. We show in computer simulations how such networks learn to represent high-dimensional distributions over images of handwritten digits with high fidelity even in presence of substantial device variations and under severe noise conditions. Therefore, the compound memristive synapse may provide a synaptic design principle for future neuromorphic

  13. Jig protects transistors from heat while tinning leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, A. J.; Willis, G. A.

    1966-01-01

    In tinning transistor leads, an aluminum jig is used to dip the leads into the molten tin. The jigs mass shunts excess heat given off by the molten tin before it reaches and damages the transistor body.

  14. Ambipolar phosphorene field effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saptarshi; Demarteau, Marcel; Roelofs, Andreas

    2014-11-25

    In this article, we demonstrate enhanced electron and hole transport in few-layer phosphorene field effect transistors (FETs) using titanium as the source/drain contact electrode and 20 nm SiO2 as the back gate dielectric. The field effect mobility values were extracted to be ∼38 cm(2)/Vs for electrons and ∼172 cm(2)/Vs for the holes. On the basis of our experimental data, we also comprehensively discuss how the contact resistances arising due to the Schottky barriers at the source and the drain end effect the different regime of the device characteristics and ultimately limit the ON state performance. We also propose and implement a novel technique for extracting the transport gap as well as the Schottky barrier height at the metal-phosphorene contact interface from the ambipolar transfer characteristics of the phosphorene FETs. This robust technique is applicable to any ultrathin body semiconductor which demonstrates symmetric ambipolar conduction. Finally, we demonstrate a high gain, high noise margin, chemical doping free, and fully complementary logic inverter based on ambipolar phosphorene FETs.

  15. Organic tunnel field effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Tietze, Max Lutz

    2017-06-29

    Various examples are provided for organic tunnel field effect transistors (OTFET), and methods thereof. In one example, an OTFET includes a first intrinsic layer (i-layer) of organic semiconductor material disposed over a gate insulating layer; source (or drain) contact stacks disposed on portions of the first i-layer; a second i-layer of organic semiconductor material disposed on the first i-layer surrounding the source (or drain) contact stacks; an n-doped organic semiconductor layer disposed on the second i-layer; and a drain (or source) contact layer disposed on the n-doped organic semiconductor layer. The source (or drain) contact stacks can include a p-doped injection layer, a source (or drain) contact layer, and a contact insulating layer. In another example, a method includes disposing a first i-layer over a gate insulating layer; forming source or drain contact stacks; and disposing a second i-layer, an n-doped organic semiconductor layer, and a drain or source contact.

  16. Ambipolar Phosphorene Field Effect Transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Saptarshi [Center for Nanoscale Material and ‡Division of High Energy Physics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Demarteau, Marcel [Center for Nanoscale Material and ‡Division of High Energy Physics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Roelofs, Andreas [Center for Nanoscale Material and ‡Division of High Energy Physics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States

    2014-10-23

    Two dimensional materials provide an intriguing platform to investigate rich physical phenomena which could ultimately lead to the development of innovative nanotechnologies (1-17). Semiconducting black phosphorous (BP) with high carrier mobility (18-20), anisotropic transport (21, 22) and tunable bandgap (23, 24) is the most recent addition to this exotic class of two dimensional materials. In this article we experimentally demonstrate room temperature quasi ballistic transport of both holes and electrons in ionic liquid gated black phosphorous (BP) field effect transistors (FET) with sub-100nm channel length. The carrier mean free path (mfp) was found to be 15nm for the holes and 5nm for the electrons. By improving the carrier injection through superior electrostatic gate control (EOT=1.5nm), highly symmetric ambipolar conduction with record high hole current of ~0.78mA/µm and electron current of ~0.68mA/µm are achieved for VDD=0.2V. The extracted record low contact resistance of 220Ω-µm is similar to the state of the art Si technology. This is also the best contact resistance value achieved for any two dimensional metal-semiconductor interfaces. Finally, we provide an analytical framework to compare the experimental results with ballistic simulations which includes quantum capacitance considerations.

  17. Power-law forgetting in synapses with metaplasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, A; Luck, J M

    2011-01-01

    The idea of using metaplastic synapses to incorporate the separate storage of long- and short-term memories via an array of hidden states was put forward in the cascade model of Fusi et al. In this paper, we devise and investigate two models of a metaplastic synapse based on these general principles. The main difference between the two models lies in their available mechanisms of decay, when a contrarian event occurs after the build-up of a long-term memory. In one case, this leads to the conversion of the long-term memory to a short-term memory of the opposite kind, while in the other, a long-term memory of the opposite kind may be generated as a result. Appropriately enough, the response of both models to short-term events is not affected by this difference in architecture. On the contrary, the transient response of both models, after long-term memories have been created by the passage of sustained signals, is rather different. The asymptotic behaviour of both models is, however, characterised by power-law forgetting with the same universal exponent

  18. A Reinforcement Learning Framework for Spiking Networks with Dynamic Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim El-Laithy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An integration of both the Hebbian-based and reinforcement learning (RL rules is presented for dynamic synapses. The proposed framework permits the Hebbian rule to update the hidden synaptic model parameters regulating the synaptic response rather than the synaptic weights. This is performed using both the value and the sign of the temporal difference in the reward signal after each trial. Applying this framework, a spiking network with spike-timing-dependent synapses is tested to learn the exclusive-OR computation on a temporally coded basis. Reward values are calculated with the distance between the output spike train of the network and a reference target one. Results show that the network is able to capture the required dynamics and that the proposed framework can reveal indeed an integrated version of Hebbian and RL. The proposed framework is tractable and less computationally expensive. The framework is applicable to a wide class of synaptic models and is not restricted to the used neural representation. This generality, along with the reported results, supports adopting the introduced approach to benefit from the biologically plausible synaptic models in a wide range of intuitive signal processing.

  19. Positioning of AMPA Receptor-Containing Endosomes Regulates Synapse Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Esteves da Silva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lateral diffusion in the membrane and endosomal trafficking both contribute to the addition and removal of AMPA receptors (AMPARs at postsynaptic sites. However, the spatial coordination between these mechanisms has remained unclear, because little is known about the dynamics of AMPAR-containing endosomes. In addition, how the positioning of AMPAR-containing endosomes affects synapse organization and functioning has never been directly explored. Here, we used live-cell imaging in hippocampal neuron cultures to show that intracellular AMPARs are transported in Rab11-positive recycling endosomes, which frequently enter dendritic spines and depend on the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton. By using chemically induced dimerization systems to recruit kinesin (KIF1C or myosin (MyosinV/VI motors to Rab11-positive recycling endosomes, we controlled their trafficking and found that induced removal of recycling endosomes from spines decreases surface AMPAR expression and PSD-95 clusters at synapses. Our data suggest a mechanistic link between endosome positioning and postsynaptic structure and composition.

  20. Hafnium transistor design for neural interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, David W; Basham, Eric J

    2008-01-01

    A design methodology is presented that uses the EKV model and the g(m)/I(D) biasing technique to design hafnium oxide field effect transistors that are suitable for neural recording circuitry. The DC gain of a common source amplifier is correlated to the structural properties of a Field Effect Transistor (FET) and a Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) capacitor. This approach allows a transistor designer to use a design flow that starts with simple and intuitive 1-D equations for gain that can be verified in 1-D MIS capacitor TCAD simulations, before final TCAD process verification of transistor properties. The DC gain of a common source amplifier is optimized by using fast 1-D simulations and using slower, complex 2-D simulations only for verification. The 1-D equations are used to show that the increased dielectric constant of hafnium oxide allows a higher DC gain for a given oxide thickness. An additional benefit is that the MIS capacitor can be employed to test additional performance parameters important to an open gate transistor such as dielectric stability and ionic penetration.

  1. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-11-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices.

  2. Two transistor cluster DICE Cells with the minimum area for a hardened 28-nm CMOS and 65-nm SRAM layout design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenin, V.Ya.; Stepanov, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    A hardened DICE cell layout design is based on the two spaced transistor clusters of the DICE cell each consisting of four transistors. The larger the distance between these two CMOS transistor clusters, the more robust the hardened DICE SRAM to Single Event Upsets. Some versions of the 28-nm and 65-nm DICE CMOS SRAM block composition have been suggested with minimum cluster distances of 2.27-2.32 mkm. The area of hardened 28-nm DICE CMOS cells is larger than the area of 28-nm 6T CMOS cells by a factor of 2.1 [ru

  3. Sniff-Like Patterned Input Results in Long-Term Plasticity at the Rat Olfactory Bulb Mitral and Tufted Cell to Granule Cell Synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahua Chatterjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During odor sensing the activity of principal neurons of the mammalian olfactory bulb, the mitral and tufted cells (MTCs, occurs in repetitive bursts that are synchronized to respiration, reminiscent of hippocampal theta-gamma coupling. Axonless granule cells (GCs mediate self- and lateral inhibitory interactions between the excitatory MTCs via reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses. We have explored long-term plasticity at this synapse by using a theta burst stimulation (TBS protocol and variations thereof. GCs were excited via glomerular stimulation in acute brain slices. We find that TBS induces exclusively long-term depression in the majority of experiments, whereas single bursts (“single-sniff paradigm” can elicit both long-term potentiation and depression. Statistical analysis predicts that the mechanism underlying this bidirectional plasticity involves the proportional addition or removal of presynaptic release sites. Gamma stimulation with the same number of APs as in TBS was less efficient in inducing plasticity. Both TBS- and “single-sniff paradigm”-induced plasticity depend on NMDA receptor activation. Since the onset of plasticity is very rapid and requires little extra activity, we propose that these forms of plasticity might play a role already during an ongoing search for odor sources. Our results imply that components of both short-term and long-term olfactory memory may be encoded at this synapse.

  4. Discrete transistor measuring and matching using a solid core oven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkinen, M; Mäkelä, K; Vuorela, T; Palovuori, K

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents transistor measurements done at a constant temperature. The aim in this research was to develop a reliable and repeatable method for measuring and searching transistor pairs with similar parameters, as in certain applications it is advantageous to use transistors from the same production batch due to the significant variability in batches from different manufacturers. Transistor manufacturing methods are well established, but due to the large variability in tolerance, not even transistors from the same manufacturing batch have identical properties. Transistors' electrical properties are also strongly temperature-dependent. Therefore, when measuring transistor properties, the temperature must be kept constant. For the measurement process, a solid-core oven providing stable temperature was implemented. In the oven, the base-to-emitter voltage (VBE) and DC-current gain (β) of 32 transistors could be measured simultaneously. The oven's temperature was controlled with a programmable thermostat, which allowed accurate constant temperature operation. The oven is formed by a large metal block with an individual chamber for each transistor to be measured. Isolation of individual transistors and the highly thermally conductive metal core structure prevent thermal coupling between transistors. The oven enables repeatable measurements, and thus measurements between different batches are comparable. In this research study, the properties of over 5000 transistors were measured and the variance of the aforementioned properties was analyzed.

  5. Bipolar-FET combinational power transistors for power conversion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D. Y.; Chin, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    Four bipolar-FET (field-effect transistor) combinational transistor configurations are compared from the application point of view. The configurations included are FET-Darlington (cascade), emitter-open switch (cascode), parallel configuration, and FET-gated bipolar transistors (FGT).

  6. Stretchable transistors with buckled carbon nanotube films as conducting channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Michael S; Xu, Feng

    2015-03-24

    Thin-film transistors comprising buckled films comprising carbon nanotubes as the conductive channel are provided. Also provided are methods of fabricating the transistors. The transistors, which are highly stretchable and bendable, exhibit stable performance even when operated under high tensile strains.

  7. The boost transistor: a field plate controlled LDMOST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrara, A.; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Boksteen, B.K.; Hueting, Raymond Josephus Engelbart; Steeneken, P.G.; Heringa, A.; Claes, J.; van der Wel, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a new device: the boost transistor. The boost transistor is an LDMOS transistor that is controlled by a separate field plate boost electrode that reduces the specific on-resistance RonA. By applying a positive voltage Vboost, this electrode creates an accumulation layer in

  8. Autism-Associated Chromatin Regulator Brg1/SmarcA4 Is Required for Synapse Development and Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2-Mediated Synapse Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zilai; Cao, Mou; Chang, Chia-Wei; Wang, Cindy; Shi, Xuanming; Zhan, Xiaoming; Birnbaum, Shari G; Bezprozvanny, Ilya; Huber, Kimberly M; Wu, Jiang I

    2016-01-01

    Synapse development requires normal neuronal activities and the precise expression of synapse-related genes. Dysregulation of synaptic genes results in neurological diseases such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Mutations in genes encoding chromatin-remodeling factor Brg1/SmarcA4 and its associated proteins are the genetic causes of several developmental diseases with neurological defects and autistic symptoms. Recent large-scale genomic studies predicted Brg1/SmarcA4 as one of the key nodes of the ASD gene network. We report that Brg1 deletion in early postnatal hippocampal neurons led to reduced dendritic spine density and maturation and impaired synapse activities. In developing mice, neuronal Brg1 deletion caused severe neurological defects. Gene expression analyses indicated that Brg1 regulates a significant number of genes known to be involved in synapse function and implicated in ASD. We found that Brg1 is required for dendritic spine/synapse elimination mediated by the ASD-associated transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) and that Brg1 regulates the activity-induced expression of a specific subset of genes that overlap significantly with the targets of MEF2. Our analyses showed that Brg1 interacts with MEF2 and that MEF2 is required for Brg1 recruitment to target genes in response to neuron activation. Thus, Brg1 plays important roles in both synapse development/maturation and MEF2-mediated synapse remodeling. Our study reveals specific functions of the epigenetic regulator Brg1 in synapse development and provides insights into its role in neurological diseases such as ASD. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. NKp46 clusters at the immune synapse and regulates NK cell polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzi eHadad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells play an important role in first-line defense against tumor and virus-infected cells. The activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by a repertoire of cell-surface expressed inhibitory and activating receptors. NKp46 is a major NK cell activating receptor that is involved in the elimination of target cells. NK cells form different types of synapses that result in distinct functional outcomes: cytotoxic, inhibitory, and regulatory. Recent studies revealed that complex integration of NK receptor signaling controls cytoskeletal rearrangement and other immune synapse-related events. However the distinct nature by which NKp46 participates in NK immunological synapse formation and function remains unknown. In this study we determined that NKp46 forms microclusters structures at the immune synapse between NK cells and target cells. Over-expression of human NKp46 is correlated with increased accumulation of F-actin mesh at the immune synapse. Concordantly, knock-down of NKp46 in primary human NK cells decreased recruitment of F-actin to the synapse. Live cell imaging experiments showed a linear correlation between NKp46 expression and lytic granules polarization to the immune synapse. Taken together, our data suggest that NKp46 signaling directly regulates the NK lytic immune synapse from early formation to late function.

  10. Flexible three-dimensional artificial synapse networks with correlated learning and trainable memory capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chaoxing; Kim, Tae Whan; Choi, Hwan Young; Strukov, Dmitri B; Yang, J Joshua

    2017-09-29

    If a three-dimensional physical electronic system emulating synapse networks could be built, that would be a significant step toward neuromorphic computing. However, the fabrication complexity of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor architectures impedes the achievement of three-dimensional interconnectivity, high-device density, or flexibility. Here we report flexible three-dimensional artificial chemical synapse networks, in which two-terminal memristive devices, namely, electronic synapses (e-synapses), are connected by vertically stacking crossbar electrodes. The e-synapses resemble the key features of biological synapses: unilateral connection, long-term potentiation/depression, a spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule, paired-pulse facilitation, and ultralow-power consumption. The three-dimensional artificial synapse networks enable a direct emulation of correlated learning and trainable memory capability with strong tolerances to input faults and variations, which shows the feasibility of using them in futuristic electronic devices and can provide a physical platform for the realization of smart memories and machine learning and for operation of the complex algorithms involving hierarchical neural networks.High-density information storage calls for the development of modern electronics with multiple stacking architectures that increase the complexity of three-dimensional interconnectivity. Here, Wu et al. build a stacked yet flexible artificial synapse network using layer-by-layer solution processing.

  11. Slowing DNA Translocation in a Nanofluidic Field-Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifan; Yobas, Levent

    2016-04-26

    Here, we present an experimental demonstration of slowing DNA translocation across a nanochannel by modulating the channel surface charge through an externally applied gate bias. The experiments were performed on a nanofluidic field-effect transistor, which is a monolithic integrated platform featuring a 50 nm-diameter in-plane alumina nanocapillary whose entire length is surrounded by a gate electrode. The field-effect transistor behavior was validated on the gating of ionic conductance and protein transport. The gating of DNA translocation was subsequently studied by measuring discrete current dips associated with single λ-DNA translocation events under a source-to-drain bias of 1 V. The translocation speeds under various gate bias conditions were extracted by fitting event histograms of the measured translocation time to the first passage time distributions obtained from a simple 1D biased diffusion model. A positive gate bias was observed to slow the translocation of single λ-DNA chains markedly; the translocation speed was reduced by an order of magnitude from 18.4 mm/s obtained under a floating gate down to 1.33 mm/s under a positive gate bias of 9 V. Therefore, a dynamic and flexible regulation of the DNA translocation speed, which is vital for single-molecule sequencing, can be achieved on this device by simply tuning the gate bias. The device is realized in a conventional semiconductor microfabrication process without the requirement of advanced lithography, and can be potentially further developed into a compact electronic single-molecule sequencer.

  12. Molecular thermal transistor: Dimension analysis and mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnia, S.; Panahinia, R.

    2018-04-01

    Recently, large challenge has been spent to realize high efficient thermal transistors. Outstanding properties of DNA make it as an excellent nano material in future technologies. In this paper, we introduced a high efficient DNA based thermal transistor. The thermal transistor operates when the system shows an increase in the thermal flux despite of decreasing temperature gradient. This is what called as negative differential thermal resistance (NDTR). Based on multifractal analysis, we could distinguish regions with NDTR state from non-NDTR state. Moreover, Based on dimension spectrum of the system, it is detected that NDTR state is accompanied by ballistic transport regime. The generalized correlation sum (analogous to specific heat) shows that an irregular decrease in the specific heat induces an increase in the mean free path (mfp) of phonons. This leads to the occurrence of NDTR.

  13. Fundamentals of nanoscaled field effect transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhry, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Fundamentals of Nanoscaled Field Effect Transistors gives comprehensive coverage of the fundamental physical principles and theory behind nanoscale transistors. The specific issues that arise for nanoscale MOSFETs, such as quantum mechanical tunneling and inversion layer quantization, are fully explored. The solutions to these issues, such as high-κ technology, strained-Si technology, alternate devices structures and graphene technology are also given. Some case studies regarding the above issues and solution are also given in the book. In summary, this book: Covers the fundamental principles behind nanoelectronics/microelectronics Includes chapters devoted to solutions tackling the quantum mechanical effects occurring at nanoscale Provides some case studies to understand the issue mathematically Fundamentals of Nanoscaled Field Effect Transistors is an ideal book for researchers and undergraduate and graduate students in the field of microelectronics, nanoelectronics, and electronics.

  14. The debate on the kiss-and-run fusion at synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liming; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2007-09-01

    It has long been proposed that following vesicle fusion, a small pore might open and close rapidly without full dilation. Such 'kiss-and-run' vesicle fusion can in principle result in rapid vesicle recycling and influence the size and the kinetics of the resulting synaptic current. However, the existence of kiss-and-run remains highly controversial, as revealed by recent imaging and electrophysiological studies at several synapses, including hippocampal synapses, neuromuscular junctions and retinal bipolar synapses. Only a minor fraction of fusion events has been shown to be kiss-and-run, as determined using cell-attached capacitance recordings in endocrine cells, pituitary nerve terminals and calyx-type synapses. Further work is needed to determine whether kiss-and-run is a major mode of fusion and has a major role in controlling synaptic strength at synapses.

  15. Silent Synapses Speak Up: Updates of the Neural Rejuvenation Hypothesis of Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanhua H; Schlüter, Oliver M; Dong, Yan

    2015-10-01

    A transient but prominent increase in the level of "silent synapses"--a signature of immature glutamatergic synapses that contain only NMDA receptors without stably expressed AMPA receptors--has been identified in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following exposure to cocaine. As the NAc is a critical forebrain region implicated in forming addiction-associated behaviors, the initial discoveries have raised speculations about whether and how these drug-induced synapses mature and potentially contribute to addiction-related behaviors. Here, we summarize recent progress in recognizing the pathway-specific regulations of silent synapse maturation, and its diverse impacts on behavior. We provide an update of the guiding hypothesis--the "neural rejuvenation hypothesis"--with recently emerged evidence of silent synapses in cocaine craving and relapse. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Transistor Small Signal Analysis under Radiation Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharshar, K.A.A.

    2004-01-01

    A Small signal transistor parameters dedicate the operation of bipolar transistor before and after exposed to gamma radiation (1 Mrad up to 5 Mrads) and electron beam(1 MeV, 25 mA) with the same doses as a radiation sources, the electrical parameters of the device are changed. The circuit Model has been discussed.Parameters, such as internal emitter resistance (re), internal base resistance, internal collector resistance (re), emitter base photocurrent (Ippe) and base collector photocurrent (Ippe). These parameters affect on the operation of the device in its applications, which work as an effective element, such as current gain (hFE≡β)degradation it's and effective parameter in the device operation. Also the leakage currents (IcBO) and (IEBO) are most important parameters, Which increased with radiation doses. Theoretical representation of the change in the equivalent circuit for NPN and PNP bipolar transistor were discussed, the input and output parameters of the two types were discussed due to the change in small signal input resistance of the two types. The emitter resistance(re) were changed by the effect of gamma and electron beam irradiation, which makes a change in the role of matching impedances between transistor stages. Also the transistor stability factors S(Ico), S(VBE) and S(β are detected to indicate the transistor operations after exposed to radiation fields. In low doses the gain stability is modified due to recombination of induced charge generated during device fabrication. Also the load resistance values are connected to compensate the effect

  17. Three-dimensional distribution of cortical synapses: a replicated point pattern-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAnton-Sanchez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The biggest problem when analyzing the brain is that its synaptic connections are extremely complex. Generally, the billions of neurons making up the brain exchange information through two types of highly specialized structures: chemical synapses (the vast majority and so-called gap junctions (a substrate of one class of electrical synapse. Here we are interested in exploring the three-dimensional spatial distribution of chemical synapses in the cerebral cortex. Recent research has showed that the three-dimensional spatial distribution of synapses in layer III of the neocortex can be modeled by a random sequential adsorption (RSA point process, i.e., synapses are distributed in space almost randomly, with the only constraint that they cannot overlap. In this study we hypothesize that RSA processes can also explain the distribution of synapses in all cortical layers. We also investigate whether there are differences in both the synaptic density and spatial distribution of synapses between layers. Using combined focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM, we obtained three-dimensional samples from the six layers of the rat somatosensory cortex and identified and reconstructed the synaptic junctions. A total volume of tissue of approximately 4500 μm3 and around 4000 synapses from three different animals were analyzed. Different samples, layers and/or animals were aggregated and compared using RSA replicated spatial point processes. The results showed no significant differences in the synaptic distribution across the different rats used in the study. We found that RSA processes described the spatial distribution of synapses in all samples of each layer. We also found that the synaptic distribution in layers II to VI conforms to a common underlying RSA process with different densities per layer. Interestingly, the results showed that synapses in layer I had a slightly different spatial distribution from the other layers.

  18. Lateral and Vertical Organic Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shadeedi, Akram

    An extensive study has been performed to provide a better understanding of the operation principles of doped organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), organic p-i-n diodes, Schottky diodes, and organic permeable base transistors (OPBTs). This has been accomplished by a combination of electrical and structural characterization of these devices. The discussion of doped OFETs focuses on the shift of the threshold voltage due to increased doping concentrations and the generation and transport of minority charge carriers. Doping of pentacene OFETs is achieved by co-evaporation of pentacene with the n-dopant W2(hpp)4. It is found that pentacene thin film are efficiently doped and that a conductivity in the range of 2.6 x 10-6 S cm-1 for 1 wt% to 2.5 x 10-4 S cm-1 for 16 wt% is reached. It is shown that n-doped OFET consisting of an n-doped channel and n-doped contacts are ambipolar. This behavior is surprising, as n-doping the contacts should suppress direct injection of minority charge carriers (holes). It was proposed that minority charge carrier injection and hence the ambipolar characteristic of n-doped OFETs can be explained by Zener tunneling inside the intrinsic pentacene layer underneath the drain electrode. It is shown that the electric field in this layer is indeed in the range of the breakdown field of pentacene based p-i-n Zener homodiodes. Doping the channel has a profound influence on the onset voltage of minority (hole) conduction. The onset voltage can be shifted by lightly n-doping the channel. The shift of onset voltage can be explained by two mechanisms: first, due to a larger voltage that has to be applied to the gate in order to fully deplete the n-doped layer. Second, it can be attributed to an increase in hole trapping by inactive dopants. Moreover, it has been shown that the threshold voltage of majority (electron) conduction is shifted by an increase in the doping concentration, and that the ambipolar OFETs can be turned into unipolar OFETs at

  19. Static Characteristics of the Ferroelectric Transistor Inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cody; Laws, crystal; MacLeond, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    The inverter is one of the most fundamental building blocks of digital logic, and it can be used as the foundation for understanding more complex logic gates and circuits. This paper presents the characteristics of an inverter circuit using a ferroelectric field-effect transistor. The voltage transfer characteristics are analyzed with respect to varying parameters such as supply voltage, input voltage, and load resistance. The effects of the ferroelectric layer between the gate and semiconductor are examined, and comparisons are made between the inverters using ferroelectric transistors and those using traditional MOSFETs.

  20. Fundamentals of RF and microwave transistor amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Bahl, Inder J

    2009-01-01

    A Comprehensive and Up-to-Date Treatment of RF and Microwave Transistor Amplifiers This book provides state-of-the-art coverage of RF and microwave transistor amplifiers, including low-noise, narrowband, broadband, linear, high-power, high-efficiency, and high-voltage. Topics covered include modeling, analysis, design, packaging, and thermal and fabrication considerations. Through a unique integration of theory and practice, readers will learn to solve amplifier-related design problems ranging from matching networks to biasing and stability. More than 240 problems are included to help read

  1. Switching Characteristics of Ferroelectric Transistor Inverters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Crystal; Mitchell, Coey; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the switching characteristics of an inverter circuit using a ferroelectric field effect transistor, FeFET. The propagation delay time characteristics, phl and plh are presented along with the output voltage rise and fall times, rise and fall. The propagation delay is the time-delay between the V50% transitions of the input and output voltages. The rise and fall times are the times required for the output voltages to transition between the voltage levels V10% and V90%. Comparisons are made between the MOSFET inverter and the ferroelectric transistor inverter.

  2. Total Dose Effects in Conventional Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, A. H.; Swift, G. W.; Rax, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines various factors in bipolar device construction and design, and discusses their impact on radiation hardness. The intent of the paper is to improve understanding of the underlying mechanisms for practical devices without special test structures, and to provide (1) guidance in ways to select transistor designs that are more resistant to radiation damage, and (2) methods to estimate the maximum amount of damage that might be expected from a basic transistor design. The latter factor is extremely important in assessing the risk that future lots of devices will be substantially below design limits, which are usually based on test data for older devices.

  3. Graphene Field Effect Transistor for Radiation Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mary J. (Inventor); Chen, Zhihong (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a graphene field effect transistor-based radiation sensor for use in a variety of radiation detection applications, including manned spaceflight missions. The sensing mechanism of the radiation sensor is based on the high sensitivity of graphene in the local change of electric field that can result from the interaction of ionizing radiation with a gated undoped silicon absorber serving as the supporting substrate in the graphene field effect transistor. The radiation sensor has low power and high sensitivity, a flexible structure, and a wide temperature range, and can be used in a variety of applications, particularly in space missions for human exploration.

  4. VHDL simulation with access to transistor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J.

    1991-01-01

    Hardware description languages such as VHDL have evolved to aid in the design of systems with large numbers of elements and a wide range of electronic and logical abstractions. For high performance circuits, behavioral models may not be able to efficiently include enough detail to give designers confidence in a simulation's accuracy. One option is to provide a link between the VHDL environment and a transistor level simulation environment. The coupling of the Vantage Analysis Systems VHDL simulator and the NOVA simulator provides the combination of VHDL modeling and transistor modeling.

  5. Dielectric Engineered Tunnel Field-Effect Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Ilatikhameneh, Hesameddin; Ameen, Tarek A.; Klimeck, Gerhard; Appenzeller, Joerg; Rahman, Rajib

    2015-01-01

    The dielectric engineered tunnel field-effect transistor (DE-TFET) as a high performance steep transistor is proposed. In this device, a combination of high-k and low-k dielectrics results in a high electric field at the tunnel junction. As a result a record ON-current of about 1000 uA/um and a subthreshold swing (SS) below 20mV/dec are predicted for WTe2 DE-TFET. The proposed TFET works based on a homojunction channel and electrically doped contacts both of which are immune to interface stat...

  6. Constructing Diodes and Transistors for Ultracold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepino, Ronald; Cooper, John; Anderson, Dana; Holland, Murray

    2008-05-01

    The ultracold atom-optical analogy to electronic systems is presented, along with the master equation formalism that is applied to this novel physical context of system-reservoir interactions. The proposed formalism lends itself quite readily to not only the study of atomtronic systems, but also transport properties of ultracold atoms in optical lattices. We demonstrate how these systems can be configured so that they emulate the behavior of the electronic diode, field effect transistor (FET), and bipolar junction transistor (BJT). The behavior of simple logic gates: namely, the AND and OR gates are follow as direct consequences of the atomtronic BJTs.

  7. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2–mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  8. Electrical and noise characteristics of graphene field-effect transistors: ambient effects, noise sources and physical mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, S; Liu, G; Stillman, W; Shur, M; Balandin, A A

    2010-10-06

    We fabricated a large number of single and bilayer graphene transistors and carried out a systematic experimental study of their low-frequency noise characteristics. Special attention was given to determining the dominant noise sources in these devices and the effect of aging on the current-voltage and noise characteristics. The analysis of the noise spectral density dependence on the area of graphene channel showed that the dominant contributions to the low-frequency electronic noise come from the graphene layer itself rather than from the contacts. Aging of graphene transistors due to exposure to ambient conditions for over a month resulted in substantially increased noise, attributed to the decreasing mobility of graphene and increasing contact resistance. The noise spectral density in both single and bilayer graphene transistors either increased with deviation from the charge neutrality point or depended weakly on the gate bias. This observation confirms that the low-frequency noise characteristics of graphene transistors are qualitatively different from those of conventional silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors.

  9. Simple PC-based system for morphometric analysis of synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buravkov, S V

    1995-01-01

    The computer system designed for synaptic morphometry of aksosomatic and aksospine synapses of brain is described in the present paper. It is based on an AT-comparable personal computer equipped with low-cost frame grabber. This hardware configuration allows to input images from any TV source such as TV camera, videorecorder for further processing. The appropriate software was written in Microsoft Quick Basic to measure the main morphometric parameters of axon ending, dendritic spines, total contact, active zone and mitochondria. Number of synaptic vesicles (total and active) were also counted using a mouse as a pointing device. The derivative parameters (vesicle density, mitochondrial density) are then calculated. All measured data are stored in ASCII format, allowing ease in editing and export into other application programs. Statistical evaluation and calculation of histograms is performed by associated program also written in Quick Basic. The advantages and disadvantages of this approach are discussed.

  10. Tripartite synapses: astrocytes process and control synaptic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Gertrudis; Navarrete, Marta; Araque, Alfonso

    2009-08-01

    The term 'tripartite synapse' refers to a concept in synaptic physiology based on the demonstration of the existence of bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. Consistent with this concept, in addition to the classic 'bipartite' information flow between the pre- and postsynaptic neurons, astrocytes exchange information with the synaptic neuronal elements, responding to synaptic activity and, in turn, regulating synaptic transmission. Because recent evidence has demonstrated that astrocytes integrate and process synaptic information and control synaptic transmission and plasticity, astrocytes, being active partners in synaptic function, are cellular elements involved in the processing, transfer and storage of information by the nervous system. Consequently, in contrast to the classically accepted paradigm that brain function results exclusively from neuronal activity, there is an emerging view, which we review herein, in which brain function actually arises from the coordinated activity of a network comprising both neurons and glia.

  11. Coordinated Feeding Behavior in Trichoplax, an Animal without Synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn L Smith

    Full Text Available Trichoplax is a small disk-shaped marine metazoan that adheres to substrates and locomotes by ciliary gliding. Despite having only six cell types and lacking synapses Trichoplax coordinates a complex sequence of behaviors culminating in external digestion of algae. We combine live cell imaging with electron microscopy to show how this is accomplished. When Trichoplax glides over a patch of algae, its cilia stop beating so it ceases moving. A subset of one of the cell types, lipophils, simultaneously secretes granules whose content rapidly lyses algae. This secretion is accurately targeted, as only lipophils located near algae release granules. The animal pauses while the algal content is ingested, and then resumes gliding. Global control of gliding is coordinated with precise local control of lipophil secretion suggesting the presence of mechanisms for cellular communication and integration.

  12. Loss of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors in synapses of tonic firing substantia gelatinosa neurons in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yishen; Derkach, Victor A; Smith, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    Synapses transmitting nociceptive information in the spinal dorsal horn undergo enduring changes following peripheral nerve injury. Indeed, such injury alters the expression of the GluA2 subunit of glutamatergic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the substantia gelatinosa and this predicts altered channel conductance and calcium permeability, leading to an altered function of excitatory synapses. We therefore investigated the functional properties of synaptic AMPA receptors in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons following 10-20d chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve; a model of neuropathic pain. We measured their single-channel conductance and sensitivity to a blocker of calcium permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs), IEM1460 (50μM). In putative inhibitory, tonic firing neurons, CCI reduced the average single-channel conductance of synaptic AMPAR from 14.4±3.5pS (n=12) to 9.2±1.0pS (n=10, pinjury acting at synapses of inhibitory neurons to reduce their drive and therefore inhibitory tone in the spinal cord, therefore contributing to the central sensitization associated with neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Transistor-based particle detection systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ankit; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2015-06-09

    Transistor-based particle detection systems and methods may be configured to detect charged and non-charged particles. Such systems may include a supporting structure contacting a gate of a transistor and separating the gate from a dielectric of the transistor, and the transistor may have a near pull-in bias and a sub-threshold region bias to facilitate particle detection. The transistor may be configured to change current flow through the transistor in response to a change in stiffness of the gate caused by securing of a particle to the gate, and the transistor-based particle detection system may configured to detect the non-charged particle at least from the change in current flow.

  14. Design method for a digitally trimmable MOS transistor structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ning, Feng; Bruun, Erik

    1996-01-01

    A digitally trimmable MOS transistor is a MOS transistor consisting of a drain, a source, and a main gate as well as several subgates. The transconductance of the transistor is tunabledigitally by means of connecting subgates either to the main gate or to the source terminal. In this paper......, a systematic design method for a digitally trimmable MOS transistor structure is proposed. Using the proposed method, we have designed a digitally trimmable MOS transistor structure and prototype devices were fabricated in a 2.4 micron n-well CMOS technology. Through measurements on these devices, the design...... method has been experimentally confirmed. The trimmable MOS transistor structure has been applied to a high precision current mirror to reduce mismatch in the current mirror. With the trimmable transistor structure, the mismatch can be reduced by more than one order of magnitude....

  15. High mobility and quantum well transistors design and TCAD simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hellings, Geert

    2013-01-01

    For many decades, the semiconductor industry has miniaturized transistors, delivering increased computing power to consumers at decreased cost. However, mere transistor downsizing does no longer provide the same improvements. One interesting option to further improve transistor characteristics is to use high mobility materials such as germanium and III-V materials. However, transistors have to be redesigned in order to fully benefit from these alternative materials. High Mobility and Quantum Well Transistors: Design and TCAD Simulation investigates planar bulk Germanium pFET technology in chapters 2-4, focusing on both the fabrication of such a technology and on the process and electrical TCAD simulation. Furthermore, this book shows that Quantum Well based transistors can leverage the benefits of these alternative materials, since they confine the charge carriers to the high-mobility material using a heterostructure. The design and fabrication of one particular transistor structure - the SiGe Implant-Free Qu...

  16. SiC Field Effect Transistor Technology Demonstrating Prolonged Stable Operation at 500 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Okojie, Robert S.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Meredith, Roger; Ferrier, Terry

    2006-01-01

    While there have been numerous reports of short-term transistor operation at 500 degree C or above, these devices have previously not demonstrated sufficient long-term operational durability at 500 degree C to be considered viable for most envisioned applications. This paper reports the development of Silicone Carbi field effect transistors capable of long-term electrical operation at 500 degree C. A 6H-SiC MESFET was packaged and subjected to continuous electrical operation while residing in a 500 degree C oven in oxidizing air atmosphere for over 2400 hours. The transistor gain, saturation current (IDSS), and on-resistance (RDS) changed by less than 20% from initial values throughout the duration of the biased 500 degree C test. Another high-temperature packaged 6H-SiC MESFET was employed to form a simple one-stage high-temperature low-frequency voltage amplifier. This single-stage common-source amplifier demonstrated stable continuous electrical operation (negligible changes to gain and operating biases) for over 600 hours while residing in a 500 degree C air ambient oven. In both cases, increased leakage from annealing of the Schottky gate-to-channel diode was the dominant transistor degradation mechanism that limited the duration of 500 degree C electrical operation.

  17. Extraction of mobility and Degradation coefficients in double gate junctionless transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneshwari, Y. V.; Kranti, Abhinav

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we use the modified McLarty function to understand and extract accumulation (μ acc) and bulk (μ bulk) mobility in Double Gate (DG) Junctionless (JL) MOSFETs over a wide range of doping concentration (N d) and temperature range (250 K to 520 K). The approach enables the estimation of mobility and its attenuation factors (θ 1 and θ 2) by a single method. The extracted results indicate that μ acc can reach higher values than μ bulk due to the screening effect. Results also show that θ 2 extracted in the accumulation regime of JL transistors exhibit relatively low values in comparison to inversion and accumulation mode devices. It is shown that the attenuation factor (θ 1) in JL devices designed with higher N d (≥1019 cm‑3) is mainly affected by series resistance (R sd) whereas, in inversion mode (IM) and Accumulation mode (AM) devices, θ 1 factor is governed by both the intrinsic mobility reduction factor (θ 10) and R sd. Additionally, the impact of variation in oxide thickness (T ox), gate length (L g), N d and temperature on θ 1 and θ 2 has been investigated for JL transistor. The weak dependence of μ bulk and μ acc on temperature shows the prevalence of coulomb scattering over phonon scattering for heavily doped JL transistors. The work provides insights into different modes of operation, extraction of mobility and attenuation factors which will be useful for the development of compact models for JL transistors.

  18. Impact of barrier thickness on transistor performance in AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors grown on free-standing GaN substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, David A.; Storm, David F.; Meyer, David J.; Bass, Robert; Binari, Steven C.; Gougousi, Theodosia; Evans, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    A series of six ultrathin AlN/GaN heterostructures with varied AlN thicknesses from 1.5–6 nm have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on free-standing hydride vapor phase epitaxy GaN substrates. High electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were fabricated from the set in order to assess the impact of barrier thickness and homo-epitaxial growth on transistor performance. Room temperature Hall characteristics revealed mobility of 1700 cm 2 /V s and sheet resistance of 130 Ω/□ for a 3 nm thick barrier, ranking amongst the lowest room-temperature sheet resistance values reported for a polarization-doped single heterostructure in the III-Nitride family. DC and small signal HEMT electrical characteristics from submicron gate length HEMTs further elucidated the effect of the AlN barrier thickness on device performance.

  19. Impact of barrier thickness on transistor performance in AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors grown on free-standing GaN substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deen, David A., E-mail: david.deen@alumni.nd.edu; Storm, David F.; Meyer, David J.; Bass, Robert; Binari, Steven C. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5347 (United States); Gougousi, Theodosia [Physics Department, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Evans, Keith R. [Kyma Technologies, Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A series of six ultrathin AlN/GaN heterostructures with varied AlN thicknesses from 1.5–6 nm have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on free-standing hydride vapor phase epitaxy GaN substrates. High electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were fabricated from the set in order to assess the impact of barrier thickness and homo-epitaxial growth on transistor performance. Room temperature Hall characteristics revealed mobility of 1700 cm{sup 2}/V s and sheet resistance of 130 Ω/□ for a 3 nm thick barrier, ranking amongst the lowest room-temperature sheet resistance values reported for a polarization-doped single heterostructure in the III-Nitride family. DC and small signal HEMT electrical characteristics from submicron gate length HEMTs further elucidated the effect of the AlN barrier thickness on device performance.

  20. Assessment of Phospohrene Field Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-28

    Promising transistors based on a few layers of phosphorus atoms," in IEEE MTT-5 IMWS- AMP , Suzhou, China, Jul. 2015, pp. 1-3. DOI: 10.1109/LED...2014.2362841. DOI: 10.1109/IMWS- AMP .2015.7324944. Keywords: Contacts, dielectric films, MOSFETs, passivation, stability. [5] X. Luo, K. Xiong, J.C. M. Hwang, Y

  1. Thermal transistor utilizing gas-liquid transition

    KAUST Repository

    Komatsu, Teruhisa S.

    2011-01-25

    We propose a simple thermal transistor, a device to control heat current. In order to effectively change the current, we utilize the gas-liquid transition of the heat-conducting medium (fluid) because the gas region can act as a good thermal insulator. The three terminals of the transistor are located at both ends and the center of the system, and are put into contact with distinct heat baths. The key idea is a special arrangement of the three terminals. The temperature at one end (the gate temperature) is used as an input signal to control the heat current between the center (source, hot) and another end (drain, cold). Simulating the nanoscale systems of this transistor, control of heat current is demonstrated. The heat current is effectively cut off when the gate temperature is cold and it flows normally when it is hot. By using an extended version of this transistor, we also simulate a primitive application for an inverter. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  2. Modelling and characterisation of transistors | Akande | Global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Models and characterisation of active devices that control the flow of energy operating within and outside the active region of the operating domain are presented. Specifically, the incremental charge carrier and Ebers Moll models of the bipolar junction transistor are presented and the parameters of electrical behaviour of ...

  3. Radiation Damage In Advanced Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoutendyk, John A.; Goben, Charles A.; Berndt, Dale F.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes measurements of common-emitter current gains (hFE) of advanced bipolar silicon transistors before, during, and after irradiation with 275-MeV bromine ions, 2.5-MeV electrons, and conductivity rays from cobalt-60 atoms.

  4. Advancement in organic nanofiber based transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Baunegaard With; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Tavares, Luciana

    The focus of this project is to study the light emission from nanofiber based organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs) with the overall aim of developing efficient, nanoscale light sources with different colors integrated on-chip. The research performed here regards the fabrication and characte...

  5. A ferroelectric transparent thin-film transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, MWJ; GrosseHolz, KO; Muller, G; Cillessen, JFM; Giesbers, JB; Weening, RP; Wolf, RM

    1996-01-01

    Operation is demonstrated of a field-effect transistor made of transparant oxidic thin films, showing an intrinsic memory function due to the usage of a ferroelectric insulator. The device consists of a high mobility Sb-doped n-type SnO2 semiconductor layer, PbZr0.2Ti0.8Os3 as a ferroelectric

  6. Series transistors isolate amplifier from flyback voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, W.

    1967-01-01

    Circuit enables high sawtooth currents to be passed through a deflection coil and isolate the coil driving amplifier from the flyback voltage. It incorporates a switch consisting of transistors in series with the driving amplifier and deflection coil. The switch disconnects the deflection coil from the amplifier during the retrace time.

  7. Weighted Synapses Without Carry Operations for RRAM-Based Neuromorphic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yan; Deng, Ning; Wu, Huaqiang; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Qingtian; Qian, He

    2018-01-01

    The parallel updating scheme of RRAM-based analog neuromorphic systems based on sign stochastic gradient descent (SGD) can dramatically accelerate the training of neural networks. However, sign SGD can decrease accuracy. Also, some non-ideal factors of RRAM devices, such as intrinsic variations and the quantity of intermediate states, may significantly damage their convergence. In this paper, we analyzed the effects of these issues on the parallel updating scheme and found that it performed poorly on the task of MNIST recognition when the number of intermediate states was limited or the variation was too large. Thus, we propose a weighted synapse method to optimize the parallel updating scheme. Weighted synapses consist of major and minor synapses with different gain factors. Such a method can be widely used in RRAM-based analog neuromorphic systems to increase the number of equivalent intermediate states exponentially. The proposed method also generates a more suitable ΔW, diminishing the distortion caused by sign SGD. Unlike when several RRAM cells are combined to achieve higher resolution, there are no carry operations for weighted synapses, even if a saturation on the minor synapses occurs. The proposed method also simplifies the circuit overhead, rendering it highly suitable to the parallel updating scheme. With the aid of weighted synapses, convergence is highly optimized, and the error rate decreases significantly. Weighted synapses are also robust against the intrinsic variations of RRAM devices.

  8. From synapse to nucleus: calcium-dependent gene transcription in the control of synapse development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Paul L; Greenberg, Michael E

    2008-09-25

    One of the unique characteristics of higher organisms is their ability to learn and adapt to changes in their environment. This plasticity is largely a result of the brain's ability to convert transient stimuli into long-lasting alterations in neuronal structure and function. This process is complex and involves changes in receptor trafficking, local mRNA translation, protein turnover, and new gene synthesis. Here, we review how neuronal activity triggers calcium-dependent gene expression to regulate synapse development, maturation, and refinement. Interestingly, many components of the activity-dependent gene expression program are mutated in human cognitive disorders, which suggest that this program is essential for proper brain development and function.

  9. Formation of a Stable p-n Junction in a Liquid-Gated MoS2 Ambipolar Transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y. J.; Ye, J. T.; Yornogida, Y.; Takenobu, T.; Iwasa, Y.

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has gained attention because of its high mobility and circular dichroism. As a crucial step to merge these advantages into a single device, we present a method that electronically controls and locates p-n junctions in liquid-gated ambipolar MoS2 transistors. A

  10. Organic Field Effect Transistors Based on Graphene and Hexagonal Boron Nitride Heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Seok Ju; Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Yu, Young-Jun; Zhao, Yue; Kim, Bumjung; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Hone, James; Kim, Philip; Nuckolls, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing the device performance of single crystal organic field effect transistors (OFETs) requires both optimized engineering of efficient injection of the carriers through the contact and improvement of the dielectric interface for reduction of traps and scattering centers. Since the accumulation and flow of charge carriers in operating organic FETs takes place in the first few layers of the semiconductor next to the dielectric, the mobility can be easily degraded by surface roughness, cha...

  11. Organic Electrolyte Based Pulsed Nanoplating and Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Network Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myung Gil; Hwang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Tae Geun; Hwang, Jong Seung; Ahn, Doyeol; Whang, Dongmok; Hwang, Sung Woo

    2011-06-01

    The formation of gold nanocontacts was performed using a pulsed electrochemical plating technique. The effect of various plating variables on the surface roughness of the plated electrodes was studied in the high frequency regime where the reduction reaction of gold complex becomes the bottleneck process. We demonstrated the selective contact formation of single wall carbon nanotube network field effect transistors (FETs) with this technique. The fabricated FETs exhibit usual p-type behavior with the performance comparable to usual network FETs.

  12. Colloquium : Electronic transport in single-crystal organic transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gershenson, M.E.; Podzorov, V.; Morpurgo, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    Small-molecule organic semiconductors, together with polymers, form the basis for the emerging field of organic electronics. Despite the rapid technological progress in this area, our understanding of fundamental electronic properties of these materials remains limited. Recently developed organic

  13. Single Electron Transistor Platform for Microgravity Proteomics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II program builds from the successful Phase I efforts to demonstrate that Quantum Logic Devices' nanoelectronic platform for biological detection could...

  14. Single Electron Transistor Platform for Microgravity Proteomics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proteomic studies in microgravity are crucial to understanding the health effects of spaceflight on astronauts. Unfortunately, existing tools for measuring protein,...

  15. DNA looping by FokI: the impact of synapse geometry on loop topology at varied site orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusling, David A.; Laurens, Niels; Pernstich, Christian; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Halford, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    Most restriction endonucleases, including FokI, interact with two copies of their recognition sequence before cutting DNA. On DNA with two sites they act in cis looping out the intervening DNA. While many restriction enzymes operate symmetrically at palindromic sites, FokI acts asymmetrically at a non-palindromic site. The directionality of its sequence means that two FokI sites can be bridged in either parallel or anti-parallel alignments. Here we show by biochemical and single-molecule biophysical methods that FokI aligns two recognition sites on separate DNA molecules in parallel and that the parallel arrangement holds for sites in the same DNA regardless of whether they are in inverted or repeated orientations. The parallel arrangement dictates the topology of the loop trapped between sites in cis: the loop from inverted sites has a simple 180° bend, while that with repeated sites has a convoluted 360° turn. The ability of FokI to act at asymmetric sites thus enabled us to identify the synapse geometry for sites in trans and in cis, which in turn revealed the relationship between synapse geometry and loop topology. PMID:22362745

  16. Highly stable thin film transistors using multilayer channel structure

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pradipta K.

    2015-03-09

    We report highly stable gate-bias stress performance of thin film transistors (TFTs) using zinc oxide (ZnO)/hafnium oxide (HfO2) multilayer structure as the channel layer. Positive and negative gate-bias stress stability of the TFTs was measured at room temperature and at 60°C. A tremendous improvement in gate-bias stress stability was obtained in case of the TFT with multiple layers of ZnO embedded between HfO2 layers compared to the TFT with a single layer of ZnO as the semiconductor. The ultra-thin HfO2 layers act as passivation layers, which prevent the adsorption of oxygen and water molecules in the ZnO layer and hence significantly improve the gate-bias stress stability of ZnO TFTs.

  17. Dirac-Point Shift by Carrier Injection Barrier in Graphene Field-Effect Transistor Operation at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia; Alexander-Webber, Jack; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Sagade, Abhay A; Lu, Haichang; Hasko, David; Robertson, John; Hofmann, Stephan

    2018-03-21

    A positive shift in the Dirac point in graphene field-effect transistors was observed with Hall-effect measurements coupled with Kelvin-probe measurements at room temperature. This shift can be explained by the asymmetrical behavior of the contact resistance by virtue of the electron injection barrier at the source contact. As an outcome, an intrinsic resistance is given to allow a retrieval of an intrinsic carrier mobility found to be decreased with increasing gate bias, suggesting the dominance of short-range scattering in a single-layer graphene field-effect transistor. These results analytically correlate the field-effect parameters with intrinsic graphene properties.

  18. Etude, réalisation et caractérisation du transistor à ionisation par impact (I-MOS)

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    The impact ionization transistor (I-MOS) is a new architecture enabling subthreshold slope smaller than 60mV/dec at room temperature, which is the intrinsic limit of the MOSFET architecture. The I-MOS is composed of a PiN diode, whose intrinsic area is partially covered by a gate. The target of this thesis is the performance evaluation of this new transistor from the single device to the circuit, as a potential post CMOS candidate. This device has been studied by the mean of TCAD simulations ...

  19. Group IV nanotube transistors for next generation ubiquitous computing

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2014-06-04

    Evolution in transistor technology from increasingly large power consuming single gate planar devices to energy efficient multiple gate non-planar ultra-narrow (< 20 nm) fins has enhanced the scaling trend to facilitate doubling performance. However, this performance gain happens at the expense of arraying multiple devices (fins) per operation bit, due to their ultra-narrow dimensions (width) originated limited number of charges to induce appreciable amount of drive current. Additionally arraying degrades device off-state leakage and increases short channel characteristics, resulting in reduced chip level energy-efficiency. In this paper, a novel nanotube device (NTFET) topology based on conventional group IV (Si, SiGe) channel materials is discussed. This device utilizes a core/shell dual gate strategy to capitalize on the volume-inversion properties of an ultra-thin (< 10 nm) group IV nanotube channel to minimize leakage and short channel effects while maximizing performance in an area-efficient manner. It is also shown that the NTFET is capable of providing a higher output drive performance per unit chip area than an array of gate-all-around nanowires, while maintaining the leakage and short channel characteristics similar to that of a single gate-all-around nanowire, the latter being the most superior in terms of electrostatic gate control. In the age of big data and the multitude of devices contributing to the internet of things, the NTFET offers a new transistor topology alternative with maximum benefits from performance-energy efficiency-functionality perspective. © (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  20. Method of making self-aligned lightly-doped-drain structure for MOS transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Kurt H.; Carey, Paul G.

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating lightly-doped-drains (LDD) for short-channel metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) transistors. The process utilizes a pulsed laser process to incorporate the dopants, thus eliminating the prior oxide deposition and etching steps. During the process, the silicon in the source/drain region is melted by the laser energy. Impurities from the gas phase diffuse into the molten silicon to appropriately dope the source/drain regions. By controlling the energy of the laser, a lightly-doped-drain can be formed in one processing step. This is accomplished by first using a single high energy laser pulse to melt the silicon to a significant depth and thus the amount of dopants incorporated into the silicon is small. Furthermore, the dopants incorporated during this step diffuse to the edge of the MOS transistor gate structure. Next, many low energy laser pulses are used to heavily dope the source/drain silicon only in a very shallow region. Because of two-dimensional heat transfer at the MOS transistor gate edge, the low energy pulses are inset from the region initially doped by the high energy pulse. By computer control of the laser energy, the single high energy laser pulse and the subsequent low energy laser pulses are carried out in a single operational step to produce a self-aligned lightly-doped-drain-structure.

  1. Quantitative 3D video microscopy of HIV transfer across T cell virological synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Wolfgang; McNerney, Gregory P; Chen, Ping; Dale, Benjamin M; Gordon, Ronald E; Chuang, Frank Y S; Li, Xiao-Dong; Asmuth, David M; Huser, Thomas; Chen, Benjamin K

    2009-03-27

    The spread of HIV between immune cells is greatly enhanced by cell-cell adhesions called virological synapses, although the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. With use of an infectious, fluorescent clone of HIV, we tracked the movement of Gag in live CD4 T cells and captured the direct translocation of HIV across the virological synapse. Quantitative, high-speed three-dimensional (3D) video microscopy revealed the rapid formation of micrometer-sized "buttons" containing oligomerized viral Gag protein. Electron microscopy showed that these buttons were packed with budding viral crescents. Viral transfer events were observed to form virus-laden internal compartments within target cells. Continuous time-lapse monitoring showed preferential infection through synapses. Thus, HIV dissemination may be enhanced by virological synapse-mediated cell adhesion coupled to viral endocytosis.

  2. Triple Function of Synaptotagmin 7 Ensures Efficiency of High-Frequency Transmission at Central GABAergic Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptotagmin 7 (Syt7 is thought to be a Ca2+ sensor that mediates asynchronous transmitter release and facilitation at synapses. However, Syt7 is strongly expressed in fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing GABAergic interneurons, and the output synapses of these neurons produce only minimal asynchronous release and show depression rather than facilitation. To resolve this apparent contradiction, we examined the effects of genetic elimination of Syt7 on synaptic transmission at the GABAergic basket cell (BC-Purkinje cell (PC synapse in cerebellum. Our results indicate that at the BC-PC synapse, Syt7 contributes to asynchronous release, pool replenishment, and facilitation. In combination, these three effects ensure efficient transmitter release during high-frequency activity and guarantee frequency independence of inhibition. Our results identify a distinct function of Syt7: ensuring the efficiency of high-frequency inhibitory synaptic transmission.

  3. Rapid strengthening of thalamo-amygdala synapses mediates cue-reward learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye, Kay M; Stuber, Garret D; de Ridder, Bram; Bonci, Antonello; Janak, Patricia H

    2008-06-26

    What neural changes underlie individual differences in goal-directed learning? The lateral amygdala (LA) is important for assigning emotional and motivational significance to discrete environmental cues, including those that signal rewarding events. Recognizing that a cue predicts a reward enhances an animal's ability to acquire that reward; however, the cellular and synaptic mechanisms that underlie cue-reward learning are unclear. Here we show that marked changes in both cue-induced neuronal firing and input-specific synaptic strength occur with the successful acquisition of a cue-reward association within a single training session. We performed both in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiological recordings in the LA of rats trained to self-administer sucrose. We observed that reward-learning success increased in proportion to the number of amygdala neurons that responded phasically to a reward-predictive cue. Furthermore, cue-reward learning induced an AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole propionic acid)-receptor-mediated increase in the strength of thalamic, but not cortical, synapses in the LA that was apparent immediately after the first training session. The level of learning attained by individual subjects was highly correlated with the degree of synaptic strength enhancement. Importantly, intra-LA NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate)-receptor blockade impaired reward-learning performance and attenuated the associated increase in synaptic strength. These findings provide evidence of a connection between LA synaptic plasticity and cue-reward learning, potentially representing a key mechanism underlying goal-directed behaviour.

  4. Single electron-ics with carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, G.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Quantum Dots, formed in Carbon Nanotubes. The first part of this thesis deals with charge sensing on such quantum dots. The charge sensor is a metallic Single-electron-transistor, sensitive to the charge of a single electron on the quantum dot. We use this technique for

  5. Learning-guided automatic three dimensional synapse quantification for drosophila neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jonathan; Singh, Anil; Sterne, Gabriella; Ye, Bing; Zhou, Jie

    2015-05-28

    The subcellular distribution of synapses is fundamentally important for the assembly, function, and plasticity of the nervous system. Automated and effective quantification tools are a prerequisite to large-scale studies of the molecular mechanisms of subcellular synapse distribution. Common practices for synapse quantification in neuroscience labs remain largely manual or semi-manual. This is mainly due to computational challenges in automatic quantification of synapses, including large volume, high dimensions and staining artifacts. In the case of confocal imaging, optical limit and xy-z resolution disparity also require special considerations to achieve the necessary robustness. A novel algorithm is presented in the paper for learning-guided automatic recognition and quantification of synaptic markers in 3D confocal images. The method developed a discriminative model based on 3D feature descriptors that detected the centers of synaptic markers. It made use of adaptive thresholding and multi-channel co-localization to improve the robustness. The detected markers then guided the splitting of synapse clumps, which further improved the precision and recall of the detected synapses. Algorithms were tested on lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs) in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster, for GABAergic synaptic markers on axon terminals as well as dendrites. The presented method was able to overcome the staining artifacts and the fuzzy boundaries of synapse clumps in 3D confocal image, and automatically quantify synaptic markers in a complex neuron such as LPTC. Comparison with some existing tools used in automatic 3D synapse quantification also proved the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Radiation-tolerant, sidewall-hardened SOI/MOS transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, S.S.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Weaver, H.T.; Pfeiffer, L.; Celler, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    Total dose radiation effects were measured for sidewall-hardened n-channel SOI/MOS transistors, fabricated in zone-melt-recrystallized (ZMR) and oxygen-implanted (SIMOX) SOI materials. The authors compare the radiation responses of transistors with three types of sidewall or edge configurations: island transistors with passivated edges, island transistors without passivated edges, and edgeless (enclosed-gate) transistors. Data from these three test devices allow clear separation of front-, back-, and edge-channel conduction. Passivated edge channels were hard to Co-60 doses in excess of 24 Mrad(Si). The overall hardness of the passivated-edge transistors is limited only by the radiation-induced threshold voltage shifts (about -1 V at 1.0 Mrad) of the top channel. No significant differences in total-dose response of ZMR and SIMOX devices were observed under the radiation conditions employed

  7. Poisson-Like Spiking in Circuits with Probabilistic Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Bote, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal activity in cortex is variable both spontaneously and during stimulation, and it has the remarkable property that it is Poisson-like over broad ranges of firing rates covering from virtually zero to hundreds of spikes per second. The mechanisms underlying cortical-like spiking variability over such a broad continuum of rates are currently unknown. We show that neuronal networks endowed with probabilistic synaptic transmission, a well-documented source of variability in cortex, robustly generate Poisson-like variability over several orders of magnitude in their firing rate without fine-tuning of the network parameters. Other sources of variability, such as random synaptic delays or spike generation jittering, do not lead to Poisson-like variability at high rates because they cannot be sufficiently amplified by recurrent neuronal networks. We also show that probabilistic synapses predict Fano factor constancy of synaptic conductances. Our results suggest that synaptic noise is a robust and sufficient mechanism for the type of variability found in cortex. PMID:25032705

  8. Calcium signaling in synapse-to-nucleus communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenston, Anna M; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-11-01

    Changes in the intracellular concentration of calcium ions in neurons are involved in neurite growth, development, and remodeling, regulation of neuronal excitability, increases and decreases in the strength of synaptic connections, and the activation of survival and programmed cell death pathways. An important aspect of the signals that trigger these processes is that they are frequently initiated in the form of glutamatergic neurotransmission within dendritic trees, while their completion involves specific changes in the patterns of genes expressed within neuronal nuclei. Accordingly, two prominent aims of research concerned with calcium signaling in neurons are determination of the mechanisms governing information conveyance between synapse and nucleus, and discovery of the rules dictating translation of specific patterns of inputs into appropriate and specific transcriptional responses. In this article, we present an overview of the avenues by which glutamatergic excitation of dendrites may be communicated to the neuronal nucleus and the primary calcium-dependent signaling pathways by which synaptic activity can invoke changes in neuronal gene expression programs.

  9. Dysfunctional synapse in Alzheimer's disease - A focus on NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Sandra I; Ferreira, Ildete L; Rego, A Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia in the elderly. Alterations capable of causing brain circuitry dysfunctions in AD may take several years to develop. Oligomeric amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) plays a complex role in the molecular events that lead to progressive loss of function and eventually to neurodegeneration in this devastating disease. Moreover, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs) activation has been recently implicated in AD-related synaptic dysfunction. Thus, in this review we focus on glutamatergic neurotransmission impairment and the changes in NMDAR regulation in AD, following the description on the role and location of NMDARs at pre- and post-synaptic sites under physiological conditions. In addition, considering that there is currently no effective ways to cure AD or stop its progression, we further discuss the relevance of NMDARs antagonists to prevent AD symptomatology. This review posits additional information on the role played by Aβ in AD and the importance of targeting the tripartite glutamatergic synapse in early asymptomatic and possible reversible stages of the disease through preventive and/or disease-modifying therapeutic strategies. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rescue of inhibitory synapse strength following developmental hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhakar C Kotak

    Full Text Available Inhibitory synapse dysfunction may contribute to many developmental brain disorders, including the secondary consequences of sensory deprivation. In fact, developmental hearing loss leads to a profound reduction in the strength of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs in the auditory cortex, and this deficit persists into adulthood. This finding is consistent with the general theory that the emergence of mature synaptic properties requires activity during development. Therefore, we tested the prediction that inhibitory strength can be restored following developmental hearing loss by boosting GABAergic transmission in vivo. Conductive or sensorineural hearing loss was induced surgically in gerbils prior to hearing onset and GABA agonists were then administered for one week. IPSCs were subsequently recorded from pyramidal neurons in a thalamocortical brain slice preparation. Administration of either a GABA(A receptor a1 subunit specific agonist (zolpidem, or a selective GABA reuptake inhibitor (SGRI, rescued IPSC amplitude in hearing loss animals. Furthermore, this restoration persisted in adults, long after drug treatment ended. In contrast, a GABA(B receptor agonist baclofen did not restore inhibitory strength. IPSCs could also be restored when SGRI administration began 3 weeks after sensory deprivation. Together, these results demonstrate long-lasting restoration of cortical inhibitory strength in the absence of normal experience. This suggests that in vivo GABA(A receptor activation is sufficient to promote maturation, and this principle may extend to other developmental disorders associated with diminished inhibitory function.

  11. Multiple synchronization transitions in scale-free neuronal networks with electrical and chemical hybrid synapses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Lin; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Tsang, Kaiming; Chan, Wailok

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Synchronization transitions in hybrid scale-free neuronal networks are investigated. • Multiple synchronization transitions can be induced by the time delay. • Effect of synchronization transitions depends on the ratio of the electrical and chemical synapses. • Coupling strength and the density of inter-neuronal links can enhance the synchronization. -- Abstract: The impacts of information transmission delay on the synchronization transitions in scale-free neuronal networks with electrical and chemical hybrid synapses are investigated. Numerical results show that multiple appearances of synchronization regions transitions can be induced by different information transmission delays. With the time delay increasing, the synchronization of neuronal activities can be enhanced or destroyed, irrespective of the probability of chemical synapses in the whole hybrid neuronal network. In particular, for larger probability of electrical synapses, the regions of synchronous activities appear broader with stronger synchronization ability of electrical synapses compared with chemical ones. Moreover, it can be found that increasing the coupling strength can promote synchronization monotonously, playing the similar role of the increasing the probability of the electrical synapses. Interestingly, the structures and parameters of the scale-free neuronal networks, especially the structural evolvement plays a more subtle role in the synchronization transitions. In the network formation process, it is found that every new vertex is attached to the more old vertices already present in the network, the more synchronous activities will be emerge

  12. Reliability of signal transfer at a tonically transmitting, graded potential synapse of the locust ocellar pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Peter J; de Ruyter van Steveninck, Rob

    2005-08-17

    We assessed the performance of a synapse that transmits small, sustained, graded potentials between two classes of second-order ocellar "L-neurons" of the locust. We characterized the transmission of both fixed levels of membrane potential and fluctuating signals by recording postsynaptic responses to changes in presynaptic potential. To ensure repeatability between stimuli, we controlled presynaptic signals with a voltage clamp. We found that the synapse introduces noise above the level of background activity in the postsynaptic neuron. By driving the presynaptic neuron with slow-ramp changes in potential, we found that the number of discrete signal levels the synapse transmits is approximately 20. It can also transmit approximately 20 discrete levels when the presynaptic signal is a graded rebound spike. Synaptic noise level is constant over the operating range of the synapse, which would not be expected if presynaptic potential set the probability for the release of individual quanta of neurotransmitter according to Poisson statistics. Responses to individual quanta of neurotransmission could not be resolved, which is consistent with a synapse that operates with large numbers of vesicles evoking small responses. When challenged with white noise stimuli, the synapse can transmit information at rates up to 450 bits/s, a performance that is sufficient to transmit natural signals about changes in illumination.

  13. The Dendritic Cell Synapse: A Life Dedicated to T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, Federica

    2016-01-01

    T-cell activation within immunological synapses is a complex process whereby different types of signals are transmitted from antigen-presenting cells to T cells. The molecular strategies developed by T cells to interpret and integrate these signals have been systematically dissected in recent years and are now in large part understood. On the other side of the immune synapse, dendritic cells (DCs) participate actively in synapse formation and maintenance by remodeling of membrane receptors and intracellular content. However, the details of such changes have been only partially characterized. The DCs actin cytoskeleton has been one of the first systems to be identified as playing an important role in T-cell priming and some of the underlying mechanisms have been elucidated. Similarly, the DCs microtubule cytoskeleton undergoes major spatial changes during synapse formation that favor polarization of the DCs subcellular space toward the interacting T cell. Recently, we have begun to investigate the trafficking machinery that controls polarized delivery of endosomal vesicles at the DC-T immune synapse with the aim of understanding the functional relevance of polarized secretion of soluble factors during T-cell priming. Here, we will review the current knowledge of events occurring in DCs during synapse formation and discuss the open questions that still remain unanswered.

  14. Application of the Johnson criteria to graphene transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, M J

    2013-01-01

    For 60 years, the Johnson criteria have guided the development of materials and the materials choices for field-effect and bipolar transistor technology. Intrinsic graphene is a semi-metal, precluding transistor applications, but only under lateral bias is a gap opened and transistor action possible. This first application of the Johnson criteria to biased graphene suggests that this material will struggle to ever achieve competitive commercial applications. (fast track communication)

  15. Organic Thin-Film Transistor (OTFT-Based Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Elkington

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic thin film transistors have been a popular research topic in recent decades and have found applications from flexible displays to disposable sensors. In this review, we present an overview of some notable articles reporting sensing applications for organic transistors with a focus on the most recent publications. In particular, we concentrate on three main types of organic transistor-based sensors: biosensors, pressure sensors and “e-nose”/vapour sensors.

  16. Vertically Integrated Multiple Nanowire Field Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Ho; Ahn, Dae-Chul; Park, Jun-Young; Bang, Tewook; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Hur, Jae; Lee, Dongil; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2015-12-09

    A vertically integrated multiple channel-based field-effect transistor (FET) with the highest number of nanowires reported ever is demonstrated on a bulk silicon substrate without use of wet etching. The driving current is increased by 5-fold due to the inherent vertically stacked five-level nanowires, thus showing good feasibility of three-dimensional integration-based high performance transistor. The developed fabrication process, which is simple and reproducible, is used to create multiple stiction-free and uniformly sized nanowires with the aid of the one-route all-dry etching process (ORADEP). Furthermore, the proposed FET is revamped to create nonvolatile memory with the adoption of a charge trapping layer for enhanced practicality. Thus, this research suggests an ultimate design for the end-of-the-roadmap devices to overcome the limits of scaling.

  17. Cylindrical-shaped nanotube field effect transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2015-12-29

    A cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET may be manufactured on silicon (Si) substrates as a ring etched into a gate stack and filled with semiconductor material. An inner gate electrode couples to a region of the gate stack inside the inner circumference of the ring. An outer gate electrode couples to a region of the gate stack outside the outer circumference of the ring. The multi-gate cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET operates in volume inversion for ring widths below 15 nanometers. The cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET demonstrates better short channel effect (SCE) mitigation and higher performance (I.sub.on/I.sub.off) than conventional transistor devices. The cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET may also be manufactured with higher yields and cheaper costs than conventional transistors.

  18. Benchmarking organic mixed conductors for transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Inal, Sahika

    2017-11-20

    Organic mixed conductors have garnered significant attention in applications from bioelectronics to energy storage/generation. Their implementation in organic transistors has led to enhanced biosensing, neuromorphic function, and specialized circuits. While a narrow class of conducting polymers continues to excel in these new applications, materials design efforts have accelerated as researchers target new functionality, processability, and improved performance/stability. Materials for organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) require both efficient electronic transport and facile ion injection in order to sustain high capacity. In this work, we show that the product of the electronic mobility and volumetric charge storage capacity (µC*) is the materials/system figure of merit; we use this framework to benchmark and compare the steady-state OECT performance of ten previously reported materials. This product can be independently verified and decoupled to guide materials design and processing. OECTs can therefore be used as a tool for understanding and designing new organic mixed conductors.

  19. Nanowire field effect transistors principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Yoon-Ha

    2014-01-01

    “Nanowire Field Effect Transistor: Basic Principles and Applications” places an emphasis on the application aspects of nanowire field effect transistors (NWFET). Device physics and electronics are discussed in a compact manner, together with the p-n junction diode and MOSFET, the former as an essential element in NWFET and the latter as a general background of the FET. During this discussion, the photo-diode, solar cell, LED, LD, DRAM, flash EEPROM and sensors are highlighted to pave the way for similar applications of NWFET. Modeling is discussed in close analogy and comparison with MOSFETs. Contributors focus on processing, electrostatic discharge (ESD) and application of NWFET. This includes coverage of solar and memory cells, biological and chemical sensors, displays and atomic scale light emitting diodes. Appropriate for scientists and engineers interested in acquiring a working knowledge of NWFET as well as graduate students specializing in this subject.

  20. BUSFET -- A radiation-hardened SOI transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwank, J.R.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Draper, B.L.; Dodd, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    The total-dose hardness of SOI technology is limited by radiation-induced charge trapping in gate, field, and SOI buried oxides. Charge trapping in the buried oxide can lead to back-channel leakage and makes hardening SOI transistors more challenging than hardening bulk-silicon transistors. Two avenues for hardening the back-channel are (1) to use specially prepared SOI buried oxides that reduce the net amount of trapped positive charge or (2) to design transistors that are less sensitive to the effects of trapped charge in the buried oxide. In this work, the authors propose a partially-depleted SOI transistor structure for mitigating the effects of trapped charge in the buried oxide on radiation hardness. They call this structure the BUSFET--Body Under Source FET. The BUSFET utilizes a shallow source and a deep drain. As a result, the silicon depletion region at the back channel caused by radiation-induced charge trapping in the buried oxide does not form a conducting path between source and drain. Thus, the BUSFET structure design can significantly reduce radiation-induced back-channel leakage without using specially prepared buried oxides. Total dose hardness is achieved without degrading the intrinsic SEU or dose rate hardness of SOI technology. The effectiveness of the BUSFET structure for reducing total-dose back-channel leakage depends on several variables, including the top silicon film thickness and doping concentration, and the depth of the source. 3-D simulations show that for a body doping concentration of 10 18 cm -3 , a drain bias of 3 V, and a source depth of 90 nm, a silicon film thickness of 180 nm is sufficient to almost completely eliminate radiation-induced back-channel leakage. However, for a doping concentration of 3 x 10 17 cm -3 , a thicker silicon film (300 nm) must be used