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Sample records for single specific chromosomal

  1. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...

  2. Microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphisms in the β-globin locus control region-hypersensitive Site 2: SPECIFICITY of Tunisian βs chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mustapha, Maha; Moumni, Imen; Zorai, Amine; Douzi, Kaïs; Ghanem, Abderraouf; Abbes, Salem

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of sickle cell disease severity is attributed to several cis acting factors, among them the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and (AT) rich region in the β-locus control region (β-LCR). This contains five DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) located 6 to 22 kb upstream to the ϵ gene. The most important of these is the HS2 (5' β-LCR-HS2), characterized by the presence of three different SNPs and a microsatellite region known to be in association with β(S) chromosomes in various populations. The aim of this study was to present the molecular investigation of the 5' β-LCR-HS2 site in normal and sickle cell disease individuals in order to determine if there is any correlation or specificity between these molecular markers, the β(S) Tunisian chromosomes and phenotypical expression of sickle cell disease. One hundred and twenty-four chromosomes from Tunisian individuals (49 β(S) carriers and 13 normal individuals) were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing for the polymorphic short tandem microsatellite repeats (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(Y) and the three SNPs (rs7119428, rs9736333 and rs60240093) of the 5' β-LCR-HS2. Twelve configurations of the microsatellite motif were found with an ancestral configuration elaborated by ClustalW software. Normal and mutated alleles were observed at the homozygous and heterozygous states for the three SNPs. Correlation between microsatellites and SNPs suggests that mutant SNP alleles were mainly associated, in the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, with the (AT)(8)N(12)GT(AT)(7) configuration, whereas, normal SNP alleles were associated with the (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(11) configurations in normal β(A) chromosomes. The correlation of these various configurations with Hb F expression was also investigated. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed the correlation between the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, mutated SNP alleles and the Benin microsatellite configuration (AT)(8)N(12)GT

  3. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  4. Slit scan flow cytometry of isolated chromosomes following fluorescence hybridization: an approach of online screening for specific chromosomes and chromosome translocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, M.; Dudin, G.; Aten, J. A.; Heilig, R.; Diaz, E.; Cremer, C.

    1991-01-01

    The recently developed methods of non radioactive in situ hybridization of chromosomes offer new aspects for chromosome analysis. Fluorescent labelling of hybridized chromosomes or chromosomal subregions allows to facilitate considerably the detection of specific chromosomal abnormalities. For many

  5. New St-chromosome-specific molecular markers for identifying ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chromosome-specific PLUG and SCAR markers, and successfully used them to detect the St-chromosome in wheat–Th. intermedium introgression lines. Materials and methods. Plant materials. Wheat line ML13 was provided by International Maize and.

  6. Exchange of core chromosomes and horizontal transfer of lineage-specific chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaardingerbroek, I.; Beerens, B.; Rose, L.; Fokkens, L.; Cornelissen, B.J.C.; Rep, M.

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of supernumerary or lineage-specific (LS) chromosomes has been described in a number of plant pathogenic filamentous fungi. So far it was not known whether transfer is restricted to chromosomes of certain size or properties, or whether 'core' chromosomes can also undergo

  7. Preparation of single rice chromosome for construction of a DNA library using a laser microbeam trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Haowei; Li, Yinmei; Tang, Yesheng; Liu, Yilei; Hu, Xin; Jia, Peixin; Ying, Kai; Feng, Qi; Guan, Jianping; Jin, Chaoqing; Zhang, Lei; Lou, Liren; Zhou, Zhuan; Han, Bin

    2004-04-29

    We report the development of a laser micromanipulation system and its application in the isolation of individual rice chromosomes directly from a metaphase cell. Microdissection and flow sorting are two major methods for the isolation of single chromosome. These methods are dependent on the techniques of chromosome spread and chromosome suspension, respectively. In the development of this system, we avoided using chromosome spread and cell suspension was used instead. The cell wall of metaphase rice cell was cut by optical scissors. The released single chromosome was captured by an optical trap and transported to an area without cell debris. The isolated single chromosome was then collected and specific library was constructed by linker adaptor PCR. The average insert size of the library was about 300 bp. Two hundred inserts of chromosome 4 library were sequenced, and 96.5% were aligned to the corresponding sequences of rice chromosome 4. These results suggest the possible application of this method for the preparation of other subcellular structures and for the cloning of single macromolecule through a laser microbeam trap.

  8. Atomic Force Microscope nanolithography on chromosomes to generate single-cell genetic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bucchianico, Sebastiano; Poma, Anna M; Giardi, Maria F; Di Leandro, Luana; Valle, Francesco; Biscarini, Fabio; Botti, Dario

    2011-06-28

    Chromosomal dissection provides a direct advance for isolating DNA from cytogenetically recognizable region to generate genetic probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization, a technique that became very common in cyto and molecular genetics research and diagnostics. Several reports describing microdissection methods (glass needle or a laser beam) to obtain specific probes from metaphase chromosomes are available. Several limitations are imposed by the traditional methods of dissection as the need for a large number of chromosomes for the production of a probe. In addition, the conventional methods are not suitable for single chromosome analysis, because of the relatively big size of the microneedles. Consequently new dissection techniques are essential for advanced research on chromosomes at the nanoscale level. We report the use of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) as a tool for nanomanipulation of single chromosomes to generate individual cell specific genetic probes. Besides new methods towards a better nanodissection, this work is focused on the combination of molecular and nanomanipulation techniques which enable both nanodissection and amplification of chromosomal and chromatidic DNA. Cross-sectional analysis of the dissected chromosomes reveals 20 nm and 40 nm deep cuts. Isolated single chromosomal regions can be directly amplified and labeled by the Degenerate Oligonucleotide-Primed Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) and subsequently hybridized to chromosomes and interphasic nuclei. Atomic force microscope can be easily used to visualize and to manipulate biological material with high resolution and accuracy. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) performed with the DOP-PCR products as test probes has been tested succesfully in avian microchromosomes and interphasic nuclei. Chromosome nanolithography, with a resolution beyond the resolution limit of light microscopy, could be useful to the construction of chromosome band libraries and to the molecular

  9. Characterization of A-11, a newly discovered X-chromosomal gene that is under both single-active-X control and tissue-specific control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadon, N.L.

    1987-01-01

    The A-11 transcript is present in fibroblasts, but is not normally expressed in B- or T-lymphoblastoid cells. The regulation of the A-11 loci on both the active and inactive X chromosomes is very easily perturbed. The A-11 locus on the fibroblast-derived inactive X in a hybrid cell is reactivated at a very high rate by 5-azacytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation, while the A-11 locus on the active X in B-lymphoblastoid cells is derepressed at a very high rate after gamma irradiation. The A-11 gene codes for a mature transcript of about 1.9 kb. The A-11 cDNA clone is incomplete, and contains 753 bases from the 3' end of the gene. A genomic clone that contains about 17 kb of human DNA and hybridizes to the A-11 cDNA was isolated. This clone contains at least the last exon of the A-11 gene, as determined by Northern blotting, nuclease protection experiments, and DNA sequencing. When the genomic clone is transferred into mouse cells. A-11 transcripts of both normal and abnormal sizes are produced, indicating that it is possible that the genomic clone contains the entire locus. However, at this time, the 5' end of the gene has not been located

  10. Cytological evidence for population-specific sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    arms. This heteromorphism was restricted to females, suggesting a female heterogametic sex chromosome system of. ZZ/ZW type at a very early step of differentiation. [Odierna G, Aprea G, Capriglione T, Castellano S and Balletto E 2007 Cytological evidence for population-specific sex chromosome heteromorphism.

  11. Radiation hybrids from human chromosome 3: A basis for the construction of region and specific sublibraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, L.; Cosmis, R.L.; Atchison, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The authors are interested in identifying genes on human chromosome involved in disease processes. To date at least 20 different loci on this chromosome are implicated with various disease states. DNA libraries containing clones derived from a small chromosomal subregion implicated in a particular disease would greatly assist these studies. They have utilized the radiation hybrid (RH) technique to generate a series of somatic cell hybrids that contain small segments of human chromosome 3 as the only human genetic material. A Chinese hamster-human cell hybrid (Q314-2) containing only human chromosome 3 was used to prepare radiation hybrids. Cells were lethally X-irradiated with 6,000 rads and fused to Urd(??) Chinese hamster cells by PEG 1000 treatment. The majority of hybrids (>72%) analyzed retained portions of chromosome 3. The amount of chromosome 3 in each hybrid ranged from nearly all of the chromosome to very little. Currently these hybrids are being further characterized with single copy probes of known map location in order to isolate regions of chromosome 3 that contain specific disease locus. These reduced hybrids can then be used for the construction of region specific libraries and for the generation of new DNA probes from the specific region of interest

  12. High-resolution physical mapping reveals that the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) in Cenchrus ciliaris is located on a heterochromatic and hemizygous region of a single chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Yukio; Hanna, Wayne W; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2005-10-01

    An apomictic mode of reproduction known as apospory is displayed by most buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris) genotypes, but rare sexual individuals have been identified. Previously, intraspecific crosses between sexual and aposporous genotypes allowed linkage to be discovered between the aposporous mode of reproduction and nine molecular markers that had been isolated from an aposporous relative, Pennisetum squamulatum. This region was described as the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). We now show an ideogram of the chromosome complement for aposporous tetraploid buffelgrass accession B-12-9 including the ASGR-carrier chromosome. The ASGR-carrier chromosome has a region of hemizygosity, as determined by in situ hybridization of BAC clones and unique morphological characteristics when compared with other chromosomes in the genome. In spite of its unique morphology, the ASGR-carrier chromosome could be identified as one of the chromosomes of a meiosis I quadrivalent. A similar partially hemizygous segment was also detected in the ASGR-carrier chromosome of the aposporous buffelgrass genotype, Higgins, but not in the sexual accession B-2S. Two non-recombining BACs linked to apospory were physically mapped on a highly condensed chromatin region of the short arm of B-12-9, and the distance between the BACs was estimated to be approximately 11 Mbp, a distance similar to what previously has been shown in P. squamulatum. The short arm of the ASGR-carrier chromosome was highly condensed at pachytene and extended only 1.7-2.7 fold that of mitotic chromosomes. Low recombination in the ASGR may partially be due to its localization in heterochromatin.

  13. New St-chromosome-specific molecular markers for identifying ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    specific marker. St-specific markers for wheat–Th. intermedium introgression lines. An introgression line Z148 was selected from the progeny of hybrid between wheat and wheat–Th. intermedium ssp. trichorophrum partial amphiploid (Yang et al. 2006). The chromosome constitution of Z148 was determined using the.

  14. Sex-specific chromosome instability in early human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Natalia V

    2005-08-01

    The predominance of females segregating chromosome aberrations to their offspring has been explained mostly by selection disadvantage of unbalanced products of spermatogenesis. However, analysis of data from the literature supports the idea that somatic cells of early female embryos are similar to female germ cells in that they are prone to malsegregation. The goal of this study was to compare the sex ratio (male to female ratio) of carriers of presumably mitotic-occurring chromosome abnormalities to identify any sex biases. In examining the literature, we found a female prevalence in cases of mosaicism associated with uniparental disomy (UPD) (26 male individuals/conceptions and 45 female individuals/conceptions, sex ratio is 0.58, significantly different from 1.06 in newborn population, P = 0.0292). This predominance was highest at gestational age X mosaics over 46,XY/45,X mosaics in prenatally diagnosed cases, which also suggests a gender-specific postzygotic chromosome loss. The male prevalence in Prader-Willi syndrome with maternal UPD of chromosome 15 also can be explained by sex-specific trisomy correction, with predominant loss of a maternal chromosome causing biparental inheritance and therefore, complete correction of trisomy in females (without UPD). Finally, there is a female predominance in carriers of chromosome rearrangement with pericentromere break (mosaicism for Robertsonian translocation/isochromosome, centric fission, nonacrocentric isochromosome, and whole arm rearrangement), in both prenatal (21 males and 36 females, sex ratio is 0.58, P < 0.0184) and postnatal ill-defined cases (14 males and 35 females, sex ratio is 0.40, P = 0.001). Thus, the findings presented in this paper suggest that, in addition to reduction in male fertility, and to probable selection against abnormal cell line(s), there are two mechanisms that contribute to female preponderance among carriers of mosaicism: sex-specific chromosome loss and sex-specific centromere

  15. Single cell Hi-C reveals cell-to-cell variability in chromosome structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Yaffe, Eitan; Dean, Wendy; Laue, Ernest D.; Tanay, Amos; Fraser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale chromosome structure and spatial nuclear arrangement have been linked to control of gene expression and DNA replication and repair. Genomic techniques based on chromosome conformation capture assess contacts for millions of loci simultaneously, but do so by averaging chromosome conformations from millions of nuclei. Here we introduce single cell Hi-C, combined with genome-wide statistical analysis and structural modeling of single copy X chromosomes, to show that individual chromosomes maintain domain organisation at the megabase scale, but show variable cell-to-cell chromosome territory structures at larger scales. Despite this structural stochasticity, localisation of active gene domains to boundaries of territories is a hallmark of chromosomal conformation. Single cell Hi-C data bridge current gaps between genomics and microscopy studies of chromosomes, demonstrating how modular organisation underlies dynamic chromosome structure, and how this structure is probabilistically linked with genome activity patterns. PMID:24067610

  16. Sex chromosome-specific regulation in the Drosophila male germline but little evidence for chromosomal dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin D Meiklejohn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes (e.g., XY in males or ZW in females has repeatedly elicited the evolution of two kinds of chromosome-specific regulation: dosage compensation--the equalization of X chromosome gene expression in males and females--and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI--the transcriptional silencing and heterochromatinization of the X during meiosis in the male (or Z in the female germline. How the X chromosome is regulated in the Drosophila melanogaster male germline is unclear. Here we report three new findings concerning gene expression from the X in Drosophila testes. First, X chromosome-wide dosage compensation appears to be absent from most of the Drosophila male germline. Second, microarray analysis provides no evidence for X chromosome-specific inactivation during meiosis. Third, we confirm the previous discovery that the expression of transgene reporters driven by autosomal spermatogenesis-specific promoters is strongly reduced when inserted on the X chromosome versus the autosomes; but we show that this chromosomal difference in expression is established in premeiotic cells and persists in meiotic cells. The magnitude of the X-autosome difference in transgene expression cannot be explained by the absence of dosage compensation, suggesting that a previously unrecognized mechanism limits expression from the X during spermatogenesis in Drosophila. These findings help to resolve several previously conflicting reports and have implications for patterns of genome evolution and speciation in Drosophila.

  17. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W [San Francisco, CA; Pinkel, Daniel [Lafayette, CA; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka [Turku, FI; Kallioniemi, Anne [Tampere, FI; Sakamoto, Masaru [Tokyo, JP

    2009-10-06

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ .[.nudeic.]. .Iadd.nucleic .Iaddend.acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  18. Chromosome-specific desynapsis in the n = 2 race of Haplopappus gracilis (Compositae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R C; Ngo, Ngan; Ngo, Hao

    2002-05-01

    During cytological screening for pollen sterility in a wild population of Haplopappus gracilis (n = 2), several partially sterile plants were found that had good pachytene pairing but varying numbers of univalents. Some plants had chromosome A bivalents or A univalents, while in the same cells chromosome B had only bivalents. In other plants the reverse condition occurred; the B chromosome had B bivalents or B univalents and only A bivalents. This demonstrates a chromosome-specific effect for the desynapsis genes. Hybridization between the two homozygous mutant genotypes produced only normal bivalents; this indicates the two mutants are not alleles and each is recessive. An F2 generation showed independent assortment of the desynaptic mutations. The chromosome A bivalent is the larger of the two and normally has one or two chiasmata; the B bivalent normally has a single chiasma. Chiasmata distribution was tested in the desynaptic mutant A bivalents and showed an acceptable fit to a binomial distribution. This occurs also in heterozygous, asynaptic pairing control gene mutations. Analysis of the NOR bivalent in two hologenomic desynaptic mutations in tomato also showed a good fit to a binomial distribution of chiasmata. This indicates the same methods are applicable to diverse species.

  19. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Evaluating melanocytic lesions with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chromosomal microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Amin A; Linos, Konstantinos; Jung, Hou-Sung; Tafe, Laura J; Yan, Shaofeng; LeBlanc, Robert E; Lefferts, Joel A

    2017-12-01

    Histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosing melanocytic lesions; however, distinguishing benign versus malignant is not always clear histologically. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray analysis may help in making a definitive diagnosis. Here, we share our experience with the Oncoscan FFPE Assay and demonstrate its diagnostic utility in the context of ambiguous melanocytic lesions. Eleven archival melanocytic lesions, including three benign nevi, four melanomas, three BAP1-deficient Spitzoid nevi and one nevoid melanoma were selected for validation. SNP-array was performed according to the manufacturer's protocol, using the recommended 80ng of DNA; however, as little as 15ng was used if the extraction yield was lower. Concordance was assessed with H&E and various combinations of BAP1 and p16 immunohistochemical stains (IHC) and external reference laboratory chromosomal microarray results. After validation, the SNP array was utilized to make definitive diagnoses in four challenging cases. Oncoscan SNP array findings were in concordance with H&E, IHC, and reference laboratory chromosomal microarray testing. The SNP-based microarray can accurately detect copy number changes and aid in making a more definitive diagnosis of challenging melanocytic lesions. This can be accomplished using significantly less DNA than is required by other microarray technologies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Lack of sex chromosome specific meiotic silencing in platypus reveals origin of MSCI in therian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daish, Tasman J; Casey, Aaron E; Grutzner, Frank

    2015-12-10

    In therian mammals heteromorphic sex chromosomes are subject to meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during meiotic prophase I while the autosomes maintain transcriptional activity. The evolution of this sex chromosome silencing is thought to result in retroposition of genes required in spermatogenesis from the sex chromosomes to autosomes. In birds sex chromosome specific silencing appears to be absent and global transcriptional reductions occur through pachytene and sex chromosome-derived autosomal retrogenes are lacking. Egg laying monotremes are the most basal mammalian lineage, feature a complex and highly differentiated XY sex chromosome system with homology to the avian sex chromosomes, and also lack autosomal retrogenes. In order to delineate the point of origin of sex chromosome specific silencing in mammals we investigated whether MSCI exists in platypus. Our results show that platypus sex chromosomes display only partial or transient colocalisation with a repressive histone variant linked to therian sex chromosome silencing and surprisingly lack a hallmark MSCI epigenetic signature present in other mammals. Remarkably, platypus instead feature an avian like period of general low level transcription through prophase I with the sex chromosomes and the future mammalian X maintaining association with a nucleolus-like structure. Our work demonstrates for the first time that in mammals meiotic silencing of sex chromosomes evolved after the divergence of monotremes presumably as a result of the differentiation of the therian XY sex chromosomes. We provide a novel evolutionary scenario on how the future therian X chromosome commenced the trajectory toward MSCI.

  2. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  3. Y-chromosome-specific microsatellite mutation rates re-examined using a minisatellite, MSY1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, M A; Heyer, E; Dieltjes, P; de Knijff, P

    1999-10-01

    Polymorphic Y-chromosome-specific microsatellites are becoming increasingly used in evolutionary and forensic studies and, in particular, in dating the origins of Y-chromosomal lineages. Previously, haplotyping of Y chromosomes from males belonging to a set of deep-rooting pedigrees was used to estimate a conservative average Y-chromosomal microsatellite mutation rate of 2.1 x 10(-3)per locus per generation. A number of males showed multiple differences in haplotypes compared with other males within their pedigrees, and these were excluded from the calculation of this estimate, on the grounds that non-paternity was a more probable explanation than multiple mutation within a lineage. Here we reanalyse the pedigrees using an independent highly polymorphic system, the Y-specific minisatellite, MSY1. This supports the hypothesis of non-paternity where more than one microsatellite difference was observed, provides further support for the previously deduced microsatellite mutation rate and throws light on the mutation dynamics of MSY1 itself, suggesting that single-step changes are not the only mode of mutation.

  4. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2009-10-06

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nudeic nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  5. Origin of specific chromosome aberration in radiation-induced leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Nobuhiko; Kai, Michiaki; Masuno, Yoko

    2005-01-01

    The theme in the title is discussed from the four aspects of specific chromosome aberration (sAb) patterns in radiation-induced leukemia (RIL), possibility for radiation to induce the sAb in RIL, any evidence for participation of delayed aberration to form sAb and the proportion of such healthy humans as having the specifically rearranged genome. Data of sAb observed in leukemia of 25 A-bomb survivors and of 38 patients post radiotherapy of cancers give a rather common pattern. However, many inconsistent results are obtained for sAb in patients post radiotherapy, A-bomb survivors, residents living in radio-contaminated houses in Taipei, in vitro exposure, and Chernobyl residents. At present, any clear evidence is available neither for sAb derived from the delayed aberration nor for estimating the proportion with the specifically rearranged gene. As above, it is unlikely that radiation induces such a translocation abnormality as BCR-ABL specifically seen in leukemia, and this aspect will be important for studies on the genesis of RIL and its risk assessment. (S.I.)

  6. Premature chromosome condensation in human resting peripheral blood lymphocytes without mitogen stimulation for chromosome aberration analysis using specific whole chromosome DNA hybridization probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rupak; Prasanna, Pataje G S

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described a unique, simple, and rapid method for inducing premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in "resting" human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) without mitogen stimulation and an approach for studying numerical changes and/or structural aberrations involving a specific pair of human chromosomes. The current protocol incorporates improvements that provide better PCC, incorporates a high-throughput automated sample preparation unit and metaphase harvester to minimize manual labor and improve quality, and supports simultaneous painting of multiple sets of human autosomes in interphase nuclei. To induce PCC, isolated HPBLs are incubated at 37 °C in cell culture medium supplemented with a phosphatase inhibitor (okadaic acid or calyculin A), adenosine triphosphate, and p34(cdc2)/cyclin B kinase (an essential component of mitosis-promoting factor) for a short period of time. PCC spreads are prepared on glass slides using a humidity- and temperature-controlled chamber (an auto-spreader) after a brief hypotonic treatment and fixation. Aberrations involving specific sets of painted human chromosome are analyzed using fluorescence microscopy. Each of the normal (undamaged) painted homologous chromosome pairs displays two fluorescent spots, whereas cells with numerical and/or structural aberration involving specific painted chromosome sets show deviation in the number of fluorescent spots. The identification and quantification of aberration involving specific chromosomes in interphase nuclei have important applications in radiobiology, toxicology, radiation therapeutics, and cancer research.

  7. Cytological evidence for population-specific sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A chromosome study was carried out on a number of European and Central Asiatic diploid green toad populations by means of standard and various other chromosome banding and staining methods (Ag-NOR-, Q-, CMA3-, late replicating [LR] banding pattern, C- and sequential C-banding + CMA3 + DAPI). This study ...

  8. Allele specific gene expression on chromosome 7 in human tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, A.

    2017-01-01

    Both copy number losses and homozygosity of chromosome 7 are extremely rare events in many tumor types, indicating that the retention of both the maternal and paternal copies of chromosome 7 is essential for the tumor cells. This thesis compiles our research into the driving force that is behind the

  9. Identification of Mitosis-Specific Phosphorylation in Mitotic Chromosome-Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Kimura, Michiko; Takagi, Shunsuke; Toramoto, Iyo; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2016-09-02

    During mitosis, phosphorylation of chromosome-associated proteins is a key regulatory mechanism. Mass spectrometry has been successfully applied to determine the complete protein composition of mitotic chromosomes, but not to identify post-translational modifications. Here, we quantitatively compared the phosphoproteome of isolated mitotic chromosomes with that of chromosomes in nonsynchronized cells. We identified 4274 total phosphorylation sites and 350 mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites in mitotic chromosome-associated proteins. Significant mitosis-specific phosphorylation in centromere/kinetochore proteins was detected, although the chromosomal association of these proteins did not change throughout the cell cycle. This mitosis-specific phosphorylation might play a key role in regulation of mitosis. Further analysis revealed strong dependency of phosphorylation dynamics on kinase consensus patterns, thus linking the identified phosphorylation sites to known key mitotic kinases. Remarkably, chromosomal axial proteins such as non-SMC subunits of condensin, TopoIIα, and Kif4A, together with the chromosomal periphery protein Ki67 involved in the establishment of the mitotic chromosomal structure, demonstrated high phosphorylation during mitosis. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for regulation of chromosome restructuring in mitosis via protein phosphorylation. Our study generated a large quantitative database on protein phosphorylation in mitotic and nonmitotic chromosomes, thus providing insights into the dynamics of chromatin protein phosphorylation at mitosis onset.

  10. A single, recent origin of the accessory B chromosome of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Pajares, A Jesús; Martínez-Rodríguez, Laura; Teruel, María; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; Perfectti, Francisco

    2011-03-01

    B chromosomes are dispensable chromosomes found in >2000 eukaryotic species, usually behaving as genomic parasites. Most B chromosomes seem to be made up of the same kind of DNA sequences present in the A chromosomes. This sequence similarity makes it difficult to obtain specific molecular probes that may permit B-presence diagnosis without cytogenetic analysis. We have developed a sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker for B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans, which specifically amplifies a 1510-bp DNA fragment exclusively in B-carrying individuals. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and fiber FISH analyses showed that this marker is a tandemly repeated DNA sequence closely intermingled with 45S rDNA. PCR reactions showed the presence of SCAR-like sequences in the A chromosomes, but in two separate fragments, supporting the intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in this species. SCAR marker DNA sequence showed to be identical in B chromosome variants from several localities from Spain and Morocco, and it was very similar to those found in B chromosome variants from Greece and Armenia. This strongly suggests that this sequence was already present in the ancestral B chromosome of this species. In addition, the scarce sequence variation observed among several B variants from very distant populations suggests either a functional constraint or, more likely, a recent and unique origin for B chromosomes in this species. © 2011 by the Genetics Society of America

  11. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  12. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION AND CHROMOSOMAL ASSIGNMENT OF YEAST ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOMES CONTAINING HUMAN 3P13-P21-SPECIFIC SEQUENCE-TAGGED SITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MICHAELIS, SC; BARDENHEUER, W; LUX, A; SCHRAMM, A; GOCKEL, A; SIEBERT, R; WILLERS, C; SCHMIDTKE, K; TODT, B; VANDERHOUT, AH; BUYS, CHCM; HEPPELLPARTON, AC; RABBITTS, PH; UNGAR, S; SMITH, D; LEPASLIER, D; COHEN, D; OPALKA, B; SCHUTTE, J

    Human chromosomal region 3p12-p23 is proposed to harbor at least three tumor suppressor genes involved in the development of lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and other neoplasias. In order to identify one of these genes we defined sequence tagged sites (STSs) specific for 3p13-p24.2 by analyzing a

  14. Hoffman's violet and dahlia as specific stains for animal chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, M K

    1979-03-01

    The paper deals with staining of the chromosomes of animal testicular materials with two basic dyes, Hoffman's violet and dahlia of the triphenylmethane group, following iodine-dye procedure. The important finding, as presented herein, is that iodinated alcohol after staining can be substituted with various acids, both organic as well as inorganic, all of which act as trapping agent preventing leaching of the dye that binds with the chromosomal DNA. It is clear from this study that RNA is not involved by this process of staining, since treatment of stained sections with cold phosphoric acid at 5 degrees C for 20--25 min and then stained also reveals perfect colouration of the chromosomes without any cytoplasmic staining. The in vitro absorption properties of Hoffman's violet have also been presented herein. The probable mechanism of action of these dyes has been suggested.

  15. Chromosomal location and gene paucity of the male specific region on papaya Y chromosome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yu, Q.; Hou, S.; Hobza, Roman; Feltus, F.A.; Wang, X.; Jin, W.; Skelton, R.L.; Blas, A.; Lemke, C.; Saw, J.H.; Moore, P.H.; Alam, M.; Jiang, J.; Paterson, A.H.; Vyskot, Boris; Ming, R.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 278, č. 2 (2007), s. 177-185 ISSN 1617-4615 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA521/06/0056 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : Carica papaya * repetitive sequences * sex chromosome Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.978, year: 2007

  16. Maternal age-specific risk of non-chromosomal anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loane, M.; Dolk, H.; Morris, Joan K.

    To determine the excess risk of non-chromosomal congenital anomaly (NCA) among teenage mothers and older mothers. Population-based prevalence study using data from EUROCAT congenital anomaly registers in 23 regions of Europe in 15 countries, covering a total of 1.75 million births from 2000 to 2004.

  17. Cytological evidence for population-specific sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    3Dipartimento di Biologia Animale e dell'Uomo, Università di Torino, Via Accademia Albertina 13, 10123 Turin, Italy. *Corresponding author (Fax, 39 081 679233; Email, gaetano.odierna@unina.it). A chromosome study was carried out on a number of European and Central Asiatic diploid green toad populations by means ...

  18. Protocol for chromosome-specific probe construction using PRINS, micromanipulation and DOP-PCR techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO Z. PASSAMANI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chromosome-specific probes have been widely used in molecular cytogenetics, being obtained with different methods. In this study, a reproducible protocol for construction of chromosome-specific probes is proposed which associates in situ amplification (PRINS, micromanipulation and degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR. Human lymphocyte cultures were used to obtain metaphases from male and female individuals. The chromosomes were amplified via PRINS, and subcentromeric fragments of the X chromosome were microdissected using microneedles coupled to a phase contrast microscope. The fragments were amplified by DOP-PCR and labeled with tetramethyl-rhodamine-5-dUTP. The probes were used in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH procedure to highlight these specific regions in the metaphases. The results show one fluorescent red spot in male and two in female X chromosomes and interphase nuclei.

  19. Protocol for chromosome-specific probe construction using PRINS, micromanipulation and DOP-PCR techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamani, Paulo Z; Carvalho, Carlos R; Soares, Fernanda A F

    2018-01-01

    Chromosome-specific probes have been widely used in molecular cytogenetics, being obtained with different methods. In this study, a reproducible protocol for construction of chromosome-specific probes is proposed which associates in situ amplification (PRINS), micromanipulation and degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR). Human lymphocyte cultures were used to obtain metaphases from male and female individuals. The chromosomes were amplified via PRINS, and subcentromeric fragments of the X chromosome were microdissected using microneedles coupled to a phase contrast microscope. The fragments were amplified by DOP-PCR and labeled with tetramethyl-rhodamine-5-dUTP. The probes were used in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure to highlight these specific regions in the metaphases. The results show one fluorescent red spot in male and two in female X chromosomes and interphase nuclei.

  20. Development of chromosome-arm-specific microsatellite markers in Triticum aestivum (Poaceae) using NGS technology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nie, X.; Li, B.; Wang, L.; Liu, P.; Biradar, S. S.; Li, T.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Edwards, D.; Luo, M.; Weining, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 9 (2012), e369-e371 ISSN 0002-9122 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : chromosome-arm-specific DNA * flow-sorted chromosomes * next-generation sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.586, year: 2012

  1. Accuracy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of single gene and chromosomal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlinsky, Y.; Strom, C.; Rechitsky, S. [Reproductive Genetics Institute, Chicage, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a polar body inferred approach for preconception diagnosis of single gene and chromosomal disorders. Preconception PCR or FISH analysis was performed in a total of 310 first polar bodies for the following genetic conditions: cystic fibrosis, hemophilia A, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Tay Sachs disease, retinitis pigmentosa and common chromosomal trisomies. An important advantage of this approach is the avoidance of sperm (DNA) contamination, which is the major problem of PGD. We are currently applying FISH analysis of biopsied blastomeres, in combination with PCR or separately, and have demonstrated a significant improvement of the accuracy of PGD of X-linked disorders at this stage. Our data have also demonstrated feasibility of the application of FISH technique for PGD of chromosomal disorders. It was possible to detect chromosomal non-disjunctions and chromatid malsegregations in the first meiotic division, as well as to evaluate chromosomal mutations originating from the second meiotic nondisjunction.

  2. Assignment of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar linkage groups to specific chromosomes: Conservation of large syntenic blocks corresponding to whole chromosome arms in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koop Ben F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most teleost species, especially freshwater groups such as the Esocidae which are the closest relatives of salmonids, have a karyotype comprising 25 pairs of acrocentric chromosomes and 48–52 chromosome arms. After the common ancestor of salmonids underwent a whole genome duplication, its karyotype would have 100 chromosome arms, and this is reflected in the modal range of 96–104 seen in extant salmonids (e.g., rainbow trout. The Atlantic salmon is an exception among the salmonids as it has 72–74 chromosome arms and its karyotype includes 12 pairs of large acrocentric chromosomes, which appear to be the result of tandem fusions. The purpose of this study was to integrate the Atlantic salmon's linkage map and karyotype and to compare the chromosome map with that of rainbow trout. Results The Atlantic salmon genetic linkage groups were assigned to specific chromosomes in the European subspecies using fluorescence in situ hybridization with BAC probes containing genetic markers mapped to each linkage group. The genetic linkage groups were larger for metacentric chromosomes compared to acrocentric chromosomes of similar size. Comparison of the Atlantic salmon chromosome map with that of rainbow trout provides strong evidence for conservation of large syntenic blocks in these species, corresponding to entire chromosome arms in the rainbow trout. Conclusion It had been suggested that some of the large acrocentric chromosomes in Atlantic salmon are the result of tandem fusions, and that the small blocks of repetitive DNA in the middle of the arms represent the sites of chromosome fusions. The finding that the chromosomal regions on either side of the blocks of repetitive DNA within the larger acrocentric chromosomes correspond to different rainbow trout chromosome arms provides support for this hypothesis.

  3. DNA Cross-Bridging Shapes a Single Nucleus from a Set of Mitotic Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwer, Matthias; Schneider, Maximilian W G; Hoefler, Rudolf; Schmalhorst, Philipp S; Jude, Julian G; Zuber, Johannes; Gerlich, Daniel W

    2017-08-24

    Eukaryotic cells store their chromosomes in a single nucleus. This is important to maintain genomic integrity, as chromosomes packaged into separate nuclei (micronuclei) are prone to massive DNA damage. During mitosis, higher eukaryotes disassemble their nucleus and release individualized chromosomes for segregation. How numerous chromosomes subsequently reform a single nucleus has remained unclear. Using image-based screening of human cells, we identified barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) as a key factor guiding membranes to form a single nucleus. Unexpectedly, nuclear assembly does not require BAF's association with inner nuclear membrane proteins but instead relies on BAF's ability to bridge distant DNA sites. Live-cell imaging and in vitro reconstitution showed that BAF enriches around the mitotic chromosome ensemble to induce a densely cross-bridged chromatin layer that is mechanically stiff and limits membranes to the surface. Our study reveals that BAF-mediated changes in chromosome mechanics underlie nuclear assembly with broad implications for proper genome function. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inferential Structure Determination of Chromosomes from Single-Cell Hi-C Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilges, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome conformation capture (3C) techniques have revealed many fascinating insights into the spatial organization of genomes. 3C methods typically provide information about chromosomal contacts in a large population of cells, which makes it difficult to draw conclusions about the three-dimensional organization of genomes in individual cells. Recently it became possible to study single cells with Hi-C, a genome-wide 3C variant, demonstrating a high cell-to-cell variability of genome organization. In principle, restraint-based modeling should allow us to infer the 3D structure of chromosomes from single-cell contact data, but suffers from the sparsity and low resolution of chromosomal contacts. To address these challenges, we adapt the Bayesian Inferential Structure Determination (ISD) framework, originally developed for NMR structure determination of proteins, to infer statistical ensembles of chromosome structures from single-cell data. Using ISD, we are able to compute structural error bars and estimate model parameters, thereby eliminating potential bias imposed by ad hoc parameter choices. We apply and compare different models for representing the chromatin fiber and for incorporating singe-cell contact information. Finally, we extend our approach to the analysis of diploid chromosome data. PMID:28027298

  5. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other “precarious” features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  6. Efficient site-specific integration in Plasmodium falciparum chromosomes mediated by mycobacteriophage Bxb1 integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, Louis J; Muhle, Rebecca A; Moura, Pedro A; Ghosh, Pallavi; Hatfull, Graham F; Jacobs, William R; Fidock, David A

    2006-08-01

    Here we report an efficient, site-specific system of genetic integration into Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite chromosomes. This is mediated by mycobacteriophage Bxb1 integrase, which catalyzes recombination between an incoming attP and a chromosomal attB site. We developed P. falciparum lines with the attB site integrated into the glutaredoxin-like cg6 gene. Transfection of these attB(+) lines with a dual-plasmid system, expressing a transgene on an attP-containing plasmid together with a drug resistance gene and the integrase on a separate plasmid, produced recombinant parasites within 2 to 4 weeks that were genetically uniform for single-copy plasmid integration. Integrase-mediated recombination resulted in proper targeting of parasite proteins to intra-erythrocytic compartments, including the apicoplast, a plastid-like organelle. Recombinant attB x attP parasites were genetically stable in the absence of drug and were phenotypically homogeneous. This system can be exploited for rapid genetic integration and complementation analyses at any stage of the P. falciparum life cycle, and it illustrates the utility of Bxb1-based integrative recombination for genetic studies of intracellular eukaryotic organisms.

  7. Macronuclear genome structure of the ciliate Nyctotherus ovalis: Single-gene chromosomes and tiny introns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landweber Laura F

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nyctotherus ovalis is a single-celled eukaryote that has hydrogen-producing mitochondria and lives in the hindgut of cockroaches. Like all members of the ciliate taxon, it has two types of nuclei, a micronucleus and a macronucleus. N. ovalis generates its macronuclear chromosomes by forming polytene chromosomes that subsequently develop into macronuclear chromosomes by DNA elimination and rearrangement. Results We examined the structure of these gene-sized macronuclear chromosomes in N. ovalis. We determined the telomeres, subtelomeric regions, UTRs, coding regions and introns by sequencing a large set of macronuclear DNA sequences (4,242 and cDNAs (5,484 and comparing them with each other. The telomeres consist of repeats CCC(AAAACCCCn, similar to those in spirotrichous ciliates such as Euplotes, Sterkiella (Oxytricha and Stylonychia. Per sequenced chromosome we found evidence for either a single protein-coding gene, a single tRNA, or the complete ribosomal RNAs cluster. Hence the chromosomes appear to encode single transcripts. In the short subtelomeric regions we identified a few overrepresented motifs that could be involved in gene regulation, but there is no consensus polyadenylation site. The introns are short (21–29 nucleotides, and a significant fraction (1/3 of the tiny introns is conserved in the distantly related ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. As has been observed in P. tetraurelia, the N. ovalis introns tend to contain in-frame stop codons or have a length that is not dividable by three. This pattern causes premature termination of mRNA translation in the event of intron retention, and potentially degradation of unspliced mRNAs by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Conclusion The combination of short leaders, tiny introns and single genes leads to very minimal macronuclear chromosomes. The smallest we identified contained only 150 nucleotides.

  8. The use of laser microdissection for the preparation of chromosome-specific painting probes in farm animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubickova, Svatava; Cernohorska, Halina; Musilova, Petra; Rubes, Jiri

    2002-01-01

    Laser microbeam microdissection and laser pressure catapulting procedure were used for the construction of chromosome-specific painting probes, arm-specific probes and probes for chromosomal subfragments. We report on a method for generation of fluorescence in-situ hybridization probes from laser dissected chromosomes of farm animals. So far, using the described method, a set of chromosome-specific painting probes has been obtained for all porcine chromosomes, 17 chromosomes of cattle and selected equine chromosomes. It is concluded that the laser technology appears to be a useful and powerful tool for the construction of chromosome-specifi c painting probes. Its main advantage is the fast non-contact collection of chromosomes.

  9. Sequence analysis of cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassaDuch.) using microdissected single somatic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Tomohiro; Shirasawa, Kenta; Terachi, Mayuko; Isobe, Sachiko

    2017-01-01

    Cultivated strawberry ( Fragaria  ×  ananassa Duch.) has homoeologous chromosomes because of allo-octoploidy. For example, two homoeologous chromosomes that belong to different sub-genome of allopolyploids have similar base sequences. Thus, when conducting de novo assembly of DNA sequences, it is difficult to determine whether these sequences are derived from the same chromosome. To avoid the difficulties associated with homoeologous chromosomes and demonstrate the possibility of sequencing allopolyploids using single chromosomes, we conducted sequence analysis using microdissected single somatic chromosomes of cultivated strawberry. Three hundred and ten somatic chromosomes of the Japanese octoploid strawberry 'Reiko' were individually selected under a light microscope using a microdissection system. DNA from 288 of the dissected chromosomes was successfully amplified using a DNA amplification kit. Using next-generation sequencing, we decoded the base sequences of the amplified DNA segments, and on the basis of mapping, we identified DNA sequences from 144 samples that were best matched to the reference genomes of the octoploid strawberry, F.  ×  ananassa , and the diploid strawberry, F. vesca . The 144 samples were classified into seven pseudo-molecules of F. vesca . The coverage rates of the DNA sequences from the single chromosome onto all pseudo-molecular sequences varied from 3 to 29.9%. We demonstrated an efficient method for sequence analysis of allopolyploid plants using microdissected single chromosomes. On the basis of our results, we believe that whole-genome analysis of allopolyploid plants can be enhanced using methodology that employs microdissected single chromosomes.

  10. Gender-specific gene expression in post-mortem human brain: localization to sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vawter, Marquis P; Evans, Simon; Choudary, Prabhakara; Tomita, Hiroaki; Meador-Woodruff, Jim; Molnar, Margherita; Li, Jun; Lopez, Juan F; Myers, Rick; Cox, David; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda; Jones, Edward G; Bunney, William E

    2004-02-01

    Gender differences in brain development and in the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression have been reported. Gender differences in human brain might be related to patterns of gene expression. Microarray technology is one useful method for investigation of gene expression in brain. We investigated gene expression, cell types, and regional expression patterns of differentially expressed sex chromosome genes in brain. We profiled gene expression in male and female dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and cerebellum using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platform. Differentially expressed genes between males and females on the Y chromosome (DBY, SMCY, UTY, RPS4Y, and USP9Y) and X chromosome (XIST) were confirmed using real-time PCR measurements. In situ hybridization confirmed the differential expression of gender-specific genes and neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY in three brain regions examined. The XIST gene, which silences gene expression on regions of the X chromosome, is expressed in a subset of neurons. Since a subset of neurons express gender-specific genes, neural subpopulations may exhibit a subtle sexual dimorphism at the level of differences in gene regulation and function. The distinctive pattern of neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY and other sex chromosome genes in neuronal subpopulations may possibly contribute to gender differences in prevalence noted for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Studies of the protein expression of these sex-chromosome-linked genes in brain tissue are required to address the functional consequences of the observed gene expression differences.

  11. The chromosome 9 ALS and FTD locus is probably derived from a single founder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mok, K.; Traynor, B.J.; Schymick, J.; Tienari, P.J.; Laaksovirta, H.; Peuralinna, T.; Myllykangas, L.; Chio, A.; Shatunov, A.; Boeve, B.F.; Boxer, A.L.; Jesus-Hernandez, M.; Mackenzie, I.R.; Waite, A.; Williams, N.; Morris, H.R.; Simon-Sanchez, J.; van Swieten, J.C.; Heutink, P.; Restagno, G.; Mora, G.; Morrison, K.E.; Shaw, P.J.; Rollinson, P.S.; Al-Chalabi, A.; Rademakers, R.; Pickering-Brown, S.; Orrell, R.W.; Nalls, M.A.; Hardy, J.

    2012-01-01

    We and others have recently reported an association between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 9p21 in several populations. Here we show that the associated haplotype is the same in all populations and that several families previously shown to have

  12. The utility of flow sorting to identify chromosomes carrying a single copy transgene in wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cápal, Petr; Endo, Takashi R.; Vrána, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Komínková, Eva; Mora-Ramirez, I.; Weschke, W.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, APR 25 (2016), s. 24 ISSN 1746-4811 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR GBP501/12/G090 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Transgene localization * Flow cytometric sorting * Single chromosome amplification Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.510, year: 2016

  13. Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 19q13.2-13.3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Jiaoyang; Vogel, Ulla; Gerdes, Lars Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    The genetic susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma (BCC) among Danish psoriatic patients was investigated in association studies with 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 19q13.2-3. The results show a significant association between BCC and the A-allele of a polymorphism in ERCCI exon4...

  14. Sex-specific Trans-regulatory Variation on the Drosophila melanogaster X Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Michael; Dean, Rebecca; Rogell, Björn; Friberg, Urban

    2015-01-01

    The X chromosome constitutes a unique genomic environment because it is present in one copy in males, but two copies in females. This simple fact has motivated several theoretical predictions with respect to how standing genetic variation on the X chromosome should differ from the autosomes. Unmasked expression of deleterious mutations in males and a lower census size are expected to reduce variation, while allelic variants with sexually antagonistic effects, and potentially those with a sex-specific effect, could accumulate on the X chromosome and contribute to increased genetic variation. In addition, incomplete dosage compensation of the X chromosome could potentially dampen the male-specific effects of random mutations, and promote the accumulation of X-linked alleles with sexually dimorphic phenotypic effects. Here we test both the amount and the type of genetic variation on the X chromosome within a population of Drosophila melanogaster, by comparing the proportion of X linked and autosomal trans-regulatory SNPs with a sexually concordant and discordant effect on gene expression. We find that the X chromosome is depleted for SNPs with a sexually concordant effect, but hosts comparatively more SNPs with a sexually discordant effect. Interestingly, the contrasting results for SNPs with sexually concordant and discordant effects are driven by SNPs with a larger influence on expression in females than expression in males. Furthermore, the distribution of these SNPs is shifted towards regions where dosage compensation is predicted to be less complete. These results suggest that intrinsic properties of dosage compensation influence either the accumulation of different types of trans-factors and/or their propensity to accumulate mutations. Our findings document a potential mechanistic basis for sex-specific genetic variation, and identify the X as a reservoir for sexually dimorphic phenotypic variation. These results have general implications for X chromosome

  15. Tumor-specific chromosome mis-segregation controls cancer plasticity by maintaining tumor heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjie Hu

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy with chromosome instability is a cancer hallmark. We studied chromosome 7 (Chr7 copy number variation (CNV in gliomas and in primary cultures derived from them. We found tumor heterogeneity with cells having Chr7-CNV commonly occurs in gliomas, with a higher percentage of cells in high-grade gliomas carrying more than 2 copies of Chr7, as compared to low-grade gliomas. Interestingly, all Chr7-aneuploid cell types in the parental culture of established glioma cell lines reappeared in single-cell-derived subcultures. We then characterized the biology of three syngeneic glioma cultures dominated by different Chr7-aneuploid cell types. We found phenotypic divergence for cells following Chr7 mis-segregation, which benefited overall tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Mathematical modeling suggested the involvement of chromosome instability and interactions among cell subpopulations in restoring the optimal equilibrium of tumor cell types. Both our experimental data and mathematical modeling demonstrated that the complexity of tumor heterogeneity could be enhanced by the existence of chromosomes with structural abnormality, in addition to their mis-segregations. Overall, our findings show, for the first time, the involvement of chromosome instability in maintaining tumor heterogeneity, which underlies the enhanced growth, persistence and treatment resistance of cancers.

  16. Domain Specific Attentional Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, Joel P.; Chiodo, Renee; Mattei, Victoria; Simon, Tony J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the defining cognitive characteristics of the chromosome 22q deletion syndrome (DS22q11.2) is visuospatial processing impairments. The purpose of this study was to investigate and extend the specific attentional profile of children with this disorder using both an object-based attention task and an inhibition of return task. A group of…

  17. Assignment of Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Linkage Groups to Specific Chromosomes Reveals a Karyotype with Multiple Rearrangements of the Chromosome Arms of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Ruth B.; Park, Linda K.; Naish, Kerry A.

    2013-01-01

    The Chinook salmon genetic linkage groups have been assigned to specific chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization with bacterial artificial chromosome probes containing genetic markers mapped to each linkage group in Chinook salmon and rainbow trout. Comparison of the Chinook salmon chromosome map with that of rainbow trout provides strong evidence for conservation of large syntenic blocks in these species, corresponding to entire chromosome arms in the rainbow trout as expected. In almost every case, the markers were found at approximately the same location on the chromosome arm in each species, suggesting conservation of marker order on the chromosome arms of the two species in most cases. Although theoretically a few centric fissions could convert the karyotype of rainbow trout (2N = 58–64) into that of Chinook salmon (2N = 68) or vice versa, our data suggest that chromosome arms underwent multiple centric fissions and subsequent new centric fusions to form the current karyotypes. The morphology of only approximately one-third of the chromosome pairs have been conserved between the two species. PMID:24170739

  18. Construction of a DNA library representing 15q11-13 by subtraction of two flow sorted marker chromosome-specific libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennow, E.; Werelius, B.; Nordenskjoeld, M. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Constitutional extra {open_quotes}marker chromosomes{close_quotes} are found in {approx}0.5/1000 of newborns. Of these, 50% are inverted duplications of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 15, including two variants; (1) inv dup(15)(pter{yields}q11:q11{yields}pter) and (2) inv dup(15) (pter{yields}q12-13::q12-13{yields}pter). Variant (1) is found in phenotypically normal individuals, whereas variant (2) will produce a typical clinical picture including mental retardation, autism, hyperactivity and discrete dysmorphic features. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using single copy probes from the Prader-Willi region confirms these observations as well as chromosome painting using a flow-sorted marker chromosome-specific library from a variant (1) marker, hybridized to the chromosomes of a patient with a variant (2) marker chromosome. Followingly, a flow-sorted biotinylated variant (1) library was subtracted from a non-labeled variant (2) library using magnetic beads and subsequent amplification by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR). The successful result was demonstrated by using the amplified material for chromosome painting on chromosome slides from variant (1) and variant (2) patients. We have constructed a library from 15q11-13. This region contains genes producing a specific abnormal phenotype when found in a tri- or tetrasomic state. The region also contains the genes responsible for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes when the paternal/maternal copy is missing, respectively. It is therefore a region where parental imprinting plays an important role. The isolated library may be used to isolate single copy clones which will allow further investigations of this region.

  19. Intra-Nuclear Single-Particle Tracking (I-SPT) to Reveal the Functional Architecture of Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Récamier, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome architecture needs to be investigated in relation with the chemical function of DNA. The kinetics of gene expression, DNA replication, and repair are driven by the mechanisms by which a functional nuclear protein finds its substrate in the nucleus. Single-particle tracking (SPT) is a method to quantify fluorescent molecules dynamics from the tracks of the single molecules recorded by high-resolution microscopes. SPT offers direct observation of the movement and single-molecule resolution. Usually SPT is performed on membranes because of higher contrast. Here, we introduce a novel method to record the trajectories of weakly fluorescent molecules in the nucleus of living cells. I-SPT uses some specific detection and analysis tools to enable the computation of reliable statistics on nuclear particle movement.

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-induced transgene insertion and telomere-associated truncation of a single human chromosome for chromosome engineering in CHO and A9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Narumi; Hiramatsu, Kei; Uno, Katsuhiro; Komoto, Shinya; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2017-10-06

    Chromosome engineering techniques including gene insertion, telomere-associated truncation and microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) are powerful tools for generation of humanised model animal, containing megabase-sized genomic fragments. However, these techniques require two cell lines: homologous recombination (HR)-proficient DT40 cells for chromosome modification, and CHO cells for transfer to recipient cells. Here we show an improved technique using a combination of CRISPR/Cas9-induced HR in CHO and mouse A9 cells without DT40 cells following MMCT to recipient cells. Transgene insertion was performed in CHO cells with the insertion of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) using CRISPR/Cas9 and a circular targeting vector containing two 3 kb HR arms. Telomere-associated truncation was performed in CHO cells using CRISPR/Cas9 and a linearised truncation vector containing a single 7 kb HR arm at the 5' end, a 1 kb artificial telomere at the 3' end. At least 11% and 6% of the targeting efficiency were achieved for transgene insertion and telomere-associated truncation, respectively. The transgene insertion was also confirmed in A9 cells (29%). The modified chromosomes were transferrable to other cells. Thus, this CHO and A9 cell-mediated chromosome engineering using the CRISPR/Cas9 for direct transfer of the modified chromosome is a rapid technique that will facilitate chromosome manipulation.

  1. Data Mining Empowers the Generation of a Novel Class of Chromosome-specific DNA Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Kwan, Johnson; Wang, Mei; O' Brien, Benjamin

    2011-03-08

    Probes that allow accurate delineation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in interphase or metaphase cell nuclei have become important clinical tools that deliver life-saving information about the gender or chromosomal make-up of a product of conception or the probability of an embryo to implant, as well as the definition of tumor-specific genetic signatures. Often such highly specific DNA probes are proprietary in nature and have been the result of extensive probe selection and optimization procedures. We describe a novel approach that eliminates costly and time consuming probe selection and testing by applying data mining and common bioinformatics tools. Similar to a rational drug design process in which drug-protein interactions are modeled in the computer, the rational probe design described here uses a set of criteria and publicly available bioinformatics software to select the desired probe molecules from libraries comprised of hundreds of thousands of probe molecules. Examples describe the selection of DNA probes for the human X and Y chromosomes, both with unprecedented performance, but in a similar fashion, this approach can be applied to other chromosomes or species.

  2. Multiple displacement amplification of the DNA from single flow–sorted plant chromosome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cápal, Petr; Blavet, Nicolas; Vrána, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 4 (2015), s. 838-844 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : whole-genome amplification * single-chromosome genomics * next-generation sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.468, year: 2015

  3. Sequence analysis of cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch. using microdissected single somatic chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Yanagi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch. has homoeologous chromosomes because of allo-octoploidy. For example, two homoeologous chromosomes that belong to different sub-genome of allopolyploids have similar base sequences. Thus, when conducting de novo assembly of DNA sequences, it is difficult to determine whether these sequences are derived from the same chromosome. To avoid the difficulties associated with homoeologous chromosomes and demonstrate the possibility of sequencing allopolyploids using single chromosomes, we conducted sequence analysis using microdissected single somatic chromosomes of cultivated strawberry. Results Three hundred and ten somatic chromosomes of the Japanese octoploid strawberry ‘Reiko’ were individually selected under a light microscope using a microdissection system. DNA from 288 of the dissected chromosomes was successfully amplified using a DNA amplification kit. Using next-generation sequencing, we decoded the base sequences of the amplified DNA segments, and on the basis of mapping, we identified DNA sequences from 144 samples that were best matched to the reference genomes of the octoploid strawberry, F. × ananassa, and the diploid strawberry, F. vesca. The 144 samples were classified into seven pseudo-molecules of F. vesca. The coverage rates of the DNA sequences from the single chromosome onto all pseudo-molecular sequences varied from 3 to 29.9%. Conclusion We demonstrated an efficient method for sequence analysis of allopolyploid plants using microdissected single chromosomes. On the basis of our results, we believe that whole-genome analysis of allopolyploid plants can be enhanced using methodology that employs microdissected single chromosomes.

  4. DNA deformability changes of single base pair mutants within CDE binding sites in S. Cerevisiae centromere DNA correlate with measured chromosomal loss rates and CDE binding site symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Kenneth A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromeres in yeast (S. cerevisiae are organized by short DNA sequences (125 bp on each chromosome consisting of 2 conserved elements: CDEI and CDEIII spaced by a CDEII region. CDEI and CDEIII are critical sequence specific protein binding sites necessary for correct centromere formation and following assembly with proteins, are positioned near each other on a specialized nucleosome. Hegemann et al. BioEssays 1993, 15: 451–460 reported single base DNA mutants within the critical CDEI and CDEIII binding sites on the centromere of chromosome 6 and quantitated centromere loss of function, which they measured as loss rates for the different chromosome 6 mutants during cell division. Olson et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998, 95: 11163–11168 reported the use of protein-DNA crystallography data to produce a DNA dinucleotide protein deformability energetic scale (PD-scale that describes local DNA deformability by sequence specific binding proteins. We have used the PD-scale to investigate the DNA sequence dependence of the yeast chromosome 6 mutants' loss rate data. Each single base mutant changes 2 PD-scale values at that changed base position relative to the wild type. In this study, we have utilized these mutants to demonstrate a correlation between the change in DNA deformability of the CDEI and CDEIII core sites and the overall experimentally measured chromosome loss rates of the chromosome 6 mutants. Results In the CDE I and CDEIII core binding regions an increase in the magnitude of change in deformability of chromosome 6 single base mutants with respect to the wild type correlates to an increase in the measured chromosome loss rate. These correlations were found to be significant relative to 105 Monte Carlo randomizations of the dinucleotide PD-scale applied to the same calculation. A net loss of deformability also tends to increase the loss rate. Binding site position specific, 4 data-point correlations were also

  5. Identification of Bacillus anthracis specific chromosomal sequences by suppressive subtractive hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redkar Rajendra

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus are closely related members of the B. cereus-group of bacilli. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH was used to identify specific chromosomal sequences unique to B. anthracis. Results Two SSH libraries were generated. Genomic DNA from plasmid-cured B. anthracis was used as the tester DNA in both libraries, while genomic DNA from either B. cereus or B. thuringiensis served as the driver DNA. Progressive screening of the libraries by colony filter and Southern blot analyses identified 29 different clones that were specific for the B. anthracis chromosome relative not only to the respective driver DNAs, but also to seven other different strains of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis included in the process. The nucleotide sequences of the clones were compared with those found in genomic databases, revealing that over half of the clones were located into 2 regions on the B. anthracis chromosome. Conclusions Genes encoding potential cell wall synthesis proteins dominated one region, while bacteriophage-related sequences dominated the other region. The latter supports the hypothesis that acquisition of these bacteriophage sequences occurred during or after speciation of B. anthracis relative to B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. This study provides insight into the chromosomal differences between B. anthracis and its closest phylogenetic relatives.

  6. Chromosomal aberrations in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: 15-year single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosova, Marie; Volejnikova, Jana; Porizkova, Ilona; Holzerova, Milena; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Novak, Zbynek; Vrbkova, Jana; Mihal, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Genetic analysis of leukemic cells significantly impacts prognosis and treatment stratification in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Our retrospective single center study of 86 children with ALL enrolled into three consecutive treatment protocols (ALL-BFM 90, ALL-BFM 95 and ALL IC-BFM 2002) between 1991 and 2007 demonstrates the importance of conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Cytogenetic and FISH examinations were performed successfully in 82/86 (95.3%) patients and chromosomal changes were detected in 78 of the 82 (95.1%) patients: in 69/73 patients with B-cell precursor (BCP)-ALL and in 9/9 patients with T-lineage ALL (T-ALL). The most frequent chromosomal changes in subgroups divided according to WHO classification independent of treatment protocol and leukemia subtype were hyperdiploidy in 36 patients (with ≥50 chromosomes in 23 patients, with 47-49 chromosomes 13 patients) followed by translocation t(12;21) with ETV6/RUNX1 fusion detected by FISH in 18 (22%) patients. Additional changes were detected in 16/18 (88.8%) ETV6/RUNX1-positive ALL patients with predominant deletion or rearrangement of untranslocated ETV6 allele. Unique aberrations were detected in 4 patients and dicentric chromosomes in 8 patients, one with T-ALL. These results demonstrate that cytogenetics and FISH successfully provided important prognostic information and revealed not only recurrent but also new and rare rearrangements requiring further investigation in terms of prognostic significance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Karyotypic relationships among Equus grevyi, Equus burchelli and domestic horse defined using horse chromosome arm-specific probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, P; Kubickova, S; Zrnova, E; Horin, P; Vahala, J; Rubes, J

    2007-01-01

    Using laser microdissection we prepared a set of horse chromosome arm-specific probes. Most of the probes were generated from horse chromosomes, some of them were derived from Equus zebra hartmannae. The set of probes were hybridized onto E. grevyi chromosomes in order to establish a genome-wide chromosomal correspondence between this zebra and horse. The use of arm-specific probes provided us with more information on the mutual arrangement of the genomes than we could obtain by means of whole-chromosome paints generated by flow sorting, even if we used reciprocal painting with probe sets from both species. By comparison of our results and results of comparative mapping in E. burchelli, we also established the chromosomal correspondence between E. grevyi and E. burchelli, providing evidence for a very close karyotypic relationship between these two zebra species. Establishment of the comparative map for E. grevyi contributes to the knowledge of the karyotypic phylogeny in the Equidae family.

  8. Rapid Development and Characterization of Chromosome Specific Translocation Line of Thinopyrum elongatum with Improved Dough Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The protein content and its type are principal factors affecting wheat (Triticum aestivum end product quality. Among the wheat proteins, glutenin proteins, especially, high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS are major determinants of processing quality. Wheat and its primary gene pool have limited variation in terms of HMW-GS alleles. Wild relatives of wheat are an important source of genetic variation. For improvement of wheat processing quality its wild relative Thinopyrum elongatum with significant potential was utilized. An attempt was made to replace Th. elongatum chromosome long arm (1EL carrying HMW-GS genes related to high dough strength with chromosome 1AL of wheat with least or negative effect on dough strength while retaining the chromosomes 1DL and 1BL with a positive effect on bread making quality. To create chromosome specific translocation line [1EL(1AS], double monosomic of chromosomes 1E and 1A were created and further crossed with different cultivars and homoeologous pairing suppressor mutant line PhI. The primary selection was based upon glutenin and gliadin protein profiles, followed by sequential genomic in situ hybridization (GISH and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH. These steps significantly reduced time, efforts, and economic cost in the generation of translocation line. In order to assess the effect of translocation on wheat quality, background recovery was carried out by backcrossing with recurrent parent for several generations and then selfing while selecting in each generation. Good recovery of parent background indicated the development of almost near isogenic line (NIL. Morphologically also translocation line was similar to recipient cultivar N61 that was further confirmed by seed storage protein profiles, RP-HPLC and scanning electron microscopy. The processing quality characteristics of translocation line (BC4F6 indicated significant improvement in the gluten performance index (GPI, dough mixing

  9. Allele-specific marker generation and linkage mapping on the Xiphophorus sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolcock, B; Kazianis, S; Lucito, R; Walter, R B; Kallman, K D; Morizot, D C; Vielkind, J R

    2006-01-01

    There is great interest in the sex chromosomes of Xiphophorus fishes because both WY/YY and XX/XY sex-determining mechanisms function in these species, with at least one taxon possessing all three types of sex chromosomes, and because in certain interspecific hybrids melanoma arises as a consequence of inheritance of the sex-linked macromelanophore determining locus (MDL). Representational difference analysis (RDA) has been used to clone two sequences from the sex-determining region of X. maculatus, including a cholinergic receptor, nicotinic, delta polypeptide (CHRND) orthologue. Allele-specific assays for these sequences, as well as for the sex-linked XMRK1 and XMRK2 genes, were developed to distinguish W, X, and Y chromosomes derived from a X. maculatus (XX/XY) strain and a X. helleri (WY/YY) strain. Linkage mapping localized these markers to linkage group (LG) 24. No recombinants were observed between XMRK2 and MDL, confirming a role for XMRK2 in macromelanophore development. Although the master sex-determining (SD) locus certainly resides on Xiphophorus LG 24, autosomal loci are probably involved in sex determination as well, as indicated by the abnormal sex ratios in the backcross hybrids that contrast theoretical predictions based on LG 24 genotyping. Marker development and allelic discrimination on the Xiphophorus sex chromosomes should prove highly useful for studies that utilize this genus as an animal model.

  10. A mitosis-specific and R loop-driven ATR pathway promotes faithful chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeche, Lilian; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Buisson, Rémi; Zou, Lee

    2018-01-05

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase is crucial for DNA damage and replication stress responses. Here, we describe an unexpected role of ATR in mitosis. Acute inhibition or degradation of ATR in mitosis induces whole-chromosome missegregation. The effect of ATR ablation is not due to altered cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) activity, DNA damage responses, or unscheduled DNA synthesis but to loss of an ATR function at centromeres. In mitosis, ATR localizes to centromeres through Aurora A-regulated association with centromere protein F (CENP-F), allowing ATR to engage replication protein A (RPA)-coated centromeric R loops. As ATR is activated at centromeres, it stimulates Aurora B through Chk1, preventing formation of lagging chromosomes. Thus, a mitosis-specific and R loop-driven ATR pathway acts at centromeres to promote faithful chromosome segregation, revealing functions of R loops and ATR in suppressing chromosome instability. Copyright © 2018, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Identification of ovule transcripts from the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region (ASGR-carrier chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozias-Akins Peggy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apomixis, asexual seed production in plants, holds great potential for agriculture as a means to fix hybrid vigor. Apospory is a form of apomixis where the embryo develops from an unreduced egg that is derived from a somatic nucellar cell, the aposporous initial, via mitosis. Understanding the molecular mechanism regulating aposporous initial specification will be a critical step toward elucidation of apomixis and also provide insight into developmental regulation and downstream signaling that results in apomixis. To discover candidate transcripts for regulating aposporous initial specification in P. squamulatum, we compared two transcriptomes derived from microdissected ovules at the stage of aposporous initial formation between the apomictic donor parent, P. squamulatum (accession PS26, and an apomictic derived backcross 8 (BC8 line containing only the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region (ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum. Toward this end, two transcriptomes derived from ovules of an apomictic donor parent and its apomictic backcross derivative at the stage of apospory initiation, were sequenced using 454-FLX technology. Results Using 454-FLX technology, we generated 332,567 reads with an average read length of 147 base pairs (bp for the PS26 ovule transcriptome library and 363,637 reads with an average read length of 142 bp for the BC8 ovule transcriptome library. A total of 33,977 contigs from the PS26 ovule transcriptome library and 26,576 contigs from the BC8 ovule transcriptome library were assembled using the Multifunctional Inertial Reference Assembly program. Using stringent in silico parameters, 61 transcripts were predicted to map to the ASGR-carrier chromosome, of which 49 transcripts were verified as ASGR-carrier chromosome specific. One of the alien expressed genes could be assigned as tightly linked to the ASGR by screening of apomictic and sexual F1s. Only one transcript, which did not map to the ASGR

  12. Screening of a Brassica napus bacterial artificial chromosome library using highly parallel single nucleotide polymorphism assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Efficient screening of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based markers is feasible provided that a multidimensional pooling strategy is implemented. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be screened in multiplexed format, therefore this marker type lends itself particularly well for medium- to high-throughput applications. Combining the power of multiplex-PCR assays with a multidimensional pooling system may prove to be especially challenging in a polyploid genome. In polyploid genomes two classes of SNPs need to be distinguished, polymorphisms between accessions (intragenomic SNPs) and those differentiating between homoeologous genomes (intergenomic SNPs). We have assessed whether the highly parallel Illumina GoldenGate® Genotyping Assay is suitable for the screening of a BAC library of the polyploid Brassica napus genome. Results A multidimensional screening platform was developed for a Brassica napus BAC library which is composed of almost 83,000 clones. Intragenomic and intergenomic SNPs were included in Illumina’s GoldenGate® Genotyping Assay and both SNP classes were used successfully for screening of the multidimensional BAC pools of the Brassica napus library. An optimized scoring method is proposed which is especially valuable for SNP calling of intergenomic SNPs. Validation of the genotyping results by independent methods revealed a success of approximately 80% for the multiplex PCR-based screening regardless of whether intra- or intergenomic SNPs were evaluated. Conclusions Illumina’s GoldenGate® Genotyping Assay can be efficiently used for screening of multidimensional Brassica napus BAC pools. SNP calling was specifically tailored for the evaluation of BAC pool screening data. The developed scoring method can be implemented independently of plant reference samples. It is demonstrated that intergenomic SNPs represent a powerful tool for BAC library screening of a polyploid genome

  13. Extending the scope of diagnostic chromosome analysis: detection of single gene defects using high-resolution SNP microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Damien L; Stark, Zornitza; Amor, David J; Burgess, Trent; Butler, Kathy; Corrie, Sylvea; Francis, David; Ganesamoorthy, Devika; Hills, Louise; James, Paul A; O'Rielly, Darren; Oertel, Ralph; Savarirayan, Ravi; Prabhakara, Krishnamurthy; Salce, Nicholas; Slater, Howard R

    2011-12-01

    Microarray analysis has provided significant advances in the diagnosis of conditions resulting from submicroscopic chromosome abnormalities. It has been recommended that array testing should be a "first tier" test in the evaluation of individuals with intellectual disability, developmental delay, congenital anomalies, and autism. The availability of arrays with increasingly high probe coverage and resolution has increased the detection of decreasingly small copy number changes (CNCs) down to the intragenic or even exon level. Importantly, arrays that genotype SNPs also detect extended regions of homozygosity. We describe 14 examples of single gene disorders caused by intragenic changes from a consecutive set of 6,500 tests using high-resolution SNP microarrays. These cases illustrate the increased scope of cytogenetic testing beyond dominant chromosome rearrangements that typically contain many genes. Nine of the cases confirmed the clinical diagnosis, that is, followed a "phenotype to genotype" approach. Five were diagnosed by the laboratory analysis in the absence of a specific clinical diagnosis, that is, followed a "genotype to phenotype" approach. Two were clinically significant, incidental findings. The importance of astute clinical assessment and laboratory-clinician consultation is emphasized to optimize the value of microarrays in the diagnosis of disorders caused by single gene copy number and sequence mutations. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Detection of Turner syndrome using X-chromosome inactivation specific differentially methylated CpG sites: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Guo, Xiaohong; Tian, Tian; Wang, Teng; Li, Qiaoli; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yun; Xing, Qinghe; He, Lin; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2017-05-01

    Early diagnosis of Turner syndrome (TS) may improve preventive measures and treatment. X-chromosome inactivation specific differentially methylated CpG sites (XIDMSs) that are high methylated in inactive X chromosomes (Xi) and unmethylated in active X chromosomes (Xa) may be potential makers for TS detection. The candidate XIDMSs were screened from 9 male and 12 female DNA samples with normal karyotypes using the Illumina 450k array and validated by bisulfite sequencing PCR and pyrosequencing assay. X chromosome dosage was calculated according to the methylation level of multiple XIDMSs. Overall, 108 candidate XIDMSs were screened by the 450k array. Validations indicated that XIDMSs gathered and formed the X-chromosome inactivation specific differentially methylated regions (XIDMRs). Using 3 XIDMRs at SAT1, UXT and UTP14A loci, 36 TS, 22 normal female and 6 male samples were analyzed. Methylation levels of the 20 XIDMSs in the XIDMRs could distinguish between TS and normal female DNA samples, the X chromosome dosage was consistent with karyotyping data. Analyzing samples of 2 triple X syndrome and 3 Klinefelter syndrome patients suggested that this method could be used to detect X chromosome aneuploids other than TS. XIDMSs are widely spread along the X chromosome and might be effective markers for detection of TS and other X chromosome aneuploids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome is a mosaic of discrete sequence classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skaletsky, Helen; Kuroda-Kawaguchi, Tomoko; Minx, Patrick J.; Cordum, Holland S.; Hillier, LaDeana; Brown, Laura G.; Repping, Sjoerd; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Ali, Johar; Bieri, Tamberlyn; Chinwalla, Asif; Delehaunty, Andrew; Delehaunty, Kim; Du, Hui; Fewell, Ginger; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Graves, Tina; Hou, Shun-Fang; Latrielle, Philip; Leonard, Shawn; Mardis, Elaine; Maupin, Rachel; McPherson, John; Miner, Tracie; Nash, William; Nguyen, Christine; Ozersky, Philip; Pepin, Kymberlie; Rock, Susan; Rohlfing, Tracy; Scott, Kelsi; Schultz, Brian; Strong, Cindy; Tin-Wollam, Aye; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Waterston, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard K.; Rozen, Steve; Page, David C.

    2003-01-01

    The male-specific region of the Y chromosome, the MSY, differentiates the sexes and comprises 95% of the chromosome's length. Here, we report that the MSY is a mosaic of heterochromatic sequences and three classes of euchromatic sequences: X-transposed, X-degenerate and ampliconic. These classes

  16. Bookmarking by specific and nonspecific binding of FoxA1 pioneer factor to mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Juan Manuel; Donahue, Greg; Becker, Justin S; He, Ximiao; Vinson, Charles; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2013-02-01

    While most transcription factors exit the chromatin during mitosis and the genome becomes silent, a subset of factors remains and "bookmarks" genes for rapid reactivation as cells progress through the cell cycle. However, it is unknown whether such bookmarking factors bind to chromatin similarly in mitosis and how different binding capacities among them relate to function. We compared a diverse set of transcription factors involved in liver differentiation and found markedly different extents of mitotic chromosome binding. Among them, the pioneer factor FoxA1 exhibits the greatest extent of mitotic chromosome binding. Genomically, ~15% of the FoxA1 interphase target sites are bound in mitosis, including at genes that are important for liver differentiation. Biophysical, genome mapping, and mutagenesis studies of FoxA1 reveals two different modes of binding to mitotic chromatin. Specific binding in mitosis occurs at sites that continue to be bound from interphase. Nonspecific binding in mitosis occurs across the chromosome due to the intrinsic chromatin affinity of FoxA1. Both specific and nonspecific binding contribute to timely reactivation of target genes post-mitosis. These studies reveal an unexpected diversity in the mechanisms by which transcription factors help retain cell identity during mitosis.

  17. Specific gene expression profiles and chromosomal abnormalities are associated with infant disseminated neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushner Brian

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroblastoma (NB tumours have the highest incidence of spontaneous remission, especially among the stage 4s NB subgroup affecting infants. Clinical distinction of stage 4s from lethal stage 4 can be difficult, but critical for therapeutic decisions. The aim of this study was to investigate chromosomal alterations and differential gene expression amongst infant disseminated NB subgroups. Methods Thirty-five NB tumours from patients diagnosed at Results All stage 4s patients underwent spontaneous remission, only 48% stage 4 patients survived despite combined modality therapy. Stage 4 tumours were 90% near-diploid/tetraploid, 44% MYCN amplified, 77% had 1p LOH (50% 1p36, 23% 11q and/or 14q LOH (27% and 47% had 17q gain. Stage 4s were 90% near-triploid, none MYCN amplified and LOH was restricted to 11q. Initial comparison analyses between stage 4s and 4 P P = 0.0054, 91% with higher expression in stage 4. Less definite expression profiles were observed between stage 4s and 4 P P = 0.005 was maintained. Distinct gene expression profiles but no significant association with specific chromosomal region localization was observed between stage 4s and stage 4 Conclusion Specific chromosomal aberrations are associated with distinct gene expression profiles which characterize spontaneously regressing or aggressive infant NB, providing the biological basis for the distinct clinical behaviour.

  18. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz-Ulrich G. Weier

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols.

  19. Specific cytogenetic labeling of bovine spermatozoa bearing X or Y chromosomes using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribiu Edmond-Paul

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract X and Y specific probes were identified in order to apply the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH technique to bovine spermatozoa. For Y chromosome detection, the BRY4a repetitive probe, covering three quarters of the chromosome, was used. For X chromosome detection, a goat Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC specific to the X chromosome of bovine and goats and giving a strong FISH signal was used. Each probe labeled roughly 45% of sperm cells. The hybridization method will be useful for evaluating the ratio of X- and Y- bearing spermatozoa in a sperm sample and consequently can be used to evaluate the efficiency of sperm sorting by different techniques such as flow cytometry.

  20. Cytogenetic studies in 32 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: insights to specific chromosomal abnormalities and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniwaki, M; Horiike, S; Inazawa, J; Nishida, K; Misawa, S; Takino, T; Abe, T

    1987-06-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed on a group of 32 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Five patients had refractory anemia (RA), four RA with ring sideroblasts (RARS), nine RA with excess blasts (RAEB), eight RAEB 'in transformation' (RAEB-T), three chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and three secondary MDS (SMDS). Two patients in the SMDS group had been treated with alkylating agents for lung cancer and polycythemia vera, respectively. The other had been exposed to thorotrast. Chromosome analyses were performed with Q and G bandings on bone marrow cells incubated for 24 hr. A clonal chromosomal abnormality was observed in the marrow cells from 19 of the 32 patients (59%). Chromosomal abnormalities of nos. 5 and/or 7 were found in five patients, and were probably specific for RAEB-T and SMDS. Among the twelve patients with solely abnormal metaphases (AA), eight (67%) progressed to acute leukemia, a higher proportion than the three from the 13 patients (23%) with solely normal metaphases (NN) (P less than 0.05). One of the seven patients (14%) with both normal and abnormal metaphases (AN) developed acute leukemia (AA v. AN, P less than 0.03). In only two of the 12 patients who progressed to acute leukemia (17%), was complete remission achieved. The median survival time was only 4.0 months for patients with karyotype AA compared with 18.0 months for AN and 24.0 months for NN (AA v. AN, P less than 0.05, AA v. NN, P less than 0.05). The absence of cytogenetically normal cells indicated a poor prognosis with frequent progression to acute leukemia which is resistant to chemotherapy. Progression to acute leukemia depended not only on chromosomal abnormalities but also on morphological subtype classified according to French-American-British co-operative group criteria. Morphological findings and karyotype combined gave a good indication of the outcome for patients with MDS.

  1. Binding of doa kinase to specific loci in polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kováčiková, M.; Raška, Ivan; Mateášik, A.; Chase, B. A.; Farkaš, R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2006), s. 21-27 ISSN 1210-0668 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC535; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/02/0342 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/3025/23; SAV(SK) APVT-51-027402; NSF(US) IBN-97-24006; US-SK(SK) 13/029/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : specific protein kinases * DOA * polytene chromosomes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  2. The probability to initiate X chromosome inactivation is determined by the X to autosomal ratio and X chromosome specific allelic properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Monkhorst

    Full Text Available In female mammalian cells, random X chromosome inactivation (XCI equalizes the dosage of X-encoded gene products to that in male cells. XCI is a stochastic process, in which each X chromosome has a probability to be inactivated. To obtain more insight in the factors setting up this probability, we studied the role of the X to autosome (X ratio A ratio in initiation of XCI, and have used the experimental data in a computer simulation model to study the cellular population dynamics of XCI.To obtain more insight in the role of the XratioA ratio in initiation of XCI, we generated triploid mouse ES cells by fusion of haploid round spermatids with diploid female and male ES cells. These fusion experiments resulted in only XXY triploid ES cells. XYY and XXX ES lines were absent, suggesting cell death related either to insufficient X-chromosomal gene dosage (XYY or to inheritance of an epigenetically modified X chromosome (XXX. Analysis of active (Xa and inactive (Xi X chromosomes in the obtained triploid XXY lines indicated that the initiation frequency of XCI is low, resulting in a mixed population of XaXiY and XaXaY cells, in which the XaXiY cells have a small proliferative advantage. This result, and findings on XCI in diploid and tetraploid ES cell lines with different X ratio A ratios, provides evidence that the X ratio A ratio determines the probability for a given X chromosome to be inactivated. Furthermore, we found that the kinetics of the XCI process can be simulated using a probability for an X chromosome to be inactivated that is proportional to the X ratio A ratio. These simulation studies re-emphasize our hypothesis that the probability is a function of the concentration of an X-encoded activator of XCI, and of X chromosome specific allelic properties determining the threshold for this activator.The present findings reveal that the probability for an X chromosome to be inactivated is proportional to the X ratio A ratio. This finding

  3. Next Generation Sequencing of Chromosome-Specific Libraries Sheds Light on Genome Evolution in Paleotetraploid Sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyushkova, Daria A; Makunin, Alexey I; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Romanenko, Svetlana A; Druzhkova, Anna S; Biltueva, Larisa B; Serdyukova, Natalya A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Trifonov, Vladimir A

    2017-11-10

    Several whole genome duplication (WGD) events followed by rediploidization took place in the evolutionary history of vertebrates. Acipenserids represent a convenient model group for investigation of the consequences of WGD as their representatives underwent additional WGD events in different lineages resulting in ploidy level variation between species, and these processes are still ongoing. Earlier, we obtained a set of sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus) chromosome-specific libraries by microdissection and revealed that they painted two or four pairs of whole sterlet chromosomes, as well as additional chromosomal regions, depending on rediploidization status and chromosomal rearrangements after genome duplication. In this study, we employed next generation sequencing to estimate the content of libraries derived from different paralogous chromosomes of sterlet. For this purpose, we aligned the obtained reads to the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) reference genome to reveal syntenic regions between these two species having diverged 360 Mya. We also showed that the approach is effective for synteny prediction at various evolutionary distances and allows one to clearly distinguish paralogous chromosomes in polyploid genomes. We postulated that after the acipenserid-specific WGD sterlet karyotype underwent multiple interchromosomal rearrangements, but different chromosomes were involved in this process unequally.

  4. Appearance and evolution of the specific chromosomal rearrangements associated with malignant transformation of mouse m5S cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, S.; Okumura, Y.; Komatsu, K.; Sasaki, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Chromosomal alterations were studied during the acquisition of malignant phenotypes in two karyotypically distinct cells isolated from transformed foci induced by x-irradiation in mouse m5S cells. Because the transformants, despite foci origin, showed low ability to grow in agar, they were cultured in vitro with serial transfer schedules to allow further cell generations and assayed for anchorage independence (AI) at each passage level. The AI frequency increased with the cell doubling numbers. Chromosome analysis showed that a focus was one cell origin, but the transformants showed karyotypic instability during cell proliferation, giving rise to the rearrangements clustered in the distal region of the specific chromosomes. These rearrangements appeared to be directed toward the acquisition of malignant phenotypes. Analysis of the types and sites of rearrangements indicated that a mechanism exists that induces frequent rearrangements of the specific region of a chromosome during the process of transformation into the malignant state

  5. A Sensitive and Specific Diagnostic Panel to Distinguish Diffuse Astrocytoma from Astrocytosis: Chromosome 7 Gain with Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 and p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Jansen, Michael; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Kim, J. ChulMin; Cosper, Arjola K.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Nutt, Catherine L.; Iafrate, A. John; Louis, David N.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges of surgical neuropathology is the distinction of diffuse astrocytoma (World Health Organization [WHO] grade II) from astrocytosis. The most commonly used ancillary tool to solve this problem is p53 immunohistochemistry (IHC), but this is neither sensitive nor specific. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations are common in lower grade gliomas, with most causing a specific amino acid change (R132H) that can be detected with a monoclonal antibody. IDH2 mutations are rare, but also occur in gliomas. In addition, gains of chromosome 7 are common in gliomas. In this study we assessed the status of p53, IDH1/2 and chromosome 7 to determine the most useful panel to distinguish astrocytoma from astrocytosis. We studied biopsy specimens from 21 WHO grade II diffuse astrocytomas and 20 reactive conditions. The single most sensitive test to identify astrocytoma is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosome 7 gain (76.2%). The combination of p53 and mutant IDH1 IHC provides a higher sensitivity (71.4%) than either test alone (47.8%); this combination offers a practical initial approach for the surgical pathologist. The best overall sensitivity (95%) is achieved when FISH for chromosome 7 gain is added to the p53-mutant IDH1 IHC panel. PMID:21343879

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based concurrent screening of 24-chromosome aneuploidy and unbalanced translocations in preimplantation human embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treff, Nathan R; Northrop, Lesley E; Kasabwala, Khushabu; Su, Jing; Levy, Brynn; Scott, Richard T

    2011-04-01

    To develop, validate, and apply a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray-based method for simultaneous preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of unbalanced inheritance of rearranged chromosomes and 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening. Prospective clinical research study. Academic reproductive medicine center. Eighteen couples carrying a balanced reciprocal or Robertsonian chromosomal rearrangement. PGD on blastocyst trophectoderm biopsy specimens. Aneuploidy, implantation, pregnancy, and delivery rates after SNP microarray-based aneuploidy and translocation screening. Single nucleotide polymorphism microarray was capable of detecting translocation-associated imbalances as small as 9.0 megabases. In the 12 transfers performed, sustained implantation occurred for 9 (45%) of 20 balanced-normal and euploid embryos replaced. The clinical pregnancy rate in patients receiving a transfer was 75% with six singleton deliveries and three ongoing singleton pregnancies thus far. Significantly fewer embryos were eligible for transfer with the incorporation of simultaneous 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening. Arrested embryos were also significantly more likely to possess unbalanced chromosomes when compared with developmentally competent blastocysts. This SNP microarray-based method provides the first opportunity to improve outcomes through comprehensive identification of euploid embryos from translocation carrier couples. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Correlation of single-cell gel electrophoresis and mitomycin C-induced chromosomal breakage for chromosomal instabiligy in children with Fanconi anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Qiang; Zou, Yao; Liu, Xiao-ming; Zhang, Jia-yuan; Wang, Shu-chun; Chen, Xiao-juan; Guo, Ye; Yang, Wen-yu; Ruan, Min; Liu, Tian-feng; Liu, Fang; Cai, Xiao-jin; Chen, Yu-mei; Zhu, Xiao-fan

    2013-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital abnormalities and predisposition to neoplasia. Hypersensitivity of FA cells to the clastogenic effect of mitomycin C (MMC) provides a unique marker for the diagnosis before the beginning of hematological manifestations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between Single-Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) and mitomycin C-induced chromosomal breakage in children with FA. Between January 2007 and June 2011, 248 children (results of the two methods and compared with each other. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the parameters in SCGE. Seventeen patients were diagnosed as FA and 231 as non-FA. Chromosomal breakage was found to be significantly higher in FA patients [(32.2 ± 4.8)%] than non-FA [(19.9 ± 3.0)%] and controls[(21.6 ± 4.8)%] when induced by MMC 80 ng/ml. The parameters of SCGE were significantly different between FA patients and non-FA or controls. All the parameters were rectilinearly correlated with MMC (P = 0.000). The most closely correlated parameter was the rate of comet cell (r = 0.848, P = 0.000). The results of ROC curves suggested the comet cell rate (0.999) was more important. SCGE might be used to discriminate between FA and non-FA individuals. The relationship between SCGE and MMC-induced chromosomal breakage was significant. The rate of comet cell was the important parameter.

  8. DETECTION OF SPECIFIC CHROMOSOMAL REARRANGEMENT IN LEUKEMIA PATIENTS BY mDx HEMAVISION KIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Pajič

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The mDx HemaVision kit is a qualitative multiplex and nested Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR test designed to detect 28 different translocations or chromosomal rearrangement, found to be specific for particular subtypes of leukemia. The presence or absence of the specific mRNA transcripts or cDNA segments after the reverse transcription of the fusion or abnormal genes, appeared after chromosomal rearrangements, could be determined by the kit.Patients and methods. The usefulness of the kit was tested on the 26 RNA samples of patients with acute leukemia and seven patients with chronic mieloproliferative diseases and by comparison of the results between mDx HemaVision kit and standardized RT-PCR protocol for the specific mRNA transcripts of the t(9;22(q34;q11, t(8;21(q22;q22, t(15;17(q21;q21 and t(4;11(q21;q23. The RNA samples were isolated from mononuclear cells of the bone marrow after Ficoll-Paque density gradient centrifugation and with a High Pure RNA isolation kit. The cDNA synthesis and Polymerase Chain Reaction were performed as described in mDx HemaVisoin’s or standardized RT-PCR’s protocols. The PCR products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, by staining with etidium bromide and by visualization under UV light.Results. We obtained 100% concordance of the results by both methods. Specific BCR-ABL mRNA transcripts were found in four chronic myeloid leukemia patients, one in B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL and one with bifenotipic leukemia (BAL patient. AML1-ETO mRNA transcript of the t(8;21(q22;q22 was identified in two patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The CBF β /MYH11 mRNA transcript specific for inv16(p13;q22 was obtained in AML patient with abnormal eozinofiles in bone marrow. MLL/AF4 mRNA transcript of the t(4;11(q21;q23 was found in the girl with B-ALL and in patient with B-ALL after treatment. In patients with B-ALL we found MLL/AF10 cDNA segment specific for t(10

  9. Species-Specific Chromosome Engineering Greatly Improves Fully Human Polyclonal Antibody Production Profile in Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Wang, Zhongde; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of fully human IgG (hIgG) or human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) by transgenic animals could be useful for human therapy. However, production level of hpAbs in transgenic animals is generally very low, probably due to the fact that evolutionarily unique interspecies-incompatible genomic sequences between human and non-human host species may impede high production of fully hIgG in the non-human environment. To address this issue, we performed species-specific human artificial chromosome (HAC) engineering and tested these engineered HAC in cattle. Our previous study has demonstrated that site-specific genomic chimerization of pre-B cell receptor/B cell receptor (pre-BCR/BCR) components on HAC vectors significantly improves human IgG expression in cattle where the endogenous bovine immunoglobulin genes were knocked out. In this report, hIgG1 class switch regulatory elements were subjected to site-specific genomic chimerization on HAC vectors to further enhance hIgG expression and improve hIgG subclass distribution in cattle. These species-specific modifications in a chromosome scale resulted in much higher production levels of fully hIgG of up to 15 g/L in sera or plasma, the highest ever reported for a transgenic animal system. Transchromosomic (Tc) cattle containing engineered HAC vectors generated hpAbs with high titers against human-origin antigens following immunization. This study clearly demonstrates that species-specific sequence differences in pre-BCR/BCR components and IgG1 class switch regulatory elements between human and bovine are indeed functionally distinct across the two species, and therefore, are responsible for low production of fully hIgG in our early versions of Tc cattle. The high production levels of fully hIgG with hIgG1 subclass dominancy in a large farm animal species achieved here is an important milestone towards broad therapeutic applications of hpAbs.

  10. Genetic counseling for a prenatal diagnosis of structural chromosomal abnormality with high-resolution analysis using a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Takashima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year old pregnant woman underwent amniocentesis to conduct a conventional karyotyping analysis; the analysis reported an abnormal karyotype: 46,XY,add(9(p24. Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA is utilized in prenatal diagnoses. A single nucleotide polymorphism microarray revealed a male fetus with balanced chromosomal translocations on 9p and balanced chromosomal rearrangements, but another chromosomal abnormality was detected. The fetus had microduplication. The child was born as a phenotypically normal male. CMA is a simple and informative procedure for prenatal genetic diagnosis. CMA is the detection of chromosomal variants of unknown clinical significance; therefore, genetic counseling is important during prenatal genetic testing.

  11. A device for extraction, manipulation and stretching of DNA from single human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted; Marie, Rodolphe; Moresco, Jacob Lange

    2011-01-01

    by time-lapse imaging; pressure-driven flow was then used to shunt the chromosomal DNA package into a nanoslit. A long linear DNA strand (>1.3 Mbp) was seen to stretch out from the DNA package and along the length of the nanoslit. Delivery of DNA in its native metaphase chromosome package as well...

  12. Current Status of Comprehensive Chromosome Screening for Elective Single-Embryo Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yih Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most in vitro fertilization (IVF experts and infertility patients agree that the most ideal assisted reproductive technology (ART outcome is to have a healthy, full-term singleton born. To this end, the most reliable policy is the single-embryo transfer (SET. However, unsatisfactory results in IVF may result from plenty of factors, in which aneuploidy associated with advanced maternal age is a major hurdle. Throughout the past few years, we have got a big leap in advancement of the genetic screening of embryos on aneuploidy, translocation, or mutations. This facilitates a higher success rate in IVF accompanied by the policy of elective SET (eSET. As the cost is lowering while the scale of genome characterization continues to be up over the recent years, the contemporary technologies on trophectoderm biopsy and freezing-thaw, comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS with eSET appear to be getting more and more popular for modern IVF centers. Furthermore, evidence has showen that, by these avant-garde techniques (trophectoderm biopsy, vitrification, and CCS, older infertile women with the help of eSET may have an opportunity to increase the success of their live birth rates approaching those reported in younger infertility patients.

  13. Microdissection and Chromosome Painting of the Alien Chromosome in an Addition Line of Wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R.-C.; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th . intermedium . Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th . intermedium , 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th . intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a Js genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (Js, J and St) in Th . intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th . bessarabicum . Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the Js genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th . intermedium . Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  14. Development of a Set of Chromosome-Specific Cytogenetic DNA Markers in Sunflower Using BAC-FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    In diploid sunflower (2n=34), conventional karyotypes and various genetic linkage maps have been established. However, the relationship between genetic linkage groups and individual chromosomes of sunflower remains unknown. Recently, a set of linkage group-specific BAC and BIBAC clones were identifi...

  15. Delineating Rearrangements in Single Yeast Artificial Chromosomes by Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wu, Jenny; Duell, Thomas

    2009-09-18

    Cloning of large chunks of human genomic DNA in recombinant systems such as yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes has greatly facilitated the construction of physical maps, the positional cloning of disease genes or the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes for diagnostic purposes. For this process to work efficiently, the DNA cloning process and subsequent clone propagation need to maintain stable inserts that are neither deleted nor otherwise rearranged. Some regions of the human genome; however, appear to have a higher propensity than others to rearrange in any host system. Thus, techniques to detect and accurately characterize such rearrangements need to be developed. We developed a technique termed 'Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping (QDFM)' that allows accurate tagging of sequence elements of interest with near kilobase accuracy and optimized it for delineation of rearrangements in recombinant DNA clones. This paper demonstrates the power of this microscopic approach by investigating YAC rearrangements. In our examples, high-resolution physical maps for regions within the immunoglobulin lambda variant gene cluster were constructed for three different YAC clones carrying deletions of 95 kb and more. Rearrangements within YACs could be demonstrated unambiguously by pairwise mapping of cosmids along YAC DNA molecules. When coverage by YAC clones was not available, distances between cosmid clones were estimated by hybridization of cosmids onto DNA fibers prepared from human genomic DNA. In addition, the QDFM technology provides essential information about clone stability facilitating closure of the maps of the human genome as well as those of model organisms.

  16. New prediction model for probe specificity in an allele-specific extension reaction for haplotype-specific extraction (HSE of Y chromosome mixtures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Rothe

    Full Text Available Allele-specific extension reactions (ASERs use 3' terminus-specific primers for the selective extension of completely annealed matches by polymerase. The ability of the polymerase to extend non-specific 3' terminal mismatches leads to a failure of the reaction, a process that is only partly understood and predictable, and often requires time-consuming assay design. In our studies we investigated haplotype-specific extraction (HSE for the separation of male DNA mixtures. HSE is an ASER and provides the ability to distinguish between diploid chromosomes from one or more individuals. Here, we show that the success of HSE and allele-specific extension depend strongly on the concentration difference between complete match and 3' terminal mismatch. Using the oligonucleotide-modeling platform Visual Omp, we demonstrated the dependency of the discrimination power of the polymerase on match- and mismatch-target hybridization between different probe lengths. Therefore, the probe specificity in HSE could be predicted by performing a relative comparison of different probe designs with their simulated differences between the duplex concentration of target-probe match and mismatches. We tested this new model for probe design in more than 300 HSE reactions with 137 different probes and obtained an accordance of 88%.

  17. Long-range chromosome organization in E. coli: a site-specific system isolates the Ter macrodomain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Axel; Valens, Michèle; Vallet-Gely, Isabelle; Espéli, Olivier; Boccard, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The organization of the Escherichia coli chromosome into a ring composed of four macrodomains and two less-structured regions influences the segregation of sister chromatids and the mobility of chromosomal DNA. The structuring of the terminus region (Ter) into a macrodomain relies on the interaction of the protein MatP with a 13-bp target called matS repeated 23 times in the 800-kb-long domain. Here, by using a new method that allows the transposition of any chromosomal segment at a defined position on the genetic map, we reveal a site-specific system that restricts to the Ter region a constraining process that reduces DNA mobility and delays loci segregation. Remarkably, the constraining process is regulated during the cell cycle and occurs only when the Ter MD is associated with the division machinery at mid-cell. The change of DNA properties does not rely on the presence of a trans-acting mechanism but rather involves a cis-effect acting at a long distance from the Ter region. Two specific 12-bp sequences located in the flanking Left and Right macrodomains and a newly identified protein designated YfbV conserved with MatP through evolution are required to impede the spreading of the constraining process to the rest of the chromosome. Our results unravel a site-specific system required to restrict to the Ter region the consequences of anchoring the Ter MD to the division machinery.

  18. Double and multiple chromosomal aneuploidies in spontaneous abortions: A single institutional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumar Subramaniyam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize double and multiple aneuploidies in spontaneous abortions (SAB. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of cytogenetics data obtained by culturing/harvesting products of the conception material at our center from 2006 to 2009 was performed. The abnormal cytogenetic results, maternal age, gestational age, and previous pregnancy history were recorded and compared. Results: Double and multiple aneuploidies are rare, however, a high percentage of double (4.6% and multiple (0.4% chromosomal aneuploidies were observed in our study of 1502 cases of SAB. Of 1502 cases of SAB evaluated, 70 cases (4.6% showed double aneuploidy, whereas 6 cases (0.4% had multiple aneuploidies. The chromosomes most frequently involved in double aneuploidy in the decreasing order were 21, 16, ± X, 22, 18, 13, and 15. The most frequent chromosome combinations observed were: Loss of X/21 (8.5%, 21/22 (4.4%, 16/21 (4.4%, and 7/16 (4.4%. The chromosome combinations in multiple aneuploidy included trisomy of chromosomes X/5/8, 8/20/22, 16/20/22, 14/21/22, and loss of X with 21/21 and 7/21. These abnormalities were significantly observed in women between the age group 40-44 years (59.2%. A high success rate (94% of obtaining metaphase cells was observed in this study mainly due to the use of direct and long-term cultures. Conclusions: We observed a high percentage of double (4.6% and multiple (0.4% aneuploidies, frequently involving the acrocentic chromosomes 13, 15, 21, and 22 and nonacrocentric chromosomes X, 16, and 18.

  19. Forensic usefulness of a 25 X-chromosome single-nucleotide polymorphism marker set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas, Carmen; Sanchez, Juan J; Castro, Jose Aurelio

    2010-01-01

    -nucleotide polymorphisms (X-SNPs) is still limited. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The forensic usefulness of a set of 25 SNPs located across the X-chromosome was analyzed in 13 populations. The applicability of the 25 X-SNPs in kinship testing was illustrated in two immigration cases where the conclusions based....... The usefulness of X-chromosome markers was particularly illustrative in Case 1, where the typing of 25 X-SNPs would have been sufficient to exclude paternity. CONCLUSION: The high level of polymorphism, low degree of linkage disequilibrium, and very low probability of mutation of the 25 X-SNPs makes this set...

  20. Persistence of Breakage in Specific Chromosome Bands 6 Years after Acute Exposure to Oil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Francés

    Full Text Available The identification of breakpoints involved in chromosomal damage could help to detect genes involved in genetic disorders, most notably cancer. Until now, only one published study, carried out by our group, has identified chromosome bands affected by exposure to oil from an oil spill. In that study, which was performed two years after the initial oil exposure in individuals who had participated in clean-up tasks following the wreck of the Prestige, three chromosomal bands (2q21, 3q27, 5q31 were found to be especially prone to breakage. A recent follow-up study, performed on the same individuals, revealed that the genotoxic damage had persisted six years after oil exposure.To determine whether there exist chromosome bands which are especially prone to breakages and to know if there is some correlation with those detected in the previous study. In addition, to investigate if the DNA repair problems detected previously persist in the present study.Follow-up study performed six years after the Prestige oil spill.Fishermen cooperatives in coastal villages.Fishermen highly exposed to oil spill who participated in previous genotoxic study six years after the oil.Chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes. For accurate identification of the breakpoints involved in chromosome damage of circulating lymphocytes, a sequential stain/G-banding technique was employed. To determine the most break-prone chromosome bands, two statistical methods, the Fragile Site Multinomial and the chi-square tests (where the bands were corrected by their length were used. To compare the chromosome lesions, structural chromosome alterations and gaps/breaks between two groups of individuals we used the GEE test which takes into account a possible within-individual correlation. Dysfunctions in DNA repair mechanisms, expressed as chromosome damage, were assessed in cultures with aphidicolin by the GEE test.Cytogenetic analyses were performed in 47 exposed individuals. A total of

  1. Persistence of Breakage in Specific Chromosome Bands 6 Years after Acute Exposure to Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francés, Alexandra; Hildur, Kristin; Barberà, Joan Albert; Rodríguez-Trigo, Gema; Zock, Jan-Paul; Giraldo, Jesús; Monyarch, Gemma; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Emma; de Castro Reis, Fernanda; Souto, Ana; Gómez, Federico P; Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; Templado, Cristina; Fuster, Carme

    2016-01-01

    The identification of breakpoints involved in chromosomal damage could help to detect genes involved in genetic disorders, most notably cancer. Until now, only one published study, carried out by our group, has identified chromosome bands affected by exposure to oil from an oil spill. In that study, which was performed two years after the initial oil exposure in individuals who had participated in clean-up tasks following the wreck of the Prestige, three chromosomal bands (2q21, 3q27, 5q31) were found to be especially prone to breakage. A recent follow-up study, performed on the same individuals, revealed that the genotoxic damage had persisted six years after oil exposure. To determine whether there exist chromosome bands which are especially prone to breakages and to know if there is some correlation with those detected in the previous study. In addition, to investigate if the DNA repair problems detected previously persist in the present study. Follow-up study performed six years after the Prestige oil spill. Fishermen cooperatives in coastal villages. Fishermen highly exposed to oil spill who participated in previous genotoxic study six years after the oil. Chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes. For accurate identification of the breakpoints involved in chromosome damage of circulating lymphocytes, a sequential stain/G-banding technique was employed. To determine the most break-prone chromosome bands, two statistical methods, the Fragile Site Multinomial and the chi-square tests (where the bands were corrected by their length) were used. To compare the chromosome lesions, structural chromosome alterations and gaps/breaks between two groups of individuals we used the GEE test which takes into account a possible within-individual correlation. Dysfunctions in DNA repair mechanisms, expressed as chromosome damage, were assessed in cultures with aphidicolin by the GEE test. Cytogenetic analyses were performed in 47 exposed individuals. A total of 251

  2. Integration of hepatitis B virus DNA in chromosome-specific satellite sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaul, Y.; Garcia, P.D.; Schonberg, S.; Rutter, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors previously reported the cloning and detailed analysis of the integrated hepatitis B virus sequences in a human hepatoma cell line. They report here the integration of at least one of hepatitis B virus at human satellite DNA sequences. The majority of the cellular sequences identified by this satellite were organized as a multimeric composition of a 0.6-kilobase EcoRI fragment. This clone hybridized in situ almost exclusively to the centromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes 1 and 16 and to a lower extent to chromosome 2 and to the heterochromatic region of the Y chromosome. The immediate flanking host sequence appeared as a hierarchy of repeating units which were almost identical to a previously reported human satellite III DNA sequence

  3. The development of 7E chromosome-specific molecular markers for Thinopyrum elongatum based on SLAF-seq technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiqiang Chen

    Full Text Available Thinopyrum elongatum is an important relative of wheat, it is favored by many researchers for the disease resistant genes that exist in its E genome. Some studies have showed that the 7E chromosome of Th. elongatum contains resistance genes related to Fusarium head blight and wheat rust. Therefore, developing 7E chromosome-specific molecular markers linked to resistance genes will provide an important tool for exploring and using the resistant genes of Th. elongatum. In addition, it would greatly contribute in the effort to cultivate disease-resistant wheat varieties. Featured in high throughput, high-accuracy and low-cost, SLAF-seq technology has been widely used in molecular breeding, system evolution, and germplasm resource detection. Based on SLAF-seq, 518 specific fragments on the 7E chromosome of Th. elongatum were successfully amplified. A total of 135 primers were designed according to 135 randomly selected fragments, and 89 specific molecular markers of Th. elongatum were developed, with efficiencies up to 65.9%. These markers were all detected in a variety of materials, and they are all proved to be specific and stable. These markers can be used not only for detecting the 7E chromosome of Th. elongatum but also for providing an important theoretical and practical basis for wheat breeding by marker-assisted selection (MAS. This paper reports the first application of SLAF-seq technology with a high success rate in developing specific molecular markers for Th. elongatum, providing a strong case for the application of this new technology.

  4. Chromosomal rearrangements formed by rrn recombination do not improve replichore balance in host-specific Salmonella enterica serovars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T David Matthews

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of the ∼2,600 serovars of Salmonella enterica have a broad host range as well as a conserved gene order. In contrast, some Salmonella serovars are host-specific and frequently exhibit large chromosomal rearrangements from recombination between rrn operons. One hypothesis explaining these rearrangements suggests that replichore imbalance introduced from horizontal transfer of pathogenicity islands and prophages drives chromosomal rearrangements in an attempt to improve balance.This hypothesis was directly tested by comparing the naturally-occurring chromosomal arrangement types to the theoretically possible arrangement types, and estimating their replichore balance using a calculator. In addition to previously characterized strains belonging to host-specific serovars, the arrangement types of 22 serovar Gallinarum strains was also determined. Only 48 out of 1,440 possible arrangement types were identified in 212 host-specific strains. While the replichores of most naturally-occurring arrangement types were well-balanced, most theoretical arrangement types had imbalanced replichores. Furthermore, the most common types of rearrangements did not change replichore balance.The results did not support the hypothesis that replichore imbalance causes these rearrangements, and suggest that the rearrangements could be explained by aspects of a host-specific lifestyle.

  5. Screening of 20 patients with X-linked mental retardation using chromosome X-specific array-MAPH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousoulidou, Ludmila; Parkel, Sven; Zilina, Olga; Palta, Priit; Puusepp, Helen; Remm, Maido; Turner, Gillian; Boyle, Jackie; van Bokhoven, Hans; de Brouwer, Arjan; Van Esch, Hilde; Froyen, Guy; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; Gecz, Jozef; Kurg, Ants; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2007-01-01

    The rapid advancement of high-resolution DNA copy number assessment methods revealed the significant contribution of submicroscopic genetic imbalances to abnormal phenotypes, including mental retardation. In order to detect submicroscopic genetic imbalances, we have screened 20 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) using a chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform with median resolution of 238kb. Among the 20 families, 18 were experimental, as they were not previously screened with any microarray method, and two were blind controls with known aberrations, as they were previously screened by array-CGH. This study presents the first clinical application of chromosome X-specific array-MAPH methodology. The screening of 20 affected males from 20 unrelated XLMR families resulted in the detection of an unknown deletion, spanning a region of 7-23kb. Family studies and population screening demonstrated that the detected deletion is an unknown rare copy number variant. One of the control samples, carrying approximately 6-Mb duplication was correctly identified, moreover it was found to be interrupted by a previously unknown 19kb region of normal copy number. The second control 50kb deletion was not identified, as this particular region was not covered by array-MAPH probes. This study demonstrates that the chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform is a valuable tool for screening patients with XLMR, or other X-linked disorders, and emerges the need for introducing new high-resolution screening methods for the detection of genetic imbalances.

  6. Untangling the Contributions of Sex-Specific Gene Regulation and X-Chromosome Dosage to Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Maxwell; Rao, Prashant; Ercan, Sevinc

    2016-01-01

    Dosage compensation mechanisms equalize the level of X chromosome expression between sexes. Yet the X chromosome is often enriched for genes exhibiting sex-biased, i.e., imbalanced expression. The relationship between X chromosome dosage compensation and sex-biased gene expression remains largely unexplored. Most studies determine sex-biased gene expression without distinguishing between contributions from X chromosome copy number (dose) and the animal’s sex. Here, we uncoupled X chromosome dose from sex-specific gene regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans to determine the effect of each on X expression. In early embryogenesis, when dosage compensation is not yet fully active, X chromosome dose drives the hermaphrodite-biased expression of many X-linked genes, including several genes that were shown to be responsible for hermaphrodite fate. A similar effect is seen in the C. elegans germline, where X chromosome dose contributes to higher hermaphrodite X expression, suggesting that lack of dosage compensation in the germline may have a role in supporting higher expression of X chromosomal genes with female-biased functions in the gonad. In the soma, dosage compensation effectively balances X expression between the sexes. As a result, somatic sex-biased expression is almost entirely due to sex-specific gene regulation. These results suggest that lack of dosage compensation in different tissues and developmental stages allow X chromosome copy number to contribute to sex-biased gene expression and function. PMID:27356611

  7. Over-representation of specific regions of chromosome 22 in cells from human glioma correlate with resistance to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheck Adrienne C

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme is the most malignant form of brain tumor. Despite treatment including surgical resection, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation, these tumors typically recur. The recurrent tumor is often resistant to further therapy with the same agent, suggesting that the surviving cells that repopulate the tumor mass have an intrinsic genetic advantage. We previously demonstrated that cells selected for resistance to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU are near-diploid, with over-representation of part or all of chromosomes 7 and 22. While cells from untreated gliomas often have over-representation of chromosome 7, chromosome 22 is typically under-represented. Methods We have analyzed cells from primary and recurrent tumors from the same patient before and after in vitro selection for resistance to clinically relevant doses of BCNU. Karyotypic analyses were done to demonstrate the genetic makeup of these cells, and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses have defined the region(s of chromosome 22 retained in these BCNU-resistant cells. Results Karyotypic analyses demonstrated that cells selected for BCNU resistance were near-diploid with over-representation of chromosomes 7 and 22. In cells where whole copies of chromosome 22 were not identified, numerous fragments of this chromosome were retained and inserted into several marker and derivative chromosomes. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses using whole chromosome paints confirmed this finding. Additional FISH analysis using bacterial artificial chromosome probes spanning the length of chromosome 22 have allowed us to map the over-represented region to 22q12.3–13.32. Conclusion Cells selected for BCNU resistance either in vivo or in vitro retain sequences mapped to chromosome 22. The specific over-representation of sequences mapped to 22q12.3–13.32 suggest the presence of a DNA sequence important to BCNU survival and/or resistance located in

  8. Identification of a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) spanning the synovial sarcoma-specific t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) breakpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, B; Berger, W; Sinke, R J; Suijkerbuijk, R F; Gilgenkrantz, S; Geraghty, M T; Valle, D; Monaco, A P; Lehrach, H; Ropers, H H

    A somatic cell hybrid containing the synovial sarcoma-associated t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) derivative (der(X)) chromosome was used to characterize the translocation breakpoint region on the X chromosome. By using Southern hybridization of DNA from this der(X) hybrid in conjunction with Xp-region specific

  9. Contrasting origin of B chromosomes in two cervids (Siberian roe deer and grey brocket deer) unravelled by chromosome-specific DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makunin, Alexey I; Kichigin, Ilya G; Larkin, Denis M; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang; Proskuryakova, Anastasiya A; Vorobieva, Nadezhda V; Chernyaeva, Ekaterina N; O'Brien, Stephen J; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Trifonov, Vladimir A

    2016-08-11

    B chromosomes are dispensable and variable karyotypic elements found in some species of animals, plants and fungi. They often originate from duplications and translocations of host genomic regions or result from hybridization. In most species, little is known about their DNA content. Here we perform high-throughput sequencing and analysis of B chromosomes of roe deer and brocket deer, the only representatives of Cetartiodactyla known to have B chromosomes. In this study we developed an approach to identify genomic regions present on chromosomes by high-throughput sequencing of DNA generated from flow-sorted chromosomes using degenerate-oligonucleotide-primed PCR. Application of this method on small cattle autosomes revealed a previously described KIT gene region translocation associated with colour sidedness. Implementing this approach to B chromosomes from two cervid species, Siberian roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) and grey brocket deer (Mazama gouazoubira), revealed dramatically different genetic content: roe deer B chromosomes consisted of two duplicated genomic regions (a total of 1.42-1.98 Mbp) involving three genes, while grey brocket deer B chromosomes contained 26 duplicated regions (a total of 8.28-9.31 Mbp) with 34 complete and 21 partial genes, including KIT and RET protooncogenes, previously found on supernumerary chromosomes in canids. Sequence variation analysis of roe deer B chromosomes revealed a high frequency of mutations and increased heterozygosity due to either amplification within B chromosomes or divergence between different Bs. In contrast, grey brocket deer B chromosomes were found to be more homogeneous and resembled autosomes in patterns of sequence variation. Similar tendencies were observed in repetitive DNA composition. Our data demonstrate independent origins of B chromosomes in the grey brocket and roe deer. We hypothesize that the B chromosomes of these two cervid species represent different stages of B chromosome sequences evolution

  10. Correlation between single nucleotide polymorphism in 11q24.1 chromosome and high myopia hereditary susceptibility

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    Xin-Hua Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the correlation between genetic susceptibility to high myopia and single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPsin 11q24. 1 chromosome among Chinese college students. METHOD: A total of 254 blood samples were obtained from Chinese college students who were often engaged in near work. The students were divided into high myopia group(42 cases, low to moderate myopia group(61 casesand non-myopic group(151 cases. Genotyping technology was utilized to analyze the frequency of mutation of the SNPs alleles of four mononucleotides in the 11q24.1 chromosome, including rs577948, rs11218544, rs10892819 and rs11218553. And the Chi-square test was performed to test the difference of such mutation with myopia. RESULTS:The frequency of the SNP alleles mutation of the mononucleotide rs577948 site in the high myopia group was significantly different from that in the low-to-moderate myopia group and the non-myopic group(P=2.28×10-7. CONCLUSION: There is no significant correlation between genetic susceptibility and the four variations of SNPs between mild myopic population and normal population and there is no significant difference between the two populations, either. However, A - G mutation of Rs577948 site in 11q24.1 chromosome in university students with high myopia group is closely associated with high myopia hereditary susceptibility.

  11. Correlation between single nucleotide polymorphism in 11q24.1 chromosome and high myopia hereditary susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Xin-Hua Wang; Xiao-Yu Zhang; Han-Si Bi; Chang Zhao; Ruo-Xi Li

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the correlation between genetic susceptibility to high myopia and single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs)in 11q24. 1 chromosome among Chinese college students. METHOD: A total of 254 blood samples were obtained from Chinese college students who were often engaged in near work. The students were divided into high myopia group(42 cases), low to moderate myopia group(61 cases)and non-myopic group(151 cases). Genotyping technology was utilized to analyze the frequency of mutation of t...

  12. Proteomic signatures and aberrations of mouse embryonic stem cells containing a single human chromosome 21 in neuronal differentiation: an in vitro model of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, M; Nishigaki, R; Wang, C C; Toda, T; Shirayoshi, Y; Inoue, T; Gojobori, T; Ikeo, K; Rogers, M S; Oshimura, M

    2004-01-01

    Neurodegeneration in fetal development of Down syndrome (DS) patients is proposed to result in apparent neuropathological abnormalities and to contribute to the phenotypic characteristics of mental retardation and premature development of Alzheimer disease. In order to identify the aberrant and specific genes involved in the early differentiation of DS neurons, we have utilized an in vitro neuronal differentiation system of mouse ES cells containing a single human chromosome 21 (TT2F/hChr21) with TT2F parental ES cells as a control. The paired protein extracts from TT2F and TT2F/hChr21 cells at several stages of neuronal differentiation were subjected to two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein separation followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry to identify the proteins differentially expressed between TT2F and TT2F/hChr21 cells. We provide here a novel set of specific gene products altered in early differentiating DS neuronal cells, which differs from that identified in adult or fetal brain with DS. The aberrant protein expression in early differentiating neurons, due to the hChr21 gene dosage effects or chromosomal imbalance, may affect neuronal outgrowth, proliferation and differentiation, producing developmental abnormalities in neural patterning, which eventually leads to formation of a suboptimal functioning neuronal network in DS.

  13. Development of Chromosome-Specific BAC Resources for Genomics of Bread Wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Kubaláková, Marie; Čihalíková, Jarmila; Suchánková, Pavla; Bartoš, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 129, 1-3 (2010), s. 211-223 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/07/1573; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Grant - others:European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme(XE) FP7/2007–2013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : BAC library * Chromosome * DNA markers Subject RIV: GE - Plant Breeding Impact factor: 1.783, year: 2010

  14. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chuanliang; Bai, Lili; Fu, Shulan; Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R-C; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a J(s) genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s) , J and St) in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s) genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  15. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanliang Deng

    Full Text Available In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome and pDbH12 (a J(s genome specific probe as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s , J and St in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of

  16. The probability to initiate X chromosome inactivation is determined by the X to autosomal ratio and X chromosome specific allelic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monkhorst, Kim; de Hoon, Bas; Jonkers, Iris; Mulugeta Achame, Eskeatnaf; Monkhorst, Wouter; Hoogerbrugge, Jos; Rentmeester, Eveline; Westerhoff, Hans V; Grosveld, Frank; Grootegoed, J Anton; Gribnau, Joost

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In female mammalian cells, random X chromosome inactivation (XCI) equalizes the dosage of X-encoded gene products to that in male cells. XCI is a stochastic process, in which each X chromosome has a probability to be inactivated. To obtain more insight in the factors setting up this

  17. Assessment of DNA damage and Chromosome aberration in human lymphocyte exposed to low dose radiation detected by FISH(Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization) and SCGE(Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hai Won; Kim, Su Young; Kim, Byung Mo; Kim, Sun Jin; Ha, Sung Whan; Kim, Tae Hwan; Cho, Chul Koo

    2000-01-01

    Comparative study was performed for the assessment of DNA damage and Chromosomal aberration in human lymphocyte exposed to low dose radiation using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization(FISH) and Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis(SCGE). Chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocyte exposed to radiation at doses of 5, 10, 30 and 50cGy were analysed with whole chromosome-specific probes by human chromosome 1, 2 and 4 according to PAINT system. FISH with chromosome-specific probe has been used to be a valid and rapid method for detection of chromosome rearrangements induced by low dose radiation. The frequencies of stable translocation per cell equivalents were 0.0116, 0.0375, 0.0407, 0.0727 and 0.0814 for 0, 5, 10, 30 and 50cGy, respectively, and those of dicentric were 0.00, 0.0125, 0.174, 0.0291 and 0.0407 respectively. Radiation induced DNA damage in human lymphocyte in a dose-dependent manner at low doses from 5cGy to 50cGy, which were analysed by single Cell Gel Electrophoresis(SCGE). From above results, FISH seemed to be useful for radiation biodosimetry by which the frequencies of stable aberrations in human lymphocyte can be observed more easily than by conventional method and SCGE also seemed to be sensitive method for detecting DNA damage by low dose radiation exposure, so that those methods will improve our technique to perform meaningful biodosimetry for radiation at low doses

  18. Frequencies of X-ray induced pericentric inversions and centric rings in human blood lymphocytes detected by FISH using chromosome arm specific DNA libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, A.T.; Boei, J.J.W.A.; Vermeulen, S.; Balajee, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    Frequencies of intra-chromosomal exchanges (pericentric inversions and centric rings) and inter-chromosomal exchanges (dicentrics and translocations) in X-irradiated (2.5 Gy) human lymphocytes have been estimated. To detect these events we employed FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) technique and arm specific painting probes for chromosomes no.1 and no.3. The ratio between centric rings and pericentric inversions was found to be about 1. For intra-changes to inter-changes, the ratio (F) was between 6 and 9. Based on the total number of colour junctions involving chromosomes no.1 and no.3 it was found that exchanges between the arms of the same chromosome occur about 8.7 times more than inter-chromosomal exchanges calculated on the basis of the DNA content of the chromosomes and random induction of aberrations in the total genome. Chromosomal organization in interphase nucleus appears to promote the formation of more intra-changes than inter-changes following X-irradiation, most probably due to close proximity of the two arms of a chromosome

  19. Imprinted chromosomal domains revealed by allele-specific replication timing of the GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaSalle, J.; Flint, A.; Lalande, M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes are organized as a cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13. The genes are separated by around 100 kb and arranged in opposite transcriptional orientations. The GABA{sub A} receptor cluster lies near the Angelman and Prader-Willi loci and displays asynchronous DNA replication, suggesting that this region is subject to parental imprinting. In order to further study the association between DNA replication and imprinting, allele-specific replication was assayed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with {lambda}-phage probes from the GABRB3/A5 region and a D15Z1 satellite probe to identify the parental origin of each chromosome. The replication kinetics of each allele was determined by using a flow sorter to fractionate mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes on the basis of cell cycle progression prior to FISH analysis. These kinetic studies reveal a 50-150 kb chromosomal domain extending from the middle of the GABRB3/A5 intergenic region into the GABRA5 5{prime}-UTR which displays maternal replication in early S with paternal replication delayed until the end of S. In contrast, genomic regions on either side of this maternal early replication domain exhibit the opposite pattern with paternal before maternal replication and both alleles replicating in the latter half of S. These results indicate that the GABRB3/A5 region is divided into domains in which replication timing is determined by parental origin. In addition to a loss of asynchronous replication, organization into replication timing domains is also lost in lymphocytes from maternal and paternal uniparental disomy 15 patients suggesting that a chromosome contribution from both parents is required for the establishment of the imprinted replication domains.

  20. Chromosome aberrations of the peripheral lymphocytes in rabbits exposed to single and fractionated whole-body x-irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Hiroaki; Sakurai, Masaharu; Sugahara, Tsutomu.

    1978-01-01

    The changes in the frequency of peripheral lymphocytes with chromosome aberrations were observed during or after irradiation of rabbits exposed to fractionated or single whole-body irradiations. In rabbits given daily fractionated whole-body irradiations the incidence of the aberrations showed a linear increase in the first week; however, the incidence decreased thereafter though exposures were repeated. The lymphocyte count tended to decrease as the number of irradiations increased. In rabbits exposed to a single dose of 250 R or 500 R the incidence of aberrations rapidly decreased over a period of 10 days following irradiation, and then showed a little change thereafter. The lymphocyte count in the peripheral blood reached a nadir 2 - 5 days after irradiation, and then started to increase gradually. It was speculated that there are two types of lymphocytes, long-lived and short-lived, in the peripheral blood of rabbits, both of which are PHA-committed. (auth.)

  1. Identification of a Novel Retrotransposon with Sex Chromosome-Specific Distribution in Silene latifolia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Králová, Tereza; Čegan, Radim; Kubát, Zdeněk; Vrána, Jan; Vyskot, Boris; Vogel, Ivan; Kejnovský, Eduard; Hobza, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 143, 1-3 (2014), s. 87-95 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/10/0102; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/2220; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/10/0930; GA ČR(CZ) GA522/09/0083; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Microdissection * Sex chromosomes * Silene latifolia (white campion) Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; EF - Botanics (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 1.561, year: 2014

  2. Light Induced Aggregation of Specific Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Gopannagari, Madhusudana; Chaturvedi, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    We report optically induced aggregation and consequent separation of specific diameter of pristine single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) from stable solution. Well dispersed solution of pristine SWNTs, without any surfactant or functionalization, show rapid aggregation by uniform exposure to UV, visible and NIR illumination. Optically induced aggregation linearly increases with consequent increase in the intensity of light. Aggregated SWNTs were separated from the dispersed supernatant and ch...

  3. Identification of VPA0451 as the specific chaperone for the Vibrio parahaemolyticus chromosome 1 type III-secreted effector VPA0450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Barbara; Southward, Carolyn M; McKenna, Neil; Devinney, Rebekah

    2014-04-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important cause of gastroenteritis resulting from the consumption of raw or undercooked shellfish. The V. parahaemolyticus genome revealed the presence of two type III secretion systems (T3SS); one on each of the two chromosomes. To date, four effectors have been identified as secreted by the chromosome 1 T3SS (T3SS1). For some effectors, efficient secretion requires a cytosolic chaperone that is often encoded in close proximity to its cognate effector. In this study, we identified VPA0451 as the specific chaperone for the T3SS1 effector, VPA0450. VPA0451 is structurally similar to known T3SS chaperones. It is required for efficient VPA0450 secretion while not affecting the secretion of other T3SS1 effectors, suggesting it is a class 1A single cargo chaperone. VPA0450 translocation into the host cell membrane requires VPA0451. VPA0451 binds directly to VPA0450, and amino acids 25-100 contribute to this activity. Taken together, we conclude that VPA0451 is the cognate chaperone for the effector VPA0450 and is the second T3SS1 chaperone identified to date. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interclonal variations in the molecular karyotype of Trypanosoma cruzi: chromosome rearrangements in a single cell-derived clone of the G strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Fabio Mitsuo; Souza, Renata Torres; Santori, Fábio Rinaldo; Santos, Michele Fernandes; Cortez, Danielle Rodrigues; Barros, Roberto Moraes; Cano, Maria Isabel; Valadares, Helder Magno Silva; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Mortara, Renato Arruda; da Silveira, José Franco

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi comprises a pool of populations which are genetically diverse in terms of DNA content, growth and infectivity. Inter- and intra-strain karyotype heterogeneities have been reported, suggesting that chromosomal rearrangements occurred during the evolution of this parasite. Clone D11 is a single-cell-derived clone of the T. cruzi G strain selected by the minimal dilution method and by infecting Vero cells with metacyclic trypomastigotes. Here we report that the karyotype of clone D11 differs from that of the G strain in both number and size of chromosomal bands. Large chromosomal rearrangement was observed in the chromosomes carrying the tubulin loci. However, most of the chromosome length polymorphisms were of small amplitude, and the absence of one band in clone D11 in relation to its reference position in the G strain could be correlated to the presence of a novel band migrating above or below this position. Despite the presence of chromosomal polymorphism, large syntenic groups were conserved between the isolates. The appearance of new chromosomal bands in clone D11 could be explained by chromosome fusion followed by a chromosome break or interchromosomal exchange of large DNA segments. Our results also suggest that telomeric regions are involved in this process. The variant represented by clone D11 could have been induced by the stress of the cloning procedure or could, as has been suggested for Leishmania infantum, have emerged from a multiclonal, mosaic parasite population submitted to frequent DNA amplification/deletion events, leading to a 'mosaic' structure with different individuals having differently sized versions of the same chromosomes. If this is the case, the variant represented by clone D11 would be better adapted to survive the stress induced by cloning, which includes intracellular development in the mammalian cell. Karyotype polymorphism could be part of the T. cruzi arsenal for responding to environmental pressure.

  5. An Improved Consensus Linkage Map of Barley Based on Flow-Sorted Chromosomes and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Muñoz-Amatriaín

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping have made it easier to combine information from different mapping populations into consensus genetic maps, which provide increased marker density and genome coverage compared to individual maps. Previously, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-based genotyping platform was developed and used to genotype 373 individuals in four barley ( L. mapping populations. This led to a 2943 SNP consensus genetic map with 975 unique positions. In this work, we add data from six additional populations and more individuals from one of the original populations to develop an improved consensus map from 1133 individuals. A stringent and systematic analysis of each of the 10 populations was performed to achieve uniformity. This involved reexamination of the four populations included in the previous map. As a consequence, we present a robust consensus genetic map that contains 2994 SNP loci mapped to 1163 unique positions. The map spans 1137.3 cM with an average density of one marker bin per 0.99 cM. A novel application of the genotyping platform for gene detection allowed the assignment of 2930 genes to flow-sorted chromosomes or arms, confirmed the position of 2545 SNP-mapped loci, added chromosome or arm allocations to an additional 370 SNP loci, and delineated pericentromeric regions for chromosomes 2H to 7H. Marker order has been improved and map resolution has been increased by almost 20%. These increased precision outcomes enable more optimized SNP selection for marker-assisted breeding and support association genetic analysis and map-based cloning. It will also improve the anchoring of DNA sequence scaffolds and the barley physical map to the genetic map.

  6. Localization of a female-specific marker on the chromosomes of the brown seaweed Saccharina japonica using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    Full Text Available There is a heteromorphic alternative life in the brown seaweed, Saccharina japonica (Aresch. C. E. Lane, C. Mayes et G. W. Saunders ( = Laminaria japonica Aresch., with macroscopic monoecious sporophytes and microscopic diecious gametophytes. Female gametophytes are genetically different from males. It is very difficult to identify the parent of a sporophyte using only routine cytological techniques due to homomorphic chromosomes. A sex-specific marker is one of the best ways to make this determination.To obtain clear images, chromosome preparation was improved using maceration enzymes and fluorochrome 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI. The chromosome number of both male and female haploid gametophytes was 31, and there were 62 chromosomes in diploid sporophytes. Although the female chromosomes ranged from 0.77 µm to 2.61 µm in size and were larger than the corresponding ones in the males (from 0.57 µm to 2.16 µm, there was not a very large X chromosome in the females. Based on the known female-related FRML-494 marker, co-electrophoresis and Southern blot profiles demonstrated that it was inheritable and specific to female gametophytes. Using modified fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, this marker could be localized on one unique chromosome of the female gametophytes as well as the sporophytes, whereas no hybridization signal was detected in the male gametophytes.Our data suggest that this marker was a female chromosome-specific DNA sequence. This is the first report of molecular marker localization on algal chromosomes. This research provides evidence for the benefit of using FISH for identifying molecular markers for sex identification, isolation of specific genes linked to this marker in the females, and sex determination of S. japonica gametophytes in the future.

  7. Lack of satellite DNA species-specific homogenization and relationship to chromosomal rearrangements in monitor lizards (Varanidae, Squamata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakhongcheep, Ornjira; Thapana, Watcharaporn; Suntronpong, Aorarat; Singchat, Worapong; Pattanatanang, Khampee; Phatcharakullawarawat, Rattanin; Muangmai, Narongrit; Peyachoknagul, Surin; Matsubara, Kazumi; Ezaz, Tariq; Srikulnath, Kornsorn

    2017-08-16

    Satellite DNAs (stDNAs) are highly repeated sequences that constitute large portions of any genome. The evolutionary dynamics of stDNA (e.g. copy number, nucleotide sequence, location) can, therefore, provide an insight into genome organization and evolution. We investigated the evolutionary origin of VSAREP stDNA in 17 monitor lizards (seven Asian, five Australian, and five African) at molecular and cytogenetic level. Results revealed that VSAREP is conserved in the genome of Asian and Australian varanids, but not in African varanids, suggesting that these sequences are either differentiated or lost in the African varanids. Phylogenetic and arrangement network analyses revealed the existence of at least four VSAREP subfamilies. The similarity of each sequence unit within the same VSAREP subfamily from different species was higher than those of other VSAREP subfamilies belonging to the same species. Additionally, all VSAREP subfamilies isolated from the three Australian species (Varanus rosenbergi, V. gouldii, and V. acanthurus) were co-localized near the centromeric or pericentromeric regions of the macrochromosomes, except for chromosomes 3 and 4 in each Australian varanid. However, their chromosomal arrangements were different among species. The VSAREP stDNA family lack homogenized species-specific nucleotide positions in varanid lineage. Most VSAREP sequences were shared among varanids within the four VSAREP subfamilies. This suggests that nucleotide substitutions in each varanid species accumulated more slowly than homogenization rates in each VSAREP subfamily, resulting in non-species-specific evolution of stDNA profiles. Moreover, changes in location of VSAREP stDNA in each Australian varanid suggests a correlation with chromosomal rearrangements, leading to karyotypic differences among these species.

  8. Development of chromosome-specific markers with high polymorphism for allotetraploid cotton based on genome-wide characterization of simple sequence repeats in diploid cottons (Gossypium arboreum L. and Gossypium raimondii Ulbrich).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cairui; Zou, Changsong; Zhang, Youping; Yu, Daoqian; Cheng, Hailiang; Jiang, Pengfei; Yang, Wencui; Wang, Qiaolian; Feng, Xiaoxu; Prosper, Mtawa Andrew; Guo, Xiaoping; Song, Guoli

    2015-02-06

    Tetraploid cotton contains two sets of homologous chromosomes, the At- and Dt-subgenomes. Consequently, many markers in cotton were mapped to multiple positions during linkage genetic map construction, posing a challenge to anchoring linkage groups and mapping economically-important genes to particular chromosomes. Chromosome-specific markers could solve this problem. Recently, the genomes of two diploid species were sequenced whose progenitors were putative contributors of the At- and Dt-subgenomes to tetraploid cotton. These sequences provide a powerful tool for developing chromosome-specific markers given the high level of synteny among tetraploid and diploid cotton genomes. In this study, simple sequence repeats (SSRs) on each chromosome in the two diploid genomes were characterized. Chromosome-specific SSRs were developed by comparative analysis and proved to distinguish chromosomes. A total of 200,744 and 142,409 SSRs were detected on the 13 chromosomes of Gossypium arboreum L. and Gossypium raimondii Ulbrich, respectively. Chromosome-specific SSRs were obtained by comparing SSR flanking sequences from each chromosome with those from the other 25 chromosomes. The average was 7,996 per chromosome. To confirm their chromosome specificity, these SSRs were used to distinguish two homologous chromosomes in tetraploid cotton through linkage group construction. The chromosome-specific SSRs and previously-reported chromosome markers were grouped together, and no marker mapped to another homologous chromosome, proving that the chromosome-specific SSRs were unique and could distinguish homologous chromosomes in tetraploid cotton. Because longer dinucleotide AT-rich repeats were the most polymorphic in previous reports, the SSRs on each chromosome were sorted by motif type and repeat length for convenient selection. The primer sequences of all chromosome-specific SSRs were also made publicly available. Chromosome-specific SSRs are efficient tools for chromosome

  9. Chromosomal instability can be induced by the formation of breakage-prone chromosome rearrangement junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.N.; Ritter, L.; Moore, S.R.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Studies in our lab have led to the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in chromosomal instability acting predominantly in cis. For example, specific breakage of large blocks of centromeric region heterochromatin on chromosome 16q by treatment with 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) is associated with repeated rearrangement of chromosome 16q during outgrowth of DAP-treated clones, thereby establishing a link between the initial site of damage and the occurrence of persistent chromosomal instability. Similarly, karyotypic analysis of gamma ray induced instability demonstrated that chromosomal rearrangements in sub-clones were significantly clustered near the site of previously identified chromosomal rearrangement junctions in unstable parental clones. This study investigates the hypothesis that integration of transfected sequences into host chromosomes could create breakage-prone junction regions and persistent genomic instability without exposure to DNA-damage agents. These junctions may mimic the unstable chromosomal rearrangements induced by DAP or radiation, and thus provide a test of the broader hypothesis that instability can to some extent be attributed to the formation of novel chromosomal breakage hot spots. These experiments were performed using human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11, which was used to monitor instability in a chromosomal painting assay. AL cells were transfected with a 2.5 Kb fragment containing multiple copies of the 180 bp human alpha heterochromatic repeat, which resulted in chromosomal instability in 41% of the transfected clones. Parallel exposure to gamma-radiation resulted in a similar level of chromosomal instability, although control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic instability. Chromosomal instability induced by integration of alpha heterochromatic repeats was also frequently associated with delayed reproductive

  10. Mapping of single-copy DNA sequences on human chromosomes by in situ hybridization with biotinylated probes: Enhancement of detection sensitivity by intensified-fluorescence digital-imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viegas-Pequignot, E.; Dutrillaux, B.; Magdelenat, H. (Institut Curie, Paris (France)); Coppey-Moisan, M. (Institut Curie, Paris (France) Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Orsay (France))

    1989-01-01

    Two single-copy DNA segments of 6 kilobases (kb) and 2.3 kb were labeled with biotin-labeled dUTP (Bio-11-dUTP) and hybridized to human chromosomes. These probes were detected by immunofluorescence and directly mapped on chromosomes by using classical fluorescence microscopy and a microchannel-plate-intensified video camera. By a subsequent R-banding, the 6-kb and 2.3-kb fragments were precisely localized to the 18p11.3 band and to the 22q11.2 band, respectively, in agreement with previous results obtained with radioactive probes. The adaptation of fluorescence intensification and digital image processing (frame integration to enhance signal-to-noise ratio and linear contrast stretching) to microscopy makes it possible to detect very weak fluorescent spots on chromosomes. This system allows a high spatial resolution, even at very low fluorescence levels. The efficiency and the specificity of the hybridization and detection methodology give a direct and precise localization of the short single-copy sequences on human chromosomes.

  11. Genome-Wide Gene Expression Disturbance by Single A1/C1 Chromosome Substitution in Brassica rapa Restituted From Natural B. napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Alien chromosome substitution (CS lines are treated as vital germplasms for breeding and genetic mapping. Previously, a whole set of nine Brassica rapa-oleracea monosonic alien addition lines (MAALs, C1-C9 was established in the background of natural B. napus genotype “Oro,” after the restituted B. rapa (RBR for Oro was realized. Herein, a monosomic substitution line with one alien C1 chromosome (Cs1 in the RBR complement was selected in the progenies of MAAL C1 and RBR, by the PCR amplification of specific gene markers and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cs1 exhibited the whole plant morphology similar to RBR except for the defective stamens without fertile pollen grains, but it produced some seeds and progeny plants carrying the C1 chromosome at high rate besides those without the alien chromosome after pollinated by RBR. The viability of the substitution and its progeny for the RBR diploid further elucidated the functional compensation between the chromosome pairs with high homoeology. To reveal the impact of such aneuploidy on genome-wide gene expression, the transcriptomes of MAAL C1, Cs1 and euploid RBR were analyzed. Compared to RBR, Cs1 had sharply reduced gene expression level across chromosome A1, demonstrating the loss of one copy of A1 chromosome. Both additional chromosome C1 in MAAL and substitutional chromosome C1 in Cs1 caused not only cis-effect but also prevalent trans-effect differentially expressed genes. A dominant gene dosage effects prevailed among low expressed genes across chromosome A1 in Cs1, and moreover, dosage effects for some genes potentially contributed to the phenotype deviations. Our results provided novel insights into the transcriptomic perturbation and gene dosage effects on phenotype in CS related to one naturally evolved allopolyploid.

  12. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Inv Dup(15) chromosomes, using probes specific for the Pradar-Willi/Angelman syndrome region: Clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leana-Cox, J. (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Jenkins, L. (Kaiser Permanente Medical Group, San Jose, CA (United States)); Palmer, C.G.; Plattner, R. (Indiana School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Sheppard, L. (Palo Verde Laboratory, Inc., Chandler, AZ (United States)); Flejter, W.L. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Zackowski, J. (Univ. of Florida Health Science Center, Gainsville, FL (United States)); Tsien, F. (Tulane Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Schwartz, S. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-seven cases of inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup[15]) were investigated by FISH with two DNA probes specific for the Prader-Willi syndrome/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on proximal 15q. Sixteen of the marker chromosomes displayed two copies of each probe, while in the remaining 11 markers no hybridization was observed. A significant association was found between the presence of this region and an abnormal phenotype (P<.01). This is the largest study to date of inv dup(15) chromosomes, that uses molecular cytogenetic methods and is the first to report a significant association between the presence of a specific chromosomal region in such markers and an abnormal phenotype. 30 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. A method for the analysis of 32 X chromosome insertion deletion polymorphisms in a single PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Rui; Pereira, Vania; Gomes, Iva

    2012-01-01

    Studies of human genetic variation predominantly use short tandem repeats (STRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) but Insertion deletion polymorphisms (Indels) are being increasingly explored. They combine desirable characteristics of other genetic markers, especially the possibility...

  14. An integrative approach to assess X-chromosome inactivation using allele-specific expression with applications to epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Nicholas B; Fogarty, Zachary C; Larson, Melissa C; Kalli, Kimberly R; Lawrenson, Kate; Gayther, Simon; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J

    2017-12-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) epigenetically silences transcription of an X chromosome in females; patterns of XCI are thought to be aberrant in women's cancers, but are understudied due to statistical challenges. We develop a two-stage statistical framework to assess skewed XCI and evaluate gene-level patterns of XCI for an individual sample by integration of RNA sequence, copy number alteration, and genotype data. Our method relies on allele-specific expression (ASE) to directly measure XCI and does not rely on male samples or paired normal tissue for comparison. We model ASE using a two-component mixture of beta distributions, allowing estimation for a given sample of the degree of skewness (based on a composite likelihood ratio test) and the posterior probability that a given gene escapes XCI (using a Bayesian beta-binomial mixture model). To illustrate the utility of our approach, we applied these methods to data from tumors of ovarian cancer patients. Among 99 patients, 45 tumors were informative for analysis and showed evidence of XCI skewed toward a particular parental chromosome. For 397 X-linked genes, we observed tumor XCI patterns largely consistent with previously identified consensus states based on multiple normal tissue types. However, 37 genes differed in XCI state between ovarian tumors and the consensus state; 17 genes aberrantly escaped XCI in ovarian tumors (including many oncogenes), whereas 20 genes were unexpectedly inactivated in ovarian tumors (including many tumor suppressor genes). These results provide evidence of the importance of XCI in ovarian cancer and demonstrate the utility of our two-stage analysis. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  15. Mouse model of chromosome mosaicism reveals lineage-specific depletion of aneuploid cells and normal developmental potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Helen; Graham, Sarah J L; Van der Aa, Niels; Kumar, Parveen; Theunis, Koen; Fernandez Gallardo, Elia; Voet, Thierry; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2016-03-29

    Most human pre-implantation embryos are mosaics of euploid and aneuploid cells. To determine the fate of aneuploid cells and the developmental potential of mosaic embryos, here we generate a mouse model of chromosome mosaicism. By treating embryos with a spindle assembly checkpoint inhibitor during the four- to eight-cell division, we efficiently generate aneuploid cells, resulting in embryo death during peri-implantation development. Live-embryo imaging and single-cell tracking in chimeric embryos, containing aneuploid and euploid cells, reveal that the fate of aneuploid cells depends on lineage: aneuploid cells in the fetal lineage are eliminated by apoptosis, whereas those in the placental lineage show severe proliferative defects. Overall, the proportion of aneuploid cells is progressively depleted from the blastocyst stage onwards. Finally, we show that mosaic embryos have full developmental potential, provided they contain sufficient euploid cells, a finding of significance for the assessment of embryo vitality in the clinic.

  16. Mouse model of chromosome mosaicism reveals lineage-specific depletion of aneuploid cells and normal developmental potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Helen; Graham, Sarah J. L.; Van der Aa, Niels; Kumar, Parveen; Theunis, Koen; Fernandez Gallardo, Elia; Voet, Thierry; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Most human pre-implantation embryos are mosaics of euploid and aneuploid cells. To determine the fate of aneuploid cells and the developmental potential of mosaic embryos, here we generate a mouse model of chromosome mosaicism. By treating embryos with a spindle assembly checkpoint inhibitor during the four- to eight-cell division, we efficiently generate aneuploid cells, resulting in embryo death during peri-implantation development. Live-embryo imaging and single-cell tracking in chimeric embryos, containing aneuploid and euploid cells, reveal that the fate of aneuploid cells depends on lineage: aneuploid cells in the fetal lineage are eliminated by apoptosis, whereas those in the placental lineage show severe proliferative defects. Overall, the proportion of aneuploid cells is progressively depleted from the blastocyst stage onwards. Finally, we show that mosaic embryos have full developmental potential, provided they contain sufficient euploid cells, a finding of significance for the assessment of embryo vitality in the clinic. PMID:27021558

  17. A dense SNP-based linkage map for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar reveals extended chromosome homeologies and striking differences in sex-specific recombination patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien Sigbjørn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Atlantic salmon genome is in the process of returning to a diploid state after undergoing a whole genome duplication (WGD event between 25 and100 million years ago. Existing data on the proportion of paralogous sequence variants (PSVs, multisite variants (MSVs and other types of complex sequence variation suggest that the rediplodization phase is far from over. The aims of this study were to construct a high density linkage map for Atlantic salmon, to characterize the extent of rediploidization and to improve our understanding of genetic differences between sexes in this species. Results A linkage map for Atlantic salmon comprising 29 chromosomes and 5650 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was constructed using genotyping data from 3297 fish belonging to 143 families. Of these, 2696 SNPs were generated from ESTs or other gene associated sequences. Homeologous chromosomal regions were identified through the mapping of duplicated SNPs and through the investigation of syntenic relationships between Atlantic salmon and the reference genome sequence of the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus. The sex-specific linkage maps spanned a total of 2402.3 cM in females and 1746.2 cM in males, highlighting a difference in sex specific recombination rate (1.38:1 which is much lower than previously reported in Atlantic salmon. The sexes, however, displayed striking differences in the distribution of recombination sites within linkage groups, with males showing recombination strongly localized to telomeres. Conclusion The map presented here represents a valuable resource for addressing important questions of interest to evolution (the process of re-diploidization, aquaculture and salmonid life history biology and not least as a resource to aid the assembly of the forthcoming Atlantic salmon reference genome sequence.

  18. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  19. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivetal, Jérémy, E-mail: jeremy.piv@netcmail.com [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Royet, David [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Ciuta, Georgeta [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Frenea-Robin, Marie [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Haddour, Naoufel [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Dempsey, Nora M. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric [Univ Limoges, CNRS, SPCTS UMR 7513, 12 Rue Atlantis, F-87068 Limoges (France); Simonet, Pascal [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France)

    2015-04-15

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications. - Highlights: 1.We report a new approach to selectively micropattern bacterial cells individually upon micro-magnet arrays. 2.Permanent micro-magnets of a size approaching that of bacteria could be fabricated using a Thermo-Magnetic Patterning process. 3.Bacterial cells were labeled using two different magnetic labeling strategies providing flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology.

  20. Trisomy 8 as the sole chromosomal aberration in myelocytic malignancies: a multicolor and locus-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Kajsa; Fioretos, Thoas; Strömbeck, Bodil; Mauritzson, Nils; Tanke, Hans J; Johansson, Bertil

    2003-01-01

    Trisomy 8 is the most common chromosomal aberration in myelocytic malignancies, occurring both as a sole change as well as in addition to other abnormalities. In spite of this, next to nothing is known about its pathogenetic importance or its molecular genetic consequences. Possible mechanisms involved in the transformation process include dosage effects of genes mapping to chromosome 8 and presence of specific mutations or cryptic fusion genes on the duplicated chromosome. In the latter case, +8 would be secondary to a cryptic primary rearrangement and not involved in leukemogenesis as such, but rather in tumor evolution. Although hidden genetic changes have been found in some trisomies, for example, mutations in KIT in acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) with +4 and in MET in hereditary papillary kidney carcinoma with trisomy 7, none associated with +8 have so far been discovered. To address this issue, we have investigated a total of 13 cases of AML, myelodysplastic syndromes, and chronic myeloproliferative disorders with trisomy 8 as the sole chromosomal anomaly. All cases were studied by combined binary ratio multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and with FISH using locus-specific probes for both arms of chromosome 8, the subtelomeric regions of 8p and 8q, and the leukemia-associated genes FGFR1, MOZ, ETO, and MYC. No cryptic changes were detected, thus excluding the possibility of gross genetic rearrangements or aberrations involving these loci on chromosome 8.

  1. Current Status of Comprehensive Chromosome Screening for Elective Single-Embryo Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ming-Yih; Chao, Kuang-Han; Chen, Chin-Der; Chang, Li-Jung; Chen, Shee-Uan; Yang, Yu-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Most in vitro fertilization (IVF) experts and infertility patients agree that the most ideal assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcome is to have a healthy, full-term singleton born. To this end, the most reliable policy is the single-embryo transfer (SET). However, unsatisfactory results in IVF may result from plenty of factors, in which aneuploidy associated with advanced maternal age is a major hurdle. Throughout the past few years, we have got a big leap in advancement of the genetic...

  2. Haplotypes of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 19q13.2-3 associated with susceptibility of lung cancer in a Chinese population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Jiaoyang; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Ma, Yegang

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the joint effect of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms for three DNA repair genes in the region of chromosome 19q13.2-3 on susceptibility of lung cancer in a Chinese population, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study consisting of 247 lung cancer cases and 253 cancer...

  3. Calculation of 3D genome structures for comparison of chromosome conformation capture experiments with microscopy: An evaluation of single-cell Hi-C protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lando, David; Stevens, Tim J; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest D

    2018-01-01

    Single-cell chromosome conformation capture approaches are revealing the extent of cell-to-cell variability in the organization and packaging of genomes. These single-cell methods, unlike their multi-cell counterparts, allow straightforward computation of realistic chromosome conformations that may be compared and combined with other, independent, techniques to study 3D structure. Here we discuss how single-cell Hi-C and subsequent 3D genome structure determination allows comparison with data from microscopy. We then carry out a systematic evaluation of recently published single-cell Hi-C datasets to establish a computational approach for the evaluation of single-cell Hi-C protocols. We show that the calculation of genome structures provides a useful tool for assessing the quality of single-cell Hi-C data because it requires a self-consistent network of interactions, relating to the underlying 3D conformation, with few errors, as well as sufficient longer-range cis- and trans-chromosomal contacts.

  4. Why genes evolve faster on secondary chromosomes in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughn S Cooper

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In bacterial genomes composed of more than one chromosome, one replicon is typically larger, harbors more essential genes than the others, and is considered primary. The greater variability of secondary chromosomes among related taxa has led to the theory that they serve as an accessory genome for specific niches or conditions. By this rationale, purifying selection should be weaker on genes on secondary chromosomes because of their reduced necessity or usage. To test this hypothesis we selected bacterial genomes composed of multiple chromosomes from two genera, Burkholderia and Vibrio, and quantified the evolutionary rates (dN and dS of all orthologs within each genus. Both evolutionary rate parameters were faster among orthologs found on secondary chromosomes than those on the primary chromosome. Further, in every bacterial genome with multiple chromosomes that we studied, genes on secondary chromosomes exhibited significantly weaker codon usage bias than those on primary chromosomes. Faster evolution and reduced codon bias could in turn result from global effects of chromosome position, as genes on secondary chromosomes experience reduced dosage and expression due to their delayed replication, or selection on specific gene attributes. These alternatives were evaluated using orthologs common to genomes with multiple chromosomes and genomes with single chromosomes. Analysis of these ortholog sets suggested that inherently fast-evolving genes tend to be sorted to secondary chromosomes when they arise; however, prolonged evolution on a secondary chromosome further accelerated substitution rates. In summary, secondary chromosomes in bacteria are evolutionary test beds where genes are weakly preserved and evolve more rapidly, likely because they are used less frequently.

  5. Whole chromosome gain does not in itself confer cancer-like chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valind, Anders; Jin, Yuesheng; Baldetorp, Bo; Gisselsson, David

    2013-12-24

    Constitutional aneuploidy is typically caused by a single-event meiotic or early mitotic error. In contrast, somatic aneuploidy, found mainly in neoplastic tissue, is attributed to continuous chromosomal instability. More debated as a cause of aneuploidy is aneuploidy itself; that is, whether aneuploidy per se causes chromosomal instability, for example, in patients with inborn aneuploidy. We have addressed this issue by quantifying the level of somatic mosaicism, a proxy marker of chromosomal instability, in patients with constitutional aneuploidy by precise background-filtered dual-color FISH. In contrast to previous studies that used less precise methods, we find that constitutional trisomy, even for large chromosomes that are often trisomic in cancer, does not confer a significantly elevated rate of somatic chromosomal mosaicism in individual cases. Constitutional triploidy was associated with an increased level of somatic mosaicism, but this consisted mostly of reversion from trisomy to disomy and did not correspond to a proportionally elevated level of chromosome mis-segregation in triploids, indicating that the observed mosaicism resulted from a specific accumulation of cells with a hypotriploid chromosome number. In no case did the rate of somatic mosaicism in constitutional aneuploidy exceed that of "chromosomally stable" cancer cells. Our findings show that even though constitutional aneuploidy was in some cases associated with low-level somatic mosaicism, it was insufficient to generate the cancer-like levels expected if aneuploidy single-handedly triggered cancer-like chromosomal instability.

  6. Single-molecule sequencing and Hi-C-based proximity-guided assembly of amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) chromosomes provide insights into genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, D J; Jarvis, D E; Ramaraj, T; Lee, R; Jellen, E N; Maughan, P J

    2017-08-31

    Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) was a food staple among the ancient civilizations of Central and South America that has recently received increased attention due to the high nutritional value of the seeds, with the potential to help alleviate malnutrition and food security concerns, particularly in arid and semiarid regions of the developing world. Here, we present a reference-quality assembly of the amaranth genome which will assist the agronomic development of the species. Utilizing single-molecule, real-time sequencing (Pacific Biosciences) and chromatin interaction mapping (Hi-C) to close assembly gaps and scaffold contigs, respectively, we improved our previously reported Illumina-based assembly to produce a chromosome-scale assembly with a scaffold N50 of 24.4 Mb. The 16 largest scaffolds contain 98% of the assembly and likely represent the haploid chromosomes (n = 16). To demonstrate the accuracy and utility of this approach, we produced physical and genetic maps and identified candidate genes for the betalain pigmentation pathway. The chromosome-scale assembly facilitated a genome-wide syntenic comparison of amaranth with other Amaranthaceae species, revealing chromosome loss and fusion events in amaranth that explain the reduction from the ancestral haploid chromosome number (n = 18) for a tetraploid member of the Amaranthaceae. The assembly method reported here minimizes cost by relying primarily on short-read technology and is one of the first reported uses of in vivo Hi-C for assembly of a plant genome. Our analyses implicate chromosome loss and fusion as major evolutionary events in the 2n = 32 amaranths and clearly establish the homoeologous relationship among most of the subgenome chromosomes, which will facilitate future investigations of intragenomic changes that occurred post polyploidization.

  7. Llama-Derived Single Domain Antibodies Specific for Abrus Agglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Carney

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Llama derived single domain antibodies (sdAb, the recombinantly expressed variable heavy domains from the unique heavy-chain only antibodies of camelids, were isolated from a library derived from llamas immunized with a commercial abrin toxoid preparation. Abrin is a potent toxin similar to ricin in structure, sequence and mechanism of action. The selected sdAb were evaluated for their ability to bind to commercial abrin as well as abrax (a recombinant abrin A-chain, purified abrin fractions, Abrus agglutinin (a protein related to abrin but with lower toxicity, ricin, and unrelated proteins. Isolated sdAb were also evaluated for their ability to refold after heat denaturation and ability to be used in sandwich assays as both capture and reporter elements. The best binders were specific for the Abrus agglutinin, showing minimal binding to purified abrin fractions or unrelated proteins. These binders had sub nM affinities and regained most of their secondary structure after heating to 95 °C. They functioned well in sandwich assays. Through gel analysis and the behavior of anti-abrin monoclonal antibodies, we determined that the commercial toxoid preparation used for the original immunizations contained a high percentage of Abrus agglutinin, explaining the selection of Abrus agglutinin binders. Used in conjunction with anti-abrin monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, these reagents can fill a role to discriminate between the highly toxic abrin and the related, but much less toxic, Abrus agglutinin and distinguish between different crude preparations.

  8. A Family of Zinc Finger Proteins Is Required forChromosome-specific Pairing and Synapsis during Meiosis in C.elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2006-06-07

    Homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis are prerequisitefor accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis. Here, we show that afamily of four related C2H2 zinc-finger proteins plays a central role inthese events in C. elegans. These proteins are encoded within a tandemgene cluster. In addition to the X-specific HIM-8 protein, threeadditional paralogs collectively mediate the behavior of the fiveautosomes. Each chromosome relies on a specific member of the family topair and synapse with its homolog. These "ZIM" proteins concentrate atspecial regions called meiotic pairing centers on the correspondingchromosomes. These sites are dispersed along the nuclear envelope duringearly meiotic prophase, suggesting a role analogous to thetelomere-mediated meiotic bouquet in other organisms. To gain insightinto the evolution of these components, wecharacterized homologs in C.briggsae and C. remanei, which revealed changes in copy number of thisgene family within the nematode lineage.

  9. A novel resource for genomics of Triticeae: BAC library specific for the short arm of rye (Secale cereale L. chromosome 1R (1RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Číhalíková Jarmila

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomics of rye (Secale cereale L. is impeded by its large nuclear genome (1C~7,900 Mbp with prevalence of DNA repeats (> 90%. An attractive possibility is to dissect the genome to small parts after flow sorting particular chromosomes and chromosome arms. To test this approach, we have chosen 1RS chromosome arm, which represents only 5.6% of the total rye genome. The 1RS arm is an attractive target as it carries many important genes and because it became part of the wheat gene pool as the 1BL.1RS translocation. Results We demonstrate that it is possible to sort 1RS arm from wheat-rye ditelosomic addition line. Using this approach, we isolated over 10 million of 1RS arms using flow sorting and used their DNA to construct a 1RS-specific BAC library, which comprises 103,680 clones with average insert size of 73 kb. The library comprises two sublibraries constructed using HindIII and EcoRI and provides a deep coverage of about 14-fold of the 1RS arm (442 Mbp. We present preliminary results obtained during positional cloning of the stem rust resistance gene SrR, which confirm a potential of the library to speed up isolation of agronomically important genes by map-based cloning. Conclusion We present a strategy that enables sorting short arms of several chromosomes of rye. Using flow-sorted chromosomes, we have constructed a deep coverage BAC library specific for the short arm of chromosome 1R (1RS. This is the first subgenomic BAC library available for rye and we demonstrate its potential for positional gene cloning. We expect that the library will facilitate development of a physical contig map of 1RS and comparative genomics of the homoeologous chromosome group 1 of wheat, barley and rye.

  10. Novel single nucleotide polymorphism associations with colorectal cancer on chromosome 8q24 in African and European Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, Sonia S; Torres, Jada Benn; Hooker, Stanley; Anderson, Jeffrey R; Skol, Andrew D; Ellis, Nathan A; Kittles, Rick A

    2009-08-01

    Regions on chromosome 8q24 harbor susceptibility alleles for multiple cancers including colorectal (region 3) and prostate cancer (regions 1-4). The objectives of the present study were (i) to test whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in region 4 are associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in European or African Americans; (ii) to test whether 8q24 SNPs previously shown to be associated with colorectal and prostate cancer also show association in our multiethnic series and (iii) to test for association between 100 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) and CRC in both the African American and European American cohorts. In total, we genotyped nine markers on 8q24 and 100 unlinked AIMs in 569 CRC cases and 439 controls (490 European Americans and 518 African Americans) obtained retrospectively from a hospital-based sample. We found rs7008482 in 8q24 region 4 to be significantly associated with CRC in European Americans (P = 0.03). Also in region 4, we found that a second SNP, rs16900305, trended toward association with CRC in African Americans. The rs6983267 in region 3, previously implicated in CRC risk, trended toward association with disease in European Americans but not in African Americans. Finally, none of the 100 AIMs tested for association reached statistical significance after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. In summary, these results are evidence that 8q24 region 4 contains novel CRC-associated alleles in European and African Americans.

  11. Conservative site-specific and single-copy transgenesis in human LINE-1 elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Chandra, Shree Harsha; Makhija, Harshyaa; Peter, Sabrina; Myint Wai, Cho Mar; Li, Jinming; Zhu, Jindong; Ren, Zhonglu; D'Alcontres, Martina Stagno; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon; Ghadessy, Farid John; Dröge, Peter

    2016-04-07

    Genome engineering of human cells plays an important role in biotechnology and molecular medicine. In particular, insertions of functional multi-transgene cassettes into suitable endogenous sequences will lead to novel applications. Although several tools have been exploited in this context, safety issues such as cytotoxicity, insertional mutagenesis and off-target cleavage together with limitations in cargo size/expression often compromise utility. Phage λ integrase (Int) is a transgenesis tool that mediates conservative site-specific integration of 48 kb DNA into a safe harbor site of the bacterial genome. Here, we show that an Int variant precisely recombines large episomes into a sequence, term edattH4X, found in 1000 human Long INterspersed Elements-1 (LINE-1). We demonstrate single-copy transgenesis through attH4X-targeting in various cell lines including hESCs, with the flexibility of selecting clones according to transgene performance and downstream applications. This is exemplified with pluripotency reporter cassettes and constitutively expressed payloads that remain functional in LINE1-targeted hESCs and differentiated progenies. Furthermore, LINE-1 targeting does not induce DNA damage-response or chromosomal aberrations, and neither global nor localized endogenous gene expression is substantially affected. Hence, this simple transgene addition tool should become particularly useful for applications that require engineering of the human genome with multi-transgenes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Female site-specific transposase-induced recombination: a high-efficiency method for fine mapping mutations on the X chromosome in Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, Jeffrey M

    2003-01-01

    P-element transposons in the Drosophila germline mobilize only in the presence of the appropriate transposase enzyme. Sometimes, instead of mobilizing completely, P elements will undergo site-specific recombination with the homologous chromosome. Site-specific recombination is the basis for male recombination mapping, since the male germline does not normally undergo recombination. Site-specific recombination also takes place in females, but this has been difficult to study because of the obs...

  13. Human chromosome-specific changes in a human-hamster hybrid cell line (AL) assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (fish)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geard, Charles R.; Jenkins, Gloria

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess all gamma-ray induced chromosomal changes confined to one human chromosome using fluorescence microscopy and in situ hybridization with a fluorescently labeled human chromosome specific nucleic acid probe. Methods and Materials: Synchronized human-hamster hybrid cells containing human chromosome 11 were obtained by a modified mitotic shake-off procedure. G1 phase cells (> 95%) were irradiated with 137 Cs gamma rays (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 Gy) at a dose rate of 1.1 Gy/min and mitotic cells collected 16-20 h later; chromosomal spreads were prepared, denatured, and hybridized with a fluorescein-tagged nucleic acid probe against total human DNA. Chromosomes were examined by fluorescence microscopy and all categories of change involving the human chromosome 11 as target, recorded. Results: Overall, of the 3104 human-hamster hybrid cells examined, 82.1% were euploid, of which 88.6% contained one copy of human chromosome 11, 6.2% contained two copies, and 5.2% contained 0 copies. This is compatible with mitotic nondisjunction in a small fraction of cells. Of the remaining 17.9% of cells, 85.2% were tetraploid cells with two copies of human chromosome 11. For all aberrations involving human chromosome 11 there was a linear relationship between yield and absorbed dose of 0.1 aberrations per chromosome per Gy. The yield of dicentrics, translocations, and terminal deletions that involve one lesion on the human chromosome was linear, while the yield of interstitial deletions that arise from two interacting lesions on the human chromosome was curvilinear. The frequencies of dicentrics and translocations were about equal, while there was a high (40-60%) incidence of incomplete exchanges between human and hamster chromosomes. Conclusions: Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures allow for the efficient detection of a broad range of induced changes in target chromosomes. Symmetrical exchanges induced in G1

  14. High-throughput single-molecule mapping links subtelomeric variants and long-range haplotypes with specific telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eleanor; Pastor, Steven; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; McCaffrey, Jennifer; Sibert, Justin; Mak, Angel C Y; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Riethman, Harold; Xiao, Ming

    2017-05-19

    Accurate maps and DNA sequences for human subtelomere regions, along with detailed knowledge of subtelomere variation and long-range telomere-terminal haplotypes in individuals, are critical for understanding telomere function and its roles in human biology. Here, we use a highly automated whole genome mapping technology in nano-channel arrays to analyze large terminal human chromosome segments extending from chromosome-specific subtelomere sequences through subtelomeric repeat regions to terminal (TTAGGG)n repeat tracts. We establish detailed maps for subtelomere gap regions in the human reference sequence, detect many new large subtelomeric variants and demonstrate the feasibility of long-range haplotyping through segmentally duplicated subtelomere regions. These features make the method a uniquely valuable new tool for improving the quality of genome assemblies in complex DNA regions. Based on single molecule mapping of telomere-terminal DNA fragments, we provide proof of principle for a novel method to estimate telomere lengths linked to distinguishable telomeric haplotypes; this single-telomere genotyping method may ultimately enable delineation of human cis elements involved in telomere length regulation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Localization of specific sequences and DNA single-strand breaks in individual UV-A-irradiated human lymphocytes by COMET FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Claudia; Rapp, Alexander; Dittmar, Heike; Monajembashi, Shamci; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1999-01-01

    The COMET assay, a single cell electrophoresis technique which allows to separate electrophoretically fractionated DNA according to size has been combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) which allows to localize specific genes or gene regions. This combination (COMET FISH) allows the detection of DNA single strand breaks in specific regions of the genome of human lymphocytes at the single cell level. Various types of DNA probes, e.g. centromere-, (alpha) - satellite-, telomere-, whole chromosome-, single copy- and region specific DNA probes have been used to investigate whether the UV-A induced DNA single strand breaks are distributed randomly all over the human genome or induced at specific sites ('hot spots'). In the investigated human peripheral blood lymphocytes all but one centromere reveal low sensitivity for UV-A irradiation (500 kJ/m2), while telomeres are randomly distributed over COMET heads and tails. The human chromosome 1 is fractionated by irradiation, but remains in the COMET head, indicating an only moderate degree of fractionation. Among three tested single copy probes, c- myc, p53 and p58, the p53 gene located on chromosome 17p13.1 and the p58 gene (1p36) appear to be located in UV-A stable regions of the human genome in 95% of 65 investigated lymphocytes. In contrast, the c-myc proto-oncogene (8q24) is found in the COMET tail in 90% of the 27 investigated lymphocytes and thus appears to be more sensitive to UV-A irradiation.

  16. Ten alien chromosome additions of Gossypium hirsutum-Gossypium bickii developed by integrative uses of GISH and species-specific SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dong; Feng, Shouli; Li, Sai; Chen, Yu; Zhou, Baoliang

    2018-03-27

    Gossypium bickii: (2n = 26, G 1 G 1 ), a wild diploid cotton, carries many favourable traits. However, these favourable traits cannot be directly transferred into G. hirsutum (2n = 52, AADD) cultivars due to the differences in genomes. Monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) are considered an invaluable tool for the introgression of genes of interest from wild relatives into cultivated crops. In this study, the G. hirsutum-G. bickii amphidiploid (2n = 78, AADDG 1 G 1 ) was backcrossed with G. hirsutum to develop alien additions containing individual G. bickii chromosomes in a G. hirsutum background. Genomic in situ hybridization was employed to detect the number of alien chromosomes added to the backcross progenies. A total of 183 G. bickii-specific DNA markers were developed to discriminate the identities of the G. bickii chromosomes added to G. hirsutum and assess the alien chromosome transmissibility. Chromosomes 4G b and 13G b showed the highest transmissibility, while chromosomes 1G b , 7G b and 11G b showed the lowest. Ten of the 13 possible G. hirsutum-G. bickii MAALs were isolated and characterized, which will lay the foundation for transferring resistance genes of G. bickii into G. hirsutum, as well as for gene assignment, physical mapping, and selective isolation and mapping of cDNAs for particular G. bickii chromosomes. The strategies of how to use MAALs to develop varieties with the trait of interest from wild species (such as glanded plant-glandless seed) were proposed and discussed.

  17. The endocrine stress response is linked to one specific locus on chromosome 3 in a mouse model based on extremes in trait anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonik Mariya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is essential to control physiological stress responses in mammals. Its dysfunction is related to several mental disorders, including anxiety and depression. The aim of this study was to identify genetic loci underlying the endocrine regulation of the HPA axis. Method High (HAB and low (LAB anxiety-related behaviour mice were established by selective inbreeding of outbred CD-1 mice to model extremes in trait anxiety. Additionally, HAB vs. LAB mice exhibit comorbid characteristics including a differential corticosterone response upon stress exposure. We crossbred HAB and LAB lines to create F1 and F2 offspring. To identify the contribution of the endocrine phenotypes to the total phenotypic variance, we examined multiple behavioural paradigms together with corticosterone secretion-based phenotypes in F2 mice by principal component analysis. Further, to pinpoint the genomic loci of the quantitative trait of the HPA axis stress response, we conducted genome-wide multipoint oligogenic linkage analyses based on Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo approach as well as parametric linkage in three-generation pedigrees, followed by a two-dimensional scan for epistasis and association analysis in freely segregating F2 mice using 267 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, which were identified to consistently differ between HAB and LAB mice as genetic markers. Results HPA axis reactivity measurements and behavioural phenotypes were represented by independent principal components and demonstrated no correlation. Based on this finding, we identified one single quantitative trait locus (QTL on chromosome 3 showing a very strong evidence for linkage (2ln (L-score > 10, LOD > 23 and significant association (lowest Bonferroni adjusted p -28 to the neuroendocrine stress response. The location of the linkage peak was estimated at 42.3 cM (95% confidence interval: 41.3 - 43.3 cM and was shown to be in

  18. Comparison of repair of DNA double-strand breaks in identical sequences in primary human fibroblast and immortal hamster-human hybrid cells harboring a single copy of human chromosome 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouladi, B.; Waldren, C. A.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We have optimized a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay that measures induction and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in specific regions of the genome (Lobrich et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 12050-12054, 1995). The increased sensitivity resulting from these improvements makes it possible to analyze the size distribution of broken DNA molecules immediately after the introduction of DSBs and after repair incubation. This analysis shows that the distribution of broken DNA pieces after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation is consistent with the distribution expected from randomly induced DSBs. It is apparent from the distribution of rejoined DNA pieces after repair incubation that DNA ends continue to rejoin between 3 and 24 h postirradiation and that some of these rejoining events are in fact misrejoining events, since novel restriction fragments both larger and smaller than the original fragment are generated after repair. This improved assay was also used to study the kinetics of DSB rejoining and the extent of misrejoining in identical DNA sequences in human GM38 cells and human-hamster hybrid A(L) cells containing a single human chromosome 11. Despite the numerous differences between these cells, which include species and tissue of origin, levels of TP53, expression of telomerase, and the presence or absence of a homologous chromosome for the restriction fragments examined, the kinetics of rejoining of radiation-induced DSBs and the extent of misrejoining were similar in the two cell lines when studied in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, DSBs were removed from the single-copy human chromosome in the hamster A(L) cells with similar kinetics and misrejoining frequency as at a locus on this hybrid's CHO chromosomes.

  19. Emergence of a Homo sapiens-specific gene family and chromosome 16p11.2 CNV susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttle, Xander; Giannuzzi, Giuliana; Duyzend, Michael H; Schraiber, Joshua G; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Sudmant, Peter H; Penn, Osnat; Chiatante, Giorgia; Malig, Maika; Huddleston, John; Benner, Chris; Camponeschi, Francesca; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Stessman, Holly A F; Marchetto, Maria C N; Denman, Laura; Harshman, Lana; Baker, Carl; Raja, Archana; Penewit, Kelsi; Janke, Nicolette; Tang, W Joyce; Ventura, Mario; Banci, Lucia; Antonacci, Francesca; Akey, Joshua M; Amemiya, Chris T; Gage, Fred H; Reymond, Alexandre; Eichler, Evan E

    2016-08-11

    Genetic differences that specify unique aspects of human evolution have typically been identified by comparative analyses between the genomes of humans and closely related primates, including more recently the genomes of archaic hominins. Not all regions of the genome, however, are equally amenable to such study. Recurrent copy number variation (CNV) at chromosome 16p11.2 accounts for approximately 1% of cases of autism and is mediated by a complex set of segmental duplications, many of which arose recently during human evolution. Here we reconstruct the evolutionary history of the locus and identify bolA family member 2 (BOLA2) as a gene duplicated exclusively in Homo sapiens. We estimate that a 95-kilobase-pair segment containing BOLA2 duplicated across the critical region approximately 282 thousand years ago (ka), one of the latest among a series of genomic changes that dramatically restructured the locus during hominid evolution. All humans examined carried one or more copies of the duplication, which nearly fixed early in the human lineage--a pattern unlikely to have arisen so rapidly in the absence of selection (P sapiens-specific duplication. In summary, the duplicative transposition of BOLA2 at the root of the H. sapiens lineage about 282 ka simultaneously increased copy number of a gene associated with iron homeostasis and predisposed our species to recurrent rearrangements associated with disease.

  20. X- and Y-chromosome specific variants of the amelogenin gene allow sex determination in sheep (Ovis aries and European red deer (Cervus elaphus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenig B

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simple and precise methods for sex determination in animals are a pre-requisite for a number of applications in animal production and forensics. However, some of the existing methods depend only on the detection of Y-chromosome specific sequences. Therefore, the abscence of a signal does not necessarily mean that the sample is of female origin, because experimental errors can also lead to negative results. Thus, the detection of Y- and X-chromosome specific sequences is advantageous. Results A novel method for sex identification in mammals (sheep, Ovis aries and European red deer, Cervus elaphus is described, using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing of a part of the amelogenin gene. A partial sequence of the amelogenin gene of sheep and red deer was obtained, which exists on both X and Y chromosomes with a deletion region on the Y chromosome. With a specific pair of primers a DNA fragment of different length between the male and female mammal was amplified. Conclusion PCR amplification using the amelogenin gene primers is useful in sex identification of samples from sheep and red deer and can be applied to DNA analysis of micro samples with small amounts of DNA such as hair roots as well as bones or embryo biopsies.

  1. Stage-specific damage to synaptonemal complexes and metaphase chromosomes induced by X rays in male mouse germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backer, L.C.; Sontag, M.R.; Allen, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Synaptonemal complexes (SCs) reveal mutagen-induced effects in germ cell meiotic chromosomes. The study was aimed at characterizing relationships between SC and metaphase I chromosome damage following radiation exposure at various stages of spermatogenesis. Male mice were irradiated with doses of 0, 2, or 4 Gy, and spermatocytes were harvested at times consistent with earlier exposures as spermatogonial stem cells, preleptotene cells (premeiotic DNA synthesis), or meiotic prophase cells. After stem-cell exposure, twice as many rearrangements were observed in SCs as in metaphase I chromosomes. Irradiation during premeiotic DNA synthesis resulted in dose-related increases in SC breakage and rearrangements (including novel forms) and in metaphase chromosomal aberrations. Following prophase exposure, various types and levels of SC and metaphase damage were observed. Irradiation of zygotene cells led to high frequencies of chromosome multivalents in metaphase I without a correspondingly high level of damage in preceding prophase SCs. Thus, irradiation of premeiotic and meiotic cells results in variable relationships between SC and metaphase chromosome damage

  2. Rapid EST isolation from chromosome 1R of rye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yu-Hong

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To obtain important expressed sequence tags (ESTs located on specific chromosomes is currently difficult. Construction of single-chromosome EST library could be an efficient strategy to isolate important ESTs located on specific chromosomes. In this research we developed a method to rapidly isolate ESTs from chromosome 1R of rye by combining the techniques of chromosome microdissection with hybrid specific amplification (HSA. Results Chromosome 1R was isolated by a glass needle and digested with proteinase K (PK. The DNA of chromosome 1R was amplified by two rounds of PCR using a degenerated oligonucleotide 6-MW sequence with a Sau3AI digestion site as the primer. The PCR product was digested with Sau3AI and linked with adaptor HSA1, then hybridized with the Sau3AI digested cDNA with adaptor HSA2 of rye leaves with and without salicylic acid (SA treatment, respectively. The hybridized DNA fragments were recovered by the HSA method and cloned into pMD18-T vector. The cloned inserts were released by PCR using the partial sequences in HSA1 and HSA2 as the primers and then sequenced. Of the 94 ESTs obtained and analyzed, 6 were known sequences located on rye chromosome 1R or on homologous group 1 chromosomes of wheat; all of them were highly homologous with ESTs of wheat, barley and/or other plants in Gramineae, some of which were induced by abiotic or biotic stresses. Isolated in this research were 22 ESTs with unknown functions, probably representing some new genes on rye chromosome 1R. Conclusion We developed a new method to rapidly clone chromosome-specific ESTs from chromosome 1R of rye. The information reported here should be useful for cloning and investigating the new genes found on chromosome 1R.

  3. Characterizing the Final Steps of Chromosomal Replication at the Single-molecule Level in the Model System Escherichia coli

    KAUST Repository

    Elshenawy, Mohamed M.

    2015-12-01

    In the circular Escherichia coli chromosome, two replisomes are assembled at the unique origin of replication and drive DNA synthesis in opposite directions until they meet in the terminus region across from the origin. Despite the difference in rates of the two replisomes, their arrival at the terminus is synchronized through a highly specialized system consisting of the terminator protein (Tus) bound to the termination sites (Ter). This synchronicity is mediated by the polarity of the Tus−Ter complex that stops replisomes from one direction (non-permissive face) but not the other (permissive face). Two oppositely oriented clusters of five Tus–Ters that each block one of the two replisomes create a “replication fork trap” for the first arriving replisome while waiting for the late arriving one. Despite extensive biochemical and structural studies, the molecular mechanism behind Tus−Ter polar arrest activity remained controversial. Moreover, none of the previous work provided answers for the long-standing discrepancy between the ability of Tus−Ter to permanently stop replisomes in vitro and its low efficiency in vivo. Here, I spearheaded a collaborative project that combined single-molecule DNA replication assays, X-ray crystallography and binding studies to provide a true molecular-level understanding of the underlying mechanism of Tus−Ter polar arrest activity. We showed that efficiency of Tus−Ter is determined by a head-to-head kinetic competition between rate of strand separation by the replisome and rate of rearrangement of Tus−Ter interactions during the melting of the first 6 base pairs of Ter. This rearrangement maintains Tus’s strong grip on the DNA and stops the advancing replisome from breaking into Tus−Ter central interactions, but only transiently. We further showed how this kinetic competition functions within the context of two mechanisms to impose permanent fork stoppage. The rate-dependent fork arrest activity of Tus

  4. Site-specific deletions of chromosomally located DNA segments with the multimer resolution system of broad-host-range plasmid RP4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Claus; Eberl, Leo; Sanchezromero, Juan M.

    1995-01-01

    The multimer resolution system (mrs) of the broad-host-range plasmid RP4 has been exploited to develop a general method that permits the precise excision of chromosomal segments in a variety of gram-negative bacteria. The procedure is based on the site-specific recombination between two directly...... of the parA expression system suggested that just a few molecules of the resolvase are required to achieve the site-specific recombination event, Transient expression of parA from a plasmid unable to replicate in the target bacterium was instrumental to effect differential deletions within complex hybrid...... transposons inserted in the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida, This strategy permits the stable inheritance of heterologous DNA segments virtually devoid of the sequences used initially to select their insertion....

  5. An Improved Consensus Linkage Map of Barley Based on Flow-Sorted Chromosomes and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Munoz-Amatriain, M.; Moscou, M. J.; Bhat, P. R.; Bartoš, Jan; Suchánková, Pavla; Šimková, Hana; Endo, T. R.; Fenton, R. D.; Lonardi, S.; Castillo, A. M.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Close, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2011), s. 238-249 ISSN 1940-3372 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004; GA MŠk ED0007/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Chromosomes sorting * Barley * Nucleotide polymorphism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  6. A set of simple PCR markers converted from sequence specific RFLP markers on tomato Chromosomes 9 to 12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Y.; Feng, X.; Hulst, van der R.G.M.; Lindhout, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    A set of 24 simple PCR markers was generated for tomato chromosomes 9, 10, 11 and 12. Polymorphism was sought for between Lycopersicon esculentum and one of six other Lycopersicon species (L. parviflorum, L. cheesmanii, L. hirsutum, L. pennellii, L. peruvianum, and L. chilense). PCR primers, which

  7. Chromosome Painting by GISH and Multicolor FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Steven S; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Qijun; Niu, Zhixia; Jan, Chao-Chien; Cai, Xiwen

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful cytogenetic technique for identifying chromosomes and mapping specific genes and DNA sequences on individual chromosomes. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and multicolor FISH (mc-FISH) represent two special types of FISH techniques. Both GISH and mc-FISH experiments have general steps and features of FISH, including chromosome preparation, probe labeling, blocking DNA preparation, target-probe DNA hybridization, post-hybridization washes, and hybridization signal detection. Specifically, GISH uses total genomic DNA from two species as probe and blocking DNA, respectively, and it can differentiate chromosomes from different genomes. The mc-FISH takes advantage of simultaneous hybridization of several DNA probes labeled by different fluorochromes to different targets on the same chromosome sample. Hybridization signals from different probes are detected using different fluorescence filter sets. Multicolor FISH can provide more structural details for target chromosomes than single-color FISH. In this chapter, we present the general experimental procedures for these two techniques with specific details in the critical steps we have modified in our laboratories.

  8. Karyotyping and single-gene detection using fluorescence in situ hybridization on chromosomes of Hydra magnipapillata (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Anokhin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The fresh water polyp Hydra L., 1758 (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa plays a key role as a model organism in modern evolutionary and developmental biology. A complete genome sequence has been published recently for Hydra magnipapillata Ito, 1947 and molecular data are rapidly accumulating in the literature, but little information is available on its chromosomes. In this study, an efficient fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH method is described for H. magnipapillata which not only allows identification of the chromosomes but also visualization of the location of individual genetic loci. Together with cDNA and genomic sequencing this may provide the foundation for increasingly precise genetic and physical mapping in this basal metazoan model organism.

  9. Single-nucleotide variant in multiple copies of a deleted in azoospermia (DAZ) sequence - a human Y chromosome quantitative polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmulewicz, Martin N; Ruiz, Luis M; Reategui, Erika P; Hussini, Saeed; Herrera, Rene J

    2002-01-01

    The evolution of the deleted in azoospermia (DAZ) gene family supports prevalent theories on the origin and development of sex chromosomes and sexual dimorphism. The ancestral DAZL gene in human chromosome 3 is known to be involved in germline development of both males and females. The available phylogenetic data suggest that some time after the divergence of the New World and Old World monkey lineages, the DAZL gene, which is found in all mammals, was copied to the Y chromosome of an ancestor to the Old World monkeys, but not New World monkeys. In modern man, the Y-linked DAZ gene complex is located on the distal part of the q arm. It is thought that after being copied to the Y chromosome, and after the divergence of the human and great ape lineages, the DAZ gene in the former underwent internal rearrangements. This included tandem duplications as well as a T > C transition altering an MboI restriction enzyme site in a duplicated sequence. In this study, we report on the ratios of MboI-/MboI+ variant sequences in individuals from seven worldwide human populations (Basque, Benin, Egypt, Formosa, Kungurtug, Oman and Rwanda) in the DAZ complex. The ratio of PCR MboI- and MboI+ amplicons can be used to characterize individuals and populations. Our results show a nonrandom distribution of MboI-/MboI+ sequence ratios in all populations examined, as well as significant differences in ratios between populations when compared pairwise. The multiple ratios imply that there have been more than one recent reorganization events at this locus. Considering the dynamic nature of this locus and its involvement in male fertility, we investigated the extent and distribution of this polymorphism. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Identification of a single chromosome in the normal human genome essential for suppression of hamster cell transformation.

    OpenAIRE

    Stoler, A; Bouck, N

    1985-01-01

    Normal human fibroblasts were fused to carcinogen-transformed baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells and found to be able to suppress the anchorage-independent transformed phenotype of the hamster cells. This suppression was not due to interspecies incompatibility, for transformation could be effectively expressed in hybrids if either the human or the BHK parent had initially been transformed by a dominantly acting viral genome. Upon growth of suppressed hybrids, loss of human chromosomes was accomp...

  11. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In each of our cells there is about 6 feet long DNA packed. Into 46 units called chromosomes. Chromosome: is a long thread of DNA wrapped around proteins. ... application of. Mendel's 'gene' concept to a human trait was' by the physician A. Garrod. He described the genetic disease alkaptonuria as an alteration In specific.

  12. Generating resources for genomics of wheat homoeologous chromosome group 3: 3AS- and 3DS-specific BAC libraries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Kubaláková, Marie; Suchánková, Pavla; Čihalíková, Jarmila; Bartoš, Jan; Fiocchetti, F.; Roselli, M.; Gill, B. S.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Lucretti, S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 61, 1-2 (2009), s. 151-160 ISSN 0394-9257 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA ČR GA521/06/1723; GA ČR GA521/07/1573; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004; GA MŠk OC08025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : BAC library * Flow sorting * Homoeologous chromosomes Subject RIV: GE - Plant Breeding

  13. Molecular characterization and chromosomal distribution of a species-specific transcribed centromeric satellite repeat from the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina T Tsoumani

    Full Text Available Satellite repetitive sequences that accumulate in the heterochromatin consist a large fraction of a genome and due to their properties are suggested to be implicated in centromere function. Current knowledge of heterochromatic regions of Bactrocera oleae genome, the major pest of the olive tree, is practically nonexistent. In our effort to explore the repetitive DNA portion of B. oleae genome, a novel satellite sequence designated BoR300 was isolated and cloned. The present study describes the genomic organization, abundance and chromosomal distribution of BoR300 which is organized in tandem, forming arrays of 298 bp-long monomers. Sequence analysis showed an AT content of 60.4%, a CENP-B like-motif and a high curvature value based on predictive models. Comparative analysis among randomly selected monomers demonstrated a high degree of sequence homogeneity (88%-97% of BoR300 repeats, which are present at approximately 3,000 copies per haploid genome accounting for about 0.28% of the total genomic DNA, based on two independent qPCR approaches. In addition, expression of the repeat was also confirmed through RT-PCR, by which BoR300 transcripts were detected in both sexes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of BoR300 on mitotic metaphases and polytene chromosomes revealed signals to the centromeres of two out of the six chromosomes which indicated a chromosome-specific centromeric localization. Moreover, BoR300 is not conserved in the closely related Bactrocera species tested and it is also absent in other dipterans, but it's rather restricted to the B. oleae genome. This feature of species-specificity attributed to BoR300 satellite makes it a good candidate as an identification probe of the insect among its relatives at early development stages.

  14. Isolation of probes specific to human chromosomal region 6p21 from immunoselected irradiation-fusion gene transfer hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragoussis, J.; Jones, T.A.; Sheer, D.; Shrimpton, A.E.; Goodfellow, P.N.; Trowsdale, J.; Ziegler, A.

    1991-01-01

    A hybrid cell line (R21/B1) containing a truncated human chromosome 6 (6pter-6q21) and a human Y chromosome on a hamster background was irradiated and fused to A23 (TK-) or W3GH (HPRT-) hamster cells. Clones containing expressed HLA class I genes (4/40) were selected using monoclonal antibodies. These clones were recloned and analyzed with a panel of probes from the HLA region. One hybrid (4G6) contained the entire HLA complex. Two other hybrids (4J4 and 4H2) contained only the HLA class I region, while the fourth hybrid (5P9) contained HLA class I and III genes in addition to other genes located in the 6p21 chromosomal region. In situ hybridization showed that the hybrid cells contained more than one fragment of human DNA. Alu and LINE PCR products were derived from these cells and compared to each other as well as to products from two somatic cell hybrids having the 6p21 region in common. The PCR fragments were then screened on conventional Southern blots of the somatic cell hybrids to select a panel of novel probes encompassing the 6p21 region. In addition, the origin of the human DNA fragments in hybrid 4J4 was determined by regional mapping of PCR products

  15. Isolation of probes specific to human chromosomal region 6p21 from immunoselected irradiation-fusion gene transfer hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragoussis, J.; Jones, T.A.; Sheer, D.; Shrimpton, A.E.; Goodfellow, P.N.; Trowsdale, J.; Ziegler, A. (ICRF Human Immunogenetics, London (England))

    1991-07-01

    A hybrid cell line (R21/B1) containing a truncated human chromosome 6 (6pter-6q21) and a human Y chromosome on a hamster background was irradiated and fused to A23 (TK-) or W3GH (HPRT-) hamster cells. Clones containing expressed HLA class I genes (4/40) were selected using monoclonal antibodies. These clones were recloned and analyzed with a panel of probes from the HLA region. One hybrid (4G6) contained the entire HLA complex. Two other hybrids (4J4 and 4H2) contained only the HLA class I region, while the fourth hybrid (5P9) contained HLA class I and III genes in addition to other genes located in the 6p21 chromosomal region. In situ hybridization showed that the hybrid cells contained more than one fragment of human DNA. Alu and LINE PCR products were derived from these cells and compared to each other as well as to products from two somatic cell hybrids having the 6p21 region in common. The PCR fragments were then screened on conventional Southern blots of the somatic cell hybrids to select a panel of novel probes encompassing the 6p21 region. In addition, the origin of the human DNA fragments in hybrid 4J4 was determined by regional mapping of PCR products.

  16. Sex-specific effects on spatial learning and memory, and sex-independent effects on blood pressure of a <3.3 Mbp rat chromosome 2 QTL region in Dahl salt-sensitive rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Herrera

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have consistently found that hypertension is associated with poor cognitive performance. We hypothesize that a putative causal mechanism underlying this association is due to genetic loci affecting both blood pressure and cognition. Consistent with this notion, we reported several blood pressure (BP quantitative trait loci (QTLs that co-localized with navigational performance (Nav-QTLs influencing spatial learning and memory in Dahl rats. The present study investigates a chromosome 2 region harboring BP-f4 and Nav-8 QTLs. We developed two congenic strains, S.R2A and S.R2B introgressing Dahl R-chromosome 2 segments into Dahl S chromosome 2 region spanning BP-f4 and Nav-8 QTLs. Radiotelemetric blood pressure analysis identified only S.R2A congenic rats with lower systolic blood pressure (females: -26.0 mmHg, P = 0.003; males: -30.9 mmHg, P<1×10(-5, diastolic blood pressure (females: -21.2 mmHg, P = 0.01; males: -25.7 mmHg, P<1×10(-5, and mean arterial pressure (females: -23.9 mmHg, P = 0.004; males: -28.0 mmHg, P<1×10(-5 compared with corresponding Dahl S controls, confirming the presence of BP-f4 QTL on rat chromosome 2. The S.R2B congenic segment did not affect blood pressure. Testing of S.R2A, S.R2B, and Dahl S male rats in the Morris water maze (MWM task revealed significantly decreased spatial navigation performance in S.R2A male congenic rats when compared with Dahl S male controls (P<0.05. The S.R2B congenic segment did not affect performance of the MWM task in males. The S.R2A female rats did not differ in spatial navigation when compared with Dahl S female controls, indicating that the Nav-8 effect on spatial navigation is male-specific. Our results suggest the existence of a single QTL on chromosome 2 176.6-179.9 Mbp region which affects blood pressure in both males and females and cognition solely in males.

  17. The association between male infertility and sperm disomy: Evidence for variation in disomy levels among individuals and a correlation between particular semen parameters and disomy of specific chromosome pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright David

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between infertility and sperm disomy is well documented. Results vary but most report that men with severely compromised semen parameters have a significantly elevated proportion of disomic sperm. The relationship between individual semen parameters and segregation of specific chromosome pairs is however less well reported as is the variation of disomy levels in individual men. Methods In order to address these questions the technique of fluorescent in-situ hybridisation (FISH was utilised to determine the disomy levels of chromosomes X, Y and 21 in 43 sperm samples from 19 infertile males. The results generated from this study were analysed using logistic regression. Results In this study we compared levels of sperm concentration, motility and morphology with levels of sperm disomy for chromosome 21 and the sex chromosomes. Our results suggest that there is considerable variation in disomy levels for certain men. They also suggest that oligozoospermic males have significantly elevated levels of sex chromosome disomy but not disomy 21; they suggest that severe asthenozoospermic males have significantly elevated levels of disomy 21 but not sex chromosome disomy. Surprisingly, severe teratozoopsermic males appeared to have significantly lower levels of sperm disomy for both the sex chromosomes and chromosome 21. Conclusion We suggest that the association between sex chromosome disomy and oligozoospermia may be due to reduced recombination in the XY pairing region and discuss the relevance of our findings for the correlations between sperm disomy and sperm motility and morphology.

  18. The inter-specific hybrid Silene latifolia x S. viscosa reveals early events of sex chromosome evolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žlůvová, Jitka; Lengerová, Martina; Marková, Michaela; Hobza, Roman; Nicolas, Michael; Vyskot, Boris; Charlesworth, Deborah; Negrutiu, Ioan; Janoušek, Bohuslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 4 (2005), s. 327-336 ISSN 1520-541X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA522/02/1485; GA ČR(CZ) GA521/05/2076; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/05/H505; GA ČR(CZ) GP204/05/P505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : interspecific hybrid * sex chromosomes * Silene latifolia Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.390, year: 2005

  19. Non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal chromosomal abnormalities by low-coverage whole-genome sequencing of maternal plasma DNA: review of 1982 consecutive cases in a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, T K; Cheung, S W; Lo, P S S; Pursley, A N; Chan, M K; Jiang, F; Zhang, H; Wang, W; Jong, L F J; Yuen, O K C; Chan, H Y C; Chan, W S K; Choy, K W

    2014-03-01

    To review the performance of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) by low-coverage whole-genome sequencing of maternal plasma DNA at a single center. The NIPT result and pregnancy outcome of 1982 consecutive cases were reviewed. NIPT was based on low coverage (0.1×) whole-genome sequencing of maternal plasma DNA. All subjects were contacted for pregnancy and fetal outcome. Of the 1982 NIPT tests, a repeat blood sample was required in 23 (1.16%). In one case, a conclusive report could not be issued, probably because of an abnormal vanished twin fetus. NIPT was positive for common trisomies in 29 cases (23 were trisomy 21, four were trisomy 18 and two were trisomy 13); all were confirmed by prenatal karyotyping (specificity=100%). In addition, 11 cases were positive for sex-chromosomal abnormalities (SCA), and nine cases were positive for other aneuploidies or deletion/duplication. Fourteen of these 20 subjects agreed to undergo further investigations, and the abnormality was found to be of fetal origin in seven, confined placental mosaicism (CPM) in four, of maternal origin in two and not confirmed in one. Overall, 85.7% of the NIPT-suspected SCA were of fetal origin, and 66.7% of the other abnormalities were caused by CPM. Two of the six cases suspected or confirmed to have CPM were complicated by early-onset growth restriction requiring delivery before 34 weeks. Fetal outcome of the NIPT-negative cases was ascertained in 1645 (85.15%). Three chromosomal abnormalities were not detected by NIPT, including one case each of a balanced translocation, unbalanced translocation and triploidy. There were no known false negatives involving the common trisomies (sensitivity=100%). Low-coverage whole-genome sequencing of maternal plasma DNA was highly accurate in detecting common trisomies. It also enabled the detection of other aneuploidies and structural chromosomal abnormalities with high positive predictive value. Copyright © 2013 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons

  20. Constitutional 11q14-q22 chromosome deletion syndrome in a child with neuroblastoma MYCN single copy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passariello, Annalisa; De Brasi, Daniele; Defferrari, Raffaella; Genesio, Rita; Tufano, Maria; Mazzocco, Katia; Capasso, Maria; Migliorati, Roberta; Martinsson, Tommy; Siani, Paolo; Nitsch, Lucio; Tonini, Gian Paolo

    2013-11-01

    Constitutional 11q deletion is a chromosome imbalance possibly found in MCA/MR patients analyzed for chromosomal anomalies. Its role in determining the phenotype depends on extension and position of deleted region. Loss of heterozygosity of 11q (region 11q23) is also associated with neuroblastoma, the most frequent extra cranial cancer in children. It represents one of the most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities observed in the tumor of patients with high-risk disease even if germline deletion of 11q in neuroblastoma is rare. Hereby, we describe a 18 months old girl presenting with trigonocephaly and dysmorphic facial features, including hypotelorism, broad depressed nasal bridge, micrognathia, synophrys, epicanthal folds, and with a stage 4 neuroblastoma without MYCN amplification, carrying a germline 11q deletion (11q14.1-q22.3), outside from Jacobsen syndrome and from neuroblastoma 11q critical regions. The role of 11q deletion in determining the clinical phenotype and its association with neuroblastoma development in the patient are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Chromosomal Abnormalties with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between specific chromosome abnormalties and various epilepsies was investigated by a study of 76 patients’ records obtained by questionnaires distributed to members of Kyoto Multi-institutional Study Group of Pediatric Neurology.

  2. The nuclear protein encoded by the Drosophila neurogenic gene mastermind is widely expressed and associates with specific chromosomal regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettler, D.; Pearson, S.; Yedvobnick, B. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Drosophila neurogenic loci encode a diverse group of proteins that comprise an inhibitory signal transduction pathway. The pathway is used throughout development in numerous contexts. We have examined the distribution of the neurogenic locus mastermind protein (Mam). Mam is expressed through all germlayers during early embryogenesis, including ectodermal precursors to both neuroblasts and epidermoblasts. Mam is subsequently down-regulated within the nervous system and then reexpressed. It persists in the nervous system through late embryogenesis and postembryonically. Mam is ubiquitously expressed in wing and leg imaginal discs and is not down-regulated in sensory organ precursor cells of the wing margin or notum. In the eye disc, Mam shows most prominent expression posterior to the morphogenetic furrow. Expression of the protein during oogenesis appears limited to follicle cells. Immunohistochemical detection of Mam on polytene chromosomes revealed binding at >100 sites. Chromosome colocalization studies with RNA polymerase and the groucho corepressor protein implicate Mam in transcriptional regulation. 94 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells with high telomerase expression do not actively restore their chromosome arm specific telomere length pattern after exposure to ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graakjaer, Jesper; Christensen, Rikke; Kølvrå, Steen

    2007-01-01

    were measured using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (Q-FISH). RESULTS: A telomere length pattern was found to exist in primary hMSC's as well as in hMSC-telo1. This pattern is similar to what was previously found in lymphocytes and fibroblasts. The cells were then exposed to a high dose of ionizing...... radiation. Irradiation caused profound changes in chromosome specific telomere lengths, effectively destroying the telomere length pattern. Following long term culturing after irradiation, a telomere length pattern was found to re-emerge. However, the new telomere length pattern did not resemble...

  4. Analysis of ParB-centromere interactions by multiplex SPR imaging reveals specific patterns for binding ParB in six centromeres of Burkholderiales chromosomes and plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavien Pillet

    Full Text Available Bacterial centromeres-also called parS, are cis-acting DNA sequences which, together with the proteins ParA and ParB, are involved in the segregation of chromosomes and plasmids. The specific binding of ParB to parS nucleates the assembly of a large ParB/DNA complex from which ParA-the motor protein, segregates the sister replicons. Closely related families of partition systems, called Bsr, were identified on the chromosomes and large plasmids of the multi-chromosomal bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia and other species from the order Burkholeriales. The centromeres of the Bsr partition families are 16 bp palindromes, displaying similar base compositions, notably a central CG dinucleotide. Despite centromeres bind the cognate ParB with a narrow specificity, weak ParB-parS non cognate interactions were nevertheless detected between few Bsr partition systems of replicons not belonging to the same genome. These observations suggested that Bsr partition systems could have a common ancestry but that evolution mostly erased the possibilities of cross-reactions between them, in particular to prevent replicon incompatibility. To detect novel similarities between Bsr partition systems, we have analyzed the binding of six Bsr parS sequences and a wide collection of modified derivatives, to their cognate ParB. The study was carried out by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi mulitplex analysis enabling a systematic survey of each nucleotide position within the centromere. We found that in each parS some positions could be changed while maintaining binding to ParB. Each centromere displays its own pattern of changes, but some positions are shared more or less widely. In addition from these changes we could speculate evolutionary links between these centromeres.

  5. Standard Specification for Sampling Single-Phase Geothermal Liquid or Steam for Purposes of Chemical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1983-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers the basic requirements for equipment to be used for the collection of uncontaminated and representative samples from single-phase geothermal liquid or steam. Geopressured liquids are included. See Fig 1.

  6. Germplasm Architecture Revealed through Chromosomal Effects for Quantitative Traits in Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex Bernardo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Germplasm architecture refers to how favorable alleles for a given trait are distributed across the genome in a germplasm collection. Our objective was to assess germplasm architecture for quantitative traits among US maize ( L. inbreds. A total of 271 inbreds were genotyped at 28,626 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP loci and phenotyped for anthesis date, plant height, starch and protein concentration, and resistance to northern corn leaf blight (NCLB, caused by . Chromosomal effects were calculated as the sum of the trait effects of SNP alleles carried on a specific chromosome by an inbred. The chromosomal effects were further decomposed into the mean effects of chromosomes, mean effects of inbreds, and chromosome × inbred effects. On average, none of the 10 maize chromosomes was particularly rich or poor in favorable quantitative trait locus (QTL alleles. However, extreme values of chromosome × inbred effects often involved chromosomes 5 and 8 for anthesis date, chromosomes 1 and 5 for plant height, and chromosome 9 for protein concentration. Inbreds with one or two chromosomes deficient in favorable alleles were candidates for improvement via chromosome-substitution lines. Specific chromosomes for which each of five genetic backgrounds (B73, Mo17, Oh43, A321, and PH207 were rich or poor for unknown favorable alleles were also identified. Chromosomal effects varied widely even when prior association mapping in the same germplasm collection had failed to identify any QTL. Genomewide marker effects, particularly when partitioned into chromosomal effects, provide a simple way to dissect germplasm architecture for quantitative traits.

  7. Tissue-specific expression of the human laminin alpha5-chain, and mapping of the gene to human chromosome 20q13.2-13.3 and to distal mouse chromosome 2 near the locus for the ragged (Ra) mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Loechel, F; Mattei, M G

    1997-01-01

    , heart, lung, skeletal muscle, kidney, and pancreas. The human laminin alpha5-chain gene (LAMA5) was assigned to chromosome 20q13.2-q13.3 by in situ hybridization, and the mouse gene (Lama5) was mapped by linkage analysis to a syntonic region of distal chromosome 2, close to the locus for the ragged (Ra...

  8. Origin and domestication of papaya Yh chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex in papaya is controlled by a pair of nascent sex chromosomes. Females are XX, and two slightly different Y chromosomes distinguish males (XY) and hermaphrodites (XYh). The hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome (HSY) and its X chromosome counterpart were sequenced and analyzed previo...

  9. The pig X and Y Chromosomes: structure, sequence, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Benjamin M; Sargent, Carole A; Churcher, Carol; Hunt, Toby; Herrero, Javier; Loveland, Jane E; Dunn, Matt; Louzada, Sandra; Fu, Beiyuan; Chow, William; Gilbert, James; Austin-Guest, Siobhan; Beal, Kathryn; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Cheng, William; Gordon, Daria; Grafham, Darren; Hardy, Matt; Harley, Jo; Hauser, Heidi; Howden, Philip; Howe, Kerstin; Lachani, Kim; Ellis, Peter J I; Kelly, Daniel; Kerry, Giselle; Kerwin, James; Ng, Bee Ling; Threadgold, Glen; Wileman, Thomas; Wood, Jonathan M D; Yang, Fengtang; Harrow, Jen; Affara, Nabeel A; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We have generated an improved assembly and gene annotation of the pig X Chromosome, and a first draft assembly of the pig Y Chromosome, by sequencing BAC and fosmid clones from Duroc animals and incorporating information from optical mapping and fiber-FISH. The X Chromosome carries 1033 annotated genes, 690 of which are protein coding. Gene order closely matches that found in primates (including humans) and carnivores (including cats and dogs), which is inferred to be ancestral. Nevertheless, several protein-coding genes present on the human X Chromosome were absent from the pig, and 38 pig-specific X-chromosomal genes were annotated, 22 of which were olfactory receptors. The pig Y-specific Chromosome sequence generated here comprises 30 megabases (Mb). A 15-Mb subset of this sequence was assembled, revealing two clusters of male-specific low copy number genes, separated by an ampliconic region including the HSFY gene family, which together make up most of the short arm. Both clusters contain palindromes with high sequence identity, presumably maintained by gene conversion. Many of the ancestral X-related genes previously reported in at least one mammalian Y Chromosome are represented either as active genes or partial sequences. This sequencing project has allowed us to identify genes--both single copy and amplified--on the pig Y Chromosome, to compare the pig X and Y Chromosomes for homologous sequences, and thereby to reveal mechanisms underlying pig X and Y Chromosome evolution. © 2016 Skinner et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. Single-cell 5hmC sequencing reveals chromosome-wide cell-to-cell variability and enables lineage reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijman, Dylan; Dey, Siddharth S.; Boisset, Jean Charles; Crosetto, Nicola; Van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic DNA modification 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has crucial roles in development and gene regulation. Quantifying the abundance of this epigenetic mark at the single-cell level could enable us to understand its roles. We present a single-cell, genome-wide and strand-specific 5hmC

  11. Single Event Testing on Complex Devices: Test Like You Fly versus Test-Specific Design Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a framework for evaluating complex digital systems targeted for harsh radiation environments such as space. Focus is limited to analyzing the single event upset (SEU) susceptibility of designs implemented inside Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices. Tradeoffs are provided between application-specific versus test-specific test structures.

  12. Mouse microsomal triglyceride transfer protein large subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamuta, Makoto; Chang, Benny Hung-Junn; Hoogeveen, R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) catalyzes the transfer of triglyceride, cholesteryl ester, and phospholipid between membranes. It is essential for the secretion of apolipoprotein B from the cell. Mutations in MTP are a major cause of abetalipoproteinemia. The mouse is a popular animal model for lipoprotein metabolism. We have cloned and sequenced mouse MTP cDNA. The DNA-deduced amino acid sequence indicates that mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence indicates that mouse MTP contains 894 amino acids; the mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence identity to the hamster, human, and bovine sequences, respectively. Northern blot analysis indicates that mouse MTP mRNA is expressed at high levels in the small intestine and at substantially lower levels in the liver and that it is not detectable in six other tissues examined. The mouse MTP gene has been localized to the distal region of chromosome 3 by Southern blots of interspecific backcross panels using progeny derived from matings of (C57BL/6J x SPRET/Ei)F1 x SPRET/Ei. Comparison of MTP sequences from human, bovine, hamster, and mouse indicates that the C-terminal region of MTP is better conserved than its N-terminal region. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Polymerase specific error rates and profiles identified by single molecule sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestand, Matthew S; Van Houdt, Jeroen; Cristofoli, Francesca; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerases have an innate error rate which is polymerase and DNA context specific. Historically the mutational rate and profiles have been measured using a variety of methods, each with their own technical limitations. Here we used the unique properties of single molecule sequencing to evaluate the mutational rate and profiles of six DNA polymerases at the sequence level. In addition to accurately determining mutations in double strands, single molecule sequencing also captures direction specific transversions and transitions through the analysis of heteroduplexes. Not only did the error rates vary, but also the direction specific transitions differed among polymerases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Site-specific labeling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomes for single-molecule manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Alexey; Puglisi, Joseph D.

    2010-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of Escherichia coli ribosomes has allowed application of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and force methods to probe the mechanism of translation. To apply these approaches to eukaryotic translation, eukaryotic ribosomes must be specifically labeled with fluorescent labels and molecular handles. Here, we describe preparation and labeling of the small and large yeast ribosomal subunits. Phylogenetically variable hairpin loops in ribosomal RNA are mutated to allow hybridization of oligonucleotides to mutant ribosomes. We demonstrate specific labeling of the ribosomal subunits, and their use in single-molecule fluorescence and force experiments. PMID:20501598

  15. Molecular karyotyping of single sperm with nuclear vacuoles identifies more chromosomal abnormalities in patients with testiculopathy than fertile controls: implications for ICSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garolla, Andrea; Sartini, Barbara; Cosci, Ilaria; Pizzol, Damiano; Ghezzi, Marco; Bertoldo, Alessandro; Menegazzo, Massimo; Speltra, Elena; Ferlin, Alberto; Foresta, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    Is there a difference between molecular karyotype of single sperm selected by high-magnification microscopy from infertile patients with testicular damage and from proven fertile controls? The molecular karyotype of single sperm from patients with testiculopathy had a significantly higher percentage of chromosomal alterations than fertile controls. Infertile patients with testicular impairment have many sperm with aneuploidies and/or increased structural chromosome alterations. In these patients, sperm use by ICSI has poor outcome and raises concerns about the possible impact on pregnancy loss and transmission of genes abnormalities in offspring. High-magnification microscopy has been recently introduced to select morphologically better sperm aimed at improving ICSI outcome. However, there are no studies evaluating the molecular karyotype of sperm selected by this method. Three consecutive infertile patients with oligozoospermia due to testicular damage and three age-matched proven fertile men attending a tertiary care center, were enrolled in the study from September to November 2014. Inclusion criteria of patients were age ≥30 ≤35 years, at least 2 years of infertility, oligozoospermia (sperm count below 10 million), reduced testicular volumes high FSH plasma levels and absence of altered karyotype, Y chromosome microdeletions, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene mutations, sperm infections, cigarette smoking, varicocele, obesity. Participants were evaluated for sperm parameters, sex hormones and testicular color-doppler ultrasound. From each semen sample, 20 sperm with large vacuoles (LVs), 20 with small vacuoles (SVs) and 20 with no vacuoles (NVs) were retrieved individually by a micromanipulator system. Each cell was further analyzed by whole genome amplification and array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). The aCGH allowed us to detect chromosomal aneuploidies, unbalanced translocations and complex abnormalities. Sperm selected

  16. The chromosome cycle of prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Summary In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, chromosomal DNA undergoes replication, condensation-decondensation and segregation, sequentially, in some fixed order. Other conditions, like sister-chromatid cohesion (SCC), may span several chromosomal events. One set of these chromosomal transactions within a single cell cycle constitutes the “chromosome cycle”. For many years it was generally assumed that the prokaryotic chromosome cycle follows major phases of the eukaryotic one: -replication-condensation-segregation-(cell division)-decondensation-, with SCC of unspecified length. Eventually it became evident that, in contrast to the strictly consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes, all stages of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle run concurrently. Thus, prokaryotes practice “progressive” chromosome segregation separated from replication by a brief SCC, and all three transactions move along the chromosome at the same fast rate. In other words, in addition to replication forks, there are “segregation forks” in prokaryotic chromosomes. Moreover, the bulk of prokaryotic DNA outside the replication-segregation transition stays compacted. I consider possible origins of this concurrent replication-segregation and outline the “nucleoid administration” system that organizes the dynamic part of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle. PMID:23962352

  17. X chromosome-linked CNVs in male infertility: discovery of overall duplication load and recurrent, patient-specific gains with potential clinical relevance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Chianese

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is a highly complex process involving several thousand genes, only a minority of which have been studied in infertile men. In a previous study, we identified a number of Copy Number Variants (CNVs by high-resolution array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (a-CGH analysis of the X chromosome, including 16 patient-specific X chromosome-linked gains. Of these, five gains (DUP1A, DUP5, DUP20, DUP26 and DUP40 were selected for further analysis to evaluate their clinical significance.The copy number state of the five selected loci was analyzed by quantitative-PCR on a total of 276 idiopathic infertile patients and 327 controls in a conventional case-control setting (199 subjects belonged to the previous a-CGH study. For one interesting locus (intersecting DUP1A additional 338 subjects were analyzed.All gains were confirmed as patient-specific and the difference in duplication load between patients and controls is significant (p = 1.65 × 10(-4. Two of the CNVs are private variants, whereas 3 are found recurrently in patients and none of the controls. These CNVs include, or are in close proximity to, genes with testis-specific expression. DUP1A, mapping to the PAR1, is found at the highest frequency (1.4% that was significantly different from controls (0% (p = 0.047 after Bonferroni correction. Two mechanisms are proposed by which DUP1A may cause spermatogenic failure: i by affecting the correct regulation of a gene with potential role in spermatogenesis; ii by disturbing recombination between PAR1 regions during meiosis. This study allowed the identification of novel spermatogenesis candidate genes linked to the 5 CNVs and the discovery of the first recurrent, X-linked gain with potential clinical relevance.

  18. A-11: cell type-specific and single-active-X transcription controls of newly found gene in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadon, N.; Korn, N.; DeMars, R.

    1988-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a human X-chromosomal gene that is subject to both single-active-X control and tissue-specific control. The A-11 gene was identified by a cDNA that hydridizes to a 3.2-kb EcoR1 fragment of genomic DNA on the long arm of the human X chromosome. A-11 transcripts are normally present in fibroblasts but not in B- or T-lymphoblasts. However, A-11 transcription was activated in four of 11 independent, gamma ray-induced B-lymphoblastoid HLA antigen-loss mutants. Cell hybrids with a human fibroblast-derived active X contained A-11 transcripts but hybrids carrying the human inactive X did not. Azacytidine, a potent inhibitor of DNA methylation, readily reactivated the A-11 locus on the inactive X in hybrid cells, indicating that differential methylation is likely to be involved in the single-active-X control of A-11 transcription in fibroblasts. Failure of cells to remethylate DNA synthesized to repair gamma ray-induced damage may also have resulted in the activation of A-11 transcription among the lymphoblastoid mutants. The A-11 locus provides an opportunity to study the relationship between two types of transcriptional regulation of a gene

  19. Genotype-specific SNP map based on whole chromosome 3B sequence information from wheat cultivars Arina and Forno

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shatalina, M.; Wicker, T.; Buchmann, J. P.; Oberhaensli, S.; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Keller, B.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2013), s. 23-32 ISSN 1467-7644 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : wheat * genetic mapping * single-nucleotide polymorphism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.677, year: 2013

  20. Therapeutic experience of adult acute myeloid leukemia in a single institution of China and its relationship with chromosome karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Yingchang; Xue, Yanping; Yu, Wenjuan; Liu, Shihe; Zhao, Yaozhong; Meng, Qingxiang; Bian, Shougeng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2008-03-01

    One hundred and ninety-six untreated de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients were treated with homoharringtonine + cytosine arabinoside (HA) based induction therapy composed of three chemotherapeutic drugs (HAD/M, D-daunorubicin-DNR, M-mitozantrone-MTZ) used in our hospital for the past 12 years. The patient population was relatively young (median age 37, oldest patient 67), and patients were excluded if they had prior MDS or prior chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Complete remission (CR) rate, disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) of the patients were calculated. One hundred and fifty-three patients who had karyotype results were divided into four groups according to Southwestern Oncology Group (SWOG) criteria. Differences of CR rate, DFS and OS of different groups were evaluated. The CR rate of all 196 cases was 153/196 (78.1%), and 95.3% of these were within 1 - 2 courses. Median DFS of the 153 CR patients was 23.8 (range from 1.0 to 153) months. DFS rates at 3 years and 5 years were 41.1% and 35.9%, respectively. The median OS of 196 patients was 19.3 (0.5 - 154) months. The probabilities of 3-year and 5-year OS were 31.5% and 29.2%, respectively. CR rate, DFS and OS of the different cytogenetic risk groups were also be analyzed. According to SWOG criteria, patients were classified into favorable, intermediate, adverse and unknown (a group where the meaning of chromosomes are unclear) groups. CR rate, median DFS and OS were 91.9%, 90.8 months and 94.4 months for the favorable group; 86.4%, 22.0 months and 22.8 months for the intermediate group; 59.4%, 9 months and 10.5 months for the adverse group; 76.0%, 22.0 months, 16.1 months for the unknown group, respectively. The differences among the four groups were statistically significant (P = 0.001, 0.0033, 0.0001). We conclude that triple-drugs induction regimens based on HA (HAD/M) are highly effective in adult AML in China. Cytogenetics is the important prognostic factor. SWOG karyotype

  1. The Consistencies of Y-Chromosomal and Autosomal Continental Ancestry Varying among Haplogroups

    OpenAIRE

    Chuan-Chao Wang; Lei Shang; Hui-Yuan Yeh; Lan-Hai Wei

    2016-01-01

    The Y-chromosome has been widely used in ancestry inference based on its region-specific haplogroup distributions. However, there is always a debate on how informative such a single marker is for inferring an individual's genetic ancestry. Here, we compared genetic ancestry inferences at continental level made by Y-chromosomal haplogroups to those made by autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 1230 samples of Affymetrix Human Origins dataset. The highest ancestry proportions of a majori...

  2. Chromosome microdissection and cloning in human genome and genetic disease analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Faten; Yu, Jingwei

    1991-01-01

    A procedure has been described for microdissection and microcloning of human chromosomal DNA sequences in which universal amplification of the dissected fragments by Mbo I linker adaptor and polymerase chain reaction is used. A very large library comprising 700,000 recombinant plasmid microclones from 30 dissected chromosomes of human chromosome 21 was constructed. Colony hybridization showed that 42% of the clones contained repetitive sequences and 58% contained single or low-copy sequences. The insert sizes generated by complete Mbo I cleavage ranged from 50 to 1,100 base pairs with a mean of 416 base pairs. Southern blot analysis of microclones from the library confirmed their human origin and chromosome 21 specificity. Some of these clones have also been regionally mapped to specific sites of chromosome 21 by using a regional mapping panel of cell hybrids. This chromosome microtechnology can generate large numbers of microclones with unique sequences from defined chromosomal regions and can be used for processes such as (i) isolating corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones with large inserts, (ii) screening various cDNA libraries for isolating expressed sequences, and (iii) constructing region-specific libraries of the entire human genome. The studies described here demonstrate the power of this technology for high-resolution genome analysis and explicate their use in an efficient search for disease-associated genes localized to specific chromosomal regions

  3. The visualization of large organized chromatin domains enriched in the H3K9me2 mark within a single chromosome in a single cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Yammine, S.; Shi, C.; Tark-Dame, M.; Göndör, A.; Ohlsson, R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts, our understanding of the organization of higher order chromatin conformations in single cells and how these relate to chromatin marks remains poor. We have earlier invented the Chromatin In Situ Proximity (ChrISP) technique to determine proximities between chromatin

  4. [Safety Evaluation of Rare Sugar Syrup: Single-dose Oral Toxicity in Rats, Reverse Mutation Assay, Chromosome Aberration Assay, and Acute Non-Effect Level for Diarrhea of a Single Dose in Humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takako; Iida, Tetsuo; Takamine, Satoshi; Hayashi, Noriko; Okuma, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The safety of rare sugar syrup obtained from high-fructose corn syrup under slightly alkaline conditions was studied. Mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was assessed by a reverse mutation assay using Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, and an in vitro chromosomal aberration assay using Chinese hamster lung cell line (CHL/IU). No mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was detected under these experimental conditions. Oral administration of single dose (15,000 mg/kg) of rare sugar syrup to rats caused no abnormalities, suggesting no adverse effect of rare sugar syrup. In humans, the acute non-effect level of rare sugar syrup for causing diarrhea was estimated as 0.9 g/kg body weight as dry solid base in both males and females.

  5. Development and validation of concurrent preimplantation genetic diagnosis for single gene disorders and comprehensive chromosomal aneuploidy screening without whole genome amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Rebekah S; Jalas, Chaim; Tao, Xin; Fedick, Anastasia M; Kim, Julia G; Pepe, Russell J; Northrop, Lesley E; Scott, Richard T; Treff, Nathan R

    2016-02-01

    To develop a novel and robust protocol for multifactorial preimplantation genetic testing of trophectoderm biopsies using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Prospective and blinded. Not applicable. Couples indicated for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). None. Allele dropout (ADO) and failed amplification rate, genotyping consistency, chromosome screening success rate, and clinical outcomes of qPCR-based screening. The ADO frequency on a single cell from a fibroblast cell line was 1.64% (18/1,096). When two or more cells were tested, the ADO frequency dropped to 0.02% (1/4,426). The rate of amplification failure was 1.38% (55/4,000) overall, with 2.5% (20/800) for single cells and 1.09% (35/3,200) for samples that had two or more cells. Among 152 embryos tested in 17 cases by qPCR-based PGD and CCS, 100% were successfully given a diagnosis, with 0% ADO or amplification failure. Genotyping consistency with reference laboratory results was >99%. Another 304 embryos from 43 cases were included in the clinical application of qPCR-based PGD and CCS, for which 99.7% (303/304) of the embryos were given a definitive diagnosis, with only 0.3% (1/304) having an inconclusive result owing to recombination. In patients receiving a transfer with follow-up, the pregnancy rate was 82% (27/33). This study demonstrates that the use of qPCR for PGD testing delivers consistent and more reliable results than existing methods and that single gene disorder PGD can be run concurrently with CCS without the need for additional embryo biopsy or whole genome amplification. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The low-temperature specific heat of pseudo-single-crystal and polycrystalline α uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, R.O.A.

    1978-01-01

    Low-temperature specific-heat measurements have been made on two samples of pseudo-single-crystal α uranium. Both show the expected first-order transitions of 23 K and 37 K and the second-order transition at 40 k. One pseudo-single crystal was re-measured after heat treatment to produce a fine, randomly orientated grain structure, and gave data showing modified transitions; after more drastic heat treatment, further refining and randomizing the grain structures, it showed no sign of either of the two first-order transitions. A comparison between the specific-heat data for the pseudo-single crystal and the subsequent heat-treated sample permits a determination of the latent heat involved in the various transitions. (author)

  7. Mechanosensing of DNA bending in a single specific protein-DNA complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Shimin; Chen, Hu; Cong, Peiwen; Lin, Jie; Dröge, Peter; Yan, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Many crucial biological processes are regulated by mechanical stimuli. Here, we report new findings that pico-Newton forces can drastically affect the stability of the site-specific DNA binding of a single transcription factor, the E. coli integration host factor (IHF), by stretching a short ~150 nm DNA containing a single IHF binding site. Dynamic binding and unbinding of single IHF were recorded and analyzed for the force-dependent stability of the IHF-DNA complex. Our results demonstrate that the IHF-DNA interaction is fine tuned by force in different salt concentration and temperature over physiological ranges, indicating that, besides other physiological factors, force may play equally important role in transcription regulation. These findings have broad implications with regard to general mechanosensitivity of site-specific DNA bending proteins.

  8. A group of grapevine MYBA transcription factors located in chromosome 14 control anthocyanin synthesis in vegetative organs with different specificities compared with the berry color locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, José Tomás; Cavallini, Erika; Loyola, Rodrigo; Höll, Janine; Finezzo, Laura; Dal Santo, Silvia; Vialet, Sandrine; Commisso, Mauro; Roman, Federica; Schubert, Andrea; Alcalde, José Antonio; Bogs, Jochen; Ageorges, Agnès; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2017-07-01

    Grapevine organs accumulate anthocyanins in a cultivar-specific and environmentally induced manner. The MYBA1-A2 genes within the berry color locus in chromosome 2 represent the major genetic determinants of fruit color. The simultaneous occurrence of transposon insertions and point mutations in these genes is responsible for most white-skinned phenotypes; however, the red pigmentation found in vegetative organs suggests the presence of additional regulators. This work describes a genomic region of chromosome 14 containing three closely related R2R3-MYB genes, named MYBA5, MYBA6 and MYBA7. Ectopic expression of the latter two genes in grapevine hairy roots promoted anthocyanin accumulation without affecting other phenylpropanoids. Transcriptomic profiling of hairy roots expressing MYBA1, MYBA6 and MYBA7 showed that these regulators share the activation of late biosynthetic and modification/transport-related genes, but differ in the activation of the FLAVONOID-3'5'-HYDROXYLASE (F3'5'H) family. An alternatively spliced MYBA6 variant was incapable of activating anthocyanin synthesis, however, because of the lack of an MYC1 interaction domain. MYBA1, MYBA6.1 and MYBA7 activated the promoters of UDP-GLUCOSE:FLAVONOID 3-O-GLUCOSYLTRANSFERASE (UFGT) and ANTHOCYANIN 3-O-GLUCOSIDE-6″-O-ACYLTRANSFERASE (3AT), but only MYBA1 induced F3'5'H in concordance with the low proportion of tri-hydroxylated anthocyanins found in MYBA6-A7 hairy roots. This putative new color locus is related to the red/cyanidic pigmentation of vegetative organs in black- and white-skinned cultivars, and forms part of the UV-B radiation response pathway orchestrated by ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5). These results demonstrate the involvement of additional anthocyanin regulators in grapevine and suggest an evolutionary divergence between the two grape color loci for controlling additional targets of the flavonoid pathway. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G 2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G 2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G 2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G 1 phase. (author)

  10. Repetitive, Marker-Free, Site-Specific Integration as a Novel Tool for Multiple Chromosomal Integration of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kia Vest; Martinussen, Jan; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2013-01-01

    of a minimal bacterial attachment site (attBmin), two mutated loxP sequences (lox66 and lox71) allowing for removal of undesirable vector elements (antibiotic resistance marker), and a counterselection marker (oroP) for selection of loxP recombination on the pKV6 vector. When transformed into L. lactis......We present a tool for repetitive, marker-free, site-specific integration in Lactococcus lactis, in which a nonreplicating plasmid vector (pKV6) carrying a phage attachment site (attP) can be integrated into a bacterial attachment site (attB). The novelty of the tool described here is the inclusion...

  11. Ki-67 acts as a biological surfactant to disperse mitotic chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuylen, Sara; Blaukopf, Claudia; Politi, Antonio Z.; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Neumann, Beate; Poser, Ina; Ellenberg, Jan; Hyman, Anthony A.; Gerlich, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic genomes are partitioned into chromosomes, which during mitosis form compact and spatially well-separated mechanical bodies1–3.This enables chromosomes to move independently of each other for segregation of precisely one copy of the genome to each of the nascent daughter cells. Despite insights into the spatial organization of mitotic chromosomes4 and the discovery of proteins at the chromosome surface3,5,6, the molecular and biophysical basis of mitotic chromosome individuality have remained unclear. We report that Ki-67, a component of the mitotic chromosome periphery, prevents chromosomes from collapsing into a single chromatin mass after nuclear envelope disassembly, thus enabling independent chromosome motility and efficient interactions with the mitotic spindle. The chromosome separation function of Ki-67 is not confined within a specific protein domain but correlates with size and net charge of truncation mutants that apparently lack secondary structure. This suggests that Ki-67 forms a steric and electrical barrier, similar to surface-active agents (surfactants) that disperse particles or phase-separated liquid droplets in solvents. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy showed a high surface density of Ki-67 and dual-color labeling of both protein termini revealed an extended molecular conformation, indicating brush-like arrangements that are characteristic for polymeric surfactants. Our study thus elucidates a biomechanical role of the mitotic chromosome periphery and suggests that natural proteins can function as surfactants in intracellular compartmentalization. PMID:27362226

  12. Beyond screening for chromosomal abnormalities: Advances in non-invasive diagnosis of single gene disorders and fetal exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Jane; Chitty, Lyn S

    2018-04-01

    Emerging genomic technologies, largely based around next generation sequencing (NGS), are offering new promise for safer prenatal genetic diagnosis. These innovative approaches will improve screening for fetal aneuploidy, allow definitive non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) of single gene disorders at an early gestational stage without the need for invasive testing, and improve our ability to detect monogenic disorders as the aetiology of fetal abnormalities. This presents clinicians and scientists with novel challenges as well as opportunities. In addition, the transformation of prenatal genetic testing arising from the introduction of whole genome, exome and targeted NGS produces unprecedented volumes of data requiring complex analysis and interpretation. Now translating these technologies to the clinic has become the goal of clinical genomics, transforming modern healthcare and personalized medicine. The achievement of this goal requires the most progressive technological tools for rapid high-throughput data generation at an affordable cost. Furthermore, as larger proportions of patients with genetic disease are identified we must be ready to offer appropriate genetic counselling to families and potential parents. In addition, the identification of novel treatment targets will continue to be explored, which is likely to introduce ethical considerations, particularly if genome editing techniques are included in these targeted treatments and transferred into mainstream personalized healthcare. Here we review the impact of NGS technology to analyse cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in maternal plasma to deliver NIPD for monogenic disorders and allow more comprehensive investigation of the abnormal fetus through the use of exome sequencing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Does occupational exposure to formaldehyde cause hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Kenneth A; Gallagher, Alexa E; Dell, Linda D; Natelson, Ethan A; Boffetta, Paolo; Gentry, P Robinan

    2017-08-01

    Several cross-sectional studies of a single population of workers exposed to formaldehyde at one of two factories using or producing formaldehyde-melamine resins in China have concluded that formaldehyde exposure induces damage to hematopoietic cells that originate in the bone marrow. Moreover, the investigators interpret observed differences between groups as evidence that formaldehyde induces myeloid leukemias, although the mechanisms for inducing these diseases are not obvious and recently published scientific findings do not support causation. Our objective was to evaluate hematological parameters and aneuploidy in relation to quantitative exposure measures of formaldehyde. We obtained the study data for the original study (Zhang et al. 2010 ) and performed linear regression analyses. Results showed that differences in white blood cell, granulocyte, platelet, and red blood cell counts are not exposure dependent. Among formaldehyde-exposed workers, no association was observed between individual average formaldehyde exposure estimates and frequency of aneuploidy, suggested by the original study authors to be indicators of myeloid leukemia risk.

  14. Filling in the Gap of Human Chromosome 4: Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing of Macrosatellite Repeats in the Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Suimye Morioka

    Full Text Available A majority of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is caused by contraction of macrosatellite repeats called D4Z4 that are located in the subtelomeric region of human chromosome 4q35. Sequencing the FSHD locus has been technically challenging due to its long size and nearly identical nature of repeat elements. Here we report sequencing and partial assembly of a BAC clone carrying an entire FSHD locus by a single molecule real time (SMRT sequencing technology which could produce long reads up to about 18 kb containing D4Z4 repeats. De novo assembly by Hierarchical Genome Assembly Process 1 (HGAP.1 yielded a contig of 41 kb containing all but a part of the most distal D4Z4 element. The validity of the sequence model was confirmed by an independent approach employing anchored multiple sequence alignment by Kalign using reads containing unique flanking sequences. Our data will provide a basis for further optimization of sequencing and assembly conditions of D4Z4.

  15. A dense single-nucleotide polymorphism-based genetic linkage map of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) anchoring Pinot Noir bacterial artificial chromosome contigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troggio, Michela; Malacarne, Giulia; Coppola, Giuseppina; Segala, Cinzia; Cartwright, Dustin A; Pindo, Massimo; Stefanini, Marco; Mank, Rolf; Moroldo, Marco; Morgante, Michele; Grando, M Stella; Velasco, Riccardo

    2007-08-01

    The construction of a dense genetic map for Vitis vinifera and its anchoring to a BAC-based physical map is described: it includes 994 loci mapped onto 19 linkage groups, corresponding to the basic chromosome number of Vitis. Spanning 1245 cM with an average distance of 1.3 cM between adjacent markers, the map was generated from the segregation of 483 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genetic markers, 132 simple sequence repeats (SSRs), and 379 AFLP markers in a mapping population of 94 F(1) individuals derived from a V. vinifera cross of the cultivars Syrah and Pinot Noir. Of these markers, 623 were anchored to 367 contigs that are included in a physical map produced from the same clone of Pinot Noir and covering 352 Mbp. On the basis of contigs containing two or more genetically mapped markers, region-dependent estimations of physical and recombinational distances are presented. The markers used in this study include 118 SSRs common to an integrated map derived from five segregating populations of V. vinifera. The positions of these SSR markers in the two maps are conserved across all Vitis linkage groups. The addition of SNP-based markers introduces polymorphisms that are easy to database, are useful for evolutionary studies, and significantly increase the density of the map. The map provides the most comprehensive view of the Vitis genome reported to date and will be relevant for future studies on structural and functional genomics and genetic improvement.

  16. Ancient host specificity within a single species of brood parasitic bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spottiswoode, Claire N; Stryjewski, Katherine Faust; Quader, Suhel; Colebrook-Robjent, John F R; Sorenson, Michael D

    2011-10-25

    Parasites that exploit multiple hosts often experience diversifying selection for host-specific adaptations. This can result in multiple strains of host specialists coexisting within a single parasitic species. A long-standing conundrum is how such sympatric host races can be maintained within a single parasitic species in the face of interbreeding among conspecifics specializing on different hosts. Striking examples are seen in certain avian brood parasites such as cuckoos, many of which show host-specific differentiation in traits such as host egg mimicry. Exploiting a Zambian egg collection amassed over several decades and supplemented by recent fieldwork, we show that the brood parasitic Greater Honeyguide Indicator indicator exhibits host-specific differentiation in both egg size and egg shape. Genetic analysis of honeyguide eggs and chicks show that two highly divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages are associated with ground- and tree-nesting hosts, respectively, indicating perfect fidelity to two mutually exclusive sets of host species for millions of years. Despite their age and apparent adaptive diversification, however, these ancient lineages are not cryptic species; a complete lack of differentiation in nuclear genes shows that mating between individuals reared by different hosts is sufficiently frequent to prevent speciation. These results indicate that host specificity is maternally inherited, that host-specific adaptation among conspecifics can be maintained without reproductive isolation, and that host specificity can be remarkably ancient in evolutionary terms.

  17. X chromosome dosage compensation via enhanced transcriptional elongation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larschan, Erica; Bishop, Eric P; Kharchenko, Peter V; Core, Leighton J; Lis, John T; Park, Peter J; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2011-03-03

    The evolution of sex chromosomes has resulted in numerous species in which females inherit two X chromosomes but males have a single X, thus requiring dosage compensation. MSL (Male-specific lethal) complex increases transcription on the single X chromosome of Drosophila males to equalize expression of X-linked genes between the sexes. The biochemical mechanisms used for dosage compensation must function over a wide dynamic range of transcription levels and differential expression patterns. It has been proposed that the MSL complex regulates transcriptional elongation to control dosage compensation, a model subsequently supported by mapping of the MSL complex and MSL-dependent histone 4 lysine 16 acetylation to the bodies of X-linked genes in males, with a bias towards 3' ends. However, experimental analysis of MSL function at the mechanistic level has been challenging owing to the small magnitude of the chromosome-wide effect and the lack of an in vitro system for biochemical analysis. Here we use global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to examine the specific effect of the MSL complex on RNA Polymerase II (RNAP II) on a genome-wide level. Results indicate that the MSL complex enhances transcription by facilitating the progression of RNAP II across the bodies of active X-linked genes. Improving transcriptional output downstream of typical gene-specific controls may explain how dosage compensation can be imposed on the diverse set of genes along an entire chromosome.

  18. Host specific diversity in Lactobacillus johnsonii as evidenced by a major chromosomal inversion and phage resistance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinane, Caitriona M; Kent, Robert M; Norberg, Sarah; Hill, Colin; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2011-04-20

    Genetic diversity and genomic rearrangements are a driving force in bacterial evolution and niche adaptation. We sequenced and annotated the genome of Lactobacillus johnsonii DPC6026, a strain isolated from the porcine intestinal tract. Although the genome of DPC6026 is similar in size (1.97 mbp) and GC content (34.8%) to the sequenced human isolate L. johnsonii NCC 533, a large symmetrical inversion of approximately 750 kb differentiated the two strains. Comparative analysis among 12 other strains of L. johnsonii including 8 porcine, 3 human and 1 poultry isolate indicated that the genome architecture found in DPC6026 is more common within the species than that of NCC 533. Furthermore a number of unique features were annotated in DPC6026, some of which are likely to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and contribute to protection against phage infection. A putative type III restriction-modification system was identified, as were novel Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) elements. Interestingly, these particular elements are not widely distributed among L. johnsonii strains. Taken together these data suggest intra-species genomic rearrangements and significant genetic diversity within the L. johnsonii species and indicate towards a host-specific divergence of L. johnsonii strains with respect to genome inversion and phage exposure.

  19. Host specific diversity in Lactobacillus johnsonii as evidenced by a major chromosomal inversion and phage resistance mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitriona M Guinane

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity and genomic rearrangements are a driving force in bacterial evolution and niche adaptation. We sequenced and annotated the genome of Lactobacillus johnsonii DPC6026, a strain isolated from the porcine intestinal tract. Although the genome of DPC6026 is similar in size (1.97 mbp and GC content (34.8% to the sequenced human isolate L. johnsonii NCC 533, a large symmetrical inversion of approximately 750 kb differentiated the two strains. Comparative analysis among 12 other strains of L. johnsonii including 8 porcine, 3 human and 1 poultry isolate indicated that the genome architecture found in DPC6026 is more common within the species than that of NCC 533. Furthermore a number of unique features were annotated in DPC6026, some of which are likely to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT and contribute to protection against phage infection. A putative type III restriction-modification system was identified, as were novel Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR elements. Interestingly, these particular elements are not widely distributed among L. johnsonii strains. Taken together these data suggest intra-species genomic rearrangements and significant genetic diversity within the L. johnsonii species and indicate towards a host-specific divergence of L. johnsonii strains with respect to genome inversion and phage exposure.

  20. Chromosomal rearrangements occurred repeatedly and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, molecular and/or chromosomal data indicate that Paroedura is a monophyletic genus, in which chromosome rearrangements occurred repeatedly and independently during the specific diversification. Moreover both P. bastardi and P. gracilis in current definitions are paraphyletic assemblages of several ...

  1. Single-Base Pair Genome Editing in Human Cells by Using Site-Specific Endonucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ochiai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with human diseases or phenotypes. However, causal relationships between most SNPs and the associated disease have not been established, owing to technical challenges such as unavailability of suitable cell lines. Recently, efficient editing of a single base pair in the genome was achieved using programmable site-specific nucleases. This technique enables experimental confirmation of the causality between SNPs and disease, and is potentially valuable in clinical applications. In this review, I introduce the molecular basis and describe examples of single-base pair editing in human cells. I also discuss the challenges associated with the technique, as well as possible solutions.

  2. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element Specific for Bromacil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bromacil is a widely used herbicide that is known to contaminate environmental systems. Due to the hazards it presents and inefficient detection methods, it is necessary to create a rapid and efficient sensing device. Towards this end, we have utilized a stringent in vitro selection method to identify single-stranded DNA molecular recognition elements (MRE specific for bromacil. We have identified one MRE with high affinity (Kd=9.6 nM and specificity for bromacil compared to negative targets of selection and other pesticides. The selected ssDNA MRE will be useful as the sensing element in a field-deployable bromacil detection device.

  3. Rapid and efficient introduction of a foreign gene into bacterial artificial chromosome-cloned varicella vaccine by Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somboonthum, Pranee; Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Shigefumi; Matsuura, Masaaki; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Michiaki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2010-01-01

    Using a rapid and reliable system based on Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition, we have successfully constructed a recombinant Oka varicella vaccine (vOka) expressing the mumps virus (MuV) fusion protein (F). The backbone of the vector was our previously reported vOka-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) genome. We inserted the transposon Tn7 attachment sequence, LacZα-mini-attTn7, into the region between ORF12 and ORF13 to generate a vOka-BAC-Tn genome. The MuV-F expressing cassette was transposed into the vOka-BAC genome at the mini-attTn7 transposition site. MuV-F protein was expressed in recombinant virus, rvOka-F infected cells. In addition, the MuV-F protein was cleaved in the rvOka-F infected cells as in MuV-infected cells. The growth of rvOka-F was similar to that of the original recombinant vOka without the F gene. Thus, we show that Tn7-mediated transposition is an efficient method for introducing a foreign gene expression cassette into the vOka-BAC genome as a live virus vector.

  4. Sex Chromosome Evolution, Heterochiasmy, and Physiological QTL in the Salmonid Brook Charr Salvelinus fontinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben J.G. Sutherland

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Whole-genome duplication (WGD can have large impacts on genome evolution, and much remains unknown about these impacts. This includes the mechanisms of coping with a duplicated sex determination system and whether this has an impact on increasing the diversity of sex determination mechanisms. Other impacts include sexual conflict, where alleles having different optimums in each sex can result in sequestration of genes into nonrecombining sex chromosomes. Sex chromosome development itself may involve sex-specific recombination rate (i.e., heterochiasmy, which is also poorly understood. The family Salmonidae is a model system for these phenomena, having undergone autotetraploidization and subsequent rediploidization in most of the genome at the base of the lineage. The salmonid master sex determining gene is known, and many species have nonhomologous sex chromosomes, putatively due to transposition of this gene. In this study, we identify the sex chromosome of Brook Charr Salvelinus fontinalis and compare sex chromosome identities across the lineage (eight species and four genera. Although nonhomology is frequent, homologous sex chromosomes and other consistencies are present in distantly related species, indicating probable convergence on specific sex and neo-sex chromosomes. We also characterize strong heterochiasmy with 2.7-fold more crossovers in maternal than paternal haplotypes with paternal crossovers biased to chromosome ends. When considering only rediploidized chromosomes, the overall heterochiasmy trend remains, although with only 1.9-fold more recombination in the female than the male. Y chromosome crossovers are restricted to a single end of the chromosome, and this chromosome contains a large interspecific inversion, although its status between males and females remains unknown. Finally, we identify quantitative trait loci (QTL for 21 unique growth, reproductive, and stress-related phenotypes to improve knowledge of the genetic

  5. Evidence for a Xer/dif system for chromosome resolution in archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Diego; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Desnoues, Nicole; Sezonov, Guennadi; Forterre, Patrick; Serre, Marie-Claude

    2010-10-21

    Homologous recombination events between circular chromosomes, occurring during or after replication, can generate dimers that need to be converted to monomers prior to their segregation at cell division. In Escherichia coli, chromosome dimers are converted to monomers by two paralogous site-specific tyrosine recombinases of the Xer family (XerC/D). The Xer recombinases act at a specific dif site located in the replication termination region, assisted by the cell division protein FtsK. This chromosome resolution system has been predicted in most Bacteria and further characterized for some species. Archaea have circular chromosomes and an active homologous recombination system and should therefore resolve chromosome dimers. Most archaea harbour a single homologue of bacterial XerC/D proteins (XerA), but not of FtsK. Therefore, the role of XerA in chromosome resolution was unclear. Here, we have identified dif-like sites in archaeal genomes by using a combination of modeling and comparative genomics approaches. These sites are systematically located in replication termination regions. We validated our in silico prediction by showing that the XerA protein of Pyrococcus abyssi specifically recombines plasmids containing the predicted dif site in vitro. In contrast to the bacterial system, XerA can recombine dif sites in the absence of protein partners. Whereas Archaea and Bacteria use a completely different set of proteins for chromosome replication, our data strongly suggest that XerA is most likely used for chromosome resolution in Archaea.

  6. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The genome of spinach single chromosome complement is about 1000 Mbp, which is the model material to study the molecular mechanisms of plant sex differentiation. The cytological study showed that the biggest spinach chromosome (chromosome 1) was taken as spinach sex chromosome. It had three alleles of ...

  7. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenfeld, H.K.; Hershberger, R.J.; Shows, T.B.; Weissman, I.L.

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage λgt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16 + natural killer cells and CD3 + , CD16 - T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. The authors propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells

  8. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-01-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  9. A single-strand specific lesion drives MMS-induced hyper-mutability at a double-strand break in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Resnick, Michael A

    2010-08-05

    Localized hyper-mutability (LHM) can be important in evolution, immunity, and genetic diseases. We previously reported that single-strand DNA (ssDNA) can be an important source of damage-induced LHM in yeast. Here, we establish that the generation of LHM by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) during repair of a chromosomal double-strand break (DSB) can result in over 0.2 mutations/kb, which is approximately 20,000-fold higher than the MMS-induced mutation density without a DSB. The MMS-induced mutations associated with DSB repair were primarily due to substitutions via translesion DNA synthesis at damaged cytosines, even though there are nearly 10 times more MMS-induced lesions at other bases. Based on this mutation bias, the promutagenic lesion dominating LHM is likely 3-methylcytosine, which is single-strand specific. Thus, the dramatic increase in mutagenesis at a DSB is concluded to result primarily from the generation of non-repairable lesions in ssDNA associated with DSB repair along with efficient induction of highly mutagenic ssDNA-specific lesions. These findings with MMS-induced LHM have broad biological implications for unrepaired damage generated in ssDNA and possibly ssRNA. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. DNA methylation profiles of human active and inactive X chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Andrew J; Stathaki, Elisavet; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Brahmachary, Manisha; Montgomery, Stephen B; Dupre, Yann; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2011-10-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a dosage compensation mechanism that silences the majority of genes on one X chromosome in each female cell. To characterize epigenetic changes that accompany this process, we measured DNA methylation levels in 45,X patients carrying a single active X chromosome (X(a)), and in normal females, who carry one X(a) and one inactive X (X(i)). Methylated DNA was immunoprecipitated and hybridized to high-density oligonucleotide arrays covering the X chromosome, generating epigenetic profiles of active and inactive X chromosomes. We observed that XCI is accompanied by changes in DNA methylation specifically at CpG islands (CGIs). While the majority of CGIs show increased methylation levels on the X(i), XCI actually results in significant reductions in methylation at 7% of CGIs. Both intra- and inter-genic CGIs undergo epigenetic modification, with the biggest increase in methylation occurring at the promoters of genes silenced by XCI. In contrast, genes escaping XCI generally have low levels of promoter methylation, while genes that show inter-individual variation in silencing show intermediate increases in methylation. Thus, promoter methylation and susceptibility to XCI are correlated. We also observed a global correlation between CGI methylation and the evolutionary age of X-chromosome strata, and that genes escaping XCI show increased methylation within gene bodies. We used our epigenetic map to predict 26 novel genes escaping XCI, and searched for parent-of-origin-specific methylation differences, but found no evidence to support imprinting on the human X chromosome. Our study provides a detailed analysis of the epigenetic profile of active and inactive X chromosomes.

  11. Single Muscle Fiber Proteomics Reveals Fiber-Type-Specific Features of Human Muscle Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Murgia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a key tissue in human aging, which affects different muscle fiber types unequally. We developed a highly sensitive single muscle fiber proteomics workflow to study human aging and show that the senescence of slow and fast muscle fibers is characterized by diverging metabolic and protein quality control adaptations. Whereas mitochondrial content declines with aging in both fiber types, glycolysis and glycogen metabolism are upregulated in slow but downregulated in fast muscle fibers. Aging mitochondria decrease expression of the redox enzyme monoamine oxidase A. Slow fibers upregulate a subset of actin and myosin chaperones, whereas an opposite change happens in fast fibers. These changes in metabolism and sarcomere quality control may be related to the ability of slow, but not fast, muscle fibers to maintain their mass during aging. We conclude that single muscle fiber analysis by proteomics can elucidate pathophysiology in a sub-type-specific manner.

  12. Relationship of DNA lesions and their repair to chromosomal aberration production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    Recent work on the roles of specific kinds of DNA lesions and their enzymatic repair systems in the production of chromosomal aberrations seems consistent with a simple molecular model of chromosomal aberrations formation. Evidence from experiments with the human repair-deficient genetic diseases xeroderma pigmentosom, ataxia telangiectasia, and Fanconi's anemia is reviewed in the light of the contributions to aberration production of single and double polynucleotide strand breaks, base damage, polynucleotide strand crosslinks, and pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers.

  13. Flip-Flop HSV-BAC: bacterial artificial chromosome based system for rapid generation of recombinant herpes simplex virus vectors using two independent site-specific recombinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todo Tomoki

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV vectors that specifically replicate in and kill tumor cells sparing normal cells are a promising cancer therapy. Traditionally, recombinant HSV vectors have been generated through homologous recombination between the HSV genome and a recombination plasmid, which usually requires laborious screening or selection and can take several months. Recent advances in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology have enabled cloning of the whole HSV genome as a BAC plasmid and subsequent manipulation in E. coli. Thus, we sought a method to generate recombinant oncolytic HSV vectors more easily and quickly using BAC technology. Results We have developed an HSV-BAC system, termed the Flip-Flop HSV-BAC system, for the rapid generation of oncolytic HSV vectors. This system has the following features: (i two site-specific recombinases, Cre and FLPe, are used sequentially to integrate desired sequences and to excise the BAC sequences, respectively; and (ii the size of the HSV-BAC-insert genome exceeds the packaging limit of HSV so only correctly recombined virus grows efficiently. We applied this to the construction of an HSV-BAC plasmid that can be used for the generation of transcriptionally-targeted HSV vectors. BAC sequences were recombined into the UL39 gene of HSV ICP4-deletion mutant d120 to generate M24-BAC virus, from which HSV-BAC plasmid pM24-BAC was isolated. An ICP4 expression cassette driven by an exogenous promoter was re-introduced to pM24-BAC by Cre-mediated recombination and nearly pure preparations of recombinant virus were obtained typically in two weeks. Insertion of the ICP4 coding sequence alone did not restore viral replication and was only minimally better than an ICP4-null construct, whereas insertion of a CMVIE promoter-ICP4 transgene (bM24-CMV efficiently drove viral replication. The levels of bM24-CMV replication in tumor cells varied considerably compared to hrR3 (UL39

  14. Mosquito has a single multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase characterized by unique substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Petersen, G.E.; Sandrini, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In mammals four deoxyribonucleoside kinases, with a relatively restricted specificity, catalyze the phosphorylation of the four natural deoxyribonucleosides. When cultured mosquito cells, originating from the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, were examined for deoxyribonucleoside kinase activities......, only a single enzyme was isolated. Subsequently, the corresponding gene was cloned and over-expressed. While the mosquito kinase (Ag-dNK) phosphorylated all four natural deoxyribonucleosides, it displayed an unexpectedly higher relative efficiency for the phosphorylation of purine versus pyrimidine...... of multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinases and their diversity among insects remains unclear, the observed variation provides a whole range of applications, as species specific and highly selective targets for insecticides, they have a potential to be used in the enzymatic production of various (di...

  15. Electrical transport and specific heat of a Cr+2.2 at% Al single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberts, H.L., E-mail: hermana@uj.ac.z [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Prinsloo, A.R.E.; Strydom, A.M. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa)

    2010-05-15

    Electrical resistivity, thermoelectric power and specific heat measurements are reported for a Cr+2.2 at% Al alloy single crystal, having an Al content close to the triple point on the magnetic phase diagram of the Cr-Al alloy system. A weak resistivity component of spin-density-wave origin, not previously observed in alloys near the triple point concentration, is isolated at low temperatures. Its presence is confirmed by the thermoelectric measurements. The specific heat measurements suggest a maximum in the density of states at the Fermi energy for alloy concentrations close to the triple point, a point that appears to be a particular type of critical point for the Cr-Al alloy system.

  16. Patient-Specific Modeling of Interventricular Hemodynamics in Single Ventricle Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Vijay; Feinstein, Jeffrey; Marsden, Alison

    2016-11-01

    Single ventricle (SV) congenital heart defects, in which babies are born with only functional ventricle, lead to significant morbidity and mortality with over 30% of patients developing heart failure prior to adulthood. Newborns with SV physiology typically undergo three palliative surgeries, in which the SV becomes the systemic pumping chamber. Depending on which ventricle performs the systemic function, patients are classified as having either a single left ventricle (SLV) or a single right ventricle (SRV), with SRV patients at higher risk of failure. As the native right ventricles are not designed to meet systemic demands, they undergo remodeling leading to abnormal hemodynamics. The hemodynamic characteristics of SLVs compared with SRVs is not well established. We present a validated computational framework for performing patient-specific modeling of ventricular flows, and apply it across 6 SV patients (3SLV + 3SRV), comparing hemodynamic conditions between the two subgroups. Simulations are performed with a stabilized finite element method coupled with an immersed boundary method for modeling heart valves. We discuss identification of hemodynamic biomarkers of ventricular remodeling for early risk assessment of failure. This research is supported in part by the Stanford Child Health Research Institute and the Stanford NIH-NCATS-CTSA through Grant UL1 TR001085 and due to U.S. National Institute of Health through NIH NHLBI R01 Grants 5R01HL129727-02 and 5R01HL121754-03.

  17. Quantifying biomass changes of single CD8+ T cells during antigen specific cytotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Zangle

    Full Text Available Existing approaches that quantify cytotoxic T cell responses rely on bulk or surrogate measurements which impede the direct identification of single activated T cells of interest. Single cell microscopy or flow cytometry methodologies typically rely on fluorescent labeling, which limits applicability to primary cells such as human derived T lymphocytes. Here, we introduce a quantitative method to track single T lymphocyte mediated cytotoxic events within a mixed population of cells using live cell interferometry (LCI, a label-free microscopy technique that maintains cell viability. LCI quantifies the mass distribution within individual cells by measuring the phase shift caused by the interaction of light with intracellular biomass. Using LCI, we imaged cytotoxic T cells killing cognate target cells. In addition to a characteristic target cell mass decrease of 20-60% over 1-4 h following attack by a T cell, there was a significant 4-fold increase in T cell mass accumulation rate at the start of the cytotoxic event and a 2-3 fold increase in T cell mass relative to the mass of unresponsive T cells. Direct, label-free measurement of CD8+ T and target cell mass changes provides a kinetic, quantitative assessment of T cell activation and a relatively rapid approach to identify specific, activated patient-derived T cells for applications in cancer immunotherapy.

  18. A sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) reference FISH karyotype for chromosome and chromosome-arm identification, integration of genetic linkage groups and analysis of major repeat family distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesold, Susanne; Borchardt, Dietrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Dechyeva, Daryna

    2012-11-01

    We developed a reference karyotype for B. vulgaris which is applicable to all beet cultivars and provides a consistent numbering of chromosomes and genetic linkage groups. Linkage groups of sugar beet were assigned to physical chromosome arms by FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) using a set of 18 genetically anchored BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) markers. Genetic maps of sugar beet were correlated to chromosome arms, and North-South orientation of linkage groups was established. The FISH karyotype provides a technical platform for genome studies and can be applied for numbering and identification of chromosomes in related wild beet species. The discrimination of all nine chromosomes by BAC probes enabled the study of chromosome-specific distribution of the major repetitive components of sugar beet genome comprising pericentromeric, intercalary and subtelomeric satellites and 18S-5.8S-25S and 5S rRNA gene arrays. We developed a multicolor FISH procedure allowing the identification of all nine sugar beet chromosome pairs in a single hybridization using a pool of satellite DNA probes. Fiber-FISH was applied to analyse five chromosome arms in which the furthermost genetic marker of the linkage group was mapped adjacently to terminal repetitive sequences on pachytene chromosomes. Only on two arms telomere arrays and the markers are physically linked, hence these linkage groups can be considered as terminally closed making the further identification of distal informative markers difficult. The results support genetic mapping by marker localization, the anchoring of contigs and scaffolds for the annotation of the sugar beet genome sequence and the analysis of the chromosomal distribution patterns of major families of repetitive DNA. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. A single glycine-alanine exchange directs ligand specificity of the elephant progestin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wierer

    Full Text Available The primary gestagen of elephants is 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP, which is unlike all other mammals studied until now. The level of DHP in elephants equals that of progesterone in other mammals, and elephants are able to bind DHP with similar affinity to progesterone indicating a unique ligand-binding specificity of the elephant progestin receptor (PR. Using site-directed mutagenesis in combination with in vitro binding studies we here report that this change in specificity is due to a single glycine to alanine exchange at position 722 (G722A of PR, which specifically increases DHP affinity while not affecting binding of progesterone. By conducting molecular dynamics simulations comparing human and elephant PR ligand-binding domains (LBD, we observed that the alanine methyl group at position 722 is able to push the DHP A-ring into a position similar to progesterone. In the human PR, the DHP A-ring position is twisted towards helix 3 of PR thereby disturbing the hydrogen bond pattern around the C3-keto group, resulting in a lower binding affinity. Furthermore, we observed that the elephant PR ligand-binding pocket is more rigid than the human analogue, which probably explains the higher affinity towards both progesterone and DHP. Interestingly, the G722A substitution is not elephant-specific, rather it is also present in five independent lineages of mammalian evolution, suggesting a special role of the substitution for the development of distinct mammalian gestagen systems.

  20. Clinical relevance of HLA donor-specific antibodies detected by single antigen assay in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro-Oleas, José Luis; González-Escribano, María Francisca; González-Roncero, Francisco Manuel; Acevedo-Calado, María José; Cabello-Chaves, Virginia; Gentil-Govantes, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Roldán, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    Clinical relevance of donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) detected by a single antigen Luminex virtual crossmatch in pre-transplant serum samples from patients with a negative cytotoxicity-dependent complement crossmatch is controversial. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of a pre-transplant positive virtual crossmatch in the outcome of kidney transplantation. A total of 892 patients who received a graft from deceased donors after a negative cytotoxicity crossmatch were included. Presence of anti-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies was investigated using a Luminex screening assay and anti-HLA specificities were assigned performing a Luminex single antigen assay. Graft survival was significantly worse among patients with anti-HLA DSA compared to both patients with anti-HLA with no DSA (P = 0.001) and patients without HLA antibodies (P HLA with no DSA and no HLA antibodies patient groups were observed (P = 0.595). Influence of both anti-Class I and anti-Class II DSA was detected (P 1500 (global P > 0.05). The presence of preformed HLA DSA in transplanted patients with a negative cytotoxicity crossmatch is associated with a lower allograft survival. The detection of anti-HLA with no DSA has no influence in the graft outcome. Finally, there were no demonstrable effects of mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) values >1500 on graft survival.

  1. Specific expression of channelrhodopsin-2 in single neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Schmitt

    Full Text Available Optogenetic approaches using light-activated proteins like Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 enable investigating the function of populations of neurons in live Caenorhabditis elegans (and other animals, as ChR2 expression can be targeted to these cells using specific promoters. Sub-populations of these neurons, or even single cells, can be further addressed by restricting the illumination to the cell of interest. However, this is technically demanding, particularly in free moving animals. Thus, it would be helpful if expression of ChR2 could be restricted to single neurons or neuron pairs, as even wide-field illumination would photostimulate only this particular cell. To this end we adopted the use of Cre or FLP recombinases and conditional ChR2 expression at the intersection of two promoter expression domains, i.e. in the cell of interest only. Success of this method depends on precise knowledge of the individual promoters' expression patterns and on relative expression levels of recombinase and ChR2. A bicistronic expression cassette with GFP helps to identify the correct expression pattern. Here we show specific expression in the AVA reverse command neurons and the aversive polymodal sensory ASH neurons. This approach shall enable to generate strains for optogenetic manipulation of each of the 302 C. elegans neurons. This may eventually allow to model the C. elegans nervous system in its entirety, based on functional data for each neuron.

  2. Specific single-cell isolation and genomic amplification of uncultured microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Thomas; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Lasken, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    We in this study describe a new method for genomic studies of individual uncultured prokaryotic organisms, which was used for the isolation and partial genome sequencing of a soil archaeon. The diversity of Archaea in a soil sample was mapped by generating a clone library using group-specific pri......We in this study describe a new method for genomic studies of individual uncultured prokaryotic organisms, which was used for the isolation and partial genome sequencing of a soil archaeon. The diversity of Archaea in a soil sample was mapped by generating a clone library using group......-specific primers in combination with a terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profile. Intact cells were extracted from the environmental sample, and fluorescent in situ hybridization probing with Cy3-labeled probes designed from the clone library was subsequently used to detect the organisms...... of interest. Single cells with a bright fluorescent signal were isolated using a micromanipulator and the genome of the single isolated cells served as a template for multiple displacement amplification (MDA) using the Phi29 DNA polymerase. The generated MDA product was afterwards used for 16S rRNA gene...

  3. A single amino acid substitution affects substrate specificity in cysteine proteinases from Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smooker, P. M.; Whisstock, J. C.; Irving, J. A.; Siyaguna, S.; Spithill, T. W.; Pike, R. N.

    2000-01-01

    The trematode Fasciola hepatica secretes a number of cathepsin L-like proteases that are proposed to be involved in feeding, migration, and immune evasion by the parasite. To date, six full cDNA sequences encoding cathepsin L preproproteins have been identified. Previous studies have demonstrated that one of these cathepsins (L2) is unusual in that it is able to cleave substrates with a proline in the P2 position, translating into an unusual ability (for a cysteine proteinase) to clot fibrinogen. In this study, we report the sequence of a novel cathepsin (L5) and compare the substrate specificity of a recombinant enzyme with that of recombinant cathepsin L2. Despite sharing 80% sequence identity with cathepsin L2, cathepsin L5 does not exhibit substantial catalytic activity against substrates containing proline in the P2 position. Molecular modeling studies suggested that a single amino acid change (L69Y) in the mature proteinases may account for the difference in specificity at the S2 subsite. Recombinant cathepsin L5/L69Y was expressed in yeast and a substantial increase in the ability of this variant to accommodate substrates with a proline residue in the P2 position was observed. Thus, we have identified a single amino acid substitution that can substantially influence the architecture of the S2 subsite of F. hepatica cathepsin L proteases. PMID:11206078

  4. Direct measurements of mass-specific optical cross sections of single-component aerosol mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radney, James G; Ma, Xiaofei; Gillis, Keith A; Zachariah, Michael R; Hodges, Joseph T; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2013-09-03

    The optical properties of atmospheric aerosols vary widely, being dependent upon particle composition, morphology, and mixing state. This diversity and complexity of aerosols motivates measurement techniques that can discriminate and quantify a variety of single- and multicomponent aerosols that are both internally and externally mixed. Here, we present a new combination of techniques to directly measure the mass-specific extinction and absorption cross sections of laboratory-generated aerosols that are relevant to atmospheric studies. Our approach employs a tandem differential mobility analyzer, an aerosol particle mass analyzer, cavity ring-down and photoacoustic spectrometers, and a condensation particle counter. This suite of instruments enables measurement of aerosol particle size, mass, extinction and absorption coefficients, and aerosol number density, respectively. Taken together, these observables yield the mass-specific extinction and absorption cross sections without the need to model particle morphology or account for sample collection artifacts. Here we demonstrate the technique in a set of case studies which involve complete separation of aerosol by charge, separation of an external mixture by mass, and discrimination between particle types by effective density and single-scattering albedo.

  5. Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project Allies with Developmental Biology: A Case Study of the Role of Y Chromosome Genes in Organ Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyfour, Anna; Pooyan, Paria; Pahlavan, Sara; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Gourabi, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2017-12-01

    One of the main goals of Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project is to identify protein evidence for missing proteins (MPs). Here, we present a case study of the role of Y chromosome genes in organ development and how to overcome the challenges facing MPs identification by employing human pluripotent stem cell differentiation into cells of different organs yielding unprecedented biological insight into adult silenced proteins. Y chromosome is a male-specific sex chromosome which escapes meiotic recombination. From an evolutionary perspective, Y chromosome has preserved 3% of ancestral genes compared to 98% preservation of the X chromosome based on Ohno's law. Male specific region of Y chromosome (MSY) contains genes that contribute to central dogma and govern the expression of various targets throughout the genome. One of the most well-known functions of MSY genes is to decide the male-specific characteristics including sex, testis formation, and spermatogenesis, which are majorly formed by ampliconic gene families. Beyond its role in sex-specific gonad development, MSY genes in coexpression with their X counterparts, as single copy and broadly expressed genes, inhibit haplolethality and play a key role in embryogenesis. The role of X-Y related gene mutations in the development of hereditary syndromes suggests an essential contribution of sex chromosome genes to development. MSY genes, solely and independent of their X counterparts and/or in association with sex hormones, have a considerable impact on organ development. In this Review, we present major recent findings on the contribution of MSY genes to gonad formation, spermatogenesis, and the brain, heart, and kidney development and discuss how Y chromosome proteome project may exploit developmental biology to find missing proteins.

  6. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  7. Tyramide-FISH mapping of single genes for development of an integrated recombination and cytogenetic map of chromosome 5 of Allium cepa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosome 5 of onion carries major quantitative trait loci (QTL) of interest to breeders that control dry-matter content, pungency and storability of bulbs, amounts and types of epicuticular waxes, and resistances to abiotic factors. SNPs, SSRs and RFLPs in expressed regions of the onion genome hav...

  8. Chromosome chains and platypus sex: kinky connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Terry

    2005-07-01

    Mammal sex determination depends on an XY chromosome system, a gene for testis development and a means of activating the X chromosome. The duckbill platypus challenges these dogmas.(1,2) Gutzner et al.(1) find no recognizable SRY sequence and question whether the mammalian X was even the original sex chromosome in the platypus. Instead they suggest that the original platypus sex chromosomes were derived from the ZW chromosome system of birds and reptiles. Unraveling the puzzles of sex determination and dosage compensation in the platypus has been complicated by the fact that it has a surplus of sex chromosomes. Rather than a single X and Y chromosome, the male platypus has five Xs and five Ys. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Delayed chromosomal instability induced by DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents rapidly results in a dose dependent increase in chromosomal breakage and gross structural chromosomal rearrangements. Over recent years, evidence has been accumulating indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to physical and chemical DNA damaging agents. Genomic instability manifests in the progeny of surviving cells, and has been implicated in mutation, gene application, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosome instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells surviving X-irradiation many generations after exposure. At higher radiation doses, chromosomal instability was observed in a relatively high frequency of surviving clones and, in general, those clones showed delayed chromosome instability also showed reduced survival as measured by colony forming ability

  10. Next-generation sequencing of flow-sorted wheat chromosome 5D reveals lineage-specific translocations and widespread gene duplications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lucas, S. J.; Akpinar, B. A.; Šimková, Hana; Kubaláková, Marie; Doležel, Jaroslav; Budak, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, DEC 9 2014 (2014) ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Wheat genome * Chromosome sorting * Triticum aestivum Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.986, year: 2014

  11. An anther- and petal-specific gene SlMF1 is a multicopy gene with homologous sequences on sex chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matsunaga, S.; Lebel-Hardenack, S.; Kejnovský, Eduard; Vyskot, Boris; Grant, Sarah R.; Kawano, S.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 80, - (2005), s. 395-401 ISSN 1341-7568 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/05/2097 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : dioecious plant * male flower * sex chromosomes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.081, year: 2005

  12. Stage-specific expression profiling of Drosophila spermatogenesis suggests that meiotic sex chromosome inactivation drives genomic relocation of testis-expressed genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D Vibranovski

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, genes expressed in males tend to accumulate on autosomes and are underrepresented on the X chromosome. In particular, genes expressed in testis have been observed to frequently relocate from the X chromosome to the autosomes. The inactivation of X-linked genes during male meiosis (i.e., meiotic sex chromosome inactivation-MSCI was first proposed to explain male sterility caused by X-autosomal translocation in Drosophila, and more recently it was suggested that MSCI might provide the conditions under which selection would favor the accumulation of testis-expressed genes on autosomes. In order to investigate the impact of MSCI on Drosophila testis-expressed genes, we performed a global gene expression analysis of the three major phases of D. melanogaster spermatogenesis: mitosis, meiosis, and post-meiosis. First, we found evidence supporting the existence of MSCI by comparing the expression levels of X- and autosome-linked genes, finding the former to be significantly reduced in meiosis. Second, we observed that the paucity of X-linked testis-expressed genes was restricted to those genes highly expressed in meiosis. Third, we found that autosomal genes relocated through retroposition from the X chromosome were more often highly expressed in meiosis in contrast to their X-linked parents. These results suggest MSCI as a general mechanism affecting the evolution of some testis-expressed genes.

  13. Conversion of chromosome-specific RAPDs into SCAR-based anchor markers for onion linkage maps and its application to genetic analyses inother Allium species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masuzaki, S.; Miyazaki, T.; McCallum, J.; Heusden, van A.W.; Kik, C.; Yamashita, K.; Tashiro, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Integration of previously developed Allium cepa linkage maps requires the availability of anchor markers for each of the eight chromosomes of shallot (A. cepa L. common group Aggregatum). To this end, eight RAPD markers originating from our previous research were converted into SCAR markers via

  14. Specific-heat measurement of single metallic, carbon, and ceramic fibers at very high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradere, C.; Goyheneche, J.M.; Batsale, J.C.; Dilhaire, S.; Pailler, R.

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to present a method for measuring the specific heat of single metallic, carbon, and ceramic fibers at very high temperature. The difficulty of the measurement is due to the microscale of the fiber (≅10 μm) and the important range of temperature (700-2700 K). An experimental device, a modelization of the thermal behavior, and an analytic model have been developed. A discussion on the measurement accuracy yields a global uncertainty lower than 10%. The characterization of a tungsten filament with thermal properties identical to those of the bulk allows the validation of the device and the thermal estimation method. Finally, measurements on carbon and ceramic fibers have been done at very high temperature

  15. Single stage to orbit mass budgets derived from propellant density and specific impulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J.C.

    1996-06-06

    The trade between specific impulse (Isp) and density is examined in view of Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) requirements. Mass allocations for vehicle hardware are derived from these two properties, for several propellant combinations and a dual-fuel case. This comparative analysis, based on flight-proven hardware, indicates that the higher density of several alternative propellants compensates for reduced Isp, when compared with cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen. Approximately half the orbiting mass of a rocket- propelled SSTO vehicle must be allocated to propulsion hardware and residuals. Using hydrogen as the only fuel requires a slightly greater fraction of orbiting mass for propulsion, because hydrogen engines and tanks are heavier than those for denser fuels. The advantage of burning both a dense fuel and hydrogen in succession depends strongly on tripropellant engine weight. The implications of the calculations for SSTO vehicle design are discussed, especially with regard to the necessity to minimize non-tankage structure.

  16. Partial deletions of the W chromosome due to reciprocal translocation in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, H; Seki, M; Ohbayashi, F; Tanaka, N; Yamashita, J; Fujii, T; Yokoyama, T; Takahashi, M; Banno, Y; Sahara, K; Yoshido, A; Ihara, J; Yasukochi, Y; Mita, K; Ajimura, M; Suzuki, M G; Oshiki, T; Shimada, T

    2005-08-01

    In the silkworm, Bombyx mori (female, ZW; male, ZZ), femaleness is determined by the presence of a single W chromosome, irrespective of the number of autosomes or Z chromosomes. The W chromosome is devoid of functional genes, except the putative female-determining gene (Fem). However, there are strains in which chromosomal fragments containing autosomal markers have been translocated on to W. In this study, we analysed the W chromosomal regions of the Zebra-W strain (T(W;3)Ze chromosome) and the Black-egg-W strain (T(W;10)+(w-2) chromosome) at the molecular level. Initially, we undertook a project to identify W-specific RAPD markers, in addition to the three already established W-specific RAPD markers (W-Kabuki, W-Samurai and W-Kamikaze). Following the screening of 3648 arbitrary 10-mer primers, we obtained nine W-specific RAPD marker sequences (W-Bonsai, W-Mikan, W-Musashi, W-Rikishi, W-Sakura, W-Sasuke, W-Yukemuri-L, W-Yukemuri-S and BMC1-Kabuki), almost all of which contained the border regions of retrotransposons, namely portions of nested retrotransposons. We confirmed the presence of eleven out of twelve W-specific RAPD markers in the normal W chromosomes of twenty-five silkworm strains maintained in Japan. These results indicate that the W chromosomes of the strains in Japan are almost identical in type. The Zebra-W strain (T(W;3)Ze chromosome) lacked the W-Samurai and W-Mikan RAPD markers and the Black-egg-W strain (T(W;10)+(w-2) chromosome) lacked the W-Mikan RAPD marker. These results strongly indicate that the regions containing the W-Samurai and W-Mikan RAPD markers or the W-Mikan RAPD marker were deleted in the T(W;3)Ze and T(W;10)+(w-2) chromosomes, respectively, due to reciprocal translocation between the W chromosome and the autosome. This deletion apparently does not affect the expression of Fem; therefore, this deleted region of the W chromosome does not contain the putative Fem gene.

  17. Stringent and reproducible tetracycline-regulated transgene expression by site-specific insertion at chromosomal loci with pre-characterised induction characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papanastasiou Antigoni M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to regulate transgene expression has many applications, mostly concerning the analysis of gene function. Desirable induction characteristics, such as low un-induced expression, high induced expression and limited cellular heterogeneity, can be seriously impaired by chromosomal position effects at the site of transgene integration. Many clones may therefore need to be screened before one with optimal induction characteristics is identified. Furthermore, such screens must be repeated for each new transgene investigated, and comparisons between clones with different transgenes is complicated by their different integration sites. Results To circumvent these problems we have developed a "screen and insert" strategy in which clones carrying a transgene for a fluorescent reporter are first screened for those with optimal induction characteristics. Site-specific recombination (SSR is then be used repeatedly to insert any new transgene at the reporter transgene locus of such clones so that optimal induction characteristics are conferred upon it. Here we have tested in a human fibrosarcoma cell line (HT1080 two of many possible implementations of this approach. Clones (e.g. Rht14-10 in which a GFP reporter gene is very stringently regulated by the tetracycline (tet transactivator (tTA protein were first identified flow-cytometrically. Transgenes encoding luciferase, I-SceI endonuclease or Rad52 were then inserted by SSR at a LoxP site adjacent to the GFP gene resulting stringent tet-regulated transgene expression. In clone Rht14-10, increases in expression from essentially background levels (+tet to more than 104-fold above background (-tet were reproducibly detected after Cre-mediated insertion of either the luciferase or the I-SceI transgenes. Conclusion Although previous methods have made use of SSR to integrate transgenes at defined sites, none has effectively combined this with a pre-selection step to identify

  18. Are There Knots in Chromosomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Siebert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments have for the first time allowed the determination of three-dimensional structures of individual chromosomes and genomes in nuclei of single haploid mouse embryonic stem (ES cells based on Hi–C chromosome conformation contact data. Although these first structures have a relatively low resolution, they provide the first experimental data that can be used to study chromosome and intact genome folding. Here we further analyze these structures and provide the first evidence that G1 phase chromosomes are knotted, consistent with the fact that plots of contact probability vs sequence separation show a power law dependence that is intermediate between that of a fractal globule and an equilibrium structure.

  19. Non-invasive prenatal testing of fetal whole chromosome aneuploidy by massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Desheng; Lv, Weigang; Wang, Hua; Xu, Liangpu; Liu, Jing; Li, Haoxian; Hu, Liang; Peng, Ying; Wu, Lingqian

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether non-invasive prenatal testing by maternal plasma DNA sequencing can uncover all fetal chromosome aneuploidies in one simple sequencing event. Plasma samples from 435 pregnant women at high risk for Down syndrome were collected prior to amniocentesis in three hospitals in China between March 2009 and June 2011. We sequenced the plasma DNA extracted from these samples at low coverage. We discovered that the genome representation of each of the 24 chromosomes obeyed a linear relationship to its GC content. Applying this relationship, we analysed the copy number of each of the 24 chromosomes. Full fetal karyotyping was compared with maternal plasma DNA sequencing results. Among the 435 samples, 412 samples (94.7%) have full karyotyping and sequencing results. Sixty-seven samples containing a fetal chromosome aneuploidy, including trisomy 21, trisomy 18, trisomy 13, trisomy 9, monosomy X or others, can be accurately identified with a detection sensitivity of 100% and a detection specificity of 99.71%. Normalization of the chromosome representation values against chromosomal guanine/cytosine base content is the key issue to ensure the accuracy. Our results indicate that non-invasive detection of fetal chromosome aneuploidies for all 24 chromosomes in one single sequencing event is feasible. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The Smc5-Smc6 complex is required to remove chromosome junctions in meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Farmer

    Full Text Available Meiosis, a specialized cell division with a single cycle of DNA replication round and two consecutive rounds of nuclear segregation, allows for the exchange of genetic material between parental chromosomes and the formation of haploid gametes. The structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC proteins aid manipulation of chromosome structures inside cells. Eukaryotic SMC complexes include cohesin, condensin and the Smc5-Smc6 complex. Meiotic roles have been discovered for cohesin and condensin. However, although Smc5-Smc6 is known to be required for successful meiotic divisions, the meiotic functions of the complex are not well understood. Here we show that the Smc5-Smc6 complex localizes to specific chromosome regions during meiotic prophase I. We report that meiotic cells lacking Smc5-Smc6 undergo catastrophic meiotic divisions as a consequence of unresolved linkages between chromosomes. Surprisingly, meiotic segregation defects are not rescued by abrogation of Spo11-induced meiotic recombination, indicating that at least some chromosome linkages in smc5-smc6 mutants originate from other cellular processes. These results demonstrate that, as in mitosis, Smc5-Smc6 is required to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis by preventing aberrant recombination intermediates between homologous chromosomes.

  1. Sex-chromosome anaphase movements in crane-fly spermatocytes are coordinated: ultraviolet microbeam irradiation of one kinetochore of one sex chromosome blocks the movements of both sex chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedak, J.A.M.; Forer, A.

    1987-01-01

    Sex chromosomes in crane-fly spermatocytes move polewards at anaphase after the autosomes have reached the poles. We irradiated one kinetochore of one sex chromosome using an ultraviolet microbeam. When both sex chromosomes were normally oriented, irradiation of a single kinetochore permanently blocked movement of both sex chromosomes. Irradiation of non-kinetochore chromosomal regions or of spindle fibres did not block movement, or blocked movement only temporarily. We argue that ultraviolet irradiation of one kinetochore blocks movement of both sex chromosomes because of effects on a 'signal' system. Irradiation of one kinetochore of a maloriented sex chromosome did not block motion of either sex chromosome. However, irradiation of one kinetochore of a normally oriented sex chromosome permanently blocked motion of both that sex chromosome and the maloriented sex chromosome. Thus for the signal system to allow the sex chromosomes to move to the pole each sex chromosome must have one spindle fibre to each pole. (author)

  2. 2D IR cross peaks reveal hydrogen-deuterium exchange with single residue specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkelberger, Emily B; Woys, Ann Marie; Zanni, Martin T

    2013-12-12

    A form of chemical exchange, hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX), has long been used as a method for studying the secondary and tertiary structure of peptides and proteins using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we resolve cross peaks between the amide II band and a (13)C(18)O isotope-labeled amide I band, which we show measures HDX with site-specific resolution. By rapidly scanning 2D IR spectra using mid-IR pulse shaping, we monitor the kinetics of HDX exchange on-the-fly. For the antimicrobial peptide ovispirin bound to membrane bilayers, we find that the amide II peak decays with a biexponential with rate constants of 0.54 ± 0.02 and 0.12 ± 0.01 min(-1), which is a measure of the overall HDX in the peptide. The cross peaks between Ile-10-labeled ovispirin and the amide II mode, which specifically monitor HDX kinetics at Ile-10, decay with a single rate constant of 0.36 ± 0.1 min(-1). Comparing this exchange rate to theoretically determined exchange rates of Ile-10 for ovispirin in a solution random coil configuration, the exchange rate at Ile-10 is at least 100 times slower, consistent with the known α-helix structure of ovispirin in bilayers. Because backbone isotope labels produce only a very small shift of the amide II band, site-specific HDX cannot be measured with FTIR spectroscopy, which is why 2D IR spectroscopy is needed for these measurements.

  3. Identification and Characterization of Single-Chain Antibodies that Specifically Bind GI Noroviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Hurwitz

    Full Text Available Norovirus infections commonly lead to outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis and spread quickly, resulting in many health and economic challenges prior to diagnosis. Rapid and reliable diagnostic tests are therefore essential to identify infections and to guide the appropriate clinical responses at the point-of-care. Existing tools, including RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays, pose several limitations based on the significant time, equipment and expertise required to elicit results. Immunochromatographic assays available for use at the point-of-care have poor sensitivity and specificity, especially for genogroup I noroviruses, thus requiring confirmation of results with more sensitive testing methods. Therefore, there is a clear need for novel reagents to help achieve quick and reliable results. In this study, we have identified two novel single-chain antibodies (scFvs-named NJT-R3-A2 and NJT-R3-A3-that effectively detect GI.1 and GI.7 virus-like particles (VLPs through selection of a phage display library against the P-domain of the GI.1 major capsid protein. The limits of detection by each scFv for GI.1 and GI.7 are 0.1 and 0.2 ng, and 6.25 and 25 ng, respectively. They detect VLPs with strong specificity in multiple diagnostic formats, including ELISAs and membrane-based dot blots, and in the context of norovirus-negative stool suspensions. The scFvs also detect native virions effectively in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Purified scFvs bind to GI.1 and GI.7 VLPs with equilibrium constant (KD values of 27 nM and 49 nM, respectively. Overall, the phage-based scFv reagents identified and characterized here show utility for detecting GI.1 and GI.7 noroviruses in multiple diagnostic assay formats with strong specificity and sensitivity, indicating promise for integration into existing point-of-care tests to improve future diagnostics.

  4. Sequence-specific detection of different strains of LCMV in a single sample using tentacle probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Lina S; Holechek, Susan A; Caplan, Michael R; Blattman, Joseph N

    2017-10-13

    Virus infections often result in quasispecies of viral strains that can have dramatic impacts on disease outcomes. However, sequencing of viruses to determine strain composition is time consuming and often cost-prohibitive. Rapid, cost-effective methods are needed for accurate measurement of virus diversity to understand virus evolution and can be useful for experimental systems. We have developed a novel molecular method for sequence-specific detection of RNA virus genetic variants called Tentacle Probes. The probes are modified molecular beacons that have dramatically improved false positive rates and specificity in routine qPCR. To validate this approach, we have designed Tentacle Probes for two different strains of Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV) that differ by only 3 nucleotide substitutions, the parental Armstrong and the more virulent Clone-13 strain. One of these mutations is a missense mutation in the receptor protein GP1 that leads to the Armstrong strain to cause an acute infection and Clone-13 to cause a chronic infection instead. The probes were designed using thermodynamic calculations for hybridization between target or non-target sequences and the probe. Using this approach, we were able to distinguish these two strains of LCMV individually by a single nucleotide mutation. The assay showed high reproducibility among different concentrations of viral cDNA, as well as high specificity and sensitivity, especially for the Clone-13 Tentacle Probe. Furthermore, in virus mixing experiments we were able to detect less than 10% of Clone-13 cDNA diluted in Armstrong cDNA. Thus, we have developed a fast, cost-effective approach for identifying Clone-13 strain in a mix of other LCMV strains.

  5. Association of a single nucleotide polymorphic variation in the human chromosome 19q13.3 with drug responses in the NCI60 cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, K.K.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Nexo, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the importance of certain polymorphisms on human chromosome 19q13.3 for drug sensitivity in human tumor cell cultures. NCI60 is a panel of 60 established tumor-derived cell lines, which have been tested for their sensitivity to tens of thousands of different drugs. Here we investigate...... the correlations between the responses of the NCI60 cells to different anticancer drugs and their respective alleles of five DNA polymorphisms located in a cancer-related chromosomal area. One polymorphism, located in the 5' noncoding region of the gene ASE-1, alias CD3EAP, proved to be associated with drug...... sensitivity (P=0.025). The same polymorphism has previously been associated with treatment response of multiple myeloma after bone marrow ablation. The polymorphism ASE-1-e1 was of importance for the drug response in the human cancer cell lines investigated and could eventually become important...

  6. Cat-eye syndrome with unusual marker chromosome probably not chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, W; Verma, R S; Jhaveri, R C

    1984-05-01

    An unusual supernumerary chromosome with a single satellite on the long arm was found in a child with manifestations of the cat-eye syndrome including apparently low-set and malformed ears, preauricular tags, micrognathia, and imperforate anus. Although G-banding suggested that this extra material was chromosome 22, this was not confirmed by several other banding techniques. After examination of the parents' chromosomes, the nature and origin of this extra chromosome remains obscure. We conclude that patients previously diagnosed as having "partial trisomy 22" with incomplete cat-eye syndrome may have a different chromosome constitution when studied by various banding techniques.

  7. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  8. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  9. Isolation of a Highly Thermal Stable Lama Single Domain Antibody Specific for Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano-González Joseline

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Camelids and sharks possess a unique subclass of antibodies comprised of only heavy chains. The antigen binding fragments of these unique antibodies can be cloned and expressed as single domain antibodies (sdAbs. The ability of these small antigen-binding molecules to refold after heating to achieve their original structure, as well as their diminutive size, makes them attractive candidates for diagnostic assays. Results Here we describe the isolation of an sdAb against Staphyloccocus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB. The clone, A3, was found to have high affinity (Kd = 75 pM and good specificity for SEB, showing no cross reactivity to related molecules such as Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA, Staphylococcal enterotoxin D (SED, and Shiga toxin. Most remarkably, this anti-SEB sdAb had an extremely high Tm of 85°C and an ability to refold after heating to 95°C. The sharp Tm determined by circular dichroism, was found to contrast with the gradual decrease observed in intrinsic fluorescence. We demonstrated the utility of this sdAb as a capture and detector molecule in Luminex based assays providing limits of detection (LODs of at least 64 pg/mL. Conclusion The anti-SEB sdAb A3 was found to have a high affinity and an extraordinarily high Tm and could still refold to recover activity after heat denaturation. This combination of heat resilience and strong, specific binding make this sdAb a good candidate for use in antibody-based toxin detection technologies.

  10. Identification of Diagnostic Mitochondrial DNA Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Specific to Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puji Rianti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The hypervariable region I of mitochondrial DNA has frequently been used to distinguish among populations, in particular in species with strong female philopatry. In such cases, populations are expected to diverge rapidly for hypervariable region I markers because of the smaller effective population size and thus increased genetic drift. This rapid divergence leads to the accumulation of mutations exclusively found in one population, which may serve as diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. To date, diagnostic SNPs distinctive to Sumatran orangutan populations have not yet been described. However, given the continuously declining numbers of Sumatran orangutans, this information can be vital for effective conservation measures, especially regarding reintroductions of orangutans in rehabilitation centers. Phylogenetic analyses of 54 samples of Sumatran orangutans from nine sampling sites with good provenance, we found five major clades and a total of 20 haplotypes. We propose a total of 52 diagnostic SNPs that are specific to Sumatran orangutan populations. Data can be used to develop restriction fragment length polymorphism assays to carry out genetic assignments using basic laboratory equipment to assign Sumatran orangutan to their population of origin.

  11. Fungal Glucosylceramide-Specific Camelid Single Domain Antibodies Are Characterized by Broad Spectrum Antifungal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara De Coninck

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical crop protection is widely used to control plant diseases. However, the adverse effects of pesticide use on human health and environment, resistance development and the impact of regulatory requirements on the crop protection market urges the agrochemical industry to explore innovative and alternative approaches. In that context, we demonstrate here the potential of camelid single domain antibodies (VHHs generated against fungal glucosylceramides (fGlcCer, important pathogenicity factors. To this end, llamas were immunized with purified fGlcCer and a mixture of mycelium and spores of the fungus Botrytis cinerea, one of the most important plant pathogenic fungi. The llama immune repertoire was subsequently cloned in a phage display vector to generate a library with a diversity of at least 108 different clones. This library was incubated with fGlcCer to identify phages that bind to fGlcCer, and VHHs that specifically bound fGlcCer but not mammalian or plant-derived GlcCer were selected. They were shown to inhibit the growth of B. cinerea in vitro, with VHH 41D01 having the highest antifungal activity. Moreover, VHH 41D01 could reduce disease symptoms induced by B. cinerea when sprayed on tomato leaves. Based on all these data, anti-fGlcCer VHHs show the potential to be used as an alternative approach to combat fungal plant diseases.

  12. Rational concept to recognize/extract single-walled carbon nanotubes with a specific chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Hiroaki; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Niidome, Yasuro; Hotta, Naosuke; Fujiki, Michiya; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2011-03-02

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have remarkable and unique electronic, mechanical, and thermal properties, which are closely related to their chiralities; thus, the chirality-selective recognition/extraction of the SWNTs is one of the central issues in nanotube science. However, any rational materials design enabling one to efficiently extract/solubilize pure SWNT with a desired chirality has yet not been demonstrated. Herein we report that certain chiral polyfluorene copolymers can well-recognize SWNTs with a certain chirality preferentially, leading to solubilization of specific chiral SWNTs. The chiral copolymers were prepared by the Ni(0)-catalyzed Yamamoto coupling reaction of 2,7-dibromo-9,9-di-n-decylfluorene and 2,7-dibromo-9,9-bis[(S)-(+)-2-methylbutyl]fluorene comonomers. The selectivity of the SWNT chirality was mainly determined by the relative fraction of the achiral and chiral side groups. By a molecular mechanics simulation, the cooperative interaction between the fluorene moiety, alkyl side chain, and graphene wall were responsible for the recognition/dissolution ability of SWNT chirality. This is a first example describing the rational design and synthesis of novel fluorene-based copolymers toward the recognition/extraction of targeted (n, m) chirality of the SWNTs.

  13. Allele specific LAMP- gold nanoparticle for characterization of single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Ferreira Carlos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their relevance as disease biomarkers and for diagnostics, screening of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs requires simple and straightforward strategies capable to provide results in medium throughput settings. Suitable approaches relying on isothermal amplification techniques have been evolving to substitute the cumbersome and highly specialized PCR amplification detection schemes. Nonetheless, identification of an individual’s genotype still requires sophisticated equipment and laborious methods.Here, we present a low-cost and reliable approach based on the allele specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (AS-LAMP coupled to ssDNA functionalized gold nanoparticle (Au-nanoprobe colorimetric sequence discrimination. The Au-nanoprobe integration allows for the colorimetric detection of AS-LAMP amplification product that can be easily interpreted in less than 15 min. We targeted a clinical relevant SNP responsible for lactose intolerance (-13910C/T dbSNP rs#: 4988235 to demonstrate its proof of concept and full potential of this novel approach. Keywords: SNP, Isothermal amplification, Gold nanoparticles, Gold nanoprobes, Lactose intolerance

  14. Insect sex chromosomes. VI. A presumptive hyperactivation of the male X chromosome in Acheta domesticus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S R; Ali, S

    1982-01-01

    The functional status of the X chromosome in Acheta domesticus has been analysed at the whole chromosome level on the basis of (1) 3H-thymidine autoradiography, (2) 5-BrdU/AO fluorescence microscopy (3) in vivo 5-BrdU incorporation and (4) 3H-UdR induced aberrations. The rationale of these techniques in relation to the functional aspect of the X chromosome is that the inactive X chromosome would (1) show asynchrony in DNA synthesis, (2) show differential fluorescence, (3) respond differentially to in vivo 5-BrdU treatment and (4) the active X chromosome would show aberrations when treated with 3H-Uridine. From the results, it appears that the X chromosomes in both male (XO) and female (XX) somatic cells of Acheta are euchromatic (active). Further, the single X in the male is transcriptionally as active as the two X chromosomes in the female. In other words, the single X in the male is hyperactive when compared with the single X in the female. From this it is inferred that the male X chromosome is differentially regulated in order to bring about an equalization of it's gene product(s) to that produced by both Xs in the female. Drosophila melanogaster has a comparable system of dosage compensation. Thus, Acheta is yet another insect showing evidence for an X chromosome regulatory mechanism of dosage compensation. Additionally, it is surmised that sex determination in Acheta is based on an autosomes/X chromosome balance mechanism.

  15. A rapid molecular approach for chromosomal phasing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Regan

    Full Text Available Determining the chromosomal phase of pairs of sequence variants - the arrangement of specific alleles as haplotypes - is a routine challenge in molecular genetics. Here we describe Drop-Phase, a molecular method for quickly ascertaining the phase of pairs of DNA sequence variants (separated by 1-200 kb without cloning or manual single-molecule dilution. In each Drop-Phase reaction, genomic DNA segments are isolated in tens of thousands of nanoliter-sized droplets together with allele-specific fluorescence probes, in a single reaction well. Physically linked alleles partition into the same droplets, revealing their chromosomal phase in the co-distribution of fluorophores across droplets. We demonstrated the accuracy of this method by phasing members of trios (revealing 100% concordance with inheritance information, and demonstrate a common clinical application by phasing CFTR alleles at genomic distances of 11-116 kb in the genomes of cystic fibrosis patients. Drop-Phase is rapid (requiring less than 4 hours, scalable (to hundreds of samples, and effective at long genomic distances (200 kb.

  16. The genome of Nectria haematococca: contribution of supernumerary chromosomes to gene expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, J.J.; Rounsley, S.D.; Rodriguez-Carres, M.; Kuo, A.; Wasmann, C.c.; Grimwood, J.; Schmutz, J.; Taga, M.; White, G.J.; Zhuo, S.; Schwartz, D.C.; Freitag, M.; Ma, L.-J.; Danchin, E.G.J.; Henrissat, B.; Cutinho, P.M.; Nelson, D.R.; Straney, D.; Napoli, C.A.; Baker, B.M.; Gribskov, M.; Rep, M.; Kroken, S.; Molnar, I.; Rensing, C.; Kennell, J.C.; Zamora, J.; Farman, M.L.; Selker, E.U.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H.; Pangilinan, J.; Lindquist, E.; Lamers, C.; Grigoriev, I.V.; Geiser, D.M.; Covert, S.F.; Temporini, S.; VanEtten, H.D.

    2009-04-20

    The ascomycetous fungus Nectria haematococca, (asexual name Fusarium solani), is a member of a group of .50 species known as the"Fusarium solani species complex". Members of this complex have diverse biological properties including the ability to cause disease on .100 genera of plants and opportunistic infections in humans. The current research analyzed the most extensively studied member of this complex, N. haematococca mating population VI (MPVI). Several genes controlling the ability of individual isolates of this species to colonize specific habitats are located on supernumerary chromosomes. Optical mapping revealed that the sequenced isolate has 17 chromosomes ranging from 530 kb to 6.52 Mb and that the physical size of the genome, 54.43 Mb, and the number of predicted genes, 15,707, are among the largest reported for ascomycetes. Two classes of genes have contributed to gene expansion: specific genes that are not found in other fungi including its closest sequenced relative, Fusarium graminearum; and genes that commonly occur as single copies in other fungi but are present as multiple copies in N. haematococca MPVI. Some of these additional genes appear to have resulted from gene duplication events, while others may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. The supernumerary nature of three chromosomes, 14, 15, and 17, was confirmed by their absence in pulsed field gel electrophoresis experiments of some isolates and by demonstrating that these isolates lacked chromosome-specific sequences found on the ends of these chromosomes. These supernumerary chromosomes contain more repeat sequences, are enriched in unique and duplicated genes, and have a lower G+C content in comparison to the other chromosomes. Although the origin(s) of the extra genes and the supernumerary chromosomes is not known, the gene expansion and its large genome size are consistent with this species' diverse range of habitats. Furthermore, the presence of unique genes on

  17. Unprecedented large inverted repeats at the replication terminus of circular bacterial chromosomes suggest a novel mode of chromosome rescue

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kafsi, Hela; Loux, Valentin; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Blin, Camille; Chiapello, Hélène; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    The first Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus genome sequence revealed the presence of a very large inverted repeat (IR), a DNA sequence arrangement which thus far seemed inconceivable in a non-manipulated circular bacterial chromosome, at the replication terminus. This intriguing observation prompted us to investigate if similar IRs could be found in other bacteria. IRs with sizes varying from 38 to 76 kbp were found at the replication terminus of all 5 L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus chromosomes analysed, but in none of 1373 other chromosomes. They represent the first naturally occurring very large IRs detected in circular bacterial genomes. A comparison of the L. bulgaricus replication terminus regions and the corresponding regions without IR in 5 L. delbrueckii ssp. lactis genomes leads us to propose a model for the formation and evolution of the IRs. The DNA sequence data are consistent with a novel model of chromosome rescue after premature replication termination or irreversible chromosome damage near the replication terminus, involving mechanisms analogous to those proposed in the formation of very large IRs in human cancer cells. We postulate that the L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus-specific IRs in different strains derive from a single ancestral IR of at least 93 kbp. PMID:28281695

  18. Clipboard Human Y-chromosome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Their findings, as described below, are revealing. They sequenced the euchromatic part of the Y-chromosome (23 Mb) (obtained from a single anony- mous human male), comprising 8 Mb of the short arm (Yp) and 14⋅5 Mb of the long arm (Yq), at an accuracy of 99⋅999% and classified these regions into three sequence ...

  19. A single nine-amino acid peptide induces virus-specific, CD8+ human cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones of heterogeneous serotype specificities

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    It is generally accepted that virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) recognize nine-amino acid peptides in conjunction with HLA class I molecules. We recently reported that dengue virus- specific CD8+ CTLs of two different serotype specificities, which were established by stimulation with dengue virus, recognize a single nine- amino acid peptide of the nonstructural protein NS3 of dengue virus type 4 (D4V) in an HLA-B35-restricted fashion. To further analyze the relationships betw...

  20. International, collaborative assessment of limitations of chromosome-specific probes (CSP) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH): Analysis of expected detections in 73,000 prenatal cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, M.I.; Henry, G.P.; Miller, W.A. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    FISH and CSP have been proposed to reduce karyotyping need. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential efficacy of CSP-FISH using currently available probes (13, 18, 21, X, & Y) in large, prenatal diagnostic centers. Results (1990-1993) from 7 centers in 4 countries were divided by those expected to be detectable by currently available probes, and those which would be missed assuming 10% probe efficacy. 72,994 karyotypes included 699 trisomy 21`s, 352 trisomy 18`s, 136 trisomy 13`s, 358 sex chromosome aneuploidies, 70 triploidies, and 855 others (translocations, inversions, deletions, markers). Of 2,613 abnormalities, 1,745 would be detectable (66.8%). [Detroit 55.7%, Stockholm 68.3%, Boston 52.6%, Denver 61.3%, Muenster 77.0%, London 84.5%, Philadelphia 69.4%]. Centers with high proportions of referrals for ultrasound anomalies had the highest CSP-FISH positives secondary to increased T 18 & 13. We conclude: (1) 73,000 karyotypes show relatively consistent incidences of the common trisomies, sex chromosome abnormalities, and other chromosome abnormalities among the centers. (2) The proportion expected detectable by FISH-CSP technology varies from 52.6% to 84.5%, averaging 66.8%. (3) 1/3 of the karyotypic abnormalities would be missed, and therefore, replacement of complete karyotyping with FISH would have unacceptably high false-negative rates for routine evaluation. (4) FISH-CSP, while useful when positive for anomalies, is not sufficient when negative to obviate the need for a complete karyotype.

  1. A novel resource for genomics of Triticeae: BAC library specific for the short arm of rye (Secale cereale L.) chromosome 1R (1RS)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimková, Hana; Šafář, Jan; Suchánková, Pavla; Kovářová, Pavlína; Bartoš, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Janda, Jaroslav; Čihalíková, Jarmila; Mago, R.; Lelley, T.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 237 (2008), s. 101-109 ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/04/0607; GA ČR GP521/05/P257; GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : flow cytometry * flow-sorted chromosomes * BAC library Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.926, year: 2008

  2. The nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans uses a single specific proton pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Beek, Josy; Krause, Nils; Reimann, Joachim; Lachmann, Peter; Ädelroth, Pia

    2013-10-18

    The NO reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans reduces NO to N2O (2NO + 2H(+) + 2e(-) → N2O + H2O) with electrons donated by periplasmic cytochrome c (cytochrome c-dependent NO reductase; cNOR). cNORs are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily of integral membrane proteins, comprising the O2-reducing, proton-pumping respiratory enzymes. In contrast, although NO reduction is as exergonic as O2 reduction, there are no protons pumped in cNOR, and in addition, protons needed for NO reduction are derived from the periplasmic solution (no contribution to the electrochemical gradient is made). cNOR thus only needs to transport protons from the periplasm into the active site without the requirement to control the timing of opening and closing (gating) of proton pathways as is needed in a proton pump. Based on the crystal structure of a closely related cNOR and molecular dynamics simulations, several proton transfer pathways were suggested, and in principle, these could all be functional. In this work, we show that residues in one of the suggested pathways (denoted pathway 1) are sensitive to site-directed mutation, whereas residues in the other proposed pathways (pathways 2 and 3) could be exchanged without severe effects on turnover activity with either NO or O2. We further show that electron transfer during single-turnover reduction of O2 is limited by proton transfer and can thus be used to study alterations in proton transfer rates. The exchange of residues along pathway 1 showed specific slowing of this proton-coupled electron transfer as well as changes in its pH dependence. Our results indicate that only pathway 1 is used to transfer protons in cNOR.

  3. Coupling amplified DNA from flow-sorted chromosomes to high-density SNP mapping in barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartoš Jan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flow cytometry facilitates sorting of single chromosomes and chromosome arms which can be used for targeted genome analysis. However, the recovery of microgram amounts of DNA needed for some assays requires sorting of millions of chromosomes which is laborious and time consuming. Yet, many genomic applications such as development of genetic maps or physical mapping do not require large DNA fragments. In such cases time-consuming de novo sorting can be minimized by utilizing whole-genome amplification. Results Here we report a protocol optimized in barley including amplification of DNA from only ten thousand chromosomes, which can be isolated in less than one hour. Flow-sorted chromosomes were treated with proteinase K and amplified using Phi29 multiple displacement amplification (MDA. Overnight amplification in a 20-microlitre reaction produced 3.7 – 5.7 micrograms DNA with a majority of products between 5 and 30 kb. To determine the purity of sorted fractions and potential amplification bias we used quantitative PCR for specific genes on each chromosome. To extend the analysis to a whole genome level we performed an oligonucleotide pool assay (OPA for interrogation of 1524 loci, of which 1153 loci had known genetic map positions. Analysis of unamplified genomic DNA of barley cv. Akcent using this OPA resulted in 1426 markers with present calls. Comparison with three replicates of amplified genomic DNA revealed >99% concordance. DNA samples from amplified chromosome 1H and a fraction containing chromosomes 2H – 7H were examined. In addition to loci with known map positions, 349 loci with unknown map positions were included. Based on this analysis 40 new loci were mapped to 1H. Conclusion The results indicate a significant potential of using this approach for physical mapping. Moreover, the study showed that multiple displacement amplification of flow-sorted chromosomes is highly efficient and representative which

  4. New insights into human nondisjunction of chromosome 21 in oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Renee Oliver

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Nondisjunction of chromosome 21 is the leading cause of Down syndrome. Two risk factors for maternal nondisjunction of chromosome 21 are increased maternal age and altered recombination. In order to provide further insight on mechanisms underlying nondisjunction, we examined the association between these two well established risk factors for chromosome 21 nondisjunction. In our approach, short tandem repeat markers along chromosome 21 were genotyped in DNA collected from individuals with free trisomy 21 and their parents. This information was used to determine the origin of the nondisjunction error and the maternal recombination profile. We analyzed 615 maternal meiosis I and 253 maternal meiosis II cases stratified by maternal age. The examination of meiosis II errors, the first of its type, suggests that the presence of a single exchange within the pericentromeric region of 21q interacts with maternal age-related risk factors. This observation could be explained in two general ways: 1 a pericentromeric exchange initiates or exacerbates the susceptibility to maternal age risk factors or 2 a pericentromeric exchange protects the bivalent against age-related risk factors allowing proper segregation of homologues at meiosis I, but not segregation of sisters at meiosis II. In contrast, analysis of maternal meiosis I errors indicates that a single telomeric exchange imposes the same risk for nondisjunction, irrespective of the age of the oocyte. Our results emphasize the fact that human nondisjunction is a multifactorial trait that must be dissected into its component parts to identify specific associated risk factors.

  5. Enhanced chromatin accessibility of the dosage compensated Drosophila male X-chromosome requires the CLAMP zinc finger protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Jennifer; Kuzu, Guray; Bowman, Sarah; Scruggs, Benjamin; Henriques, Telmo; Kingston, Robert; Adelman, Karen; Tolstorukov, Michael; Larschan, Erica

    2017-01-01

    The essential process of dosage compensation is required to equalize gene expression of X-chromosome genes between males (XY) and females (XX). In Drosophila, the conserved Male-specific lethal (MSL) histone acetyltransferase complex mediates dosage compensation by increasing transcript levels from genes on the single male X-chromosome approximately two-fold. Consistent with its increased levels of transcription, the male X-chromosome has enhanced chromatin accessibility, distinguishing it from the autosomes. Here, we demonstrate that the non-sex-specific CLAMP (Chromatin-linked adaptor for MSL proteins) zinc finger protein that recognizes GA-rich sequences genome-wide promotes the specialized chromatin environment on the male X-chromosome and can act over long genomic distances (~14 kb). Although MSL complex is required for increasing transcript levels of X-linked genes, it is not required for enhancing global male X-chromosome chromatin accessibility, and instead works cooperatively with CLAMP to facilitate an accessible chromatin configuration at its sites of highest occupancy. Furthermore, CLAMP regulates chromatin structure at strong MSL complex binding sites through promoting recruitment of the Nucleosome Remodeling Factor (NURF) complex. In contrast to the X-chromosome, CLAMP regulates chromatin and gene expression on autosomes through a distinct mechanism that does not involve NURF recruitment. Overall, our results support a model where synergy between a non-sex-specific transcription factor (CLAMP) and a sex-specific cofactor (MSL) creates a specialized chromatin domain on the male X-chromosome.

  6. Dynamic mosaicism involving an unstable supernumerary der(22) chromosome in cat eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urioste, M; Visedo, G; Sanchís, A; Sentís, C; Villa, A; Ludeña, P; Hortigüela, J L; Martínez-Frías, M L; Fernández-Piqueras, J

    1994-01-01

    We have studied a girl, her sister and her mother who had a supernumerary marker chromosome in mosaicism. The marker was studied by cytogenetic methods and non-isotopic in situ hybridization with the single D22S9 DNA probe which maps to 22q11. The supernumerary chromosome was derived from a chromosome 22 and it did not present the same morphology in all the cells. At least 5 distinct types of the marker chromosome were detected and some of them were probably derived from each other (dynamic mosaicism). The proposita had an MCA pattern consistent with mild cat eye syndrome, while her sister and her mother had some of the manifestations described in this syndrome. A specific correlation could be established between phenotype and karyotype.

  7. Typing of Y chromosome SNPs with multiplex PCR methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2005-01-01

    We describe a method for the simultaneous typing of Y-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers by means of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategies that allow the detection of 35 Y chromosome SNPs on 25 amplicons from 100 to 200 pg of chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid...

  8. A single cognitive heuristic process meets the complexity of domain-specific moral heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubljević, Veljko; Racine, Eric

    2014-10-01

    The inherence heuristic (a) offers modest insights into the complex nature of both the is-ought tension in moral reasoning and moral reasoning per se, and (b) does not reflect the complexity of domain-specific moral heuristics. Formal and general in nature, we contextualize the process described as "inherence heuristic" in a web of domain-specific heuristics (e.g., agent specific; action specific; consequences specific).

  9. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  10. Chromosomal painting and ZW sex chromosomes differentiation in Characidium (Characiformes, Crenuchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artoni Roberto F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Characidium (a Neotropical fish group have a conserved diploid number (2n = 50, but show remarkable differences among species and populations in relation to sex chromosome systems and location of nucleolus organizer regions (NOR. In this study, we isolated a W-specific probe for the Characidium and characterized six Characidium species/populations using cytogenetic procedures. We analyzed the origin and differentiation of sex and NOR-bearing chromosomes by chromosome painting in populations of Characidium to reveal their evolution, phylogeny, and biogeography. Results A W-specific probe for efficient chromosome painting was isolated by microdissection and degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR amplification of W chromosomes from C. gomesi. The W probe generated weak signals dispersed on the proto sex chromosomes in C. zebra, dispersed signals in both W and Z chromosomes in C. lauroi and, in C. gomesi populations revealed a proximal site on the long arms of the Z chromosome and the entire W chromosome. All populations showed small terminal W probe sites in some autosomes. The 18S rDNA revealed distinctive patterns for each analyzed species/population with regard to proto sex chromosome, sex chromosome pair, and autosome location. Conclusions The results from dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (dual-color FISH using W and 18S rDNA probes allowed us to infer the putative evolutionary pathways for the differentiation of sex chromosomes and NORs, from structural rearrangements in a sex proto-chromosome, followed by gene erosion and heterochromatin amplification, morphological differentiation of the sex chromosomal pair, and NOR transposition, giving rise to the distinctive patterns observed among species/populations of Characidium. Biogeographic isolation and differentiation of sex chromosomes seem to have played a major role in the speciation process in this group of fish.

  11. Epigenetic-genetic chromosome dosage approach for fetal trisomy 21 detection using an autosomal genetic reference marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu K Tong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The putative promoter of the holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS gene on chromosome 21 is hypermethylated in placental tissues and could be detected as a fetal-specific DNA marker in maternal plasma. Detection of fetal trisomy 21 (T21 has been demonstrated by an epigenetic-genetic chromosome dosage approach where the amount of hypermethylated HLCS in maternal plasma is normalized using a fetal genetic marker on the Y chromosome as a chromosome dosage reference marker. We explore if this method can be applied on both male and female fetuses with the use of a paternally-inherited fetal single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP allele on a reference chromosome for chromosome dosage normalization. METHODOLOGY: We quantified hypermethylated HLCS molecules using methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease digestion followed by real-time or digital PCR analyses. For chromosome dosage analysis, we compared the amount of digestion-resistant HLCS to that of a SNP allele (rs6636, a C/G SNP that the fetus has inherited from the father but absent in the pregnant mother. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a fetal-specific SNP allele on a reference chromosome, we analyzed 20 euploid and nine T21 placental tissue samples. All samples with the fetal-specific C allele were correctly classified. One sample from each of the euploid and T21 groups were misclassified when the fetal-specific G allele was used as the reference marker. We then analyzed 33 euploid and 14 T21 maternal plasma samples. All but one sample from each of the euploid and T21 groups were correctly classified using the fetal-specific C allele, while correct classification was achieved for all samples using the fetal-specific G allele as the reference marker. CONCLUSIONS: As a proof-of-concept study, we have demonstrated that the epigenetic-genetic chromosome dosage approach can be applied to the prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 21 for both male and female fetuses.

  12. Radiation-induced genomic instability driven by de novo chromosomal rearrangement hot spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Allen, R.N.; Moore, S.R.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability has become generally recognized as a critical contributor to tumor progression by generating the necessary number of genetic alterations required for expression of a clinically significant malignancy. Our study of chromosomal instability investigates the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in instability acting predominantly in cis. Here we present an analysis of the karyotypic distribution of instability associated chromosomal rearrangements in TK6 and derivative human lymphoblasts. Karyotypic analysis performed on a total of 455 independent clones included 183 rearrangements distributed among 100 separate unstable clones. The results demonstrate that the breakpoints of chromosomal rearrangements in unstable clones are non-randomly distributed throughout the genome. This pattern is statistically significant, and incompatible with expectations for random breakage associated with loss or alteration of a trans-acting factor. Furthermore, specific chromosomal breakage hot spots associated with instability have been identified; these occur in several independent unstable clones and are often repeatedly broken and rejoined during the outgrowth of an individual clone. In complimentary studies, genomic instability was generated without any exposure to a DNA-damaging agent, but rather by transfection with alpha heterochromatin DNA. In a prospective analysis, human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11 were transfected with heterochromatic alpha DNA repeats and clones were analyzed by chromosome 11 painting. Transfection with alpha DNA was associated with karyotypic heterogeneity in 40% of clones examined; control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic heterogeneity

  13. Polymerase-free measurement of microRNA-122 with single base specificity using single molecule arrays: Detection of drug-induced liver injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Rissin

    Full Text Available We have developed a single probe method for detecting microRNA from human serum using single molecule arrays, with sequence specificity down to a single base, and without the use of amplification by polymerases. An abasic peptide nucleic acid (PNA probe-containing a reactive amine instead of a nucleotide at a specific position in the sequence-for detecting a microRNA was conjugated to superparamagnetic beads. These beads were incubated with a sample containing microRNA, a biotinylated reactive nucleobase-containing an aldehyde group-that was complementary to the missing base in the probe sequence, and a reducing agent. When a target molecule with an exact match in sequence hybridized to the capture probe, the reactive nucleobase was covalently attached to the backbone of the probe by a dynamic covalent chemical reaction. Single molecules of the biotin-labeled probe were then labeled with streptavidin-β-galactosidase (SβG, the beads were resuspended in a fluorogenic enzyme substrate, loaded into an array of femtoliter wells, and sealed with oil. The array was imaged fluorescently to determine which beads were associated with single enzymes, and the average number of enzymes per bead was determined. The assay had a limit of detection of 500 fM, approximately 500 times more sensitive than a corresponding analog bead-based assay, with target specificity down to a single base mis-match. This assay was used to measure microRNA-122 (miR-122-an established biomarker of liver toxicity-extracted from the serum of patients who had acute liver injury due to acetaminophen, and control healthy patients. All patients with liver injury had higher levels of miR-122 in their serum compared to controls, and the concentrations measured correlated well with those determined using RT-qPCR. This approach allows rapid quantification of circulating microRNA with single-based specificity and a limit of quantification suitable for clinical use.

  14. Micromechanical study of mitotic chromosome structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John

    2011-03-01

    Our group has developed micromanipulation techniques for study of the highly compacted mitotic form of chromosome found in eukaryote cells during cell division. Each metaphase chromosome contains two duplicate centimeter-long DNA molecules, folded up by proteins into cylindrical structures several microns in length. Native chromosomes display linear and reversible stretching behavior over a wide range of extensions (up to 5x native length for amphibian chromosomes), described by a Young modulus of about 300 Pa. Studies using DNA-cutting and protein-cutting enzymes have revealed that metaphase chromosomes behave as a network of chromatin fibers held together by protein-based isolated crosslinks. Our results are not consistent with the more classical model of loops of chromatin attached to a protein-based structural organizer or ``scaffold". In short, our experiments indicate that metaphase chromosomes can be considered to be ``gels" of chromatin; the stretching modulus of a whole chromosome is consistent with stretching of the chromatin fibers contained within it. Experiments using topoisomerases suggest that topological constraints may play an appreciable role in confining chromatin in the metaphase chromosome. Finally, recent experiments on human chromosomes will be reviewed, including results of experiments where chromosome-folding proteins are specifically depleted using siRNA methods. Supported by NSF-MCB-1022117, DMR-0715099, PHY-0852130, DMR-0520513, NCI 1U54CA143869-01 (NU-PS-OC), and the American Heart Association.

  15. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  16. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  17. Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis to AnalyzeSchizosaccharomyces pombeChromosomes and Chromosomal Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Chen-Chun; Walker, Carol; Humphrey, Timothy C

    2018-04-02

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) uses alternatively oriented pulsed electrical fields to separate large DNA molecules. Here, we describe PFGE protocols and conditions for separating and visualizing chromosomes between 0.5 and 6 Mb (optimal for analyzing the endogenous fission yeast chromosomes of 5.7, 4.6, and 3.5 Mb), and for shorter chromosomal elements of between 50 and 600 kb, such as the 530 kb Ch 16 minichromosome. In addition to determining chromosome size, this technique has a wide range of applications, including determining whether DNA replication or repair is complete, defining the molecular karyotype of cells, analyzing chromosomal rearrangements, assigning genes or constructs to particular chromosomes, and isolating DNA from specific chromosomes. © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies to liposomes enhances photosensitizer uptake and photodynamic therapy efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekgaarden, M.; van Vught, R.; Oliveira, S.; Roovers, R. C.; van Bergen En Henegouwen, P. M. P.; Pieters, R. J.; van Gulik, T. M.; Breukink, E.; Heger, M.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy for therapy-resistant cancers will greatly benefit from targeted delivery of tumor photosensitizing agents. In this study, a strategy for the site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies onto liposomes containing the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine was developed and

  19. Site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies to liposomes enhances photosensitizer uptake and photodynamic therapy efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekgaarden, M; van Vught, R; Oliveira, S; Roovers, R C; van Bergen en Henegouwen, P M P; Pieters, R J; Van Gulik, T M; Breukink, E; Heger, M

    2016-03-28

    Photodynamic therapy for therapy-resistant cancers will greatly benefit from targeted delivery of tumor photosensitizing agents. In this study, a strategy for the site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies onto liposomes containing the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine was developed and tested.

  20. A Segment of the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region Is Highly Microsyntenic Not Only between the Apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and Buffelgrass, But Also with a Rice Chromosome 11 Centromeric-Proximal Genomic Region1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, Gustavo; Conner, Joann A.; Morishige, Daryl T.; Moore, L. David; Mullet, John E.; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris), isolated with the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) marker ugt197, were assembled into contigs that were extended by chromosome walking. Gene-like sequences from contigs were identified by shotgun sequencing and BLAST searches, and used to isolate orthologous rice contigs. Additional gene-like sequences in the apomicts' contigs were identified by bioinformatics using fully sequenced BACs from orthologous rice contigs as templates, as well as by interspecies, whole-contig cross-hybridizations. Hierarchical contig orthology was rapidly assessed by constructing detailed long-range contig molecular maps showing the distribution of gene-like sequences and markers, and searching for microsyntenic patterns of sequence identity and spatial distribution within and across species contigs. We found microsynteny between P. squamulatum and buffelgrass contigs. Importantly, this approach also enabled us to isolate from within the rice (Oryza sativa) genome contig Rice A, which shows the highest microsynteny and is most orthologous to the ugt197-containing C1C buffelgrass contig. Contig Rice A belongs to the rice genome database contig 77 (according to the current September 12, 2003, rice fingerprint contig build) that maps proximal to the chromosome 11 centromere, a feature that interestingly correlates with the mapping of ASGR-linked BACs proximal to the centromere or centromere-like sequences. Thus, relatedness between these two orthologous contigs is supported both by their molecular microstructure and by their centromeric-proximal location. Our discoveries promote the use of a microsynteny-based positional-cloning approach using the rice genome as a template to aid in constructing the ASGR toward the isolation of genes underlying apospory. PMID:16415213

  1. A segment of the apospory-specific genomic region is highly microsyntenic not only between the apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and buffelgrass, but also with a rice chromosome 11 centromeric-proximal genomic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, Gustavo; Conner, Joann A; Morishige, Daryl T; Moore, L David; Mullet, John E; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2006-03-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris), isolated with the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) marker ugt197, were assembled into contigs that were extended by chromosome walking. Gene-like sequences from contigs were identified by shotgun sequencing and BLAST searches, and used to isolate orthologous rice contigs. Additional gene-like sequences in the apomicts' contigs were identified by bioinformatics using fully sequenced BACs from orthologous rice contigs as templates, as well as by interspecies, whole-contig cross-hybridizations. Hierarchical contig orthology was rapidly assessed by constructing detailed long-range contig molecular maps showing the distribution of gene-like sequences and markers, and searching for microsyntenic patterns of sequence identity and spatial distribution within and across species contigs. We found microsynteny between P. squamulatum and buffelgrass contigs. Importantly, this approach also enabled us to isolate from within the rice (Oryza sativa) genome contig Rice A, which shows the highest microsynteny and is most orthologous to the ugt197-containing C1C buffelgrass contig. Contig Rice A belongs to the rice genome database contig 77 (according to the current September 12, 2003, rice fingerprint contig build) that maps proximal to the chromosome 11 centromere, a feature that interestingly correlates with the mapping of ASGR-linked BACs proximal to the centromere or centromere-like sequences. Thus, relatedness between these two orthologous contigs is supported both by their molecular microstructure and by their centromeric-proximal location. Our discoveries promote the use of a microsynteny-based positional-cloning approach using the rice genome as a template to aid in constructing the ASGR toward the isolation of genes underlying apospory.

  2. Genomic structure, chromosomal localization and expression profile of a novel melanoma differentiation associated (mda-7) gene with cancer specific growth suppressing and apoptosis inducing properties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, E. Y.; Madireddi, M. T.; Gopalkrishnan, R. V.; Leszczyniecka, M.; Su, Z. Z.; Lebedeva, I. V.; Kang, D. C.; Jian, H.; Lin, J. J.; Alexandre, D.; Chen, Y.; Vozhilla, N.; Mei, M. X.; Christiansen, K. A.; Sivo, F.; Goldstein, N. I.; Chada, S.; Huberman, E.; Pestka, S.; Fisher, P. B.; Biochip Technology Center; Columbia Univ.; Introgen Therapeutics Inc.; UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    2001-10-25

    Abnormalities in cellular differentiation are frequent occurrences in human cancers. Treatment of human melanoma cells with recombinant fibroblast interferon (IFN-beta) and the protein kinase C activator mezerein (MEZ) results in an irreversible loss in growth potential, suppression of tumorigenic properties and induction of terminal cell differentiation. Subtraction hybridization identified melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7), as a gene induced during these physiological changes in human melanoma cells. Ectopic expression of mda-7 by means of a replication defective adenovirus results in growth suppression and induction of apoptosis in a broad spectrum of additional cancers, including melanoma, glioblastoma multiforme, osteosarcoma and carcinomas of the breast, cervix, colon, lung, nasopharynx and prostate. In contrast, no apparent harmful effects occur when mda-7 is expressed in normal epithelial or fibroblast cells. Human clones of mda-7 were isolated and its organization resolved in terms of intron/exon structure and chromosomal localization. Hu-mda-7 encompasses seven exons and six introns and encodes a protein with a predicted size of 23.8 kDa, consisting of 206 amino acids. Hu-mda-7 mRNA is stably expressed in the thymus, spleen and peripheral blood leukocytes. De novo mda-7 mRNA expression is also detected in human melanocytes and expression is inducible in cells of melanocyte/melanoma lineage and in certain normal and cancer cell types following treatment with a combination of IFN-beta plus MEZ. Mda-7 expression is also induced during megakaryocyte differentiation induced in human hematopoietic cells by treatment with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate). In contrast, de novo expression of mda-7 is not detected nor is it inducible by IFN-beta+MEZ in a spectrum of additional normal and cancer cells. No correlation was observed between induction of mda-7 mRNA expression and growth suppression following treatment with IFN-beta+MEZ and

  3. Highly macroscopically degenerated single-point ground states as source of specific heat capacity anomalies in magnetic frustrated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčišinová, E.; Jurčišin, M.

    2018-04-01

    Anomalies of the specific heat capacity are investigated in the framework of the exactly solvable antiferromagnetic spin- 1 / 2 Ising model in the external magnetic field on the geometrically frustrated tetrahedron recursive lattice. It is shown that the Schottky-type anomaly in the behavior of the specific heat capacity is related to the existence of unique highly macroscopically degenerated single-point ground states which are formed on the borders between neighboring plateau-like ground states. It is also shown that the very existence of these single-point ground states with large residual entropies predicts the appearance of another anomaly in the behavior of the specific heat capacity for low temperatures, namely, the field-induced double-peak structure, which exists, and should be observed experimentally, along with the Schottky-type anomaly in various frustrated magnetic system.

  4. Multiplex PCR for 17 Y-Chromosome Specific Short Tandem Repeats (STR to Enhance the Reliability of Fetal Sex Determination in Maternal Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zheng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to demonstrate the influence of target gene and amplification product length on the performance of fetal gender determination systems using maternal plasma. A total of 40 pairs of plasma DNA samples from pregnant women and genomic DNA samples from maternal blood, amniotic fluid and paternal blood were isolated for gender determination by amplification of the amelogenin gene and 17 Y-chromosome STR loci, using three different commercial kits. The gender of the fetuses was confirmed by cytogenetic analysis or phenotype at birth. Both the AmpFℓSTR-Identifiler amplification kit and the Mini-STR Amplification kit for amelogenin gene detection were reliable in determining fetal gender (92.0% and 96.0%, respectively, but false negatives were present in both systems. AmpFℓSTR-Yfiler was found to be fully reliable as it amplified Y-STR in all cases of pregnancies with male fetuses and thus was 100% correct in determining fetal gender. The results demonstrated that multiple fluorescent PCR for 17 Y-STR loci was more reliable than AMELY gene testing in fetal sex determination with maternal plasma. We also found that the shorter amplification products could improve the performance of fetal gender determination systems.

  5. A donor-specific QTL, exhibiting allelic variation for leaf sheath hairiness in a nested association mapping population, is located on barley chromosome 4H

    KAUST Repository

    Saade, Stephanie

    2017-12-07

    Leaf sheath hairiness is a morphological trait associated with various advantages, including tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, thereby increasing yield. Understanding the genetic basis of this trait in barley can therefore improve the agronomic performance of this economically important crop. We scored leaf sheath hairiness in a two-year field trial in 1,420 BC1S3 lines from the wild barley nested association mapping (NAM) population HEB-25. Leaf sheath hairiness segregated in six out of 25 families with the reference parent Barke being glabrous. We detected the major hairy leaf sheath locus Hs (syn. Hsh) on chromosome 4H (111.3 cM) with high precision. The effects of the locus varied across the six different wild barley donors, with donor of HEB family 11 conferring the highest score of leaf sheath hairiness. Due to the high mapping resolution present in HEB-25, we were able to discuss physically linked pentatricopeptide repeat genes and subtilisin-like proteases as potential candidate genes underlying this locus. In this study, we proved that HEB-25 provides an appropriate tool to further understand the genetic control of leaf sheath hairiness in barley. Furthermore, our work represents a perfect starting position to clone the gene responsible for the 4H locus observed.

  6. A donor-specific QTL, exhibiting allelic variation for leaf sheath hairiness in a nested association mapping population, is located on barley chromosome 4H.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Saade

    Full Text Available Leaf sheath hairiness is a morphological trait associated with various advantages, including tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, thereby increasing yield. Understanding the genetic basis of this trait in barley can therefore improve the agronomic performance of this economically important crop. We scored leaf sheath hairiness in a two-year field trial in 1,420 BC1S3 lines from the wild barley nested association mapping (NAM population HEB-25. Leaf sheath hairiness segregated in six out of 25 families with the reference parent Barke being glabrous. We detected the major hairy leaf sheath locus Hs (syn. Hsh on chromosome 4H (111.3 cM with high precision. The effects of the locus varied across the six different wild barley donors, with donor of HEB family 11 conferring the highest score of leaf sheath hairiness. Due to the high mapping resolution present in HEB-25, we were able to discuss physically linked pentatricopeptide repeat genes and subtilisin-like proteases as potential candidate genes underlying this locus. In this study, we proved that HEB-25 provides an appropriate tool to further understand the genetic control of leaf sheath hairiness in barley. Furthermore, our work represents a perfect starting position to clone the gene responsible for the 4H locus observed.

  7. An algorithm for automatic detection of chromosome aberrations induced by radiation using features of gray level profile across the main axis of chromosome image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Hironao; Imai, Katsuhiro; Fukuoka, Hideya; Yamamoto, Mikio; Hayata, Isamu.

    1990-01-01

    A simple algorithm for detecting chromosome aberrations induced by radiation is developed. Microscopic images of conventional Giemsa stained chromosomes of rearranged chromosomes (abnormal chromosomes) including dicentric chromosomes, ordinary acentric fragments, small acentric fragments, and acentric rings are used as samples. Variation of width along the main axis and gray level profile across the main axis of the chromosome image are used as features for classification. In 7 microscopic images which include 257 single chromosomes, 90.0% (231 chromosomes) are correctly classified into 6 categories and 23 of 26 abnormal chromosomes are correctly identified. As a result of discrimination between a normal and an abnormal chromosome, 95.3% of abnormal chromosomes are detected. (author)

  8. Semi-automatic laser beam microdissection of the Y chromosome and analysis of Y chromosome DNA in a dioecious plant, Silene latifolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, S.; Kawano, S.; Michimoto, T.; Higashiyama, T.; Nakao, S.; Sakai, A.; Kuroiwa, T.

    1999-01-01

    Silene latifolia has heteromorphic sex chromosomes, the X and Y chromosomes. The Y chromosome, which is thought to carry the male determining gene, was isolated by UV laser microdissection and amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR. In situ chromosome suppression of the amplified Y chromosome DNA in the presence of female genomic DNA as a competitor showed that the microdissected Y chromosome DNA did not specifically hybridize to the Y chromosome, but-hybridized to all chromosomes. This result suggests that the Y chromosome does not contain Y chromosome-enriched repetitive sequences. A repetitive sequence in the microdissected Y chromosome, RMY1, was isolated while screening repetitive sequences in the amplified Y chromosome. Part of the nucleotide sequence shared a similarity to that of X-43.1, which was isolated from microdissected X chromosomes. Since fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with RMY1 demonstrated that RMY1 was localized at the ends of the chromosome, RMY1 may be a subtelomeric repetitive sequence. Regarding the sex chromosomes, RMY1 was detected at both ends of the X chromosome and at one end near the pseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome. The different localization of RMY1 on the sex chromosomes provides a clue to the problem of how the sex chromosomes arose from autosomes

  9. Isolation of anonymous, polymorphic DNA fragments from human chromosome 22q12-qter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Dumanski (Jan); A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); M. Ruttledge (Martin); A. Wladis (Andreas); N. Sugawa (Noriaki); V.P. Collins (Peter); M. Nordenskjöld

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA series of 195 random chromosome 22-specific probes, equivalent to approximately 1% of the size of this chromosome, have been isolated from a chromosome 22-specific bacteriophage lambda genomic library. These probes were mapped to four different regions of chromosome 22 on a panel of

  10. Chromosome aberrations in solid tumors have a stochastic nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Mauro A.A. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600-anexo, Porto Alegre 90035-003 (Brazil) and Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2350, Porto Alegre 90035-903 (Brazil) and Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Porto Alegre 91501-970 (Brazil) and Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Rua Miguel Tostes 101, Canoas 92420-280 (Brazil)]. E-mail: mauro@ufrgs.br; Onsten, Tor G.H. [Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2350, Porto Alegre 90035-903 (Brazil); Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Rua Miguel Tostes 101, Canoas 92420-280 (Brazil); Moreira, Jose C.F. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600-anexo, Porto Alegre 90035-003 (Brazil); Almeida, Rita M.C. de [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Porto Alegre 91501-970 (Brazil)

    2006-08-30

    An important question nowadays is whether chromosome aberrations are random events or arise from an internal deterministic mechanism, which leads to the delicate task of quantifying the degree of randomness. For this purpose, we have defined several Shannon information functions to evaluate disorder inside a tumor and between tumors of the same kind. We have considered 79 different kinds of solid tumors with 30 or more karyotypes retrieved from the Mitelman Database of Chromosome Aberrations in Cancer. The Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival was also obtained for each solid tumor type in order to correlate data with tumor malignance. The results here show that aberration spread is specific for each tumor type, with high degree of diversity for those tumor types with worst survival indices. Those tumor types with preferential variants (e.g. high proportion of a given karyotype) have shown better survival statistics, indicating that aberration recurrence is a good prognosis. Indeed, global spread of both numerical and structural abnormalities demonstrates the stochastic nature of chromosome aberrations by setting a signature of randomness associated to the production of disorder. These results also indicate that tumor malignancy correlates not only with karyotypic diversity taken from different tumor types but also taken from single tumors. Therefore, by quantifying aberration spread, we could confront diverse models and verify which of them points to the most likely outcome. Our results suggest that the generating process of chromosome aberrations is neither deterministic nor totally random, but produces variations that are distributed between these two boundaries.

  11. Crucial Roles of Single Residues in Binding Affinity, Specificity, and Promiscuity in the Cellulosomal Cohesin-Dockerin Interface*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutzki, Michal; Reshef, Dan; Barak, Yoav; Haimovitz, Rachel; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A.; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cohesin and dockerin modules play a crucial role in the assembly of multienzyme cellulosome complexes. Although intraspecies cohesin and dockerin modules bind in general with high affinity but indiscriminately, cross-species binding is rare. Here, we combined ELISA-based experiments with Rosetta-based computational design to evaluate the contribution of distinct residues at the Clostridium thermocellum cohesin-dockerin interface to binding affinity, specificity, and promiscuity. We found that single mutations can show distinct and significant effects on binding affinity and specificity. In particular, mutations at cohesin position Asn37 show dramatic variability in their effect on dockerin binding affinity and specificity: the N37A mutant binds promiscuously both to cognate (C. thermocellum) as well as to non-cognate Clostridium cellulolyticum dockerin. N37L in turn switches binding specificity: compared with the wild-type C. thermocellum cohesin, this mutant shows significantly increased preference for C. cellulolyticum dockerin combined with strongly reduced binding to its cognate C. thermocellum dockerin. The observation that a single mutation can overcome the naturally observed specificity barrier provides insights into the evolutionary dynamics of this system that allows rapid modulation of binding specificity within a high affinity background. PMID:25833947

  12. Location and direction specificity in motion direction learning associated with a single-level method of constant stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying-Zi; Xie, Xin-Yu; Yu, Cong

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies reported significantly less location specificity in motion direction learning than in previous classical studies. The latter performed training with the method of constant stimuli containing a single level of direction difference. In contrast the former used staircase methods that varied the direction difference trial by trial. We suspect that extensive practice with a single direction difference could allow an observer to use some subtle local cues for direction discrimination. Such local cues may be unavailable at a new stimulus location, leading to higher location specificity. To test this hypothesis, we jittered slightly the directions of a stimulus pair by the same amount while keeping the direction difference constant, so as to disturb the potential local cues. We observed significantly more transfer of learning to untrained locations. The local cue effects may also explain the recent controversies regarding the finding that foveal motion direction learning becomes significantly more transferrable to a new direction with TPE (training-plus-exposure) training. One specific study by Zili Liu and collaborators that challenges this finding also used a single-level direction difference for training. We first replicated their results. But we found that if the directions of the stimulus pair were again jittered while the direction difference was kept constant, motion direction learning transferred significantly more to an orthogonal direction with TPE training. Our results thus demonstrate the importance of using appropriate psychophysical methods in training to reduce local-cue related specificity in perceptual learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    other human chromosomes. The presence of abnormal chromosomal number described in general as aneuploidy, here trisomy, is observed in certain other syndromes too. Trisomies of chromosome 18, 13,22,8,9 and X are known. Children with these 'numerical' anomalies have severe and complex malformations. Mental ...

  14. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  15. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric

  16. Liver-Specific Deletion of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog Deleted on Chromosome 10 Significantly Ameliorates Chronic EtOH-Induced Increases in Hepatocellular Damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin T Shearn

    Full Text Available Alcoholic liver disease is a significant contributor to global liver failure. In murine models, chronic ethanol consumption dysregulates PTEN/Akt signaling. Hepatospecific deletion of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTENLKO mice possess constitutive activation of Akt(s and increased de novo lipogenesis resulting in increased hepatocellular steatosis. This makes PTENLKO a viable model to examine the effects of ethanol in an environment of preexisting steatosis. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of chronic ethanol consumption and the absence of PTEN (PTENLKO compared to Alb-Cre control mice (PTENf/f on hepatocellular damage as evidenced by changes in lipid accumulation, protein carbonylation and alanine amino transferase (ALT. In the control PTENf/f animals, ethanol significantly increased ALT, liver triglycerides and steatosis. In contrast, chronic ethanol consumption in PTENLKO mice decreased hepatocellular damage when compared to PTENLKO pair-fed controls. Consumption of ethanol elevated protein carbonylation in PTENf/f animals but had no effect in PTENLKO animals. In PTENLKO mice, overall hepatic mRNA expression of genes that contribute to GSH homeostasis as well as reduced glutathione (GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG concentrations were significantly elevated compared to respective PTENf/f counterparts. These data indicate that during conditions of constitutive Akt activation and steatosis, increased GSH homeostasis assists in mitigation of ethanol-dependent induction of oxidative stress and hepatocellular damage. Furthermore, data herein suggest a divergence in EtOH-induced hepatocellular damage and increases in steatosis due to polyunsaturated fatty acids downstream of PTEN.

  17. Independent Evolution of Transcriptional Inactivation on Sex Chromosomes in Birds and Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livernois, Alexandra M.; Waters, Shafagh A.; Deakin, Janine E.; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A.; Waters, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation in eutherian mammals has been thought to be tightly controlled, as expected from a mechanism that compensates for the different dosage of X-borne genes in XX females and XY males. However, many X genes escape inactivation in humans, inactivation of the X in marsupials is partial, and the unrelated sex chromosomes of monotreme mammals have incomplete and gene-specific inactivation of X-linked genes. The bird ZW sex chromosome system represents a third independently evolved amniote sex chromosome system with dosage compensation, albeit partial and gene-specific, via an unknown mechanism (i.e. upregulation of the single Z in females, down regulation of one or both Zs in males, or a combination). We used RNA-fluorescent in situ hybridization (RNA-FISH) to demonstrate, on individual fibroblast cells, inactivation of 11 genes on the chicken Z and 28 genes on the X chromosomes of platypus. Each gene displayed a reproducible frequency of 1Z/1X-active and 2Z/2X-active cells in the homogametic sex. Our results indicate that the probability of inactivation is controlled on a gene-by-gene basis (or small domains) on the chicken Z and platypus X chromosomes. This regulatory mechanism must have been exapted independently to the non-homologous sex chromosomes in birds and mammals in response to an over-expressed Z or X in the homogametic sex, highlighting the universal importance that (at least partial) silencing plays in the evolution on amniote dosage compensation and, therefore, the differentiation of sex chromosomes. PMID:23874231

  18. Independent evolution of transcriptional inactivation on sex chromosomes in birds and mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M Livernois

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation in eutherian mammals has been thought to be tightly controlled, as expected from a mechanism that compensates for the different dosage of X-borne genes in XX females and XY males. However, many X genes escape inactivation in humans, inactivation of the X in marsupials is partial, and the unrelated sex chromosomes of monotreme mammals have incomplete and gene-specific inactivation of X-linked genes. The bird ZW sex chromosome system represents a third independently evolved amniote sex chromosome system with dosage compensation, albeit partial and gene-specific, via an unknown mechanism (i.e. upregulation of the single Z in females, down regulation of one or both Zs in males, or a combination. We used RNA-fluorescent in situ hybridization (RNA-FISH to demonstrate, on individual fibroblast cells, inactivation of 11 genes on the chicken Z and 28 genes on the X chromosomes of platypus. Each gene displayed a reproducible frequency of 1Z/1X-active and 2Z/2X-active cells in the homogametic sex. Our results indicate that the probability of inactivation is controlled on a gene-by-gene basis (or small domains on the chicken Z and platypus X chromosomes. This regulatory mechanism must have been exapted independently to the non-homologous sex chromosomes in birds and mammals in response to an over-expressed Z or X in the homogametic sex, highlighting the universal importance that (at least partial silencing plays in the evolution on amniote dosage compensation and, therefore, the differentiation of sex chromosomes.

  19. Combined array-comparative genomic hybridization and single-nucleotide polymorphism-loss of heterozygosity analysis reveals complex changes and multiple forms of chromosomal instability in colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaasenbeek, Michelle; Howarth, Kimberley; Rowan, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    (CGH) for copy number changes and single-copy number polymorphism (SNP) microarrays for allelic loss (LOH). Many array-based CGH changes were not found by LOH because they did not cause true reduction-to-homozygosity. Conversely, many regions of SNP-LOH occurred in the absence of copy number change...

  20. Identification of a sodium chloride-regulated promoter in Lactococcus lactis by single-copy chromosomal fusion with a reporter gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, J.W.; Venema, G.; Kok, J.; Leenhouts, K.

    An integration vector, pORI13, was developed to screen in Lactococcus lactis for expression signals induced by changes in the environment and to assay transcriptional activity of genes in single copy. The plasmid carries a promoterless Escherichia coli lacZ gene preceded by a start codon, a

  1. Sequence-specific RNA Photocleavage by Single-stranded DNA in Presence of Riboflavin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongyun; Chen, Gangyi; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Dong, Juan; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Constant efforts have been made to develop new method to realize sequence-specific RNA degradation, which could cause inhibition of the expression of targeted gene. Herein, by using an unmodified short DNA oligonucleotide for sequence recognition and endogenic small molecue, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) as photosensitizer, we report a simple strategy to realize the sequence-specific photocleavage of targeted RNA. The DNA strand is complimentary to the target sequence to form DNA/RNA duplex containing a G•U wobble in the middle. The cleavage reaction goes through oxidative elimination mechanism at the nucleoside downstream of U of the G•U wobble in duplex to obtain unnatural RNA terminal, and the whole process is under tight control by using light as switch, which means the cleavage could be carried out according to specific spatial and temporal requirements. The biocompatibility of this method makes the DNA strand in combination with riboflavin a promising molecular tool for RNA manipulation.

  2. Sequence-specific RNA Photocleavage by Single-stranded DNA in Presence of Riboflavin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongyun; Chen, Gangyi; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Dong, Juan; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-10-13

    Constant efforts have been made to develop new method to realize sequence-specific RNA degradation, which could cause inhibition of the expression of targeted gene. Herein, by using an unmodified short DNA oligonucleotide for sequence recognition and endogenic small molecule, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) as photosensitizer, we report a simple strategy to realize the sequence-specific photocleavage of targeted RNA. The DNA strand is complimentary to the target sequence to form DNA/RNA duplex containing a G • U wobble in the middle. The cleavage reaction goes through oxidative elimination mechanism at the nucleoside downstream of U of the G • U wobble in duplex to obtain unnatural RNA terminal, and the whole process is under tight control by using light as switch, which means the cleavage could be carried out according to specific spatial and temporal requirements. The biocompatibility of this method makes the DNA strand in combination with riboflavin a promising molecular tool for RNA manipulation.

  3. [Treating specific childhood phobia in a single session? A systematic review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fond, G; Franc, N

    2013-04-01

    The essential feature of specific phobia is a persistent fear of clearly discernable, circumscribed objects or situations. The DSM-IV distinguishes four subtypes: animal, natural environment, blood-injection-injury, and situational. Specific phobias frequently co-occur. Specific phobia is one of the most common psychiatric disorders with a lifetime prevalence of 12.5% and is about twice as common in women as in men. Most phobias have a childhood onset except for the situational subtype which usually occurs during patients' twenties. It is well known that childhood anxiety increases the risk of psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety in later life, as well as the risk of suicide attempts and psychiatric hospitalization. Nonetheless, there are few studies on the psychobiology and pharmacotherapy of specific phobias. Neuroimaging studies have shown that specific phobia seems to be associated with amygdala (more specifically the right amygdala) and anterior cingulate cortex hyperactivation that is reduced after exposure therapy. The aim of this study is to propose the first systematic review of specific phobia treatment among children. The review follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement guidelines. Two databases (Medline and Web of Science) were searched combining the search terms: specific phobia and treatment. English and French language were imposed. There were no publication date or publication status limitations. Seventy-four studies met the inclusion criteria and 36 were included. The goal of treatment is to achieve habituation and eventual extinction of the phobic reaction. Treatments for children's anxiety have been suggested to work through diverse processes such as counter-conditioning, extinction, habituation, change in catastrophic cognitions, development of coping skills, increased self-efficacy, emotional processing, and changes in expectancies and perceptions of dangerousness. Most

  4. Spectral Weighting Functions for Single-symbol Phase-noise Specifications in OFDM Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, F.W.; Schiphorst, Roelof; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2003-01-01

    For the specification of phase-noise requirements for the front-end of a HiperLAN/2 system we investigated available literature on the subject. Literature differed in several aspects. One aspect is in the type of phase-noise used (Wiener phase-noise or small-angle phase noise). A Wiener phase-noise

  5. Specific heat and magnetism of a UIrGe single crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sechovský, V.; Vejpravová, J.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Honda, F.; Prokeš, K.; Šantavá, Eva

    359-361, - (2005), s. 1126-1128 ISSN 0921-4526 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : uranium intermetallics * antiferromagnetism * magnetic anisotropy * specific heat Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.796, year: 2005

  6. VNAR single-domain antibodies specific for BAFF inhibit B cell development by molecular mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häsler, Julien; Flajnik, Martin F; Williams, Gareth; Walsh, Frank S; Rutkowski, J Lynn

    2016-07-01

    B cell-activating factor (BAFF) plays a dominant role in the B cell homeostasis. However, excessive BAFF promotes the development of autoreactive B-cells and several antibodies have been developed to block its activity. Bispecific antibodies with added functionality represent the next wave of biologics that may be more effective in the treatment of complex autoimmune disease. The single variable domain from the immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (VNAR) is one of the smallest antibody recognition units that could be combined with monospecific antibodies to develop bispecific agents. We isolated a panel of BAFF-binding VNARs with low nM potency from a semi-synthetic phage display library and examined their functional activity. The anti-BAFF VNARs blocked the binding of BAFF to all three of its receptors (BR3, TACI and BCMA) and the presence of the conserved DXL receptor motif found in the CDR3 regions suggests molecular mimicry as the mechanism of antagonism. One clone was formatted as an Fc fusion for functional testing and it was found to inhibit both mouse and human BAFF with equal potency ex vivo in a splenocyte proliferation assay. In mice, subchronic administration reduced the number of immature and transitional intermediates B cells and mature B cell subsets. These results indicate that VNAR single domain antibodies function as selective B-cell inhibitors and offer an alternative molecular format for targeting B-cell disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simultaneous Measurement of Thermal Conductivity and Specific Heat in a Single TDTR Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fangyuan; Wang, Xinwei; Yang, Ming; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Hang; Tang, Dawei

    2018-01-01

    Time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) technique is a powerful thermal property measurement method, especially for nano-structures and material interfaces. Thermal properties can be obtained by fitting TDTR experimental data with a proper thermal transport model. In a single TDTR experiment, thermal properties with different sensitivity trends can be extracted simultaneously. However, thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity usually have similar trends in sensitivity for most materials; it is difficult to measure them simultaneously. In this work, we present a two-step data fitting method to measure the thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity simultaneously from a set of TDTR experimental data at single modulation frequency. This method takes full advantage of the information carried by both amplitude and phase signals; it is a more convenient and effective solution compared with the frequency-domain thermoreflectance method. The relative error is lower than 5 % for most cases. A silicon wafer sample was measured by TDTR method to verify the two-step fitting method.

  8. Painting of fourth and chromosome-wide regulation of the 4th chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna-Mia; Stenberg, Per; Bernhardsson, Carolina; Larsson, Jan

    2007-05-02

    Drosophila melanogaster exhibits two expression-regulating systems that target whole, specific chromosomes: the dosage compensation system whereby the male-specific lethal complex doubles transcription of genes on the male X-chromosome and the chromosome 4-specific protein Painting of fourth, POF. POF is the first example of an autosome-specific protein and its presence raises the question of the universality of chromosome-specific regulation. Here we show that POF and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) are involved in the global regulation of the 4th chromosome. Contrary to previous conclusions, Pof is not essential for survival of diplo-4th karyotype flies. However, Pof is essential for survival of haplo-4th individuals and expression of chromosome 4 genes in diplo-4th individuals is decreased in the absence of Pof. Mapping of POF using chromatin immunoprecipitation suggested that it binds within genes. Furthermore, we show that POF binding is dependent on heterochromatin and that POF and HP1 bind interdependently to the 4th chromosome. We propose a balancing mechanism involving POF and HP1 that provides a feedback system for fine-tuning expression status of genes on the 4th chromosome.

  9. Karyotypic Determinants of Chromosome Instability in Aneuploid Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, William D.; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies in cancer cells and budding yeast demonstrated that aneuploidy, the state of having abnormal chromosome numbers, correlates with elevated chromosome instability (CIN), i.e. the propensity of gaining and losing chromosomes at a high frequency. Here we have investigated ploidy- and chromosome-specific determinants underlying aneuploidy-induced CIN by observing karyotype dynamics in fully isogenic aneuploid yeast strains with ploidies between 1N and 2N obtained through a random meiotic process. The aneuploid strains exhibited various levels of whole-chromosome instability (i.e. chromosome gains and losses). CIN correlates with cellular ploidy in an unexpected way: cells with a chromosomal content close to the haploid state are significantly more stable than cells displaying an apparent ploidy between 1.5 and 2N. We propose that the capacity for accurate chromosome segregation by the mitotic system does not scale continuously with an increasing number of chromosomes, but may occur via discrete steps each time a full set of chromosomes is added to the genome. On top of such general ploidy-related effect, CIN is also associated with the presence of specific aneuploid chromosomes as well as dosage imbalance between specific chromosome pairs. Our findings potentially help reconcile the divide between gene-centric versus genome-centric theories in cancer evolution. PMID:22615582

  10. Dynamic sex chromosomes in Old World chameleons (Squamata: Chamaeleonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S V; Banks, J L; Diaz, R E; Trainor, P A; Gamble, T

    2018-01-18

    Much of our current state of knowledge concerning sex chromosome evolution is based on a handful of 'exceptional' taxa with heteromorphic sex chromosomes. However, classifying the sex chromosome systems of additional species lacking easily identifiable, heteromorphic sex chromosomes is indispensable if we wish to fully understand the genesis, degeneration and turnover of vertebrate sex chromosomes. Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are a potential model clade for studying sex chromosome evolution as they exhibit a suite of sex-determining modes yet most species lack heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Only three (of 203) chameleon species have identified sex chromosome systems (all with female heterogamety, ZZ/ZW). This study uses a recently developed method to identify sex-specific genetic markers from restriction site-associated DNA sequence (RADseq) data, which enables the identification of sex chromosome systems in species lacking heteromorphic sex chromosomes. We used RADseq and subsequent PCR validation to identify an XX/XY sex chromosome system in the veiled chameleon (Chamaeleo calyptratus), revealing a novel transition in sex chromosome systems within the Chamaeleonidae. The sex-specific genetic markers identified here will be essential in research focused on sex-specific, comparative, functional and developmental evolutionary questions, further promoting C. calyptratus' utility as an emerging model organism. © 2018 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2018 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  11. Centromere-associated protein-E is essential for the mammalian mitotic checkpoint to prevent aneuploidy due to single chromosome loss

    OpenAIRE

    Weaver, Beth A.A.; Bonday, Zahid Q.; Putkey, Frances R.; Kops, Geert J.P.L.; Silk, Alain D.; Cleveland, Don W.

    2003-01-01

    Centromere-associated protein-E (CENP-E) is an essential mitotic kinesin that is required for efficient, stable microtubule capture at kinetochores. It also directly binds to BubR1, a kinetochore-associated kinase implicated in the mitotic checkpoint, the major cell cycle control pathway in which unattached kinetochores prevent anaphase onset. Here, we show that single unattached kinetochores depleted of CENP-E cannot block entry into anaphase, resulting in aneuploidy in 25% of divisions in p...

  12. The Inner Centromere Protein (INCENP) Coil Is a Single α-Helix (SAH) Domain That Binds Directly to Microtubules and Is Important for Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC) Localization and Function in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samejima, Kumiko; Platani, Melpomeni; Wolny, Marcin; Ogawa, Hiromi; Vargiu, Giulia; Knight, Peter J; Peckham, Michelle; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-08-28

    The chromosome passenger complex (CPC) is a master regulator of mitosis. Inner centromere protein (INCENP) acts as a scaffold regulating CPC localization and activity. During early mitosis, the N-terminal region of INCENP forms a three-helix bundle with Survivin and Borealin, directing the CPC to the inner centromere where it plays essential roles in chromosome alignment and the spindle assembly checkpoint. The C-terminal IN box region of INCENP is responsible for binding and activating Aurora B kinase. The central region of INCENP has been proposed to comprise a coiled coil domain acting as a spacer between the N- and C-terminal domains that is involved in microtubule binding and regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Here we show that the central region (213 residues) of chicken INCENP is not a coiled coil but a ∼ 32-nm-long single α-helix (SAH) domain. The N-terminal half of this domain directly binds to microtubules in vitro. By analogy with previous studies of myosin 10, our data suggest that the INCENP SAH might stretch up to ∼ 80 nm under physiological forces. Thus, the INCENP SAH could act as a flexible "dog leash," allowing Aurora B to phosphorylate dynamic substrates localized in the outer kinetochore while at the same time being stably anchored to the heterochromatin of the inner centromere. Furthermore, by achieving this flexibility via an SAH domain, the CPC avoids a need for dimerization (required for coiled coil formation), which would greatly complicate regulation of the proximity-induced trans-phosphorylation that is critical for Aurora B activation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Mycobacterial nonhomologous end joining mediates mutagenic repair of chromosomal double-strand DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanou, Nicolas C; Gao, Feng; Bongiorno, Paola; Ehrt, Sabine; Schnappinger, Dirk; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2007-07-01

    Bacterial nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a recently described DNA repair pathway best characterized in mycobacteria. Bacterial NHEJ proteins LigD and Ku have been analyzed biochemically, and their roles in linear plasmid repair in vivo have been verified genetically; yet the contributions of NHEJ to repair of chromosomal DNA damage are unknown. Here we use an extensive set of NHEJ- and homologous recombination (HR)-deficient Mycobacterium smegmatis strains to probe the importance of HR and NHEJ in repairing diverse types of chromosomal DNA damage. An M. smegmatis Delta recA Delta ku double mutant has no apparent growth defect in vitro. Loss of the NHEJ components Ku and LigD had no effect on sensitivity to UV radiation, methyl methanesulfonate, or quinolone antibiotics. NHEJ deficiency had no effect on sensitivity to ionizing radiation in logarithmic- or early-stationary-phase cells but was required for ionizing radiation resistance in late stationary phase in 7H9 but not LB medium. In addition, NHEJ components were required for repair of I-SceI mediated chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs), and in the absence of HR, the NHEJ pathway rapidly mutates the chromosomal break site. The molecular outcomes of NHEJ-mediated chromosomal DSB repair involve predominantly single-nucleotide insertions at the break site, similar to previous findings using plasmid substrates. These findings demonstrate that prokaryotic NHEJ is specifically required for DSB repair in late stationary phase and can mediate mutagenic repair of homing endonuclease-generated chromosomal DSBs.

  14. Induction of specific neuron types by overexpression of single transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teratani-Ota, Yusuke; Yamamizu, Kohei; Piao, Yulan; Sharova, Lioudmila; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S H; Sharov, Alexei A

    2016-10-01

    Specific neuronal types derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can facilitate mechanistic studies and potentially aid in regenerative medicine. Existing induction methods, however, mostly rely on the effects of the combined action of multiple added growth factors, which generally tend to result in mixed populations of neurons. Here, we report that overexpression of specific transcription factors (TFs) in ESCs can rather guide the differentiation of ESCs towards specific neuron lineages. Analysis of data on gene expression changes 2 d after induction of each of 185 TFs implicated candidate TFs for further ESC differentiation studies. Induction of 23 TFs (out of 49 TFs tested) for 6 d facilitated neural differentiation of ESCs as inferred from increased proportion of cells with neural progenitor marker PSA-NCAM. We identified early activation of the Notch signaling pathway as a common feature of most potent inducers of neural differentiation. The majority of neuron-like cells generated by induction of Ascl1, Smad7, Nr2f1, Dlx2, Dlx4, Nr2f2, Barhl2, and Lhx1 were GABA-positive and expressed other markers of GABAergic neurons. In the same way, we identified Lmx1a and Nr4a2 as inducers for neurons bearing dopaminergic markers and Isl1, Fezf2, and St18 for cholinergic motor neurons. A time-course experiment with induction of Ascl1 showed early upregulation of most neural-specific messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNAs (miRNAs). Sets of Ascl1-induced mRNAs and miRNAs were enriched in Ascl1 targets. In further studies, enrichment of cells obtained with the induction of Ascl1, Smad7, and Nr2f1 using microbeads resulted in essentially pure population of neuron-like cells with expression profiles similar to neural tissues and expressed markers of GABAergic neurons. In summary, this study indicates that induction of transcription factors is a promising approach to generate cultures that show the transcription profiles characteristic of specific neural cell types.

  15. A single sex pheromone receptor determines chemical response specificity of sexual behavior in the silkmoth Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sakurai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In insects and other animals, intraspecific communication between individuals of the opposite sex is mediated in part by chemical signals called sex pheromones. In most moth species, male moths rely heavily on species-specific sex pheromones emitted by female moths to identify and orient towards an appropriate mating partner among a large number of sympatric insect species. The silkmoth, Bombyx mori, utilizes the simplest possible pheromone system, in which a single pheromone component, (E, Z-10,12-hexadecadienol (bombykol, is sufficient to elicit full sexual behavior. We have previously shown that the sex pheromone receptor BmOR1 mediates specific detection of bombykol in the antennae of male silkmoths. However, it is unclear whether the sex pheromone receptor is the minimally sufficient determination factor that triggers initiation of orientation behavior towards a potential mate. Using transgenic silkmoths expressing the sex pheromone receptor PxOR1 of the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella in BmOR1-expressing neurons, we show that the selectivity of the sex pheromone receptor determines the chemical response specificity of sexual behavior in the silkmoth. Bombykol receptor neurons expressing PxOR1 responded to its specific ligand, (Z-11-hexadecenal (Z11-16:Ald, in a dose-dependent manner. Male moths expressing PxOR1 exhibited typical pheromone orientation behavior and copulation attempts in response to Z11-16:Ald and to females of P. xylostella. Transformation of the bombykol receptor neurons had no effect on their projections in the antennal lobe. These results indicate that activation of bombykol receptor neurons alone is sufficient to trigger full sexual behavior. Thus, a single gene defines behavioral selectivity in sex pheromone communication in the silkmoth. Our findings show that a single molecular determinant can not only function as a modulator of behavior but also as an all-or-nothing initiator of a complex species-specific

  16. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  17. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications......The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...

  18. The Antiviral Mechanism of an Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein-Specific Single-Domain Antibody Fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanke, Leo; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Brewer, R. Camille; van Diest, Eline; Schmidt, Florian I.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L. (Whitehead); (MIT)

    2016-12-13

    Alpaca-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that target the influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP) can protect cells from infection when expressed in the cytosol. We found that one such VHH, αNP-VHH1, exhibits antiviral activity similar to that of Mx proteins by blocking nuclear import of incoming viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) and viral transcription and replication in the nucleus. We determined a 3.2-Å crystal structure of αNP-VHH1 in complex with influenza A virus NP. The VHH binds to a nonconserved region on the body domain of NP, which has been associated with binding to host factors and serves as a determinant of host range. Several of the NP/VHH interface residues determine sensitivity of NP to antiviral Mx GTPases. The structure of the NP/αNP-VHH1 complex affords a plausible explanation for the inhibitory properties of the VHH and suggests a rationale for the antiviral properties of Mx proteins. Such knowledge can be leveraged for much-needed novel antiviral strategies.

    IMPORTANCEInfluenza virus strains can rapidly escape from protection afforded by seasonal vaccines or acquire resistance to available drugs. Additional ways to interfere with the virus life cycle are therefore urgently needed. The influenza virus nucleoprotein is one promising target for antiviral interventions. We have previously isolated alpaca-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that protect cells from influenza virus infection if expressed intracellularly. We show here that one such VHH exhibits antiviral activities similar to those of proteins of the cellular antiviral defense (Mx proteins). We determined the three-dimensional structure of this VHH in complex with the influenza virus nucleoprotein and identified the interaction site, which overlaps regions that determine sensitivity of the virus to Mx proteins. Our data define a new vulnerability of influenza virus, help us to better understand the cellular antiviral mechanisms, and

  19. The Antiviral Mechanism of an Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein-Specific Single-Domain Antibody Fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Leo; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Brewer, R Camille; van Diest, Eline; Schmidt, Florian I; Schwartz, Thomas U; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2016-12-13

    Alpaca-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that target the influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP) can protect cells from infection when expressed in the cytosol. We found that one such VHH, αNP-VHH1, exhibits antiviral activity similar to that of Mx proteins by blocking nuclear import of incoming viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) and viral transcription and replication in the nucleus. We determined a 3.2-Å crystal structure of αNP-VHH1 in complex with influenza A virus NP. The VHH binds to a nonconserved region on the body domain of NP, which has been associated with binding to host factors and serves as a determinant of host range. Several of the NP/VHH interface residues determine sensitivity of NP to antiviral Mx GTPases. The structure of the NP/αNP-VHH1 complex affords a plausible explanation for the inhibitory properties of the VHH and suggests a rationale for the antiviral properties of Mx proteins. Such knowledge can be leveraged for much-needed novel antiviral strategies. Influenza virus strains can rapidly escape from protection afforded by seasonal vaccines or acquire resistance to available drugs. Additional ways to interfere with the virus life cycle are therefore urgently needed. The influenza virus nucleoprotein is one promising target for antiviral interventions. We have previously isolated alpaca-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that protect cells from influenza virus infection if expressed intracellularly. We show here that one such VHH exhibits antiviral activities similar to those of proteins of the cellular antiviral defense (Mx proteins). We determined the three-dimensional structure of this VHH in complex with the influenza virus nucleoprotein and identified the interaction site, which overlaps regions that determine sensitivity of the virus to Mx proteins. Our data define a new vulnerability of influenza virus, help us to better understand the cellular antiviral mechanisms, and provide a well-characterized tool to

  20. A new imprinted cluster on the human chromosome 7q21-q31, identified by human-mouse monochromosomal hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Chiga; Meguro, Makiko; Hoshiya, Hidetoshi; Haruta, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Yu-ki; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2003-06-01

    We have previously established a series of human monochromosomal hybrids containing a single human chromosome of defined parental origin as an in vitro resource for the investigation of human imprinted loci. Using the hybrids with a paternal or maternal human chromosome 7, we determined the allelic expression profiles of 76 ESTs mapped to the human chromosome 7q21-q31. Seven genes/transcripts, including PEG10 which has previously been reported to be imprinted, showed parent-of-origin-specific expression in monochromosomal hybrids. One of the 6 candidate genes/transcripts, i.e., DLX5 was confirmed to be imprinted in normal human lymphoblasts and brain tissues by a polymorphic analysis. Thus, an imprinted domain has been newly defined in the region of human chromosome 7q21-q31 using human-mouse monochromosomal hybrids.

  1. Avian sex, sex chromosomes, and dosage compensation in the age of genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2014-04-01

    Comparisons of the sex chromosome systems in birds and mammals are widening our view and deepening our understanding of vertebrate sex chromosome organization, function, and evolution. Birds have a very conserved ZW system of sex determination in which males have two copies of a large, gene-rich Z chromosome, and females have a single Z and a female-specific W chromosome. The avian ZW system is quite the reverse of the well-studied mammalian XY chromosome system, and evolved independently from different autosomal blocs. Despite the different gene content of mammal and bird sex chromosomes, there are many parallels. Genes on the bird Z and the mammal X have both undergone selection for male-advantage functions, and there has been amplification of male-advantage genes and accumulation of LINEs. The bird W and mammal Y have both undergone extensive degradation, but some birds retain early stages and some mammals terminal stages of the process, suggesting that the process is more advanced in mammals. Different sex-determining genes, DMRT1 and SRY, define the ZW and XY systems, but DMRT1 is involved in downstream events in mammals. Birds show strong cell autonomous specification of somatic sex differences in ZZ and ZW tissue, but there is growing evidence for direct X chromosome effects on sexual phenotype in mammals. Dosage compensation in birds appears to be phenotypically and molecularly quite different from X inactivation, being partial and gene-specific, but both systems use tools from the same molecular toolbox and there are some signs that galliform birds represent an early stage in the evolution of a coordinated system.

  2. Quantitative Molecular Imaging with a Single Gd-Based Contrast Agent Reveals Specific Tumor Binding and Retention in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mette L; Gao, Ying; Hutnick, Melanie A; Craig, Sonya E L; Pokorski, Jonathan K; Flask, Chris A; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2017-06-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, especially cancer. However, the poor sensitivity of MRI relative to other imaging modalities, such as PET, has hindered the development and clinical use of molecular MRI contrast agents that could provide vital diagnostic information by specifically locating a molecular target altered in the disease process. This work describes the specific and sustained in vivo binding and retention of a protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ)-targeted, molecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent with a single gadolinium (Gd) chelate using a quantitative MRI T 1 mapping technique in glioma xenografts. Quantitative T 1 mapping is an imaging method used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time, the T 1 relaxation time, of protons in a magnetic field after excitation by a radiofrequency pulse. T 1 relaxation times can in turn be used to calculate the concentration of a gadolinium-containing contrast agent in a region of interest, thereby allowing the retention or clearance of an agent to be quantified. In this context, retention is a measure of molecular contrast agent binding. Using conventional peptide chemistry, a PTPμ-targeted peptide was linked to a chelator that had been conjugated to a lysine residue. Following complexation with Gd, this PTPμ-targeted molecular contrast agent containing a single Gd ion showed significant tumor enhancement and a sustained increase in Gd concentration in both heterotopic and orthotopic tumors using dynamic quantitative MRI. This single Gd-containing PTPμ agent was more effective than our previous version with three Gd ions. Differences between nonspecific and specific agents, due to specific tumor binding, can be determined within the first 30 min after agent administration by examining clearance rates. This more facile chemistry, when combined with quantitative MR techniques, allows for widespread adoption by academic

  3. Chromosomal rearrangements caused by gamma-irradiation in winter wheat cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Nazarenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we report the results of our investigation into several cytogenetic parameters of variability in mutation induction of modern winter wheat varieties and some connections between the means of cytogenetic indices and different doses of gamma-rays. Analysis of chromosomal aberrations following the action of any kind of mutagen by the anaphases method is one of the most widely investigated and most precise methods which can be used to determine the fact of mutagenic action on plants and identify the nature of the mutagen. We combined in our investigation the sensitivity of genotype to mutagen using cytological analysis of mutagen treated wheat populations with the corresponding different varieties by breeding methods to reveal its connections and differences, specific sensitivity to mutagens action on the cell level. Dry seeds of 8 varieties of winter wheat were subjected to 100, 150, 200, 250 Gy gamma irradiation, which are trivial for winter wheat mutation breeding. We investigated rates and spectra of chromosomal aberrations in the cells of winter wheat primary roots tips. The coefficients of correlations amid the rate of chromosomal aberrations and the dose of gamma-rays were on the level 0.8–0.9. The fragments/bridges ratio is a clear and sufficient index for determining the nature of the mutagen agent. We distinguished the following types of chromosomal rearrangements: chromatid and chromosome bridges, single and double fragments, micronuclei, and delayed chromosomes. The ratio of chromosomal aberrations changes with the change in mutagen; note that bridge-types are characteristic of irradiation. Radiomutants are more resistant to gamma rays. This is apparent in the lower rate of chromosomal aberrations. Varieties obtained by chemical mutagenesis (varieties Sonechko, Kalinova are more sensitive to gamma-irradiation than others. We propose these varieties as objects for a mutation breeding programme and radiation of mutants

  4. Organization of DNA partners and strand exchange mechanisms during Flp site-specific recombination analyzed by difference topology, single molecule FRET and single molecule TPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chien-Hui; Liu, Yen-Ting; Savva, Christos G; Rowley, Paul A; Cannon, Brian; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Russell, Rick; Holzenburg, Andreas; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2014-02-20

    Flp site-specific recombination between two target sites (FRTs) harboring non-homology within the strand exchange region does not yield stable recombinant products. In negatively supercoiled plasmids containing head-to-tail sites, the reaction produces a series of knots with odd-numbered crossings. When the sites are in head-to-head orientation, the knot products contain even-numbered crossings. Both types of knots retain parental DNA configuration. By carrying out Flp recombination after first assembling the topologically well defined Tn3 resolvase synapse, it is possible to determine whether these knots arise by a processive or a dissociative mechanism. The nearly exclusive products from head-to-head and head-to-tail oriented "non-homologous" FRT partners are a 4-noded knot and a 5-noded knot, respectively. The corresponding products from a pair of native (homologous) FRT sites are a 3-noded knot and a 4-noded catenane, respectively. These results are consistent with non-homology-induced two rounds of dissociative recombination by Flp, the first to generate reciprocal recombinants containing non-complementary base pairs and the second to produce parental molecules with restored base pairing. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) analysis of geometrically restricted FRTs, together with single molecule tethered particle motion (smTPM) assays of unconstrained FRTs, suggests that the sites are preferentially synapsed in an anti-parallel fashion. This selectivity in synapse geometry occurs prior to the chemical steps of recombination, signifying early commitment to a productive reaction path. The cumulative topological, smFRET and smTPM results have implications for the relative orientation of DNA partners and the directionality of strand exchange during recombination mediated by tyrosine site-specific recombinases. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Gene and Association with Non-specific Digestive Disorder in Rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Fu Liu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The NLRP12 (NLR family, pyrin domain containing 12 serves as a suppressor factor in the inflammatory response and protects the host against inflammation-induced damage. In the present study, we aimed to study the polymorphisms of NLRP12 gene and its association with susceptibility to non-specific digestive disorder (NSDD in rabbits. We re-sequenced the entire coding region of the rabbit NLRP12 gene and detected a total of 19 SNPs containing 14 synonymous and five non-synonymous variations. Among them, the coding SNP (c.1682A>G, which would carry a potential functional implication, was subsequently subjected to genotyping for case-control association study (272 cases and 267 controls. The results revealed that allele A was significantly protective against NSDD with an odds ratio value of 0.884 (95% confidence interval, 0.788 to 0.993; p = 0.038. We also experimentally induced NSDD in growing rabbits by feeding a fibre-deficient diet and subsequently investigated NLRP12 mRNA expression. The mRNA expression of NLRP12 in healthy status was significantly higher than that in severe NSDD (p = 0.0016. The highest expression was observed in individuals carrying the protective genotype AA (p = 0.0108. These results suggested that NLRP12 was significantly associated with the NSDD in rabbits. However, the precise molecular mechanism of NLRP12 involving in the development of rabbit NSDD requires further research.

  6. Genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed receptors harboring TAG-72-specific camelid single domain antibodies as targeting agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A

    2013-01-01

    Despite the preclinical success of adoptive therapy with T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed antigen receptors (CARs), certain limitations of this therapeutic approach such as the immunogenicity of the antigen binding domain, the emergence of tumor cell escape variants and the blocking...... expressing tumor cells, the combination of CD3ζ, OX40, CD28 as well as the CH3-CH2-hinge-hinge domains most efficiently triggered T cell activation. Importantly, CAR mediated functions were not blocked by the soluble TAG-72 antigen at a supraphysiological concentration. Our approach may have the potential...... capacity of soluble antigen still remain. Here, we address these issues using a novel CAR binding moiety based on the oligoclonal camelid single domain antibodies. A unique set of 13 single domain antibodies were selected from an immunized camel phage library based on their target specificity and binding...

  7. Site-Specific SERS Assay for Survivin Protein Dimer: From Ensemble Experiments to Correlative Single-Particle Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissler, Jörg; Bäcker, Sandra; Feis, Alessandro; Knauer, Shirley K; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2017-08-01

    An assay for Survivin, a small dimeric protein which functions as modulator of apoptosis and cell division and serves as a promising diagnostic biomarker for different types of cancer, is presented. The assay is based on switching on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) upon incubation of the Survivin protein dimer with Raman reporter-labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNP). Site-specificity is achieved by complexation of nickel-chelated N-nitrilo-triacetic acid (Ni-NTA) anchors on the particle surface by multiple histidines (His 6 -tag) attached to each C-terminus of the centrosymmetric protein dimer. Correlative single-particle analysis using light sheet laser microscopy enables the simultaneous observation of both elastic and inelastic light scattering from the same sample volume. Thereby, the SERS-inactive AuNP-protein monomers can be directly discriminated from the SERS-active AuNP-protein dimers/oligomers. This information, i.e. the percentage of SERS-active AuNP in colloidal suspension, is not accessible from conventional SERS experiments due to ensemble averaging. The presented correlative single-particle approach paves the way for quantitative site-specific SERS assays in which site-specific protein recognition by small chemical and in particular supramolecular ligands can be tested. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... [Traut W. 2010 New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome differentiation: sex determination in Megaselia. J. Genet. 89,. 307–313]. Introduction. Sex-chromosome ..... age group III-Y chromosomes were successful while in well- aerated population cages, linkage group I-Y chromosomes.

  9. Defining the anatomy of the Rangifer tarandus sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C; Griffin, D K; O'Brien, P C; Yang, F; Lin, C C; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    1998-03-01

    A comprehensive cytogenetic characterization of the unusally large reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) sex chromosomes is presented for the purpose of studying the evolution of these atypical gonosomes. Sex chromosome idiograms were constructed from G-banded and C-banded chromosomes to illustrate the relative amounts and locations of euchromatin and heterochromatin. Hybridization with a Mazama gouazoubira X whole-chromosome paint revealed that essentially all reindeer X-linked euchromatin and most reindeer Y-linked euchromatin is conserved interspecifically. Subsequently, painting probes were generated from flow-sorted reindeer X chromosomes, flow-sorted reindeer Y chromosomes, and from microdissections of specific gonosomal regions to establish specific segment-to-segment homologies between these gonosomes. In particular, one microdissection-generated paint demonstrated that certain constituent repetitive DNAs, found in C-band region Xq31, were also present in essentially all heterochromatin blocks of the Y chromosome. Microdissection-generated paints from other X-linked heterochromatin blocks revealed the presence of DNA sequences that lacked homologous sequences on the Y chromosomes and were more specific for their region of origin. These characteristics of the reindeer sex chromosomes are consistent with the notion that mammalian sex chromosomes were derived from homologous progenitor chromosome pairs and provide insights into the evolution of these atypical mammalian gonosomes.

  10. Sex Chromosome Drive

    OpenAIRE

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R.; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in t...

  11. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G; Baker, Robert J; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-10-13

    Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62). As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae), focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  12. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele G. Sotero-Caio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62. As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae, focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  13. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...... with the probe L1.26 confirmed the derivation from chromosome 13 and DNA polymorphism analysis showed maternal origin of the ring chromosome. Our results, together with a review of previous reports of cases with ring chromosome 13 with identified breakpoints, could neither support the theory of distinct clinical...

  14. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  15. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences

  16. The architecture of chicken chromosome territories changes during differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler Sonja

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Between cell divisions the chromatin fiber of each chromosome is restricted to a subvolume of the interphase cell nucleus called chromosome territory. The internal organization of these chromosome territories is still largely unknown. Results We compared the large-scale chromatin structure of chromosome territories between several hematopoietic chicken cell types at various differentiation stages. Chromosome territories were labeled by fluorescence in situ hybridization in structurally preserved nuclei, recorded by confocal microscopy and evaluated visually and by quantitative image analysis. Chromosome territories in multipotent myeloid precursor cells appeared homogeneously stained and compact. The inactive lysozyme gene as well as the centromere of the lysozyme gene harboring chromosome located to the interior of the chromosome territory. In further differentiated cell types such as myeloblasts, macrophages and erythroblasts chromosome territories appeared increasingly diffuse, disaggregating to separable substructures. The lysozyme gene, which is gradually activated during the differentiation to activated macrophages, as well as the centromere were relocated increasingly to more external positions. Conclusions Our results reveal a cell type specific constitution of chromosome territories. The data suggest that a repositioning of chromosomal loci during differentiation may be a consequence of general changes in chromosome territory morphology, not necessarily related to transcriptional changes.

  17. Mosaicism for a chromosome 8-derived minute marker chromosome in a patient with manifestations of trisomy 8 mosaicism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinner, N.B.; Grace, K.R.; Owens, N.L. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-13

    We describe a patient with manifestations of the mosaic trisomy 8 syndrome and mosaicism for a minute marker chromosome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a chromosome 8 probe confirmed that the marker was derived from chromosome 8. This is the smallest piece of chromosome 8 to be reported in a patient with mosaic trisomy 8 syndrome. When the clinical picture is strongly suggestive of trisomy for a specific chromosome region, we believe that FISH can be used to test markers in a guided, rather than random, fashion. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  18. The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN protein is able to specifically bind DNA through its single Cys2-His2 zinc finger motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathan, Nina; Zaccaro, Laura; Esposito, Sabrina; Isernia, Carla; Omichinski, James G; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Carlo; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Fattorusso, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V

    2002-11-15

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene has been shown to be important in maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels, and is presumed to act by regulating cell proliferation. In this work, we show that the SUP protein, which contains a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger domain including the QALGGH sequence, highly conserved in the plant zinc finger proteins, binds DNA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was determined that the minimal domain required for specific DNA binding (residues 15-78) includes the single zinc finger and two basic regions located on either side of this motif. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions in the zinc finger or in the basic regions, including a mutation that knocks out the function of the SUP protein in vivo (glycine 63 to aspartate), have been found to abolish the activity of the SUP DNA-binding domain. These results strongly suggest that the SUP protein functions in vivo by acting as a DNA-binding protein, likely involved in transcriptional regulation. The association of both an N-terminal and a C-terminal basic region with a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger represents a novel DNA-binding motif suggesting that the mechanism of DNA recognition adopted by the SUP protein is different from that described so far in other zinc finger proteins.

  19. Chromosome evolution in Cophomantini (Amphibia, Anura, Hylinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Juan M; Cardozo, Dario E; Suárez, Pablo; Boeris, Juan M; Blasco-Zúñiga, Ailin; Barbero, Gastón; Gomes, Anderson; Gazoni, Thiago; Costa, William; Nagamachi, Cleusa Y; Rivera, Miryan; Parise-Maltempi, Patricia P; Wiley, John E; Pieczarka, Julio C; Haddad, Celio F B; Faivovich, Julián; Baldo, Diego

    2018-01-01

    The hylid tribe Cophomantini is a diverse clade of Neotropical treefrogs composed of the genera Aplastodiscus, Boana, Bokermannohyla, Hyloscirtus, and Myersiohyla. The phylogenetic relationships of Cophomantini have been comprehensively reviewed in the literature, providing a suitable framework for the study of chromosome evolution. Employing different banding techniques, we studied the chromosomes of 25 species of Boana and 3 of Hyloscirtus; thus providing, for the first time, data for Hyloscirtus and for 15 species of Boana. Most species showed karyotypes with 2n = 2x = 24 chromosomes; some species of the B. albopunctata group have 2n = 2x = 22, and H. alytolylax has 2n = 2x = 20. Karyotypes are all bi-armed in most species presented, with the exception of H. larinopygion (FN = 46) and H. alytolylax (FN = 38), with karyotypes that have a single pair of small telocentric chromosomes. In most species of Boana, NORs are observed in a single pair of chromosomes, mostly in the small chromosomes, although in some species of the B. albopunctata, B. pulchella, and B. semilineata groups, this marker occurs on the larger pairs 8, 1, and 7, respectively. In Hyloscirtus, NOR position differs in the three studied species: H. alytolylax (4p), H. palmeri (4q), and H. larinopygion (1p). Heterochromatin is a variable marker that could provide valuable evidence, but it would be necesserary to understand the molecular composition of the C-bands that are observed in different species in order to test its putative homology. In H. alytolylax, a centromeric DAPI+ band was observed on one homologue of chromosome pair 2. The band was present in males but absent in females, providing evidence for an XX/XY sex determining system in this species. We review and discuss the importance of the different chromosome markers (NOR position, C-bands, and DAPI/CMA3 patterns) for their impact on the taxonomy and karyotype evolution in Cophomantini.

  20. Chromosome evolution in Cophomantini (Amphibia, Anura, Hylinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Pablo; Boeris, Juan M.; Blasco-Zúñiga, Ailin; Barbero, Gastón; Gomes, Anderson; Gazoni, Thiago; Costa, William; Nagamachi, Cleusa Y.; Rivera, Miryan; Parise-Maltempi, Patricia P.; Wiley, John E.; Pieczarka, Julio C.; Haddad, Celio F. B.; Faivovich, Julián; Baldo, Diego

    2018-01-01

    The hylid tribe Cophomantini is a diverse clade of Neotropical treefrogs composed of the genera Aplastodiscus, Boana, Bokermannohyla, Hyloscirtus, and Myersiohyla. The phylogenetic relationships of Cophomantini have been comprehensively reviewed in the literature, providing a suitable framework for the study of chromosome evolution. Employing different banding techniques, we studied the chromosomes of 25 species of Boana and 3 of Hyloscirtus; thus providing, for the first time, data for Hyloscirtus and for 15 species of Boana. Most species showed karyotypes with 2n = 2x = 24 chromosomes; some species of the B. albopunctata group have 2n = 2x = 22, and H. alytolylax has 2n = 2x = 20. Karyotypes are all bi-armed in most species presented, with the exception of H. larinopygion (FN = 46) and H. alytolylax (FN = 38), with karyotypes that have a single pair of small telocentric chromosomes. In most species of Boana, NORs are observed in a single pair of chromosomes, mostly in the small chromosomes, although in some species of the B. albopunctata, B. pulchella, and B. semilineata groups, this marker occurs on the larger pairs 8, 1, and 7, respectively. In Hyloscirtus, NOR position differs in the three studied species: H. alytolylax (4p), H. palmeri (4q), and H. larinopygion (1p). Heterochromatin is a variable marker that could provide valuable evidence, but it would be necesserary to understand the molecular composition of the C-bands that are observed in different species in order to test its putative homology. In H. alytolylax, a centromeric DAPI+ band was observed on one homologue of chromosome pair 2. The band was present in males but absent in females, providing evidence for an XX/XY sex determining system in this species. We review and discuss the importance of the different chromosome markers (NOR position, C-bands, and DAPI/CMA3 patterns) for their impact on the taxonomy and karyotype evolution in Cophomantini. PMID:29444174

  1. Chromatin structure and ionizing-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlmann-Diaz, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The possible influence of chromatic structure or activity on chromosomal radiosensitivity was studied. A cell line was isolated which contained some 10 5 copies of an amplified plasmid in a single large mosquito artificial chromosome (MAC). This chromosome was hypersensitive to DNase I. Its radiosensitivity was some three fold greater than normal mosquito chromosomes in the same cell. In cultured human cells irradiated during G 0 , the initial breakage frequency in chromosome 4, 19 and the euchromatic and heterochromatic portions of the Y chromosome were measured over a wide range of doses by inducing Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC) immediately after irradiation with Cs-137 gamma rays. No evidence was seen that Y heterochromatin or large fragments of it remained unbroken. The only significant deviation from the expected initial breakage frequency per Gy per unit length of chromosome was that observed for the euchromatic portion of the Y chromosome, with breakage nearly twice that expected. The development of aberrations involving X and Y chromosomes at the first mitosis after irradation was also studied. Normal female cells sustained about twice the frequency of aberrations involving X chromosomes for a dose of 7.3 Gy than the corresponding male cells. Fibroblasts from individuals with supernumerary X chromosomes did not show any further increase in X aberrations for this dos. The frequency of aberrations involving the heterochromatic portion of the long arm of the Y chromosome was about what would be expected for a similar length of autosome, but the euchromatic portion of the Y was about 3 times more radiosensitive per unit length. 5-Azacytidine treatment of cultured human female fibroblasts or fibroblasts from a 49,XXXXY individual, reduced the methylation of cytosine residues in DNA, and resulted in an increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in general, but it did not increase the frequency of aberrations involving the X chromosomes

  2. Differential interaction kinetics of a bipolar structure-specific endonuclease with DNA flaps revealed by single-molecule imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Rezgui

    Full Text Available As DNA repair enzymes are essential for preserving genome integrity, understanding their substrate interaction dynamics and the regulation of their catalytic mechanisms is crucial. Using single-molecule imaging, we investigated the association and dissociation kinetics of the bipolar endonuclease NucS from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab on 5' and 3'-flap structures under various experimental conditions. We show that association of the PabNucS with ssDNA flaps is largely controlled by diffusion in the NucS-DNA energy landscape and does not require a free 5' or 3' extremity. On the other hand, NucS dissociation is independent of the flap length and thus independent of sliding on the single-stranded portion of the flapped DNA substrates. Our kinetic measurements have revealed previously unnoticed asymmetry in dissociation kinetics from these substrates that is markedly modulated by the replication clamp PCNA. We propose that the replication clamp PCNA enhances the cleavage specificity of NucS proteins by accelerating NucS loading at the ssDNA/dsDNA junctions and by minimizing the nuclease interaction time with its DNA substrate. Our data are also consistent with marked reorganization of ssDNA and nuclease domains occurring during NucS catalysis, and indicate that NucS binds its substrate directly at the ssDNA-dsDNA junction and then threads the ssDNA extremity into the catalytic site. The powerful techniques used here for probing the dynamics of DNA-enzyme binding at the single-molecule have provided new insight regarding substrate specificity of NucS nucleases.

  3. Nuclear Envelope-Associated Chromosome Dynamics during Meiotic Prophase I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome dynamics during meiotic prophase I are associated with a series of major events such as chromosomal reorganization and condensation, pairing/synapsis and recombination of the homologs, and chromosome movements at the nuclear envelope (NE. The NE is the barrier separating the nucleus from the cytoplasm and thus plays a central role in NE-associated chromosomal movements during meiosis. Previous studies have shown in various species that NE-linked chromosome dynamics are actually driven by the cytoskeleton. The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC complexes are important constituents of the NE that facilitate in the transfer of cytoskeletal forces across the NE to individual chromosomes. The LINCs consist of the inner and outer NE proteins Sad1/UNC-84 (SUN, and Klarsicht/Anc-1/Syne (KASH domain proteins. Meiosis-specific adaptations of the LINC components and unique modifications of the NE are required during chromosomal movements. Nonetheless, the actual role of the NE in chromosomic dynamic movements in plants remains elusive. This review summarizes the findings of recent studies on meiosis-specific constituents and modifications of the NE and corresponding nucleoplasmic/cytoplasmic adaptors being involved in NE-associated movement of meiotic chromosomes, as well as describes the potential molecular network of transferring cytoplasm-derived forces into meiotic chromosomes in model organisms. It helps to gain a better understanding of the NE-associated meiotic chromosomal movements in plants.

  4. High degree of sex chromosome differentiation in stickleback fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimada Yukinori

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of closely related species with different sex chromosome systems can provide insights into the processes of sex chromosome differentiation and evolution. To investigate the potential utility of molecular markers in studying sex chromosome differentiation at early stages of their divergence, we examined the levels and patterns of genetic differentiation between sex chromosomes in nine-spined (Pungitius pungitius and three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus using microsatellite markers. Results A set of novel microsatellite markers spanning the entire length of the sex chromosomes were developed for nine-spined sticklebacks using the sequenced genomes of other fish species. Sex-specific patterns of genetic variability and male-specific alleles were identified at most of these loci, indicating a high degree of differentiation between the X and Y chromosomes in nine-spined sticklebacks. In three-spined sticklebacks, male-specific alleles were detected at some loci confined to two chromosomal regions. In addition, male-specific null alleles were identified at several other loci, implying the absence of Y chromosomal alleles at these loci. Overall, male-specific alleles and null alleles were found over a region spanning 81% of the sex chromosomes in three-spined sticklebacks. Conclusions High levels but distinct patterns of sex chromosome differentiation were uncovered in the stickleback species that diverged 13 million years ago. Our results suggest that the Y chromosome is highly degenerate in three-spined sticklebacks, but not in nine-spined sticklebacks. In general, the results demonstrate that microsatellites can be useful in identifying the degree and patterns of sex chromosome differentiation in species at initial stages of sex chromosome evolution.

  5. High degree of sex chromosome differentiation in stickleback fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikano, Takahito; Natri, Heini M; Shimada, Yukinori; Merilä, Juha

    2011-09-29

    Studies of closely related species with different sex chromosome systems can provide insights into the processes of sex chromosome differentiation and evolution. To investigate the potential utility of molecular markers in studying sex chromosome differentiation at early stages of their divergence, we examined the levels and patterns of genetic differentiation between sex chromosomes in nine-spined (Pungitius pungitius) and three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) using microsatellite markers. A set of novel microsatellite markers spanning the entire length of the sex chromosomes were developed for nine-spined sticklebacks using the sequenced genomes of other fish species. Sex-specific patterns of genetic variability and male-specific alleles were identified at most of these loci, indicating a high degree of differentiation between the X and Y chromosomes in nine-spined sticklebacks. In three-spined sticklebacks, male-specific alleles were detected at some loci confined to two chromosomal regions. In addition, male-specific null alleles were identified at several other loci, implying the absence of Y chromosomal alleles at these loci. Overall, male-specific alleles and null alleles were found over a region spanning 81% of the sex chromosomes in three-spined sticklebacks. High levels but distinct patterns of sex chromosome differentiation were uncovered in the stickleback species that diverged 13 million years ago. Our results suggest that the Y chromosome is highly degenerate in three-spined sticklebacks, but not in nine-spined sticklebacks. In general, the results demonstrate that microsatellites can be useful in identifying the degree and patterns of sex chromosome differentiation in species at initial stages of sex chromosome evolution. © 2011 Shikano et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  6. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 6. Know Your Chromosomes Hybrid Cells and Human Chromosomes. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 6 June 1996 pp 41-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These pieces of DNA which are clusters of several genes are called linkages groups or chromosomes. Therefore chromosomes are nothing but long. Cen. DNA. A,denin~ .... and as precursors for other biomolecules like hormones, purines and pyrimidines. ... in the history of science, Garrod's contributions to human genet-.

  8. Combining M-FISH and Quantum Dot technology for fast chromosomal assignment of transgenic insertions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Mohammed

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical mapping of transgenic insertions by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH is a reliable and cost-effective technique. Chromosomal assignment is commonly achieved either by concurrent G-banding or by a multi-color FISH approach consisting of iteratively co-hybridizing the transgenic sequence of interest with one or more chromosome-specific probes at a time, until the location of the transgenic insertion is identified. Results Here we report a technical development for fast chromosomal assignment of transgenic insertions at the single cell level in mouse and rat models. This comprises a simplified 'single denaturation mixed hybridization' procedure that combines multi-color karyotyping by Multiplex FISH (M-FISH, for simultaneous and unambiguous identification of all chromosomes at once, and the use of a Quantum Dot (QD conjugate for the transgene detection. Conclusions Although the exploitation of the unique optical properties of QD nanocrystals, such as photo-stability and brightness, to improve FISH performance generally has been previously investigated, to our knowledge this is the first report of a purpose-designed molecular cytogenetic protocol in which the combined use of QDs and standard organic fluorophores is specifically tailored to assist gene transfer technology.

  9. Delimiting the origin of a B chromosome by FISH mapping, chromosome painting and DNA sequence analysis in Astyanax paranae (Teleostei, Characiformes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duílio M Z de A Silva

    Full Text Available Supernumerary (B chromosomes have been shown to contain a wide variety of repetitive sequences. For this reason, fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH is a useful tool for ascertaining the origin of these genomic elements, especially when combined with painting from microdissected B chromosomes. In order to investigate the origin of B chromosomes in the fish species Astyanax paranae, these two approaches were used along with PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences obtained from the B chromosomes and its comparison with those residing in the A chromosomes. Remarkably, chromosome painting with the one-arm metacentric B chromosome probe showed hybridization signals on entire B chromosome, while FISH mapping revealed the presence of H1 histone and 18S rDNA genes symmetrically placed in both arms of the B chromosome. These results support the hypothesis that the B chromosome of A. paranae is an isochromosome. Additionally, the chromosome pairs Nos. 2 or 23 are considered the possible B chromosome ancestors since both contain syntenic H1 and 18S rRNA sequences. The analysis of DNA sequence fragments of the histone and rRNA genes obtained from the microdissected B chromosomes showed high similarity with those obtained from 0B individuals, which supports the intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in A. paranae. Finally, the population hereby analysed showed a female-biased B chromosome presence suggesting that B chromosomes in this species could influence sex determinism.

  10. Mapping to mouse chromosome 3 of the gene encoding latexin (Lxn) expressed in neocortical neurons in a region-specific manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Ming-hao; Uratani, Yoshihiko; Arimatsu, Yasuyoshi [Mitsubishi Kasei Institute of Life Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Latexin was first found as a 29-kDa antigen expressed in a subset of neurons in infragranular layers of lateral, but not dorsal, neocortical areas in the rat using a monoclonal antibody PC3.1. It was found that the vast majority of latexin-expressing neurons in both layers V and VI within the lateral neocortex were generated concurrently at Embryonic Day 15, demonstrating a strict correlation between the molecular identity of neurons and the time of their generation. Since neurons expressing latexin are located in the restricted part of the neocortex, latexin has been used as a useful molecular marker to elucidate the mechanism underlying cortical regional specification. The latexin cDNA isolated from a cDNA library of the rat cerebral cortex encodes a protein composed of 223-amino-acid residues containing two potential Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase sites and one cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site. The absence of any signal peptide or potential transmembrane domain is consistent with the apparent cytosolic localization of latexin in the rat brain. The transcripts of latexin were expressed in not only neutral but also nonneural tissues (e.g., lung, spleen, kidney, heart, and digestive tracts). Recently, it has been demonstrated that latexin purified from the rat brain has inhibitory activity against carboxypeptidase A1, carboxypeptidase A2, and mast cell carboxypeptidase A, with less carboxypeptidase B-inhibiting activity. The amino acid sequence deduced from the rat latexin cDNA has no strict homology to any sequences so far known. Genomic Southern blot analysis using a cDNA probe of rat latexin suggested that the gene encoding latexin in the rat has homologues in other mammalian species and in the chicken, but not in the nematode, fly, or frog. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masubuchi, Masanori

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography. In this method, the difference in DNA synthetic phase between each chromosome was used as a standard, and the used chromosome was in metaphase, as morphological characteristics were markedly in this phase. Cell cycle and autoradiography with 3 H-thymidine were also examined. In order to discriminate chromosome by autoradiography, it was effective to utilize the labelled pattern in late DNA synthetic phase, where asynchronous replication of chromosome appeared most obviously. DNA synthesis in chromosome was examined in each DNA synthetic phase by culturing the chromosome after the treatment with 3 H-thymidine and altering the time to prepare chromosome specimen. Discrimination of chromosome in plants and animals by autoradiography was also mentioned. It was noticed as a structural and functional discrimination of chromosome to observe amino acid uptake into chromosome protein and to utilize the difference in labelled pattern between the sites of chromosome. (K. Serizawa)

  12. The human Y chromosome: a masculine chromosome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordam, Michiel J.; Repping, Sjoerd

    2006-01-01

    Once considered to be a genetic wasteland of no scientific interest beyond sex determination, the human Y chromosome has made a significant comeback in the past few decades and is currently implicated in multiple diseases, including spermatogenic failure - absent or very low levels of sperm

  13. A universal probe design for colorimetric detection of single-nucleotide variation with visible readout and high specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueping; Zhou, Dandan; Shen, Huawei; Chen, Hui; Feng, Wenli; Xie, Guoming

    2016-02-02

    Single-nucleotide variation (SNV) is a crucial biomarker for drug resistance-related detection in cancer and bacterial infection. However, the unintended binding of DNA probes limits the specificity of SNV detection, and the need for redesigned sequences compromise the universality of SNV assay. Herein, we demonstrated a universal and low-cost assay for the colorimetric discrimination of drug-resistance related point mutation. By the use of a universal DNA probe and a split G-quadruplex, the signal could be recognized by naked eye at room temperature. The DNA probe was used as a signal reporter which not only improved the universality, but also enabled high specificity of probe hybridization. This assay was successfully applied in the detection of cancer-related SNV in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homologue (KRAS), and tuberculosis drug-resistance related point mutation in RNA polymerase beta subunit gene (rpoB) with high specificity and visible readout. This method was simple, rapid, high-throughput and effective, which was suitable for point-of-care applications.

  14. Chromosomal aberrations in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muammer Altok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the chromosomal changes in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 patients diagnosed with clinical BPH underwent transurethral prostate resection to address their primary urological problem. All patients were evaluated by use of a comprehensive medical history and rectal digital examination. The preoperative evaluation also included serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA measurement and ultrasonographic measurement of prostate volume. Prostate cancer was detected in one patient, who was then excluded from the study. We performed conventional cytogenetic analyses of short-term cultures of 53 peripheral blood samples obtained from the BPH patients. Results: The mean (±standard deviation age of the 53 patients was 67.8±9.4 years. The mean PSA value of the patients was 5.8±7.0 ng/mL. The mean prostate volume was 53.6±22.9 mL. Chromosomal abnormalities were noted in 5 of the 53 cases (9.4%. Loss of the Y chromosome was the most frequent chromosomal abnormality and was observed in three patients (5.7%. There was no statistically significant relationship among age, PSA, prostate volume, and chromosomal changes. Conclusions: Loss of the Y chromosome was the main chromosomal abnormality found in our study. However, this coexistence did not reach a significant level. Our study concluded that loss of the Y chromosome cannot be considered relevant for the diagnosis of BPH as it is for prostate cancer. Because BPH usually occurs in aging men, loss of the Y chromosome in BPH patients may instead be related to the aging process.

  15. Study of 25 X-chromosome SNPs in the Portuguese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Vania; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Amorim, António

    2011-01-01

    The importance of X-chromosome markers in individual identifications, population genetics, forensics and kinship testing is getting wide recognition. In this work, we studied the distributions of 25 X-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (X-SNPs) in population samples from Northern, Central...

  16. Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    trast to mitotic cell cultures, the assessment of chromosomal. Figure 7. Prematurely condensed sperm chromatin in uncleaved oocytes. (a) Part of metaphase with 12 oocyte chromosomes (num- bered) and sperm chromatids of which the smaller ones (arrows) re- semble oocyte chromatids. (b) Part of metaphase with single ...

  17. Evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovatsos, Michail; Vukić, Jasna; Lymberakis, Petros; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-12-22

    Amniote vertebrates possess various mechanisms of sex determination, but their variability is not equally distributed. The large evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in viviparous mammals and birds was believed to be connected with their endothermy. However, some ectotherm lineages seem to be comparably conserved in sex determination, but previously there was a lack of molecular evidence to confirm this. Here, we document a stability of sex chromosomes in advanced snakes based on the testing of Z-specificity of genes using quantitative PCR (qPCR) across 37 snake species (our qPCR technique is suitable for molecular sexing in potentially all advanced snakes). We discovered that at least part of sex chromosomes is homologous across all families of caenophidian snakes (Acrochordidae, Xenodermatidae, Pareatidae, Viperidae, Homalopsidae, Colubridae, Elapidae and Lamprophiidae). The emergence of differentiated sex chromosomes can be dated back to about 60 Ma and preceded the extensive diversification of advanced snakes, the group with more than 3000 species. The Z-specific genes of caenophidian snakes are (pseudo)autosomal in the members of the snake families Pythonidae, Xenopeltidae, Boidae, Erycidae and Sanziniidae, as well as in outgroups with differentiated sex chromosomes such as monitor lizards, iguanas and chameleons. Along with iguanas, advanced snakes are therefore another example of ectothermic amniotes with a long-term stability of sex chromosomes comparable with endotherms. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Identification of chromosomal errors in human preimplantation embryos with oligonucleotide DNA microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Liang

    Full Text Available A previous study comparing the performance of different platforms for DNA microarray found that the oligonucleotide (oligo microarray platform containing 385K isothermal probes had the best performance when evaluating dosage sensitivity, precision, specificity, sensitivity and copy number variations border definition. Although oligo microarray platform has been used in some research fields and clinics, it has not been used for aneuploidy screening in human embryos. The present study was designed to use this new microarray platform for preimplantation genetic screening in the human. A total of 383 blastocysts from 72 infertility patients with either advanced maternal age or with previous miscarriage were analyzed after biopsy and microarray. Euploid blastocysts were transferred to patients and clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were measured. Chromosomes in some aneuploid blastocysts were further analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH to evaluate accuracy of the results. We found that most (58.1% of the blastocysts had chromosomal abnormalities that included single or multiple gains and/or losses of chromosome(s, partial chromosome deletions and/or duplications in both euploid and aneuploid embryos. Transfer of normal euploid blastocysts in 34 cycles resulted in 58.8% clinical pregnancy and 54.4% implantation rates. Examination of abnormal blastocysts by FISH showed that all embryos had matching results comparing microarray and FISH analysis. The present study indicates that oligo microarray conducted with a higher resolution and a greater number of probes is able to detect not only aneuploidy, but also minor chromosomal abnormalities, such as partial chromosome deletion and/or duplication in human embryos. Preimplantation genetic screening of the aneuploidy by DNA microarray is an advanced technology used to select embryos for transfer and improved embryo implantation can be obtained after transfer of the screened normal

  19. The single cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterase of the intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia represents a potential drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Stefan; Balmer, Vreni; Sterk, Geert Jan; Pollastri, Michael P; Leurs, Rob; Müller, Norbert; Hemphill, Andrew; Spycher, Cornelia

    2017-09-01

    Giardiasis is an intestinal infection correlated with poverty and poor drinking water quality, and treatment options are limited. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Giardia infections afflict nearly 33% of people in developing countries, and 2% of the adult population in the developed world. This study describes the single cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) of G. lamblia and assesses PDE inhibitors as a new generation of anti-giardial drugs. An extensive search of the Giardia genome database identified a single gene coding for a class I PDE, GlPDE. The predicted protein sequence was analyzed in-silico to characterize its domain structure and catalytic domain. Enzymatic activity of GlPDE was established by complementation of a PDE-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, and enzyme kinetics were characterized in soluble yeast lysates. The potency of known PDE inhibitors was tested against the activity of recombinant GlPDE expressed in yeast and against proliferating Giardia trophozoites. Finally, the localization of epitope-tagged and ectopically expressed GlPDE in Giardia cells was investigated. Giardia encodes a class I PDE. Catalytically important residues are fully conserved between GlPDE and human PDEs, but sequence differences between their catalytic domains suggest that designing Giardia-specific inhibitors is feasible. Recombinant GlPDE hydrolyzes cAMP with a Km of 408 μM, and cGMP is not accepted as a substrate. A number of drugs exhibit a high degree of correlation between their potency against the recombinant enzyme and their inhibition of trophozoite proliferation in culture. Epitope-tagged GlPDE localizes as dots in a pattern reminiscent of mitosomes and to the perinuclear region in Giardia. Our data strongly suggest that inhibition of G. lamblia PDE activity leads to a profound inhibition of parasite proliferation and that GlPDE is a promising target for developing novel anti-giardial drugs.

  20. Chromosome and cell wall segregation in Streptococcus faecium ATCC 9790

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, M.L.; Glaser, D.; Dicker, D.T.; Zito, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    Segregation was studied by measuring the positions of autoradiographic grain clusters in chains formed from single cells containing on average less than one radiolabeled chromosome strand. The degree to which chromosomal and cell wall material cosegregated was quantified by using the methods of S. Cooper and M. Weinberger, dividing the number of chains labeled at the middle. This analysis indicated that in contrast to chromosomal segregation in Escherichia coli and, in some studies, to that in gram-positive rods, chromosomal segregation in Streptococcus faecium was slightly nonrandom and did not vary with growth rate. Results were not significantly affected by strand exchange. In contrast, labeled cell wall segregated predominantly nonrandomly.

  1. Modeling Three-Dimensional Chromosome Structures Using Gene Expression Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guanghua; Wang, Xinlei; Khodursky, Arkady B

    2011-03-01

    Recent genomic studies have shown that significant chromosomal spatial correlation exists in gene expression of many organisms. Interestingly, coexpression has been observed among genes separated by a fixed interval in specific regions of a chromosome chain, which is likely caused by three-dimensional (3D) chromosome folding structures. Modeling such spatial correlation explicitly may lead to essential understandings of 3D chromosome structures and their roles in transcriptional regulation. In this paper, we explore chromosomal spatial correlation induced by 3D chromosome structures, and propose a hierarchical Bayesian method based on helical structures to formally model and incorporate the correlation into the analysis of gene expression microarray data. It is the first study to quantify and infer 3D chromosome structures in vivo using expression microarrays. Simulation studies show computing feasibility of the proposed method and that, under the assumption of helical chromosome structures, it can lead to precise estimation of structural parameters and gene expression levels. Real data applications demonstrate an intriguing biological phenomenon that functionally associated genes, which are far apart along the chromosome chain, are brought into physical proximity by chromosomal folding in 3D space to facilitate their coexpression. It leads to important biological insight into relationship between chromosome structure and function.

  2. Chromosomal evolution in the plant family Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feinan; Tanksley, Steven D

    2010-03-17

    Over the past decades, extensive comparative mapping research has been performed in the plant family Solanaceae. The recent identification of a large set of single-copy conserved orthologous (COSII) markers has greatly accelerated comparative mapping studies among major solanaceous species including tomato, potato, eggplant, pepper and diploid Nicotiana species (as well as tetraploid tobacco). The large amount of comparative data now available for these species provides the opportunity to describe the overall patterns of chromosomal evolution in this important plant family. The results of this investigation are described herein. We combined data from multiple COSII studies, and other comparative mapping studies performed in tomato, potato, eggplant, pepper and diploid Nicotiana species, to deduce the features and outcomes of chromosomal evolution in the Solanaceae over the past 30 million years. This includes estimating the rates and timing of chromosomal changes (inversions and translocations) as well as deducing the age of ancestral progenitor species and predicting their genome configurations. The Solanaceae has experienced chromosomal changes at a modest rate compared with other families and the rates are likely conserved across different lineages of the family. Chromosomal inversions occur at a consistently higher rate than do translocations. Further, we find evidences for non-random positioning of the chromosomal rearrangement breakpoints. This finding is consistent with the similar finding in mammals, where hot spots for chromosomal breakages have apparently played a significant role in shaping genome evolution. Finally, by utilizing multiple genome comparisons we were able to reconstruct the most likely genome configuration for a number of now-extinct progenitor species that gave rise to the extant solanaceous species used in this research. The results from this study provide the first broad overview of chromosomal evolution in the family Solanaceae, and

  3. Characterization of the OmyY1 Region on the Rainbow Trout Y Chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth B. Phillips

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We characterized the male-specific region on the Y chromosome of rainbow trout, which contains both sdY (the sex-determining gene and the male-specific genetic marker, OmyY1. Several clones containing the OmyY1 marker were screened from a BAC library from a YY clonal line and found to be part of an 800 kb BAC contig. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, these clones were localized to the end of the short arm of the Y chromosome in rainbow trout, with an additional signal on the end of the X chromosome in many cells. We sequenced a minimum tiling path of these clones using Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing. The region is rich in transposons and rDNA, but also appears to contain several single-copy protein-coding genes. Most of these genes are also found on the X chromosome; and in several cases sex-specific SNPs in these genes were identified between the male (YY and female (XX homozygous clonal lines. Additional genes were identified by hybridization of the BACs to the cGRASP salmonid 4x44K oligo microarray. By BLASTn evaluations using hypothetical transcripts of OmyY1-linked candidate genes as query against several EST databases, we conclude at least 12 of these candidate genes are likely functional, and expressed.

  4. Muscle and liver-specific alterations in lipid and acylcarnitine metabolism after a single bout of exercise in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoene, Miriam; Li, Jia; Li, Yanjie; Runge, Heike; Zhao, Xinjie; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Lehmann, Rainer; Xu, Guowang; Weigert, Cora

    2016-02-26

    Intracellular lipid pools are highly dynamic and tissue-specific. Physical exercise is a strong physiologic modulator of lipid metabolism, but most studies focus on changes induced by long-term training. To assess the acute effects of endurance exercise, mice were subjected to one hour of treadmill running, and (13)C16-palmitate was applied to trace fatty acid incorporation in soleus and gastrocnemius muscle and liver. The amounts of carnitine, FFA, lysophospholipids and diacylglycerol and the post-exercise increase in acetylcarnitine were pronouncedly higher in soleus than in gastrocnemius. In the liver, exercise increased the content of lysophospholipids, plasmalogens and carnitine as well as transcript levels of the carnitine transporter. (13)C16-palmitate was detectable in several lipid and acylcarnitine species, with pronounced levels of tracer-derived palmitoylcarnitine in both muscles and a strikingly high incorporation into triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine in the liver. These data illustrate the high lipid storing activity of the liver immediately after exercise whereas in muscle, fatty acids are directed towards oxidation. The observed muscle-specific differences accentuate the need for single-muscle analyses as well as careful consideration of the particular muscle employed when studying lipid metabolism in mice. In addition, our results reveal that lysophospholipids and plasmalogens, potential lipid signalling molecules, are acutely regulated by physical exercise.

  5. Antiproliferative and Apoptotic Effects of a Specific Antiprostate Stem Cell Single Chain Antibody on Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroogh Nejatollahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA is a highly glycosylated cell surface protein which is overexpressed in several malignancies including prostate, pancreas, and urinary bladder cancers. Tumor suppression has been reported by anti-PSCA antibody. Small and high affinity single chain antibodies (scFv have been introduced as effective agents for cancer immunotargeting approaches. In the present study, we used a phage antibody display library of scFv and selected two antibodies against two immunodominant epitopes of PSCA by panning process. The reactivity of the scFvs for the corresponding epitopes was determined by phage ELISA. The binding specificity of antibodies to PSCA-expressing prostate cancer cell line, DU-145, was analyzed by flow cytometry. The antiproliferative and apoptotic induction effects were evaluated by MTT and Annexin-V assays, respectively. Results represented functional scFv C5-II which could bind specifically to DU-145 cells and significantly inhibited the proliferation of these cells (61% with no effect on PSCA-negative cells. The antibody also induced apoptosis in the PSCA expressing cells. The percentage of the apoptotic cells after 24 hrs of exposure to 500 scFv/cell was 33.80%. These results demonstrate that the functional anti-PSCA scFv C5-II has the potential to be considered as a new agent for targeted therapy of prostate cancer.

  6. Gonadal sex chromosome complement in individuals with sex chromosomal and/or gonadal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, J.A.; Sanger, W.G.; Seemayer, T. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Gonadal abnormalities are characteristically seen in patients with sex chromosomal aneuploidy. Morphologically these abnormalities can be variable and are hypothesized to be dependent on the sex chromosomal consititution of the gonad (independent of the chromosomal complement of other tissues, such as peripheral blood lymphocytes). In this study, the gonadal sex chromosome complement was evaluated for potential mosaicism and correlated with the histopathology from 5 patients with known sex chromosomal and/or gonadal disorders. FISH techniques using X and Y chromosome specific probes were performed on nuclei extracted from paraffin embedded tissue. Gonadal tissue obtained from case 1 (a true hemaphroditic newborn) consisted of ovotestes and epididymis (left side) and ovary with fallopian tube (right side). Cytogenetic and FISH studies performed on blood, ovotestes and ovary revealed an XX complement. Cytogenetic analysis of blood from case 2, a 4-year-old with suspected Turner syndrome revealed 45,X/46,X,del(Y)(q11.21). FISH analysis of the resected gonads (histologically = immature testes) confirmed an X/XY mosaic complement. Histologically, the gonadal tissue was testicular. Severe autolysis prohibited successful analysis in the 2 remaining cases. In summary, molecular cytogenetic evaluation of gonadal tissue from individuals with sex chromosomal and/or gonadal disorders did not reveal tissue-specific anomalies which could account for differences observed pathologically.

  7. Microdissection and chromosome painting of X and B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruel, M; Cabrero, J; Perfectti, F; Acosta, M J; Sánchez, A; Camacho, J P M

    2009-01-01

    The relative location of 2 repetitive DNAs, i.e. ribosomal (rDNA) and a tandemly repeated satellite DNA (satDNA), with respect to the centromere, suggested that B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans derived intraspecifically from the X chromosome. To test this hypothesis, we microdissected X and B chromosomes and amplified the obtained DNA by 2 different procedures, the conventional DOP-PCR method and the single-cell whole-genome amplification GenomePlex method. We then generated DNA probes to perform chromosome painting. Our results have confirmed that X and B chromosomes share many DNA sequences between them and with most of the autosomes, especially at locations where the satDNA and rDNA reside, in consistency with previous information. This supports the hypothesis of an intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in E. plorans. Nevertheless, the present results did not help to clarify whether Bs were derived from the X chromosome or else from 1 or more autosomes. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas-Pequignot, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs [fr

  9. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  10. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications...... who want it, is discussed. Screening for chromosome disease in all pregnancies is not without problems, but may be reasonable in some localities....

  11. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotrophia/Granulicatella. Results As lactobacilli are known for notorious resistance to probe penetration, probe-specific assay protocols were experimentally developed to provide maximum cell wall permeability, probe accessibility, hybridization stringency, and fluorescence intensity. The new assays were then applied in a pilot study to three biofilm samples harvested from variably demineralized bovine enamel discs that had been carried in situ for 10 days by different volunteers. Best probe penetration and fluorescent labeling of reference strains were obtained after combined lysozyme and achromopeptidase treatment followed by exposure to lipase. Hybridization stringency had to be established strictly for each probe. Thereafter all probes showed the expected specificity with reference strains and labeled the anticipated morphotypes in dental plaques. Applied to in situ grown biofilms the set of probes detected only Lactobacillus fermentum and bacteria of the Lactobacillus casei group. The most cariogenic biofilm contained two orders of magnitude higher L. fermentum cell numbers than the other biofilms. Abiotrophia/Granulicatella and streptococci from the mitis group were found in all samples at high levels, whereas Streptococcus mutans was detected in only one sample in very low numbers. Conclusions Application of these new group- and species-specific FISH probes to oral biofilm-forming lactic acid bacteria will allow a clearer understanding of the supragingival biome, its spatial architecture and of structure-function relationships implicated during plaque homeostasis and caries development. The probes should prove of value far beyond the field of oral microbiology, as many of

  12. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurnheer Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotrophia/Granulicatella. Results As lactobacilli are known for notorious resistance to probe penetration, probe-specific assay protocols were experimentally developed to provide maximum cell wall permeability, probe accessibility, hybridization stringency, and fluorescence intensity. The new assays were then applied in a pilot study to three biofilm samples harvested from variably demineralized bovine enamel discs that had been carried in situ for 10 days by different volunteers. Best probe penetration and fluorescent labeling of reference strains were obtained after combined lysozyme and achromopeptidase treatment followed by exposure to lipase. Hybridization stringency had to be established strictly for each probe. Thereafter all probes showed the expected specificity with reference strains and labeled the anticipated morphotypes in dental plaques. Applied to in situ grown biofilms the set of probes detected only Lactobacillus fermentum and bacteria of the Lactobacillus casei group. The most cariogenic biofilm contained two orders of magnitude higher L. fermentum cell numbers than the other biofilms. Abiotrophia/Granulicatella and streptococci from the mitis group were found in all samples at high levels, whereas Streptococcus mutans was detected in only one sample in very low numbers. Conclusions Application of these new group- and species-specific FISH probes to oral biofilm-forming lactic acid bacteria will allow a clearer understanding of the supragingival biome, its spatial architecture and of structure-function relationships implicated during plaque homeostasis and caries development. The probes should prove of value far beyond the field of

  13. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Cotias-de-Oliveira,Ana Lúcia Pires; Assis,José Geraldo Aquino de; Bellintani,Moema Cortizo; Andrade,Jorge Clarêncio Souza; Guedes,Maria Lenise Silva

    2000-01-01

    The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. u...

  14. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    OpenAIRE

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G.; Baker, Robert J.; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62). As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within d...

  15. Chromosomes in the flow to simplify genome analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Šafář, Jan; Bartoš, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Šimková, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2012), s. 397-416 ISSN 1438-793X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1740; GA ČR GAP501/10/1778 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Chromosome sorting * Chromosome-specific BAC libraries * Chromosome sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.292, year: 2012

  16. Activation of X Chromosome Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Maduro (Cheryl)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn mammals, males are the heterogametic sex having an X chromosome and a Y chromosome whereas females have two X chromosomes. Despite originating from an ancient homologous autosomal pair, the X and Y chromosome now differ greatly in size and gene content after ~180 MY of evolution.

  17. A review of thresholding strategies applied to human chromosome segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Enea; Zappelli, Francesca; Ruggeri, Alfredo; Grisan, Enrico

    2012-11-01

    Karyotype analysis is a widespread procedure in cytogenetics to assess the presence of genetic defects by the visualization of the structure of chromosomes. The procedure is lengthy and repetitive and an effective automatic analysis would greatly help the cytogeneticist routine work. Still, automatic segmentation and the full disentangling of chromosomes are open issues. The first step in every automatic procedure is the thresholding step, which detect blobs that represent either single chromosomes or clusters of chromosomes. The better the thresholding step, the easier is the subsequent disentanglement of chromosome clusters into single entities. We implemented eleven thresholding methods, i.e. the ones that appear in the literature as the best performers, and compared their performance in segmenting chromosomes and chromosome clusters in cytogenetic Q-band images. The images are affected by the presence of hyper- or hypo-fluorescent regions and by a contrast variability between the stained chromosomes and the background. A thorough analysis of the results highlights that, although every single algorithm shows peculiar strong/weak points, Adaptive Threshold and Region Based Level Set have the overall best performance. In order to provide the scientific community with a public dataset, the data and manual segmentation used in this paper are available for public download at http://bioimlab.dei.unipd.it. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Consistencies of Y-Chromosomal and Autosomal Continental Ancestry Varying among Haplogroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Chao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Y-chromosome has been widely used in ancestry inference based on its region-specific haplogroup distributions. However, there is always a debate on how informative such a single marker is for inferring an individual's genetic ancestry. Here, we compared genetic ancestry inferences at continental level made by Y-chromosomal haplogroups to those made by autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 1230 samples of Affymetrix Human Origins dataset. The highest ancestry proportions of a majority of individuals match the highest average continental-ancestry proportions in haplogroups A, B, D, H, I, K, L, T, O, and M. The high consistencies have not been observed in haplogroups E, C, G, J, N, Q, and R, but in some of their sublineages, such as E1a, E1b1a1, E1b1b1b1a, E2b1a, J1a2b, Q1a1a1, Q1a2a1a1, R1b1a2a1a, and R2. Although the consistencies of Y-chromosomal and autosomal continental ancestry vary among haplogroups, Y-chromosome could provide valuable clues for individual's continental ancestry.

  19. Differential activation behavior of dermal dendritic cells underlies the strain-specific Th1 responses to single epicutaneous immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih-Hung; Chen, Jau-Shiuh; Chiu, Hsien-Ching; Hong, Chien-Hui; Liu, Ching-Yi; Ta, Yng-Cun; Wang, Li-Fang

    2016-12-01

    Epicutaneous immunization with allergens is an important sensitization route for atopic dermatitis. We recently showed in addition to the Th2 response following single epicutaneous immunization, a remarkable Th1 response is induced in B6 mice, but not in BALB/c mice, mimicking the immune response to allergens in human non-atopics and atopics. We investigated the underlying mechanisms driving this differential Th1 response between BALB/c and B6 mice. We characterized dermal dendritic cells by flow cytometric analysis. We measured the induced Th1/Th2 responses by measuring the IFN-γ/IL-13 contents of supernatants of antigen reactivation cultures of lymph node cells. We demonstrate that more dermal dendritic cells with higher activation status migrate into draining lymph nodes of B6 mice compared to BALB/c mice. Dermal dendritic cells of B6 mice have a greater ability to capture protein antigen than those of BALB/c mice. Moreover, increasing the activation status or amount of captured antigen in dermal dendritic cells induced a Th1 response in BALB/c mice. Further, differential activation behavior, but not antigen-capturing ability of dermal dendritic cells between BALB/c and B6 mice is dendritic cell-intrinsic. These results show that the differential activation behavior of dermal dendritic cells underlies the strain-specific Th1 responses following single epicutaneous immunization. Furthermore, our findings highlight the potential differences between human atopics and non-atopics and provide useful information for the prediction and prevention of atopic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Schoenmakers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW, whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  1. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome. Progress report, September 1991--November 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  2. Amplifications of chromosomal region 20q13 as a prognostic indicator in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Collins, Colin; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Tanner, Minna M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  3. Combinations of chromosome transfer and genome editing for the development of cell/animal models of human disease and humanized animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Narumi; Abe, Satoshi; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Kazuki, Yasuhiro

    2018-02-01

    Chromosome transfer technology, including chromosome modification, enables the introduction of Mb-sized or multiple genes to desired cells or animals. This technology has allowed innovative developments to be made for models of human disease and humanized animals, including Down syndrome model mice and humanized transchromosomic (Tc) immunoglobulin mice. Genome editing techniques are developing rapidly, and permit modifications such as gene knockout and knockin to be performed in various cell lines and animals. This review summarizes chromosome transfer-related technologies and the combined technologies of chromosome transfer and genome editing mainly for the production of cell/animal models of human disease and humanized animal models. Specifically, these include: (1) chromosome modification with genome editing in Chinese hamster ovary cells and mouse A9 cells for efficient transfer to desired cell types; (2) single-nucleotide polymorphism modification in humanized Tc mice with genome editing; and (3) generation of a disease model of Down syndrome-associated hematopoiesis abnormalities by the transfer of human chromosome 21 to normal human embryonic stem cells and the induction of mutation(s) in the endogenous gene(s) with genome editing. These combinations of chromosome transfer and genome editing open up new avenues for drug development and therapy as well as for basic research.

  4. Meiotic and mitotic behaviour of a ring/deleted chromosome 22 in human embryos determined by preimplantation genetic diagnosis for a maternal carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laver Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ring chromosomes are normally associated with developmental anomalies and are rarely inherited. An exception to this rule is provided by deletion/ring cases. We were provided with a unique opportunity to investigate the meiotic segregation at oogenesis in a woman who is a carrier of a deleted/ring 22 chromosome. The couple requested preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD following the birth of a son with a mosaic karyotype. The couple underwent two cycles of PGD. Studies were performed on lymphocytes, single embryonic cells removed from 3 day-old embryos and un-transferred embryos. Analysis was carried out using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH with specific probe sets in two rounds of hybridization. Results In total, 12 embryos were biopsied, and follow up information was obtained for 10 embryos. No embryos were completely normal or balanced for chromosome 22 by day 5. There was only one embryo diagnosed as balanced of 12 biopsied but that accumulated postzygotic errors by day 5. Three oocytes apparently had a balanced chromosome 22 complement but all had the deleted and the ring 22 and not the intact chromosome 22. After fertilisation all the embryos accumulated postzygotic errors for chromosome 22. Conclusion The study of the preimplantation embryos in this case provided a rare and significant chance to study and understand the phenomena associated with this unusual type of anomaly during meiosis and in the earliest stages of development. It is the first reported PGD attempt for a ring chromosome abnormality.

  5. Genetic variation within the Y chromosome is not associated with histological characteristics of the atherosclerotic carotid artery or aneurysmal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitjema, Saskia; van Setten, Jessica; Eales, James; van der Laan, Sander W; Gandin, Ilaria; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; de Borst, Gert J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Charchar, Fadi J; Wilson, James F; de Jager, Saskia C A; Tomaszewski, Maciej; den Ruijter, Hester M

    2017-04-01

    Haplogroup I, a common European paternal lineage of the Y chromosome, is associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease in British men. It is unclear whether this haplogroup or any other haplogroup on the Y chromosome is associated with histological characteristics of the diseased vessel wall in other vascular manifestations of cardiovascular diseases showing a male preponderance. We examined Dutch men undergoing either carotid endarterectomy from the Athero-Express biobank (AE, n = 1217) or open aneurysm repair from the Aneurysm-Express biobank (AAA, n = 393). Upon resolving the Y chromosome phylogeny, each man was assigned to one of the paternal lineages based on combinations of single nucleotide polymorphisms of the male-specific region of the Y chromosome. We examined the associations between the Y chromosome and the histological characteristics of the carotid plaque and aneurysm wall, including lipid content, leukocyte infiltration and intraplaque haemorrhage, in all men. A majority of men were carriers of either haplogroup I (AE: 28% AAA: 24%) or haplogroup R (AE: 59% AAA: 61%). We found no association between Y chromosomal haplogroups and histological characteristics of plaque collected from carotid arteries or tissue specimens of aneurysms. Moreover, the distribution of frequency for all Y chromosomal haplogroups in both cohorts was similar to that of a general population of Dutch men. Our data show that genetic variation on the Y chromosome is not associated with histological characteristics of the plaques from carotid arteries or specimens of aneurysms in men of Dutch origin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Establishment of a 10-Plex Quantitative Fluorescent-PCR Assay for rapid diagnosis of sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmei Xie

    Full Text Available Sex chromosome aneuploidies occur commonly in the general population, with an incidence of 1 in 400 newborns. However, no tests specifically targeting sex chromosomes have been carried out in prenatal diagnosis or newborn screening, resulting in late recognition of these diseases. In this study, a rapid diagnostic method for sex chromosome aneuploidies was established using Quantitative Fluorescent-PCR (QF-PCR. Ten markers were included in one multiplex QF-PCR assay, including two sex determination genes (AMXY and SRY, five X-linked short tandem repeats (STRs; DXS1053, DXS981, DXS6809, DXS1187, and DXS8377, one X/Y-common STR (X22, and two autosomal STRs (D13S305 and D21S11. Retrospective tests of 70 cases with known cytogenetic results indicated that the 10-plex QF-PCR assay could well determine sex chromosome copy numbers by both allelic peak numbers and a sex chromosome dosage calculation with the autosomal STRs as internal controls. Prospective comparison with cytogenetic karyotyping on 534 cases confirmed that the 10-plex QF-PCR assay could be well employed for sex chromosome aneuploidy diagnosis in at least the Chinese Han population. This is the first QF-PCR test for the diagnosis of sex chromosome aneuploidies in the Chinese population. This test is superior to previous designs by including up to 8 sex-linked markers covering different parts of sex chromosomes as well as employing internal controls for copy number dosage calculation in a single PCR reaction. Due to simple technique and data analysis, as well as easy implementation within routine clinical services, this method is of great clinical application value and could be widely applied.

  7. Single dose CpG immunization protects against a heterosubtypic challenge and generates antigen specific memory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eVogel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive research, influenza A virus (IAV remains a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditure. Emerging pandemics from highly pathogenic IAV strains such as H5N1 and pandemic H1N1 highlight the need for universal, cross-protective vaccines. Current vaccine formulations generate strain-specific neutralizing antibodies primarily against the outer coat proteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. In contrast to these highly mutable proteins, internal proteins of IAV are more conserved and are a favorable target for developing vaccines that induce strong T cell responses in addition to humoral immunity. Here, we found that intranasal administration with a single dose of CpG and inactivated x31 (H3N2 reduced viral titers and partially protected mice from a heterosubtypic challenge with a lethal dose of PR8 (H1N1. Early after immunization, vaccinated mice showed increased innate immune activation with high levels of MHCII and CD86 expression on dendritic cells in both the draining lymph nodes and lungs. Three days after immunization, CD4 and CD8 cells in the lung upregulated CD69, suggesting that activated lymphocytes are present at the site of vaccine administration. The ensuing effector Th1 responses were capable of producing multiple cytokines and were present at least 30 days after immunization. Furthermore, functional memory responses were observed, as antigen specific IFN-γ+ and GrB+ cells were detected early after lethal infection. Together, this work provides evidence for using pattern recognition receptor agonists as a mucosal vaccine platform for inducing robust T cell responses capable of protecting against heterologous IAV challenges.

  8. Single cell subtractive transcriptomics for identification of cell-specifically expressed candidate genes of pyrrolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Christian; Beuerle, Till; Hollmann, Julien; Ober, Dietrich

    2015-09-01

    Progress has recently been made in the elucidation of pathways of secondary metabolism. However, because of its diversity, genetic information concerning biosynthetic details is still missing for many natural products. This is also the case for the biosynthesis of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. To close this gap, we tested strategies using tissues that express this pathway in comparison to tissues in which this pathway is not expressed. As many pathways of secondary metabolism are known to be induced by jasmonates, the pyrrolizidine alkaloid-producing species Heliotropium indicum, Symphytum officinale, and Cynoglossum officinale of the Boraginales order were treated with methyl jasmonate. An effect on pyrrolizidine alkaloid levels and on transcript levels of homospermidine synthase, the first specific enzyme of pyrrolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis, was not detectable. Therefore, a method was developed by making use of the often observed cell-specific production of secondary compounds. H. indicum produces pyrrolizidine alkaloids exclusively in the shoot. Homospermidine synthase is expressed only in the cells of the lower leaf epidermis and the epidermis of the stem. Suggesting that the whole pathway of pyrrolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis might be localized in these cells, we have isolated single cells of the upper and lower epidermis by laser-capture microdissection. The resulting cDNA preparations have been used in a subtractive transcriptomic approach. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction has shown that the resulting library is significantly enriched for homospermidine-synthase-coding transcripts providing a valuable source for the identification of further genes involved in pyrrolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Y-Chromosome variation in hominids: intraspecific variation is limited to the polygamous chimpanzee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Greve

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that the Y-specific ampliconic fertility genes DAZ (deleted in azoospermia and CDY (chromodomain protein Y varied with respect to copy number and position among chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes. In comparison, seven Y-chromosomal lineages of the bonobo (Pan paniscus, the chimpanzee's closest living relative, showed no variation. We extend our earlier comparative investigation to include an analysis of the intraspecific variation of these genes in gorillas (Gorilla gorilla and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus, and examine the resulting patterns in the light of the species' markedly different social and mating behaviors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH of DAZ and CDY in 12 Y-chromosomal lineages of western lowland gorilla (G. gorilla gorilla and a single lineage of the eastern lowland gorilla (G. beringei graueri showed no variation among lineages. Similar findings were noted for the 10 Y-chromosomal lineages examined in the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus, and 11 Y-chromosomal lineages of the Sumatran orangutan (P. abelii. We validated the contrasting DAZ and CDY patterns using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR in chimpanzee and bonobo. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: High intraspecific variation in copy number and position of the DAZ and CDY genes is seen only in the chimpanzee. We hypothesize that this is best explained by sperm competition that results in the variant DAZ and CDY haplotypes detected in this species. In contrast, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans-species that are not subject to sperm competition-showed no intraspecific variation in DAZ and CDY suggesting that monoandry in gorillas, and preferential female mate choice in bonobos and orangutans, probably permitted the fixation of a single Y variant in each taxon. These data support the notion that the evolutionary history of a primate Y chromosome is not simply encrypted in its DNA

  10. Simultaneous Characterization of Instantaneous Young’s Modulus and Specific Membrane Capacitance of Single Cells Using a Microfluidic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a microfluidics-based approach capable of continuously characterizing instantaneous Young’s modulus (Einstantaneous and specific membrane capacitance (Cspecific membrane of suspended single cells. In this method, cells were aspirated through a constriction channel while the cellular entry process into the constriction channel was recorded using a high speed camera and the impedance profiles at two frequencies (1 kHz and 100 kHz were simultaneously measured by a lock-in amplifier. Numerical simulations were conducted to model cellular entry process into the constriction channel, focusing on two key parameters: instantaneous aspiration length (Linstantaneous and transitional aspiration length (Ltransitional, which was further translated to Einstantaneous. An equivalent distribution circuit model for a cell travelling in the constriction channel was used to determine Cspecific membrane. A non-small-cell lung cancer cell line 95C (n = 354 was used to evaluate this technique, producing Einstantaneous of 2.96 ± 0.40 kPa and Cspecific membrane of 1.59 ± 0.28 μF/cm2. As a platform for continuous and simultaneous characterization of cellular Einstantaneous and Cspecific membrane, this approach can facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of cellular biophysical properties.

  11. Automated identification of brain tumours from single MR images based on segmentation with refined patient-specific priors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eSanjuán

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumours can have different shapes or locations, making their identification very challenging. In functional MRI, it is not unusual that patients have only one anatomical image due to time and financial constraints. Here, we provide a modified automatic lesion identification (ALI procedure which enables brain tumour identification from single MR images. Our method rests on (A a modified segmentation-normalisation procedure with an explicit extra prior for the tumour and (B an outlier detection procedure for abnormal voxel (i.e. tumour classification. To minimise tissue misclassification, the segmentation-normalisation procedure requires prior information of the tumour location and extent. We therefore propose that ALI is run iteratively so that the output of Step B is used as a patient-specific prior in Step A. We test this procedure on real T1-weighted images from 18 patients, and the results were validated in comparison to two independent observers’ manual tracings. The automated procedure identified the tumours successfully with an excellent agreement with the manual segmentation (area under the ROC curve = 0.97 ± 0.03. The proposed procedure increases the flexibility and robustness of the ALI tool and will be particularly useful for lesion-behaviour mapping studies, or when lesion identification and/or spatial normalisation are problematic.

  12. Cyanobacterial symbionts diverged in the late Cretaceous towards lineage-specific nitrogen fixation factories in single-celled phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Cabello, Ana M; Salazar, Guillem; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Hingamp, Pascal; Alberti, Adriana; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Raes, Jeroen; Bowler, Chris; Wincker, Patrick; Zehr, Jonathan P; Gasol, Josep M; Massana, Ramon; Acinas, Silvia G

    2016-03-22

    The unicellular cyanobacterium UCYN-A, one of the major contributors to nitrogen fixation in the open ocean, lives in symbiosis with single-celled phytoplankton. UCYN-A includes several closely related lineages whose partner fidelity, genome-wide expression and time of evolutionary divergence remain to be resolved. Here we detect and distinguish UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 lineages in symbiosis with two distinct prymnesiophyte partners in the South Atlantic Ocean. Both symbiotic systems are lineage specific and differ in the number of UCYN-A cells involved. Our analyses infer a streamlined genome expression towards nitrogen fixation in both UCYN-A lineages. Comparative genomics reveal a strong purifying selection in UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 with a diversification process ∼91 Myr ago, in the late Cretaceous, after the low-nutrient regime period occurred during the Jurassic. These findings suggest that UCYN-A diversified in a co-evolutionary process, wherein their prymnesiophyte partners acted as a barrier driving an allopatric speciation of extant UCYN-A lineages.

  13. Evaluation of the single-pass flow-through test to support a low-activity waste specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrail, B.P.; Peeler, D.K.

    1995-09-01

    A series of single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests was performed on five reference low-activity waste glasses and a reference glass from the National Institute of Standards and Technology to support a product specification for low-activity waste (LAW) forms. The results showed that the SPFT test provides a means to quantitatively distinguish among LAW glass forms in terms of their forward reaction rate at a given temperature and solution pH. Two of the test glasses were also subjected to SPFT testing at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Forward reaction rate constants calculated from the ANL test data were 100 to over 1,000 times larger than the values obtained from the SPFT tests conducted at PNL. An analysis of the ANL results showed that they were inconsistent with independent measurements done on glasses of similar composition, the known pH-dependence of the forward rate, and with the results from low surface-area-to-volume, short duration product consistency tests. Because the data set obtained from the SPFT tests done at PNL was consistent with each of these same factors, a detailed examination of the test procedures used at both laboratories was performed to determine the cause(s) of the discrepancy. The omission of background subtraction in the data analysis procedure and the short-duration (on the order of hours) of the ANL tests are factors that may have significantly affected the calculated rates

  14. Transgenic expression in citrus of single-chain antibody fragments specific to Citrus tristeza virus confers virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Magdalena; Esteban, Olga; Gil, Maite; Gorris, M Teresa; Martínez, M Carmen; Peña, Leandro; Cambra, Mariano

    2010-12-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes one of the most destructive viral diseases of citrus worldwide. Generation of resistant citrus genotypes through genetic engineering could be a good alternative to control CTV. To study whether production of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies in citrus could interfere and immunomodulate CTV infection, transgenic Mexican lime plants expressing two different scFv constructs, separately and simultaneously, were generated. These constructs derived from the well-referenced monoclonal antibodies 3DF1 and 3CA5, specific against CTV p25 major coat protein, whose mixture is able to detect all CTV isolates characterized so far. ScFv accumulation levels were low and could be readily detected just in four transgenic lines. Twelve homogeneous and vigorous lines were propagated and CTV-challenged by graft inoculation with an aggressive CTV strain. A clear protective effect was observed in most transgenic lines, which showed resistance in up to 40-60% of propagations. Besides, both a delay in symptom appearance and attenuation of symptom intensity were observed in infected transgenic plants compared with control plants. This effect was more evident in lines carrying the 3DF1scFv transgene, being probably related to the biological functions of the epitope recognized by this antibody. This is the first report describing successful protection against a pathogen in woody transgenic plants by ectopic expression of scFv recombinant antibodies.

  15. An Efficient Algorithm for Simulating the Real-Time Quantum Dynamics of a Single Spin-1/2 Coupled to Specific Spin-1/2 Baths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novotny, M.A.; Guerra, M.; Raedt, H. De; Michielsen, K.; Jin, F.

    2012-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for the computation of the real-time dependence of a single quantum spin-1/2 coupled to a specific set of quantum spin-1/2 baths is presented. The specific spin baths have couplings only with the spin operators Sx between bath spins and the central spin. We calculate spin

  16. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping clones from a larger genome.

  17. Detection of short repeated genomic sequences on metaphase chromosomes using padlock probes and target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stougaard Magnus

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situ detection of short sequence elements in genomic DNA requires short probes with high molecular resolution and powerful specific signal amplification. Padlock probes can differentiate single base variations. Ligated padlock probes can be amplified in situ by rolling circle DNA synthesis and detected by fluorescence microscopy, thus enhancing PRINS type reactions, where localized DNA synthesis reports on the position of hybridization targets, to potentially reveal the binding of single oligonucleotide-size probe molecules. Such a system has been presented for the detection of mitochondrial DNA in fixed cells, whereas attempts to apply rolling circle detection to metaphase chromosomes have previously failed, according to the literature. Methods Synchronized cultured cells were fixed with methanol/acetic acid to prepare chromosome spreads in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides. Apart from the slide format and the chromosome spreading everything was done essentially according to standard protocols. Hybridization targets were detected in situ with padlock probes, which were ligated and amplified using target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis, and detected by fluorescence labeling. Results An optimized protocol for the spreading of condensed metaphase chromosomes in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides was developed. Applying this protocol we generated specimens for target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis of padlock probes recognizing a 40 nucleotide sequence in the male specific repetitive satellite I sequence (DYZ1 on the Y-chromosome and a 32 nucleotide sequence in the repetitive kringle IV domain in the apolipoprotein(a gene positioned on the long arm of chromosome 6. These targets were detected with good efficiency, but the efficiency on other target sites was unsatisfactory. Conclusion Our aim was to test the applicability of the method used on mitochondrial DNA to the analysis of nuclear genomes, in particular as

  18. Recombinant protein expression by targeting pre-selected chromosomal loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krömer Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells is mostly achieved by stable integration of transgenes into the chromosomal DNA of established cell lines. The chromosomal surroundings have strong influences on the expression of transgenes. The exploitation of defined loci by targeting expression constructs with different regulatory elements is an approach to design high level expression systems. Further, this allows to evaluate the impact of chromosomal surroundings on distinct vector constructs. Results We explored antibody expression upon targeting diverse expression constructs into previously tagged loci in CHO-K1 and HEK293 cells that exhibit high reporter gene expression. These loci were selected by random transfer of reporter cassettes and subsequent screening. Both, retroviral infection and plasmid transfection with eGFP or antibody expression cassettes were employed for tagging. The tagged cell clones were screened for expression and single copy integration. Cell clones producing > 20 pg/cell in 24 hours could be identified. Selected integration sites that had been flanked with heterologous recombinase target sites (FRTs were targeted by Flp recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE. The results give proof of principle for consistent protein expression upon RMCE. Upon targeting antibody expression cassettes 90-100% of all resulting cell clones showed correct integration. Antibody production was found to be highly consistent within the individual cell clones as expected from their isogenic nature. However, the nature and orientation of expression control elements revealed to be critical. The impact of different promoters was examined with the tag-and-targeting approach. For each of the chosen promoters high expression sites were identified. However, each site supported the chosen promoters to a different extent, indicating that the strength of a particular promoter is dominantly defined by its chromosomal context

  19. DistAMo: A web-based tool to characterize DNA-motif distribution on bacterial chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eSobetzko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Short DNA motifs are involved in a multitude of functions such as for example chromosome segregation, DNA replication or mismatch repair. Distribution of such motifs is often not random and the specific chromosomal pattern relates to the respective motif function. Computational approaches which quantitatively assess such chromosomal motif patterns are necessary. Here we present a new computer tool DistAMo (Distribution Analysis of DNA Motifs. The algorithm uses codon redundancy to calculate the relative abundance of short DNA motifs from single genes to entire chromosomes. Comparative genomics analyses of the GATC-motif distribution in γ-proteobacterial genomes using DistAMo revealed that (i genes beside the replication origin are enriched in GATCs, (ii genome-wide GATC distribution follows a distinct pattern and (iii genes involved in DNA replication and repair are enriched in GATCs. These features are specific for bacterial chromosomes encoding a Dam methyltransferase. The new software is available as a stand-alone or as an easy-to-use web-based server version at http://www.computational.bio.uni-giessen.de/distamo.

  20. Investigations of chromosomal stability in the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römke, C; Gödde-Salz, E; Grote, W

    1985-01-01

    Chromosomal studies were carried out on nine patients with the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome using recently developed methods on cultured lymphocytes. In addition, the dermatoglyphics of these patients were examined. No evidence of a characteristic chromosome aberration was found in banded prometaphase-chromosome preparations, nor could increased chromosome breakage be demonstrated in eight of the patients. One proposita showed frequent breaks of Chromosome 1 at p22. Increased chromosome instability in these patients was suggested by higher spontaneous and mitomycin-C-induced sister chromatid exchange rates in patients than in controls. Although the dermatoglyphic findings cannot be regarded as specific for the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, an increased occurrence of whorl patterns and white lines in patients' fingerprints was noted.

  1. Origin of B chromosomes in Characidium alipioi (Characiformes, Crenuchidae) and its relationship with supernumerary chromosomes in other Characidium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Érica Alves; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Scudeller, Patrícia Sobrinho; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2017-01-01

    B chromosomes are apparently dispensable components found in the genomes of many species that are mainly composed of repetitive DNA sequences. Among the numerous questions concerning B chromosomes, the origin of these elements has been widely studied. To date, supernumerary chromosomes have been identified in approximately 60 species of fish, including species of the genus Characidium Reinhardt, 1867 in which these elements appear to have independently originated. In this study, we used molecular cytogenetic techniques to investigate the origin of B chromosomes in a population of Characidium alipioi Travassos, 1955 and determine their relationship with the extra chromosomes of other species of the genus. The results showed that the B chromosomes of Characidium alipioi had an intraspecific origin, apparently originated independently in relation to the B chromosomes of Characidium gomesi Travassos, 1956 Characidium pterostictum Gomes, 1947 and Characidium oiticicai Travassos, 1967, since they do not share specific DNA sequences, as well as their possible ancestral chromosomes and belong to different phylogenetic clades. The shared sequences between the supernumerary chromosomes and the autosommal sm pair indicate the origin of these chromosomes.

  2. Origin of B chromosomes in Characidium alipioi (Characiformes, Crenuchidae and its relationship with supernumerary chromosomes in other Characidium species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Alves Serrano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available B chromosomes are apparently dispensable components found in the genomes of many species that are mainly composed of repetitive DNA sequences. Among the numerous questions concerning B chromosomes, the origin of these elements has been widely studied. To date, supernumerary chromosomes have been identified in approximately 60 species of fish, including species of the genus Characidium Reinhardt, 1867 in which these elements appear to have independently originated. In this study, we used molecular cytogenetic techniques to investigate the origin of B chromosomes in a population of Characidium alipioi Travassos, 1955 and determine their relationship with the extra chromosomes of other species of the genus. The results showed that the B chromosomes of C. alipioi had an intraspecific origin, apparently originated independently in relation to the B chromosomes of C. gomesi Travassos, 1956 C. pterostictum Gomes, 1947 and C. oiticicai Travassos, 1967, since they do not share specific DNA sequences, as well as their possible ancestral chromosomes and belong to different phylogenetic clades. The shared sequences between the supernumerary chromosomes and the autosommal sm pair indicate the origin of these chromosomes.

  3. Y chromosome STR typing in crime casework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roewer, Lutz

    2009-01-01

    Since the beginning of the nineties the field of forensic Y chromosome analysis has been successfully developed to become commonplace in laboratories working in crime casework all over the world. The ability to identify male-specific DNA renders highly variable Y-chromosomal polymorphisms, the STR sequences, an invaluable addition to the standard panel of autosomal loci used in forensic genetics. The male-specificity makes the Y chromosome especially useful in cases of male/female cell admixture, namely in sexual assault cases. On the other hand, the haploidy and patrilineal inheritance complicates the interpretation of a Y-STR match, because male relatives share for several generations an identical Y-STR profile. Since paternal relatives tend to live in the geographic and cultural territory of their ancestors, the Y chromosome analysis has a potential to make inferences on the population of origin of a given DNA profile. This review addresses the fields of application of Y chromosome haplotyping, the interpretation of results, databasing efforts and population genetics aspects.

  4. Cryptic Chromosome Abormalities in Acute Leukaemia: Identification and Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.C.M. van Zutven

    2005-01-01

    textabstractSpecific chromosome aberrations are observed in 50% of all new acute leukaemia patients. As a result of chromosome aberrations, genes located at the breakpoints can be disrupted and fusion genes can be formed. In addition, genes can be lost or amplified. An increasing number of these

  5. Supernumerary ring chromosome 20 characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Langen, Irene M.; Otter, Mariëlle A.; Aronson, Daniël C.; Overweg-Plandsoen, W.C.G.; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Leschot, Nico J.; Hoovers, Jan M.N.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a boy with mild dysmorphic features and developmental delay, in whom karyotyping showed an additional minute ring chromosome in 60% of metaphases. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a centromere specific probe demonstrated that the ring chromosome contained the centromeric

  6. Forensic use of Y-chromosome DNA: a general overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe male-specific part of the human Y chromosome is widely used in forensic DNA analysis, particularly in cases where standard autosomal DNA profiling is not informative. A Y-chromosomal gene fragment is applied for inferring the biological sex of a crime scene trace donor. Haplotypes

  7. Comparison of the measured specific activities in milk and beef in Aachen after 1986 with calculations using a single- and multicompartment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonka, H.; Schmelz, G.

    1998-01-01

    After the nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl until the end of 1990 the specific activity in milk from five farms and in beef from the slaughterhouse Aachen was measured. At the same time the specific activity in grass and other feed was determined at the farms. Transfer factors for feed-milk and feed-beef were derived from the data. The development of the measured specific activities can be approximated very well using single- or multi-compartment models. (orig.) [de

  8. Constitutional translocation t(1;17)(p36.31-p36.13;q11.2-q12.1) in a neuroblastoma patient. Establishment of somatic cell hybrids and identification of PND/A12M2 on chromosome 1 and NF1/SCYA7 on chromosome 17 as breakpoint flanking single copy markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laureys, G.; Speleman, F.; Versteeg, R.; van der Drift, P.; Chan, A.; Leroy, J.; Francke, U.; Opdenakker, G.; van Roy, N.

    1995-01-01

    Cytogenetic and molecular studies in neuroblastoma suggest the presence of a tumor suppressor gene at the distal band p36 of human chromosome 1. We described a constitutional translocation t(1;17)(p36;q12-q21), involving the critical region 1p36, in a patient with neuroblastoma, and hypothesized

  9. Chromosomal evolution of the Chinese muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F; O'Brien, P C; Wienberg, J; Neitzel, H; Lin, C C; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the validity of the hypothesis that the 2n=46 karyotype of the Chinese muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi) could have evolved through 12 tandem fusions from a 2n=70 hypothetical ancestral karyotype, which is still retained in Chinese water deer (Hydropotes inermis) and brown-brocket deer (Mazama gouazoubira). Combining fluorescence-activated chromosomal sorting and degenerate oligonucleotide-primed polymerase chain reaction, we generated chromosome-specific DNA paint probes for 13 M. gouazoubira chromosomes and most of the M. reevesi chromosomes with the exception of 18, 19 and X. These paint probes were used for fluorescence in situ hybridisation to chromosomal preparations of M. reevesi, H. inermis and M. gouazoubira. Chromosome-specific paint probes from M. reevesi chromosomes 1-5 and 11 each delineated more than one homologous pair (18 pairs in total) on the metaphases of H. inermis and M. gouazoubira. All the other probes from M. reevesi and probes from M. gouazoubira each hybridised to one pair of homologous chromosomes or regions. The C5 probe, derived from centromeric satellite sequences of M. reevesi, hybridised to the centromeric regions of all chromosomes of these three species. Most interestingly, several non-random interstitial signals, which are apparently localised to the putative fusion points, were found on chromosomes 1-5 and 11 of M. reevesi. Both the reciprocal painting patterns and localisation of the C5 probe demonstrate that M. reevesi chromosomes 1-5 and 11 could have evolved from 18 different ancestral chromosomes through 12 tandem fusions, thus providing direct molecular cytogenetic support for the tandem fusion hypothesis of karyotype evolution in M. reevesi.

  10. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotias-de-Oliveira Ana Lúcia Pires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. utriculosa. The chromosome number of all species was determined for the first time, except for Billbergia chlorosticta and Cryptanthus bahianus. Our data supports the hypothesis of a basic number of x = 25 for the Bromeliaceae family and decreasing aneuploidy in the genus Cryptanthus.

  11. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome structure modulate the contribution of individual chromosomes in abnormal nuclear morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pampalona, J.; Soler, D.; Genesca, A. [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain); Tusell, L., E-mail: laura.tusell@uab.es [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain)

    2010-01-05

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay has emerged as a biomarker of chromosome damage relevant to cancer. Although it was initially developed to measure micronuclei, it is also useful for measuring nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds. Abnormal nuclear morphologies are frequently observed in malignant tissues and short-term tumour cell cultures. Changes in chromosome structure and number resulting from chromosome instability are important factors in oncogenesis. Telomeres have become key players in the initiation of chromosome instability related to carcinogenesis by means of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. To better understand the connection between telomere dysfunction and the appearance of abnormal nuclear morphologies, we have characterised the presence of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds in human mammary primary epithelial cells. These cells can proliferate beyond the Hayflick limit by spontaneously losing expression of the p16{sup INK4a} protein. Progressive telomere shortening leads to the loss of the capping function, and the appearance of end-to-end chromosome fusions that can enter into breakage-fusion-bridge cycles generating massive chromosomal instability. In human mammary epithelial cells, different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies were observed, however only nucleoplasmatic bridges and buds increased significantly with population doublings. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation using centromeric and painting specific probes for chromosomes with eroded telomeres has revealed that these chromosomes are preferentially included in the different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies observed, thus reflecting their common origin. Accordingly, real-time imaging of cell divisions enabled us to determine that anaphase bridge resolution was mainly through chromatin breakage and the formation of symmetric buds in daughter nuclei. Few micronuclei emerged in this cell system thus validating the scoring of nucleoplasmic bridges and

  12. Unique signatures of natural background radiation on human Y chromosomes from Kerala, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Premi

    Full Text Available The most frequently observed major consequences of ionizing radiation are chromosomal lesions and cancers, although the entire genome may be affected. Owing to its haploid status and absence of recombination, the human Y chromosome is an ideal candidate to be assessed for possible genetic alterations induced by ionizing radiation. We studied the human Y chromosome in 390 males from the South Indian state of Kerala, where the level of natural background radiation (NBR is ten-fold higher than the worldwide average, and that from 790 unexposed males as control.We observed random microdeletions in the Azoospermia factor (AZF a, b and c regions in >90%, and tandem duplication and copy number polymorphism (CNP of 11 different Y-linked genes in about 80% of males exposed to NBR. The autosomal homologues of Y-linked CDY genes largely remained unaffected. Multiple polymorphic copies of the Y-linked genes showing single Y-specific signals suggested their tandem duplication. Some exposed males showed unilocus duplication of DAZ genes resulting in six copies. Notably, in the AZFa region, approximately 25% of exposed males showed deletion of the DBY gene, whereas flanking genes USP9Y and UTY remained unaffected. All these alterations were detected in blood samples but not in the germline (sperm samples.Exposure to high levels of NBR correlated with several interstitial polymorphisms of the human Y chromosome. CNPs and enhanced transcription of the SRY gene after duplication are envisaged to compensate for the loss of Y chromosome in some cells. The aforesaid changes, confined to peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggest a possible innate mechanism protecting the germline DNA from the NBR. Genome analysis of a larger population focusing on greater numbers of genes may provide new insights into the mechanisms and risks of the resultant genetic damages. The present work demonstrates unique signatures of NBR on human Y chromosomes from Kerala, India.

  13. A selective sweep of >8 Mb on chromosome 26 in the Boxer genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilez, Javier; Short, Andrea D; Martínez, Verónica; Kennedy, Lorna J; Ollier, William; Sanchez, Armand; Altet, Laura; Francino, Olga

    2011-07-01

    Modern dog breeds display traits that are either breed-specific or shared by a few breeds as a result of genetic bottlenecks during the breed creation process and artificial selection for breed standards. Selective sweeps in the genome result from strong selection and can be detected as a reduction or elimination of polymorphism in a given region of the genome. Extended regions of homozygosity, indicative of selective sweeps, were identified in a genome-wide scan dataset of 25 Boxers from the United Kingdom genotyped at ~20,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). These regions were further examined in a second dataset of Boxers collected from a different geographical location and genotyped using higher density SNP arrays (~170,000 SNPs). A selective sweep previously associated with canine brachycephaly was detected on chromosome 1. A novel selective sweep of over 8 Mb was observed on chromosome 26 in Boxer and for a shorter region in English and French bulldogs. It was absent in 171 samples from eight other dog breeds and 7 Iberian wolf samples. A region of extended increased heterozygosity on chromosome 9 overlapped with a previously reported copy number variant (CNV) which was polymorphic in multiple dog breeds. A selective sweep of more than 8 Mb on chromosome 26 was identified in the Boxer genome. This sweep is likely caused by strong artificial selection for a trait of interest and could have inadvertently led to undesired health implications for this breed. Furthermore, we provide supporting evidence for two previously described regions: a selective sweep on chromosome 1 associated with canine brachycephaly and a CNV on chromosome 9 polymorphic in multiple dog breeds.

  14. A selective sweep of >8 Mb on chromosome 26 in the Boxer genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altet Laura

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern dog breeds display traits that are either breed-specific or shared by a few breeds as a result of genetic bottlenecks during the breed creation process and artificial selection for breed standards. Selective sweeps in the genome result from strong selection and can be detected as a reduction or elimination of polymorphism in a given region of the genome. Results Extended regions of homozygosity, indicative of selective sweeps, were identified in a genome-wide scan dataset of 25 Boxers from the United Kingdom genotyped at ~20,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. These regions were further examined in a second dataset of Boxers collected from a different geographical location and genotyped using higher density SNP arrays (~170,000 SNPs. A selective sweep previously associated with canine brachycephaly was detected on chromosome 1. A novel selective sweep of over 8 Mb was observed on chromosome 26 in Boxer and for a shorter region in English and French bulldogs. It was absent in 171 samples from eight other dog breeds and 7 Iberian wolf samples. A region of extended increased heterozygosity on chromosome 9 overlapped with a previously reported copy number variant (CNV which was polymorphic in multiple dog breeds. Conclusion A selective sweep of more than 8 Mb on chromosome 26 was identified in the Boxer genome. This sweep is likely caused by strong artificial selection for a trait of interest and could have inadvertently led to undesired health implications for this breed. Furthermore, we provide supporting evidence for two previously described regions: a selective sweep on chromosome 1 associated with canine brachycephaly and a CNV on chromosome 9 polymorphic in multiple dog breeds.

  15. Cloning and characterization of dispersed repetitive DNA derived from microdissected sex chromosomes of Rumex acetosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Beatrice; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Lozano, Rafael; Parker, John S; de la Herrán, Roberto; Rejón, Carmelo Ruiz; Rejón, Manuel Ruiz; Garrido-Ramos, Manuel; Jamilena, Manuel

    2006-02-01

    Rumex acetosa is characterized by a multiple chromosome system (2n = 12 + XX for females, and 2n = 12 + XY1Y2 for males), in which sex is determined by the ratio between the number of X chromosomes and autosome sets. For a better understanding of the molecular structure and evolution of plant sex chromosomes, we have generated a sex chromosome specific library of R. acetosa by microdissection. The screening of this library has allowed us to identify 5 repetitive DNA families that have been characterized in detail. One of these families, DOP-20, has shown no homology with other sequences in databases. Nevertheless, the putative proteins encoded by the other 4 families, DOP-8, DOP-47, DOP-60, and DOP-61, show homology with proteins from different plant retroelements, including poly proteins from Ty3-gypsy- and Ty1-copia-like long terminal repeat (LTR) retroelements, and reverse transcriptase from non-LTR retro elements. Results indicate that sequences from these 5 families are dispersed throughout the genome of both males and females, but no appreciable accumulation or differentiation of these types of sequences have been found in the Y chromosomes. These repetitive DNA sequences are more conserved in the genome of other dioecious species such as Rumex papillaris, Rumex intermedius, Rumex thyrsoides, Rumex hastatulus, and Rumex suffruticosus, than in the polygamous, gynodioecious, or hermaphrodite species Rumex induratus, Rumex lunaria, Rumex con glom er atus, Rumex crispus, and Rumex bucephalo phorus, which supports a single origin of dioecious species in this genus. The implication of these transposable elements in the origin and evolution of the heteromorphic sex chromosomes of R. acetosa is discussed.

  16. Chromosomal mapping of canine-derived BAC clones to the red fox and American mink genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukekova, Anna V; Vorobieva, Nadegda V; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Johnson, Jennifer L; Temnykh, Svetlana V; Yudkin, Dmitry V; Trut, Lyudmila N; Andre, Catherine; Galibert, Francis; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2009-01-01

    High-quality sequencing of the dog (Canis lupus familiaris) genome has enabled enormous progress in genetic mapping of canine phenotypic variation. The red fox (Vulpes vulpes), another canid species, also exhibits a wide range of variation in coat color, morphology, and behavior. Although the fox genome has not yet been sequenced, canine genomic resources have been used to construct a meiotic linkage map of the red fox genome and begin genetic mapping in foxes. However, a more detailed gene-specific comparative map between the dog and fox genomes is required to establish gene order within homologous regions of dog and fox chromosomes and to refine breakpoints between homologous chromosomes of the 2 species. In the current study, we tested whether canine-derived gene-containing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones can be routinely used to build a gene-specific map of the red fox genome. Forty canine BAC clones were mapped to the red fox genome by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Each clone was uniquely assigned to a single fox chromosome, and the locations of 38 clones agreed with cytogenetic predictions. These results clearly demonstrate the utility of FISH mapping for construction of a whole-genome gene-specific map of the red fox. The further possibility of using canine BAC clones to map genes in the American mink (Mustela vison) genome was also explored. Much lower success was obtained for this more distantly related farm-bred species, although a few BAC clones were mapped to the predicted chromosomal locations.

  17. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van't Hof, J.

    1987-01-01

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs

  18. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  19. Human oocyte chromosome analyses need a standardized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Studies of DNA polymorphisms in human trisomic abor- tions and liveborn have revealed a chromosome-specific vari- ation in the importance of meiosis I versus meiosis II er- rors. As a general rule, maternal meiosis I errors predom- inate among almost all trisomies (Hassold and Hunt 2001). It is evident that a direct ...

  20. RESEARCH ARTICLE Y chromosome polymorphisms of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-10

    Feb 10, 2017 ... Kolmogorov-Smirnov test using SPSS 17.0 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Results. SNP detection. The male specificity for PCR amplification of 29 pairs of primers was confirmed. For the. PCR products of the vast majority of primers, all of the samples carried the same. Y-chromosome haplotype ...

  1. Transcriptional analysis of genes on human chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, P.W.; Van Kueren, M.L.; Kurnit, D.M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to screen embryonic, fetal and adult human cDNA libraries for transcription on chromosome 21q22.1{yields}21q22.3. 73 pairs of oligonucleotide primers on chromosome 21 were applied to analyze 41 different cDNA libraries. Only phage eluate (and therefore no DNA isolation) was required for this sensitive screening. This technique was first used to demonstrate that huntingtin is expressed ubiquitiously throughout human life. 60 of the primers were positive with at least one library screening, indicating that the majority of primers derived from transcribed sequences. We examined embryonic (which we synthesized), fetal and adult human cDNA libraries. Even with our most complex human fetal brain library, we detected only ca. 50% of transcribed sequences, underscoring the need to screen multiple human cDNA libraries to determine if transcription occurred. Since only 2/73 clones were present in only one cDNA library, the vast majority of transcribed sequences are present in more than one tissue. Because this study involves random genes rather than genes selected because of their import, this demonstrates that only few anonymous genes are transcribed in a single tissue type. Expression of genes in different cDNA libraries aids in comparison between genotype and phenotype. Using combinations of gene-specific and vector-specific primers, we went on to develop a PCR-based technology that retrieves the largest sequences present in a cDNA library. This technology was used to isolate large genes on chromosome 21 that can be used in expression studies to examine the Down syndrome phenotype.

  2. Molecular analysis of myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5 reveals a specific spectrum of molecular mutations with prognostic impact: a study on 123 patients and 27 genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    The only cytogenetic aberration defining a myelodysplastic syndrome subtype is the deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, which, along with morphological features, leads to the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5. These patients show a good prognosis and respond to treatment such as lenalidomide, but some cases progress to acute myeloid leukemia; however, the molecular mutation pattern is rarely characterized. Therefore, we investigated a large cohort of 123 myelodysplastic syndrome patients with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, diagnosed following the World Health Organization classifications 2008 and 2016, by sequencing 27 genes. A great proportion of patients showed no or only one mutation. Only seven genes showed mutation frequencies >5% (SF3B1, DNMT3A, TP53, TET2, CSNK1A1, ASXL1, JAK2). However, the pattern of recurrently mutated genes was comparable to other myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes by comparison to a reference cohort, except that of TP53 which was significantly more often mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5. As expected, SF3B1 was frequently mutated and correlated with ring sider-oblasts, while JAK2 mutations correlated with elevated platelet counts. Surprisingly, SF3B1 mutations led to significantly worse prognosis within cases with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, but showed a comparable outcome to other myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes with SF3B1 mutation. However, addressing genetic stability in follow-up cases might suggest different genetic mechanisms for progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia compared to overall myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:28642303

  3. Interspecific chromosomal rearrangements in monosomic addition lines of Allium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, L; Ricroch, A

    2001-10-01

    Monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) are useful for assigning linkage groups to chromosomes. We examined whether the chromosomal rearrangements following the introduction of a single onion (Allium cepa) chromosome into the Allium fistulosum genome were produced by homeologous crossing over or by a nonreciprocal conversion event. Among the monosomic lines available, 17 were studied by fluorescent genomic in situ hybridisation, using total A. cepa genomic DNA as the probe and total A. fistulosum genomic DNA as the competitor. In this way, rearrangements such as chromosomal translocations between A. cepa and A. fistulosum were identified as terminal regions consisting of tandem DNA repeats. Homeologous crossing over between the two closely related genomes occurred in 4 of the 17 lines, suggesting that such events are not rare. On the basis of a detailed molecular cytogenetic characterisation, we identified true monosomic alien addition lines for A. cepa chromosomes 3, 4, 5, 7, and 8 that can reliably be used in genetic studies.

  4. Identification of Pneumocystis carinii chromosomes and mapping of five genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, B; Cotton, R; Lundgren, J D

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis was used to identify the chromosome-size DNA of Pneumocystis carinii, a major pathogen of immunocompromised patients. Thirteen chromosomes of rodent Pneumocystis carinii, ranging in size from 300 to 700 kilobases (kb), were identified. The minimum genome size for P....... carinii, estimated on the basis of the sizes of chromosomes, is 7,000 kb. Genetic heterogeneity among different P. carinii isolates was documented by demonstration of chromosomal size variability. By hybridization studies, the genes for topoisomerase I, dihydrofolate reductase, rRNA, actin......, and thymidylate synthase were mapped to single chromosomes of approximately 650, 590, 550, 460, and 350 kb, respectively. Hybridization studies further confirmed the genetic heterogeneity of P. carinii....

  5. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  6. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 3. Know Your Chromosomes The Strong Holds of Family Trees. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 3 March 1996 pp 30-38 ... Author Affiliations. Vani Brahmachari1. Developmental Biology and Genetics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  7. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farida El-Baz

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism. Farida El-Baz a. , Mohamed Saad Zaghloul a. , Ezzat El Sobky a. ,. Reham M Elhossiny a,. *, Heba Salah a. , Neveen Ezy Abdelaziz b a Pediatric Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt b Children with Special ...

  8. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 3. Know Your Chromosomes The Strong Holds of Family Trees. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 3 March 1996 pp 30-38. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. The complete sequence of human chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, State; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie, Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan, Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, Chris; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstenin, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimbal, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar, Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan M.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-04-15

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes yet has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding and syntenic conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-encoding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families and the first complete versions of each of the large chromosome 5 specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and play a likely mechanistic role, since deletions of these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

  10. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States)

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Non-disjunction of chromosome 18

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, M; Collins, A; Petersen, M B

    1998-01-01

    A sample of 100 trisomy 18 conceptuses analysed separately and together with a published sample of 61 conceptuses confirms that an error in maternal meiosis II (MII) is the most frequent cause of non-disjunction for chromosome 18. This is unlike all other human trisomies that have been studied......, which show a higher frequency in maternal meiosis I (MI). Maternal MI trisomy 18 shows a low frequency of recombination in proximal p and medial q, but not the reduction in proximal q observed in chromosome 21 MI non-disjunction. Maternal MII non-disjunction does not fit the entanglement model...... that predicts increased recombination, especially near the centromere. Whereas recent data on MII trisomy 21 show the predicted increase in recombination proximally, maternal MII trisomy 18 has non-significantly reduced recombination. Therefore, chromosome-specific factors must complicate the simple model...

  12. Chromosomal Mapping of Repetitive DNAs in the Grasshopper Abracris flavolineata Reveal Possible Ancestry of the B Chromosome and H3 Histone Spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Bueno

    Full Text Available Supernumerary chromosomes (B chromosomes occur in approximately 15% of eukaryote species. Although these chromosomes have been extensively studied, knowledge concerning their specific molecular composition is lacking in most cases. The accumulation of repetitive DNAs is one remarkable characteristic of B chromosomes, and the occurrence of distinct types of multigene families, satellite DNAs and some transposable elements have been reported. Here, we describe the organization of repetitive DNAs in the A complement and B chromosome system in the grasshopper species Abracris flavolineata using classical cytogenetic techniques and FISH analysis using probes for five multigene families, telomeric repeats and repetitive C0t-1 DNA fractions. The 18S rRNA and H3 histone multigene families are highly variable and well distributed in A. flavolineata chromosomes, which contrasts with the conservation of U snRNA genes and less variable distribution of 5S rDNA sequences. The H3 histone gene was an extensively distributed with clusters occurring in all chromosomes. Repetitive DNAs were concentrated in C-positive regions, including the pericentromeric region and small chromosomal arms, with some occurrence in C-negative regions, but abundance was low in the B chromosome. Finally, the first demonstration of the U2 snRNA gene in B chromosomes in A. flavolineata may shed light on its possible origin. These results provide new information regarding chromosomal variability for repetitive DNAs in grasshoppers and the specific molecular composition of B chromosomes.

  13. Chromosomal Mapping of Repetitive DNAs in the Grasshopper Abracris flavolineata Reveal Possible Ancestry of the B Chromosome and H3 Histone Spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Danilo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2013-01-01

    Supernumerary chromosomes (B chromosomes) occur in approximately 15% of eukaryote species. Although these chromosomes have been extensively studied, knowledge concerning their specific molecular composition is lacking in most cases. The accumulation of repetitive DNAs is one remarkable characteristic of B chromosomes, and the occurrence of distinct types of multigene families, satellite DNAs and some transposable elements have been reported. Here, we describe the organization of repetitive DNAs in the A complement and B chromosome system in the grasshopper species Abracris flavolineata using classical cytogenetic techniques and FISH analysis using probes for five multigene families, telomeric repeats and repetitive C0t-1 DNA fractions. The 18S rRNA and H3 histone multigene families are highly variable and well distributed in A. flavolineata chromosomes, which contrasts with the conservation of U snRNA genes and less variable distribution of 5S rDNA sequences. The H3 histone gene was an extensively distributed with clusters occurring in all chromosomes. Repetitive DNAs were concentrated in C-positive regions, including the pericentromeric region and small chromosomal arms, with some occurrence in C-negative regions, but abundance was low in the B chromosome. Finally, the first demonstration of the U2 snRNA gene in B chromosomes in A. flavolineata may shed light on its possible origin. These results provide new information regarding chromosomal variability for repetitive DNAs in grasshoppers and the specific molecular composition of B chromosomes.

  14. Chromosomal Mapping of Repetitive DNAs in the Grasshopper Abracris flavolineata Reveal Possible Ancestry of the B Chromosome and H3 Histone Spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Danilo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2013-01-01

    Supernumerary chromosomes (B chromosomes) occur in approximately 15% of eukaryote species. Although these chromosomes have been extensively studied, knowledge concerning their specific molecular composition is lacking in most cases. The accumulation of repetitive DNAs is one remarkable characteristic of B chromosomes, and the occurrence of distinct types of multigene families, satellite DNAs and some transposable elements have been reported. Here, we describe the organization of repetitive DNAs in the A complement and B chromosome system in the grasshopper species Abracris flavolineata using classical cytogenetic techniques and FISH analysis using probes for five multigene families, telomeric repeats and repetitive C0t-1 DNA fractions. The 18S rRNA and H3 histone multigene families are highly variable and well distributed in A. flavolineata chromosomes, which contrasts with the conservation of U snRNA genes and less variable distribution of 5S rDNA sequences. The H3 histone gene was an extensively distributed with clusters occurring in all chromosomes. Repetitive DNAs were concentrated in C-positive regions, including the pericentromeric region and small chromosomal arms, with some occurrence in C-negative regions, but abundance was low in the B chromosome. Finally, the first demonstration of the U2 snRNA gene in B chromosomes in A. flavolineata may shed light on its possible origin. These results provide new information regarding chromosomal variability for repetitive DNAs in grasshoppers and the specific molecular composition of B chromosomes. PMID:23826099

  15. The Consequences of Chromosome Segregation Errors in Mitosis and Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Potapova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mistakes during cell division frequently generate changes in chromosome content, producing aneuploid or polyploid progeny cells. Polyploid cells may then undergo abnormal division to generate aneuploid cells. Chromosome segregation errors may also involve fragments of whole chromosomes. A major consequence of segregation defects is change in the relative dosage of products from genes located on the missegregated chromosomes. Abnormal expression of transcriptional regulators can also impact genes on the properly segregated chromosomes. The consequences of these perturbations in gene expression depend on the specific chromosomes affected and on the interplay of the aneuploid phenotype with the environment. Most often, these novel chromosome distributions are detrimental to the health and survival of the organism. However, in a changed environment, alterations in gene copy number may generate a more highly adapted phenotype. Chromosome segregation errors also have important implications in human health. They may promote drug resistance in pathogenic microorganisms. In cancer cells, they are a source for genetic and phenotypic variability that may select for populations with increased malignance and resistance to therapy. Lastly, chromosome segregation errors during gamete formation in meiosis are a primary cause of human birth defects and infertility. This review describes the consequences of mitotic and meiotic errors focusing on novel concepts and human health.

  16. The Consequences of Chromosome Segregation Errors in Mitosis and Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapova, Tamara; Gorbsky, Gary J

    2017-02-08

    Mistakes during cell division frequently generate changes in chromosome content, producing aneuploid or polyploid progeny cells. Polyploid cells may then undergo abnormal division to generate aneuploid cells. Chromosome segregation errors may also involve fragments of whole chromosomes. A major consequence of segregation defects is change in the relative dosage of products from genes located on the missegregated chromosomes. Abnormal expression of transcriptional regulators can also impact genes on the properly segregated chromosomes. The consequences of these perturbations in gene expression depend on the specific chromosomes affected and on the interplay of the aneuploid phenotype with the environment. Most often, these novel chromosome distributions are detrimental to the health and survival of the organism. However, in a changed environment, alterations in gene copy number may generate a more highly adapted phenotype. Chromosome segregation errors also have important implications in human health. They may promote drug resistance in pathogenic microorganisms. In cancer cells, they are a source for genetic and phenotypic variability that may select for populations with increased malignance and resistance to therapy. Lastly, chromosome segregation errors during gamete formation in meiosis are a primary cause of human birth defects and infertility. This review describes the consequences of mitotic and meiotic errors focusing on novel concepts and human health.

  17. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  18. Chromosome painting reveals asynaptic full alignment of homologs and HIM-8-dependent remodeling of X chromosome territories during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Nabeshima

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During early meiotic prophase, a nucleus-wide reorganization leads to sorting of chromosomes into homologous pairs and to establishing associations between homologous chromosomes along their entire lengths. Here, we investigate global features of chromosome organization during this process, using a chromosome painting method in whole-mount Caenorhabditis elegans gonads that enables visualization of whole chromosomes along their entire lengths in the context of preserved 3D nuclear architecture. First, we show that neither spatial proximity of premeiotic chromosome territories nor chromosome-specific timing is a major factor driving homolog pairing. Second, we show that synaptonemal complex-independent associations can support full lengthwise juxtaposition of homologous chromosomes. Third, we reveal a prominent elongation of chromosome territories during meiotic prophase that initiates prior to homolog association and alignment. Mutant analysis indicates that chromosome movement mediated by association of chromosome pairing centers (PCs with mobile patches of the nuclear envelope (NE-spanning SUN-1/ZYG-12 protein complexes is not the primary driver of territory elongation. Moreover, we identify new roles for the X chromosome PC (X-PC and X-PC binding protein HIM-8 in promoting elongation of X chromosome territories, separable from their role(s in mediating local stabilization of pairing and association of X chromosomes with mobile SUN-1/ZYG-12 patches. Further, we present evidence that HIM-8 functions both at and outside of PCs to mediate chromosome territory elongation. These and other data support a model in which synapsis-independent elongation of chromosome territories, driven by PC binding proteins, enables lengthwise juxtaposition of chromosomes, thereby facilitating assessment of their suitability as potential pairing partners.

  19. Depth-discrete specific storage in fractured sedimentary rock using steady-state and transient single-hole hydraulic tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Patryk M.; Cherry, John A.; Parker, Beth L.

    2016-11-01

    A method is presented for obtaining depth-discrete values of specific storage (Ss) from single-hole hydraulic tests in fractured rock boreholes using straddle packers (1.5-17 m test intervals). Low flow constant head (CH) step tests analyzed using the Thiem method provide transmissivity (T) values free from non-Darcian error. Short-term, constant-rate pumping tests (0.5-2 h) analyzed using the Cooper-Jacob approximation of the Theis method provide S from the hydraulic diffusivity using the Darcian T value from the CH step test. This synergistic use of two types of hydraulic tests avoids the common source of error when pumping tests (injection or withdrawal) are conducted at higher flow rates and thereby induce non-Darcian flow resulting in the underestimation of T. Other errors, such as well bore storage and leakage, can also substantially influence S by causing a shift in the time axis of the Cooper-Jacob semi-log plot. In this approach, the Darcian T values from the CH step tests are used in the analysis of the transient pumping test data for calculating S throughout the pumping test using the Cooper-Jacob approximation to minimize all of the aforementioned errors, resulting in more representative S values. The effect of these non-idealities on the measured drawdown is illustrated using the Theis equation with the Darcian T and S values to calculate drawdown for comparison to measured data. The Ss values for tests in sandstone obtained from this approach are more consistent with confined aquifer conditions than values derived from the traditional Cooper-Jacob method, and are within the range of field and lab values presented from a compilation of literature values for fractured sandstone. (10-7-10-5 m-1) This method for obtaining Ss values from short-interval, straddle packer tests improves the estimation of both K and Ss and provides opportunity to study their spatial distribution in fractured rock.

  20. Fine mapping of a region of common deletion on chromosome arm 10p in human glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voesten, A. M.; Bijleveld, E. H.; Westerveld, A.; Hulsebos, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    Allelic loss on chromosome 10 is a frequent event in high grade gliomas. Earlier studies have shown that in most cases a complete copy of chromosome 10 is lost in the tumor. To define more accurately and specifically the region of common deletion on chromosome arm 10p, we have screened a large

  1. Molecular cytogenetics of human germ cell tumours : i(12p) and related chromosomal anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts van Kessel, A; Suijkerbuijk, R F; Sinke, R J; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, J W; de Jong, B

    1993-01-01

    Human testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) comprise a heterogeneous group of solid neoplasms. These tumours are characterized by a highly specific chromosomal anomaly, i.e. an isochromosome of the short arm of chromosome 12. At present, this i(12p) chromosome has been observed in about 80% of TGCTs.

  2. The Bactrocera oleae genome: localization of nine genes on the polytene chromosomes of the olive fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosopoulou, Elena; Nakou, Ifigeneia; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope

    2014-10-01

    Four homologous and five heterologous gene-specific sequences have been mapped by in situ hybridization on the salivary gland polytene chromosomes of the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae. The nine genes were dispersed on four of the five autosomal chromosomes, thus enriching the available set of chromosome landmarks for this major agricultural pest. Present data further supports the proposed chromosome homologies among B. oleae, Ceratitis capitata, and Drosophila melanogaster and the idea of the conservation of chromosomal element identity throughout dipteran evolution.

  3. Chromosomes of Protists: The crucible of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyer-Gobillard, Marie-Odile; Dolan, Michael F

    2015-12-01

    As early as 1925, the great protozoologist Edouard Chatton classified microorganisms into two categories, the prokaryotic and the eukaryotic microbes, based on light microscopical observation of their nuclear organization. Now, by means of transmission electron microscopy, we know that prokaryotic microbes are characterized by the absence of nuclear envelope surrounding the bacterial chromosome, which is more or less condensed and whose chromatin is deprived of histone proteins but presents specific basic proteins. Eukaryotic microbes, the protists, have nuclei surrounded by a nuclear envelope and have chromosomes more or less condensed, with chromatin-containing histone proteins organized into nucleosomes. The extraordinary diversity of mitotic systems presented by the 36 phyla of protists (according to Margulis et al., Handbook of Protoctista, 1990) is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of their chromosome structure and chromatin components. Dinoflagellates are the exception to this pattern. The phylum is composed of around 2000 species, and characterized by unique features including their nucleus (dinokaryon), dinomitosis, chromosome organization and chromatin composition. Although their DNA synthesis is typically eukaryotic, dinoflagellates are the only eukaryotes in which the chromatin, organized into quasi-permanently condensed chromosomes, is in some species devoid of histones and nucleosomes. In these cases, their chromatin contains specific DNA-binding basic proteins. The permanent compaction of their chromosomes throughout the cell cycle raises the question of the modalities of their division and their transcription. Successful in vitro reconstitution of nucleosomes using dinoflagellate DNA and heterologous corn histones raises questions about dinoflagellate evolution and phylogeny. [Int Microbiol 18(4):209-216 (2015)]. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  4. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    The basic aims of this project are the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X and the utilization of these maps for the subsequent isolation of a set of physically overlapping DNA segment clones. The strategy depends on the utilization of chromosome specific libraries of small (1--15 kb) segments from each of the two chromosomes. Since the time of submission of our previous progress report, we have refined the genetic map of markers which we had previously isolated for chromosome 17. We have completed our genetic mapping in CEPH reference and NF1 families of 15 markers in the pericentric region of chromosome 17. Physical mapping results with three probes, were shown be in very close genetic proximity to the NF1 gene, with respect to two translocation breakpoints which disrupt the activity of the gene. All three of the probes were found to lie between the centromere and the most proximal translocation breakpoint, providing important genetic markers proximal to the NF1 gene. Our primary focus has shifted to the X chromosome. We have isolated an additional 30 polymorphic markers, bringing the total number we have isolated to over 80. We have invested substantial effort in characterizing the polymorphisms at each of these loci and constructed plasmid subclones which reveal the polymorphisms for nearly all of the loci. These subclones are of practical value in that they produce simpler and stronger patterns on human genomic Southern blots, thus improving the efficiency of the genetic mapping experiments. These subclones may also be of value for deriving DNA sequence information at each locus, necessary for establishing polymerase chain reaction primers specific for each locus. Such information would allow the use of each locus as a sequence tagged site.

  5. Genome-wide detection of chromosomal rearrangements, indels, and mutations in circular chromosomes by short read sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Ole; Bak, Mads; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    a combination of WGS and genome copy number analysis, for the identification of mutations that suppress the growth deficiency imposed by excessive initiations from the Escherichia coli origin of replication, oriC. The E. coli chromosome, like the majority of bacterial chromosomes, is circular, and DNA...... replication is initiated by assembling two replication complexes at the origin, oriC. These complexes then replicate the chromosome bidirectionally toward the terminus, ter. In a population of growing cells, this results in a copy number gradient, so that origin-proximal sequences are more frequent than...... origin-distal sequences. Major rearrangements in the chromosome are, therefore, readily identified by changes in copy number, i.e., certain sequences become over- or under-represented. Of the eight mutations analyzed in detail here, six were found to affect a single gene only, one was a large chromosomal...

  6. Structural basis for cyclization specificity of two Azotobacter type III polyketide synthases: a single amino acid substitution reverses their cyclization specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satou, Ryutaro; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Ozawa, Hiroki; Funa, Nobutaka; Katsuyama, Yohei; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Tanokura, Masaru; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2013-11-22

    Type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) show diverse cyclization specificity. We previously characterized two Azotobacter type III PKSs (ArsB and ArsC) with different cyclization specificity. ArsB and ArsC, which share a high sequence identity (71%), produce alkylresorcinols and alkylpyrones through aldol condensation and lactonization of the same polyketomethylene intermediate, respectively. Here we identified a key amino acid residue for the cyclization specificity of each enzyme by site-directed mutagenesis. Trp-281 of ArsB corresponded to Gly-284 of ArsC in the amino acid sequence alignment. The ArsB W281G mutant synthesized alkylpyrone but not alkylresorcinol. In contrast, the ArsC G284W mutant synthesized alkylresorcinol with a small amount of alkylpyrone. These results indicate that this amino acid residue (Trp-281 of ArsB or Gly-284 of ArsC) should occupy a critical position for the cyclization specificity of each enzyme. We then determined crystal structures of the wild-type and G284W ArsC proteins at resolutions of 1.76 and 1.99 Å, respectively. Comparison of these two ArsC structures indicates that the G284W substitution brings a steric wall to the active site cavity, resulting in a significant reduction of the cavity volume. We postulate that the polyketomethylene intermediate can be folded to a suitable form for aldol condensation only in such a relatively narrow cavity of ArsC G284W (and presumably ArsB). This is the first report on the alteration of cyclization specificity from lactonization to aldol condensation for a type III PKS. The ArsC G284W structure is significant as it is the first reported structure of a microbial resorcinol synthase.

  7. Origin and Evolution of the Neo-Sex Chromosomes in Pamphagidae Grasshoppers through Chromosome Fusion and Following Heteromorphization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugrov, Alexander Gennadievich; Buleu, Olesya Georgievna; Bogomolov, Anton Gennadievich; Rubtsov, Nikolay Borisovich

    2017-01-01

    In most phylogenetic lineages, the evolution of sex chromosomes is accompanied by their heteromorphization and degradation of one of them. The neo-sex chromosomes are useful model for studying early stages of these processes. Recently two lineages of the neo-sex chromosomes on different stages of heteromorphization was discovered in Pamphagidae family. The neo-sex chromosome heteromorphization was analyzed by generation of DNA probes derived from the neo-Xs and neo-Ys followed with chromosome painting in nineteen species of Pamphagidae family. The homologous regions of the neo-sex chromosomes were determined in closely related species with the painting procedure and image analysis with application of the Visualization of the Specific Signal in Silico software package. Results of these analyses and distribution of C-positive regions in the neo-sex chromosomes revealed details of the heteromorphization of the neo-sex chromosomes in species from both phylogenetic lineages of Pamphagidae grasshoppers. The hypothetical mechanism of the neo-Y degradation was suggested. It includes expansion of different repeats from the proximal neo-Y chromosome region by inversions, spreading them towards distal region. Amplification of these repeats leads to formation of C-positive regions and elimination of the C-negative regions located between them. PMID:29137168

  8. Minimal sharing of Y-chromosome STR haplotypes among five endogamous population groups from western and southwestern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Birajalaxmi; Chauhan, P S; Seshadri, M

    2004-10-01

    We attempt to address the issue of genetic variation and the pattern of male gene flow among and between five Indian population groups of two different geographic and linguistic affiliations using Y-chromosome markers. We studied 221 males at three Y-chromosome biallelic loci and 184 males for the five Y-chromosome STRs. We observed 111 Y-chromosome STR haplotypes. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) based on Y-chromosome STRs showed that the variation observed between the population groups belonging to two major regions (western and southwestern India) was 0.17%, which was significantly lower than the level of genetic variance among the five populations (0.59%) considered as a single group. Combined haplotype analysis of the five STRs and the biallelic locus 92R7 revealed minimal sharing of haplotypes among these five ethnic groups, irrespective of the similar origin of the linguistic and geographic affiliations; this minimal sharing indicates restricted male gene flow. As a consequence, most of the haplotypes were population specific. Network analysis showed that the haplotypes, which were shared between the populations, seem to have originated from different mutational pathways at different loci. Biallelic markers showed that all five ethnic groups have a similar ancestral origin despite their geographic and linguistic diversity.

  9. Importance of Hypervariable Region 2 for Stability and Affinity of a Shark Single-Domain Antibody Specific for Ebola Virus Nucleoprotein.

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    George P Anderson

    Full Text Available Single-domain antibodies derived from the unique New Antigen Receptor found in sharks have numerous potential applications, ranging from diagnostic reagents to therapeutics. Shark-derived single-domain antibodies possess the same characteristic ability to refold after heat denaturation found in single-domain antibodies derived from camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies. Recently, two shark derived single-domain antibodies specific for the nucleoprotein of Ebola virus were described. Our evaluation confirmed their high affinity for the nucleoprotein, but found their melting temperatures to be low relative to most single-domain antibodies. Our first approach towards improving their stability was grafting antigen-binding regions (complementarity determining regions of one of these single-domain antibodies onto a high melting temperature shark single-domain antibody. This resulted in two variants: one that displayed excellent affinity with a low melting temperature, while the other had poor affinity but a higher melting temperature. These new proteins, however, differed in only 3 amino acids within the complementarity determining region 2 sequence. In shark single-domain antibodies, the complementarity determining region 2 is often referred to as hypervariable region 2, as this segment of the antibody domain is truncated compared to the sequence in camelid single-domain antibodies and conventional heavy chain variable domains. To elucidate which of the three amino acids or combinations thereof were responsible for the affinity and stability we made the 6 double and single point mutants that covered the intermediates between these two clones. We found a single amino acid change that achieved a 10°C higher melting temperature while maintaining sub nM affinity. This research gives insights into the impact of the shark sdAb hypervariable 2 region on both stability and affinity.

  10. Chromosomal evolution among leaf-nosed nectarivorous bats – evidence from cross-species chromosome painting (Phyllostomidae, Chiroptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background New World leaf-nosed bats, Phyllostomidae, represent a lineage of Chiroptera marked by unprecedented morphological/ecological diversity and extensive intergeneric chromosomal reorganization. There are still disagreements regarding their systematic relationships due to morphological convergence among some groups. Their history of karyotypic evolution also remains to be documented. Results To better understand the evolutionary relationships within Phyllostomidae, we developed chromosome paints from the bat species Macrotus californicus. We tested the potential of these paints as phylogenetic tools by looking for chromosomal signatures in two lineages of nectarivorous phyllostomids whose independent origins have been statistically supported by molecular phylogenies. By examining the chromosomal homologies defined by chromosome painting among two representatives of the subfamily Glossophaginae (Glossophaga soricina and Anoura cultrata) and one species from the subfamily Lonchophyllinae (Lonchophylla concava), we found chromosomal correspondence in regions not previously detected by other comparative cytogenetic techniques. We proposed the corresponding human chromosomal segments for chromosomes of the investigated species and found two syntenic associations shared by G. soricina and A. cultrata. Conclusion Comparative painting with whole chromosome-specific paints of M. californicus demonstrates an extensive chromosomal reorganization within the two lineages of nectarivorous phyllostomids, with a large number of chromosomes shared between M. californicus and G. soricina. We show that the evolution of nectar-feeding bats occurs mainly by reshuffling of chiropteran Evolutionarily Conserved Units (ECUs). Robertsonian fusions/fissions and inversions seem to be important modifiers of phyllostomid karyotypes, and autapomorphic character states are common within species. Macrotus californicus chromosome paints will be a valuable tool for documenting the pattern of

  11. Chromosomal evolution among leaf-nosed nectarivorous bats--evidence from cross-species chromosome painting (Phyllostomidae, Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G; Volleth, Marianne; Gollahon, Lauren S; Fu, Beiyuan; Cheng, William; Ng, Bee L; Yang, Fengtang; Baker, Robert J

    2013-12-26

    New World leaf-nosed bats, Phyllostomidae, represent a lineage of Chiroptera marked by unprecedented morphological/ecological diversity and extensive intergeneric chromosomal reorganization. There are still disagreements regarding their systematic relationships due to morphological convergence among some groups. Their history of karyotypic evolution also remains to be documented. To better understand the evolutionary relationships within Phyllostomidae, we developed chromosome paints from the bat species Macrotus californicus. We tested the potential of these paints as phylogenetic tools by looking for chromosomal signatures in two lineages of nectarivorous phyllostomids whose independent origins have been statistically supported by molecular phylogenies. By examining the chromosomal homologies defined by chromosome painting among two representatives of the subfamily Glossophaginae (Glossophaga soricina and Anoura cultrata) and one species from the subfamily Lonchophyllinae (Lonchophylla concava), we found chromosomal correspondence in regions not previously detected by other comparative cytogenetic techniques. We proposed the corresponding human chromosomal segments for chromosomes of the investigated species and found two syntenic associations shared by G. soricina and A. cultrata. Comparative painting with whole chromosome-specific paints of M. californicus demonstrates an extensive chromosomal reorganization within the two lineages of nectarivorous phyllostomids, with a large number of chromosomes shared between M. californicus and G. soricina. We show that the evolution of nectar-feeding bats occurs mainly by reshuffling of chiropteran Evolutionarily Conserved Units (ECUs). Robertsonian fusions/fissions and inversions seem to be important modifiers of phyllostomid karyotypes, and autapomorphic character states are common within species. Macrotus californicus chromosome paints will be a valuable tool for documenting the pattern of karyotypic evolution within

  12. Rapid divergence and expansion of the X chromosome in papaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwend, Andrea R.; Yu, Qingyi; Tong, Eric J.; Zeng, Fanchang; Han, Jennifer; VanBuren, Robert; Aryal, Rishi; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H.; Paterson, Andrew H.; Ming, Ray

    2012-01-01

    X chromosomes have long been thought to conserve the structure and gene content of the ancestral autosome from which the sex chromosomes evolved. We compared the recently evolved papaya sex chromosomes with a homologous autosome of a close relative, the monoecious Vasconcellea monoica, to infer changes since recombination stopped between the papaya sex chromosomes. We sequenced 12 V. monoica bacterial artificial chromosomes, 11 corresponding to the papaya X-specific region, and 1 to a papaya autosomal