WorldWideScience

Sample records for single small tunnel

  1. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q ∼ 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement

  2. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments investigated the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very-small-capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson-phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters. The experiments on small-capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the large-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wave function has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias

  3. Single Electron Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-01-01

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  4. Single-contact tunneling thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-02-23

    A single-contact tunneling thermometry circuit includes a tunnel junction formed between two objects. Junction temperature gradient information is determined based on a mathematical relationship between a target alternating voltage applied across the junction and the junction temperature gradient. Total voltage measured across the junction indicates the magnitude of the target alternating voltage. A thermal gradient is induced across the junction. A reference thermovoltage is measured when zero alternating voltage is applied across the junction. An increasing alternating voltage is applied while measuring a thermovoltage component and a DC rectification voltage component created by the applied alternating voltage. The target alternating voltage is reached when the thermovoltage is nullified or doubled by the DC rectification voltage depending on the sign of the reference thermovoltage. Thermoelectric current and current measurements may be utilized in place of the thermovoltage and voltage measurements. The system may be automated with a feedback loop.

  5. Microwave-induced co-tunneling in single electron tunneling transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnaes, M.; Savolainen, M.; Manscher, M.

    2002-01-01

    on rubber bellows. Cross-talk was minimized by using individual coaxial lines between the sample and the room temperature electronics: The co-tunneling experiments were performed at zero DC bias current by measuring the voltage response to a very small amplitude 2 Hz current modulation with the gate voltage......The influence of microwaves on the co-tunneling in single electron tunneling transistors has been investigated as function of frequency and power in the temperature range from 150 to 500 mK. All 20 low frequency connections and the RF line were filtered, and the whole cryostat was suspended...

  6. Tunneling spin injection into single layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Pi, K; McCreary, K M; Li, Yan; Wong, Jared J I; Swartz, A G; Kawakami, R K

    2010-10-15

    We achieve tunneling spin injection from Co into single layer graphene (SLG) using TiO₂ seeded MgO barriers. A nonlocal magnetoresistance (ΔR(NL)) of 130  Ω is observed at room temperature, which is the largest value observed in any material. Investigating ΔR(NL) vs SLG conductivity from the transparent to the tunneling contact regimes demonstrates the contrasting behaviors predicted by the drift-diffusion theory of spin transport. Furthermore, tunnel barriers reduce the contact-induced spin relaxation and are therefore important for future investigations of spin relaxation in graphene.

  7. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with a single-crystalline LiF tunnel barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Narayananellore, Sai; Doko, Naoki; Matsuo, Norihiro; Saito, Hidekazu; Yuasa, Shinji

    2018-04-01

    We fabricated Fe/LiF/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgO(001) substrate, where LiF is an insulating tunnel barrier with the same crystal structure as MgO (rock-salt type). Crystallographical studies such as transmission electron microscopy and nanobeam electron diffraction observations revealed that the LiF tunnel barrier is single-crystalline and has a LiF(001)[100] ∥ bottom Fe(001)[110] crystal orientation, which is constructed in the same manner as MgO(001) on Fe(001). Also, the in-plane lattice mismatch between the LiF tunnel barrier and the Fe bottom electrode was estimated to be small (about 0.5%). Despite such advantages for the tunnel barrier of the MTJ, the observed tunnel magnetoresistance (MR) ratio was low (˜6% at 20 K) and showed a significant decrease with increasing temperature (˜1% at room temperature). The results imply that indirect tunneling and/or thermally excited carriers in the LiF tunnel barrier, in which the current basically is not spin-polarized, play a major role in electrical transport in the MTJ.

  8. Simulation of single-electron tunnelling circuits using SPICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Haar, R.

    2004-01-01

    Single-electron tunnelling (SET) devices have very promising properties, like their extremely low power consumption, their extremely high switching speeds and their extremely small physical dimensions. Since the field of SET devices is far from being fully exploited, and their device properties seem

  9. High-Performance Single Nanowire Tunnel Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallentin, Jesper; Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate single nanowire tunnel diodes with room temperature peak current densities of up to 329 A/cm(2). Despite the large surface to volume ratio of the type-II InP-GaAs axial heterostructure nanowires, we measure peak to valley current ratios (PVCR) of up to 8.2 at room temperature and 27...

  10. Small Numbers From Tunneling Between Brane Throats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachru, Shamit

    2001-07-25

    Generic classes of string compactifications include ''brane throats'' emanating from the compact dimensions and separated by effective potential barriers raised by the background gravitational fields. The interaction of observers inside different throats occurs via tunneling and is consequently weak. This provides a new mechanism for generating small numbers in Nature. We apply it to the hierarchy problem, where supersymmetry breaking near the unification scale causes TeV sparticle masses inside the standard model throat. We also design naturally long-lived cold dark matter which decays within a Hubble time to the approximate conformal matter of a long throat. This may soften structure formation at galactic scales and raises the possibility that much of the dark matter of the universe is conformal matter. Finally, the tunneling rate shows that the coupling between throats, mediated by bulk modes, is stronger than a naive application of holography suggests.

  11. Single-electron tunnel junction array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likharev, K.K.; Bakhvalov, N.S.; Kazacha, G.S.; Serdyukova, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have carried out an analysis of statics and dynamics of uniform one-dimensional arrays of ultrasmall tunnel junctions. The correlated single-electron tunneling in the junctions of the array results in its behavior qualitatively similar to that of the Josephson transmission line. In particular, external electric fields applied to the array edges can inject single-electron-charged solitons into the array interior. Shape of such soliton and character of its interactions with other solitons and the array edges are very similar to those of the Josephson vortices (sine-Gordon solitons) in the Josephson transmission line. Under certain conditions, a coherent motion of the soliton train along the array is possible, resulting in generation of narrowband SET oscillations with frequency f/sub s/ = /e where is the dc current flowing along the array

  12. Small numbers from tunneling between brane throats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2003-01-01

    In generic string compactifications with branes, the regions of space in the vicinity of brane horizons, or brane throats, support effective potential barriers, raised by the back-ground gravitational fields. A familiar example is the AdS brane throats in the Randall-Sundrum model. The barriers obstruct the interaction of observers inside different throats, whose communication is effectively described by tunneling through the barriers. Consequently the interactions between different throats are exponentially weak. This provides for a new mechanism for explaining small numbers in Nature. We review the applications to the hierarchy problem where supersymmetry breaking scale is reduced by tunneling, long-lived cold dark matter particles which decay into hot CFT, and consider the implications for holography. We finally discuss the important interplay between the tunneling suppression and our recent conjecture that black holes stuck on a brane in AdS D+1 should be interpreted as duals of quantum-corrected D-dimensional black holes, rather than classical ones, of a CFT coupled to gravity. (author)

  13. Small-size low-temperature scanning tunnel microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al'tfeder, I.B.; Khajkin, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    A small-size scanning tunnel microscope, designed for operation in transport helium-filled Dewar flasks is described. The microscope design contains a device moving the pin to the tested sample surface and a piezoelectric fine positioning device. High vibration protection of the microscope is provided by its suspension using silk threads. The small-size scanning tunnel microscope provides for atomic resolution

  14. Single-atom contacts with a scanning tunnelling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, J; Neel, N; Sperl, A; Wang, Y F; Berndt, R

    2009-01-01

    The tip of a cryogenic scanning tunnelling microscope is used to controllably contact single atoms adsorbed on metal surfaces. The transition between tunnelling and contact is gradual for silver, while contact to adsorbed gold atoms is abrupt. The single-atom junctions are stable and enable spectroscopic measurements of, e.g., the Abrikosov-Suhl resonance of single Kondo impurities.

  15. Seismic Response of Tunnel Lining for Shallow-Bias Tunnel with a Small Clear Distance under Wenchuan Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the internal force characteristics of shallow-bias tunnel with a small clear distance in earthquake, a large-scale shaking table slope model test was designed, and the geometric scale was 1 : 10. In the model test, the Wenchuan (WC seismic wave was used as the excitation wave. Then, the three-dimensional numerical model was established by using MIDAS-NX, and the reliability of the numerical model was verified by comparing the acceleration of the test results. The axial force, bending moment, and shear force of the tunnel cross section and longitudinal direction were calculated by the numerical model under different excitation directions included the horizontal direction (X, the vertical direction (Z, and the horizontal and vertical direction (XZ. The results show the following. (1 The internal force of right arch foot of left hole and the left arch foot of right hole is larger than other part of the tunnels because the distance between the two tunnels is smaller and they interact with each other. (2 The loading direction of single direction loading method is different and the variation trend of tunnel force are different, so the loading direction of seismic wave has a significant influence on the seismic force response of the tunnel. (3 All of the internal force values of tunnel lining under the seismic wave action in bidirection are larger than those in single direction. The value is not a simple superposition of two directions and has some coupling effect. The influence of the vertical seismic wave cannot be ignored in dynamic response research. These results improve the understanding of the rock slope with small spacing tunnel under seismic action.

  16. "Size-Independent" Single-Electron Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianli; Sun, Shasha; Swartz, Logan; Riechers, Shawn; Hu, Peiguang; Chen, Shaowei; Zheng, Jie; Liu, Gang-Yu

    2015-12-17

    Incorporating single-electron tunneling (SET) of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) into modern electronic devices offers great promise to enable new properties; however, it is technically very challenging due to the necessity to integrate ultrasmall (<10 nm) particles into the devices. The nanosize requirements are intrinsic for NPs to exhibit quantum or SET behaviors, for example, 10 nm or smaller, at room temperature. This work represents the first observation of SET that defies the well-known size restriction. Using polycrystalline Au NPs synthesized via our newly developed solid-state glycine matrices method, a Coulomb Blockade was observed for particles as large as tens of nanometers, and the blockade voltage exhibited little dependence on the size of the NPs. These observations are counterintuitive at first glance. Further investigations reveal that each observed SET arises from the ultrasmall single crystalline grain(s) within the polycrystal NP, which is (are) sufficiently isolated from the nearest neighbor grains. This work demonstrates the concept and feasibility to overcome orthodox spatial confinement requirements to achieve quantum effects.

  17. Quantum dot resonant tunneling diode single photon detector with aluminum oxide aperture defined tunneling area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, H.W.; Kardynal, Beata; Ellis, D.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum dot resonant tunneling diode single photon detector with independently defined absorption and sensing areas is demonstrated. The device, in which the tunneling is constricted to an aperture in an insulating layer in the emitter, shows electrical characteristics typical of high quality res...

  18. High Performance Single Nanowire Tunnel Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallentin, Jesper; Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    NWs were contacted in a NW-FET setup. Electrical measurements at room temperature display typical tunnel diode behavior, with a Peak-to-Valley Current Ratio (PVCR) as high as 8.2 and a peak current density as high as 329 A/cm2. Low temperature measurements show improved PVCR of up to 27.6....... is the tunnel (Esaki) diode, which provides a low-resistance connection between junctions. We demonstrate an InP-GaAs NW axial heterostructure with tunnel diode behavior. InP and GaAs can be readily n- and p-doped, respectively, and the heterointerface is expected to have an advantageous type II band alignment...

  19. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of a single nuclear spin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, F; Fernández-Rossier, J

    2011-08-12

    Detection of a single nuclear spin constitutes an outstanding problem in different fields of physics such as quantum computing or magnetic imaging. Here we show that the energy levels of a single nuclear spin can be measured by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). We consider two different systems, a magnetic adatom probed with scanning tunneling microscopy and a single Bi dopant in a silicon nanotransistor. We find that the hyperfine coupling opens new transport channels which can be resolved at experimentally accessible temperatures. Our simulations evince that IETS yields information about the occupations of the nuclear spin states, paving the way towards transport-detected single nuclear spin resonance.

  20. Theory of single-spin inelastic tunneling spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rossier, J

    2009-06-26

    I show that recent experiments of inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy of single and a few magnetic atoms are modeled with a phenomenological spin-assisted tunneling Hamiltonian so that the inelastic dI/dV line shape is related to the spin spectral weight of the magnetic atom. This accounts for the spin selection rules and dI/dV spectra observed experimentally for single Fe and Mn atoms deposited on Cu2N. In the case of chains of Mn atoms it is found necessary to include both first and second-neighbor exchange interactions as well as single-ion anisotropy.

  1. Single-electron tunneling in InP nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franceschi, De S.; Dam, Van J.A.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Feiner, L.F.; Gurevich, L.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2003-01-01

    A study was performed on single-electron tunneling in InP nanowires. The contact resistances as low as ~10 k¿, with minor temperature dependence were obtained. The Coulomb-blockade behavior was shown with single-electron charging energies of ~1 meV.

  2. Small-scale tunnel test for blast performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felts, J E; Lee, R J

    2014-01-01

    The data reported here provide a validation of a small-scale tunnel test as a tool to guide the optimization of new explosives for blast performance in tunnels. The small-scale arrangement consisted of a 2-g booster and 10-g sample mounted at the closed end of a 127 mm diameter by 4.6-m long steel tube with pressure transducers along its length. The three performance characteristics considered were peak pressure, initial energy release, and impulse. The relative performance from five explosives was compared to that from a 1.16-m diameter by 30-m long tunnel that used 2.27-kg samples. The peak pressure values didn't correlate between the tunnels. Partial impulse for the explosives did rank similarly. The initial energy release was determined from a one-dimensional point-source analysis, which nearly tracked with impulse suggesting additional energy released further down the tunnel for some explosives. This test is a viable tool for optimizing compositional variations for blast performance in target scenarios of similar geometry.

  3. Single-electron tunneling in double-barrier nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, V.J.; Su, B.; Cunningham, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors review experimental study of charge transport in nanometer double-barrier resonant tunneling devices. Heterostructure material is asymmetric: one barrier is substantially less transparent than the other. Resonant tunneling through size-quantized well states and single-electron charging of the well are thus largely separated in the two bias polarities. When the emitter barrier is more transparent than the collector barrier, electrons accumulate in the well; incremental electron occupation of the well is accompanied by Coulomb blockade leading to sharp steps of the tunneling current. When the emitter barrier is less transparent, the current reflects resonant tunneling of just one electron at a time through size-quantized well states; the current peaks and/or steps (depending on experimental parameters) appear in current-voltage characteristics. Magnetic field and temperature effects are also reviewed. Good agreement is achieved in comparison of many features of experimental data with simple theoretical models

  4. Electromigration of single metal atoms observed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, K.-F.; Soe, W.H.; Flipse, C.F.J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors show in this letter that single metal atoms on a Ni(111) surface can be pushed by electromigration forces from a scanning tunneling microscope tip. This repulsive interaction is obsd. over a length scale of 6 nm. While for voltages above -300 mV the atoms are pulled by the microscope

  5. Subelectron transport in single-electron-tunneling arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel M.; Sverdlov, Victor A.; Likharev, Konstantin K.

    2002-05-01

    We have shown that a special distribution of background charges in islands of single-electron-tunneling arrays can completely suppress its Coulomb blockade and at the same time reduce substantially its shot noise at low applied voltages. In particular the Fano factor F can approach the minimum value Fmin=1/Nopalescence.

  6. A new technique of single portal endoscopic carpal tunnel release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Wing-Yuk Josephine; Sweed, Tamer Ahmed; Fung, Kwok Keung Boris; Tipoe, George L; Pun, Tze Shing

    2012-03-01

    Since the first description of endoscopic carpal tunnel release (ECTR) in 1987 by Okutsu many endoscopic techniques have been developed, but the majority of the literature on ECTR has dealt with the Chow and Agee techniques. ECTR is indicated for carpal tunnel syndrome that is not responding to conservative treatment for 6 months. This new technique of ECTR is a single-portal technique using instruments originally designed for endoscopic cubital tunnel release, with no disposable instruments used. It also has the advantage of performing the release with the median nerve protected under direct vision. Ten cases were operated with this technique after performing the procedure on 8 hands of 4 fresh frozen cadavers. There were no neurovascular or tendon injuries with this technique and patients were satisfied with the results.

  7. Single Nucleobase Identification Using Biophysical Signatures from Nanoelectronic Quantum Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshoj, Lee E; Afsari, Sepideh; Khan, Sajida; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-03-01

    Nanoelectronic DNA sequencing can provide an important alternative to sequencing-by-synthesis by reducing sample preparation time, cost, and complexity as a high-throughput next-generation technique with accurate single-molecule identification. However, sample noise and signature overlap continue to prevent high-resolution and accurate sequencing results. Probing the molecular orbitals of chemically distinct DNA nucleobases offers a path for facile sequence identification, but molecular entropy (from nucleotide conformations) makes such identification difficult when relying only on the energies of lowest-unoccupied and highest-occupied molecular orbitals (LUMO and HOMO). Here, nine biophysical parameters are developed to better characterize molecular orbitals of individual nucleobases, intended for single-molecule DNA sequencing using quantum tunneling of charges. For this analysis, theoretical models for quantum tunneling are combined with transition voltage spectroscopy to obtain measurable parameters unique to the molecule within an electronic junction. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy is then used to measure these nine biophysical parameters for DNA nucleotides, and a modified machine learning algorithm identified nucleobases. The new parameters significantly improve base calling over merely using LUMO and HOMO frontier orbital energies. Furthermore, high accuracies for identifying DNA nucleobases were observed at different pH conditions. These results have significant implications for developing a robust and accurate high-throughput nanoelectronic DNA sequencing technique. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Low-temperature phonoemissive tunneling rates in single molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Garg, Anupam

    2016-03-01

    Tunneling between the two lowest energy levels of single molecule magnets with Ising type anisotropy, accompanied by the emission or absorption of phonons, is considered. Quantitatively accurate calculations of the rates for such tunneling are performed for a model Hamiltonian especially relevant to the best studied example, Fe8. Two different methods are used: high-order perturbation theory in the spin-phonon interaction and the non-Ising-symmetric parts of the spin Hamiltonian, and a novel semiclassical approach based on spin-coherent-state-path-integral instantons. The methods are found to be in good quantitative agreement with other, and consistent with previous approaches to the problem. The implications of these results for magnetization of molecular solids of these molecules are discussed briefly.

  9. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics.

  10. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in single-molecule magnet junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haiqing; Wang, Qiang; Jiao, Hujun; Liang, J.-Q.

    2012-08-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum transport through single-molecule magnet (SMM) junctions with ferromagnetic and normal-metal leads in the sequential regime. The current obtained by means of the rate-equation gives rise to the tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR), which varies with the angle between the magnetization direction of ferromagnetic lead and the easy axis of SMM. The angular dependence of TAMR can serve as a probe to determine experimentally the easy axis of SMM. Moreover, it is demonstrated that both the magnitude and the sign of TAMR are tunable by the bias voltage, suggesting a new spin-valve device with only one magnetic electrode in molecular spintronics.

  11. Generating Small Numbers by Tunneling in Multi-Throat Compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverstein, Eva M

    2001-07-25

    A generic F-theory compactification containing many D3 branes develops multiple brane throats. The interaction of observers residing inside different throats involves tunneling suppression and, as a result, is very weak. This suggests a new mechanism for generating small numbers in Nature. One application is to the hierarchy problem: large supersymmetry breaking near the unification scale inside a shallow throat causes TeV-scale SUSY-breaking inside the standard-model throat. Another application, inspired by nuclear-decay, is in designing naturally long-lived particles: a cold dark matter particle residing near the standard model brane decays to an approximate CFT-state of a longer throat within a Hubble time. This suggests that most of the mass of the universe today could consist of CFT-matter and may soften structure formation at sub-galactic scales. The tunneling calculation demonstrates that the coupling between two throats is dominated by higher dimensional modes and consequently is much larger than a naive application of holography might suggest.

  12. Water table tests of proposed heat transfer tunnels for small turbine vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1974-01-01

    Water-table flow tests were conducted for proposed heat-transfer tunnels which were designed to provide uniform flow into their respective test sections of a single core engine turbine vane and a full annular ring of helicopter turbine vanes. Water-table tests were also performed for the single-vane test section of the core engine tunnel. The flow in the heat-transfer tunnels was shown to be acceptable.

  13. Quantum Tunneling of Magnetization in Trigonal Single-Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjie; Del Barco, Enrique; Hill, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    We perform a numerical analysis of the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) that occurs in a spin S = 6 single-molecule magnet (SMM) with idealized C3 symmetry. The deconstructive points in the QTM are located by following the Berry-phase interference (BPI) oscillations. We find that the O4^3 (=12[Sz,S+^3 +S-^3 ]) operator unfreezes odd-k QTM resonances and generates three-fold patterns of BPI minima in all resonances, including k = 0! This behavior cannot be reproduced with operators that possess even rotational symmetry about the quantization axis. We find also that the k = 0 BPI minima shift away from zero longitudinal field. The wider implications of these results will be discussed in terms of the QTM behavior observed in other SMMs.

  14. Plasmonic tunnel junctions for single-molecule redox chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nijs, Bart; Benz, Felix; Barrow, Steven J; Sigle, Daniel O; Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Palma, Aniello; Carnegie, Cloudy; Kamp, Marlous; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Scherman, Oren A; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2017-10-20

    Nanoparticles attached just above a flat metallic surface can trap optical fields in the nanoscale gap. This enables local spectroscopy of a few molecules within each coupled plasmonic hotspot, with near thousand-fold enhancement of the incident fields. As a result of non-radiative relaxation pathways, the plasmons in such sub-nanometre cavities generate hot charge carriers, which can catalyse chemical reactions or induce redox processes in molecules located within the plasmonic hotspots. Here, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy allows us to track these hot-electron-induced chemical reduction processes in a series of different aromatic molecules. We demonstrate that by increasing the tunnelling barrier height and the dephasing strength, a transition from coherent to hopping electron transport occurs, enabling observation of redox processes in real time at the single-molecule level.

  15. Low-frequency noise in single electron tunneling transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavkhelidze, A.N.; Mygind, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    The noise in current biased aluminium single electron tunneling (SET) transistors has been investigated in the frequency range of 5 mHz ..., we find the same input charge noise, typically QN = 5 × 10–4 e/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz, with and without the HF shielding. At lower frequencies, the noise is due to charge trapping, and the voltage noise pattern superimposed on the V(Vg) curve (voltage across transistor versus gate voltage) strongly depends...... when ramping the junction voltage. Dynamic trapping may limit the high frequency applications of the SET transistor. Also reported on are the effects of rf irradiation and the dependence of the SET transistor noise on bias voltage. ©1998 American Institute of Physics....

  16. Chemical Transfer (Single Small-Scale) Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratoryThe Chemical Transfer Facility (CTF)  is the only U.S. single small-scale  facility, a single repository for the Army’s...

  17. Small angle single arm spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, C.Y.

    1976-01-01

    A study is given of an experiment described in the 1975 Summer Study to review the adequacy of the apparatus for its physics goals, equipment needs, logistic needs, vacuum chambers, compatibility with other experiments and to summarize its impacts on ISABELLE. The spectrometer is designed to study single particle inclusive spectra near x = 1 with particle identification and good momentum resolution

  18. Simulating Small-Scale Experiments of In-Tunnel Airblast Using STUN and ALE3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuscamman, Stephanie [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glenn, Lewis [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schebler, Gregory [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McMichael, Larry [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glascoe, Lee [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-09-12

    This report details continuing validation efforts for the Sphere and Tunnel (STUN) and ALE3D codes. STUN has been validated previously for blast propagation through tunnels using several sets of experimental data with varying charge sizes and tunnel configurations, including the MARVEL nuclear driven shock tube experiment (Glenn, 2001). The DHS-funded STUNTool version is compared to experimental data and the LLNL ALE3D hydrocode. In this particular study, we compare the performance of the STUN and ALE3D codes in modeling an in-tunnel airblast to experimental results obtained by Lunderman and Ohrt in a series of small-scale high explosive experiments (1997).

  19. Tunneling Mode of Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy: Probing Electrochemical Processes at Single Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tong; Wang, Dengchao; Mirkin, Michael V

    2018-06-18

    Electrochemical experiments at individual nanoparticles (NPs) can provide new insights into their structure-activity relationships. By using small nanoelectrodes as tips in a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), we recently imaged individual surface-bound 10-50 nm metal NPs. Herein, we introduce a new mode of SECM operation based on tunneling between the tip and a nanoparticle immobilized on the insulating surface. The obtained current vs. distance curves show the transition from the conventional feedback response to electron tunneling between the tip and the NP at separation distances of less than about 3 nm. In addition to high-resolution imaging of the NP topography, the tunneling mode enables measurement of the heterogeneous kinetics at a single NP without making an ohmic contact with it. The developed method should be useful for studying the effects of nanoparticle size and geometry on electrocatalytic activity in real-world applications. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Analytical calculation of spin tunneling effect in single molecule magnet Fe8 with considering quadrupole excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Y Yousefi; H Fakhari; K Muminov; M R Benam

    2018-01-01

    Spin tunneling effect in Single Molecule Magnet Fe8 is studied by instanton calculation technique using SU(3) generalized spin coherent state in real parameter as a trial function. For this SMM, tunnel splitting arises due to the presence of a Berry like phase in action, which causes interference between tunneling trajectories (instantons). For this SMM, it is established that the use of quadrupole excitation (g dependence) changes not only the location of the quenching points, but also the n...

  1. Quantum Tunneling of Magnetization in Single Molecular Magnets Coupled to Ferromagnetic Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnas, Józef

    2006-01-01

    The role of spin polarized reservoirs in quantum tunneling of magnetization and relaxation processes in a single molecular magnet (SMM) is investigated theoretically. The SMM is exchange-coupled to the reservoirs and also subjected to a magnetic field varying in time, which enables the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). The spin relaxation times are calculated from the Fermi golden rule. The exchange interaction with tunneling electrons is shown to affect the spin reversal due to QTM. ...

  2. Manifestation of Spin Selection Rules on the Quantum Tunneling of Magnetization in a Single Molecule Magnet

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, J. J.; Koo, C.; Feng, P. L.; del Barco, E.; Hill, S.; Tupitsyn, I. S.; Stamp, P. C. E.; Hendrickson, D. N.

    2009-01-01

    We present low temperature magnetometry measurements on a new Mn3 single-molecule magnet (SMM) in which the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) displays clear evidence for quantum mechanical selection rules. A QTM resonance appearing only at elevated temperatures demonstrates tunneling between excited states with spin projections differing by a multiple of three: this is dictated by the C3 symmetry of the molecule, which forbids pure tunneling from the lowest metastable state. Resonances...

  3. Tunneling-Electron-Induced Light Emission from Single Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Arthur; Li, Shaowei; Czap, Gregory; Ho, W

    2016-09-14

    The coupling of tunneling electrons with the tip-nanocluster-substrate junction plasmon was investigated by monitoring light emission in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Gold atoms were evaporated onto the ∼5 Å thick Al2O3 thin film grown on the NiAl (110) surface where they formed nanoclusters 3-7 nm wide. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) of these nanoclusters revealed quantum-confined electronic states. Spatially resolved photon imaging showed localized emission hot spots. Size dependent study and light emission from nanocluster dimers further support the viewpoint that coupling of tunneling electrons to the junction plasmon is the main radiative mechanism. These results showed the potential of the STM to reveal the electronic and optical properties of nanoscale metallic systems in the confined geometry of the tunnel junction.

  4. Magnetic Quantum Tunneling and Symmetry in Single Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Andrew D.

    2003-03-01

    We have studied the symmetry of magnetic quantum tunneling (MQT) in single molecule magnets (SMMs) using a micro-Hall effect magnetometer and high field vector superconducting magnet system. In the most widely studied SMM, Mn12-acetate, an average crystal 4-fold symmetry in the magnetic response is shown to be due to local molecular environments of 2-fold symmetry that are rotated by 90 degrees with respect to one another. We attribute this to ligand disorder that leads to local rhombic distortions, a model first proposed by Cornia et al. based on x-ray diffraction data [1]. We have magnetically distilled a Mn12-acetate crystal to study a subset of these lower (2-fold) site symmetry molecules and present evidence for a spin-parity effect consistent with a local 2-fold symmetry [2]. These results highlight the importance of subtle changes in molecule environment in modulating magnetic anisotropy and MQT. [1] Cornia et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 257201 (2002) [2] E. del Barco, A. D. Kent, E. Rumberger, D. H. Hendrickson, G. Christou, submitted for publication (2002) and Europhys. Lett. 60, 768 (2002)

  5. Landau-Zener tunneling in the presence of weak intermolecular interactions in a crystal of Mn4 single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Bhaduri, S.; Vinslava, A.; Christou, G.

    2005-12-01

    A Mn4 single-molecule magnet (SMM), with a well-isolated spin ground state of S=9/2 , is used as a model system to study Landau-Zener (LZ) tunneling in the presence of weak intermolecular dipolar and exchange interactions. The anisotropy constants D and B are measured with minor hysteresis loops. A transverse field is used to tune the tunnel splitting over a large range. Using the LZ and inverse LZ method, it is shown that these interactions play an important role in the tunnel rates. Three regions are identified: (i) at small transverse fields, tunneling is dominated by single tunnel transitions, (ii) at intermediate transverse fields, the measured tunnel rates are governed by reshuffling of internal fields, and (iii) at larger transverse fields, the magnetization reversal starts to be influenced by the direct relaxation process, and many-body tunnel events may occur. The hole digging method is used to study the next-nearest-neighbor interactions. At small external fields, it is shown that magnetic ordering occurs which does not quench tunneling. An applied transverse field can increase the ordering rate. Spin-spin cross-relaxations, mediated by dipolar and weak exchange interactions, are proposed to explain additional quantum steps.

  6. Single-magnon tunneling through a ferromagnetic nanochain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; Ostrovsky, V.

    2010-01-01

    Magnon transmission between ferromagnetic contacts coupled by a linear ferromagnetic chain is studied at the condition when the chain exhibits itself as a tunnel magnon transmitter. It is shown that dependently on magnon energy at the chain, a distant intercontact magnon transmission occurs either in resonant or off-resonant tunneling regime. In the first case, a transmission function depends weakly on the number of chain sites whereas at off-resonant regime the same function manifests an exponential drop with the chain length. Change of direction of external magnetic field in one of ferromagnetic contacts blocks a tunnel transmission of magnon.

  7. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2016-03-21

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions.

  8. A temperature dependent tunneling study of the spin density wave gap in EuFe2As2 single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirban; Anupam; Hossain, Z; Gupta, Anjan K

    2013-09-18

    We report temperature dependent scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy measurements on single crystals of EuFe2As2 in the 15-292 K temperature range. The in situ cleaved crystals show atomic terraces with homogeneous tunnel spectra that correlate well with the spin density wave (SDW) transition at a temperature, TSDW ≈ 186 K. Above TSDW the local tunnel spectra show a small depression in the density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy (EF). The gap becomes more pronounced upon entering the SDW state with a gap value ∼90 meV at 15 K. However, the zero bias conductance remains finite down to 15 K indicating a finite DOS at the EF in the SDW phase. Furthermore, no noticeable change is observed in the DOS at the antiferromagnetic ordering transition of Eu(2+) moments at 19 K.

  9. Probing Single Nanometer-scale Particles with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarty, G.S.; Love, J.C.; Kushmerick, J.G.; Charles, L.F.; Keating, C.D.; Toleno, B.J.; Lyn, M.E.; Castleman, A.W.; Natan, M.J.; Weiss, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy can be used to isolate single particles on surfaces for further study. Local optical and electronic properties coupled with topographic information collected by the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) give insight into the intrinsic properties of the species under study. Since each spectroscopic measurement is done on a single particle, each sample is 'monodisperse', regardless of the degree of heterogeneity of the original preparation. We illustrate this with three example systems - a metal cluster of known atomic structure, metal nanoparticles dispersed from colloid suspensions, and metallocarbohedrenes (Met-Cars) deposited with other reaction products. Au and Ag nanoparticles were imaged using a photon emission STM. The threshold voltage, the lowest bias voltage at which photons are produced, was determined for Au nanoparticles. Electronic spectra of small clusters of Ni atoms on MoS 2 were recorded. Preliminary images of Zr-based Met-Car-containing soot were obtained on Au and MoS 2 substrates and partial electronic spectra were recorded of these possible Met-Car particles

  10. Analysis of Co-Tunneling Current in Fullerene Single-Electron Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    KhademHosseini, Vahideh; Dideban, Daryoosh; Ahmadi, MohammadTaghi; Ismail, Razali

    2018-05-01

    Single-electron transistors (SETs) are nano devices which can be used in low-power electronic systems. They operate based on coulomb blockade effect. This phenomenon controls single-electron tunneling and it switches the current in SET. On the other hand, co-tunneling process increases leakage current, so it reduces main current and reliability of SET. Due to co-tunneling phenomenon, main characteristics of fullerene SET with multiple islands are modelled in this research. Its performance is compared with silicon SET and consequently, research result reports that fullerene SET has lower leakage current and higher reliability than silicon counterpart. Based on the presented model, lower co-tunneling current is achieved by selection of fullerene as SET island material which leads to smaller value of the leakage current. Moreover, island length and the number of islands can affect on co-tunneling and then they tune the current flow in SET.

  11. Quantum Tunneling Symmetry of Single Molecule Magnet Mn_12-acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barco, E.; Kent, A. D.; Rumberger, E.; Hendrikson, D. N.; Christou, G.

    2003-03-01

    We have studied the symmetry of magnetic quantum tunneling (MQT) in single crystals of single molecular magnet (SMM) Mn_12-acetate. A superconducting high field vector magnet was used to apply magnetic fields in arbitrary directions respect to the axes of the crystal. The MQT probability is extracted from the change in magnetization measured on sweeping the field through a MQT resonance. This is related to the quantum splitting of the molecules relaxing in the time window of the experiment [1]. The dependence of the MQT probability on the angle between the applied transverse field and the crystallographic axes shows a four-fold rotation pattern, with maxima at angles separated by 90 degrees. By selecting a part of the splitting distribution of the sample by applying an initial transverse field in the direction of one of the observed maxima the situation changes completely. The resulting behavior of the MQT probability shows a two-fold rotation pattern with maxima separated by 180 degrees. Moreover, if the selection is made by applying the initial transverse field in the direction of a complementary four-fold maximum the behavior shows again two-fold symmetry. However, the maxima are found to be shifted by 90 degrees respect to the first selection. The fact that we observe two-fold symmetry for different selections is a clear evidence of the existence of different molecules with lower anisotropy than the imposed by the tetragonal crystallographic site symmetry. The general four-fold symmetry observed is thus due in large part to equal populations of molecules with opposite signs of the second order anisotropy, as suggested by Cornia et al. and appears to be a consequence of to the existence of a discrete set of lower symmetry isomers in a Mn_12-acetate crystal [2]. [1] E. del Barco, A. D. Kent, E. Rumberger, D. N. Hendrikson and G. Christou, Europhys. Lett. 60, 768 (2002) [2] A. Cornia, R. Sessoli, L. Sorace, D. Gatteschi, A. L. Barra and C. Daiguebonne, Phys. Rev

  12. All-electric-controlled spin current switching in single-molecule magnet-tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng-Zhong; Shen, Rui; Sheng, Li; Wang, Rui-Qiang; Wang, Bai-Gen; Xing, Ding-Yu

    2011-04-01

    A single-molecule magnet (SMM) coupled to two normal metallic electrodes can both switch spin-up and spin-down electronic currents within two different windows of SMM gate voltage. Such spin current switching in the SMM tunnel junction arises from spin-selected single electron resonant tunneling via the lowest unoccupied molecular orbit of the SMM. Since it is not magnetically controlled but all-electrically controlled, the proposed spin current switching effect may have potential applications in future spintronics.

  13. STUDY ON THE BLASTING SEISMIC DAMAGE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR SMALL SPACING SOFT ROCK TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chengzhong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available With a lot construction of transportation infrastructure in Chinese mountainous area, because of its unique advantages such as less land occupation, beautiful appearance and convenient route planning, small spacing tunnels are widely used. The shallow buried tunnel with small spacing, the blasting excavation will lead to tunnel surrounding rock especially in the middle rock wall damage and reduce the self-bearing capacity of surrounding rock. Through detecting and analyzing by the geological radar of the excavated red layer soft rock tunnel surrounding rock found that the middle rock wall loose circle thickness of the tunnel reaches to 1.8 m, the vault and sidewall loose circle thickness is about 1.2 m. Through selection of rational strengthening measures and blasting design scheme to improve drilling parameters and methods, as far as possible to protect the integrity and self-bearing capacity of the surrounding rock, the deformation and vibration of the tunnel would be controlled in reasonable limits and ensure the safety of tunnel construction.

  14. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance: A spin-valve-like tunnel magnetoresistance using a single magnetic layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gould, C.; Rüster, C.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Girgis, E.; Schott, G. M.; Giraud, R.; Brunner, K.; Schmidt, G.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 11 (2004), 117203/1-117203/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0912 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : semiconductor spintronics * tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.218, year: 2004

  15. Compact, single-tube scanning tunneling microscope with thermoelectric cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobbins, Matthew M; Agostino, Christopher J; Michel, Jolai D; Gans, Ashley R; Kandel, S Alex

    2013-10-01

    We have designed and built a scanning tunneling microscope with a compact inertial-approach mechanism that fits inside the piezoelectric scanner tube. Rigid construction allows the microscope to be operated without the use of external vibration isolators or acoustic enclosures. Thermoelectric cooling and a water-ice bath are used to increase temperature stability when scanning under ambient conditions.

  16. Tunnelling determined superconducting energy gap of bulk single crystal aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civiak, R.L.

    1974-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for fabricating Giaver tunnel junctions on bulk aluminum. Al-I-Ag junctions were prepared, where I is the naturally formed oxide on the polished, chemically treated aluminum surface. The aluminum energy gap was determined from tunneling conductance curves obtained from samples oriented in three different crystal directions, and as a function of magnetic field in each of these orientations. In contrast to the results of microwave absorption measurements on superconducting aluminum, no magnetic field dependence could be measured for either the average gap or the spread in gap values of the tunneling electrons. This is consistent with commonly accepted tunneling selection rules, and Garfunkel's interpretation of the microwave behavior which depended upon adjusting the energy spectrum of only the electrons traveling parallel to the surface in the presence of a magnetic field. The energy gaps measured for samples oriented in the 100, 110 and 111 directions are 3.52, 3.50 and 3.39 kT/sub c/, respectively. The trend in the anisotropy is the same as in the calculation of Leavens and Carbotte, however, the magnitude of the anisotropy is smaller than in their calculation and that which previous measurements have indicated

  17. Electron tunnelling through single azurin molecules can be on/off switched by voltage pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldacchini, Chiara [Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, DEB-CNISM, Università della Tuscia, I-01100 Viterbo (Italy); Institute of Agro-Environmental and Forest Biology, CNR, I-05010 Porano (Italy); Kumar, Vivek; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore, E-mail: cannistr@unitus.it [Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, DEB-CNISM, Università della Tuscia, I-01100 Viterbo (Italy)

    2015-05-04

    Redox metalloproteins are emerging as promising candidates for future bio-optoelectronic and nano-biomemory devices, and the control of their electron transfer properties through external signals is still a crucial task. Here, we show that a reversible on/off switching of the electron current tunnelling through a single protein can be achieved in azurin protein molecules adsorbed on gold surfaces, by applying appropriate voltage pulses through a scanning tunnelling microscope tip. The observed changes in the hybrid system tunnelling properties are discussed in terms of long-sustained charging of the protein milieu.

  18. Nb/NiCu bilayers in single and stacked superconductive tunnel junctions: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepe, G.P.; Ruotolo, A.; Parlato, L.; Peluso, G.; Ausanio, G.; Carapella, G.; Latempa, R.

    2004-01-01

    We present preliminary experimental results concerning both single and stacked tunnel junctions in which one of the electrodes was formed by a superconductor/ferromagnet (S/F) bi-layer. In particular, in the stacked configuration a Nb/NiCu bi-layer was used as the intermediate electrode, and it was probed by tunneling on both sides. Tunnel junctions have been characterized in terms of current-voltage characteristics (IVC), and differential conductance. Preliminary steady-state injection-detection measurements performed in the stacked devices at T=4.2 K are also presented and discussed

  19. Quantum tunneling of magnetization in single molecular magnets coupled to ferromagnetic reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorny, M.; Barnas, J.

    2007-04-01

    The role of spin polarized reservoirs in quantum tunneling of magnetization and relaxation processes in a single molecular magnet (SMM) is investigated theoretically. The SMM is exchange-coupled to the reservoirs and also subjected to a magnetic field varying in time, which enables the quantum tunneling of magnetization. The spin relaxation times are calculated from the Fermi golden rule. The exchange interaction of SMM and electrons in the leads is shown to affect the spin reversal due to quantum tunneling of magnetization. It is shown that the switching is associated with transfer of a certain charge between the leads.

  20. Two-body tunnel transitions in a Mn 4 single-molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Bhaduri, S.; Tiron, R.; Hendrickson, D. N.; Christou, G.

    2004-05-01

    The one-body tunnel picture of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) is not always sufficient to explain the measured tunnel transitions. An improvement to the picture is proposed by including also two-body tunnel transitions such as spin-spin cross-relaxation (SSCR) which are mediated by dipolar and weak superexchange interactions between molecules. A Mn 4 SMM is used as a model system. At certain external fields, SSCRs lead to additional quantum resonances which show up in hysteresis loop measurements as well-defined steps.

  1. Sub-electron transport in single-electron-tunneling arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel; Sverdlov, Viktor; Korotkov, Alexander; Likharev, Konstantin

    2002-03-01

    We have analyzed quasi-continuous charge transport in two-dimensional tunnel junction arrays with a special distribution of background charges, providing a complete suppression of Coulomb blockade thresholds of tunneling between any pair of islands. Numerical simulations show that at low currents the dc I-V curve is indeed linear, while the shot noise is strongly suppressed and approaches 1/N of the Schottky value (where N is the array length). Thus both conditions of quasi-continuous transport, formulated earlier by Matsuoka and Likharev (Phys. Rev. B, v57, 15613, 1998), are satisfied. At higher fields the electron-hole pair production begins, and shot noise grows sharply. At higher voltages still, the array enters the "plasma" regime (with nearly balanced number of electrons and holes) and the Fano factor drops to 1/N once again. We have studied the resulting shot noise peak in detail, and concluded that its physics is close to that of critical opalescence.

  2. Concept for room temperature single-spin tunneling force microscopy with atomic spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Adam

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy (AFM) system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated defect states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  3. Atomic-resolution single-spin magnetic resonance detection concept based on tunneling force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, A.; Ambal, K.; Boehme, C.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single-electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated qubit states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  4. Radiation- and phonon-bottleneck--induced tunneling in the Fe8 single-molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, M.; Friedman, Jonathan R.; Chen, W.; Tuominen, M. T.; Beedle, C. C.; Rumberger, E. M.; Hendrickson, D. N.

    2008-04-01

    We measure magnetization changes in a single crystal of the single-molecule magnet Fe8 when exposed to intense, short (spin dynamics, allowing observation of thermally assisted resonant tunneling between spin states at the 100 ns time scale. Detailed numerical simulations quantitatively reproduce the data and yield a spin-phonon relaxation time T1~40 ns.

  5. Electroluminescence from single nanowires by tunnel injection: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmler, Mariano A; Bao Jiming; Shalish, Ilan; Yi, Wei; Yoon, Joonah; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh; Capasso, Federico

    2007-01-01

    We present a hybrid light-emitting diode structure composed of an n-type gallium nitride nanowire on a p-type silicon substrate in which current is injected along the length of the nanowire. The device emits ultraviolet light under both bias polarities. Tunnel injection of holes from the p-type substrate (under forward bias) and from the metal (under reverse bias) through thin native oxide barriers consistently explains the observed electroluminescence behaviour. This work shows that the standard p-n junction model is generally not applicable to this kind of device structure

  6. Single-electron charging effects and implications for tunneling measurements of the high-T/sub c/ superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barner, J.B.; Honkanen, M.J.; Ruggiero, S.T.; Mullen, K.; Ben-Jacob, E.; Pelton, A.R.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a theory for the dynamics of two voltage-biased, ultra-small-capacitance tunnel junctions connected in series when one or more electrodes are superconducting and experiments performed on parallel arrays of such junctions. Using the semiclassical model, they find that the I-V characteristics display steps and therefore multiple peaks in dI/dV, corresponding to the time-average occupation of the interjunction region by integral numbers of electrons. The voltage at which the first step is located depends on the superconducting gap, Δ(T), and the capacitances of the junctions. The spacing between subsequent steps depends solely on the capacitances. They discuss electron tunneling results performed on metal/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//2-10 nm-diameter metal particles/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//metal junctions where this multiple-peak structure is observed. They present preliminary tunneling results in junctions employing Pb-particles, where they observe a shift of the peaks when the sample is cooled below T/sub c/ of Pb consistent with theory. Taken together, these results indicate that the multiple-peak structure commonly observed in tunneling data of high-T/sub c/ oxide superconductors can be explained in terms of charging effects in a material with a single superconducting gap. Finally, they discuss possible applications in a new type of transistor element

  7. Spin- and energy-dependent tunneling through a single molecule with intramolecular spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brede, Jens; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Kuck, Stefan; Lazić, Predrag; Caciuc, Vasile; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Hoffmann, Germar; Blügel, Stefan; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2010-07-23

    We investigate the spin- and energy-dependent tunneling through a single organic molecule (CoPc) adsorbed on a ferromagnetic Fe thin film, spatially resolved by low-temperature spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy. Interestingly, the metal ion as well as the organic ligand show a significant spin dependence of tunneling current flow. State-of-the-art ab initio calculations including also van der Waals interactions reveal a strong hybridization of molecular orbitals and substrate 3d states. The molecule is anionic due to a transfer of one electron, resulting in a nonmagnetic (S=0) state. Nevertheless, tunneling through the molecule exhibits a pronounced spin dependence due to spin-split molecule-surface hybrid states.

  8. Metal-Insulator-Metal Single Electron Transistors with Tunnel Barriers Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnaz Karbasian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Single electron transistors are nanoscale electron devices that require thin, high-quality tunnel barriers to operate and have potential applications in sensing, metrology and beyond-CMOS computing schemes. Given that atomic layer deposition is used to form CMOS gate stacks with low trap densities and excellent thickness control, it is well-suited as a technique to form a variety of tunnel barriers. This work is a review of our recent research on atomic layer deposition and post-fabrication treatments to fabricate metallic single electron transistors with a variety of metals and dielectrics.

  9. Extracting random numbers from quantum tunnelling through a single diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo-Gavito, Ramón; Bagci, Ibrahim Ethem; Roberts, Jonathan; Sexton, James; Astbury, Benjamin; Shokeir, Hamzah; McGrath, Thomas; Noori, Yasir J; Woodhead, Christopher S; Missous, Mohamed; Roedig, Utz; Young, Robert J

    2017-12-19

    Random number generation is crucial in many aspects of everyday life, as online security and privacy depend ultimately on the quality of random numbers. Many current implementations are based on pseudo-random number generators, but information security requires true random numbers for sensitive applications like key generation in banking, defence or even social media. True random number generators are systems whose outputs cannot be determined, even if their internal structure and response history are known. Sources of quantum noise are thus ideal for this application due to their intrinsic uncertainty. In this work, we propose using resonant tunnelling diodes as practical true random number generators based on a quantum mechanical effect. The output of the proposed devices can be directly used as a random stream of bits or can be further distilled using randomness extraction algorithms, depending on the application.

  10. Energy tunneling through narrow waveguide channel and design of small antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the conditions for energy tunneling through narrow channel obtained by reducing the height of rectangular waveguide. Tunneling of the energy occurs at the frequency for which the effective dielectric permittivity of the channel becomes equal to zero, so it can be treated as an ENZ (epsilon-near-zero metamaterial. We investigated how geometry of the channel and dielectric permittivity affect the transmission coefficient and field density in the channel. Adding slots in the channel, which are placed orthogonally to the wave propagation, we designed a small antenna with directivity of 5.44 dBi at the frequency of 3 GHz.

  11. Interaction Driven Interband Tunneling of Bosons in the Triple Well

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Lushuai; Brouzos, Ioannis; Zöllner, Sascha; Schmelcher, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We study the tunneling of a small ensemble of strongly repulsive bosons in a one-dimensional triple-well potential. The usual treatment within the single-band approximation suggests suppression of tunneling in the strong interaction regime. However, we show that several windows of enhanced tunneling are opened in this regime. This enhanced tunneling results from higher band contributions, and has the character of interband tunneling. It can give rise to various tunneling processes, such as si...

  12. Fano Description of Single-Hydrocarbon Fluorescence Excited by a Scanning Tunneling Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Jörg; Doppagne, Benjamin; Scheurer, Fabrice; Schull, Guillaume

    2018-06-13

    The detection of fluorescence with submolecular resolution enables the exploration of spatially varying photon yields and vibronic properties at the single-molecule level. By placing individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules into the plasmon cavity formed by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a NaCl-covered Ag(111) surface, molecular light emission spectra are obtained that unravel vibrational progression. In addition, light spectra unveil a signature of the molecule even when the tunneling current is injected well separated from the molecular emitter. This signature exhibits a distance-dependent Fano profile that reflects the subtle interplay between inelastic tunneling electrons, the molecular exciton and localized plasmons in at-distance as well as on-molecule fluorescence. The presented findings open the path to luminescence of a different class of molecules than investigated before and contribute to the understanding of single-molecule luminescence at surfaces in a unified picture.

  13. One-by-one single-molecule detection of mutated nucleobases by monitoring tunneling current using a DNA tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Phuc Tan; Nishino, Tomoaki; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Tsutomu

    2015-01-31

    A DNA molecule was utilized as a probe tip to achieve single-molecule genetic diagnoses. Hybridization of the probe and target DNAs resulted in electron tunneling along the emergent double-stranded DNA. Simple stationary monitoring of the tunneling current leads to single-molecule DNA detection and discovery of base mismatches and methylation.

  14. Submolecular Electronic Mapping of Single Cysteine Molecules by in Situ Scanning Tunneling Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nazmutdinov, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    We have used L-Cysteine (Cys) as a model system to study the surface electronic structures of single molecules at the submolecular level in aqueous buffer solution by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM), electrochemistry including voltammetry and chronocou...

  15. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisenda, R.; Perrin, M.L.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from

  16. Evaluation of the Kinetic Property of Single-Molecule Junctions by Tunneling Current Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harashima, Takanori; Hasegawa, Yusuke; Kiguchi, Manabu; Nishino, Tomoaki

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the formation and breaking of single-molecule junctions of two kinds of dithiol molecules by time-resolved tunneling current measurements in a metal nanogap. The resulting current trajectory was statistically analyzed to determine the single-molecule conductance and, more importantly, to reveal the kinetic property of the single-molecular junction. These results suggested that combining a measurement of the single-molecule conductance and statistical analysis is a promising method to uncover the kinetic properties of the single-molecule junction.

  17. Radio frequency scanning tunneling spectroscopy for single-molecule spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllegger, Stefan; Tebi, Stefano; Das, Amal K; Schöfberger, Wolfgang; Faschinger, Felix; Koch, Reinhold

    2014-09-26

    We probe nuclear and electron spins in a single molecule even beyond the electromagnetic dipole selection rules, at readily accessible magnetic fields (few mT) and temperatures (5 K) by resonant radio-frequency current from a scanning tunneling microscope. We achieve subnanometer spatial resolution combined with single-spin sensitivity, representing a 10 orders of magnitude improvement compared to existing magnetic resonance techniques. We demonstrate the successful resonant spectroscopy of the complete manifold of nuclear and electronic magnetic transitions of up to ΔI(z)=±3 and ΔJ(z)=±12 of single quantum spins in a single molecule. Our method of resonant radio-frequency scanning tunneling spectroscopy offers, atom-by-atom, unprecedented analytical power and spin control with an impact on diverse fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  18. Thin films of metal oxides on metal single crystals: Structure and growth by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, H.C.

    1995-12-01

    Detailed studies of the growth and structure of thin films of metal oxides grown on metal single crystal surfaces using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) are presented. The oxide overlayer systems studied are iron oxide and titanium oxide on the Pt(III) surface. The complexity of the metal oxides and large lattice mismatches often lead to surface structures with large unit cells. These are particularly suited to a local real space technique such as scanning tunneling microscopy. In particular, the symmetry that is directly observed with the STM elucidates the relationship of the oxide overlayers to the substrate as well as distinguishing, the structures of different oxides

  19. Conductance of single atoms and molecules studied with a scanning tunnelling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, N; Kroeger, J; Limot, L; Berndt, R

    2007-01-01

    The conductance of single atoms and molecules is investigated with a low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscope. In a controlled and reproducible way, clean Ag(111) surfaces, individual silver atoms on Ag(111) as well as individual C 60 molecules adsorbed on Cu(100) are contacted with the tip of the microscope. Upon contact the conductance changes discontinuously in the case of the tip-surface junction while the tip-atom and tip-molecule junctions exhibit a continuous transition from the tunnelling to the contact regime

  20. Observation of negative differential resistance and single-electron tunneling in electromigrated break junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Yutaka; Ueda, Rieko; Kubota, Tohru; Kamikado, Toshiya; Yokoyama, Shiyoshi; Nagase, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    We observed a negative differential resistance (NDR) along with single-electron tunneling (SET) in the electron transport of electromigrated break junctions with metal-free tetraphenylporphyrin (H 2 BSTBPP) at a temperature of 11 K. The NDR strongly depended on the applied gate voltages, and appeared only in the electron tunneling region of the Coulomb diamond. We could explain the mechanism of this new type of electron transport by a model assuming a molecular Coulomb island and local density of states of the source and the drain electrodes

  1. Controllable resonant tunnelling through single-point potentials: A point triode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotaryuk, A.V.; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav

    2015-01-01

    A zero-thickness limit of three-layer heterostructures under two bias voltages applied externally, where one of which is supposed to be a gate parameter, is studied. As a result, an effect of controllable resonant tunnelling of electrons through single-point potentials is shown to exist. Therefore the limiting structure may be termed a “point triode” and considered in the theory of point interactions as a new object. The simple limiting analytical expressions adequately describe the resonant behaviour in the transistor with realistic parameter values and thus one can conclude that the zero-range limit of multi-layer structures may be used in fabricating nanodevices. The difference between the resonant tunnelling across single-point potentials and the Fabry–Pérot interference effect is also emphasized. - Highlights: • The zero-thickness limit of three-layer heterostructures is described in terms of point interactions. • The effect of resonant tunnelling through these single-point potentials is established. • The resonant tunnelling is shown to be controlled by a gate voltage

  2. Analytical calculation of spin tunneling effect in single molecule magnet Fe8 with considering quadrupole excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Yousefi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Spin tunneling effect in Single Molecule Magnet Fe8 is studied by instanton calculation technique using SU(3 generalized spin coherent state in real parameter as a trial function. For this SMM, tunnel splitting arises due to the presence of a Berry like phase in action, which causes interference between tunneling trajectories (instantons. For this SMM, it is established that the use of quadrupole excitation (g dependence changes not only the location of the quenching points, but also the number of these points. Also, these quenching points are the steps in hysteresis loops of this SMM. If dipole and quadrupole excitations in classical energy considered, the number of these steps equals to the number that obtained from experimental data.

  3. Tetrairon(III) Single Molecule Magnet Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Youngtek; Jeong, Hogyun; Lee, Minjun; Kwon, Jeonghoon; Yu, Jaejun; Mamun, Shariful Islam; Gupta, Gajendra; Kim, Jinkwon; Kuk, Young

    2011-03-01

    Tetrairon(III) single-molecule magnet (SMM) on a clean Au(111) has studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) to understand quantum mechanical tunneling of magnetization and hysteresis of pure molecular origin. Before the STM studies, elemental analysis, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement and Energy Dispersive X- ray Spectroscopy (EDS) were carried out to check the robustness of the sample. The STM image of this molecule shows a hexagonal shape, with a phenyl ring at the center and surrounding six dipivaloylmethane ligands. Two peaks are observed at 0.5 eV, 1.5 eV in the STS results, agreeing well with the first principles calculations. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SPSTM) measurements have been performed with a magnetic tip to get the magnetization image of the SMM. We could observe the antiferromagnetic coupling and a centered- triangular topology with six alkoxo bridges inside the molecule while applying external magnetic fields.

  4. Single-charge tunneling in ambipolar silicon quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Filipp

    2015-01-01

    Spin qubits in coupled quantum dots (QDs) are promising for future quantum information processing (QIP). A quantum bit (qubit) is the quantum mechanical analogon of a classical bit. In general, each quantum mechanical two-level system can represent a qubit. For the spin of a single charge carrier

  5. Suppression of Magnetic Quantum Tunneling in a Chiral Single-Molecule Magnet by Ferromagnetic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Kai-Alexander; Mukherjee, Chandan; Broschinski, Jan-Philipp; Lippert, Yvonne; Walleck, Stephan; Stammler, Anja; Bögge, Hartmut; Schnack, Jürgen; Glaser, Thorsten

    2017-12-18

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) retain a magnetization without applied magnetic field for a decent time due to an energy barrier U for spin-reversal. Despite the success to increase U, the difficult to control magnetic quantum tunneling often leads to a decreased effective barrier U eff and a fast relaxation. Here, we demonstrate the influence of the exchange coupling on the tunneling probability in two heptanuclear SMMs hosting the same spin-system with the same high spin ground state S t = 21/2. A chirality-induced symmetry reduction leads to a switch of the Mn III -Mn III exchange from antiferromagnetic in the achiral SMM [Mn III 6 Cr III ] 3+ to ferromagnetic in the new chiral SMM RR [Mn III 6 Cr III ] 3+ . Multispin Hamiltonian analysis by full-matrix diagonalization demonstrates that the ferromagnetic interactions in RR [Mn III 6 Cr III ] 3+ enforce a well-defined S t = 21/2 ground state with substantially less mixing of M S substates in contrast to [Mn III 6 Cr III ] 3+ and no tunneling pathways below the top of the energy barrier. This is experimentally verified as U eff is smaller than the calculated energy barrier U in [Mn III 6 Cr III ] 3+ due to tunneling pathways, whereas U eff equals U in RR [Mn III 6 Cr III ] 3+ demonstrating the absence of quantum tunneling.

  6. Tunnel Linking the CERN Sites: Discontinuation of the (small) 'Attestation CERN'

    CERN Multimedia

    Service des Relations avec les Pays-hôtes

    2004-01-01

    With effect from 1st June 2004, members of the personnel whose contracts with the Organization are too short for them to hold legitimation documents issued by the Host States will be required to carry only the following documents to use the Tunnel linking the CERN sites: their national identity card, if accepted by the French and Swiss regulations, or their passport (with a visa/visas if required by the French and/or Swiss regulations) and their blue CERN card (access card). The (small) 'Attestation CERN' (CERN certificate) issued by the Users Office or the Human Resources Department will no longer be required. This amendment to paragraph 10 b) and to Annex 3 of the Rules for Use of the Tunnel (ref. CERN/DSU-DO/RH/8200) is related to the addition of an expiry date on blue CERN cards, which has been compulsory since 1st January 2003, and to the recording of all relevant information in the database used for the systematic checking of tunnel users by means of card readers installed at the tunnel. Relations...

  7. Electron-assisted magnetization tunneling in single spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, Timofey; Karlewski, Christian; Märkl, Tobias; Schön, Gerd; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic excitations of single atoms on surfaces have been widely studied experimentally in the past decade. Lately, systems with unprecedented magnetic stability started to emerge. Here, we present a general theoretical investigation of the stability of rare-earth magnetic atoms exposed to crystal or ligand fields of various symmetry and to exchange scattering with an electron bath. By analyzing the properties of the atomic wave function, we show that certain combinations of symmetry and total angular momentum are inherently stable against first or even higher-order interactions with electrons. Further, we investigate the effect of an external magnetic field on the magnetic stability.

  8. Fabrication and dc characteristics of small-area tantalum and niobium superconducting tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Face, D.W.; Prober, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss the fabrication and dc electrical characteristics of small-area (1--6 μm 2 ) superconducting tunnel junctions with Ta or Nb base electrodes and Pb or Pb/sub 0.9/Bi/sub 0.1/ counterelectrodes. These junctions have very small subgap leakage currents, a ''sharp'' current rise at the sum-gap voltage, and show strong quantum effects when used as microwave mixers. The use of a low-energy (--150 eV) ion cleaning process and a novel step-defined fabrication process that eliminates photoresist processing after base electrode deposition are discussed. Tunnel barriers formed by dc glow discharge oxidation were the most successful. Tunnel barrier formation by thermal oxidation and ion-beam oxidation is also discussed. An oxidized Ta overlayer (--7 nm thick) was found to improve the characteristics of Nb-based junctions. The electrical characteristics of junctions with different electrode and barrier materials are presented and discussed in terms of the physical mechanisms that lead to excess subgap current and to a width of the current rise at the sum-gap voltage

  9. Spin quantum tunneling via entangled states in a dimer of exchange coupled single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiron, R.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Aliaga-Alcalde, N.; Foguet-Albiol, D.; Christou, G.

    2004-03-01

    A new family of supramolecular, antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled dimers of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) has recently been reported [W. Wernsdorfer, N. Aliaga-Alcalde, D.N. Hendrickson, and G. Christou, Nature 416, 406 (2002)]. Each SMM acts as a bias on its neighbor, shifting the quantum tunneling resonances of the individual SMMs. Hysteresis loop measurements on a single crystal of SMM-dimers have now established quantum tunneling of the magnetization via entangled states of the dimer. This shows that the dimer really does behave as a quantum-mechanically coupled dimer. The transitions are well separated, suggesting long coherence times compared to the time scale of the energy splitting. This result is of great importance if such systems are to be used for quantum computing. It also allows the measurement of the longitudinal and transverse superexchange coupling constants [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 227203 (2003)].

  10. Photon-assisted tunneling in a Fe-8 single-molecule magnet

    OpenAIRE

    Sorace, L.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Thirion, C.; Barra, A. L.; Pacchioni, M.; Mailly, D.; Barbara, B.

    2003-01-01

    The low temperature spin dynamics of a Fe8 Single-Molecule Magnet was studied under circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation allowing us to establish clearly photon-assisted tunneling. This effect, while linear at low power, becomes highly non-linear above a relatively low power threshold. This non-linearity is attributed to the nature of the coupling of the sample to the thermostat.These results are of great importance if such systems are to be used as quantum computers.

  11. Thermoelectric-induced spin currents in single-molecule magnet tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzhong; Jiang, Liang; Wang, Ruiqiang; Wang, Baigeng; Xing, D. Y.

    2010-12-01

    A molecular spin-current generator is proposed, which consists of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) coupled to two normal metal electrodes with temperature gradient. It is shown that this tunneling junction can generate a highly spin-polarized current by thermoelectric effects, whose flowing direction and spin polarization can be changed by adjusting the gate voltage applied to the SMM. This device can be realized with current technologies and may have practical use in spintronics and quantum information.

  12. Single-step electrochemical method for producing very sharp Au scanning tunneling microscopy tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingery, David; Buehlmann, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    A single-step electrochemical method for making sharp gold scanning tunneling microscopy tips is described. 3.0M NaCl in 1% perchloric acid is compared to several previously reported etchants. The addition of perchloric acid to sodium chloride solutions drastically shortens etching times and is shown by transmission electron microscopy to produce very sharp tips with a mean radius of curvature of 15 nm

  13. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, Jongone; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic `fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore.

  14. Near-Field Enhanced Photochemistry of Single Molecules in a Scanning Tunneling Microscope Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böckmann, Hannes; Gawinkowski, Sylwester; Waluk, Jacek; Raschke, Markus B; Wolf, Martin; Kumagai, Takashi

    2018-01-10

    Optical near-field excitation of metallic nanostructures can be used to enhance photochemical reactions. The enhancement under visible light illumination is of particular interest because it can facilitate the use of sunlight to promote photocatalytic chemical and energy conversion. However, few studies have yet addressed optical near-field induced chemistry, in particular at the single-molecule level. In this Letter, we report the near-field enhanced tautomerization of porphycene on a Cu(111) surface in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) junction. The light-induced tautomerization is mediated by photogenerated carriers in the Cu substrate. It is revealed that the reaction cross section is significantly enhanced in the presence of a Au tip compared to the far-field induced process. The strong enhancement occurs in the red and near-infrared spectral range for Au tips, whereas a W tip shows a much weaker enhancement, suggesting that excitation of the localized plasmon resonance contributes to the process. Additionally, using the precise tip-surface distance control of the STM, the near-field enhanced tautomerization is examined in and out of the tunneling regime. Our results suggest that the enhancement is attributed to the increased carrier generation rate via decay of the excited near-field in the STM junction. Additionally, optically excited tunneling electrons also contribute to the process in the tunneling regime.

  15. Inelastic tunneling of electrons through a quantum dot with an embedded single molecular magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bo; Liang, J.-Q.

    2010-06-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of electron transport through a quantum dot with an embedded biaxial single-molecule magnet (SMM) based on mapping of the many-body interaction-system onto a one-body problem by means of the non-equilibrium Green function technique. It is found that the conducting current exhibits a stepwise behavior and the nonlinear differential conductance displays additional peaks with variation of the sweeping speed and the magnitude of magnetic field. This observation can be interpreted by the interaction of electron-spin with the SMM and the quantum tunneling of magnetization. The inelastic conductance and the corresponding tunneling processes are investigated with normal as well as ferromagnetic electrodes. In the case of ferromagnetic configuration, the coupling to the SMM leads to an asymmetric tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), which can be enhanced or suppressed greatly in certain regions. Moreover, a sudden TMR-switch with the variation of magnetic field is observed, which is seen to be caused by the inelastic tunneling.

  16. Inelastic tunneling of electrons through a quantum dot with an embedded single molecular magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Bo [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Liang, J.-Q., E-mail: jqliang@sxu.edu.c [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

    2010-06-28

    We report a theoretical analysis of electron transport through a quantum dot with an embedded biaxial single-molecule magnet (SMM) based on mapping of the many-body interaction-system onto a one-body problem by means of the non-equilibrium Green function technique. It is found that the conducting current exhibits a stepwise behavior and the nonlinear differential conductance displays additional peaks with variation of the sweeping speed and the magnitude of magnetic field. This observation can be interpreted by the interaction of electron-spin with the SMM and the quantum tunneling of magnetization. The inelastic conductance and the corresponding tunneling processes are investigated with normal as well as ferromagnetic electrodes. In the case of ferromagnetic configuration, the coupling to the SMM leads to an asymmetric tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), which can be enhanced or suppressed greatly in certain regions. Moreover, a sudden TMR-switch with the variation of magnetic field is observed, which is seen to be caused by the inelastic tunneling.

  17. A scanning tunneling microscope capable of imaging specified micron-scale small samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei; Cao, Yufei; Wang, Huafeng; Wang, Kaiyou; Lu, Qingyou

    2012-12-01

    We present a home-built scanning tunneling microscope (STM) which allows us to precisely position the tip on any specified small sample or sample feature of micron scale. The core structure is a stand-alone soft junction mechanical loop (SJML), in which a small piezoelectric tube scanner is mounted on a sliding piece and a "U"-like soft spring strip has its one end fixed to the sliding piece and its opposite end holding the tip pointing to the sample on the scanner. Here, the tip can be precisely aligned to a specified small sample of micron scale by adjusting the position of the spring-clamped sample on the scanner in the field of view of an optical microscope. The aligned SJML can be transferred to a piezoelectric inertial motor for coarse approach, during which the U-spring is pushed towards the sample, causing the tip to approach the pre-aligned small sample. We have successfully approached a hand cut tip that was made from 0.1 mm thin Pt∕Ir wire to an isolated individual 32.5 × 32.5 μm(2) graphite flake. Good atomic resolution images and high quality tunneling current spectra for that specified tiny flake are obtained in ambient conditions with high repeatability within one month showing high and long term stability of the new STM structure. In addition, frequency spectra of the tunneling current signals do not show outstanding tip mount related resonant frequency (low frequency), which further confirms the stability of the STM structure.

  18. A scanning tunneling microscope capable of imaging specified micron-scale small samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei; Cao, Yufei; Wang, Huafeng; Wang, Kaiyou; Lu, Qingyou

    2012-12-01

    We present a home-built scanning tunneling microscope (STM) which allows us to precisely position the tip on any specified small sample or sample feature of micron scale. The core structure is a stand-alone soft junction mechanical loop (SJML), in which a small piezoelectric tube scanner is mounted on a sliding piece and a "U"-like soft spring strip has its one end fixed to the sliding piece and its opposite end holding the tip pointing to the sample on the scanner. Here, the tip can be precisely aligned to a specified small sample of micron scale by adjusting the position of the spring-clamped sample on the scanner in the field of view of an optical microscope. The aligned SJML can be transferred to a piezoelectric inertial motor for coarse approach, during which the U-spring is pushed towards the sample, causing the tip to approach the pre-aligned small sample. We have successfully approached a hand cut tip that was made from 0.1 mm thin Pt/Ir wire to an isolated individual 32.5 × 32.5 μm2 graphite flake. Good atomic resolution images and high quality tunneling current spectra for that specified tiny flake are obtained in ambient conditions with high repeatability within one month showing high and long term stability of the new STM structure. In addition, frequency spectra of the tunneling current signals do not show outstanding tip mount related resonant frequency (low frequency), which further confirms the stability of the STM structure.

  19. Detecting Single-Nucleotides by Tunneling Current Measurements at Sub-MHz Temporal Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Takanori; Yokota, Kazumichi; Tanimoto, Sachie; Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2017-04-18

    Label-free detection of single-nucleotides was performed by fast tunneling current measurements in a polar solvent at 1 MHz sampling rate using SiO₂-protected Au nanoprobes. Short current spikes were observed, suggestive of trapping/detrapping of individual nucleotides between the nanoelectrodes. The fall and rise features of the electrical signatures indicated signal retardation by capacitance effects with a time constant of about 10 microseconds. The high temporal resolution revealed current fluctuations, reflecting the molecular conformation degrees of freedom in the electrode gap. The method presented in this work may enable direct characterizations of dynamic changes in single-molecule conformations in an electrode gap in liquid.

  20. Low-noise parametric amplification at 35 GHz in a single Josephson tunnel junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Jesper; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, O. H.

    1979-01-01

    Parametric amplification at 35 GHz has been obtained using a single Josephson tunnel junction as the active element. The amplifier was operated in the singly quasidegenerate mode with a pump frequency at 70 GHz. The noise temperature was measured and found correlated with the gain. At the highest...... gain achieved, 11.6 dB, the noise temperature was 400 K. The noise temperature was reduced considerably by decreasing the gain. At 8 and 4 dB we found 165±25 K and 50±30 K, respectively. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  1. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4p z atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices

  2. Manifestation of spin selection rules on the quantum tunneling of magnetization in a single-molecule magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, J J; Koo, C; Feng, P L; del Barco, E; Hill, S; Tupitsyn, I S; Stamp, P C E; Hendrickson, D N

    2009-07-03

    We present low temperature magnetometry measurements on a new Mn3 single-molecule magnet in which the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) displays clear evidence for quantum mechanical selection rules. A QTM resonance appearing only at high temperatures demonstrates tunneling between excited states with spin projections differing by a multiple of three. This is dictated by the C3 molecular symmetry, which forbids pure tunneling from the lowest metastable state. Transverse field resonances are understood by correctly orienting the Jahn-Teller axes of the individual manganese ions and including transverse dipolar fields. These factors are likely to be important for QTM in all single-molecule magnets.

  3. Static properties of small Josephson tunnel junctions in a transverse magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, R.; Aarøe, Morten; Mygind, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic field distribution in the barrier of small planar Josephson tunnel junctions is numerically simulated in the case when an external magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the barrier plane. The simulations allow for heuristic analytical solutions for the Josephson static phase...... profile from which the dependence of the maximum Josephson current on the applied field amplitude is derived. The most common geometrical configurations are considered and, when possible, the theoretical findings are compared with the experimental data. ©2008 American Institute of Physics...

  4. A variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscope capable of single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stipe, B.C.; Rezaei, M.A.; Ho, W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and performance of a variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is presented. The microscope operates from 8 to 350 K in ultrahigh vacuum. The thermally compensated STM is suspended by springs from the cold tip of a continuous flow cryostat and is completely surrounded by two radiation shields. The design allows for in situ dosing and irradiation of the sample as well as for the exchange of samples and STM tips. With the STM feedback loop off, the drift of the tip-sample spacing is approximately 0.001 Angstrom/min at 8 K. It is demonstrated that the STM is well-suited for the study of atomic-scale chemistry over a wide temperature range, for atomic-scale manipulation, and for single-molecule inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  5. Effect of single Abrikosov vortices on the properties of Josephson tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubov, A.A.; Kupriyanov, M.Yu.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of single Abrikosov vortices, trapped in the electrodes of a Josephson tunnel junction perpendicularly to the junction surface, on the tunnel current through the junction is studied within the framework of the microscopic theory. The current-voltage characteristic and the critical junction current I c are calculated for temperatures 0 c . It is shown that if the vortices at the junction are misaligned, singularities on the current-voltage characteristic appear at eV Δ (T), and in some cases the magnitude of suppression of I c may be of the order of magnitude of I c itself. The temperature dependence of the critical current is calculated for the case of one of the electrodes being a two-dimensional superconducting film in which the creation of opposite sign vortex pairs is significant

  6. Quantum breathers in small networks: dynamics, tunneling, correlations, and application to Josephson cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto Rengifo, Ricardo Alberto

    2008-02-15

    We address the excitation of quantum breathers in small nonlinear networks of two and three degrees of freedom, in order to study their properties. The invariance under permutation of two sites of these networks substitutes the translation invariance that is present in nonlinear lattices, where (classical) discrete breathers are time periodic space localized solutions of the underlying classical equations of motion. We do a systematic analysis of the spectrum and eigenstates of such small systems, characterizing quantum breather states by their tunneling rate (energy splitting), site correlations, fluctuations of the number of quanta, and entanglement. We observe how these properties are reflected in the time evolution of initially localized excitations. Quantum breathers manifest as pairs of nearly degenerate eigenstates that show strong site correlation of quanta, and are characterized by a strong excitation of quanta on one site of the network which perform slow coherent tunneling motion from one site to another. They enhance the fluctuations of quanta, and are the least entangled states among the group of eigenstates in the same range of the energy spectrum. We use our analysis methods to consider the excitation of quantum breathers in a cell of two coupled Josephson junctions, and study their properties as compared with those in the previous cases. We describe how quantum breathers could be experimentally observed by employing the already developed techniques for quantum information processing with Josephson junctions. (orig.)

  7. Quantum breathers in small networks: dynamics, tunneling, correlations, and application to Josephson cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto Rengifo, Ricardo Alberto

    2008-02-01

    We address the excitation of quantum breathers in small nonlinear networks of two and three degrees of freedom, in order to study their properties. The invariance under permutation of two sites of these networks substitutes the translation invariance that is present in nonlinear lattices, where (classical) discrete breathers are time periodic space localized solutions of the underlying classical equations of motion. We do a systematic analysis of the spectrum and eigenstates of such small systems, characterizing quantum breather states by their tunneling rate (energy splitting), site correlations, fluctuations of the number of quanta, and entanglement. We observe how these properties are reflected in the time evolution of initially localized excitations. Quantum breathers manifest as pairs of nearly degenerate eigenstates that show strong site correlation of quanta, and are characterized by a strong excitation of quanta on one site of the network which perform slow coherent tunneling motion from one site to another. They enhance the fluctuations of quanta, and are the least entangled states among the group of eigenstates in the same range of the energy spectrum. We use our analysis methods to consider the excitation of quantum breathers in a cell of two coupled Josephson junctions, and study their properties as compared with those in the previous cases. We describe how quantum breathers could be experimentally observed by employing the already developed techniques for quantum information processing with Josephson junctions. (orig.)

  8. Quantum dot single-photon switches of resonant tunneling current for discriminating-photon-number detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Qianchun; An, Zhenghua; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Pingping; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Zhu, Ziqiang; Lu, Wei

    2015-03-23

    Low-noise single-photon detectors that can resolve photon numbers are used to monitor the operation of quantum gates in linear-optical quantum computation. Exactly 0, 1 or 2 photons registered in a detector should be distinguished especially in long-distance quantum communication and quantum computation. Here we demonstrate a photon-number-resolving detector based on quantum dot coupled resonant tunneling diodes (QD-cRTD). Individual quantum-dots (QDs) coupled closely with adjacent quantum well (QW) of resonant tunneling diode operate as photon-gated switches- which turn on (off) the RTD tunneling current when they trap photon-generated holes (recombine with injected electrons). Proposed electron-injecting operation fills electrons into coupled QDs which turn "photon-switches" to "OFF" state and make the detector ready for multiple-photons detection. With proper decision regions defined, 1-photon and 2-photon states are resolved in 4.2 K with excellent propabilities of accuracy of 90% and 98% respectively. Further, by identifying step-like photon responses, the photon-number-resolving capability is sustained to 77 K, making the detector a promising candidate for advanced quantum information applications where photon-number-states should be accurately distinguished.

  9. Strained Silicon Single Nanowire Gate-All-Around TFETs with Optimized Tunneling Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Narimani

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we demonstrate a strained Si single nanowire tunnel field effect transistor (TFET with gate-all-around (GAA structure yielding Ion-current of 15 μA/μm at the supply voltage of Vdd = 0.5V with linear onset at low drain voltages. The subthreshold swing (SS at room temperature shows an average of 76 mV/dec over 4 orders of drain current Id from 5 × 10−6 to 5 × 10−2 µA/µm Optimized devices also show excellent current saturation, an important feature for analog performance.

  10. Note: A quartz cell with Pt single crystal bead electrode for electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhigang; Wang, Jihao; Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we provide and demonstrate a design of a unique cell with Pt single crystal bead electrode for electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ECSTM) measurements. The active metal Pt electrode can be protected from air contamination during the preparation process. The transparency of the cell allows the tip and bead to be aligned by direct observation. Based on this, a new and effective alignment method is introduced. The high-quality bead preparations through this new cell have been confirmed by the ECSTM images of Pt (111).

  11. Bias voltage induced resistance switching effect in single-molecule magnets' tunneling junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzhong; Jiang, Liang

    2014-09-12

    An electric-pulse-induced reversible resistance change effect in a molecular magnetic tunneling junction, consisting of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) sandwiched in one nonmagnetic and one ferromagnetic electrode, is theoretically investigated. By applying a time-varying bias voltage, the SMM's spin orientation can be manipulated with large bias voltage pulses. Moreover, the different magnetic configuration at high-resistance/low-resistance states can be 'read out' by utilizing relative low bias voltage. This device scheme can be implemented with current technologies (Khajetoorians et al 2013 Science 339 55) and has potential application in molecular spintronics and high-density nonvolatile memory devices.

  12. Photon-assisted tunneling in a Fe8 single-molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorace, L.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Thirion, C.; Barra, A.-L.; Pacchioni, M.; Mailly, D.; Barbara, B.

    2003-12-01

    The low-temperature spin dynamics of a Fe8 single-molecule magnet was studied under circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation allowing us to establish clearly photon-assisted tunneling. This effect, while linear at low power, becomes highly nonlinear above a relatively low-power threshold. Heating due to phonon emission, spin-spin interactions, and coherent emission/absorption of photons might lead to the observed nonlinearity. These results are of importance if such systems are to be used as quantum computers.

  13. Effects of microwave on spin tunneling in single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwang-Hee; Kim, Tae-Suk

    2005-03-01

    We study theoretically the effects of the irradiated microwave on the magnetization in single-molecule magnets (SMMs) like V15 and Fe8. We find that the shape of magnetization depends on the microwave intensity as well as the microwave polarization. The applied microwave field enhances the tunneling probability. The linearly polarized microwaves induce the suppression of magnetization at both positive and negative magnetic fields. The circularly polarized microwaves are absorbed either at one direction of magnetic field or at both directions of magnetic fields, depending on the polarization directions with respect to the direction of longitudinal magnetic field. The generic features we found will be compared with the recent experimental results.

  14. Bias voltage induced resistance switching effect in single-molecule magnets’ tunneling junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzhong; Jiang, Liang

    2014-09-01

    An electric-pulse-induced reversible resistance change effect in a molecular magnetic tunneling junction, consisting of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) sandwiched in one nonmagnetic and one ferromagnetic electrode, is theoretically investigated. By applying a time-varying bias voltage, the SMM's spin orientation can be manipulated with large bias voltage pulses. Moreover, the different magnetic configuration at high-resistance/low-resistance states can be ‘read out’ by utilizing relative low bias voltage. This device scheme can be implemented with current technologies (Khajetoorians et al 2013 Science 339 55) and has potential application in molecular spintronics and high-density nonvolatile memory devices.

  15. Tunneling of coupled methyl quantum rotors in 4-methylpyridine: Single rotor potential versus coupling interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Somayeh; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    We study the influence of rotational coupling between a pair of methyl rotators on the tunneling spectrum in condensed phase. Two interacting adjacent methyl groups are simulated within a coupled-pair model composed of static rotational potential created by the chemical environment and the interaction potential between two methyl groups. We solve the two-dimensional time-independent Schrödinger equation analytically by expanding the wave functions on the basis set of two independent free-rotor functions. We investigate three scenarios which differ with respect to the relative strength of single-rotor and coupling potential. For each scenario, we illustrate the dependence of the energy level scheme on the coupling strength. It is found that the main determinant of splitting energy levels tends to be a function of the ratio of strengths of coupling and single-rotor potential. The tunnel splitting caused by coupling is maximized for the coupled rotors in which their total hindering potential is relatively shallow. Such a weakly hindered methyl rotational potential is predicted for 4-methylpyridine at low temperature. The experimental observation of multiple tunneling peaks arising from a single type of methyl group in 4-methylpyridine in the inelastic neutron scattering spectrum is widely attributed to the rotor-rotor coupling. In this regard, using a set of first-principles calculations combined with the nudged elastic band method, we investigate the rotational potential energy surface (PES) of the coaxial pairs of rotors in 4-methylpyridine. A Numerov-type method is used to numerically solve the two-dimensional time-independent Schrödinger equation for the calculated 2D-density functional theory profile. Our computed energy levels reproduce the observed tunneling transitions well. Moreover, the calculated density distribution of the three methyl protons resembles the experimental nuclear densities obtained from the Fourier difference method. By mapping the

  16. Nonadiabatic Dynamics in Single-Electron Tunneling Devices with Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Niklas; Splettstoesser, Janine; Helbig, Nicole

    2018-04-01

    We simulate the dynamics of a single-electron source, modeled as a quantum dot with on-site Coulomb interaction and tunnel coupling to an adjacent lead in time-dependent density-functional theory. Based on this system, we develop a time-nonlocal exchange-correlation potential by exploiting analogies with quantum-transport theory. The time nonlocality manifests itself in a dynamical potential step. We explicitly link the time evolution of the dynamical step to physical relaxation timescales of the electron dynamics. Finally, we discuss prospects for simulations of larger mesoscopic systems.

  17. Direct Observation of Double Hydrogen Transfer via Quantum Tunneling in a Single Porphycene Molecule on a Ag(110) Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Matthias; Pagan, Mark; Persson, Mats; Gawinkowski, Sylwester; Waluk, Jacek; Kumagai, Takashi

    2017-09-13

    Quantum tunneling of hydrogen atoms (or protons) plays a crucial role in many chemical and biological reactions. Although tunneling of a single particle has been examined extensively in various one-dimensional potentials, many-particle tunneling in high-dimensional potential energy surfaces remains poorly understood. Here we present a direct observation of a double hydrogen atom transfer (tautomerization) within a single porphycene molecule on a Ag(110) surface using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tautomerization rates are temperature independent below ∼10 K, and a large kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is observed upon substituting the transferred hydrogen atoms by deuterium, indicating that the process is governed by tunneling. The observed KIE for three isotopologues and density functional theory calculations reveal that a stepwise transfer mechanism is dominant in the tautomerization. It is also found that the tautomerization rate is increased by vibrational excitation via an inelastic electron tunneling process. Moreover, the STM tip can be used to manipulate the tunneling dynamics through modification of the potential landscape.

  18. Radiographer performed single contrast small bowel enteroclysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Robert L.; Slack, Nicola; Harvey, Richard F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To analyse the technical success and reporting sensitivity of radiographer performed small bowel enteroclysis (SBE) undertaken by a specialist radiographer according to a standard technique [Nolan DJ, Cadman PJ. The small bowel enema made easy. Clinical Radiology 1987;38(3):295-301]. Methods: Patients (1413) had 1646 SBE in 10 years from May 1992 to April 2002. The original request card and the separate radiographer and consultant radiologist reports were reviewed. Where the radiology reports were discordant or inconclusive, the clinical notes were also reviewed. Results: Patients (1022) X-ray films were available. Nine hundred and forty-three (93.3%) SBEs had been successfully completed. Radiographer and consultant radiologist reporting had a 99.3% concordance. There was a 98.4% sensitivity for Crohn's disease (181 of 184 cases where Crohn's disease was the clinical final diagnosis). Overall reporting sensitivity was 93.7% although correct 'probably normal and abnormal' reporting bias suggests a sensitivity of 96.9%. Sixty of 943 (6.4%) reports were inconclusive. Of 1022 patients, 68 (6.6%) of small bowel intubations were not achieved, or else consent was withdrawn at the time of the procedure. Conclusion: Specialist radiographers can perform small bowel enteroclysis with a reporting sensitivity equal to that of a consultant radiologist. Radiographers accustomed to providing an SBE service become skilled at passing fine bore feeding tubes into the small bowel and can provide this service also

  19. Realization of a four-step molecular switch in scanning tunneling microscope manipulation of single chlorophyll-a molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, Violeta; Hla, Saw-Wai

    2006-01-01

    Single chlorophyll-a molecules, a vital resource for the sustenance of life on Earth, have been investigated by using scanning tunneling microscope manipulation and spectroscopy on a gold substrate at 4.6 K. Chlorophyll-a binds on Au(111) via its porphyrin unit while the phytyl-chain is elevated from the surface by the support of four CH3 groups. By injecting tunneling electrons from the scanning tunneling microscope tip, we are able to bend the phytyl-chain, which enables the switching of four molecular conformations in a controlled manner. Statistical analyses and structural calculations reveal that all reversible switching mechanisms are initiated by a single tunneling-electron energy-transfer process, which induces bond rotation within the phytyl-chain. PMID:16954201

  20. WIND TUNNEL EVALUATION FOR CONTROL TRANSITION FROM ELEVATOR TO STABILATOR OF SMALL UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZULHILMY SAHWEE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Faulty control surface actuator in a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (sUAV could be overcome with a few techniques. Redundant actuators, analytical redundancy or combination of both are normally used as fault accommodation techniques. In this paper, the accommodation technique of faulty elevator actuator is presented. This technique uses a standby control surface as temporary control reallocation. Wind tunnel measurement facility is set up for the experimental validation and it is compared with FoilSim software. Flat plate airfoil which was used as horizontal stabilizer, is simulated using numerical model and it is validated using the wind tunnel test. Then, a flat airfoil is designed to be used as stabilator for the recovery of faulty elevator actuator. Results show the different deflection angle is needed when transferring from one control surface to another. From the analysis, the proposed method could be implemented without affecting the pitch stability during control surface transition. The alternate control surface accommodation technique proves to be promising for higher reliability sUAV in the case of a faulty on-board actuator.

  1. Comparing flows to a tunnel for single porosity, double porosity and discrete fracture representations of the EDZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, I.; Swift, B.; Hoch, A.; Wendling, J.

    2010-01-01

    transfer between the continua. The MINC model is an extension of double continuum models. Double continuum models assume that the flow between the fractures and matrix blocks is 'quasi-steady' (i.e. proportional to the local difference in average pressure between the fractures and matrix blocks). In contrast, the MINC model treats this flow in a fully transient way; it resolves the gradients that drive the flow by discretizing the matrix blocks into a nested sequence of volume elements. DFN models were implemented using the computer program NAPSAC. The program uses an efficient finite-element method that allows the flow through many thousands of fractures to be calculated accurately. Amongst its capabilities, NAPSAC is able to: calculate the effective continuum permeability tensor; calculate the porosity and the inter-fracture matrix block size; simulate steady-state and transient inflows to tunnels; and simulate unsaturated flow in fractured rocks. Continuum models were implemented using the computer program TOUGH2v2. TOUGH2v2 can be used to simulate multiphase flows in single continuum, double continuum or MINC models. A DFN model of the EDZ was developed. The model includes three classes of fractures. - Chevron fractures are curved, flowing surfaces, which cut perpendicular to the tunnel axis and have a variable spacing. - Oblique fractures are planar, and cut into the side of the tunnel at a defined angle. - Random fractures are small, planar features, which lie in a narrow region close to the tunnel wall. - Additionally, lattices of fractures were included in the DFN model to represent the undamaged clay and the concrete lining of the tunnel. NAPSAC was used to calculate effective continuum permeability tensors and porosities for sub-regions of the DFN model. These permeability tensors and porosities were used to parameterize both single continuum and MINC models of the EDZ. For each of the models (i.e. DFN, single continuum and MINC), desaturation of the

  2. Core-state manipulation of single Fe impurities in GaAs with a scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bocquel, J.; Kortan, V.R.; Sahin, C.; Campion, R.P.; Gallagher, B.L.; Flatte, M.E.; Koenraad, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that a scanning tunneling microscope tip can be used to manipulate the tightly bound core (d-electron) state of single Fe ions embedded in GaAs. Increasing tip-sample voltage removes one d electron from the core of a single Fe, changing the dopant from the (Fe2+)(-) ionized acceptor

  3. Resonant tunnelling features in a suspended silicon nanowire single-hole transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llobet, Jordi; Pérez-Murano, Francesc, E-mail: francesc.perez@csic.es, E-mail: z.durrani@imperial.ac.uk [Institut de Microelectrònica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Krali, Emiljana; Wang, Chen; Jones, Mervyn E.; Durrani, Zahid A. K., E-mail: francesc.perez@csic.es, E-mail: z.durrani@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Arbiol, Jordi [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA) and Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); CELLS-ALBA Synchrotron Light Facility, 08290 Cerdanyola, Catalonia (Spain)

    2015-11-30

    Suspended silicon nanowires have significant potential for a broad spectrum of device applications. A suspended p-type Si nanowire incorporating Si nanocrystal quantum dots has been used to form a single-hole transistor. Transistor fabrication uses a novel and rapid process, based on focused gallium ion beam exposure and anisotropic wet etching, generating <10 nm nanocrystals inside suspended Si nanowires. Electrical characteristics at 10 K show Coulomb diamonds with charging energy ∼27 meV, associated with a single dominant nanocrystal. Resonant tunnelling features with energy spacing ∼10 meV are observed, parallel to both diamond edges. These may be associated either with excited states or hole–acoustic phonon interactions, in the nanocrystal. In the latter case, the energy spacing corresponds well with reported Raman spectroscopy results and phonon spectra calculations.

  4. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Perrin, Mickael L; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule-electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  5. Magnetization tunneling in high-symmetry single-molecule magnets: Limitations of the giant spin approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A.; Lawrence, J.; Yang, E.-C.; Nakano, M.; Hendrickson, D. N.; Hill, S.

    2006-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of a Ni4 single-molecule magnet (SMM) yield the zero-field-splitting (ZFS) parameters D , B40 , and B44 , based on the giant spin approximation (GSA) with S=4 ; B44 is responsible for the magnetization tunneling in this SMM. Experiments on an isostructural Ni-doped Zn4 crystal establish the NiII ion ZFS parameters. The fourth-order ZFS parameters in the GSA arise from the interplay between the Heisenberg interaction Jŝ1•ŝ2 and the second-order single-ion anisotropy, giving rise to mixing of higher-lying S≠4 states into the S=4 state. Consequently, J directly influences the ZFS in the ground state, enabling its determination by EPR.

  6. Resonant tunnelling features in a suspended silicon nanowire single-hole transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llobet, Jordi; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Krali, Emiljana; Wang, Chen; Jones, Mervyn E.; Durrani, Zahid A. K.; Arbiol, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Suspended silicon nanowires have significant potential for a broad spectrum of device applications. A suspended p-type Si nanowire incorporating Si nanocrystal quantum dots has been used to form a single-hole transistor. Transistor fabrication uses a novel and rapid process, based on focused gallium ion beam exposure and anisotropic wet etching, generating <10 nm nanocrystals inside suspended Si nanowires. Electrical characteristics at 10 K show Coulomb diamonds with charging energy ∼27 meV, associated with a single dominant nanocrystal. Resonant tunnelling features with energy spacing ∼10 meV are observed, parallel to both diamond edges. These may be associated either with excited states or hole–acoustic phonon interactions, in the nanocrystal. In the latter case, the energy spacing corresponds well with reported Raman spectroscopy results and phonon spectra calculations

  7. Spin asymmetry calculations of the TMR-V curves in single and double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2011-10-01

    Spin-polarization asymmetry is the key parameter in asymmetric voltage behavior (AVB) of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in magnetic tunnel junctions. In this paper, we study the value of the TMR as a function of the applied voltage Va in the single as well as double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (SMTJ & DMTJ, which are constructed from CoFeB/MgO interfaces) and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR-V a curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions. As a result, we found that AVB may help to determine the exact values of Fermi wave vectors for minority and majority conducting spin sub-bands. Moreover, significant asymmetry of the experimental TMR-Va curves, which arises due to different annealing regimes, is explained by different heights of the tunnel barriers and values of the spin asymmetry. The numerical TMR-V a data are in good agreement with experimental ones. © 2011 IEEE.

  8. Direct exchange between silicon nanocrystals and tunnel oxide traps under illumination on single electron photodetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatbouri, S., E-mail: Samir.chatbouri@yahoo.com; Troudi, M.; Sghaier, N.; Kalboussi, A. [Avenue de I’environnement, Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro électronique et Instrumentation (LR13ES12), Faculté des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Aimez, V. [Université de Sherbrooke, Laboratoire Nanotechnologies et Nanosystémes (UMI-LN2 3463), Université de Sherbrooke—CNRS—INSA de Lyon-ECL-UJF-CPE Lyon, Institut Interdisciplinaire d’Innovation Technologique (Canada); Drouin, D. [Avenue de I’environnement, Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro électronique et Instrumentation (LR13ES12), Faculté des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Souifi, A. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon—site INSA de Lyon, UMR CNRS 5270 (France)

    2016-09-15

    In this paper we present the trapping of photogenerated charge carriers for 300 s resulted by their direct exchange under illumination between a few silicon nanocrystals (ncs-Si) embedded in an oxide tunnel layer (SiO{sub x} = 1.5) and the tunnel oxide traps levels for a single electron photodetector (photo-SET or nanopixel). At first place, the presence of a photocurrent limited in the inversion zone under illumination in the I–V curves confirms the creation of a pair electron/hole (e–h) at high energy. This photogenerated charge carriers can be trapped in the oxide. Using the capacitance-voltage under illumination (the photo-CV measurements) we show a hysteresis chargement limited in the inversion area, indicating that the photo-generated charge carriers are stored at traps levels at the interface and within ncs-Si. The direct exchange of the photogenerated charge carriers between the interface traps levels and the ncs-Si contributed on the photomemory effect for 300 s for our nanopixel at room temperature.

  9. Dipolar-Biased Tunneling of Magnetization in Crystals of Single Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaga, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    The molecular cluster Mn12 has attracted much interest as a single-molecule magnet (SMM) and as a multi-redox system. It has a high-spin ground state of S=10 and a strong uniaxial magnetic anisotropy, and the combination of the two natures makes an effective potential barrier between the up and down spin states. At low temperatures, the magnetization curve exhibited a hysteresis loop and the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). In the present work, we studied the structure and magnetic properties of the mixed-metal SMM, Mn11Cr, through the analysis of Mn11Cr/Mn12 mixed crystal. High-frequency EPR spectra were well explained by assuming that Mn11Cr was in a ground spin-state of S=19/2 with nearly the same EPR parameter set as for Mn12. QTM in Mn11Cr was observed with the same field interval as for Mn12. The magnetization of Mn11Cr and Mn12 in the mixed crystal can be independently manipulated by utilizing the difference between their coercive fields. The resonance fields of QTM in Mn11Cr are significantly affected by the magnetization direction of Mn12, suggesting the effect of dipolar-biased tunneling. Besides SMM, we would also like to report the unusual magnetic properties of spherical hollow nanomagnets, the electrical properties of heterocyclic thiazyl radicals, and their possible applications in spintronics and organic electronics.

  10. Spin Quantum Tunneling via Entangled States in a Dimer of Exchange-Coupled Single-Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiron, R.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Foguet-Albiol, D.; Aliaga-Alcalde, N.; Christou, G.

    2003-11-01

    A new family of supramolecular, antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled dimers of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) has recently been reported. Each SMM acts as a bias on its neighbor, shifting the quantum tunneling resonances of the individual SMMs. Hysteresis loop measurements on a single crystal of SMM dimers have now established quantum tunneling of the magnetization via entangled states of the dimer. This shows that the dimer really does behave as a quantum mechanically coupled dimer, and also allows the measurement of the longitudinal and transverse superexchange coupling constants.

  11. Shell-Tunneling Spectroscopy of the Single-Particle Energy Levels of Insulating Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Hens, Z.; Zunger, A.; Franceschetti, A; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Gurevich, L.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.

    2001-01-01

    The energy levels of CdSe quantum dots are studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. By varying the tip-dot distance, we switch from "shell-filling" spectroscopy (where electrons accumulate in the dot and experience mutual repulsion) to "shell-tunneling" spectroscopy (where electrons tunnel, one

  12. Intrinsic spin-relaxation induced negative tunnel magnetoresistance in a single-molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haiqing; Wang, Qiang; Xue, Hai-Bin; Jiao, HuJun; Liang, J.-Q.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate theoretically the effects of intrinsic spin-relaxation on the spin-dependent transport through a single-molecule magnet (SMM), which is weakly coupled to ferromagnetic leads. The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) is obtained by means of the rate-equation approach including not only the sequential but also the cotunneling processes. It is shown that the TMR is strongly suppressed by the fast spin-relaxation in the sequential region and can vary from a large positive to slight negative value in the cotunneling region. Moreover, with an external magnetic field along the easy-axis of SMM, a large negative TMR is found when the relaxation strength increases. Finally, in the high bias voltage limit the TMR for the negative bias is slightly larger than its characteristic value of the sequential region; however, it can become negative for the positive bias caused by the fast spin-relaxation.

  13. Single-molecule electron tunnelling through multiple redox levels with environmental relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    represent the substrate and tip in electrochemical in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy. An equivalent three-electrode configuration represents a molecular single-electron transistor in which the enclosing electrodes constitute source and drain, and the reference electrode the gate. Current-bias voltage...... relations at fixed electrochemical overpotential or gate voltage, and current-overpotential or current-gate voltage relations at fixed bias voltage are equivalent in the two systems. Due to the activation-less nature of the processes, electron flow between the electrodes through the molecular redox levels...... level(s) subsequent to electron transfer. Several physical mechanisms can be distinguished and distinctive current-overpotential/gate voltage or current-bias voltage relations obtained. These reflect electronic level separation, environmental nuclear reorganisation, and coherent or incoherent multi...

  14. Fast magnetization tunneling in tetranickel(II) single-molecule magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, En-Che; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Zakharov, Lev N; Karaki, Yoshitomo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Isidro, Rose M; Lu, Guo-Di; Wilson, Samuel A; Rheingold, Arnold L; Ishimoto, Hidehiko; Hendrickson, David N

    2006-01-23

    A series of Ni(4) cubane complexes with the composition [Ni(hmp)(ROH)Cl](4) complexes 1-4 where R= -CH(3) (complex 1), -CH(2)CH(3) (complex 2), -CH(2)CH(2)(C(4)H(9)) (complex 3), -CH(2)CH(2)CH(2)(C(6)H(11)) (complex 4), hmp(-) is the anion of 2-hydroxymethylpyridine, t-Buhmp(-) is the anion of 4-tert-butyl-2-hydroxymethylpyridine, and dmb is 3,3-dimethyl-1-butanol] and [Ni(hmp)(dmb)Br](4) (complex 5) and [Ni(t-Buhmp)(dmb)Cl](4) (complex 6) were prepared. All six complexes were characterized by dc magnetic susceptibility data to be ferromagnetically coupled to give an S = 4 ground state with significant magnetoanisotropy (D approximately equal to -0.6 cm(-1)). Magnetization hysteresis measurements carried out on single crystals of complexes 1-6 establish the single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior of these complexes. The exchange bias observed in the magnetization hysteresis loops of complexes 1 and 2 is dramatically decreased to zero in complex 3, where the bulky dmb ligand is employed. Fast tunneling of magnetization is observed for the high-symmetry (S(4) site symmetry) Ni(4) complexes in the crystal of complex 3, and the tunneling rate can even be enhanced by destroying the S(4) site symmetry, as is the case for complex 4, where there are two crystallographically different Ni(4) molecules, one with C(2) and the other with C(1) site symmetry. Magnetic ordering temperatures due to intermolecular dipolar and magnetic exchange interactions were determined by means of very low-temperature ac susceptibility measurements; complex 1 orders at 1100 mK, complex 3 at 290 mK, complex 4 at approximately 80 mK, and complex 6 at lower temperatures for those complexes with the bulkiest ligands.

  15. Spin asymmetry calculations of the TMR-V curves in single and double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    in the single as well as double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (SMTJ & DMTJ, which are constructed from CoFeB/MgO interfaces) and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR-V a curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions

  16. Development of CdTe/Cd1-xMgxTe double barrier, single quantum well heterostructure for resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuscher, G.; Keim, M.; Fischer, F.; Waag, A.; Landwehr, G.

    1995-01-01

    We report the first observation of resonant tunneling through a CdTe/Cd 1-x Mg x Te double barrier, single quantum well heterostructure. Negative differential resistance is observable at temperatures below 230 K, exhibiting a peak to valley ratio of 3:1 at 4.2 K. (author)

  17. Low-leakage superconducting tunnel junctions with a single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Cicak, K; Osborn, K D; Simmonds, R W; Pappas, D P [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); McDermott, R; Cooper, K B; Steffen, M; Martinis, J M [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    We have developed a two-step growth scheme for single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barriers. The barriers are epitaxially grown on single-crystal rhenium (Re) base electrodes that are grown epitaxially on a sapphire substrate, while polycrystalline Al is used as the top electrode. We show that by first growing an amorphous aluminium (Al) oxide layer at room temperature and crystallizing it at a high temperature in oxygen environment, a morphologically intact single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer is obtained. Tunnel junctions fabricated from these trilayers show very low subgap leakage current. This single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} junction may open a new venue for coherent quantum devices.

  18. Crystal lattice desolvation effects on the magnetic quantum tunneling of single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redler, G.; Lampropoulos, C.; Datta, S.; Koo, C.; Stamatatos, T. C.; Chakov, N. E.; Christou, G.; Hill, S.

    2009-09-01

    High-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) and alternating current (ac) susceptibility measurements are reported for a new high-symmetry Mn12 complex, [Mn12O12(O2CCH3)16(CH3OH)4]ṡCH3OH . The results are compared to those of other high-symmetry spin S=10Mn12 single-molecule magnets (SMMs), including the original acetate, [Mn12(O2CCH3)16(H2O)4]ṡ2CH3CO2Hṡ4H2O , and the [Mn12O12(O2CCH2Br)16(H2O)4]ṡ4CH2Cl2 and [Mn12O12(O2CCH2But)16(CH3OH)4]ṡCH3OH complexes. These comparisons reveal important insights into the factors that influence the values of the effective barrier to magnetization reversal, Ueff , deduced on the basis of ac susceptibility measurements. In particular, we find that variations in Ueff can be correlated with the degree of disorder in a crystal which can be controlled by desolvating (drying) samples. This highlights the importance of careful sample handling when making measurements on SMM crystals containing volatile lattice solvents. The HFEPR data additionally provide spectroscopic evidence suggesting that the relatively weak disorder induced by desolvation influences the quantum tunneling interactions and that it is under-barrier tunneling that is responsible for a consistent reduction in Ueff that is found upon drying samples. Meanwhile, the axial anisotropy deduced from HFEPR is found to be virtually identical for all four Mn12 complexes, with no measurable reduction upon desolvation.

  19. Magnetic Quantum Tunneling in Single Molecule Magnets: Mn-12 and Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barco, Enrique

    2004-03-01

    Magnetic quantum tunneling (MQT) has been studied in single molecule magnets (SMMs) using a micro-Hall effect magnetometer in a superconducting high field vector magnet system that incorporates the possibility of applying pulsed microwave fields. Mn_12-acetate has been studied extensively over the years. However, only recently the symmetry of MQT and the nature of the transverse interactions important to MQT have been determined [1,2]. Magnetic measurements in the pure quantum tunneling regime (0.6 K) illustrate that an average crystal fourfold MQT symmetry is due to local molecular environments of twofold symmetry that are rotated by 90 degrees with respect to one another, confirming that disorder which lowers the molecule symmetry is important to MQT. We have studied a subset of these lower site symmetry molecules and present evidence for a Berry phase that results from a combination of second and forth order contributions to the transverse magnetic anisotropy. These observations are consistent with high frequency EPR studies of the transverse interactions in Mn_12-acetate [3]. Finally, we discuss recent experiments in which microwave radiation is applied to modulate MQT and characterize the lifetimes and coherence times of states that are superpositions of "up" and "down" high spin-projections. [1] E. del Barco, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 047203 (2003) [2] S. Hill, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 217204 (2003). [3] E. del Barco, A, D. Kent, R. S. Edwards, S. I. Jones, S. Hill, J. M. North, N. S. Dalal, E. M. Rumnberger, D. N. Hendrickson and G. Christou, to be published.

  20. Effectiveness of PELOID therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized controlled single blind study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin Ökmen, Burcu; Kasapoğlu Aksoy, Meliha; Güneş, Aygül; Eröksüz, Riza; Altan, Lale

    2017-08-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome(CTS) is the most common neuromuscular cause of upper extremity disability. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of peloid therapy in patients with CTS. This randomized, controlled, single-blind study enrolled 70 patients between the ages of 30 to 65 who had a diagnosis of either mild, mild-to-moderate, or moderate CTS. The patients were randomized into two groups using random number table. In the first group, (Group 1)( n = 35), patients were given splint (every night for 6 weeks) + peloid treatment(five consecutive days a week for 2 weeks) and in the second group, (Group 2)( n = 28), patients received splint treatment(every night for 6 weeks) alone. The patients were assessed by using visual analog scale(VAS) for pain, electroneuromyography(ENMG), the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire(BCTSQ), hand grip strength(HGS), finger grip strength(FGS), and Short Form-12(SF-12). The data were obtained before treatment(W0), immediately after treatment(W2), and one month after treatment(W6). Both in Group 1 and 2, there was a statistically significant improvement in all the evaluation parameters at W2 and W6 when compared to W0( p < 0.05). Comparison of the groups with each other revealed significantly better results for VAS, BCTSQ, mSNCV, SF-12 in Group 1 than in Group 2 at W2( p < 0.05). There was also a statistically significant difference in favor of Group 1 for VAS, BCTSQ, FGS and MCS at W6 when compared to W0 ( p < 0.05). The results of our study demonstrated that in patients with CTS; peloid + splint treatment was more effective than splint treatment alone in pain, functionality and life quality both at after treatment(W2) and one month after treatment (W6). We may suggest peloid as a supplementary therapeutic agent in CTS.

  1. The effects of changing the electrodes temperature on the tunnel magnetoresistance in the ferromagnetic single electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, N.; Pourali, N.; Kavaz, E.

    2018-01-01

    Ferromagnetic single electron transistor with electrodes having different temperatures is investigated and the effects of changing electrodes temperature on TMR of system are studied. A modified orthodox theory is used to study the system and to calculate the electron tunneling transition rate. The results show that the temperature of electrodes can be an effective tool to control and tune the tunnel magnetoresistance of FM-SET. Also, the effects of parameters such as resistance ratio of junctions, magnetic polarization and spin relaxation time on the behaviour of the system are studied.

  2. Transparent Flash Memory using Single Ta2O5 Layer for both Charge Trapping and Tunneling Dielectrics

    KAUST Repository

    Hota, Mrinal Kanti

    2017-06-08

    We report reproducible multibit transparent flash memory in which a single solution-derived Ta2O5 layer is used simultaneously as charge trapping and tunneling layer. This is different from conventional flash cells, where two different dielectric layers are typically used. Under optimized programming/erasing operations, the memory device shows excellent programmable memory characteristics with a maximum memory window of ~10 V. Moreover, the flash memory device shows a stable 2-bit memory performance, good reliability, including data retention for more than 104 sec and endurance performance for more than 100 cycles. The use of a common charge trapping and tunneling layer can simplify advanced flash memory fabrication.

  3. Transparent Flash Memory using Single Ta2O5 Layer for both Charge Trapping and Tunneling Dielectrics

    KAUST Repository

    Hota, Mrinal Kanti; Alshammari, Fwzah H.; Salama, Khaled N.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    We report reproducible multibit transparent flash memory in which a single solution-derived Ta2O5 layer is used simultaneously as charge trapping and tunneling layer. This is different from conventional flash cells, where two different dielectric layers are typically used. Under optimized programming/erasing operations, the memory device shows excellent programmable memory characteristics with a maximum memory window of ~10 V. Moreover, the flash memory device shows a stable 2-bit memory performance, good reliability, including data retention for more than 104 sec and endurance performance for more than 100 cycles. The use of a common charge trapping and tunneling layer can simplify advanced flash memory fabrication.

  4. Tunneling spectroscopy of a germanium quantum dot in single-hole transistors with self-aligned electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G-L; Kuo, David M T; Lai, W-T; Li, P-W

    2007-01-01

    We have fabricated a Ge quantum dot (QD) (∼10 nm) single-hole transistor with self-aligned electrodes using thermal oxidation of a SiGe-on-insulator nanowire based on FinFET technology. This fabricated device exhibits clear Coulomb blockade oscillations with large peak-to-valley ratio (PVCR) of 250-750 and negative differential conductance with PVCR of ∼12 at room temperature. This reveals that the gate-induced tunneling barrier lowering is effectively suppressed due to the self-aligned electrode structure. The magnitude of tunneling current spectra also reveals the coupling strengths between the energy levels of the Ge QD and electrodes

  5. Two-photon-induced hot-electron transfer to a single molecule in a scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S. W.; Ho, W.

    2010-01-01

    The junction of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in the tunneling regime was irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. A photoexcited hot electron in the STM tip resonantly tunnels into an excited state of a single molecule on the surface, converting it from the neutral to the anion. The electron-transfer rate depends quadratically on the incident laser power, suggesting a two-photon excitation process. This nonlinear optical process is further confirmed by the polarization measurement. Spatial dependence of the electron-transfer rate exhibits atomic-scale variations. A two-pulse correlation experiment reveals the ultrafast dynamic nature of photoinduced charging process in the STM junction. Results from these experiments are important for understanding photoinduced interfacial charge transfer in many nanoscale inorganic-organic structures.

  6. Electron and Cooper-pair transport across a single magnetic molecule explored with a scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J.; Gozdzik, S.; Néel, N.; Lado, J. L.; Fernández-Rossier, J.; Kröger, J.

    2018-05-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope is used to explore the evolution of electron and Cooper-pair transport across single Mn-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Pb(111) from tunneling to contact ranges. Normal-metal as well as superconducting tips give rise to a gradual transition of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer energy gap in the tunneling range into a zero-energy resonance close to and at contact. Supporting transport calculations show that in the normal-metal-superconductor junctions this resonance reflects the merging of in-gap Yu-Shiba-Rusinov states as well as the onset of Andreev reflection. For the superconductor-superconductor contacts, the zero-energy resonance is rationalized in terms of a finite Josephson current that is carried by phase-dependent Andreev and Yu-Shiba-Rusinov levels.

  7. Occurrence of myofascial pain in patients with possible carpal tunnel syndrome - a single-blinded study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qerama, Erisela; Kasch, Helge; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    There exits some similarity between symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and myofascial pain related to trigger points (TPs) in the infraspinatus muscle.......There exits some similarity between symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and myofascial pain related to trigger points (TPs) in the infraspinatus muscle....

  8. Absence of a spin-signature from a single Ho adatom as probed by spin-sensitive tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, M; Sonntag, A; dos Santos Dias, M; Bouhassoune, M; Lounis, S; Wiebe, J; Wiesendanger, R; Khajetoorians, A A

    2016-02-03

    Whether rare-earth materials can be used as single-atom magnetic memory is an ongoing debate in recent literature. Here we show, by inelastic and spin-resolved scanning tunnelling-based methods, that we observe a strong magnetic signal and excitation from Fe atoms adsorbed on Pt(111), but see no signatures of magnetic excitation or spin-based telegraph noise for Ho atoms. Moreover, we observe that the indirect exchange field produced by a single Ho atom is negligible, as sensed by nearby Fe atoms. We demonstrate, using ab initio methods, that this stems from a comparatively weak coupling of the Ho 4f electrons with both tunnelling electrons and substrate-derived itinerant electrons, making both magnetic coupling and detection very difficult when compared to 3d elements. We discuss these results in the context of ongoing disputes and clarify important controversies.

  9. Small hydropower plant in Ruetenen - Drainage water utilization from the Alpine motor way tunnel 'Seelisberg' in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odermatt, K.; Ettlin, M.

    2001-01-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes a project that uses the drainage water from the Seelisberg motor way tunnel in central Switzerland to drive a small turbine that uses the fall distance between the collection point near the tunnel portal and the lake of Lucerne, which lies 48 meters below, to generate more than 100 kW of electrical power. The operation of the hydraulic power station and the experience gained during initial operation are described and the somewhat erratic amounts of water - depending on rainfall, snow-melting etc. - are discussed. Figures are given on the building and operational costs, electricity production and the price of the electricity produced. The report is illustrated with technical drawings and photos of the installation

  10. Ultrafast terahertz control of extreme tunnel currents through single atoms on a silicon surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelic, Vedran; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Nguyen, Peter H.

    2017-01-01

    scanning tunnelling microscopy (THz-STM) in ultrahigh vacuum as a new platform for exploring ultrafast non-equilibrium tunnelling dynamics with atomic precision. Extreme terahertz-pulse-driven tunnel currents up to 10(7) times larger than steady-state currents in conventional STM are used to image...... terahertz-induced band bending and non-equilibrium charging of surface states opens new conduction pathways to the bulk, enabling extreme transient tunnel currents to flow between the tip and sample.......Ultrafast control of current on the atomic scale is essential for future innovations in nanoelectronics. Extremely localized transient electric fields on the nanoscale can be achieved by coupling picosecond duration terahertz pulses to metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate terahertz...

  11. Effects of temperature and other experimental variables on single molecule vibrational spectroscopy with the scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauhon, L. J.; Ho, W.

    2001-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) was performed on single molecules with a variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope. The peak intensity, width, position, and line shape of single molecule vibrational spectra were studied as a function of temperature, modulation bias, bias polarity, and tip position for the (C--H,C--D) stretching vibration of acetylene (C 2 H 2 ,C 2 D 2 ) on Cu(001). The temperature broadening of vibrational peaks was found to be a consequence of Fermi smearing as in macroscopic IETS. The modulation broadening of vibrational peaks assumed the expected form for IETS. Extrapolation of the peak width to zero temperature and modulation suggested an intrinsic width of ∼4 meV due primarily to instrumental broadening. The inelastic tunneling cross section at negative bias was reduced by a factor of 1.7 for the C--H stretch mode. Low energy modes of other molecules did not show such a reduction. There was no evidence of a tip-induced Stark shift in the peak positions. The spatial variation of the inelastic signal was measured to determine the junction stability necessary for the acquisition of single molecule vibrational spectra

  12. Dopant induced single electron tunneling within the sub-bands of single silicon NW tri-gate junctionless n-MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Wasi; Georgiev, Yordan M.; Maity, Sarmistha; Das, Samaresh

    2017-09-01

    We report 1D electron transport of silicon junctionless tri-gate n-type transistor at 4.2 K. The step like curve observed in the current voltage characteristic suggests 1D transport. Besides the current steps for 1D transport, we found multiple spikes within individual steps, which we relate to inter-band single electron tunneling, mediated by the charged dopants available in the channel region. Clear Coulomb diamonds were observed in the stability diagram of the device. It is shown that a uniformly doped silicon nanowire can provide us the window for the single electron tunnelling. Back-gate versus front-gate color plot, where current is in a color scale, shows a crossover of the increased conduction region. This is a clear indication of the dopant-dopant interaction. It has been shown that back-gate biasing can be used to tune the coupling strength between the dopants.

  13. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level: In situ mapping of redox-gated tunneling resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, O; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    on the redox potential. Maximum resonance appears around the equilibrium redox potential of azurin with an on/off current ratio of approximate to 9. Simulation analyses, based on a two-step interfacial ET model for the scanning tunneling microscopy redox process, were performed and provide quantitative......A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi...... constants display tunneling features with distance-decay factors of 0.83 and 0.91 angstrom(-1) in H2O and D2O, respectively. Redox-gated tunneling resonance is observed in situ at the single-molecule level by using electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy, exhibiting an asymmetric dependence...

  14. Static properties of small Josephson tunnel junctions in an oblique magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, Roberto; Aarøe, Morten; Mygind, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed experimental investigation of the static properties of planar Josephson tunnel junctions in presence of a uniform external magnetic field applied in an arbitrary orientation with respect to the barrier plane. We considered annular junctions, as well as rectangular...

  15. Seismic Design of a Single Bored Tunnel: Longitudinal Deformations and Seismic Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J.; Moon, T.

    2018-03-01

    The large diameter bored tunnel passing through rock and alluvial deposits subjected to seismic loading is analyzed for estimating longitudinal deformations and member forces on the segmental tunnel liners. The project site has challenges including high hydrostatic pressure, variable ground profile and high seismic loading. To ensure the safety of segmental tunnel liner from the seismic demands, the performance-based two-level design earthquake approach, Functional Evaluation Earthquake and Safety Evaluation Earthquake, has been adopted. The longitudinal tunnel and ground response seismic analyses are performed using a three-dimensional quasi-static linear elastic and nonlinear elastic discrete beam-spring elements to represent segmental liner and ground spring, respectively. Three components (longitudinal, transverse and vertical) of free-field ground displacement-time histories evaluated from site response analyses considering wave passage effects have been applied at the end support of the strain-compatible ground springs. The result of the longitudinal seismic analyses suggests that seismic joint for the mitigation measure requiring the design deflection capacity of 5-7.5 cm is to be furnished at the transition zone between hard and soft ground condition where the maximum member forces on the segmental liner (i.e., axial, shear forces and bending moments) are induced. The paper illustrates how detailed numerical analyses can be practically applied to evaluate the axial and curvature deformations along the tunnel alignment under difficult ground conditions and to provide the seismic joints at proper locations to effectively reduce the seismic demands below the allowable levels.

  16. Gap anisotropy and tunneling currents. [MPS3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarides, N.; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    1996-01-01

    The tunneling Hamiltonian formalism is applied to calculate the tunnelingcurrents through a small superconducting tunnel junction. The formalism isextended to nonconstant tunneling matrix elements. The electrodes of thejunction are assumed to......The tunneling Hamiltonian formalism is applied to calculate the tunnelingcurrents through a small superconducting tunnel junction. The formalism isextended to nonconstant tunneling matrix elements. The electrodes of thejunction are assumed to...

  17. Tunneling couplings in discrete lattices, single-particle band structure, and eigenstates of interacting atom pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piil, Rune; Moelmer, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    By adjusting the tunneling couplings over longer than nearest-neighbor distances, it is possible in discrete lattice models to reproduce the properties of the lowest energy band of a real, continuous periodic potential. We propose to include such terms in problems with interacting particles, and we show that they have significant consequences for scattering and bound states of atom pairs in periodic potentials

  18. Revealing energy level structure of individual quantum dots by tunneling rate measured by single-electron sensitive electrostatic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Gobeil, Antoine; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter

    2015-04-08

    We present theoretical and experimental studies of the effect of the density of states of a quantum dot (QD) on the rate of single-electron tunneling that can be directly measured by electrostatic force microscopy (e-EFM) experiments. In e-EFM, the motion of a biased atomic force microscope cantilever tip modulates the charge state of a QD in the Coulomb blockade regime. The charge dynamics of the dot, which is detected through its back-action on the capacitavely coupled cantilever, depends on the tunneling rate of the QD to a back-electrode. The density of states of the QD can therefore be measured through its effect on the energy dependence of tunneling rate. We present experimental data on individual 5 nm colloidal gold nanoparticles that exhibit a near continuous density of state at 77 K. In contrast, our analysis of already published data on self-assembled InAs QDs at 4 K clearly reveals discrete degenerate energy levels.

  19. Examining the effect of adverse geological conditions on jamming of a single shielded TBM in Uluabat tunnel using numerical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohola Hasanpour

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Severe shield jamming events have been reported during excavation of Uluabat tunnel through adverse geological conditions, which resulted in several stoppages at advancing a single shielded tunnel boring machine (TBM. To study the jamming mechanism, three-dimensional (3D simulation of the machine and surrounding ground was implemented using the finite difference code FLAC3D. Numerical analyses were performed for three sections along the tunnel with a higher risk for entrapment due to the combination of overburden and geological conditions. The computational results including longitudinal displacement contours and ground pressure profiles around the shield allow a better understanding of ground behavior within the excavation. Furthermore, they allow realistically assessing the impact of adverse geological conditions on shield jamming. The calculated thrust forces, which are required to move the machine forward, are in good agreement with field observations and measurements. It also proves that the numerical analysis can effectively be used for evaluating the effect of adverse geological environment on TBM entrapments and can be applied to prediction of loads on the shield and pre-estimating of the required thrust force during excavation through adverse ground conditions.

  20. Tunneling works. Tunnel koji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higo, M [Hazam Gumi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-10-25

    A mountain tunneling method for rock-beds used to be applied mainly to construction works in the mountains under few restrictions by environmental problems. However, construction works near residential sreas have been increasing. There are such enviromental problems due to tunneling works as vibration, noise, lowering of ground-water level, and influences on other structures. This report mainly describes the measurement examples of vibration and noise accompanied with blasting and the effects of the measures to lessen such influences. When the tunneling works for the railroad was carried out on the natural ground mainly composed of basalt, vibration of the test blasting was measured at three stations with piezoelectric accelerometers. Then, ordinary blasting, mutistage blasting, and ABM blasting methods were used properly besed on the above results, and only a few complaints were made. In the different works, normal noise and low-frequency sound were mesured at 22 stations around the pit mouth. As countermeasures for noise, sound-proof sheets, walls, and single and double doors were installed and foundto be effective. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Coulomb blockade threshold in finite one-dimensional arrays of small tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien, Nguyen V.; Dat, Nguyen T.; Nam, Nguyen H.

    2001-11-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of one-dimensional tunnel junction arrays are simulated using the semiclassical and full capacitance matrix description. The threshold voltage V th of the Coulomb blockade (CB) is evaluated and analyzed in detail as a function of the gate capacitance C 0 , the array length N, the temperature, and the degree of disorder. The disordered effect is found to be essential, while the long range interaction included in the full capacitance matrix calculations, when decreasing V th , weakly affects the qualitative behaviour of the CB for the V th (C 0 ) - and the V th (N)-dependences. (author)

  2. Energy relaxation between low lying tunnel split spin-states of the single molecule magnet Ni4

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Loubens, G.; Chaves-O'Flynn, G. D.; Kent, A. D.; Ramsey, C.; Del Barco, E.; Beedle, C.; Hendrickson, D. N.

    2007-03-01

    We have developed integrated magnetic sensors to study quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) in single molecule magnet (SMMs) single crystals. These sensors incorporate a microstrip resonator (30 GHz) and a micro-Hall effect magnetometer. They have been used to investigate the relaxation rates between the 2 lowest lying tunnel split spin-states of the SMM Ni4 (S=4). EPR spectroscopy at 30 GHz and 0.4 K and concurrent magnetization measurements of several Ni4 single crystals are presented. EPR enables measurement of the energy splitting between the 2 lowest lying superposition states as a function of the longitudinal and transverse fields. The energy relaxation rate is determined in two ways. First, in cw microwave experiments the change in spin-population together with the microwave absorption directly gives the relaxation time from energy conservation in steady-state. Second, direct time-resolved measurements of the magnetization with pulsed microwave radiation have been performed. The relaxation time is found to vary by several orders of magnitude in different crystals, from a few seconds down to smaller than 100 μs. We discuss this and the form of the relaxation found for different crystals and pulse conditions.

  3. Coherent Cooper pair tunneling in systems of Josephson junctions: effects of quasiparticle tunneling and of the electromagnetic environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen van den Brink, A.; Odintsov, A.A.; Bobbert, P.A.; Schön, G.

    1991-01-01

    Small capacitance tunnel junctions show single electron effects and, in the superconducting state, the coherent tunneling of Cooper pairs. We study these effects in a system of two Josephson junctions, driven by a voltage source with a finite impedance. Novel features show up in theI–V

  4. Molecular electronics of a single photosystem I reaction center: Studies with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.; Lee, J.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Allison, D.P.; Greenbaum, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-14

    Thylakoids and photosystem I (PSI) reaction centers were imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy. The thylakoids were isolated from spinach chloroplasts, and PSI reaction centers were extracted from thylakoid membranes. Because thylakoids are relatively thick nonconductors, they were sputter-coated with Pd/Au before imaging. PSI photosynthetic centers and chemically platinized PSI were investigated without sputter-coating. They were mounted on flat gold substrates that had been treated with mercaptoacetic acid to help bind the proteins. With tunneling spectroscopy, the PSI centers displayed a semiconductor-like response with a band gap of 1.8 eV. Lightly platinized (platinized for 1 hr) centers displayed diode-like conduction that resulted in dramatic contrast changes between images taken with opposite bias voltages. The electronic properties of this system were stable under long-term storage. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Electronic single-molecule identification of carbohydrate isomers by recognition tunnelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jongone; Biswas, Sovan; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Yanan; Sen, Suman; Biswas, Sudipta; Ashcroft, Brian; Borges, Chad; Wang, Xu; Lindsay, Stuart; Zhang, Peiming

    2016-12-01

    Carbohydrates are one of the four main building blocks of life, and are categorized as monosaccharides (sugars), oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. Each sugar can exist in two alternative anomers (in which a hydroxy group at C-1 takes different orientations) and each pair of sugars can form different epimers (isomers around the stereocentres connecting the sugars). This leads to a vast combinatorial complexity, intractable to mass spectrometry and requiring large amounts of sample for NMR characterization. Combining measurements of collision cross section with mass spectrometry (IM-MS) helps, but many isomers are still difficult to separate. Here, we show that recognition tunnelling (RT) can classify many anomers and epimers via the current fluctuations they produce when captured in a tunnel junction functionalized with recognition molecules. Most importantly, RT is a nanoscale technique utilizing sub-picomole quantities of analyte. If integrated into a nanopore, RT would provide a unique approach to sequencing linear polysaccharides.

  6. Design model for bending vibrations of single-stage tunnel fan rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasyuk, AM; Kosykh, PV

    2018-03-01

    Using of one-mass model of tunnel fan rotor is justified for estimation calculation of the natural bending vibrations frequency during the design stage. It’s shown that the evaluative computation of the main axial tunnel fan at the early design stage yields the acceptable accuracy. It is shown that after completion of the design, the mass of the stepped-type shaft differs from the mass of the calculated uniform-diameter shaft no more than by 40%. Inclusion of this additional mass in the estimation calculation makes it possible to improve the calculation accuracy. The region of the dimensionless rotor design parameters at which the relative difference of frequency in the evaluative and verification calculations is not higher than 5 % is determined.

  7. Synthesis of single crystal manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS) nanostructures with tunable tunnels and shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Na; Yuan, Jikang; Gomez-Mower, Sinue; Sithambaram, Shantakumar; Suib, Steven L

    2006-02-23

    A new and facile route is reported to manipulate the self-assembly synthesis of hierarchically ordered Rb-OMS-2 and pyrolusite with an interesting flowerlike morphology by a direct and mild reaction between rubidium chromateand manganese sulfate without any organic templates. The crystal forms, morphologies, and tunnel sizes of the obtained OMS materials can be controlled. A mechanism for the growth of manganese dioxides with flowerlike architectures was proposed. The obtained products exhibit potential for use in catalysis and other applications.

  8. Detecting stray microwaves and nonequilibrium quasiparticles in thin films by single-electron tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saira, Olli-Pentti; Maisi, Ville; Kemppinen, Antti; Möttönen, Mikko; Pekola, Jukka

    2013-03-01

    Superconducting thin films and tunnel junctions are the building blocks of many state-of-the-art technologies related to quantum information processing, microwave detection, and electronic amplification. These devices operate at millikelvin temperatures, and - in a naive picture - their fidelity metrics are expected to improve as the temperature is lowered. However, very often one finds in the experiment that the device performance levels off around 100-150 mK. In my presentation, I will address three common physical mechanisms that can cause such saturation: stray microwaves, nonequilibrium quasiparticles, and sub-gap quasiparticle states. The new experimental data I will present is based on a series of studies on quasiparticle transport in Coulomb-blockaded normal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction devices. We have used a capacitively coupled SET electrometer to detect individual quasiparticle tunneling events in real time. We demonstrate the following record-low values for thin film aluminum: quasiparticle density nqp < 0 . 033 / μm3 , normalized density of sub-gap quasiparticle states (Dynes parameter) γ < 1 . 6 ×10-7 . I will also discuss some sample stage and chip designs that improve microwave shielding.

  9. Design and Numerical Calculation of Variable Test Section for Small Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav DVOŘÁK

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with numerical modelling of transition in a separated boundary layer. The model of laminar/turbulent transition is based on the combination of empirical terms determining position of the transition and averaged Navier – Stokes equations closed by the k – ω SST turbulence model. The model of transition is applied in computation of 2D flow past NACA63A421 airfoil. Computation is performed using the commercial code ANSYS Fluent 6.3.26, in which the transition method is implemented as a User-Defined-Function. Computed distributions of Cp along the airfoil are verified by comparison with experimental data, which were obtained by measurements in a closed circuit wind tunnel at the constant Reynolds number and several angles of attack. Comparisons prove applicability of the implemented transitional model.

  10. Hyperfine-Interaction-Driven Suppression of Quantum Tunneling at Zero Field in a Holmium(III) Single-Ion Magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Cong; Liu, Jun-Liang; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Liu, Dan; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2017-04-24

    An extremely rare non-Kramers holmium(III) single-ion magnet (SIM) is reported to be stabilized in the pentagonal-bipyramidal geometry by a phosphine oxide with a high energy barrier of 237(4) cm -1 . The suppression of the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) at zero field and the hyperfine structures originating from field-induced QTMs can be observed even from the field-dependent alternating-current magnetic susceptibility in addition to single-crystal hysteresis loops. These dramatic dynamics were attributed to the combination of the favorable crystal-field environment and the hyperfine interactions arising from 165 Ho (I=7/2) with a natural abundance of 100 %. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Hyperfine-interaction-driven suppression of quantum tunneling at zero field in a holmium(III) single-ion magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yan-Cong; Liu, Jun-Liang; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang [Key Lab. of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry of Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry, Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Guangzhou (China); Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang [Institut Neel, CNRS and Universite Joseph Fournier, Grenoble (France); Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Liu, Dan; Chibotaru, Liviu F. [Theory of Nanomaterials Group and INPAC-Institute of Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium)

    2017-04-24

    An extremely rare non-Kramers holmium(III) single-ion magnet (SIM) is reported to be stabilized in the pentagonal-bipyramidal geometry by a phosphine oxide with a high energy barrier of 237(4) cm{sup -1}. The suppression of the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) at zero field and the hyperfine structures originating from field-induced QTMs can be observed even from the field-dependent alternating-current magnetic susceptibility in addition to single-crystal hysteresis loops. These dramatic dynamics were attributed to the combination of the favorable crystal-field environment and the hyperfine interactions arising from {sup 165}Ho (I=7/2) with a natural abundance of 100 %. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Consequences of Spin-Orbit Coupling at the Single Hole Level: Spin-Flip Tunneling and the Anisotropic g Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, A; Studenikin, S A; Korkusinski, M; Aers, G C; Gaudreau, L; Zawadzki, P; Sachrajda, A S; Tracy, L A; Reno, J L; Hargett, T W

    2017-04-21

    Hole transport experiments were performed on a gated double quantum dot device defined in a p-GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure with a single hole occupancy in each dot. The charging diagram of the device was mapped out using charge detection confirming that the single hole limit is reached. In that limit, a detailed study of the two-hole spin system was performed using high bias magnetotransport spectroscopy. In contrast to electron systems, the hole spin was found not to be conserved during interdot resonant tunneling. This allows one to fully map out the two-hole energy spectrum as a function of the magnitude and the direction of the external magnetic field. The heavy-hole g factor was extracted and shown to be strongly anisotropic, with a value of 1.45 for a perpendicular field and close to zero for an in-plane field as required for hybridizing schemes between spin and photonic quantum platforms.

  13. Single-molecule conductance of redox molecules in electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haiss, W.; Albrecht, Tim; van Zalinge, H.

    2007-01-01

    of a maximum in the I-tunneling versus electrode potential relationship can be fitted by a "soft" gating concept. This arises from large configurational fluctuations of the molecular bridge linked to the gold contacts by flexible chains. This view is incorporated in a formalism that is well-suited for data...... analysis and reproduces in all important respects the 6V6 data for physically sound values of the appropriate parameters. This study demonstrates that fluctuations of isolated configurationally "soft" molecules can dominate charge transport patterns and that theoretical frameworks for compact monolayers...

  14. Quantum tunneling in the adiabatic Dicke model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Gang; Chen Zidong; Liang Jiuqing

    2007-01-01

    The Dicke model describes N two-level atoms interacting with a single-mode bosonic field and exhibits a second-order phase transition from the normal to the superradiant phase. The energy levels are not degenerate in the normal phase but have degeneracy in the superradiant phase, where quantum tunneling occurs. By means of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and the instanton method in quantum field theory, the tunneling splitting, inversely proportional to the tunneling rate for the adiabatic Dicke model, in the superradiant phase can be evaluated explicitly. It is shown that the tunneling splitting vanishes as exp(-N) for large N, whereas for small N it disappears as √(N)/exp(N). The dependence of the tunneling splitting on the relevant parameters, especially on the atom-field coupling strength, is also discussed

  15. Scanning tunneling microscopy on iron-chalcogenide superconductor Fe(Se, Te) single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukita, R.; Sugimoto, A.; Ekino, T.

    2011-01-01

    We show scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) results of Fe(Se, Te). STM topography shows square arrangements of spots with the lattice spacing 0.37 nm. Te and Se atoms are randomly distributed in the STM topography. The STM topography of FeTe exhibits clusters of separated iron atoms. We have investigated the iron-chalcogenide superconductor Fe(Se, Te) using a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) technique. STM topography at 4.9 K shows clear regular square arrangements of spots with the lattice spacing ∼0.37 nm, from which what we observe are attributed to Se or Te atomic plane. In the topography, brighter and darker atomic spots are randomly distributed, which are most probably due to Te and Se atoms, respectively. For the FeTe compound, the topography exhibits clusters of the bright spots probably arising from separated iron atoms distributing over several Te lattice sites. The STS measurements clarify the existence of the large-size gap with 2Δ = 0.4-0.6 eV.

  16. Comparison of Magnetization Tunneling in the Giant-Spin and Multi-Spin Descriptions of Single-Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjie; Del Barco, Enrique; Hill, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    We perform a mapping of the spectrum obtained for a triangular Mn3 single-molecule magnet (SMM) with idealized C3 symmetry via exact diagonalization of a multi-spin (MS) Hamiltonian onto that of a giant-spin (GS) model which assumes strong ferromagnetic coupling and a spin S = 6 ground state. Magnetic hysteresis measurements on this Mn3 SMM reveal clear evidence that the steps in magnetization due to magnetization tunneling obey the expected quantum mechanical selection rules [J. Henderson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 017202 (2009)]. High-frequency EPR and magnetization data are first fit to the MS model. The tunnel splittings obtained via the two models are then compared in order to find a relationship between the sixth order transverse anisotropy term B6^6 in GS model and the exchange constant J coupling the Mn^III ions in the MS model. We also find that the fourth order transverse term B4^3 in the GS model is related to the orientation of JahnTeller axes of Mn^III ions, as well as J

  17. Quantum tunneling in real space: Tautomerization of single porphycene molecules on the (111) surface of Cu, Ag, and Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Takashi; Ladenthin, Janina N.; Litman, Yair; Rossi, Mariana; Grill, Leonhard; Gawinkowski, Sylwester; Waluk, Jacek; Persson, Mats

    2018-03-01

    Tautomerization in single porphycene molecules is investigated on Cu(111), Ag(111), and Au(111) surfaces by a combination of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is revealed that the trans configuration is the thermodynamically stable form of porphycene on Cu(111) and Ag(111), whereas the cis configuration occurs as a meta-stable form. The trans → cis or cis → trans conversion on Cu(111) can be induced in an unidirectional fashion by injecting tunneling electrons from the STM tip or heating the surface, respectively. We find that the cis ↔ cis tautomerization on Cu(111) occurs spontaneously via tunneling, verified by the negligible temperature dependence of the tautomerization rate below ˜23 K. Van der Waals corrected DFT calculations are used to characterize the adsorption structures of porphycene and to map the potential energy surface of the tautomerization on Cu(111). The calculated barriers are too high to be thermally overcome at cryogenic temperatures used in the experiment and zero-point energy corrections do not change this picture, leaving tunneling as the most likely mechanism. On Ag(111), the reversible trans ↔ cis conversion occurs spontaneously at 5 K and the cis ↔ cis tautomerization rate is much higher than on Cu(111), indicating a significantly smaller tautomerization barrier on Ag(111) due to the weaker interaction between porphycene and the surface compared to Cu(111). Additionally, the STM experiments and DFT calculations reveal that tautomerization on Cu(111) and Ag(111) occurs with migration of porphycene along the surface; thus, the translational motion couples with the tautomerization coordinate. On the other hand, the trans and cis configurations are not discernible in the STM image and no tautomerization is observed for porphycene on Au(111). The weak interaction of porphycene with Au(111) is closest to the gas-phase limit and therefore the absence

  18. Magnetic and transport properties of single and double perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuchet, Lea

    2015-01-01

    Due to their advantageous properties in terms of data retention, storage density and critical current density for Spin Transfer Torque (STT) switching, the magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy have become predominant in the developments for MRAM applications. The aim of this thesis is to improve the anisotropy and transport properties of such structures and to realize even more complex stacks such as perpendicular double junctions. Studies on the magnetic properties and Tunnel Magnetoresistance (TMR) measurements showed that to optimize the performances of the junctions, all the thicknesses of the different layers constituting the stack have to be adapted. To guaranty both a large TMR as well a strong perpendicular anisotropy, compromises are most of the time needed. Studies as a function of magnetic thickness enabled to extract the saturation magnetization, the critical thickness and the magnetic dead layer thickness both in the bottom reference and the top storage layer in structures capped with Ta. This type of junction could be tested electrically after patterning the sample into nano-pillars. Knowing that perpendicular anisotropy mostly arises at the metal/oxide interface, the Ta capping layer was replaced by a MgO one, leading to a huge increase in the anisotropy of the free layer. A second top reference was then added on such a stack to create functional perpendicular double junctions. CoFeB/insertion/CoFeB synthetic antiferromagnetic storage layers could be developed and were proved to be stable enough to replace the standard Co/Pt-based reference layers. (author) [fr

  19. Controlled assembly and single electron charging of monolayer protected Au144 clusters: an electrochemistry and scanning tunneling spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodappa, Nataraju; Fluch, Ulrike; Fu, Yongchun; Mayor, Marcel; Moreno-García, Pavel; Siegenthaler, Hans; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Single gold particles may serve as room temperature single electron memory units because of their size dependent electronic level spacing. Here, we present a proof-of-concept study by electrochemically controlled scanning probe experiments performed on tailor-made Au particles of narrow dispersity. In particular, the charge transport characteristics through chemically synthesized hexane-1-thiol and 4-pyridylbenzene-1-thiol mixed monolayer protected Au144 clusters (MPCs) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical scanning tunneling spectroscopy (EC-STS) are reported. The pyridyl groups exposed by the Au-MPCs enable their immobilization on Pt(111) substrates. By varying the humidity during their deposition, samples coated by stacks of compact monolayers of Au-MPCs or decorated with individual, laterally separated Au-MPCs are obtained. DPV experiments with stacked monolayers of Au144-MPCs and EC-STS experiments with laterally separated individual Au144-MPCs are performed both in aqueous and ionic liquid electrolytes. Lower capacitance values were observed for individual clusters compared to ensemble clusters. This trend remains the same irrespective of the composition of the electrolyte surrounding the Au144-MPC. However, the resolution of the energy level spacing of the single clusters is strongly affected by the proximity of neighboring particles.Single gold particles may serve as room temperature single electron memory units because of their size dependent electronic level spacing. Here, we present a proof-of-concept study by electrochemically controlled scanning probe experiments performed on tailor-made Au particles of narrow dispersity. In particular, the charge transport characteristics through chemically synthesized hexane-1-thiol and 4-pyridylbenzene-1-thiol mixed monolayer protected Au144 clusters (MPCs) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical scanning tunneling spectroscopy (EC-STS) are reported. The pyridyl groups

  20. Measurement and statistical analysis of single-molecule current-voltage characteristics, transition voltage spectroscopy, and tunneling barrier height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaoyin; Hihath, Joshua; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Tao, Nongjian

    2011-11-30

    We report on the measurement and statistical study of thousands of current-voltage characteristics and transition voltage spectra (TVS) of single-molecule junctions with different contact geometries that are rapidly acquired using a new break junction method at room temperature. This capability allows one to obtain current-voltage, conductance voltage, and transition voltage histograms, thus adding a new dimension to the previous conductance histogram analysis at a fixed low-bias voltage for single molecules. This method confirms the low-bias conductance values of alkanedithiols and biphenyldithiol reported in literature. However, at high biases the current shows large nonlinearity and asymmetry, and TVS allows for the determination of a critically important parameter, the tunneling barrier height or energy level alignment between the molecule and the electrodes of single-molecule junctions. The energy level alignment is found to depend on the molecule and also on the contact geometry, revealing the role of contact geometry in both the contact resistance and energy level alignment of a molecular junction. Detailed statistical analysis further reveals that, despite the dependence of the energy level alignment on contact geometry, the variation in single-molecule conductance is primarily due to contact resistance rather than variations in the energy level alignment.

  1. Single molecule manipulation at low temperature and laser scanning tunnelling photo-induced processes analysis through time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, Damien

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes, firstly, the statistical analysis used to determine the processes that occur during the manipulation of a single molecule through electronically induced excitations with a low temperature (5 K) scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). Various molecular operation examples are described and the ability to probe the ensuing molecular manipulation dynamics is discussed within the excitation context. It is, in particular, shown that such studies can reveal reversible manipulation for tuning dynamics through variation of the excitation energy. Secondly, the photo-induced process arising from the irradiation of the STM junction is also studied through feedback loop dynamics analysis, allowing us to distinguish between photo-thermally and photo-electronically induced signals.

  2. Conversion from temporary to tunneled catheters by nephrologists: report of a single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva BC

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bruno C Silva, Camila E Rodrigues, Regina CRM Abdulkader, Rosilene M Elias Nephrology Division, Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Nephrologists have increasingly participated in the conversion from temporary catheters (TC to tunneled-cuffed catheters (TCCs for hemodialysis. Objective: To prospectively analyze the outcomes associated with TCC placement by nephrologists with expertise in such procedure, in different time periods at the same center. The impact of vancomycin or cefazolin as prophylactic antibiotics on the infection outcomes was also tested. Patients and methods: Hemodialysis patients who presented to such procedure were divided into two cohorts: A (from 2004 to 2008 and B (from 2013 to 2015. Time from TC to TCC conversion, prophylactic antibiotics, and reasons for TCC removal were evaluated. Results: One hundred and thirty patients were included in cohort A and 228 in cohort B. Sex, age, and follow-up time were similar between cohorts. Median time from TC to TCC conversion was longer in cohort A than in cohort B (14 [3; 30] vs 4 [1; 8] days, respectively; P<0.0001. Infection leading to catheter removal occurred in 26.4% vs 18.9% of procedures in cohorts A and B, respectively, and infection rate was 0.93 vs 0.73 infections per 1,000 catheter-days, respectively (P=0.092. Infection within 30 days from the procedure occurred in 1.4% of overall cohort. No differences were observed when comparing vancomycin and cefazolin as prophylactic antibiotics on 90-day infection-free TCC survival in a Kaplan–Meier model (log-rank = 0.188. TCC removal for low blood flow occurred in 8.9% of procedures. Conclusion: Conversion of TC to TCC by nephrologists had overall infection, catheter patency, and complications similar to data reported in the literature. Vancomycin was not superior to cefazolin as a prophylactic antibiotic. Keywords: renal dialysis, tunneled catheters, interventional nephrology

  3. Carbon nanotubes as electromechanical resonators : Single-electron tunneling, nonlinearity, and high-bandwidth readout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerwaldt, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) is a remarkable material and can be thought of as a single-atom thick cylinder of carbon atoms capped of with a semisphere. This is called a single-walled CNT and, depending on how the cylinder is rolled up, CNTs are either semiconducting or metallic. A CNT is made into a

  4. Development of CdTe/Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te double barrier, single quantum well heterostructure for resonant tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuscher, G.; Keim, M.; Fischer, F.; Waag, A.; Landwehr, G. [Physikalishes Institut der Universitaet Wuerzburg am Hubland, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    We report the first observation of resonant tunneling through a CdTe/Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te double barrier, single quantum well heterostructure. Negative differential resistance is observable at temperatures below 230 K, exhibiting a peak to valley ratio of 3:1 at 4.2 K. (author). 16 refs, 2 figs.

  5. Spin magnetic moments from single atoms to small Cr clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeglin, C.; Decker, R.; Bulou, H.; Scheurer, F.; Chado, I. [IPCMS-GSI - UMR 7504, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Ohresser, P. [LURE, 91405 Orsay (France); Dhesi, S.S. [ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Present permanent address: Diamond Light Source, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gaudry, E. [LMCP, 4, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France); Lazarovits, B. [CCMS, T.U. Vienna, Gumpendorfstr. 1a, 1060 Wien (Austria)

    2005-07-01

    Morphology studies at the first stages of the growth of Cr/Au(111) are reported and compared to the magnetic properties of the nanostructures. We analyze by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction the Cr clusters growth between 200 K and 300 K. In the early stages of the growth the morphology of the clusters shows monoatomic high islands located at the kinks of the herringbone reconstructed Au(111) surface. By X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism performed on the Cr L{sub 2,3} edges it is shown that the temperature dependent morphology strongly influences the magnetic properties of the Cr clusters. We show that in the sub-monolayer regime Cr clusters are antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic when the size reaches the atomic limit. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Photoelectron diffraction studies of small adsorbates on single crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascal, Mathieu

    2002-01-01

    The structural determination of small molecules adsorbed on single crystal surfaces has been investigated using scanned energy mode photoelectron diffraction (PhD). The experimental PhD data were compared to theoretical models using a simulation program based on multiple scattering calculations. Three adsorption systems have been examined on Ag(110), Cu(110) and Cu(111) crystals. The structure of the (2x1)-O adsorption phase on Ag(110) revealed that the O atoms occupied the long bridge site and are almost co-planar with the top layer of Ag atoms. The best agreement between multiple scattering theory and experiment has been obtained for a missing-row (or equivalently an 'added- row') reconstruction. Alternative buckled-row and unreconstructed surface models can be excluded. The adsorption of the benzoate species on Cu(110) has been found to occur via the carboxylate group. The molecules occupy short bridge sites with the O atoms being slightly displaced from atop sites and are aligned along the close-packed azimuth. The tilt of the molecule with respect to the surface and the degree to which the surface is relaxed have also been investigated. The adsorption of methyl on Cu(111) was studied using either azomethane or methyl iodide to prepare the surface layers. At saturation coverage the preferred adsorption site is the fcc threefold hollow site, whereas at half saturation coverage ∼ 30 % of the methyl species occupy the hop threefold hollow sites. Best agreement between theory and experiment corresponded to a methyl group adsorbed with C 3v symmetry. The height of the C above the surface in a pure methyl layer was 1.66 ± 0.02 A, but was reduced to 1.62 ± 0.02 A in the presence of co-adsorbed iodine, suggesting that iodine increases the strength of adsorption. Iodine was also found to occupy the fee threefold hollow sites with a Cu-l bondlength of 2.61 ± 0.02 A. (author)

  7. Magnetic field manipulation of spin current in a single-molecule magnet tunnel junction with two-electron Coulomb interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Yao, Hui; Nie, Yi-Hang; Liang, Jiu-Qing; Niu, Peng-Bin

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we study the generation of spin-current in a single-molecule magnet (SMM) tunnel junction with Coulomb interaction of transport electrons and external magnetic field. In the absence of field the spin-up and -down currents are symmetric with respect to the initial polarizations of molecule. The existence of magnetic field breaks the time-reversal symmetry, which leads to unsymmetrical spin currents of parallel and antiparallel polarizations. Both the amplitude and polarization direction of spin current can be controlled by the applied magnetic field. Particularly when the magnetic field increases to a certain value the spin-current with antiparallel polarization is reversed along with the magnetization reversal of the SMM. The two-electron occupation indeed enhances the transport current compared with the single-electron process. However the increase of Coulomb interaction results in the suppression of spin-current amplitude at the electron-hole symmetry point. We propose a scheme to compensate the suppression with the magnetic field.

  8. Anatomic single-bundle ACL surgery: consequences of tibial tunnel diameter and drill-guide angle on tibial footprint coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Bracht, H; Verhelst, L; Stuyts, B; Page, B; Bellemans, J; Verdonk, P

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the consequences of differences in drill-guide angle and tibial tunnel diameter on the amount of tibial anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) footprint coverage and the risk of overhang of the tibial tunnel aperture over the edges of the native tibial ACL footprint. Twenty fresh-frozen adult human knee specimens with a median age of 46 years were used for this study. Digital templates mimicking the ellipsoid aperture of tibial tunnels with a different drill-guide angle and a different diameter were designed. The centres of these templates were positioned over the geometric centre of the tibial ACL footprint. The amount of tibial ACL footprint coverage and overhang was calculated. Risk factors for overhang were determined. Footprint coverage and the risk of overhang were also compared between a lateral tibial tunnel and a classic antero-medial tibial tunnel. A larger tibial tunnel diameter and a smaller drill-guide angle both will create significant more footprint coverage and overhang. In 45% of the knees, an overhang was created with a 10-mm diameter tibial tunnel with drill-guide angle 45°. Furthermore, a lateral tibial tunnel was found not to be at increased risk of overhang. A larger tibial tunnel diameter and a smaller drill-guide angle both will increase the amount of footprint coverage. Inversely, larger tibial tunnel diameters and smaller drill-guide angles will increase the risk of overhang of the tibial tunnel aperture over the edges of the native tibial ACL footprint. A lateral tibial tunnel does not increase the risk of overhang.

  9. Small--radiation-amplitude dynamical voltage model of an irradiated, externally unbiased Josephson tunnel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAdory, R.T. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A theory is presented for the nonequilibrium voltage states of an irradiated Josephson junction shunted by an external resistor but with no external current or voltage biasing. This device, referred to as a free-running Josephson junction, is modeled in a small--radiation-amplitude, deterministic regime extending the previous work of Shenoy and Agarwal. The time-averaged induced voltage is treated as a dynamical variable, the external radiation is modeled as a current source, and the induced junction-radiation vector potential, with and without a mode structure, is treated to first order in the driving currents. A dynamical equation for the time-averaged induced voltage yields a (nonequilibrium) steady-state relation between the time-averaged induced voltage and the incident radiation amplitude valid for a wide range of voltages, including zero. Regions of bistability occur in the voltage--versus--incident-amplitude curves, some of which are dependent on the external resistor. The zero-voltage state breaks down, as the external radiation amplitude is increased, at a critical value of the incident-radiation amplitude inversely proportional to the external resistance

  10. Directional emission of single photons from small atomic samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; V. Poulsen, Uffe; Mølmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    We provide a formalism to describe deterministic emission of single photons with tailored spatial and temporal profiles from a regular array of multi-level atoms. We assume that a single collective excitation is initially shared by all the atoms in a metastable atomic state, and that this state i...... is coupled by a classical laser field to an optically excited state which rapidly decays to the ground atomic state. Our model accounts for the different field polarization components via re-absorption and emission of light by the Zeeman manifold of optically excited states.......We provide a formalism to describe deterministic emission of single photons with tailored spatial and temporal profiles from a regular array of multi-level atoms. We assume that a single collective excitation is initially shared by all the atoms in a metastable atomic state, and that this state...

  11. Low Leakage Superconducting Tunnel Junctions with a Single Crystal Al2O3 Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    10-6 Torr ). In this low-pressure oxygen environment, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) study shows that while oxidation of the base layer is...three layers were grown in situ in an ultra high vacuum (UHV) system with a nominal base pressure of ~1×10-10 Torr . First, a 120~150 nm thick...high-temperature annealing in order to crystallize the amorphous AlOx into a single-crystal Al2O3. After the sample was cooled to room temperature

  12. DFT calculations of the charged states of N@C60 and Fe4 single molecule magnets investigated in tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossa, Javier; Islam, Fhokrul; Canali, Carlo; Pederson, Mark

    2012-02-01

    For device applications of single molecule magnets (SMMs) in high-density information storage and quantum-state control it is essential that the magnetic properties of the molecules remain stable under the influence of metallic contacts or surface environment. Recent tunneling experiments [1, 2] on N@C60 and Fe4 SMM have shown that these molecules preserve their magnetic characteristics when they are used as the central island of single-electron transistors. Although quantum spin models have been used extensively to study theoretically tunneling spectroscopy of SMMs, it has been shown recently that the orbital degrees of freedom, which is absent in spin models, can significantly affect the tunneling conductance [3]. In this work we present first-principles calculations of the neutral and charged states of N@C60 and Fe4 SMMs, and discuss a strategy to include their properties into a theory of quantum transport. We also present results of the magnetic anisotropy for the different charge states of Fe4 and discuss their relevance for experiments [2] in the sequential tunneling and cotunnelling regimes. [4pt] [1]. N. Roch et al., Phys. Rev. B 83, 081407 (2011). [0pt] [2]. A.S. Zyazin et al., Nano Lett. 10, 3307 (2010). [0pt] [3]. L. Michalak et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 017202 (2010).

  13. Quantum tunneling of magnetization in a new [Mn18]2+ single-molecule magnet with s = 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechin, Euan K; Boskovic, Colette; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Yoo, Jae; Yamaguchi, Akira; Sañudo, E Carolina; Concolino, Thomas R; Rheingold, Arnold L; Ishimoto, Hidehiko; Hendrickson, David N; Christou, George

    2002-08-21

    The reaction between 2-(hydroxyethyl)pyridine (hepH) and a 2:1 molar mixture of [Mn3O(O2CMe)6(py)3](ClO4) and [Mn3O(O2CMe)6(py)3](py) in MeCN leads to isolation of [Mn18O14(O2CMe)18(hep)4(hepH)2(H2O)2](ClO4)2 (1) in 10% yield. The complex is 2MnII,16MnIII and consists of a Mn4O6 central unit to either side of which is attached a Mn7O9 unit. Magnetization data collected in the 2.0-4.0 K and 20-50 kG ranges were fit to yield S = 13, g = 1.86, and D = -0.13 cm-1 = -0.19 K, where D is the axial zero-field splitting parameter. AC susceptibility studies in the 0.04-4.0 K range at frequencies up to 996 Hz display out-of-phase (chiM' ') signals, indicative of a single-molecule magnet (SMM). Magnetization vs applied DC field scans exhibit hysteresis at SMM. DC magnetization decay data were collected on both a microcrystalline sample and a single crystal, and the combined data were used to construct an Arrhenius plot. Between 3.50 and 0.50 K, the relaxation rate is temperature-dependent with an effective barrier to relaxation (Ueff) of 14.8 cm-1 = 21.3 K. Below ca. 0.25 K, the relaxation rate is temperature-independent at 1.3 x 10-8 s-1, indicative of quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) between the lowest energy Ms = +/-13 levels of the S = 13 state. Complex 1 is both the largest spin and highest nuclearity SMM to exhibit QTM.

  14. Rotary balance data for a single-engine trainer design for an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg. [conducted in langely spin tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantason, P.; Dickens, W.

    1979-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a rotational flow environment utilizing a rotary balance located in the Langley spin tunnel are presented in plotted form for a 1/6 scale, single engine trainer airplane model. The configurations tested included the basic airplane, various wing leading edge devices, elevator, aileron and rudder control settings as well as airplane components. Data are presented without analysis for an angle of attack range of 8 to 90 degrees and clockwise and counter-clockwise rotations.

  15. Wind Tunnel Aeroacoustic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: August 23, 2002 through March 31, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oerlemans, S.

    2004-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, working through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, is engaged in a comprehensive research effort to improve our understanding of wind turbine aeroacoustics. Quiet wind turbines are an inducement to widespread deployment, so the goal of NREL's aeroacoustic research is to develop tools that the U.S. wind industry can use in developing and deploying highly efficient, quiet wind turbines at low wind speed sites. NREL's National Wind Technology Center is implementing a multifaceted approach that includes wind tunnel tests, field tests, and theoretical analyses in direct support of low wind speed turbine development by its industry partners. To that end, wind tunnel aerodynamic tests and aeroacoustic tests have been performed on six airfoils that are candidates for use on small wind turbines. Results are documented in this report.

  16. Surface species formed by the adsorption and dissociation of water molecules on Ru(0001) surface containing a small coverage of carbon atoms studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dept of Materials Science and Engineering UCB; Dept of Applied Science and Technology, UCB; Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale University; Salmeron, Miquel; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge I.; Heyde, Markus; Qi, Yabing; Schwarz, Udo D.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-04-26

    The adsorption and dissociation of water on a Ru(0001) surface containing a small amount ({le} 3 %) of carbon impurities was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Various surface species are formed depending on the temperature. These include molecular H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O-C complexes, H, O, OH and CH. Clusters of either pure H{sub 2}O or mixed H{sub 2}O-OH species are also formed. Each of these species produces a characteristic contrast in the STM images and can be identified by experiment and by ab initio total energy calculations coupled with STM image simulations. Manipulation of individual species via excitation of vibrational modes with the tunneling electrons has been used as supporting evidence.

  17. Small Molecules Facilitate Single Factor-Mediated Hepatic Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Tae Lim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that defined factors could lead to the direct conversion of fibroblasts into induced hepatocyte-like cells (iHeps. However, reported conversion efficiencies are very low, and the underlying mechanism of the direct hepatic reprogramming is largely unknown. Here, we report that direct conversion into iHeps is a stepwise transition involving the erasure of somatic memory, mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, and induction of hepatic cell fate in a sequential manner. Through screening for additional factors that could potentially enhance the conversion kinetics, we have found that c-Myc and Klf4 (CK dramatically accelerate conversion kinetics, resulting in remarkably improved iHep generation. Furthermore, we identified small molecules that could lead to the robust generation of iHeps without CK. Finally, we show that Hnf1α supported by small molecules is sufficient to efficiently induce direct hepatic reprogramming. This approach might help to fully elucidate the direct conversion process and also facilitate the translation of iHep into the clinic.

  18. A Single Global Small-User Nuclear Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conca, J.L.; Wright, J.

    2009-01-01

    Global energy partnerships in nuclear power, proposed by France, Russia, U.S. and England, seek to address the proliferation issue by controlling fuel production and nuclear materials, removing the need for each country to develop enrichment, fabrication, recycling or disposal capabilities. Several of the large generator countries such as France, the U.S., Japan, S. Korea, Russia, the U.K., China and India, all have plans for deep geologic repositories because they anticipate sufficient waste over the next century to justify the expense of a repository. However, countries having, or planning, less than five reactors, such as Egypt, Iran, Indonesia, Brazil and about 30 other countries, will not have sufficient waste generation, or a favorable geologic site, to justify the economic and environmental issues of developing their own repository. The Salado salt formation in New Mexico, set aside for nuclear waste disposal within the 16 square-mile area by the Land Withdrawal Act of 1992, is the most optimal geologic formation for the permanent disposal of any nuclear waste and is easily able to host all of the commercial nuclear waste that will be generated in the next thousand years. The U.S. commercial nuclear waste needs presently surpass all others, and will for the foreseeable future. Hosting the relatively small amount of waste from these small-user nations will add little to U.S. waste stream while the cost/benefit analysis from the standpoint of operations, safety, geology, cost and proliferation is overwhelmingly positive for developing such a global repository. Oceanic and overland transportation, high-level disposal logistics and costs from several programs, including WIPP, have demonstrated that the operation would pay for itself from international user fees with no U.S. taxpayer dollars required and still save the world about $400 billion over 100 years. The ethical considerations alone are compelling. (authors)

  19. Assessing costs and effectiveness of safety measures for the transit of small type a packages through road tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.; Pages, P.; Ringot, C.; Tomachevsky, E.; Hamard, J.

    1986-06-01

    The 12 km long Mont Blanc Tunnel, is one of the longest road tunnels. Local authorities have to state whether the general regulations for the road transportation of radioactive materials, as defined by the IAEA, apply, or whether additive measures need to be taken. Whereas an activity limit - A 2 - applies only to the content of a type A package containing dispersible materials, a derived limit applying to the whole cargo of a truck has been in use in the tunnel and can be redefined. The present paper deals with the question of the choice of a proper figure for such a limit, that might regulate the transit under the tunnel for Technetium generators (ELUMATIC III from ORIS FRANCE). The first step is a risk assessment, with the truck content as an explicit parameter. The yearly traffic is of 150 trucks, carrying, on the average, 26 Ci of Technetium 99m on a yearly basis, about 5.10 -6 road accidents might be expected, while the expected radiological fatalities would amount to approximately 2.10 -8 and the expected monetary loss would be dollars 10. The second step is the implementation of decision aiding techniques based on the previous estimates

  20. Superconductivity and electronic structure in single-layer FeSe on SrTiO{sub 3} probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandke, Jasmin; Dressner, Jonas; Wulfhekel, Wulf [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Yang, Fang; Gao, Chunlei [Fudan Universitaet, Shanghai (China)

    2016-07-01

    We use high-resolution scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) to study single-layer FeSe on Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} (001). Features of bosonic excitations were observed in the measured quasiparticle density of states. Furthermore, using STS, quasiparticle interference (QPI) imaging was performed in order to map the multiband electronic structure of FeSe. Compared to previous measurements, an additional feature is visible in our measured QPI maps on a single-layer FeSe/SrTiO{sub 3}. The origin of this feature will be discussed.

  1. Prey Selection of Scandinavian Wolves: Single Large or Several Small?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Sand

    Full Text Available Research on large predator-prey interactions are often limited to the predators' primary prey, with the potential for prey switching in systems with multiple ungulate species rarely investigated. We evaluated wolf (Canis lupus prey selection at two different spatial scales, i.e., inter- and intra-territorial, using data from 409 ungulate wolf-kills in an expanding wolf population in Scandinavia. This expansion includes a change from a one-prey into a two-prey system with variable densities of one large-sized ungulate; moose (Alces alces and one small-sized ungulate; roe deer (Capreolus capreolus. Among wolf territories, the proportion of roe deer in wolf kills was related to both pack size and roe deer density, but not to moose density. Pairs of wolves killed a higher proportion of roe deer than did packs, and wolves switched to kill more roe deer as their density increased above a 1:1 ratio in relation to the availability of the two species. At the intra-territorial level, wolves again responded to changes in roe deer density in their prey selection whereas we found no effect of snow depth, time during winter, or other predator-related factors on the wolves' choice to kill moose or roe deer. Moose population density was only weakly related to intra-territorial prey selection. Our results show that the functional response of wolves on moose, the species hitherto considered as the main prey, was strongly dependent on the density of a smaller, alternative, ungulate prey. The impact of wolf predation on the prey species community is therefore likely to change with the composition of the multi-prey species community along with the geographical expansion of the wolf population.

  2. Prey Selection of Scandinavian Wolves: Single Large or Several Small?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Ann; Zimmermann, Barbara; Wikenros, Camilla; Wabakken, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Research on large predator-prey interactions are often limited to the predators’ primary prey, with the potential for prey switching in systems with multiple ungulate species rarely investigated. We evaluated wolf (Canis lupus) prey selection at two different spatial scales, i.e., inter- and intra-territorial, using data from 409 ungulate wolf-kills in an expanding wolf population in Scandinavia. This expansion includes a change from a one-prey into a two-prey system with variable densities of one large-sized ungulate; moose (Alces alces) and one small-sized ungulate; roe deer (Capreolus capreolus). Among wolf territories, the proportion of roe deer in wolf kills was related to both pack size and roe deer density, but not to moose density. Pairs of wolves killed a higher proportion of roe deer than did packs, and wolves switched to kill more roe deer as their density increased above a 1:1 ratio in relation to the availability of the two species. At the intra-territorial level, wolves again responded to changes in roe deer density in their prey selection whereas we found no effect of snow depth, time during winter, or other predator-related factors on the wolves’ choice to kill moose or roe deer. Moose population density was only weakly related to intra-territorial prey selection. Our results show that the functional response of wolves on moose, the species hitherto considered as the main prey, was strongly dependent on the density of a smaller, alternative, ungulate prey. The impact of wolf predation on the prey species community is therefore likely to change with the composition of the multi-prey species community along with the geographical expansion of the wolf population. PMID:28030549

  3. Prey Selection of Scandinavian Wolves: Single Large or Several Small?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Håkan; Eklund, Ann; Zimmermann, Barbara; Wikenros, Camilla; Wabakken, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Research on large predator-prey interactions are often limited to the predators' primary prey, with the potential for prey switching in systems with multiple ungulate species rarely investigated. We evaluated wolf (Canis lupus) prey selection at two different spatial scales, i.e., inter- and intra-territorial, using data from 409 ungulate wolf-kills in an expanding wolf population in Scandinavia. This expansion includes a change from a one-prey into a two-prey system with variable densities of one large-sized ungulate; moose (Alces alces) and one small-sized ungulate; roe deer (Capreolus capreolus). Among wolf territories, the proportion of roe deer in wolf kills was related to both pack size and roe deer density, but not to moose density. Pairs of wolves killed a higher proportion of roe deer than did packs, and wolves switched to kill more roe deer as their density increased above a 1:1 ratio in relation to the availability of the two species. At the intra-territorial level, wolves again responded to changes in roe deer density in their prey selection whereas we found no effect of snow depth, time during winter, or other predator-related factors on the wolves' choice to kill moose or roe deer. Moose population density was only weakly related to intra-territorial prey selection. Our results show that the functional response of wolves on moose, the species hitherto considered as the main prey, was strongly dependent on the density of a smaller, alternative, ungulate prey. The impact of wolf predation on the prey species community is therefore likely to change with the composition of the multi-prey species community along with the geographical expansion of the wolf population.

  4. Study on climate control of dwellings using underground air tunnel in the cold region. Part 1. Cooling performance of the underground air tunnel connected to a small-scaled test house; Kanreichi ni okeru chika air tunnel ni yoru junetsukankyo kaizen ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. Shokibo shiken kaoku ni okeru kaki no ryobo seino hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miki, Y; Sanji, H; Ito, J; Komoda, T; Mitsuoka, K; Mogami, S [Kitami Institute of Technology, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    Underground air tunnel is provided for cooling an experimentally built small house and the cooling performance is examined at Kitami Institute of Technology, Hokkaido. The house is provided with 120mm-thick layers of insulating material under the floor and inside the side walls and partitioning walls. The windows are equipped with blinds, with reed screens positioned outside to cover the windows. The air tunnel is a hard vinyl chloride tube, 200mm in internal diameter. It is buried 4.5m deep in the ground, and extends as long as 27m. A filter-provided 72W blower installed at the tunnel outlet is driven to force air through. As for the natural soil temperature in summer, it is found variable between 7.2 and 8.5degC. As the result of the experiment, it is found that thanks to the underground tunnel the room temperature is kept below 27degC even when the maximum temperature in the daytime is 30degC or higher provided the air flow is appropriately regulated. In this experiment, the maximum rate of instantaneously removed heat is approximately 2.5 times higher than the values in other previously reported experiments. The daily coefficient of performance is 6.5-11.1, again higher than the previously reported values. Different from application in warm regions, the effect of rise in the surrounding soil temperature on the cooling performance is not so conspicuous. 3 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Constructing a generalized network design model to study air distribution in ventilation networks in subway with a single-track tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugin, IV

    2018-03-01

    In focus are the features of construction of the generalized design model for the network method to study air distribution in ventilation system in subway with the single-track tunnel. The generalizations, assumptions and simplifications included in the model are specified. The air distribution is calculated with regard to the influence of topology and air resistances of the ventilation network sections. The author studies two variants of the subway line: half-open and closed with dead end on the both sides. It is found that the total air exchange at a subway station depends on the station location within the line. The operating mode of fans remains unaltered in this case. The article shows that elimination of air leakage in the station ventilation room allows an increase in the air flow rate by 7–8% at the same energy consumption by fans. The influence of the stop of a train in the tunnel on the air distribution is illustrated.

  6. Temperature dependent tunneling study of CaFe{sub 1.96}Ni{sub 0.04}As{sub 2} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Anirban, E-mail: adatta@iitk.ac.in; Gupta, Anjan K. [Department of Physics, IIT Kanpur, Kanpur-208 016 (India); Thamizhavel, A. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai-400 005 (India)

    2014-04-24

    We report on temperature dependent scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies on CaFe{sub 1.96}Ni{sub 0.04}As{sub 2} single crystals in 5.4 – 19.7 K temperature range across the normal metal - superconductor transition temperature, T{sub C} = 14K. The in-situ cleaved crystals show reasonably flat surface with signatures of atomic resolution. The tunnel spectra show significant spatial inhomogeneity below T{sub C}, which reduces significantly as the temperature goes above the T{sub C}. We discuss these results in terms of an inhomogeneous electronic phase that may exist due to the vicinity of this composition to the quantum critical point.

  7. Reliability of a semi-automated 3D-CT measuring method for tunnel diameters after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A comparison between soft-tissue single-bundle allograft vs. autograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbrecht, Cedric; Claes, Steven; Cromheecke, Michiel; Mahieu, Peter; Kakavelakis, Kyriakos; Victor, Jan; Bellemans, Johan; Verdonk, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Post-operative widening of tibial and/or femoral bone tunnels is a common observation after ACL reconstruction, especially with soft-tissue grafts. There are no studies comparing tunnel widening in hamstring autografts versus tibialis anterior allografts. The goal of this study was to observe the difference in tunnel widening after the use of allograft vs. autograft for ACL reconstruction, by measuring it with a novel 3-D computed tomography based method. Thirty-five ACL-deficient subjects were included, underwent anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction and were evaluated at one year after surgery with the use of 3-D CT imaging. Three independent observers semi-automatically delineated femoral and tibial tunnel outlines, after which a best-fit cylinder was derived and the tunnel diameter was determined. Finally, intra- and inter-observer reliability of this novel measurement protocol was defined. In femoral tunnels, the intra-observer ICC was 0.973 (95% CI: 0.922-0.991) and the inter-observer ICC was 0.992 (95% CI: 0.982-0.996). In tibial tunnels, the intra-observer ICC was 0.955 (95% CI: 0.875-0.985). The combined inter-observer ICC was 0.970 (95% CI: 0.987-0.917). Tunnel widening was significantly higher in allografts compared to autografts, in the tibial tunnels (p=0.013) as well as in the femoral tunnels (p=0.007). To our knowledge, this novel, semi-automated 3D-computed tomography image processing method has shown to yield highly reproducible results for the measurement of bone tunnel diameter and area. This series showed a significantly higher amount of tunnel widening observed in the allograft group at one-year follow-up. Level II, Prospective comparative study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ARTHROSCOPIC SINGLE BUNDLE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION AND NON-ANATOMICAL DOUBLE BUNDLE WITH SINGLE TIBIAL TUNNEL ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH SEMITENDINOSUS ± GRACILIS AUTOGRAFTS USING LAXOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivananda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The knee joint is the most commonly injured of all joints and the ACL is the most commonly injured ligament. Arthroscopic reconstruction of ACL has become gold standard in treating these injuries. AIM 1. To compare the short-term results of ACL reconstruction using single bundle (one Tibial + one Femoral tunnel and non-anatomical double-bundle (one Tibial + two Femoral tunnels techniques using Hamstrings (Semitendinosus ± Gracilis graft. 2. To evaluate ACL graft reconstruction stability measured by laxometry and to find out an association with clinical findings. MATERIAL & METHODS We performed a prospective study between 2014-2015 of 20 case of ACL injuries & compared single bundle reconstruction with Non – anatomical double Bundle reconstruction with semitendinosus ± Gracilis, Autograft using laxometry. CONCLUSION Arthroscopic Non-anatomical double ACL Reconstruction is Bio-mechanically stable reconstruction resembling anatomy of the ACL.

  9. Scanning tunneling spectroscopic studies of superconducting NbN single crystal thin films at 4.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwaya, S.; Koyanagi, M.; Matsuda, M.; Shoji, A.; Shibata, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a Low Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscope (LTSTM) constructed to study the microscopic properties of superconductors. It has atomic resolution from room temperature to 4.2 K. Conductance spectra obtained between a Pt tip and a NbN thin film agreed well with theoretical curves based on the BCS theory

  10. Advantages and Disadvantages of Transtibial, Anteromedial Portal, and Outside-In Femoral Tunnel Drilling in Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Brett N; Jani, Sunil S; Marvil, Sean C; Reid, John B; Schillhammer, Carl K; Lubowitz, James H

    2015-07-01

    Controversy exists regarding the best method for creating the knee anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) femoral tunnel or socket. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the risks, benefits, advantages, and disadvantages of the endoscopic transtibial (TT) technique, anteromedial portal technique, outside-in technique, and outside-in retrograde drilling technique for creating the ACL femoral tunnel. A PubMed search of English-language studies published between January 1, 2000, and February 17, 2014, was performed using the following keywords: "anterior cruciate ligament" AND "femoral tunnel." Included were studies reporting risks, benefits, advantages, and/or disadvantages of any ACL femoral technique. In addition, references of included articles were reviewed to identify potential studies missed in the original search. A total of 27 articles were identified through the search. TT technique advantages include familiarity and proven long-term outcomes; disadvantages include the risk of nonanatomic placement because of constrained (TT) drilling. Anteromedial portal technique advantages include unconstrained anatomic placement; disadvantages include technical challenges, short tunnels or sockets, and posterior-wall blowout. Outside-in technique advantages include unconstrained anatomic placement; disadvantages include the need for 2 incisions. Retrograde drilling technique advantages include unconstrained anatomic placement, as well as all-epiphyseal drilling in skeletally immature patients; disadvantages include the need for fluoroscopy for all-epiphyseal drilling. There is no one, single, established "gold-standard" technique for creation of the ACL femoral socket. Four accepted techniques show diverse and subjective advantages, disadvantages, risks, and benefits. Level V, systematic review of Level II through V evidence. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Single IGF1 Allele Is a Major Determinant of Small Size in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Nathan B.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Chase, Kevin; Gray, Melissa M.; Zhao, Keyan; Zhu, Lan; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Karlins, Eric; Davis, Sean; Jones, Paul G.; Quignon, Pascale; Johnson, Gary S.; Parker, Heidi G.; Fretwell, Neale; Mosher, Dana S.; Lawler, Dennis F.; Satyaraj, Ebenezer; Nordborg, Magnus; Lark, K. Gordon; Wayne, Robert K.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2009-01-01

    The domestic dog exhibits greater diversity in body size than any other terrestrial vertebrate. We used a strategy that exploits the breed structure of dogs to investigate the genetic basis of size. First, through a genome-wide scan, we identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 15 influencing size variation within a single breed. Second, we examined genetic variation in the 15-megabase interval surrounding the QTL in small and giant breeds and found marked evidence for a selective sweep spanning a single gene (IGF1), encoding insulin-like growth factor 1. A single IGF1 single-nucleotide polymorphism haplotype is common to all small breeds and nearly absent from giant breeds, suggesting that the same causal sequence variant is a major contributor to body size in all small dogs. PMID:17412960

  12. NEW SCANNING DEVICE FOR SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPE APPLICATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SAWATZKY, GA; Koops, Karl Richard

    A small, single piezo XYZ translator has been developed. The device has been used as a scanner for a scanning tunneling microscope and has been tested successfully in air and in UHV. Its simple design results in a rigid and compact scanning unit which permits high scanning rates.

  13. A 350 mK, 9 T scanning tunneling microscope for the study of superconducting thin films on insulating substrates and single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamlapure, Anand; Saraswat, Garima; Ganguli, Somesh Chandra; Bagwe, Vivas; Raychaudhuri, Pratap; Pai, Subash P

    2013-12-01

    We report the construction and performance of a low temperature, high field scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating down to 350 mK and in magnetic fields up to 9 T, with thin film deposition and in situ single crystal cleaving capabilities. The main focus lies on the simple design of STM head and a sample holder design that allows us to get spectroscopic data on superconducting thin films grown in situ on insulating substrates. Other design details on sample transport, sample preparation chamber, and vibration isolation schemes are also described. We demonstrate the capability of our instrument through the atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy on NbSe2 single crystal and spectroscopic maps obtained on homogeneously disordered NbN thin film.

  14. Local stabilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes on Si(100)-2 x 1:H via nanoscale hydrogen desorption with an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunnelling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, Peter M; Lyding, Joseph W

    2007-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunnelling microscope (UHV-STM) was used to modify the interface between isolated ∼10 A-diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the hydrogen-passivated Si(100) surface. Room-temperature UHV-STM desorption of hydrogen at the SWNT/H-Si(100) interface resulted in the local mechanical stabilization of tubes originally perturbed by the rastered STM tip under nominal imaging conditions. For the section of the SWNT contacted by depassivated Si, a topographic depression of 1.5 A (1 A) was measured in the case of parallel (nearly perpendicular) alignment between the tube axis and the Si dimer rows, in agreement with existing first-principles calculations. The compatibility of hydrogen-resist UHV-STM nanolithography with SWNTs adsorbed on H-Si(100) would enable the atomically precise placement of single molecules in proximity to the tube for the bottom-up fabrication of molecular electronic devices

  15. Direct, coherent and incoherent intermediate state tunneling and scanning tunnel microscopy (STM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbritter, J.

    1997-01-01

    Theory and experiment in tunneling are still qualitative in nature, which hold true also for the latest developments in direct-, resonant-, coherent- and incoherent-tunneling. Those tunnel processes have recently branched out of the field of ''solid state tunnel junctions'' into the fields of scanning tunnel microscopy (STM), single electron tunneling (SET) and semiconducting resonant tunnel structures (RTS). All these fields have promoted the understanding of tunneling in different ways reaching from the effect of coherence, of incoherence and of charging in tunneling, to spin flip or inelastic effects. STM allows not only the accurate measurements of the tunnel current and its voltage dependence but, more importantly, the easy quantification via the (quantum) tunnel channel conductance and the distance dependence. This new degree of freedom entering exponentially the tunnel current allows an unique identification of individual tunnel channels and their quantification. In STM measurements large tunnel currents are observed for large distances d > 1 nm explainable by intermediate state tunneling. Direct tunneling with its reduced tunnel time and reduced off-site Coulomb charging bridges distances below 1 nm, only. The effective charge transfer process with its larger off-site and on-site charging at intermediate states dominates tunnel transfer in STM, biology and chemistry over distances in the nm-range. Intermediates state tunneling becomes variable range hopping conduction for distances larger than d > 2 nm, for larger densities of intermediate states n 1 (ε) and for larger temperatures T or voltages U, still allowing high resolution imaging

  16. Scanning-tunneling microscope imaging of single-electron solitons in a material with incommensurate charge-density waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazovskii, Serguei; Brun, Christophe; Wang, Zhao-Zhong; Monceau, Pierre

    2012-03-02

    We report on scanning-tunneling microscopy experiments in a charge-density wave (CDW) system allowing visually capturing and studying in detail the individual solitons corresponding to the self-trapping of just one electron. This "Amplitude Soliton" is marked by vanishing of the CDW amplitude and by the π shift of its phase. It might be the realization of the spinon--the long-sought particle (along with the holon) in the study of science of strongly correlated electronic systems. As a distinct feature we also observe one-dimensional Friedel oscillations superimposed on the CDW which develop independently of solitons.

  17. A case history of a tunnel constructed by ground freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, H. S.; Jones, J. S., Jr.; Gidlow, B.

    Artificial ground freezing was used for structural support and groundwater control for a 37 m long, 3.2 m diameter tunnel located about 2 m beneath high speed railroad lines in Syracuse, New York. A double row of freeze pipes spaced approximately 0.9 m on-center was used around the periphery of the tunnel above the spring line, while only a single row of freeze pipes was required below the spring line. Excavation of the frozen soil within the tunnel was accomplished with a small road header tunnel boring machine. The results of in situ testing of frozen soil, laboratory testing of frozen soils, computer analysis to predict stress deformation-time characteristics under static and cyclic loading, the instrumentation program including a comparison of estimated and measured performance are discussed.

  18. Molecular assembly and electro polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene on Au(100) single crystal electrode using in-situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Jonyl L.; Tongol, Bernard John V.; ShuehLin Yau

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (Ec-STM) is a powerful technique that can provide molecular-level information regarding electrode surface processes in-situ in electrolyte solvent under ambient conditions. In this study, the adsorption and electro polymerization of an industrially important conducting polymer precursor, 3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene (EDOT), on Au (100) single crystal was probed using Ec-STM. The Au (100) single crystal electrode substrate used for this study was fabricated using the well-known Clavilier's flame melting procedure. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used along with Ec-STM to characterize the bare, EDOT-modified, and poly(EDOT)-modified Au (100) single crystal electrode. Time-dependent Ec-STM imaging at 0.550 V showed the formation of an EDOT self-assembled monolayer through 2-D surface dillusion. The resulting EDOT molecular assembly on Au (100) single crystal electrode was found to fit in a 4√2χ3√2 unit cell. Difference in apparent corrugation between molecular rows was attributed to different angular orientation with respect to the substrate. The electro polymerization of EDOT on Au (100) single crystal electrode was done by potentiostatic and potentiodynamic methods. Both methods suggested a solution-process mechanism for EDOT electro polymerization. (author)

  19. Electronic noise of superconducting tunnel junction detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochum, J.; Kraus, H.; Gutsche, M.; Kemmather, B.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Moessbauer, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal signal to noise ratio for detectors based on superconducting tunnel junctions is calculated and compared for the cases of a detector consisting of one single tunnel junction, as well as of series and of parallel connections of such tunnel junctions. The influence of 1 / f noise and its dependence on the dynamical resistance of tunnel junctions is discussed quantitatively. A single tunnel junction yields the minimum equivalent noise charge. Such a tunnel junction exhibits the best signal to noise ratio if the signal charge is independent of detector size. In case, signal charge increases with detector size, a parallel or a series connection of tunnel junctions would provide the optimum signal to noise ratio. The equivalent noise charge and the respective signal to noise ratio are deduced as functions of tunnel junction parameters such as tunneling time, quasiparticle lifetime, etc. (orig.)

  20. Measuring fire size in tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qihui

    2013-01-01

    A new measure of fire size Q′ has been introduced in longitudinally ventilated tunnel as the ratio of flame height to the height of tunnel. The analysis in this article has shown that Q′ controls both the critical velocity and the maximum ceiling temperature in the tunnel. Before the fire flame reaches tunnel ceiling (Q′ 1.0), Fr approaches a constant value. This is also a well-known phenomenon in large tunnel fires. Tunnel ceiling temperature shows the opposite trend. Before the fire flame reaches the ceiling, it increases very slowly with the fire size. Once the flame has hit the ceiling of tunnel, temperature rises rapidly with Q′. The good agreement between the current prediction and three different sets of experimental data has demonstrated that the theory has correctly modelled the relation among the heat release rate of fire, ventilation flow and the height of tunnel. From design point of view, the theoretical maximum of critical velocity for a given tunnel can help to prevent oversized ventilation system. -- Highlights: • Fire sizing is an important safety measure in tunnel design. • New measure of fire size a function of HRR of fire, tunnel height and ventilation. • The measure can identify large and small fires. • The characteristics of different fire are consistent with observation in real fires

  1. Exchange coupling and magnetic anisotropy of exchanged-biased quantum tunnelling single-molecule magnet Ni3Mn2 complexes using theoretical methods based on Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Coca, Silvia; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2012-03-07

    The magnetic properties of a new family of single-molecule magnet Ni(3)Mn(2) complexes were studied using theoretical methods based on Density Functional Theory (DFT). The first part of this study is devoted to analysing the exchange coupling constants, focusing on the intramolecular as well as the intermolecular interactions. The calculated intramolecular J values were in excellent agreement with the experimental data, which show that all the couplings are ferromagnetic, leading to an S = 7 ground state. The intermolecular interactions were investigated because the two complexes studied do not show tunnelling at zero magnetic field. Usually, this exchange-biased quantum tunnelling is attributed to the presence of intermolecular interactions calculated with the help of theoretical methods. The results indicate the presence of weak intermolecular antiferromagnetic couplings that cannot explain the ferromagnetic value found experimentally for one of the systems. In the second part, the goal is to analyse magnetic anisotropy through the calculation of the zero-field splitting parameters (D and E), using DFT methods including the spin-orbit effect.

  2. A wind-tunnel study on exhaust gas dispersion from road vehicles. Part 1. Velocity and concentration fields behind single vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanda, Isao; Uehara, Kiyoshi; Yamao, Yukio [National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, 305-8506 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Yasuo; Morikawa, Tazuko [Petroleum Energy Center, 4-3-9 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 105-0001 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    By a reduced-scale model in a wind tunnel, we investigate the dispersion behavior of exhaust gas from automobiles. Two types of vehicles are considered, a passenger car and a small-size truck. Tracer gas experiments show that the exhaust gas dispersion is enhanced significantly by the vehicle wake compared to the case when the vehicle body is absent. The passenger car and the truck promote dispersion in the horizontal and the vertical direction, respectively. The wake field is analyzed by particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the distribution of the mean and the fluctuation fields is found to conform to the concentration field of the exhaust gas. The buoyancy of the exhaust gas has minor effect except on the vertical spread behind the truck whose wake flow amplifies the vertical displacement generated near the pipe exit. (author)

  3. Measurements on very small single crystals of NdFeB using a vibrating reed magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, H.J.; Hempel, K.A.; Verhoef, R.

    1988-01-01

    Nd 2 Fe 14 B single crystals with magnetic moments ranging from 1.6 x 10 -8 Acm 2 to 9.5 x 10 -7 Acm 2 are measured using the ultra high sensitivity vibrating reed magnetometer. The hysteresis loops are compared to those of BaFe 12 O 19 single crystals. It turns out that the magnetization reversal of the Nd 2 Fe 14 B samples is similar to that of BaFe 12 O 19 single crystals if the ferrite samples are considerably bigger in size. This does not hold for bigger Nd 2 Fe 14 B particles where stronger domain wall pinning is observed. For very small grains of Nd 2 Fe 14 B there is still evidence of domain wall processes while for BaFe 12 O 19 grains of the same size true single domain behaviour can be observed

  4. Benchmarking of small-signal dynamics of single-phase PLLs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chong; Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    Phase-looked Loop (PLL) is a critical component for the control and grid synchronization of grid-connected power converters. This paper presents a benchmarking study on the small-signal dynamics of three commonly used PLLs for single-phase converters, including enhanced PLL, second......-order generalized integrator based PLL, and the inverse-PLL. First, a unified small-signal model of those PLLs is established for comparing their dynamics. Then, a systematic design guideline for parameters tuning of the PLLs is formulated. To confirm the validity of theoretical analysis, nonlinear time...

  5. Perfusion by Arterial Spin labelling following Single dose Tadalafil In Small vessel disease (PASTIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauls, Mathilde M H; Clarke, Natasha; Trippier, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    vascular territories. The aim of this trial is to test the hypothesis that tadalafil increases cerebral blood flow in older people with small vessel disease. METHODS/DESIGN: Perfusion by Arterial Spin labelling following Single dose Tadalafil In Small vessel disease (PASTIS) is a phase II randomised double......-blind crossover trial. In two visits, 7-30 days apart, participants undergo arterial spin labelling to measure cerebral blood flow and a battery of cognitive tests, pre- and post-dosing with oral tadalafil (20 mg) or placebo. SAMPLE SIZE: 54 participants are required to detect a 15% increase in cerebral blood...

  6. Selective scanning tunnelling microscope electron-induced reactions of single biphenyl molecules on a Si(100) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Damien; Bocquet, Marie-Laure; Lesnard, Hervé; Lastapis, Mathieu; Lorente, Nicolas; Sonnet, Philippe; Dujardin, Gérald

    2009-06-03

    Selective electron-induced reactions of individual biphenyl molecules adsorbed in their weakly chemisorbed configuration on a Si(100) surface are investigated by using the tip of a low-temperature (5 K) scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) as an atomic size source of electrons. Selected types of molecular reactions are produced, depending on the polarity of the surface voltage during STM excitation. At negative surface voltages, the biphenyl molecule diffuses across the surface in its weakly chemisorbed configuration. At positive surface voltages, different types of molecular reactions are activated, which involve the change of adsorption configuration from the weakly chemisorbed to the strongly chemisorbed bistable and quadristable configurations. Calculated reaction pathways of the molecular reactions on the silicon surface, using the nudge elastic band method, provide evidence that the observed selectivity as a function of the surface voltage polarity cannot be ascribed to different activation energies. These results, together with the measured threshold surface voltages and the calculated molecular electronic structures via density functional theory, suggest that the electron-induced molecular reactions are driven by selective electron detachment (oxidation) or attachment (reduction) processes.

  7. Large room-temperature tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance and electroresistance in single ferromagnet/Nb:SrTiO3 Schottky devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerbeek, Alexander M; Ruiter, Roald; Banerjee, Tamalika

    2018-01-22

    There is a large effort in research and development to realize electronic devices capable of storing information in new ways - for instance devices which simultaneously exhibit electro and magnetoresistance. However it remains a challenge to create devices in which both effects coexist. In this work we show that the well-known electroresistance in noble metal-Nb:SrTiO 3 Schottky junctions can be augmented by a magnetoresistance effect in the same junction. This is realized by replacing the noble metal electrode with ferromagnetic Co. This magnetoresistance manifests as a room temperature tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR). The maximum room temperature TAMR (1.6%) is significantly larger and robuster with bias than observed earlier, not using Nb:SrTiO 3 . In a different set of devices, a thin amorphous AlO x interlayer inserted between Co and Nb:SrTiO 3 , reduces the TAMR by more than 2 orders of magnitude. This points to the importance of intimate contact between the Co and Nb:SrTiO 3 for the TAMR effect. This is explained by electric field enhanced spin-orbit coupling of the interfacial Co layer in contact with Nb:SrTiO 3 . We propose that the large TAMR likely has its origin in the 3d orbital derived conduction band and large relative permittivity of Nb:SrTiO 3 and discuss ways to further enhance the TAMR.

  8. Investigation of current university research concerning energy conversion and conservation in small single-family dwellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, G. R.; Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was made of university research concerning energy conversion and conservation techniques which may be applied in small single-family residences. Information was accumulated through published papers, progress reports, telephone conversations, and personal interviews. A synopsis of each pertinent investigation is given. Finally, a discussion of the synopses is presented and recommendations are made concerning the applicability of concepts for the design and construction of NASA-Langley Research Center's proposed Technology Utilization House in Hampton, Virginia.

  9. A Single IGF1 Allele Is a Major Determinant of Small Size in Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Sutter, Nathan B.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Chase, Kevin; Gray, Melissa M.; Zhao, Keyan; Zhu, Lan; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Karlins, Eric; Davis, Sean; Jones, Paul G.; Quignon, Pascale; Johnson, Gary S.; Parker, Heidi G.; Fretwell, Neale; Mosher, Dana S.

    2007-01-01

    The domestic dog exhibits greater diversity in body size than any other terrestrial vertebrate. We used a strategy that exploits the breed structure of dogs to investigate the genetic basis of size. First, through a genome-wide scan, we identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 15 influencing size variation within a single breed. Second, we examined genetic variation in the 15-megabase interval surrounding the QTL in small and giant breeds and found marked evidence for a...

  10. Voltammetry and single-molecule in situ scanning tunneling microscopy of laccases and bilirubin oxidase in electrocatalytic dioxygen reduction on Au(111) single-crystal electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Climent, Victor; Zhang, Jingdong; Friis, Esben Peter

    2012-01-01

    Laccases (E.C. 1.10.3.2) are multicopper oxidases catalytically active in the oxidation of diphenolics and related compounds by molecular dioxygen. The laccases contain a single-copper type I center and a trinuclear cluster of a single-copper type II and a dinuclear type III center. The oxidation...

  11. Tunneling processes into localized subgap states in superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruby, Michael; Heinrich, Benjamin W.; Franke, Katharina J. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Pientka, Falko; Peng, Yang; Oppen, Felix von [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Dahlem Center for Complex Quantum Systems, Freie Universitaet Berlin, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The Yu-Shiba-Rusinov states bound by magnetic impurities in conventional s-wave superconductors are a simple model system for probing the competition between superconducting and magnetic correlations. Shiba states can be observed in scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) as a pair of resonances at positive and negative bias voltages in the superconducting gap. These resonances have been interpreted in terms of single-electron tunneling into the localized sub-gap states. This requires relaxation mechanisms that depopulate the state after an initial tunneling event. Recently, theory suggests that the current can also be carried by Andreev processes which resonantly transfer a Cooper pair into the superconductor. We performed high-resolution STS experiments on single adatom Shiba states on the superconductor Pb, and provide evidence for the existence of two transport regimes. The single-electron processes dominate at large tip-sample distances and small tunneling currents, whereas Andreev processes become important at stronger tunneling. Our conclusions are based on a careful comparison of experiment and theory.

  12. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Mn12-acetat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiter, J.; Reissner, M.; Hilscher, G.; Steiner, W.; Pajic, D.; Zadro, K.; Bartel, M.; Linert, W.

    2004-01-01

    Molecules provide the exciting opportunity to study magnetism on the passage from atomic to macroscopic level. One of the most interesting effects in such mesoscopic systems is the appearance of quantum tunnelling of magnetization (MQT) at low temperatures. In the last decade molecular chemistry has had a large impact in this field by providing new single molecule magnets. They consist of small clusters exhibiting superparamagnetic behavior, similar to that of conventional nanomagnetic particles. The advantage of these new materials is that they form macroscopic samples consisting of regularly arranged small identical high-spin clusters which are widely separated by organic molecules. The lack of distributions in size and shape of the magnetic clusters and the very weak intercluster interaction lead in principle to only one barrier for the spin reversal. We present detailed magnetic investigations on a Mn 12 -ac single crystal. In this compound the tetragonal ordered clusters consist of a central tetrahedron of four Mn 4+ (S = 3/2) atoms surrounded by eight Mn 3+ (S = 2) atoms with antiparallel oriented spins, leading to an overall spin moment of S = 10. In the hysteresis loops nine different jumps at regularly spaced fields are identified in the investigated temperature range (1.5 < T < 3 K). At these fields the relaxation of moment due to thermal activation is superimposed by strong quantum tunnelling. In lowering the temperature the time dependence changes from thermally activated to thermally assisted tunnelling. (author)

  13. Apparent Barrier Height in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, L.; Brandbyge, Mads; Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt

    1996-01-01

    The apparent barrier height phi(ap), that is, the rate of change of the logarithm of the conductance with tip-sample separation in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), has been measured for Ni, Pt, and Au single crystal surfaces. The results show that phi(ap) is constant until point contact...... is reached rather than decreasing at small tunneling gap distances, as previously reported. The findings for phi(ap) can be accounted for theoretically by including the relaxations of the tip-surface junction in an STM due to the strong adhesive forces at close proximity. These relaxation effects are shown...

  14. Tunnelling instability via perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graffi, S. (Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Matematica); Grecchi, V. (Moderna Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Matematica); Jona-Lasinio, G. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique et Hautes Energies)

    1984-10-21

    The semiclassical limit of low lying states in a multiwell potential is studied by rigorous perturbative techniques. In particular tunnelling instability and localisation of wave functions is obtained in a simple way under small deformations of symmetric potentials.

  15. On the basically single-type excitation source of resonance in the wind tunnel and in the hydroturbine channel of a hydraulic power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavosov, R. K.; Prozorov, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the spectra of pressure pulsations in the near field of the open working section of the wind tunnel with a vortex flow behind the tunnel blower formed like the flow behind the hydroturbine of a hydraulic power plant. We have made a comparison between the measurement data for pressure pulsations and the air stream velocity in tunnels of the above type and in tunnels in which a large-scale vortex structure behind the blower is not formed. It has been established that the large-scale vortex formation in the incompressible medium behind the blade system in the wind tunnel is a source of narrow-band acoustic radiation capable of exciting resonance self-oscillations in the tunnel channel.

  16. Adsorption of human insulin on single-crystal gold surfaces investigated by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy and electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welinder, Anna Christina; Zhang, Jingdong; Steensgaard, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    sweep, LSV, cyclic, CV, and square wave (SQWV) voltammetry. Multifarious electrochemical patterns were observed. Most attention was given to reductive desorption caused by insulin binding to the Au-surfaces via up to three disulfide groups per insulin monomer, presumably converted to single Au-S links....... SQWV suggested the Au-S bond strength order Au(111) > Au(110) > Au(100) based on the reductive desorption potentials. The voltammetric diversity was paralleled by different in situ STM insulin adsorption modes on the three surfaces. Single-molecule resolution was achieved in all cases. The coverage...... followed the order Au(110) > Au(100) > Au(111) and differs from the reductive desorption order that records the Au-S bonding element. Evenly distributed single molecules were scattered over large Au(111)-terraces, with intriguing molecular arrays disclosed near the terrace edges. In comparison, high...

  17. New vision of magnetic tunnelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Jonathan R. [Amherst College, Amhurst, MA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments support the idea that crystal defects may be responsible for the quantum tunnelling of magnetic moments in molecular magnets at low temperatures. The magnetic moment of a typical bar magnet will never spontaneously reverse direction. However, thermal fluctuations can flip the moment of a magnetic particle just a few nanometres across. The particle can be cooled to nearly absolute zero to suppress this process, but the moment may still find a way to reverse via quantum tunnelling. Quantum tunnelling of magnetization has been the subject of decades of research. Until a few years ago, however, there had only been circumstantial evidence for the phenomenon. This is because most systems of small magnetic particles are hard to characterize - the particles have a variety of shapes, sizes and other properties, making it difficult to compare data with theory. Some real progress was made a few years ago through research into high-spin single-molecule magnets. With dimensions of about a nanometre, these magnets are usually composed of a magnetic core that is surrounded by organic complexes. When they crystallize into a regular lattice, the organic ions keep neighbouring magnets well separated so that they interact only weakly. Ideally all the molecules are identical because they have been built chemically, which means that they can be characterized precisely and that any data can be analysed quantitatively. The most studied of these molecules is manganese-12 acetate (Mn{sub 12}). Within each molecule, the spins of the eight Mn{sup 3+} ions (each with S=2) are antiparallel to the spins of the four Mn{sup 4+} ions (each with S=3/2), giving Mn{sub 12} a total spin of S=10. Or, to put it another way, the magnetic moment of Mn{sub 12} is 20 times larger than that of the electron. Now Eugene Chudnovsky of Lehman College in New York and Dmitry Garanin of the University of Mainz in Germany have suggested a new mechanism for producing tunnelling in Mn{sub 12

  18. I19, the small-molecule single-crystal diffraction beamline at Diamond Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Harriott; Barnett, Sarah A; Christensen, Kirsten E; Teat, Simon J; Allan, David R

    2012-05-01

    The dedicated small-molecule single-crystal X-ray diffraction beamline (I19) at Diamond Light Source has been operational and supporting users for over three years. I19 is a high-flux tunable-wavelength beamline and its key details are described in this article. Much of the work performed on the beamline involves structure determination from small and weakly diffracting crystals. Other experiments that have been supported to date include structural studies at high pressure, studies of metastable species, variable-temperature crystallography, studies involving gas exchange in porous materials and structural characterizations that require analysis of the diffuse scattering between Bragg reflections. A range of sample environments to facilitate crystallographic studies under non-ambient conditions are available as well as a number of options for automation. An indication of the scope of the science carried out on the beamline is provided by the range of highlights selected for this paper.

  19. Large or small angle MSW from single right-handed neutrino dominance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, S.F

    2000-01-01

    In this talk we discuss a natural explanation of both neutrino mass hierarchies and large neutrino mixing angles, as required by the atmospheric neutrino data, in terms of a single right-handed neutrino giving the dominant contribution to the 23 block of the light effective neutrino matrix, and illustrate this mechanism in the framework of models with U(1) family symmetries. Sub-dominant contributions from other right-handed neutrinos are required to give small mass splittings appropriate to the MSW solution to the solar neutrino problem. We present three explicit examples for achieving the small angle MSW solution in the framework of U(1) family symmetry models containing three right-handed neutrinos, which can naturally describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing angles. In this talk we also extend the analysis to the large angle MSW solution

  20. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the HIRA Gene Affect Litter Size in Small Tail Han Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of appropriate levels of fecundity is critical for efficient sheep production. Opportunities to increase sheep litter size include identifying single gene mutations with major effects on ovulation rate and litter size. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS data of 89 Chinese domestic sheep from nine different geographical locations and ten Australian sheep were analyzed to detect new polymorphisms affecting litter size. Comparative genomic analysis of sheep with contrasting litter size detected a novel set of candidate genes. Two SNPs, g.71874104G>A and g.71833755T>C, were genotyped in 760 Small Tail Han sheep and analyzed for association with litter size. The two SNPs were significantly associated with litter size, being in strong linkage disequilibrium in the region 71.80–71.87 Mb. This haplotype block contains one gene that may affect litter size, Histone Cell Cycle Regulator (HIRA. HIRA mRNA levels in sheep with different lambing ability were significantly higher in ovaries of Small Tail Han sheep (high fecundity than in Sunite sheep (low fecundity. Moreover, the expression levels of HIRA in eight tissues of uniparous Small Tail Han sheep were significantly higher than in multiparous Small Tail Han sheep (p < 0.05. HIRA SNPs significantly affect litter size in sheep and are useful as genetic markers for litter size.

  1. Ruptured Jejunal Diverticulum Due to a Single-Band Small Bowel Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaraman Durai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Jejunal diverticulosis is rare and often goes unnoticed until complications occur. The diverticula are true, acquired diverticula and often asymptomatic. Jejunal diverticulosis can be associated with diverticulosis of the duodenum, ileum, and colon. Here we describe a patient with known severe diverticular disease of the large bowel, who presented acutely with abdominal pain and signs of generalised peritonitis. Laparotomy showed ruptured jejunal diverticulosis with a single band over the terminal ileum, causing small bowel obstruction. Spontaneous perforation of a jejunal diverticulum is rare and is usually an intraoperative finding. One should exclude a precipitating cause, such as coexisting distal obstruction, stricture, or a foreign body.

  2. Small cell lung cancer presenting as dermatomyositis: mistaken for single connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Guanqun; Fang, Lizheng; Lu, Chongrong; Chen, Zhouwen

    2012-06-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is well-known to be associated with several types of malignancy. This case emphasizes the importance of a thorough examination for an underlying cancer, in patients with the symptoms of dermatomyositis. We report the case of a 62-year-old Chinese man who presented with a two-month history of edema of face and neck, together with erythema of the eyelids diagnosed of small cell lung cancer. Initially, it was thought to be single connective tissue disease such as DM. This study highlights the importance of a thorough physical examination when visiting a patient.

  3. Magnetic tunnel junctions with monolayer hexagonal boron nitride tunnel barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquemal-Banci, M.; Galceran, R.; Bouzehouane, K.; Anane, A.; Petroff, F.; Fert, A.; Dlubak, B.; Seneor, P. [Unité Mixte de Physique, CNRS, Thales, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Palaiseau 91767 (France); Caneva, S.; Martin, M.-B.; Weatherup, R. S.; Kidambi, P. R.; Robertson, J.; Hofmann, S. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB21PZ (United Kingdom); Xavier, S. [Thales Research and Technology, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, Palaiseau 91767 (France)

    2016-03-07

    We report on the integration of atomically thin 2D insulating hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) tunnel barriers into Co/h-BN/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The h-BN monolayer is directly grown by chemical vapor deposition on Fe. The Conductive Tip Atomic Force Microscopy (CT-AFM) measurements reveal the homogeneity of the tunnel behavior of our h-BN layers. As expected for tunneling, the resistance depends exponentially on the number of h-BN layers. The h-BN monolayer properties are also characterized through integration into complete MTJ devices. A Tunnel Magnetoresistance of up to 6% is observed for a MTJ based on a single atomically thin h-BN layer.

  4. Electronic Transport in Single Molecule Junctions: Control of the Molecule-Electrode Coupling Through Intramolecular Tunneling Barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danilov, Andrey; Kubatkin, Sergey; Kafanov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    We report on single molecule electron transport measurements of two oligophenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives placed in a nanogap between gold (Au) or lead (Pb) electrodes in a field effect transistor device. Both derivatives contain thiol end groups that allow chemical binding to the electrodes....... One derivative has additional methylene groups separating the thiols from the delocalized -electron system. The insertion of methylene groups changes the open state conductance by 3-4 orders of magnitude and changes the transport mechanism from a coherent regime with finite zero-bias conductance...

  5. Probing spin-polarized tunneling at high bias and temperature with a magnetic tunnel transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, B.G.; Banerjee, T.; Min, B.C.; Sanderink, Johannes G.M.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic tunnel transistor (MTT) is a three terminal hybrid device that consists of a tunnel emitter, a ferromagnetic (FM) base, and a semiconductor collector. In the MTT with a FM emitter and a single FM base, spin-polarized hot electrons are injected into the base by tunneling. After

  6. Coherent tunneling of atoms from Bose-condensed gases at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxat, David L.; Griffin, Allan

    2002-01-01

    Tunneling of atoms between two trapped Bose-condensed gases at finite temperatures is explored using a many-body linear-response tunneling formalism similar to that used in superconductors. To lowest order, the tunneling currents can be expressed quite generally in terms of the single-particle Green's functions of isolated Bose gases. A coherent first-order tunneling Josephson current between two atomic Bose-Einstein condensates is found, in addition to coherent and dissipative contributions from second-order condensate-noncondensate and noncondensate-noncondensate tunneling. Our work is a generalization of Meier and Zwerger, who recently treated tunneling between uniform atomic Bose gases. We apply our formalism to the analysis of an out-coupling experiment induced by light wave fields, using a simple Bogoliubov-Popov quasiparticle approximation for the trapped Bose gas. For tunneling into the vacuum, we recover the results of Japha, Choi, Burnett, and Band, who recently pointed out the usefulness of studying the spectrum of out-coupled atoms. In particular, we show that the small tunneling current of noncondensate atoms from a trapped Bose gas has a broad spectrum of energies, with a characteristic structure associated with the Bogoliubov quasiparticle u 2 and v 2 amplitudes

  7. Energy-expending behaviour in frightened caribou when dispersed singly or in small bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Blehr

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of single, and small bands of caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus when confronted by humans was compared with the energy—saving behaviour zoologists have ascribed to caribou in encounters with non-hunting wolves (Canis lupus. When confronted by me, or upon getting my scent, caribou ran away on all occasions. Their flight was occasionally interrupted by short stops to look back in my direction, but would continue on all occasions until they were out of sight. This behaviour is inconsistent with the one ascribed to caribou by zoologists when the intruder is a wolf instead of a human. In their view, the caribou stop their flight soon after the wolf gives up the chase, and accordingly save energy owing to their ability to distinguish between hunting and non-hunting wolves. However, small bands of caribou, as well as single animals, have never been observed to behave in this manner. On the contrary, the behaviour of caribou in such encounters is known to follow the same pattern as in their encounters with humans. Energy—saving behaviour is, however, sometimes observed when caribou become inquisitive about something in their surroundings. They will then readily approach as well as try to get down-wind of the object. When the object does not induce fear, it may simply be ignored, or charged before the caribou calm down. The effect of this "confirming behaviour" is that energy which would otherwise have been spent in needless flights from non-predators is saved.

  8. Simulation of planar single-gate Si tunnel FET with average subthreshold swing of less than 60 mV/decade for 0.3 V operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukita, Kentaro; Uechi, Tadayoshi; Shimokawa, Junji; Goto, Masakazu; Yokota, Yoshinori; Kawanaka, Shigeru; Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Tanimoto, Hiroyoshi; Takagi, Shinichi

    2018-04-01

    Planar single-gate (SG) silicon (Si) tunnel field effect transistors (TFETs) are attracting interest for ultra-low voltage operation and CMOS applications. For the achievement of subthreshold swing (S.S.) less than thermal limit of Si MOSFETs (S.S. = 60 mV/decade at 300 K), previous studies have proposed the formation of a pocket region, which needs very difficult implantation process. In this work, a planar SG Si TFET without pocket was proposed by using the technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations. An average S.S. of less than 60 mV/decade for 0.3 V (= V gs = V ds) operation was obtained. It is found that both low average S.S. (= 27.8 mV/decade) and high on-current I on (= 3.8 µA/µm) are achieved without pocket doping by scaling the equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) and increasing the gate-to-source overlap length L ov.

  9. EVALUATION OF A FAST-RESPONSE URBAN WIND MODEL - COMPARISON TO SINGLE-BUILDING WIND TUNNEL DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.R. PARDYJAK; M.J. BROWN

    2001-01-01

    Prediction of the 3-dimensional flow field around buildings and other obstacles is important for a number of applications, including urban air quality studies, the tracking of plumes from accidental releases of toxic air contaminants, indoor/outdoor air pollution problems, and thermal comfort assessments. Various types of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been used for determining the flow fields around buildings (e.g., Reisner et al., 1998; Eichhorn et al., 1988). Comparisons to measurements show that these models work reasonably well for the most part (e.g., Ehrhard et al., 2 ; Johnson and Hunter, 1998; Murakami, 1997). However, CFD models are computationally intensive and for some applications turn-around time is of the essence. For example, planning and assessment studies in which hundreds of cases must be analyzed or emergency response scenarios in which plume transport must be computed quickly. Several fast-response dispersion models of varying levels of fidelity have been developed to explicitly account for the effects of a single building or groups of buildings (e.g., UDM - Hall et al. (2000), NRC-Ramsdell and Fosmire (1995), CBP-3 - Yamartino and Wiegand (1986), APRAC - Daerdt et al. (1973)). Although a few of these models include the Hotchkiss and Harlow (1973) analytical solution for potential flow in a notch to describe the velocity field within an urban canyon, in general, these models do not explicitly compute the velocity field around groups of buildings. The EPA PRIME model (Schulman et al., 2000) has been empirically derived to provide streamlines around a single isolated building

  10. Diamond turning of small Fresnel lens array in single crystal InSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasinevicius, R G; Duduch, J G; Cirino, G A; Pizani, P S

    2013-01-01

    A small Fresnel lens array was diamond turned in a single crystal (0 0 1) InSb wafer using a half-radius negative rake angle (−25°) single-point diamond tool. The machined array consisted of three concave Fresnel lenses cut under different machining sequences. The Fresnel lens profiles were designed to operate in the paraxial domain having a quadratic phase distribution. The sample was examined by scanning electron microscopy and an optical profilometer. Optical profilometry was also used to measure the surface roughness of the machined surface. Ductile ribbon-like chips were observed on the cutting tool rake face. No signs of cutting edge wear was observed on the diamond tool. The machined surface presented an amorphous phase probed by micro Raman spectroscopy. A successful heat treatment of annealing was carried out to recover the crystalline phase on the machined surface. The results indicated that it is possible to perform a ‘mechanical lithography’ process in single crystal semiconductors. (paper)

  11. Transition from many domain to single domain martensite morphology in small-scale shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueland, Stian M.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    The morphology of the martensitic transformation during a superelastic cycle is studied by in situ scanning electron microscopy deformation experiments in microwires of Cu–Zn–Al. The diameters of the wires studied (21–136 μm) span the range in which significant size effects upon transformation hysteresis have been observed. In larger wires the transformation is accommodated by the continual nucleation of many new martensite plates that grow and eventually coalesce with their neighbors. In small wires a single martensite plate nucleates at the start of transformation and then proceeds to grow in a monolithic fashion; the wire transforms by smooth axial propagation of a single interface. The transition from many domain to single domain transformation is gradual with wire diameter, and is based upon scaling of the domain density with sample size. We attribute it to a crossover from bulk to surface obstacle control of transformation front propagation. This observation also sheds light on reported size effects in energy dissipation in shape memory alloys

  12. Thermal and Pressure Characterization of a Wind Tunnel Force Balance Using the Single Vector System. Experimental Design and Analysis Approach to Model Pressure and Temperature Effects in Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Commo, Sean A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Parker, Peter A,

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel research at NASA Langley Research Center s 31-inch Mach 10 hypersonic facility utilized a 5-component force balance, which provided a pressurized flow-thru capability to the test article. The goal of the research was to determine the interaction effects between the free-stream flow and the exit flow from the reaction control system on the Mars Science Laboratory aeroshell during planetary entry. In the wind tunnel, the balance was exposed to aerodynamic forces and moments, steady-state and transient thermal gradients, and various internal balance cavity pressures. Historically, these effects on force measurement accuracy have not been fully characterized due to limitations in the calibration apparatus. A statistically designed experiment was developed to adequately characterize the behavior of the balance over the expected wind tunnel operating ranges (forces/moments, temperatures, and pressures). The experimental design was based on a Taylor-series expansion in the seven factors for the mathematical models. Model inversion was required to calculate the aerodynamic forces and moments as a function of the strain-gage readings. Details regarding transducer on-board compensation techniques, experimental design development, mathematical modeling, and wind tunnel data reduction are included in this paper.

  13. Fluctuation Dominated Josephson Tunneling with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naaman, O.; Teizer, W.; Dynes, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate Josephson tunneling in vacuum tunnel junctions formed between a superconducting scanning tunneling microscope tip and a Pb film, for junction resistances in the range 50--300 k Omega. We show that the superconducting phase dynamics is dominated by thermal fluctuations, and that the Josephson current appears as a peak centered at small finite voltage. In the presence of microwave fields (f=15.0 GHz) the peak decreases in magnitude and shifts to higher voltages with increasing rf power, in agreement with theory

  14. Klein tunneling phenomenon with pair creation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, G. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; Fu, L. B.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Klein tunneling phenomenon with electron-positron pair creation process. Pairs can be created from the vacuum by a supercritical single-well potential (for electrons). In the time region, the time-dependent growth pattern of the created pairs can be characterized by four distinct regimes which can be considered as four different statuses of the single well. We find that if positrons penetrate the single well by Klein tunneling in different statuses, the total number of the tunneling positrons will be different. If Klein tunneling begins at the initial stage of the first status i.e. when the sing well is empty, the tunneling process and the total number of tunneling positrons are similar to the traditional Klein tunneling case without considering the pair creation process. As the tunneling begins later, the total tunneling positron number increases. The number will finally settle to an asymptotic value when the tunneling begins later than the settling-down time t s of the single well which has been defined in this paper.

  15. Tunneling in decay and fusion of compound nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarakanov, A.V.; Shilov, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of the multichannel boundary-condition model we demonstrate the asymmetry of the total transmission of the Coulomb barrier taking into account the internal structure of the colliding nuclei. For decay the enhancement of the tunneling probability in comparison with the single-channel case is small. We prove the importance of taking into account states in which one of the decay-product fragments is in an excited state

  16. Osculum dynamics and filtration activity in small single-osculum explants of the demosponge Halichondria panicea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumala, Lars; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2017-01-01

    the clearance method. Osculum dynamics, as expressed by temporal variation of the OSA, including osculum contraction and expansion, correlated with variability in the explant filtration rate, and no water pumping was observed during periods of osculum closure. A linear relationship between filtration rate (FR......Contraction-inflation behavior, including the closure and opening of the exhalant opening (osculum), is common among sponges. This behavior may temporally affect filtration activity, making it difficult to study and understand sponge feeding biology. To examine the interplay between osculum...... dynamics and filtration activity, small (18 mm3) single-osculum explants of the demosponge Halichondria panicea were studied. Time-lapse video stereo-microscope recordings of the osculum cross-sectional area (OSA) were made simultaneously with measurements of the filtration rate (∼15°C, ∼20 PSU) using...

  17. Siting analysis and risk assessment for small single-purpose heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarjanne, R.

    1979-04-01

    Two alternative sites both 10km away from the centre of Helsinki are considered for reactor unit sizes of 400mw and 800mw. The risks associated with a small single-purpose heating reactor is evaluated for normal operation and accident conditions. The evaluation for accident condition is performed for three characteristics accidents. Three pathways are considered in the calculation of the radiation exposure: direct external gamma dose from the release plume, direct gamma radiation from deposited activity on the ground and dose due to inhalation. The risks are compared with the risks from alternative conventional fossil fuelled district heat production methods. The results show that the heating reactor alternative causes an unsignificant risk, which is far less than the risk caused by the fossil-fuelled alternatives

  18. Techniques and processes for the measurement of the resonances of small single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliori, A.; Stekel, A.; Sarrao, J.L.; Visscher, W.M.; Bell, T.; Lei, M.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical resonances of small oriented single crystals of materials of interest to basic science and engineering can be used to determine all the elastic moduli and the ultrasonic attenuation of these materials. To measure the resonances of the samples without introducing the resonances of the measuring system requires that the transducers be non-resonant at the frequencies of interest, and that they be well isolated from their mounts. However, for samples near 1 mm in the largest dimension, the transducer design problem becomes sever, and the signals become weak. In addition, no resonances can be missed, and, often, the symmetry class of the resonances must be known. We outline here appropriate transducer, electronics, and system designs to circumvent these problems. 10 refs., 4 figs

  19. Prototype design of singles processing unit for the small animal PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, P.; Zhao, L.; Lu, J.; Li, B.; Dong, R.; Liu, S.; An, Q.

    2018-05-01

    Position Emission Tomography (PET) is an advanced clinical diagnostic imaging technique for nuclear medicine. Small animal PET is increasingly used for studying the animal model of disease, new drugs and new therapies. A prototype of Singles Processing Unit (SPU) for a small animal PET system was designed to obtain the time, energy, and position information. The energy and position is actually calculated through high precison charge measurement, which is based on amplification, shaping, A/D conversion and area calculation in digital signal processing domian. Analysis and simulations were also conducted to optimize the key parameters in system design. Initial tests indicate that the charge and time precision is better than 3‰ FWHM and 350 ps FWHM respectively, while the position resolution is better than 3.5‰ FWHM. Commination tests of the SPU prototype with the PET detector indicate that the system time precision is better than 2.5 ns, while the flood map and energy spectra concored well with the expected.

  20. Anisotropic small-polaron hopping in W:BiVO4 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettie, Alexander J. E.; Chemelewski, William D.; Zhou, Jianshi; Lindemuth, Jeffrey; McCloy, John S.; Marshall, Luke G.; Emin, David; Mullins, C. Buddie

    2015-01-01

    DC electrical conductivity, Seebeck and Hall coefficients are measured between 300 and 450 K on single crystals of monoclinic bismuth vanadate that are doped n-type with 0.3% tungsten donors (W:BiVO 4 ). Strongly activated small-polaron hopping is implied by the activation energies of the Arrhenius conductivities (about 300 meV) greatly exceeding the energies characterizing the falls of the Seebeck coefficients' magnitudes with increasing temperature (about 50 meV). Small-polaron hopping is further evidenced by the measured Hall mobility in the ab-plane (10 −1  cm 2  V −1  s −1 at 300 K) being larger and much less strongly activated than the deduced drift mobility (about 5 × 10 −5  cm 2  V −1  s −1 at 300 K). The conductivity and n-type Seebeck coefficient is found to be anisotropic with the conductivity larger and the Seebeck coefficient's magnitude smaller and less temperature dependent for motion within the ab-plane than that in the c-direction. These anisotropies are addressed by considering highly anisotropic next-nearest-neighbor (≈5 Å) transfers in addition to the somewhat shorter (≈4 Å), nearly isotropic nearest-neighbor transfers

  1. Creep lifing methodologies applied to a single crystal superalloy by use of small scale test techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffs, S.P., E-mail: s.p.jeffs@swansea.ac.uk [Institute of Structural Materials, Swansea University, Singleton Park SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Lancaster, R.J. [Institute of Structural Materials, Swansea University, Singleton Park SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Garcia, T.E. [IUTA (University Institute of Industrial Technology of Asturias), University of Oviedo, Edificio Departamental Oeste 7.1.17, Campus Universitario, 33203 Gijón (Spain)

    2015-06-11

    In recent years, advances in creep data interpretation have been achieved either by modified Monkman–Grant relationships or through the more contemporary Wilshire equations, which offer the opportunity of predicting long term behaviour extrapolated from short term results. Long term lifing techniques prove extremely useful in creep dominated applications, such as in the power generation industry and in particular nuclear where large static loads are applied, equally a reduction in lead time for new alloy implementation within the industry is critical. The latter requirement brings about the utilisation of the small punch (SP) creep test, a widely recognised approach for obtaining useful mechanical property information from limited material volumes, as is typically the case with novel alloy development and for any in-situ mechanical testing that may be required. The ability to correlate SP creep results with uniaxial data is vital when considering the benefits of the technique. As such an equation has been developed, known as the k{sub SP} method, which has been proven to be an effective tool across several material systems. The current work now explores the application of the aforementioned empirical approaches to correlate small punch creep data obtained on a single crystal superalloy over a range of elevated temperatures. Finite element modelling through ABAQUS software based on the uniaxial creep data has also been implemented to characterise the SP deformation and help corroborate the experimental results.

  2. Creep lifing methodologies applied to a single crystal superalloy by use of small scale test techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffs, S.P.; Lancaster, R.J.; Garcia, T.E.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, advances in creep data interpretation have been achieved either by modified Monkman–Grant relationships or through the more contemporary Wilshire equations, which offer the opportunity of predicting long term behaviour extrapolated from short term results. Long term lifing techniques prove extremely useful in creep dominated applications, such as in the power generation industry and in particular nuclear where large static loads are applied, equally a reduction in lead time for new alloy implementation within the industry is critical. The latter requirement brings about the utilisation of the small punch (SP) creep test, a widely recognised approach for obtaining useful mechanical property information from limited material volumes, as is typically the case with novel alloy development and for any in-situ mechanical testing that may be required. The ability to correlate SP creep results with uniaxial data is vital when considering the benefits of the technique. As such an equation has been developed, known as the k SP method, which has been proven to be an effective tool across several material systems. The current work now explores the application of the aforementioned empirical approaches to correlate small punch creep data obtained on a single crystal superalloy over a range of elevated temperatures. Finite element modelling through ABAQUS software based on the uniaxial creep data has also been implemented to characterise the SP deformation and help corroborate the experimental results

  3. Single-balloon enteroscopy following videocapsule endoscopy for diagnosis of small bowel tumors: preliminary experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifan, A; Singeap, A M; Cojocariu, C; Sfarti, C; Tarcoveanu, E; Georgescu, S

    2010-01-01

    Small bowel tumors (SBTs), either benign or malignant, are rare, accounting for 3-6% of all digestive neoplasms. Videocapsule endoscopy (VCE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) have revolutionized the diagnosis and management of patients with small bowel diseases, including SBTs. A novel method using the single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) has recently been developed. The aim of present study was to present our preliminary experience with SBE in patients with suspected SBTs on VCE examination. Patients in whom VCE showed one or more lesions suggesting SBTs underwent SBE. Three patients (2 males, 1 female; mean age 52 +/- 11 years) underwent SBE, and then surgery. There were two gastrointestinal stromal tumors and one adenocarcinoma. Clinically, all patients had iron-deficiency anemia and abdominal pain, and one patient had episodes of nausea/ vomiting. SBE was well tolerated without adverse events. SBE is a safe procedure and overcomes the limitations of VCE. Both procedures are complimentary in patients with suspected SBTs. VCE should be used first for initial diagnosis, followed by SBE for histopathological confrmation of the diagnosis and, if necessary, endoscopic therapy.

  4. Single fraction prophylactic cranial irradiation for small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewster, A.E.; Hopwood, P.; Stout, R.; Burt, P.A.; Thatcher, N.

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of a single 8-Gy fraction prophylactic cranial irradiation regime was assessed in 106 patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung. All patients had limited stage disease and received combination chemotherapy consisting of either cisplatin or carboplatin with ifosfamide, etoposide, and vincristine (VICE). Cranial irradiation was administered 48 h after the first cycle of chemotherapy and was well tolerated. Actual 2-year survival was 35% and cranial relapse occurred in 22% of those patients who achieved complete remission. This compares favourably with a cranial relapse rate of 45% incomplete remitters previously reported with the same chemotherapy regime after a minimum follow-up of 2 years where PCI was not used. Formal psychometric testing was performed retrospectively on a series of 25 long-term survivors of whom 14 were taken from this reported series. Whilst 75% of patients were impaired on at least one test with 68% performing badly in the most complex task, this was not associated with clinically detectable neurological damage and the patients did not complain of memory or concentration difficulties. In conclusion, single fraction PCI, when used with platinum based combination chemotherapy, appears to be equally effective but may be less neurotoxic than the more standard fractionated regimes

  5. Bone mineral content measurement in small infants by single-photon absorptiometry: current methodologic issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steichen, J.J.; Asch, P.A.; Tsang, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Single-photon absorptiometry (SPA), developed in 1963 and adapted for infants by Steichen et al. in 1976, is an important tool to quantitate bone mineralization in infants. Studies of infants in which SPA was used include studies of fetal bone mineralization and postnatal bone mineralization in very low birth weight infants. The SPA technique has also been used as a research tool to investigate longitudinal bone mineralization and to study the effect of nutrition and disease processes such as rickets or osteopenia of prematurity. At present, it has little direct clinical application for diagnosing bone disease in single patients. The bones most often used to measure bone mineral content (BMC) are the radius, the ulna, and, less often, the humerus. The radius appears to be preferred as a suitable bone to measure BMC in infants. It is easily accessible; anatomic reference points are easily palpated and have a constant relationship to the radial mid-shaft site; soft tissue does not affect either palpation of anatomic reference points or BMC quantitation in vivo. The peripheral location of the radius minimizes body radiation exposure. Trabecular and cortical bone can be measured separately. Extensive background studies exist on radial BMC in small infants. Most important, the radius has a relatively long zone of constant BMC. Finally, SPA for BMC in the radius has a high degree of precision and accuracy. 61 references

  6. Thermal radiation analysis for small satellites with single-node model using techniques of equivalent linearization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anh, N.D.; Hieu, N.N.; Chung, P.N.; Anh, N.T.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Linearization criteria are presented for a single-node model of satellite thermal. • A nonlinear algebraic system for linearization coefficients is obtained. • The temperature evolutions obtained from different methods are explored. • The temperature mean and amplitudes versus the heat capacity are discussed. • The dual criterion approach yields smaller errors than other approximate methods. - Abstract: In this paper, the method of equivalent linearization is extended to the thermal analysis of satellite using both conventional and dual criteria of linearization. These criteria are applied to a differential nonlinear equation of single-node model of the heat transfer of a small satellite in the Low Earth Orbit. A system of nonlinear algebraic equations for linearization coefficients is obtained in the closed form and then solved by the iteration method. The temperature evolution, average values and amplitudes versus the heat capacity obtained by various approaches including Runge–Kutta algorithm, conventional and dual criteria of equivalent linearization, and Grande's approach are compared together. Numerical results reveal that temperature responses obtained from the method of linearization and Grande's approach are quite close to those obtained from the Runge–Kutta method. The dual criterion yields smaller errors than those of the remaining methods when the nonlinearity of the system increases, namely, when the heat capacity varies in the range [1.0, 3.0] × 10 4  J K −1 .

  7. National impacts of the Weatherization Assistance Program in single-family and small multifamily dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Balzer, R.A.; Faby, E.

    1993-05-01

    Since 1976, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has operated one of the largest energy conservation programs in the nation -- the low-income Weatherization Assistance Program. The program strives to increase the energy efficiency of dwellings occupied by low-income persons in order to reduce their energy consumption, lower their fuel bills, increase the comfort of their homes, and safeguard their health. It targets vulnerable groups including the elderly, people with disabilities, and families with children. The most recent national evaluation of the impacts of the Program was completed in 1984 based on energy consumption data for households weatherized in 1981. DOE Program regulations and operations have changed substantially since then: new funding sources, management principles, diagnostic procedures, and weatherization technologies have been incorporated. Many of these new features have been studied in isolation or at a local level; however, no recent evaluation has assessed their combined, nationwide impacts to date or their potential for the future. In 1990, DOE initiated such an evaluation. This evaluation is comprised of three ``impact`` studies (the Single-Family Study, High-Density Multifamily Study, and Fuel-Oil Study) and two ``policy`` studies. Altogether, these five studies will provide a comprehensive national assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program as it existed in the 1989 Program Year (PY 1989). This report presents the results of the first phase of the Single-Family Study. It evaluates the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the Program as it has been applied to the largest portion of its client base -- low-income households that occupy single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and small (2- to 4-unit) multifamily dwellings. It is based upon a representative national sample that covers the full range of conditions under which the program was implemented in PY 1989.

  8. Primary Tunnel Junction Thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekola, Jukka P.; Holmqvist, Tommy; Meschke, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    We describe the concept and experimental demonstration of primary thermometry based on a four-probe measurement of a single tunnel junction embedded within four arrays of junctions. We show that in this configuration random sample specific and environment-related errors can be avoided. This method relates temperature directly to Boltzmann constant, which will form the basis of the definition of temperature and realization of official temperature scales in the future

  9. Recognition tunneling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lindsay, S.; He, J.; Sankey, O.; Hapala, Prokop; Jelínek, Pavel; Zhang, P.; Chang, S.; Huang, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 26 (2010), 262001/1-262001/12 ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : STM * tunneling current * molecular electronics * DFT calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.644, year: 2010

  10. Fan array wind tunnel: a multifunctional, complex environmental flow manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Christopher; Veismann, Marcel; Gharib, Morteza

    2017-11-01

    The recent emergence of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has reshaped the aerospace testing environment. Traditional closed-loop wind tunnels are not particularly suited nor easily retrofit to take advantage of these coordinated, controls-based rotorcraft. As such, a highly configurable, novel wind tunnel aimed at addressing the unmet technical challenges associated with single or formation flight performance of autonomous drone systems is presented. The open-loop fan array wind tunnel features 1296 individually controllable DC fans arranged in a 2.88m x 2.88m array. The fan array can operate with and without a tunnel enclosure and is able to rotate between horizontal and vertical testing configurations. In addition to standard variable speed uniform flow, the fan array can generate both unsteady and shear flows. Through the aid of smaller side fan array units, vortex flows are also possible. Conceptual design, fabrication, and validation of the tunnel performance will be presented, including theoretical and computational predictions of flow speed and turbulence intensity. Validation of these parameters is accomplished through standard pitot-static and hot-wire techniques. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) of various complex flows will also be shown. This material is based upon work supported by the Center for Autonomous Systems and Technologies (CAST) at the Graduate Aerospace Laboratories of the California Institute of Technology (GALCIT).

  11. R.f.-induced steps in mutually coupled, two-dimensional distributed Josephson tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, U.; Dammschneider, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the amplitudes of the current steps in the I-V characteristics of mutually coupled two-dimensional distributed Josephson tunnel junctions driven by microwaves. For this purpose we use a numerical computation algorithm based on a planar resonator model for the individual Josephson tunnel junctions to calculate the d.c. current density distribution. In addition to the fundamental microwave frequency, harmonic contents of the tunneling current are also considered. The lateral dimensions of the individual junctions are small compared to the microwave wavelength and the Josephson penetration depth, giving an almost constant current density distribution. Therefore, the coupled junctions can give much greater step amplitudes than a single junction with an equal tunneling area, because of their nonuniform current density distribution

  12. A wheel-shaped single-molecule magnet of [MnII 3MnIII 4]: quantum tunneling of magnetization under static and pulse magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Satoshi; Nihei, Masayuki; Shiga, Takuya; Nakano, Motohiro; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Bircher, Roland; Waldmann, Oliver; Ochsenbein, Stefan T; Güdel, Hans U; Fernandez-Alonso, Felix; Oshio, Hiroki

    2007-01-01

    The reaction of N-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl)iminodiethanol (=H3(5-NO2-hbide)) with Mn(OAc)2* 4 H2O in methanol, followed by recrystallization from 1,2-dichloroethane, yielded a wheel-shaped single-molecule magnet (SMM) of [MnII 3MnIII 4(5-NO2-hbide)6].5 C2H4Cl2 (1). In 1, seven manganese ions are linked by six tri-anionic ligands and form the wheel in which the two manganese ions on the rim and the one in the center are MnII and the other four manganese ions are MnIII ions. Powder magnetic susceptibility measurements showed a gradual increase with chimT values as the temperature was lowered, reaching a maximum value of 53.9 emu mol(-1) K. Analyses of magnetic susceptibility data suggested a spin ground state of S=19/2. The zero-field splitting parameters of D and B 0 4 were estimated to be -0.283(1) K and -1.64(1)x10(-5) K, respectively, by high-field EPR measurements (HF-EPR). The anisotropic parameters agreed with those estimated from magnetization and inelastic neutron scattering experiments. AC magnetic susceptibility measurements showed frequency-dependent in- and out-of-phase signals, characteristic data for an SMM, and an Arrhenius plot of the relaxation time gave a re-orientation energy barrier (DeltaE) of 18.1 K and a pre-exponential factor of 1.63x10(-7) s. Magnetization experiments on aligned single crystals below 0.7 K showed a stepped hysteresis loop, confirming the occurrence of quantum tunneling of the on magnetization (QTM). QTM was, on the other hand, suppressed by rapid sweeps of the magnetic field even at 0.5 K. The sweep-rate dependence of the spin flips can be understood by considering the Landau-Zener-Stückelberg (LZS) model.

  13. Tunnel - history of

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    This book introduces history of tunnel in ancient times, the middle ages and modern times, survey of tunnel and classification of bedrock like environment survey of position, survey of the ground, design of tunnel on basic thing of the design, and design of tunnel of bedrock, analysis of stability of tunnel and application of the data, construction of tunnel like lattice girder and steel fiber reinforced shot crete, and maintenance control and repair of tunnel.

  14. Variability in ACL tunnel placement: observational clinical study of surgeon ACL tunnel variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Brian R; Ramme, Austin J; Wright, Rick W; Brophy, Robert H; McCarty, Eric C; Vidal, Armando R; Parker, Richard D; Andrish, Jack T; Amendola, Annunziato

    2013-06-01

    Multicenter and multisurgeon cohort studies on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are becoming more common. Minimal information exists on intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement. Purpose/ The purpose of this study was to analyze intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement in a series of The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) ACL reconstruction patients and in a clinical cohort of ACL reconstruction patients. The hypothesis was that there would be minimal variability between surgeons in ACL tunnel placement. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Seventy-eight patients who underwent ACL reconstruction by 8 surgeons had postoperative imaging with computed tomography, and ACL tunnel location and angulation were analyzed using 3-dimensional surface processing and measurement. Intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement was analyzed. For intersurgeon variability, the range in mean ACL femoral tunnel depth between surgeons was 22%. For femoral tunnel height, there was a 19% range. Tibial tunnel location from anterior to posterior on the plateau had a 16% range in mean results. There was only a small range of 4% for mean tibial tunnel location from the medial to lateral dimension. For intrasurgeon variability, femoral tunnel depth demonstrated the largest ranges, and tibial tunnel location from medial to lateral on the plateau demonstrated the least variability. Overall, surgeons were relatively consistent within their own cases. Using applied measurement criteria, 85% of femoral tunnels and 90% of tibial tunnels fell within applied literature-based guidelines. Ninety-one percent of the axes of the femoral tunnels fell within the boundaries of the femoral footprint. The data demonstrate that surgeons performing ACL reconstructions are relatively consistent between each other. There is, however, variability of average tunnel placement up to 22% of mean condylar depth

  15. Shaft and tunnel sealing considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsall, P.C.; Shukla, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Much of the emphasis of previous repository sealing research has been placed on plugging small diameter boreholes. It is increasingly evident that equal emphasis should now be given to shafts and tunnels which constitute more significant pathways between a repository and the biosphere. The paper discusses differences in requirements for sealing shafts and tunnels as compared with boreholes and the implications for seal design. Consideration is given to a design approach for shaft and tunnel seals based on a multiple component design concept, taking into account the requirements for retrievability of the waste. A work plan is developed for the future studies required to advance shaft and tunnel sealing technology to a level comparable with the existing technology for borehole sealing

  16. Effectiveness of low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: design of a randomized single-blinded controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa Rafael Inácio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common neuropathy in the upper extremity, resulting from the compression of the median nerve at wrist level. Clinical studies are essentials to present evidence on therapeutic resources use at early restoration on peripheral nerve functionality. Low-level laser therapy has been widely investigated in researches related to nerve regeneration. Therefore, it is suggested that the effect of low-level laser therapy associated with other conservative rehabilitation techniques may positively affect symptoms and overall hand function in compressive neuropathies such as carpal tunnel syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy in addition to orthoses therapy and home orientations in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods/Design Patients older than 18 years old will be included, with clinical diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, excluding comorbidies. A physiotherapist will conduct intervention, with a blinding evaluator. Randomization will be applied to allocate the patients in each group: with association or not to low-level laser therapy. All of them will be submitted to orthoses therapy and home orientations. Outcome will be assessed through: pain visual analogic scale, Semmes Weinstein monofilaments™ threshold sensibility test, Pinch Gauge™, Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and two point discrimination test. Discussion This paper describes the design of a randomized controlled trial, which aim to assess the effectiveness of conservative treatment added to low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Trial registration Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (ReBec - 75ddtf / Universal Trial Number: U1111-1121-5184

  17. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Z; Iwinski, E G; Ni, G X; Zhang, L M; Bao, W; Rodin, A S; Lee, Y; Wagner, M; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Goldflam, M D; Thiemens, M; Keilmann, F; Lau, C N; Castro-Neto, A H; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2015-08-12

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At subnanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nanoimaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene, yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers.

  18. A method for multiple sequential analyses of macrophage functions using a small single cell sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.R.F. Nascimento

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial pathogens such as bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG induce the activation of macrophages. Activated macrophages can be characterized by the increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites, generated via NADPH oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, respectively, and by the increased expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC II. Multiple microassays have been developed to measure these parameters. Usually each assay requires 2-5 x 10(5 cells per well. In some experimental conditions the number of cells is the limiting factor for the phenotypic characterization of macrophages. Here we describe a method whereby this limitation can be circumvented. Using a single 96-well microassay and a very small number of peritoneal cells obtained from C3H/HePas mice, containing as little as <=2 x 10(5 macrophages per well, we determined sequentially the oxidative burst (H2O2, nitric oxide production and MHC II (IAk expression of BCG-activated macrophages. More specifically, with 100 µl of cell suspension it was possible to quantify H2O2 release and nitric oxide production after 1 and 48 h, respectively, and IAk expression after 48 h of cell culture. In addition, this microassay is easy to perform, highly reproducible and more economical.

  19. Design of Single Stage Axial Turbine with Constant Nozzle Angle Blading for Small Turbojet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra Adnan, F.; Hartono, Firman

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, an aerodynamic design of a single stage gas generator axial turbine for small turbojet engine is explained. As per design requirement, the turbine should be able to deliver power output of 155 kW at 0.8139 kg/s gas mass flow, inlet total temperature of 1200 K and inlet total pressure of 335330 Pa. The design phase consist of several steps, i.e.: determination of velocity triangles in 2D plane, 2D blading design and 3D flow analysis at design point using Computational Fluid Dynamics method. In the determination of velocity triangles, two conditions are applied: zero inlet swirl (i.e. the gas flow enter the turbine at axial direction) and constant nozzle angle design (i.e. the inlet and outlet angle of the nozzle blade are constant from root to tip). The 2D approach in cascade plane is used to specify airfoil type at root, mean and tip of the blade based on inlet and outlet flow conditions. The 3D approach is done by simulating the turbine in full configuration to evaluate the overall performance of the turbine. The observed parameters including axial gap, stagger angle, and tip clearance affect its output power. Based on analysis results, axial gap and stagger angle are positively correlated with output power up to a certain point at which the power decreases. Tip clearance, however, gives inversely correlation with output power.

  20. Use of single large or several small policies as strategies to manage people-park interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catrina A; Baird, Timothy D; Hartter, Joel

    2014-12-01

    Biodiversity conservation has been criticized for undermining or ignoring social well-being. Currently efforts to mutually promote social justice, rural development, and biodiversity conservation, which have been contentious and yielded mixed results, continue to spread despite a general dearth of effective management strategies. We contend that social and economic concerns should be integral to conservation planning and propose that the scale of these phenomena is also critical. To evaluate the merit of this proposal, we adopted and expanded a conservation management strategy framework developed by Joel Heinen and examined how population density, economic disparity, and ethnic heterogeneity vary spatially surrounding 2 contrasting protected areas in East Africa: Kibale National Park in Uganda and Tarangire National Park in Tanzania. Analyses of demographic, wealth, and ethnicity data from regional censuses and household surveys conducted in 2009 and 2010 indicated that choice of scale (landscape or community) changed the management strategies recommended by the model. Therefore, "several small" people-park management strategies varying around a given protected area may be more appropriate than a "single large" people-park strategy applied across an entire protected area. Correspondingly, scale adjusted Heinen recommendations offered new strategies for effective conservation management within these human landscapes not incorporated in current in situ management plans. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  1. Bayesian pedigree inference with small numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms via a factor-graph representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric C; Ng, Thomas C

    2016-02-01

    We develop a computational framework for addressing pedigree inference problems using small numbers (80-400) of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our approach relaxes the assumptions, which are commonly made, that sampling is complete with respect to the pedigree and that there is no genotyping error. It relies on representing the inferred pedigree as a factor graph and invoking the Sum-Product algorithm to compute and store quantities that allow the joint probability of the data to be rapidly computed under a large class of rearrangements of the pedigree structure. This allows efficient MCMC sampling over the space of pedigrees, and, hence, Bayesian inference of pedigree structure. In this paper we restrict ourselves to inference of pedigrees without loops using SNPs assumed to be unlinked. We present the methodology in general for multigenerational inference, and we illustrate the method by applying it to the inference of full sibling groups in a large sample (n=1157) of Chinook salmon typed at 95 SNPs. The results show that our method provides a better point estimate and estimate of uncertainty than the currently best-available maximum-likelihood sibling reconstruction method. Extensions of this work to more complex scenarios are briefly discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Simulation of Quantum Tunnelling in an Open System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Julio F.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic clusters, such as Fe8 and Mn12, within large organic molecules, behave at low temperature T as large single spins S, that is, as single molecule magnets (SMM's). In crystals, magnetic anisotropy gives rise to energy barriers U, and quantum tunnelling is then the only available path for magnetic relaxation at vanishingly small temperatures. Even this path, however, would seem to be nearly closed by energy conservation requirements, given the existence of magnetic dipolar interactions among all SMM's in the crystal. Nevertheless, magnetic relaxation that is temperature independent has lately been observed for temperatures under 0.1 U/kBS for Fe8 and Mn12 (U ≈ 30 K and U ≈ 60 K, for Fe8 and Mn12, respectively, and S = 10 for both of them). Prokof'ev and Stamp (PS) were able to explain it by taking into account hyperfine interactions between the tunnelling electronic spins and nuclear spins. In the PS theory, the system of nuclear spins acts much as a heat bath providing a somewhat random magnetic field h(t) that acts on the otherwise closed system of interacting magnetic dipoles. Thus, the open nature of these systems plays an essential role in bringing tunnelling about. Their numerical simulations are explained, results that follow from the simulations are discussed, and a simple derivation of the tunnelling rate is given.

  3. Comparison of the effectiveness of orthotic intervention, kinesiotaping, and paraffin treatments in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: A single-blind and randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansiz Kaplan, Basak; Akyuz, Gulseren; Kokar, Serdar; Yagci, Ilker

    2018-02-17

    The aim of the study was to compare different conservative treatments in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). A single-blind randomized controlled study. Patients (n = 169) diagnosed with mild or moderate CTS were screened; 110 met study requirements. The patients were randomized into 3 groups. The control (CON) comparison provided to all patients was a fabricated night orthotic which held the wrist in a neutral position. The second group received adjunctive kinesiotaping (KIN) and the third group received paraffin (PARA). All patients were evaluated clinically, electrophysiologically, and ultrasonographically before treatment and at 3 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. There were 36 patients in CON, 37 in KIN, and 37 in PARA. Pain reduction in KIN was better than the other groups at 3 weeks (mean difference [MD] in CON 2.4 ± 2.5, KIN 3.7 ± 2.0, PARA 2.7 ± 2.3; P < .01) and 6 months (MD in CON 3.4 ± 3.0, KIN 4.9 ± 3.1, PARA 3.7 ± 2.9; P < .05). KIN pain reduction was better than CON at 3 months (MD in CON 3.8 ± 2.8, KIN 5.0 ± 2.5; P < .05). Reduction of the cross-sectional area of median nerve at the level of radioulnar joint was greater for KIN than CON at 3 weeks (MD in CON 0.0 ± 0.5, KIN 0.3 ± 0.7; P < .01) than PARA at 3 months (MD in KIN 0.3 ± 0.8, PARA 0.0 ± 0.8; P < .05) and both groups at 6 months (MD in CON 0.1 ± 0.8, KIN 0.5 ± 0.9, PARA 0.0 ± 1.0 P < .05). Adding KIN to night use of an orthotic was more effective in achieving symptomatic and structural improvements than either the orthotic alone or adjunctive use of paraffin in patients with mild and moderate CTS. Copyright © 2018 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. THE STRATEGIC RESPONSE OF SMALL AND MEDIUM-SIZED ENTERPRISE SECTOR FIRMS TO THE SINGLE EUROPEAN MARKET - A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    BRICKAU, RALF ALEXANDER

    1994-01-01

    The creation of the post-1992 European Single Market represents a significant change in the business environment confronting firms throughout Europe. Although there is an extensive source of literature available on appropriate strategic responses to the Single Market, very few of these writings contain guidance specifically related to the situation facing small and medium- sized enterprises (SMEs). The objectives of this study are i) to determine important veu-iables which m...

  5. Correlation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 single nucleotide polymorphisms with the risk of small vessel disease (SVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zhu, Wusheng; Yun, Wenwei; Wang, Qizhang; Cheng, Maogang; Zhang, Zhizhong; Liu, Xinfeng; Zhou, Xianju; Xu, Gelin

    2015-09-15

    Maladjustment of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) results in cerebral vasculature and blood-brain barrier dysfunction, which is associated with small vessel disease (SVD). This study was to aim at evaluating correlations between matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms and the risk of SVD. A total of 178 patients with SVD were enrolled into this study via Nanjing Stroke Registry Program (NSRP) from January 2010 to November 2011. SVD patients were further subtyped as isolated lacunar infarction (ILI, absent or with mild leukoaraiosis) and ischemic leukoaraiosis (ILA, with moderate or severe leukoaraiosis) according to the Fazekas scale. 100 age- and gender-matched individuals from outpatient medical examination were recruited as the control group. The genotypes of MMP-2-1306 T/C and MMP-9-1562 C/T were determined by the TaqMan method. Of 178 SVD patients, 86 and 92 patients were classified as ILI and ILA, respectively. Comparison analysis between SVD patients and controls revealed a significant correlation between SVD and hypertension, as well as a prevalence of hypertension in ILA. Further genotype analysis showed that the frequency of MMP-2-1306 CC genotype was higher in ILA patients than in controls (P=0.009, χ(2) test; P=0.027, the multiple test with Bonferroni correction). Finally, logistic regression analysis with adjustment of age, sex and vascular risk factors showed that the MMP-2-1306 T/C polymorphism was an independent predictor for ILA (OR: 2.605; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.067-6.364; P=0.036). Our findings suggest that the MMP-2-1306 T/C polymorphism is a direct risk factor for ILA. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Percutaneous CT-guided radiofrequency ablation of solitary small renal masses. A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, C.C.; Fischer, S.; Strunk, H.; Meyer, C.; Thomas, D.; Willinek, W.A.; Schild, H. [Univ. Bonn (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Hauser, S. [Univ. Bonn (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Nadal, J. [Univ. Bonn (Germany). Inst. for Medical Biometry; Wilhelm, K. [Johanniter Hospital Bonn (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-07-15

    To analyze the outcome of patients undergoing percutaneous CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of small renal masses (SRM) at a single center during a ten-year time period. Patient records of renal RFAs (07/2003 - 11/2013) were reviewed. Indications were SRM suspicious of malignancy on imaging and one of the following: severe comorbidity; old age; solitary kidney; impaired renal function; patient wish. Biopsy was performed at the time of RFA. Patients were excluded if no follow-up was available. Patient and procedural characteristics were recorded. Survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier's method and compared with log-rank or cox tests. 38 patients (16 females, mean age 70.0 years [range 52 - 87]) presenting with a solitary SRM were included in the study. Biopsy showed malignancy in 29 patients; 9 had benign tumors. 26 patients suffered from cardiovascular, respiratory or hepatic comorbidities. Technical success (complete ablation on first follow-up) was achieved in 95 % of cases. Two major complications (bowel perforation; hematothorax) occurred. The 3- and 7-year overall survival (OS) [any cause] rates were 73.4 ± 0.8 % and 50.3 ± 1.0 %, respectively (mean follow-up 54.6 months, range 1 - 127). 4 recurrences and 2 metastases were observed. The presence of comorbidities was the only independent predictor of OS. There was no difference in survival between patients with benign and malignant tumors. RFA of SRM is successful in a large percentage of cases with a low complication rate and durable local control. As RFA is typically performed in multimorbid patients, overall survival seems to depend primarily on comorbidities rather than cancer progression.

  7. Performance characteristics of single effect lithium bromide/ water absorption chiller for small data centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysore, Abhishek Arun Babu

    A medium data center consists of servers performing operations such as file sharing, collaboration and email. There are a large number of small and medium data centers across the world which consume more energy and are less efficient when compared to large data center facilities of companies such as GOOGLE, APPLE and FACEBOOK. Such companies are making their data center facilities more environmental friendly by employing renewable energy solutions such as wind and solar to power the data center or in data center cooling. This not only reduces the carbon footprint significantly but also decreases the costs incurred over a period of time. Cooling of data center play a vital role in proper functioning of the servers. It is found that cooling consumes about 50% of the total power consumed by the data center. Traditional method of cooling includes the use of mechanical compression chillers which consume lot of power and is not desirable. In order to eliminate the use of mechanical compressor chillers renewable energy resources such as solar and wind should be employed. One such technology is solar thermal cooling by means of absorption chiller which is powered by solar energy. The absorption chiller unit can be coupled with either flat plate or evacuated tube collectors in order to achieve the required inlet temperature for the generator of the absorption chiller unit. In this study a modular data center is considered having a cooling load requirement of 23kw. The performance characteristics of a single stage Lithium Bromide/ water refrigeration is presented in this study considering the cooling load of 23kw. Performance characteristics of each of the 4 heat exchangers within the unit is discussed which helps in customizing the unit according to the users' specific needs. This analysis helps in studying the importance of different properties such as the effect of inlet temperatures of hot water for generator, inlet temperatures of cooling water for absorber and

  8. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ... three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men. Early diagnosis and treatment are important ...

  9. Resonant tunneling of electrons in quantum wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krive, I.V.; Shekhter, R.I.; Jonson, M.; Krive, I.V.

    2010-01-01

    We considered resonant electron tunneling in various nanostructures including single wall carbon nanotubes, molecular transistors and quantum wires formed in two-dimensional electron gas. The review starts with a textbook description of resonant tunneling of noninteracting electrons through a double-barrier structure. The effects of electron-electron interaction in sequential and resonant electron tunneling are studied by using Luttinger liquid model of electron transport in quantum wires. The experimental aspects of the problem (fabrication of quantum wires and transport measurements) are also considered. The influence of vibrational and electromechanical effects on resonant electron tunneling in molecular transistors is discussed.

  10. Amrubicin therapy improves patients with refractory small-cell lung cancer: A single-arm confirmatory Chinese clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengli Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to evaluate an open-label, multicenter, single-arm study to appraise whether amrubicin therapy improves patients with refractory small-cell lung cancer in Chinese clinical study. Patients (n=95 with refractory small-cell lung cancer received 3 consecutive days amrubicin therapy for 21 days. Overall response rate of response to amrubicin was 39%. Anemia, febrile neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, hyperglycemia, hyponatremia, infection, elevated serum transaminases levels were appeared, but the incidences of adverse events were very few. Our results suggest amrubicin therapy can improve patients with refractory small-cell lung cancer and may be an effective and safe treatment option.

  11. Coherence in Magnetic Quantum Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Julio F.

    2001-03-01

    Crystals of single molecule magnets such as Mn_12 and Fe8 behave at low temperatures as a collection of independent spins. Magnetic anisotropy barriers slow down spin-flip processes. Their rate Γ becomes temperature independent at sufficiently low temperature. Quantum tunneling (QT) accounts for this behavior. Currently, spin QT in Mn_12 and Fe8 is assumed to proceed as an incoherent sum of small probability increments that occur whenever a bias field h(t) (arising from hyperfine interactions with nuclear spins) that varies with time t becomes sufficiently small, as in Landau-Zener transitions. Within a two-state model, we study the behavior of a suitably defined coherence time τ_φ and compare it with the correlation time τh for h(t). It turns out that τ_φ >τ_h, when τ_hδ h < hbar, where δ h is the rms deviation of h. We show what effect such coherence has on Γ. Its dependence on a static longitudinal applied field Hz is drastically affected. There is however no effect if the field is swept through resonance.

  12. Josephson tunneling current in the presence of a time-dependent voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The expression for the current through a small Josephson tunnel junction in the presence of a time-dependent voltage is presented. Four terms appear: the usual sine, cosine, and quasiparticle terms, and a reactive part of the quasiparticle current. The latter is displayed graphically as a function of both energy and temperature. It is shown that in the limit of zero dc voltage and small ac voltage, the Josephson device behaves linearly. Interpretation of the in- and out-of-phase components of the current in this linear limit is given to provide physical insight into some of the details of the general expression. Finally, the tunneling current in the linear limit is shown for thin tunneling barriers to be proportional to the current in a single superconductor in the presence of an electromagnetic field

  13. Local study of the Mg{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}B{sub 2} single crystals by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in magnetic field up to 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubileo, F. [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SUPERMAT, Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, via Salvador Allende, 84081 Baronissi, SA (Italy)], E-mail: giubileo@sa.infn.it; Bobba, F.; Scarfato, A.; Cucolo, A.M. [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SUPERMAT, Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, via Salvador Allende, 84081 Baronissi, SA (Italy); Kohen, A.; Roditchev, D. [Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, INSP, Universite P. et M. Curie Paris 6, CNRS, UMR 75-88, Paris (France); Zhigadlo, N.D.; Karpinski, J. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-04-01

    We have performed local tunneling spectroscopy on high quality Mg{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}B{sub 2} single crystals by means of variable temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy in magnetic field up to 3 Tesla. Single gap conductance spectra due to c-axis tunneling were extensively measured, probing different amplitudes of the three-dimensional {delta}{sub {pi}} as a function of Al content (i.e. as a function of the critical temperature T{sub C}). Temperature and magnetic field dependences of the conductance spectra were studied in S-I-N configuration: the effect of the doping resulted in a monotonous reduction of the locally measured T{sub C} down to 24 K for x = 0.2. The magnetic field dependence was studied in a local way: An estimation for upper critical field H{sub c2} was inferred from the evolution of the tunneling spectra with the field perpendicular to the sample surface, for different doping levels. The high spatial resolution of the STS technique allowed us to evidence possible non-homogeneities of the superconducting properties on the sample surface with variation of in the same sample depending on different local levels of doping. The locally measured upper critical field resulted to vary for different dopings, and the maximum value H{sub c2}{approx_equal}3T was found for samples with T{sub C}=33 K. The evolution of the density of states (DOS) was found to be characterized by two distinct regimes separated by a crossover region. Our results indicate a rapid suppression of the intrinsic term in {pi}-band superconductivity for 0 T < B < 0.5 T. At high fields (0.8 T < B < 3 T) the superconductivity in the {pi}-band survives uniquely due to the coupling to the {sigma}-band. The shape of tunneling spectra suggests an important role played by the quasiparticle inter-band scattering.

  14. Chaos regularization of quantum tunneling rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecora, Louis M.; Wu Dongho; Lee, Hoshik; Antonsen, Thomas; Lee, Ming-Jer; Ott, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Quantum tunneling rates through a barrier separating two-dimensional, symmetric, double-well potentials are shown to depend on the classical dynamics of the billiard trajectories in each well and, hence, on the shape of the wells. For shapes that lead to regular (integrable) classical dynamics the tunneling rates fluctuate greatly with eigenenergies of the states sometimes by over two orders of magnitude. Contrarily, shapes that lead to completely chaotic trajectories lead to tunneling rates whose fluctuations are greatly reduced, a phenomenon we call regularization of tunneling rates. We show that a random-plane-wave theory of tunneling accounts for the mean tunneling rates and the small fluctuation variances for the chaotic systems.

  15. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle of attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg. 1: Low wing model C. [wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcay, W. J.; Rose, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a helical flow environment utilizing a rotary balance located in the Langley spin tunnel are presented in plotted form for a 1/6 scale, single engine, low wing, general aviation model (model C). The configurations tested included the basic airplane and control deflections, wing leading edge and fuselage modification devices, tail designs and airplane components. Data are presented without analysis for an angle of attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg and clockwise and counter clockwise rotations covering an omega b/2v range from 0 to .9.

  16. Effects of junction resistance and counterelectrode material on point-contact tunneling into single- and polycrystalline YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-y/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moog, E.R.; Hawley, M.E.; Gray, K.E.; Liu, J.Z.; Hinks, D.G.; Capone, D.W. II; Downey, J.

    1988-06-01

    The effects of junction resistance and counterelectrode material on the results of point-contact tunneling studies into single- and polycrystalline YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-y/ are illustrated. Although reasonably symmetric I(V) curves predominantly indicate energy gap values /Delta/ /approx/ 20 meV, large asymmetries are often found for high-resistance junctions. Very low-resistance junctions show the expected behavior of pure metallic bridge and indicate /Delta/ /approx/ 25-30 meV.

  17. Modeling of inter-ribbon tunneling in graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Van de Put, Maarten L.; Vandenberghe, William G.; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim; Fischetti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The tunneling current between two crossed graphene ribbons is described invoking the empirical pseudopotential approximation and the Bardeen transfer Hamiltonian method. Results indicate that the density of states is the most important factor determining the tunneling current between small (nm) ribbons. The quasi-one dimensional nature of graphene nanoribbons is shown to result in resonant tunneling.

  18. Single-tube hydroponics as a novel idea for small-scale production of crop seed in a plant incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Masaharu; Ikenaga, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel protocol for small-scale production of crop seed in a plant incubator termed "Single-tube hydroponics." Our protocol minimizes the materials and methods for cultivation whereby a large number of independent plants can be cultured in a limited space. This study may aid in the improvement of crop seed components, especially in the cultivation of transgenic plants.

  19. Single-step solution processing of small-molecule organic semiconductor field-effect transistors at high yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Liyang; Li, X.; Pavlica, E.; Loth, M.A.; Anthony, J.E.; Bratina, G.; Kjellander, B.K.C.; Gelinck, G.H.; Stutzmann, N.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report a simple, alternative route towards high-mobility structures of the small-molecular semiconductor 5,11-bis(triethyl silylethynyl) anthradithiophene that requires one single processing step without the need for any post-deposition processing. The method relies on careful control of

  20. Fully automated microchip system for the detection of quantal exocytosis from single and small ensembles of cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spégel, Christer; Heiskanen, Arto; Pedersen, Simon

    2008-01-01

    A lab-on-a-chip device that enables positioning of single or small ensembles of cells on an aperture in close proximity to a mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) modified sensing electrode has been developed and characterized. The microchip was used for the detection of Ca2+-dependent quantal catecholamine...

  1. Tunneling technologies for the collider ring tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frobenius, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Texas site chosen for the Superconducting Super Collider has been studied, and it has been determined that proven, conventional technology and accepted engineering practice are suitable for constructing the collider tunnels. The Texas National Research Laboratory Commission report recommended that two types of tunneling machines be used for construction of the tunnels: a conventional hard rock tunnel boring machine (TBM) for the Austin chalk and a double shielded, rotary TBM for the Taylor marl. Since the tunneling machines usually set the pace for the project, efficient planning, operation, and coordination of the tunneling system components will be critical to the schedule and cost of the project. During design, tunneling rate prediction should be refined by focusing on the development of an effective tunneling system and evaluating its capacity to meet or exceed the required schedules. 8 refs., 13 figs

  2. Microdissection and molecular manipulation of single chromosomes in woody fruit trees with small chromosomes using pomelo (Citrus grandis) as a model. I. Construction of single chromosomal DNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, D; Wu, W; Zhou, Y; Hu, Z; Lu, L

    2004-05-01

    Construction of single chromosomal DNA libraries by means of chromosome microdissection and microcloning will be useful for genomic research, especially for those species that have not been extensively studied genetically. Application of the technology of microdissection and microcloning to woody fruit plants has not been reported hitherto, largely due to the generally small sizes of metaphase chromosomes and the difficulty of chromosome preparation. The present study was performed to establish a method for single chromosome microdissection and microcloning in woody fruit species using pomelo as a model. The standard karyotype of a pomelo cultivar ( Citrus grandis cv. Guanxi) was established based on 20 prometaphase photomicrographs. According to the standard karyotype, chromosome 1 was identified and isolated with fine glass microneedles controlled by a micromanipulator. DNA fragments ranging from 0.3 kb to 2 kb were acquired from the isolated single chromosome 1 via two rounds of PCR mediated by Sau3A linker adaptors and then cloned into T-easy vectors to generate a DNA library of chromosome 1. Approximately 30,000 recombinant clones were obtained. Evaluation based on 108 randomly selected clones showed that the sizes of the cloned inserts varied from 0.5 kb to 1.5 kb with an average of 860 bp. Our research suggests that microdissection and microcloning of single small chromosomes in woody plants is feasible.

  3. Single center experience with percutaneous and laparoscopic cryoablation of small renal masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, John B; Berry, Tristan T; Williams, Michael B; Logan, Joshua E; Given, Robert W; Lance, Raymond S; Barone, Bethany; Shaves, Sarah; Vingan, Harlan; Fabrizio, Michael D

    2009-06-01

    While partial nephrectomy remains the gold standard for the management of most small renal masses, increasing experience with renal cryoablation has suggested a viable alternative with a favorable morbidity profile and good efficacy. We report intermediate-term oncologic outcomes from a single-center experience with laparoscopic and percutaneous renal cryoablation. We performed a retrospective review of our laparoscopic renal cryoablation (LRC) and percutaneous renal cryoablation (PRC) experience between January 2003 and April 2007. Patients with at least 12 months of follow-up were included in the analysis. Follow-up consisted of imaging and laboratory studies at regular intervals. Persistent mass enhancement or interval tumor growth was considered a treatment failure. Sixty-six patients (44% women/56% men; 42% African-American/58% Caucasian/other; mean body mass index, 29.7) with 72 tumors underwent either LRC (n = 52) or PRC (n = 20) with a mean follow-up of 30 months (median 25.1 mos; range 13-63 mos). Average patient age was 66.5 years (range 34-82 yrs). Mean tumor size was 2.33 cm (range 1-4.6 cm). Comorbid conditions were prevalent: 76% hypertension, 36% hyperlipidemia, 24% chronic kidney disease, 29% diabetes mellitus, 36% tobacco use, and 32% heart disease. RESULTS of pretreatment biopsy were 62% renal-cell carcinoma and 38% benign or nondiagnostic. Overall cancer-specific and cancer-free survival were 100% and 97%, respectively. There were two treatment failures (3.8%) in the LRC group and five primary failures in the PRC group (25%) (P = 0.015), four of which were salvaged with repeated PRC with no evidence of recurrence at 6 to 36 months of follow-up. There has been no significant local or metastatic progression. LRC and PRC achieved good oncologic control with minimal morbidity at a mean follow-up of 30 months in a patient cohort characterized by numerous comorbid conditions. PRC had a significantly higher primary treatment failure rate than LRC, but

  4. Note: optical optimization for ultrasensitive photon mapping with submolecular resolution by scanning tunneling microscope induced luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L G; Zhang, C; Zhang, R; Zhang, X L; Dong, Z C

    2013-06-01

    We report the development of a custom scanning tunneling microscope equipped with photon collection and detection systems. The optical optimization includes the comprehensive design of aspherical lens for light collimation and condensing, the sophisticated piezo stages for in situ lens adjustment inside ultrahigh vacuum, and the fiber-free coupling of collected photons directly onto the ultrasensitive single-photon detectors. We also demonstrate submolecular photon mapping for the molecular islands of porphyrin on Ag(111) under small tunneling currents down to 10 pA and short exposure time down to 1.2 ms/pixel. A high quantum efficiency up to 10(-2) was also observed.

  5. Morphometric identification of small mammal footprints from ink tracking tunnels in the Brazilian Cerrado Identificação morfométrica de pequenos mamíferos usando tubos de pegadas no Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre R. T. Palma

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available An alternative method for identifying and inventorying rodents and marsupials inhabiting forests and grasslands of Brazilian Cerrado is presented and discussed. Ink tracking tunnels were designed according to the size of target species and used to build a reference collection of small mammal footprints composed of 1408 footprints belonging to 251 individuals from 30 species (21 rodents and nine marsupials. Sherman traps and ink tracking tunnels were used to conduct inventories in gallery forests. Footprints obtained in ink tracking tunnels were digitalized and compared with those in reference collection using Discriminant Analysis (DFA. DFA allowed good footprint differentiation, even among congeneric species. In DFA analysis, the first two axis were related to size and arboreality. The efficiency of ink tracking tunnels was higher (track-success = 31% than conventional trapping (trap-success = 14% in inventories. Ink tracking tunnels gave a good description of the small mammal community of gallery forest by detecting rodents and marsupials of different habits, including trap-shy species. This paper also discusses advantages and limitations of ink tracking tunnels use in inventories and ecological studies, and concludes that this technique can be efficient in long-term studies and in rapid inventories as a complementary technique for trapping.Um método alternativo de identificação e inventário de roedores e marsupiais de florestas e áreas abertas do Cerrado é apresentado e discutido. Os tubos de pegadas foram projetados de acordo com o tamanho das espécies alvo e usados para construir uma coleção de referência de pegadas de pequenos mamíferos formada por 1408 pegadas pertencentes a 251 indivíduos de 30 espécies (21 roedores e nove marsupiais. Armadilhas Sherman e tubos de pegadas foram usados para conduzir inventários em matas de galeria. As pegadas obtidas nos tubos foram digitalizadas e comparadas com as da coleção de refer

  6. Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy Trajectories of a Single Protein and Its Polyproteins Are Equivalent: A Direct Experimental Validation Based on A Small Protein NuG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hai; He, Chengzhi; Hu, Chunguang; Li, Jinliang; Hu, Xiaodong; Hu, Xiaotang; Li, Hongbin

    2017-05-22

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) has become a powerful tool in investigating the mechanical unfolding/folding of proteins at the single-molecule level. Polyproteins made of tandem identical repeats have been widely used in atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based SMFS studies, where polyproteins not only serve as fingerprints to identify single-molecule stretching events, but may also improve statistics of data collection. However, the inherent assumption of such experiments is that all the domains in the polyprotein are equivalent and one SMFS trajectory of stretching a polyprotein made of n domains is equivalent to n trajectories of stretching a single domain. Such an assumption has not been validated experimentally. Using a small protein NuG2 and its polyprotein (NuG2) 4 as model systems, here we use optical trapping (OT) to directly validate this assumption. Our results show that OT experiments on NuG2 and (NuG2) 4 lead to identical parameters describing the unfolding and folding kinetics of NuG2, demonstrating that indeed stretching a polyprotein of NuG2 is equivalent to stretching single NuG2 in force spectroscopy experiments and thus validating the use of polyproteins in SMFS experiments. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Cyclopropenyl Anions: Carbon Tunneling or Diradical Formation? A Contest between Jahn-Teller and Hund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuch, Sebastian

    2015-07-14

    The π bond shifting (automerization) by carbon tunneling of cyclopropenyl anions was computationally analyzed by the small curvature tunneling methodology. Similar to other antiaromatic cases, the process is hindered by substituents departing from planarity, since these groups must be realigned along with the π bond shifting. With hydrogens as substituents the tunneling is extremely fast, in a case of both heavy and light atom tunneling. But, with more massive substituents (such as Me and F), and especially with longer groups (such as CN), the tunneling probability is reduced or even virtually canceled. The automerization of triphenylcyclopropyl anion by tunneling was supposed to be impossible due to the high mass of the phenyl groups. However, it was found that the ground state of this species is actually a D3h aromatic triplet, a single-well system that cannot undergo automerization. For this and other systems with π acceptor groups, the superposition of states that generates the second-order Jahn-Teller distortion is diminished, and by Hund's rule, the triplet results in the ground state.

  8. Single-electron charging effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    The status of our project on single-electron tunneling is, again, excellent. As outlined in our original proposal, a key goal in the development of this project was the demonstration and exploration of the microwave properties of single-electron system. As discussed in this paper such work has to data been carried out. Also as discussed in our previous progress report, the next step in the experimental evolution of the project will be to use lithographically-defined small dots as capacitors as outlined in our proposal. At this point we have made such microdotsdots as will be discussed. We have also continued our work with metal droplets to form single-electron tunnel systems

  9. Tunneling field effect transistor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to the state-of-the art in tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs). Readers will learn the TFETs physics from advanced atomistic simulations, the TFETs fabrication process and the important roles that TFETs will play in enabling integrated circuit designs for power efficiency. · Provides comprehensive reference to tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs); · Covers all aspects of TFETs, from device process to modeling and applications; · Enables design of power-efficient integrated circuits, with low power consumption TFETs.

  10. Does flexible tunnel drilling affect the femoral tunnel angle measurement after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Bart; Hofbauer, Marcus; Atte, Akere; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H.

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the mean difference in femoral tunnel angle (FTA) as measured on knee radiographs between rigid and flexible tunnel drilling after anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Fifty consecutive patients that underwent primary anatomic ACL reconstruction with a single femoral

  11. Hybrid inflation exit through tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbrecht, Bjoern; Konstandin, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    For hybrid inflationary potentials, we derive the tunneling rate from field configurations along the flat direction towards the waterfall regime. This process competes with the classically rolling evolution of the scalar fields and needs to be strongly subdominant for phenomenologically viable models. Tunneling may exclude models with a mass scale below 10 12 GeV, but can be suppressed by small values of the coupling constants. We find that tunneling is negligible for those models, which do not require fine tuning in order to cancel radiative corrections, in particular for GUT-scale SUSY inflation. In contrast, electroweak scale hybrid inflation is not viable, unless the inflaton-waterfall field coupling is smaller than approximately 10 -11

  12. Tunneling and Transport in Nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, Allen M.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this program was to study new physical phenomena that might be relevant to the performance of conductive devices and circuits of the smallest realizable feature sizes possible using physical rather than biological techniques. Although the initial scientific work supported involved the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to ascertain the statistics of the energy level distribution of randomly sized and randomly shaped quantum dots, or nano-crystals, the main focus was on the investigation of selected properties, including superconductivity, of conducting and superconducting nanowires prepared using electron-beam-lithography. We discovered a magnetic-field-restoration of superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium nanowires driven resistive by current. This phenomenon was explained by the existence of a state in which dissipation coexisted with nonvanishing superconducting order. We also produced ultra-small superconducting loops to study a predicted anomalous fluxoid quantization, but instead, found a magnetic-field-dependent, high-resistance state, rather than superconductivity. Finally, we developed a simple and controllable nanowire in an induced charged layer near the surface of a masked single-crystal insulator, SrTiO_3. The layer was induced using an electric double layer transistor employing an ionic liquid (IL). The transport properties of the induced nanowire resembled those of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots.

  13. Tunneling and Transport in Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Allen M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-08-16

    The goal of this program was to study new physical phenomena that might be relevant to the performance of conductive devices and circuits of the smallest realizable feature sizes possible using physical rather than biological techniques. Although the initial scientific work supported involved the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to ascertain the statistics of the energy level distribution of randomly sized and randomly shaped quantum dots, or nano-crystals, the main focus was on the investigation of selected properties, including superconductivity, of conducting and superconducting nanowires prepared using electron-beam-lithography. We discovered a magnetic-field-restoration of superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium nanowires driven resistive by current. This phenomenon was explained by the existence of a state in which dissipation coexisted with nonvanishing superconducting order. We also produced ultra-small superconducting loops to study a predicted anomalous fluxoid quantization, but instead, found a magnetic-field-dependent, high-resistance state, rather than superconductivity. Finally, we developed a simple and controllable nanowire in an induced charged layer near the surface of a masked single-crystal insulator, SrTiO3. The layer was induced using an electric double layer transistor employing an ionic liquid (IL). The transport properties of the induced nanowire resembled those of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots.

  14. Experimental evidence for s-wave pairing symmetry in superconducting Cu(x)Bi2Se3 single crystals using a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Niv; Zhang, Tong; Ha, Jeonghoon; Sharifi, Fred; Talin, A Alec; Kuk, Young; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2013-03-15

    Topological superconductors represent a newly predicted phase of matter that is topologically distinct from conventional superconducting condensates of Cooper pairs. As a manifestation of their topological character, topological superconductors support solid-state realizations of Majorana fermions at their boundaries. The recently discovered superconductor Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) has been theoretically proposed as an odd-parity superconductor in the time-reversal-invariant topological superconductor class, and point-contact spectroscopy measurements have reported the observation of zero-bias conductance peaks corresponding to Majorana states in this material. Here we report scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of the superconducting energy gap in Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) as a function of spatial position and applied magnetic field. The tunneling spectrum shows that the density of states at the Fermi level is fully gapped without any in-gap states. The spectrum is well described by the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory with a momentum independent order parameter, which suggests that Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) is a classical s-wave superconductor contrary to previous expectations and measurements.

  15. SINGLE AGENT DOCETAXEL AS SECOND- LINE CHEMOTHERAPY FOR PRETREATED PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT NON- SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyan N. Davidov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Single agent Docetaxel is a standard therapy for patients with non- small cell lung cancer after the failure of platinum- containing regimens. The aim of this study was to explore the efficacy and safety of Docetaxel monotherapy as second- line chemotherapy in pretreated patient with inoperable non- small cell lung cancer. Methods: From January 2005 to May 2008 thirty- six consecutive patients with locally advanced or metastatic morphologically proven stage IIIB/ IV non- small cell lung cancer entered the study after failure of previous platinum- based regimens. Treatment schedule consist of Docetaxel 75 mg/m2 administered every three weeks with repetition after 21 days with Dexamethasone premedication. Results: Overall response rate, median time to progression and median survival was 16,6 %, 4,5 months and 5,6 months respectively. The main hematological toxicity was neutropenia. Conclusions: That data suggest that single agent Docetaxel remain reasonable choices for the chemotherapy in pretreated patients with non- small cell lung cancer.

  16. Tunneling rates in electron transport through double-barrier molecular junctions in a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazin, G V; Wu, S W; Ho, W

    2005-06-21

    The scanning tunneling microscope enables atomic-scale measurements of electron transport through individual molecules. Copper phthalocyanine and magnesium porphine molecules adsorbed on a thin oxide film grown on the NiAl(110) surface were probed. The single-molecule junctions contained two tunneling barriers, vacuum gap, and oxide film. Differential conductance spectroscopy shows that electron transport occurs via vibronic states of the molecules. The intensity of spectral peaks corresponding to the individual vibronic states depends on the relative electron tunneling rates through the two barriers of the junction, as found by varying the vacuum gap tunneling rate by changing the height of the scanning tunneling microscope tip above the molecule. A simple, sequential tunneling model explains the observed trends.

  17. MediSPECT: Single photon emission computed tomography system for small field of view small animal imaging based on a CdTe hybrid pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accorsi, R.; Autiero, M.; Celentano, L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe MediSPECT, a new scanner developed at University and INFN Napoli, for SPECT studies on small animals with a small field of view (FOV) and high spatial resolution. The CdTe pixel detector (a 256x256 matrix of 55 μm square pixels) operating in single photon counting for detection of gamma-rays with low and medium energy (e.g. 125 I, 27-35 keV, 99m Tc, 140 keV), is bump bonded to the Medipix2 readout chip. The FOV of the MediSPECT scanner with a coded aperture mask collimator ranges from 6.3 mm (system spatial resolution 110 μm at 27-35 keV) to 24.3 mm. With a 0.30 mm pinhole the FOV ranges from 2.4 to 29 mm (where the system spatial resolution is 1.0 mm at 27-35 keV and 2.0 mm at 140 keV). MediSPECT will be used for in vivo imaging of small organs or tissue structures in mouse, e.g., brain, thyroid, heart or tumor

  18. Outcome and prognostic factors in single brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhardt, Denise; Koenig, Laila [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, INF 400, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Adeberg, Sebastian; Debus, Juergen [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, INF 400, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Bozorgmehr, Farastuk; Thomas, Michael; Steins, Martin [Heidelberg University, Department of Thoracic Oncology, Thoraxklinik, Translational Lung Research Centre Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Heidelberg (Germany); German Centre for Lung Research (DZL), Translational Lung Research Centre Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Heidelberg (Germany); Opfermann, Nils; Hoerner-Rieber, Juliane; Rieken, Stefan [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, INF 400, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Kappes, Jutta [Heidelberg University, Department of Pneumology, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); Unterberg, Andreas [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Neurosurgery, INF 400, Heidelberg (Germany); Herth, Felix [Heidelberg University, Department of Pneumology, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); German Centre for Lung Research (DZL), Translational Lung Research Centre Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Heidelberg (Germany); Heussel, Claus Peter [German Centre for Lung Research (DZL), Translational Lung Research Centre Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Warth, Arne [German Centre for Lung Research (DZL), Translational Lung Research Centre Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Heidelberg (DE); Heidelberg University, Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg (DE)

    2018-02-15

    Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is historically the standard of care for patients with brain metastases (BM) from small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), although locally ablative treatments are the standard of care for patients with 1-4 BM from other solid tumors. The objective of this analysis was to find prognostic factors influencing overall survival (OS) and intracranial progression-free survival (iPFS) in SCLC patients with single BM (SBM) treated with WBRT. A total of 52 patients were identified in the authors' cancer center database with histologically confirmed SCLC and contrast-enhanced magnet resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT), which confirmed SBM between 2006 and 2015 and were therefore treated with WBRT. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed for OS analyses. The log-rank (Mantel-Cox) test was used to compare survival curves. Univariate Cox proportional-hazards ratios (HRs) were used to assess the influence of cofactors on OS and iPFS. The median OS after WBRT was 5 months and the median iPFS after WBRT 16 months. Patients that received surgery prior to WBRT had a significantly longer median OS of 19 months compared to 5 months in the group receiving only WBRT (p = 0.03; HR 2.24; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06-4.73). Patients with synchronous disease had a significantly longer OS compared to patients with metachronous BM (6 months vs. 3 months, p = 0.005; HR 0.27; 95% CI 0.11-0.68). Univariate analysis for OS revealed a statistically significant effect for metachronous disease (HR 2.25; 95% CI 1.14-4.46; p = 0.019), initial response to first-line chemotherapy (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.35-0.97; p = 0.04), and surgical resection (HR 0.36; 95% CI 0.15-0.88; p = 0.026). OS was significantly affected by metachronous disease in multivariate analysis (HR 2.20; 95% CI 1.09-4.45; p = 0.028). Univariate analysis revealed that surgery followed by WBRT can improve OS in patients with SBM in SCLC. Furthermore, synchronous disease and response

  19. Penetration of a Small Caliber Projectile into Single and Multi-layered Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riad A.M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The normal penetration of armor-piercing projectiles into single and multi-layered steel plates has been investigated. An experimental program has been conducted to study the effect of spaced and in-contact layered targets on their ballistic resistance. Armor piercing projectiles with caliber of 7.62 mm were fired against a series of single and multi-layered steel targets. The projectile impact velocities were ranged from 300-600 m/s, whereas the total thicknesses of the tested single, spaced and in-contact layered steel targets were 3 mm. The penetration process of different tested target configurations has been simulated using Autodayn-2D hydrocode. The experimental measurements of the present work were used to discuss the effect of impact velocity, target configurations and number of layers of different spaced and in-contact layered steel targets on their ballistic resistance. In addition, the post-firing examination of the tested targets over the used impact velocity range showed that the single and each layer of spaced and in-contact laminated steel targets were failed by petalling. Finally, the obtained experimental measurements were compared with the corresponding numerical results of Autodyn-2D hydrocode, good agreement was generally obtained.

  20. Improved functional immobilization of llama single-domain antibody fragments to polystyrene surfaces using small peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, M.M.; Fijten, H.P.D.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of different fusion domains on the functional immobilization of three llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) after passive adsorption to polystyrene in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Three VHHs produced without any fusion domain were efficiently adsorbed to

  1. Production of vertical arrays of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2013-08-13

    A hot filament chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to grow at least one vertical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). In general, various embodiments of the present invention disclose novel processes for growing and/or producing enhanced nanotube carpets with decreased diameters as compared to the prior art.

  2. Manipulation of magnetic Skyrmions with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Wieser, R.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of a single magnetic Skyrmion in an atomic spin system under the influence of Scanning Tunneling Microscope is investigated by computer simulations solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. Two possible scenarios are described: manipulation with aid of a spin-polarized tunneling current and by an electric field created by the scanning tunneling microscope. The dynamics during the creation and annihilation process is studied and the possibility to move single Skyrmions is showed.

  3. Prognostic factors in primary adenocarcinoma of the small intestine: 13-year single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel is a relatively rare malignancy as compared to the other malignancies of the gastrointestinal tract. Nonspecific presentation and infrequent occurrence often leads to a delay in diagnosis and consequent poor prognosis. Various other factors are of prognostic importance while managing these tumors. Methods The medical records of a total of 27 patients treated for adenocarcinoma of the small bowel at Providence Hospital and Medical Centers from year 1990 through 2003 were reviewed retrospectively. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 10.0; SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL. Survival analyses were calculated using the Kaplan Meier method with the log rank test to assess the statistical significance. The socio-demographics (age, gender were calculated using frequency analyses. Results The patients included nine males and eighteen females with a median age at diagnosis of 62 years. Only 48% of the patients had an accurate preoperative diagnosis while another 33% had a diagnosis suspicious of small bowel malignancy. None of the patients presented in stage 1. The cumulative five-year survival was 30% while the median survival was 3.3 years. There was no 30-day mortality in the postoperative period in our series. Conclusion The univariate analysis demonstrated that tumor grade, stage at presentation, lymph nodal metastasis and resection margins were significant predictors of survival.

  4. Single-row versus double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in small- to medium-sized tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Nuri; Kocaoglu, Baris; Guven, Osman

    2010-07-01

    Double-row rotator cuff repair leads to superior cuff integrity and clinical results compared with single-row repair. The study enrolled 68 patients with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear who were divided into 2 groups of 34 patients according to repair technique. The patients were followed-up for at least 2 years. The results were evaluated by Constant score. Despite the biomechanical studies and cadaver studies that proved the superiority of double-row fixation over single-row fixation, our clinical results show no difference in functional outcome between the two methods. It is evident that double-row repair is more technically demanding, expensive, and time-consuming than single-row repair, without providing a significant improvement in clinical results. Comparison between groups did not show significant differences. At the final follow-up, the Constant score was 82.2 in the single-row group and 78.8 in the double-row group. Functional outcome was improved in both groups after surgery, but the difference between the 2 groups was not significant. At long-term follow-up, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with the double-row technique showed no significant difference in clinical outcome compared with single-row repair in small to medium tears. 2010 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A toy model for single field open inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaudrevange, Pascal M.; Westphal, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    Inflation in an open universe produced by Coleman-De Luccia (CDL) tunneling induces a friction term that is strong enough to allow for successful small-field inflation in models that would otherwise suffer from a severe overshoot problem. In this paper, we present a polynomial scalar potential which allows for a full analysis. This provides a simple model of single-field open inflation on a small-field inflection point after tunneling. We present numerical results and compare them with analytic approximations.

  6. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in small cell lung cancer: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, J; Kehoe, M; Sasiadek, W; Hacking, D; Calvert, P

    2014-03-01

    Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is used to prevent the development of brain metastases in small cell lung carcinoma. PCI confers an overall survival (OS) benefit in both limited and extensive stage disease. We analyze the incidence of symptomatic brain metastases, progression-free survival (PFS) and OS in a cohort of patients who received PCI, in a 5-year period. A retrospective review of all patients who had received PCI between 2006 and 2011 at the Whitfield Clinic was completed. Patient- and disease-related characteristics, the number of patients who developed brain metastases, PFS and OS data were collected. 24 patients were identified. 14 (58.3 %) patients were male, 10 (41.7 %) were female, with a mean age of 62.5 years (range 31-78). All patients were smokers. 12 (50 %) patients had limited stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC), 12 (50 %) had extensive stage disease. 2 (8.2 %) patients developed brain metastases post PCI (p = 0.478.) The median PFS for limited stage SCLC was 13 months (range 3-20) and 10 months (range 5-18) for extensive stage SCLC. Median OS was 15 months (range 4-29) in limited stage SCLC, and 11 months (range 5-29) in extensive stage SCLC. Our study demonstrated a low incidence of symptomatic brain metastases and favourable median PFS and OS in the patients that received PCI, when compared to published phase III data.

  7. Effect of small-molecule modification on single-cell pharmacokinetics of PARP inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M; Reiner, Thomas; Yang, Katherine S; Kohler, Rainer H; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-04-01

    The heterogeneous delivery of drugs in tumors is an established process contributing to variability in treatment outcome. Despite the general acceptance of variable delivery, the study of the underlying causes is challenging, given the complex tumor microenvironment including intra- and intertumor heterogeneity. The difficulty in studying this distribution is even more significant for small-molecule drugs where radiolabeled compounds or mass spectrometry detection lack the spatial and temporal resolution required to quantify the kinetics of drug distribution in vivo. In this work, we take advantage of the synthesis of fluorescent drug conjugates that retain their target binding but are designed with different physiochemical and thus pharmacokinetic properties. Using these probes, we followed the drug distribution in cell culture and tumor xenografts with temporal resolution of seconds and subcellular spatial resolution. These measurements, including in vivo permeability of small-molecule drugs, can be used directly in predictive pharmacokinetic models for the design of therapeutics and companion imaging agents as demonstrated by a finite element model.

  8. Effect of Small Molecule Modification on Single Cell Pharmacokinetics of PARP Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M.; Reiner, Thomas; Yang, Katherine S; Kohler, Rainer; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The heterogeneous delivery of drugs in tumors is an established process contributing to variability in treatment outcome. Despite the general acceptance of variable delivery, the study of the underlying causes is challenging given the complex tumor microenvironment including intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity. The difficulty in studying this distribution is even more significant for small molecule drugs where radiolabeled compounds or mass spectrometry detection lack the spatial and temporal resolution required to quantify the kinetics of drug distribution in vivo. In this work, we take advantage of the synthesis of fluorescent drug conjugates that retain their target binding but are designed with different physiochemical and thus pharmacokinetic properties. Using these probes, we followed the drug distribution in cell culture and tumor xenografts with temporal resolution of seconds and subcellular spatial resolution. These measurements, including in vivo permeability of small molecule drugs, can be used directly in predictive pharmacokinetic models for the design of therapeutics and companion imaging agents as demonstrated by a finite element model. PMID:24552776

  9. Strong quasi-particle tunneling study in the paired quantum Hall states

    OpenAIRE

    Nomura, Kentaro; Yoshioka, Daijiro

    2001-01-01

    The quasi-particle tunneling phenomena in the paired fractional quantum Hall states are studied. A single point-contact system is first considered. Because of relevancy of the quasi-particle tunneling term, the strong tunneling regime should be investigated. Using the instanton method it is shown that the strong quasi-particle tunneling regime is described as the weak electron tunneling regime effectively. Expanding to the network model the paired quantum Hall liquid to insulator transition i...

  10. Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is a continuous flow wind-tunnel facility capable of speeds up to Mach 1.2 at stagnation pressures up to one atmosphere. The TDT...

  11. Quantum theory of tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Razavy, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    In this revised and expanded edition, in addition to a comprehensible introduction to the theoretical foundations of quantum tunneling based on different methods of formulating and solving tunneling problems, different semiclassical approximations for multidimensional systems are presented. Particular attention is given to the tunneling of composite systems, with examples taken from molecular tunneling and also from nuclear reactions. The interesting and puzzling features of tunneling times are given extensive coverage, and the possibility of measurement of these times with quantum clocks are critically examined. In addition by considering the analogy between evanescent waves in waveguides and in quantum tunneling, the times related to electromagnetic wave propagation have been used to explain certain aspects of quantum tunneling times. These topics are treated in both non-relativistic as well as relativistic regimes. Finally, a large number of examples of tunneling in atomic, molecular, condensed matter and ...

  12. Road and Railroad Tunnels

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Tunnels in the United States According to the HSIP Tiger Team Report, a tunnel is defined as a linear underground passageway open at both ends. This dataset is based...

  13. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  14. Scanning Tunneling Microscope For Use In Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Phillip B.

    1993-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope with subangstrom resolution developed to study surface structures. Although instrument used in air, designed especially for use in vacuum. Scanning head is assembly of small, mostly rigid components made of low-outgassing materials. Includes coarse-positioning mechanical-translation stage, on which specimen mounted by use of standard mounting stub. Tunneling tip mounted on piezoelectric fine-positioning tube. Application of suitable voltages to electrodes on piezoelectric tube controls scan of tunneling tip across surface of specimen. Electronic subsystem generates scanning voltages and collects data.

  15. Hard rock tunneling using pulsed electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.T.; Brekke, T.L.; Finnie, I.

    1974-01-01

    Intense submicrosecond bursts of energetic electrons cause significant pulverization and surface spalling of a variety of rock types, the spall debris generally consisting of sand, dust, and small flakes. If carried out at rapid repetition rate this can lead to a promising technique for increasing the speed and reducing the cost of underground excavation of tunnels, mines, and storage spaces. The conceptual design features of a Pulsed Electron Tunnel Excavator capable of tunneling approximately ten times faster than conventional drill/blast methods were studied. (auth)

  16. Integrated tunneling sensor for nanoelectromechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadewasser, S.; Abadal, G.; Barniol, N.

    2006-01-01

    Transducers based on quantum mechanical tunneling provide an extremely sensitive sensor principle, especially for nanoelectromechanical systems. For proper operation a gap between the electrodes of below 1 nm is essential, requiring the use of structures with a mobile electrode. At such small...... distances, attractive van der Waals and capillary forces become sizable, possibly resulting in snap-in of the electrodes. The authors present a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of the interplay between the involved forces and identify requirements for the design of tunneling sensors. Based...... on this analysis, a tunneling sensor is fabricated by Si micromachining technology and its proper operation is demonstrated. (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics....

  17. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    José Santander, María, E-mail: maria.jose.noemi@gmail.com [Recursos Educativos Quántica, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile and CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Nunez, Alvaro S., E-mail: alnunez@dfi.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487-3, Santiago (Chile); Roldán-Molina, A. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Avenida Universidad 330, Curauma, Valparaíso (Chile); Troncoso, Roberto E., E-mail: r.troncoso.c@gmail.com [Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago 9170124 (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avenida España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-12-15

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation.

  18. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    José Santander, María; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Roldán-Molina, A.; Troncoso, Roberto E.

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation

  19. Modification of Pawlow's thermodynamical model for the melting of small single-component particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barybin, Anatoly; Shapovalov, Victor

    2011-02-01

    A new approach to the melting of small particles is proposed to modify the known Pawlow's model by taking into account the transfer of material from solid spherical particles to liquid ones through a gas phase. Thermodynamical analysis gives rise to a differential equation for the melting point Tm involving such size-dependent and temperature-dependent parameters of a material as the surface tensions σs(l ), molar heat of fusion ΔHm and molar volumes vs(l ). Solution of this equation has shown that all the limiting cases for size-independent situations coincide with results known in the literature and our analysis of size-dependent situations gives results close to the experimental data previously obtained by other authors for some metallic particles.

  20. Single-Molecule View of Small RNA-Guided Target Search and Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globyte, Viktorija; Kim, Sung Hyun; Joo, Chirlmin

    2018-05-20

    Most everyday processes in life involve a necessity for an entity to locate its target. On a cellular level, many proteins have to find their target to perform their function. From gene-expression regulation to DNA repair to host defense, numerous nucleic acid-interacting proteins use distinct target search mechanisms. Several proteins achieve that with the help of short RNA strands known as guides. This review focuses on single-molecule advances studying the target search and recognition mechanism of Argonaute and CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) systems. We discuss different steps involved in search and recognition, from the initial complex prearrangement into the target-search competent state to the final proofreading steps. We focus on target search mechanisms that range from weak interactions, to one- and three-dimensional diffusion, to conformational proofreading. We compare the mechanisms of Argonaute and CRISPR with a well-studied target search system, RecA.

  1. On the scavenging of SO2 by large and small rain drops. 5. A wind tunnel and theoretical study of the desorption of SO2 from water drops containing S(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, S.K.; Hannemann, A.U.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study has been carried out to investigate the fate of desorption of SO 2 from water drops falling at terminal velocity in air. The experiments were carried out in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel in which water drops of various sizes containing S(IV) in various concentrations were freely suspended in the vertical airstream of the tunnel. The results were compared with the predictions of theoretical models, and with the experiments of Walcek et al. This comparison shows that the predictions of the diffusion model of Kronig and Brink in the formulation given by Walcek and Pruppacher agree well with the experimental results. In contrast, the predictions of the diffusion model which assumes complete internal mixing inside a drop agrees with the experimental results only if the concentration of S(IV) inside the drop is less than that equivalent of an equilibrium SO 2 concentration of 15 ppbv. At larger concentrations, the theoretical predictions of the model for complete internal mixing progressively deviate from the experimental results. It is further shown that Barrie's double film model can be used to interpret the resistance to diffusion inside a drop in terms of a diffusion boundary layer inside the drop which increases in thickness with decreasing concentration of S(IV). Applying our results to the desorption of SO 2 from small and large rain drops falling below an assumed cloud base, shows that for typical contents of S(IV) inside the drops substantial amounts of SO 2 will desorb from these drops unless H 2 O 2 is present in the surrounding air

  2. Electroluminescence from graphene excited by electron tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams, Ryan; Bharadwaj, Palash; Novotny, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    We use low-energy electron tunneling to excite electroluminescence in single layer graphene. Electrons are injected locally using a scanning tunneling microscope and the luminescence is analyzed using a wide-angle optical imaging system. The luminescence can be switched on and off by inverting the tip–sample bias voltage. The observed luminescence is explained in terms of a hot luminescence mechanism. (paper)

  3. Does flexible tunnel drilling affect the femoral tunnel angle measurement after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bart; Hofbauer, Marcus; Atte, Akere; van Dijk, C Niek; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-12-01

    To quantify the mean difference in femoral tunnel angle (FTA) as measured on knee radiographs between rigid and flexible tunnel drilling after anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Fifty consecutive patients that underwent primary anatomic ACL reconstruction with a single femoral tunnel drilled with a flexible reamer were included in this study. The control group was comprised of 50 patients all of who underwent primary anatomic ACL reconstruction with a single femoral tunnel drilled with a rigid reamer. All femoral tunnels were drilled through a medial portal to ensure anatomic tunnel placement. The FTA was determined from post-operative anterior-to-posterior (AP) radiographs by two independent observers. A 5° difference between the two mean FTA was considered clinically significant. The average FTA, when drilled with a rigid reamer, was 42.0° ± 7.2°. Drilling with a flexible reamer resulted in a mean FTA of 44.7° ± 7.0°. The mean difference of 2.7° was not statistically significant. The intraclass correlation coefficient for inter-tester reliability was 0.895. The FTA can be reliably determined from post-operative AP radiographs and provides a useful and reproducible metric for characterizing femoral tunnel position after both rigid and flexible femoral tunnel drilling. This has implications for post-operative evaluation and preoperative treatment planning for ACL revision surgery. IV.

  4. Experimental investigation of single small bubble motion in linear shear flow in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhongchun; Zhao, Yang; Song, Xiaoming; Yu, Hongxing; Jiang, Shengyao; Ishii, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The bubble motion in simple linear shear flow was experimentally investigated. • The bubble trajectories, bubble velocity and drag and lift force were obtained using image process routine. • The bubble trajectory was coupled with a zigzag motion and incline path. • The lift force was kept negative and it decreased when bubble diameter and shear flow magnitude increased. - Abstract: The motion of small bubble in a simple shear flow in water was experimental studied. Stable shear flow with low turbulence level was achieved with curved screen and measured using LDV. The bubbles were captured by high speed camera and the captured images were processed with digital image routine. The bubble was released from a capillary tube. The instantaneous bubble position, bubble velocity and forces were obtained based on the captured parameters. The quasi-steady lift coefficient was determined by the linear fitting of the bubble trajectory of several cycles. The results indicated that the lateral migration was coupled with the zigzag motion of bubble in the present experiment. The bubble migrated to the left side and its quasi-steady lift coefficient was negative. Good repeatable results were observed by measurements of 18 bubbles. The bubble motion in shear flow in water was first experimental studied and negative lift force was observed in the present study condition. The lift coefficient decreased when shear stress magnitude or bubble diameter increased in the present experiment condition.

  5. Cytokine single-nucleotide polymorphisms and risk of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ramírez, Cristina; Alnatsha, Ahmed; Cañadas-Garre, Marisa; Villar, Eduardo; Valdivia-Bautista, Javier; Faus-Dáder, María J; Calleja-Hernández, Miguel Á

    2017-12-01

    Lung cancer, particularly the non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) subtype, is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Several functional polymorphisms in inflammatory cytokine genes, such as IL1B, IL6, IL12A, IL13 and IL16, have been associated with the risk of NSCLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between ILs gene polymorphisms and the risk of developing NSCLC. A retrospective case-control study was carried out, including 174 NSCLC cases and 298 controls of Spanish origin. IL1B (rs1143634), IL1B (rs12621220), IL1B (rs1143623), IL1B (rs16944), IL1B (rs1143627), IL12A (rs662959), IL13 (rs1881457), IL6 (rs1800795) and IL16 (rs7170924) gene polymorphisms were analysed by TaqMan. The genotypic logistic regression model adjusted by smoking status showed that the IL1B rs1143634-TT genotype was associated with a lower risk of NSCLC (P=0.04312; odds ratio=0.226; 95% confidence interval=0.044-0.840). No other gene polymorphisms showed an association with NSCLC in any of the models tested. In conclusion, IL1B rs1143634 was significantly associated with a higher risk of NSCLC. No influence of IL1B rs12621220, rs1143623, rs16944, rs1143627, IL12A rs662959, IL13 rs1881457 and IL16 rs7170924 on the risk of developing NSCLC was found in our study.

  6. Assignment of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates to clonal complexes using a small set of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsa, Erin; Fricke, Thomas; Stephens, Alex J; Ko, Danny; Kong, Fanrong; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Huygens, Flavia; Giffard, Philip M

    2008-08-19

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus (GBS)) is an important human pathogen, particularly of newborns. Emerging evidence for a relationship between genotype and virulence has accentuated the need for efficient and well-defined typing methods. The objective of this study was to develop a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based method for assigning GBS isolates to multilocus sequence typing (MLST)-defined clonal complexes. It was found that a SNP set derived from the MLST database on the basis of maximization of Simpsons Index of Diversity provided poor resolution and did not define groups concordant with the population structure as defined by eBURST analysis of the MLST database. This was interpreted as being a consequence of low diversity and high frequency horizontal gene transfer. Accordingly, a different approach to SNP identification was developed. This entailed use of the "Not-N" bioinformatic algorithm that identifies SNPs diagnostic for groups of known sequence variants, together with an empirical process of SNP testing. This yielded a four member SNP set that divides GBS into 10 groups that are concordant with the population structure. A fifth SNP was identified that increased the sensitivity for the clinically significant clonal complex 17 to 100%. Kinetic PCR methods for the interrogation of these SNPs were developed, and used to genotype 116 well characterized isolates. A five SNP method for dividing GBS into biologically valid groups has been developed. These SNPs are ideal for high throughput surveillance activities, and combining with more rapidly evolving loci when additional resolution is required.

  7. Live visualizations of single isolated tubulin protein self-assembly via tunneling current: effect of electromagnetic pumping during spontaneous growth of microtubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Satyajit; Ghosh, Subrata; Fujita, Daisuke; Bandyopadhyay, Anirban

    2014-12-03

    As we bring tubulin protein molecules one by one into the vicinity, they self-assemble and entire event we capture live via quantum tunneling. We observe how these molecules form a linear chain and then chains self-assemble into 2D sheet, an essential for microtubule, --fundamental nano-tube in a cellular life form. Even without using GTP, or any chemical reaction, but applying particular ac signal using specially designed antenna around atomic sharp tip we could carry out the self-assembly, however, if there is no electromagnetic pumping, no self-assembly is observed. In order to verify this atomic scale observation, we have built an artificial cell-like environment with nano-scale engineering and repeated spontaneous growth of tubulin protein to its complex with and without electromagnetic signal. We used 64 combinations of plant, animal and fungi tubulins and several doping molecules used as drug, and repeatedly observed that the long reported common frequency region where protein folds mechanically and its structures vibrate electromagnetically. Under pumping, the growth process exhibits a unique organized behavior unprecedented otherwise. Thus, "common frequency point" is proposed as a tool to regulate protein complex related diseases in the future.

  8. Comparative Performance in Single-Port Versus Multiport Minimally Invasive Surgery, and Small Versus Large Operative Working Spaces: A Preclinical Randomized Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Hani J; Seneci, Carlo A; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Cundy, Thomas P; Nandi, Dipankar; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara

    2016-04-01

    Surgical approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery, which utilize small operative working spaces, and are necessarily single-port, are particularly demanding with standard instruments and have not been widely adopted. The aim of this study was to compare simultaneously surgical performance in single-port versus multiport approaches, and small versus large working spaces. Ten novice, 4 intermediate, and 1 expert surgeons were recruited from a university hospital. A preclinical randomized crossover study design was implemented, comparing performance under the following conditions: (1) multiport approach and large working space, (2) multiport approach and intermediate working space, (3) single-port approach and large working space, (4) single-port approach and intermediate working space, and (5) single-port approach and small working space. In each case, participants performed a peg transfer and pattern cutting tasks, and each task repetition was scored. Intermediate and expert surgeons performed significantly better than novices in all conditions (P Performance in single-port surgery was significantly worse than multiport surgery (P performance in the intermediate versus large working space. In single-port surgery, there was a converse trend; performances in the intermediate and small working spaces were significantly better than in the large working space. Single-port approaches were significantly more technically challenging than multiport approaches, possibly reflecting loss of instrument triangulation. Surprisingly, in single-port approaches, in which triangulation was no longer a factor, performance in large working spaces was worse than in intermediate and small working spaces. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. New experimental model for single liver lobe hyperthermia in small animals using non-directional microwaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionuț Tudorancea

    Full Text Available Our aim was to develop a new experimental model for in vivo hyperthermia using non-directional microwaves, applicable to small experimental animals. We present an affordable approach for targeted microwave heat delivery to an isolated liver lobe in rat, which allows rapid, precise and stable tissue temperature control.A new experimental model is proposed. We used a commercial available magnetron generating 2450 MHz, with 4.4V and 14A in the filament and 4500V anodic voltage. Modifications were required in order to adjust tissue heating such as to prevent overheating and to allow for fine adjustments according to real-time target temperature. The heating is controlled using a virtual instrument application implemented in LabView® and responds to 0.1° C variations in the target. Ten healthy adult male Wistar rats, weighing 250-270 g were used in this study. The middle liver lobe was the target for controlled heating, while the rest of the living animal was protected.In vivo microwave delivery using our experimental setting is safe for the animals. Target tissue temperature rises from 30°C to 40°C with 3.375°C / second (R2 = 0.9551, while the increment is lower it the next two intervals (40-42°C and 42-44°C with 0.291°C/ s (R2 = 0.9337 and 0.136°C/ s (R2 = 0.7894 respectively, when testing in sequences. After reaching the desired temperature, controlled microwave delivery insures a very stable temperature during the experiments.We have developed an inexpensive and easy to manufacture system for targeted hyperthermia using non-directional microwave radiation. This system allows for fine and stable temperature adjustments within the target tissue and is ideal for experimental models testing below or above threshold hyperthermia.

  10. Safety assessment of a new single-use small-incision injector for intraocular lens implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satanovsky, Alexandra; Ben-Eliahu, Shmuel; Apple, David J; Kleinmann, Guy

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate the safety of a new injector, the Raysert R-INJ-04/18, for implantation of the C-flex intraocular lens (IOL). Ophthalmology Department, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot, Israel. Experimental study. Sixty IOLs were subdivided into 2 equally sized groups. Group A IOLs were injected using the established R-INJ-04 injector, and those in Group B were injected with the new injector. The IOLs were injected into a Petri dish. Subsequently, all IOLs and injectors were evaluated macroscopically and microscopically and then photographed under light microscopy (LM). Two IOLs in each group were randomly chosen and sent for evaluation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of x-ray. All remaining IOLs were sent for power and modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. All Group B IOLs were successfully injected without evident signs of scratching, cracks, or deposits on LM and SEM examination. In Group A, findings were confined to a singular incidence of a small deposit detected on the periphery of the posterior optical surface of the IOL, with corresponding findings detected on the injector nozzle. No signs of scratching, cracks, or deposits were found in the rest of the IOLs or injectors. The power and MTF analyses were within the normal range for all IOLs. The new 1.8 mm external diameter soft-tipped injector for 2.4 to 2.2 mm incisions was shown to be safe for the implantation of the C-flex 21.0 diopter IOL. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Assignment of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates to clonal complexes using a small set of single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Gwendolyn L

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus (GBS is an important human pathogen, particularly of newborns. Emerging evidence for a relationship between genotype and virulence has accentuated the need for efficient and well-defined typing methods. The objective of this study was to develop a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP based method for assigning GBS isolates to multilocus sequence typing (MLST-defined clonal complexes. Results It was found that a SNP set derived from the MLST database on the basis of maximisation of Simpsons Index of Diversity provided poor resolution and did not define groups concordant with the population structure as defined by eBURST analysis of the MLST database. This was interpreted as being a consequence of low diversity and high frequency horizontal gene transfer. Accordingly, a different approach to SNP identification was developed. This entailed use of the "Not-N" bioinformatic algorithm that identifies SNPs diagnostic for groups of known sequence variants, together with an empirical process of SNP testing. This yielded a four member SNP set that divides GBS into 10 groups that are concordant with the population structure. A fifth SNP was identified that increased the sensitivity for the clinically significant clonal complex 17 to 100%. Kinetic PCR methods for the interrogation of these SNPs were developed, and used to genotype 116 well characterized isolates. Conclusion A five SNP method for dividing GBS into biologically valid groups has been developed. These SNPs are ideal for high throughput surveillance activities, and combining with more rapidly evolving loci when additional resolution is required.

  12. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  13. Proton tunneling in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-01-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  14. Output voltage calculations in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with asymmetric voltage behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Mryasov, Oleg; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the asymmetric voltage behavior (AVB) of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) for single and double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) in range of a quasi-classical free electron model. Numerical calculations of the TMR

  15. First-line single agent treatment with gefitinib in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yong-Qian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is a malignant carcinoma which has the highest morbidity and mortality in Chinese population. Gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase (TK inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, displays anti-tumor activity. The present data regarding first-line treatment with single agent gefitinib against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC in Chinese population are not sufficient. Purpose To assess the efficacy and toxicity of gefitinib in Chinese patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, a study of single agent treatment with gefitinib in Chinese patients was conducted. Methods 45 patients with advanced NSCLC were treated with gefitinib (250 mg daily until the disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Results Among the 45 patients, 15 patients achieved partial response (PR, 17 patients experienced stable disease (SD, and 13 patients developed progression disease (PD. None of the patients achieved complete response (CR. The tumor response rate and disease control rate was 33% and 71.1%, respectively. Symptom remission rate was 72.5%, and median remission time was 8 days. Median overall survival and median progression-free survival was 15.3 months and 6.0 months, respectively. The main induced toxicities by gefitinib were skin rash and diarrhea (53.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The minor induced toxicities included dehydration and pruritus of skin (26.7% and 22.2%, respectively. In addition, hepatic toxicity and oral ulceration occurred in few patients (6.7% and 4.4%2, respectively. Conclusions Single agent treatment with gefitinib is effective and well tolerated in Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC.

  16. Clinical significance and predictive factors of early massive recurrence after radiofrequency ablation in patients with a single small hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Yeon Cho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims Radiofrequency ablation (RFA is one of the most frequently applied curative treatments in patients with a single small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However, the clinical significance of and risk factors for early massive recurrence after RFA—a dreadful event limiting further curative treatment—have not been fully evaluated. Methods In total, 438 patients with a single HCC of size ≤3 cm who underwent percutaneous RFA as an initial treatment between 2006 and 2009 were included. Baseline patient characteristics, overall survival, predictive factors, and recurrence after RFA were evaluated. In addition, the incidence, impact on survival, and predictive factors of early massive recurrence, and initial recurrence beyond the Milan criteria within 2 years were also investigated. Results During the median follow-up of 68.4 months, recurrent HCC was confirmed in 302 (68.9% patients, with early massive recurrence in 27 patients (6.2%. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 95.4%, 84.7%, and 81.8%, respectively, in patients with no recurrence, 99.6%, 86.4%, and 70.1% in patients with recurrence within the Milan criteria or late recurrence, and 92.6%, 46.5%, and 0.05% in patients with early massive recurrence. Multivariable analysis identified older age, Child-Pugh score B or C, and early massive recurrence as predictive of poor overall survival. A tumor size of ≥2 cm and tumor location adjacent to the colon were independent risk factors predictive of early massive recurrence. Conclusions Early massive recurrence is independently predictive of poor overall survival after RFA in patients with a single small HCC. Tumors sized ≥2 cm and located adjacent to the colon appear to be independent risk factors for early massive recurrence.

  17. Single-electron charging effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    The status of our project on single-electron tunneling is, again, excellent. As outlined in our original proposal, a key goal for this project has been the development of a scanning tunneling instrument for the purpose of imaging individual particles and tunneling into these particles at high magnetic fields. Further progress is discussed in this report

  18. Dimensions and Global Twist of Single-Layer DNA Origami Measured by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Matthew A B; Tuckwell, Andrew J; Berengut, Jonathan F; Bath, Jonathan; Benn, Florence; Duff, Anthony P; Whitten, Andrew E; Dunn, Katherine E; Hynson, Robert M; Turberfield, Andrew J; Lee, Lawrence K

    2018-06-04

    The rational design of complementary DNA sequences can be used to create nanostructures that self-assemble with nanometer precision. DNA nanostructures have been imaged by atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) provides complementary structural information on the ensemble-averaged state of DNA nanostructures in solution. Here we demonstrate that SAXS can distinguish between different single-layer DNA origami tiles that look identical when immobilized on a mica surface and imaged with atomic force microscopy. We use SAXS to quantify the magnitude of global twist of DNA origami tiles with different crossover periodicities: these measurements highlight the extreme structural sensitivity of single-layer origami to the location of strand crossovers. We also use SAXS to quantify the distance between pairs of gold nanoparticles tethered to specific locations on a DNA origami tile and use this method to measure the overall dimensions and geometry of the DNA nanostructure in solution. Finally, we use indirect Fourier methods, which have long been used for the interpretation of SAXS data from biomolecules, to measure the distance between DNA helix pairs in a DNA origami nanotube. Together, these results provide important methodological advances in the use of SAXS to analyze DNA nanostructures in solution and insights into the structures of single-layer DNA origami.

  19. Model of tunnelling through periodic array of quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meynster Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several explicitly solvable models of electron tunnelling in a system of single and double two-dimensional periodic arrays of quantum dots with two laterally coupled leads in a homogeneous magnetic field are constructed. First, a model of single layer formed by periodic array of zero-range potentials is described. The Landau operator (the Schrodinger operator with a magnetic field with point-like interactions is the system Hamiltonian. We deal with two types of the layer lattices: square and honeycomb. The periodicity condition gives one an invariance property for the Hamiltonian in respect to magnetic translations group. The consideration of double quantum layer reduces to the replacement of the basic cell for the single layer by a cell including centers of different layers. Two variants of themodel for the double layer are suggested: with direct tunneling between the layers and with the connecting channels (segments in the model between the layers. The theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators is a mathematical background of the model. The third stage of the construction is the description of leads connection. It is made by the operator extensions theory method too. Electron tunneling from input lead to the output lead through the double quantum layer is described. Energy ranges with extremely small (practically, zero transmission were found. Dependencies of the transmission coefficient (particularly, “zero transmission bands” positions on the magnetic field, the energy of electron and the distance between layers are investigated. The results are compared with the corresponding single-layer transmission.

  20. Flow instability and turbulence - ONERA water tunnel visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, H.

    The experimental technique used for visualizing laminar-turbulent transition phenomena, developed in previous tests in ONERA's small TH1 water tunnel, has been successfully applied in the new TH2 tunnel. With its very extensive Reynold's number domain (10 to the 4th - 10 to the 6th), this tunnel has shown itself to be well adapted to the study of turbulence and of the flow instabilities related to its appearance.

  1. A Vision in Aeronautics: The K-12 Wind Tunnel Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A Vision in Aeronautics, a project within the NASA Lewis Research Center's Information Infrastructure Technologies and Applications (IITA) K-12 Program, employs small-scale, subsonic wind tunnels to inspire students to explore the world of aeronautics and computers. Recently, two educational K-12 wind tunnels were built in the Cleveland area. During the 1995-1996 school year, preliminary testing occurred in both tunnels.

  2. The comparison between limited open carpal tunnel release using direct vision and tunneling technique and standard open carpal tunnel release: a randomized controlled trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppaphol, Sorasak; Worathanarat, Patarawan; Kawinwongkovit, Viroj; Pittayawutwinit, Preecha

    2012-04-01

    To compare the operative outcome of carpal tunnel release between limited open carpal tunnel release using direct vision and tunneling technique (group A) with standard open carpal tunnel release (group B). Twenty-eight patients were enrolled in the present study. A single blind randomized control trial study was conducted to compare the postoperative results between group A and B. The study parameters were Levine's symptom severity and functional score, grip and pinch strength, and average two-point discrimination. The postoperative results between two groups were comparable with no statistical significance. Only grip strength at three months follow up was significantly greater in group A than in group B. The limited open carpal tunnel release in the present study is effective comparable to the standard open carpal tunnel release. The others advantage of this technique are better cosmesis and improvement in grip strength at the three months postoperative period.

  3. Tunnel magnetoresistance in double spin filter junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffarzadeh, Alireza

    2003-01-01

    We consider a new type of magnetic tunnel junction, which consists of two ferromagnetic tunnel barriers acting as spin filters (SFs), separated by a nonmagnetic metal (NM) layer. Using the transfer matrix method and the free-electron approximation, the dependence of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) on the thickness of the central NM layer, bias voltage and temperature in the double SF junction are studied theoretically. It is shown that the TMR and electron-spin polarization in this structure can reach very large values under suitable conditions. The highest value of the TMR can reach 99%. By an appropriate choice of the thickness of the central NM layer, the degree of spin polarization in this structure will be higher than that of the single SF junctions. These results may be useful in designing future spin-polarized tunnelling devices

  4. Thermodynamics of phonon-modulated tunneling centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junker, W.; Wagner, M.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years tunneling centers have frequently been used to explain the unusual thermodynamic properties of disordered materials; in these approaches, however, the effect of the tunneling-phonon interaction is neglected. The present study considers the archetype model of phono-assisted tunneling, which is well known from other areas of tunneling physics (quantum diffusion, etc.). It is shown that the full thermodynamic information can be rigorously extracted from a single Green function. An extended factorization procedure beyond Hartree-Fock is introduced, which is checked by sum rules as well as by exact Goldberger-Adams expansions. The phonon-modulated internal energy and specific heat are calculated for different power-law coupling setups

  5. A vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel tests and its application in pollutant dispersion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromke, Christof

    2011-01-01

    A new vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel investigations was developed. The modeling concept is based on fluid dynamical similarity aspects and allows the small-scale modeling of various kinds of vegetation, e.g. field crops, shrubs, hedges, single trees and forest stands. The applicability of the modeling concept was validated in wind tunnel pollutant dispersion studies. Avenue trees in urban street canyons were modeled and their implications on traffic pollutant dispersion were investigated. The dispersion experiments proved the modeling concept to be practicable for wind tunnel studies and suggested to provide reliable concentration results. Unfavorable effects of trees on pollutant dispersion and natural ventilation in street canyons were revealed. Increased traffic pollutant concentrations were found in comparison to the tree-free reference case. - Highlights: → A concept for aerodynamic modelling of vegetation in small scale wind tunnel studies is presented. → The concept was applied to study pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons with avenue tress. → The wind tunnel studies show that modelling the aerodynamic effects of vegetation is important. → Avenue trees give rise to increased pollutant concentrations in urban street canyons. - Avenue trees in urban street canyons affect the pollutant dispersion and result in increased traffic exhaust concentrations.

  6. Automatic control of cryogenic wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishna, S.

    1989-01-01

    Inadequate Reynolds number similarity in testing of scaled models affects the quality of aerodynamic data from wind tunnels. This is due to scale effects of boundary-layer shock wave interaction which is likely to be severe at transonic speeds. The idea of operation of wind tunnels using test gas cooled to cryogenic temperatures has yielded a quantrum jump in the ability to realize full scale Reynolds number flow similarity in small transonic tunnels. In such tunnels, the basic flow control problem consists of obtaining and maintaining the desired test section flow parameters. Mach number, Reynolds number, and dynamic pressure are the three flow parameters that are usually required to be kept constant during the period of model aerodynamic data acquisition. The series of activity involved in modeling, control law development, mechanization of the control laws on a microcomputer, and the performance of a globally stable automatic control system for the 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) are discussed. A lumped multi-variable nonlinear dynamic model of the cryogenic tunnel, generation of a set of linear control laws for small perturbation, and nonlinear control strategy for large set point changes including tunnel trajectory control are described. The details of mechanization of the control laws on a 16 bit microcomputer system, the software features, operator interface, the display and safety are discussed. The controller is shown to provide globally stable and reliable temperature control to + or - 0.2 K, pressure to + or - 0.07 psi and Mach number to + or - 0.002 of the set point value. This performance is obtained both during large set point commands as for a tunnel cooldown, and during aerodynamic data acquisition with intrusive activity like geometrical changes in the test section such as angle of attack changes, drag rake movements, wall adaptation and sidewall boundary-layer removal. Feasibility of the use of an automatic Reynolds number control mode with

  7. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-11-09

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance of small diameter semiconducting Si nanowires attached to ferromagnetic Fe electrodes, using first principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green\\'s functions method for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we systematically study the spin transport properties for neutral nanowires and both n and p doping conditions. We find a substantial low bias magnetoresistance for the neutral case, which halves for an applied voltage of about 0.35 V and persists up to 1 V. Doping in general decreases the magnetoresistance, as soon as the conductance is no longer dominated by tunneling.

  8. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  9. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.; Hanafy, Sherif M.; Huang, Yunsong

    2012-01-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  10. Single case design studies in music therapy: resurrecting experimental evidence in small group and individual music therapy clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Kamile; Hitchcock, John H

    2014-01-01

    The profession would benefit from greater and routine generation of causal evidence pertaining to the impact of music therapy interventions on client outcomes. One way to meet this goal is to revisit the use of Single Case Designs (SCDs) in clinical practice and research endeavors in music therapy. Given the appropriate setting and goals, this design can be accomplished with small sample sizes and it is often appropriate for studying music therapy interventions. In this article, we promote and discuss implementation of SCD studies in music therapy settings, review the meaning of internal study validity and by extension the notion of causality, and describe two of the most commonly used SCDs to demonstrate how they can help generate causal evidence to inform the field. In closing, we describe the need for replication and future meta-analysis of SCD studies completed in music therapy settings. SCD studies are both feasible and appropriate for use in music therapy clinical practice settings, particularly for testing effectiveness of interventions for individuals or small groups. © the American Music Therapy Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A single-supply, high rate, small size and cheap electronic chain for 3He neutron counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boffa, A.; Fazzi, A.; Pirovano, C.; Varoli, V.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes a complete counting chain (charge preamplifier, shaping amplifier and threshold discriminator) devoted to 3 He neutron detectors. Since it is characterized by single supply operation, high counting rate, small size and low cost, it is well suited for high efficiency neutron well detectors where a large number (10 - 100) of counting tubes are used. Such detectors are commonly used for verification of Plutonium stocks. The preamplifier adopts an innovative circuit with the gate of the input JFET floating and a DC feedback loop that stabilizes the output voltage acting on the input cascode second transistor. Static and dynamic analysis, including the effects of the detector bias network, is reported. The shaping amplifier transfer function is a fifth order approximation of the gaussian response. All the complex pole pairs are realized with a single fourth order Voltage Controlled Voltage Source cell thus minimizing component count. Experimental signals and spectra, obtained with shaping time constants in the 1 μs - 100 ns range, are reported and discussed

  12. The spin chirality in MnSi single crystal probed by small angle scattering with polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okorokov, A.I.; Grigoriev, S.V.; Chetverikov, Yu.O.; Georgii, R.; Boeni, P.; Eckerlebe, H.; Pranzas, K.; Roessli, B.

    2004-01-01

    The weak itinerant ferromagnet MnSi orders with a left-handed helical spin structure below T C =29 K. The helicity with a vector m=[S 1 xS 2 ]/S 2 along the crystallographic axis [1 1 1] is realized by an antisymmetric Dzyaloshinski-Moriya interaction. The small angle diffraction study with polarized neutrons on a single MnSi crystal was performed within the temperature range from 10 K to T C and the magnetic field B from 1 to 350 mT. The single crystal was oriented in such a way that two axes [1 1 1] and [1 1 -1] were set in a plane perpendicular to the incident beam. Four major diffraction peaks at ±q 1 and ±q 2 along the axes and four minor peaks at q=±q 1 ±q 2 were observed. The intensity I p =I(+P 0 )+I(-P 0 ), the polarization P p =[I(+P 0 )-I(-P 0 )]/I p and the position q p of the peaks were measured as a function of the temperature and the magnetic field. From intensity of the peaks the chiral critical exponent is obtained as β=0.47±0.04

  13. Extrapulmonary small-cell carcinoma series in a single-institution experience. With a case report of small cell carcinoma in the hypopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monobe, Hiroko; Kagoya, Ryoji; Tojima, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Extrapulmonary small-cell carcinoma (EPSCC) is clinically underrecognized and optimal management remains illusive. Although head and neck EPSCC tends to involve early widespread dissemination and poor prognosis, recently reported favorable outcomes have used concurrent chemoradiotherapy in limited-stage disease. We report an EPSCC case of arising in the hypopharynx successfully treated by induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy. To clarify EPSCC clinically, we retrospectively reviewed clinical courses of all EPSCC records between 1999 and 2008 in a single-institution series. The 14 subjects identified had primary sites at the gastrointestinal tract in 5, uterine cervix in 3, genitourinary system in 2 and at the gallbladder, liver, hypopharynx, and an unidentified primary lymph node in one case each. Of the 14, 2 cases had stage I, 2 cases had stage II, 4 cases had stage III, 5 cases had stage IV in tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification. Stage IV subjects usually underwent platinum-based chemotherapy, to which 25% showed partial response (PR) and 75% progressive disease (PD) with median overall survival (OS) of 114.0 days, or 16 weeks. Of stage III or lower subjects, 75% underwent surgery and 62.5% chemotherapy. OS was 1244.0 days or 3.7 years and 2-year survival rates was estimated at 87.5%. Survival duration differed significantly between those in stage III or lower and those in group IV. Age significantly affected survival time in the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Brain metastasis was uncommon in this series, despite the absence of prophylactic cranial radiation. Further studies are needed to improve and clarify the clinical EPSCC course. (author)

  14. Anomalous Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin Transfer Torque in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Embedded Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Useinov, Arthur; Ye, Lin-Xiu; Useinov, Niazbeck; Wu, Te-Ho; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2015-01-01

    The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with embedded nanoparticles (NPs) was calculated in range of the quantum-ballistic model. The simulation was performed for electron tunneling through the insulating layer with embedded magnetic and non-magnetic NPs within the approach of the double barrier subsystem connected in parallel to the single barrier one. This model can be applied for both MTJs with in-plane magnetization and perpendicular one. We also calculated the in-plane component of the spin transfer torque (STT) versus the applied voltage in MTJs with magnetic NPs and determined that its value can be much larger than in single barrier system (SBS) for the same tunneling thickness. The reported simulation reproduces experimental data of the TMR suppression and peak-like TMR anomalies at low voltages available in leterature. PMID:26681336

  15. Laparoscopic nephrectomy for a single-system ectopic ureter draining a small, dysplastic and poorly functioning kidney in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Byong-Chang; Lim, Dae-Jung; Lee, Sang-Chul; Choi, Hwang; Kim, Hyeon-Hoe

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of laparoscopic nephrectomy for a single-system ectopic ureter draining a dysplastic kidney in children. Between February 1999 and September 2005, 16 girls with a mean age of 6.2 years (range: 2-15 years) presented with urinary incontinence accompanied by regular voiding since birth (15 patients) and vaginitis (one patient). Ultrasonography, intravenous urography and a technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid ( 99m Tc-DMSA) renal scan showed the presence of only a single kidney in all cases. Computed tomography (CT) showed a dysplastic kidney definitely in nine patients, structures suspicious of dysplastic kidney in three cases, and no dysplastic kidney in four cases. Magnetic resonance imaging was carried out in the four cases with non-visualized dysplastic kidneys by CT, and showed a suspicious lesion in only one case, and no lesion in the other three patients. All patients underwent transperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy for a dysplastic kidney. Laparoscopy identifies all dysplastic kidneys easily, even in those cases in which dystrophic kidney could not be identified by preoperative imaging. Dysplastic kidneys and ectopic ureters were removed successfully in all 16 patients. Mean operative time was 109 min (range: 40-155 min) with little intraoperative bleeding. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 2.6 days (range: 2-4 days). No intraoperative complication was encountered, except in one single case, in which a small bowel injury occurred during open Hasson's procedure. All patients became dry soon after the operation. Laparoscopic nephrectomy for an ectopic ureter draining into a dysplastic kidney is a safe and effective method, and can be carried out successfully, despite a failure by preoperative imaging studies to localize the dysplastic kidney. (author)

  16. Quantum tunneling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.S.; Lai, C.H.; Oh, C.H.; Kwek, L.C.

    2004-01-01

    We present a calculation of quantum tunneling time based on the transition duration of wave peak from one side of a barrier to the other. In our formulation, the tunneling time comprises a real and an imaginary part. The real part is an extension of the phase tunneling time with quantum corrections whereas the imaginary time is associated with energy derivatives of the probability amplitudes

  17. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  18. Josephson tunneling and nanosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Ovchinnikov, Yurii; Kresin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Josephson tunneling between nanoclusters is analyzed. The discrete nature of the electronic energy spectra, including their shell ordering, is explicitly taken into account. The treatment considers the two distinct cases of resonant and non-resonant tunneling. It is demonstrated that the current density greatly exceeds the value discussed in the conventional theory. Nanoparticles are shown to be promising building blocks for nanomaterials-based tunneling networks.

  19. About tunnelling times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Recami, E.

    1991-08-01

    In this paper, first we critically analyse the main theoretical definitions and calculations of the sub-barrier tunnelling and reflection times. Secondly, we propose a new, physically sensible definition of such durations, on the basis of a recent general formalism (already tested for other types of quantum collisions). At last, we discuss some results regarding temporal evolution of the tunnelling processes, and in particular the ''particle'' speed during tunnelling. (author). 36 refs, 1 fig

  20. Newly developed low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope and its application to the study of superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, F.; Dai, C.; Chen, Z.; Huang, G.; Bai, C.; Tao, H.; Yin, B.; Yang, Q.; Zhao, Z.

    1994-01-01

    A newly developed scanning tunneling microscope (STM) capable of operating at room temperature, 77 K, and 4.2 K is presented. This compact STM has a highly symmetric and rigid tunneling unit designed as an integral frame except the coarse and fine adjustment parts. The tunneling unit is incorporated into a small vacuum chamber that is usually pumped down to 2x10 -4 Pa to avoid water contamination. The fine mechanic adjustment makes the tip approach the sample in 5 nm steps. The coarse adjustment not only changes the distance between the tip and the sample, but also adjusts the tip to be normal to the surface of the sample. With this low-temperature STM atomic resolution images of Bi-2212 single-crystal and large-scale topographies of a YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 thin film are observed at 77 K

  1. Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel advances the study of fundamental flow physics relevant to micro air vehicle (MAV) flight and assesses vehicle performance...

  2. Tunneling rates in electron transport through double-barrier molecular junctions in a scanning tunneling microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Nazin, G. V.; Wu, S. W.; Ho, W.

    2005-01-01

    The scanning tunneling microscope enables atomic-scale measurements of electron transport through individual molecules. Copper phthalocyanine and magnesium porphine molecules adsorbed on a thin oxide film grown on the NiAl(110) surface were probed. The single-molecule junctions contained two tunneling barriers, vacuum gap, and oxide film. Differential conductance spectroscopy shows that electron transport occurs via vibronic states of the molecules. The intensity of spectral peaks correspondi...

  3. Ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy with atomic resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelic, Vedran; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Nguyen, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy (THz-STM) can probe single atoms on a silicon surface with simultaneous sub-nanometer and sub-picosecond spatio-temporal resolution. THz-STM is established as a new technique for exploring high-field non-equilibrium tunneling...

  4. Spin polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczewski, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews tunneling of spin-polarized electrons through molecules positioned between ferromagnetic electrodes, which gives rise to tunneling magnetoresistance. Such measurements yield important insight into the factors governing spin-polarized electron injection into organic semiconductors, thereby offering the possibility to manipulate the quantum-mechanical spin degrees of freedom for charge carriers in optical/electrical devices. In the first section of the chapter a brief description of the Jullière model of spin-dependent electron tunneling is reviewed. Next, a brief description of device fabrication and characterization is presented. The bulk of the review highlights experimental studies on spin-polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions. In addition, some experiments describing spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy on single molecules are mentioned. Finally, some general conclusions and prospectus on the impact of spin-polarized tunneling in molecular junctions are offered.

  5. A review on all-perovskite multiferroic tunnel junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuewei Yin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the basic concept was proposed only about 10 years ago, multiferroic tunnel junctions (MFTJs with a ferroelectric barrier sandwiched between two ferromagnetic electrodes have already drawn considerable interests, driven mainly by its potential applications in multi-level memories and electric field controlled spintronics. The purpose of this article is to review the recent progress of all-perovskite MFTJs. Starting from the key functional properties of the tunneling magnetoresistance, tunneling electroresistance, and tunneling electromagnetoresistance effects, we discuss the main origins of the tunneling electroresistance effect, recent progress in achieving multilevel resistance states in a single device, and the electrical control of spin polarization and transport through the ferroelectric polarization reversal of the tunneling barrier.

  6. Brighter for small power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaland, Leif

    2003-01-01

    The article presents a small tunnel drilling machine aimed at using for the construction of small hydroelectric power plants and mentions briefly some advantages economically and environmentally of both the machine and the power production solution

  7. Quantum tunneling of magnetization in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamp, P.C.E.; Barbara, B.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic solids should, under certain circumstances, show macroscopic quantum behavior, in which coherence exists between completely distinct magnetization states, each involving a very large number of spins (∼10 12 spins). This article reviews the recent work in this field, concentrating particularly on macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) of magnetization. The two main phenomena discussed are the tunneling of magnetization in single-domain particles or grains (in which some 10 3 - 10 4 spins rotate together through an energy barrier), and the tunneling of domain walls in films or in bulk magnets; where walls containing ∼10 10 spins may tunnel off a pinning potential, or from one pinning center to another. Some attention is also given to the quantum nucleation of magnetization reversal in a bulk magnet, and to the quantum motion of other magnetic solitons (such as vortices). After a thorough analysis of the basic grain and wall tunneling phenomena, the authors continue on to a discussion of the various dissipative or decoherence mechanisms, which destroy the phase correlations involved in tunneling. The coupling of grain magnetization to phonons, photons, and electrons is shown to have little consequence for weakly-conducting or insulating grains. Domain walls couple to these and also to magnons and impurities or defects; the 3rd order coupling to magnons can have serious effects, but if one uses pure insulators at low temperatures, these can also be ignored

  8. Theory of inelastic electron tunneling from a localized spin in the impulsive approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Mats

    2009-07-31

    A simple expression for the conductance steps in inelastic electron tunneling from spin excitations in a single magnetic atom adsorbed on a nonmagnetic metal surface is derived. The inelastic coupling between the tunneling electron and the spin is via the exchange coupling and is treated in an impulsive approximation using the Tersoff-Hamann approximation for the tunneling between the tip and the sample.

  9. The Effect of A Single Sub-Lethal Dose of Whole Body Irradiation on the Small Intestine of Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ramli, M. A.; Kubba, M. A.; Al-Bassam, L. S.; Belhaj, K.; Al-shawish, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of whole body radiation with a single sub-lethal dose at 4 Gy on rat small intestine was studied histologically and quantitatively. Irradiated animals were euthanized at 24 hours, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post- irradiation. Crypts of Leiberkuhn and peyer's patches were especially targeted by irradiation. The crypts showed severe cellular fragmentation in the germinal cellular compartments twenty Four hours after irradiation resulting in partial denudation of villi especially at their Tips. At three days, these cells resumed their proliferative activity with the appearance of unusually large numbers of mitotic figures. Cellular regeneration in the crypts and on the villous surface showed improvement with advancing time till day 28 when the villi had complete epithelial covering and the proliferative activity of the germinal cryptic cells returned to normal. The quantitative study included the measurement of about fifty villi at each time after irradiation. A significant decrease in villous length was noticed at twenty four hours post-irradiation compared to the control values. The length of villi plateaued at about this level till day twenty one when it slightly increased to reach a sub normal mean length on day 28. We concluded that whole body irradiation with a single dose at 4 Gy was enough to induce cryptic cellular necrosis with sloughing of epithelial villous columnar covering. This cellular damage was, however, sub- total since quick regenerative cellular activity was noticed three days post-irradiation. The decrease in the villous length paralleled the cryptic cellular damage whereas full recovery was not achieved despite obvious cellular regeneration.

  10. Performance assessment of the single photon emission microscope: high spatial resolution SPECT imaging of small animal organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mejia

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The single photon emission microscope (SPEM is an instrument developed to obtain high spatial resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT images of small structures inside the mouse brain. SPEM consists of two independent imaging devices, which combine a multipinhole collimator, a high-resolution, thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl] columnar scintillator, a demagnifying/intensifier tube, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupling device (CCD. Collimators have 300- and 450-µm diameter pinholes on tungsten slabs, in hexagonal arrays of 19 and 7 holes. Projection data are acquired in a photon-counting strategy, where CCD frames are stored at 50 frames per second, with a radius of rotation of 35 mm and magnification factor of one. The image reconstruction software tool is based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity attainable with the seven-pinhole imaging device, together with the linearity for quantification on the tomographic images, and to test the instrument in obtaining tomographic images of different mouse organs. A spatial resolution better than 500 µm and a sensitivity of 21.6 counts·s-1·MBq-1 were reached, as well as a correlation coefficient between activity and intensity better than 0.99, when imaging 99mTc sources. Images of the thyroid, heart, lungs, and bones of mice were registered using 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in times appropriate for routine preclinical experimentation of <1 h per projection data set. Detailed experimental protocols and images of the aforementioned organs are shown. We plan to extend the instrument's field of view to fix larger animals and to combine data from both detectors to reduce the acquisition time or applied activity.

  11. Performance assessment of the single photon emission microscope: high spatial resolution SPECT imaging of small animal organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, J.; Reis, M.A.; Miranda, A.C.C.; Batista, I.R.; Barboza, M.R.F.; Shih, M.C.; Fu, G.; Chen, C.T.; Meng, L.J.; Bressan, R.A.; Amaro, E. Jr

    2013-01-01

    The single photon emission microscope (SPEM) is an instrument developed to obtain high spatial resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of small structures inside the mouse brain. SPEM consists of two independent imaging devices, which combine a multipinhole collimator, a high-resolution, thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl)] columnar scintillator, a demagnifying/intensifier tube, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupling device (CCD). Collimators have 300- and 450-µm diameter pinholes on tungsten slabs, in hexagonal arrays of 19 and 7 holes. Projection data are acquired in a photon-counting strategy, where CCD frames are stored at 50 frames per second, with a radius of rotation of 35 mm and magnification factor of one. The image reconstruction software tool is based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity attainable with the seven-pinhole imaging device, together with the linearity for quantification on the tomographic images, and to test the instrument in obtaining tomographic images of different mouse organs. A spatial resolution better than 500 µm and a sensitivity of 21.6 counts·s -1 ·MBq -1 were reached, as well as a correlation coefficient between activity and intensity better than 0.99, when imaging 99m Tc sources. Images of the thyroid, heart, lungs, and bones of mice were registered using 99m Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in times appropriate for routine preclinical experimentation of <1 h per projection data set. Detailed experimental protocols and images of the aforementioned organs are shown. We plan to extend the instrument's field of view to fix larger animals and to combine data from both detectors to reduce the acquisition time or applied activity

  12. Performance assessment of the single photon emission microscope: high spatial resolution SPECT imaging of small animal organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Reis, M.A. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, A.C.C. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Batista, I.R. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Barboza, M.R.F.; Shih, M.C. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fu, G. [GE Global Research, Schenectady, NY (United States); Chen, C.T. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Meng, L.J. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Bressan, R.A. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amaro, E. Jr [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-06

    The single photon emission microscope (SPEM) is an instrument developed to obtain high spatial resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of small structures inside the mouse brain. SPEM consists of two independent imaging devices, which combine a multipinhole collimator, a high-resolution, thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl)] columnar scintillator, a demagnifying/intensifier tube, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupling device (CCD). Collimators have 300- and 450-µm diameter pinholes on tungsten slabs, in hexagonal arrays of 19 and 7 holes. Projection data are acquired in a photon-counting strategy, where CCD frames are stored at 50 frames per second, with a radius of rotation of 35 mm and magnification factor of one. The image reconstruction software tool is based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity attainable with the seven-pinhole imaging device, together with the linearity for quantification on the tomographic images, and to test the instrument in obtaining tomographic images of different mouse organs. A spatial resolution better than 500 µm and a sensitivity of 21.6 counts·s{sup -1}·MBq{sup -1} were reached, as well as a correlation coefficient between activity and intensity better than 0.99, when imaging {sup 99m}Tc sources. Images of the thyroid, heart, lungs, and bones of mice were registered using {sup 99m}Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in times appropriate for routine preclinical experimentation of <1 h per projection data set. Detailed experimental protocols and images of the aforementioned organs are shown. We plan to extend the instrument's field of view to fix larger animals and to combine data from both detectors to reduce the acquisition time or applied activity.

  13. Single agent and synergistic combinatorial efficacy of first-in-class small molecule imipridone ONC201 in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Varun V; Talekar, Mala K; Lulla, Amriti R; Kline, C Leah B; Zhou, Lanlan; Hall, Junior; Van den Heuvel, A Pieter J; Dicker, David T; Babar, Jawad; Grupp, Stephan A; Garnett, Mathew J; McDermott, Ultan; Benes, Cyril H; Pu, Jeffrey J; Claxton, David F; Khan, Nadia; Oster, Wolfgang; Allen, Joshua E; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2018-01-01

    ONC201, founding member of the imipridone class of small molecules, is currently being evaluated in advancer cancer clinical trials. We explored single agent and combinatorial efficacy of ONC201 in preclinical models of hematological malignancies. ONC201 demonstrated (GI50 1-8 µM) dose- and time-dependent efficacy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), Burkitt's lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), Hodgkin's lymphoma (nodular sclerosis) and multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines including cells resistant to standard of care (dexamethasone in MM) and primary samples. ONC201 induced caspase-dependent apoptosis that involved activation of the integrated stress response (ATF4/CHOP) pathway, inhibition of Akt phosphorylation, Foxo3a activation, downregulation of cyclin D1, IAP and Bcl-2 family members. ONC201 synergistically reduced cell viability in combination with cytarabine and 5-azacytidine in AML cells. ONC201 combined with cytarabine in a Burkitt's lymphoma xenograft model induced tumor growth inhibition that was superior to either agent alone. ONC201 synergistically combined with bortezomib in MM, MCL and ALCL cells and with ixazomib or dexamethasone in MM cells. ONC201 combined with bortezomib in a Burkitt's lymphoma xenograft model reduced tumor cell density and improved CHOP induction compared to either agent alone. These results serve as a rationale for ONC201 single-agent trials in relapsed/refractory acute leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, MM and combination trial with dexamethasone in MM, provide pharmacodynamic biomarkers and identify further synergistic combinatorial regimens that can be explored in the clinic.

  14. Scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnig, G.; Rohrer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Based on vacuum tunneling, a novel type of microscope, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was developed. It has an unprecedented resolution in real space on an atomic scale. The authors review the important technical features, illustrate the power of the STM for surface topographies and discuss its potential in other areas of science and technology. (Auth.)

  15. Electron tunneling in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamaraev, K.I.; Khajrutdinov, R.F.; Zhdanov, V.P.; Molin, Yu.N.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical investigations are outlined systematically on electron tunnelling in chemical reactions. Mechanism of electron transport to great distances is shown to be characteristic to chemical compounds of a wide range. The function of tunnel reactions is discussed for various fields of chemistry, including radiation chemistry, electrochemistry, chemistry of solids, chemistry of surface and catalysis

  16. Dependences of the Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin Transfer Torque on the Sizes and Concentration of Nanoparticles in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, A. M.; Useinov, A. N.; Useinov, N. Kh.

    2018-01-01

    Dependences of the tunnel magnetoresistance and in-plane component of the spin transfer torque on the applied voltage in a magnetic tunnel junction have been calculated in the approximation of ballistic transport of conduction electrons through an insulating layer with embedded magnetic or nonmagnetic nanoparticles. A single-barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nanoparticle embedded in an insulator forms a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction. It has been shown that the in-plane component of the spin transfer torque in the double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction can be higher than that in the single-barrier one at the same thickness of the insulating layer. The calculations show that nanoparticles embedded in the tunnel junction increase the probability of tunneling of electrons, create resonance conditions, and ensure the quantization of the conductance in contrast to the tunnel junction without nanoparticles. The calculated dependences of the tunnel magnetoresistance correspond to experimental data demonstrating peak anomalies and suppression of the maximum magnetoresistances at low voltages.

  17. Tunnel fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  18. Similar mitochondrial signaling responses to a single bout of continuous or small-sided-games-based exercise in sedentary men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendham, Amy E; Duffield, Rob; Coutts, Aaron J; Marino, Frank E; Boyko, Andriy; McAinch, Andrew J; Bishop, David John

    2016-12-01

    This study assessed the mitochondrial related signaling responses to a single bout of noncontact, modified football (touch rugby), played as small-sided games (SSG), or cycling (CYC) exercise in sedentary, obese, middle-aged men. In a randomized, crossover design, nine middle-aged, sedentary, obese men completed two, 40-min exercise conditions (CYC and SSG) separated by a 21-day recovery period. Heart rate (HR) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were collected during each bout. Needle biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were collected at rest and 30 and 240 min postexercise for analysis of protein content and phosphorylation (PGC-1α, SIRT1, p53, p53 Ser15 , AMPK, AMPK Thr172 , CAMKII, CAMKII Thr286 , p38MAPK, and p38MAPK Thr180/Tyr182 ) and mRNA expression (PGC-1α, p53, NRF1, NRF2, Tfam, and cytochrome c). A main effect of time effect for both conditions was evident for HR, RPE, and blood lactate (P 0.05). Both conditions increased PGC1-α protein and mRNA expression at 240 min (P 0.05). CYC increased p53 protein content at 240 min to a greater extent than SSG (P benefit for stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis. Differences between conditions regarding fluctuation in exercise intensity and type of muscle contraction may explain the increase of p53 and AMPK within CYC and not SSG (noncontact, modified football). Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Small scale endemism in Brazil's Atlantic Forest: 14 new species of Mesabolivar (Araneae, Pholcidae), each known from a single locality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bernhard A

    2015-04-07

    In an ongoing mega-transect project that aims at analyzing pholcid spider diversity and distribution in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, many species appear restricted to small geographic ranges. Of the 84 species collected between 2003 and 2011 at 17 sites between Bahia and Santa Catarina, 51 species (61%) were found at only one locality. The present paper focuses on such species in the genus Mesabolivar, and compares diversity and distribution patterns of this genus within and outside the Atlantic Forest. The percentage of species known from single localities is higher in the Atlantic Forest (34 of 52 species; 65%) than outside the Atlantic Forest (10 of 25; 40%). Distribution rages of species in the Atlantic Forest are significantly smaller than of species outside the Atlantic Forest (mean maximum distances between localities: 184 versus 541 km; medians: 10 km versus 220 km). The following species are newly described (arranged from north to south), each currently known from the respective type locality only: M. caipora; M. kathrinae; M. bonita; M. pau (Bahia); M. monteverde; M. perezi (Espírito Santo); M. giupponii; M. goitaca; M. sai (Rio de Janeiro); M. tamoio; M. unicornis; M. gabettae; M. inornatus (São Paulo); M. itapoa (Santa Catarina).

  20. Quantum tunneling beyond semiclassical approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2008-01-01

    Hawking radiation as tunneling by Hamilton-Jacobi method beyond semiclassical approximation is analysed. We compute all quantum corrections in the single particle action revealing that these are proportional to the usual semiclassical contribution. We show that a simple choice of the proportionality constants reproduces the one loop back reaction effect in the spacetime, found by conformal field theory methods, which modifies the Hawking temperature of the black hole. Using the law of black hole mechanics we give the corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking area law following from the modified Hawking temperature. Some examples are explicitly worked out.

  1. Tents and tunnels on martensitic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, K.; Hane, K.F.; James, R.D.; Palmstroem, C.J.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we outline a strategy for producing certain deformable structures - tents and tunnels - on epitaxially grown martensitic single crystal films. These structures are intended to be the basic building blocks of micropumps and microactuators. We give specific predictions for the systems Ni 2 MnGa, PbTiO 3 and Cu-Zn-Al. (orig.)

  2. Asymmetric voltage behavior of the tunnel magnetoresistance in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we study the value of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as a function of the applied voltage in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJs) with the left and right ferromagnetic (FM) layers being pinned and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions (equal barriers and electrodes). DMTJs are modeled as two single barrier junctions connected in series with consecutive tunneling (CST). We investigated the asymmetric voltage behavior of the TMR for the CST in the range of a general theoretical model. Significant asymmetries of the experimental curves, which arise due to different annealing regimes, are mostly explained by different heights of the tunnel barriers and asymmetries of spin polarizations in magnetic layers. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications.

  3. Asymmetric voltage behavior of the tunnel magnetoresistance in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the value of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as a function of the applied voltage in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJs) with the left and right ferromagnetic (FM) layers being pinned and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions (equal barriers and electrodes). DMTJs are modeled as two single barrier junctions connected in series with consecutive tunneling (CST). We investigated the asymmetric voltage behavior of the TMR for the CST in the range of a general theoretical model. Significant asymmetries of the experimental curves, which arise due to different annealing regimes, are mostly explained by different heights of the tunnel barriers and asymmetries of spin polarizations in magnetic layers. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications.

  4. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  5. Tunnel magnetoresistance in alumina, magnesia and composite tunnel barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schebaum, Oliver; Drewello, Volker; Auge, Alexander; Reiss, Guenter; Muenzenberg, Markus; Schuhmann, Henning; Seibt, Michael; Thomas, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Using magnetron sputtering, we have prepared Co-Fe-B/tunnel barrier/Co-Fe-B magnetic tunnel junctions with tunnel barriers consisting of alumina, magnesia, and magnesia-alumina bilayer systems. The highest tunnel magnetoresistance ratios we found were 73% for alumina and 323% for magnesia-based tunnel junctions. Additionally, tunnel junctions with a unified layer stack were prepared for the three different barriers. In these systems, the tunnel magnetoresistance ratios at optimum annealing temperatures were found to be 65% for alumina, 173% for magnesia, and 78% for the composite tunnel barriers. The similar tunnel magnetoresistance ratios of the tunnel junctions containing alumina provide evidence that coherent tunneling is suppressed by the alumina layer in the composite tunnel barrier. - Research highlights: → Transport properties of Co-Fe-B/tunnel barrier/Co-Fe-B magnetic tunnel junctions. → Tunnel barrier consists of MgO, Al-Ox, or MgO/Al-Ox bilayer systems. → Limitation of TMR-ratio in composite barrier tunnel junctions to Al-Ox values. → Limitation indicates that Al-Ox layer is causing incoherent tunneling.

  6. Proposed method of producing large optical mirrors Single-point diamond crushing followed by polishing with a small-area tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, G.; Bryan, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Faster production of large optical mirrors may result from combining single-point diamond crushing of the glass with polishing using a small area tool to smooth the surface and remove the damaged layer. Diamond crushing allows a surface contour accurate to 0.5 microns to be generated, and the small area computer-controlled polishing tool allows the surface roughness to be removed without destroying the initial contour. Final contours with an accuracy of 0.04 microns have been achieved.

  7. Knee rotation influences the femoral tunnel angle measurement after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a 3-dimensional computed tomography model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Thorhauer, Eric; Marsh, Chelsea; Fu, Freddie H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Femoral tunnel angle (FTA) has been proposed as a metric for evaluating whether ACL reconstruction was performed anatomically. In clinic, radiographic images are typically acquired with an uncertain amount of internal/external knee rotation. The extent to which knee rotation will influence FTA measurement is unclear. Furthermore, differences in FTA measurement between the two common positions (0° and 45° knee flexion) have not been established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of knee rotation on FTA measurement after ACL reconstruction. Methods Knee CT data from 16 subjects were segmented to produce 3D bone models. Central axes of tunnels were identified. The 0° and 45° flexion angles were simulated. Knee internal/external rotations were simulated in a range of ±20°. FTA was defined as the angle between the tunnel axis and femoral shaft axis, orthogonally projected into the coronal plane. Results Femoral tunnel angle was positively/negatively correlated with knee rotation angle at 0°/45° knee flexion. At 0° knee flexion, FTA for anterio-medial (AM) tunnels was significantly decreased at 20° of external knee rotation. At 45° knee flexion, more than 16° external or 19° internal rotation significantly altered FTA measurements for single-bundle tunnels; smaller rotations (±9° for AM, ±5° for PL) created significant errors in FTA measurements after double-bundle reconstruction. Conclusion Femoral tunnel angle measurements were correlated with knee rotation. Relatively small imaging malalignment introduced significant errors with knee flexed 45°. This study supports using the 0° flexion position for knee radiographs to reduce errors in FTA measurement due to knee internal/external rotation. Level of evidence Case–control study, Level III. PMID:23589127

  8. Tunneling current between graphene layers

    OpenAIRE

    Poklonski, Nikolai A.; Siahlo, Andrei I.; Vyrko, Sergey A.; Popov, Andrey M.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2013-01-01

    The physical model that allows to calculate the values of the tunneling current be-tween graphene layers is proposed. The tunneling current according to the pro-posed model is proportional to the area of tunneling transition. The calculated value of tunneling conductivity is in qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  9. Vacuum phonon tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altfeder, Igor; Voevodin, Andrey A; Roy, Ajit K

    2010-10-15

    Field-induced phonon tunneling, a previously unknown mechanism of interfacial thermal transport, has been revealed by ultrahigh vacuum inelastic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Using thermally broadened Fermi-Dirac distribution in the STM tip as in situ atomic-scale thermometer we found that thermal vibrations of the last tip atom are effectively transmitted to sample surface despite few angstroms wide vacuum gap. We show that phonon tunneling is driven by interfacial electric field and thermally vibrating image charges, and its rate is enhanced by surface electron-phonon interaction.

  10. Macroscopic quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, J.; Hernandez, J. M.; del Barco, E.

    1999-05-01

    In this paper we review the work done on magnetic relaxation during the last 10 years on both single-domain particles and magnetic molecules and its contribution to the discovery of quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment (Chudnovsky and Tejada, Macroscopic Quantum tunneling of the Magnetic moment, Cambridge University press, Cambridge, 1998). We present first the theoretical expressions and their connection to quantum relaxation and secondly, we show and discuss the experimental results. Finally, we discuss very recent hysteresis data on Mn 12Ac molecules at extremely large sweeping rate for the external magnetic field which suggest the existence of quantum spin—phonon avalanches.

  11. In vivo assessment of the tolerance dose of small liver volumes after single-fraction HDR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricke, Jens; Seidensticker, Max; Luedemann, Lutz; Pech, Maciej; Wieners, Gero; Hengst, Susanne; Mohnike, Konrad; Cho, Chie Hee; Lopez Haenninen, Enrique; Al-Abadi, Hussain; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess a dose-response relationship for small volumes of liver parenchyma after single-fraction irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five liver metastases were treated by computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial brachytherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed 1 day before and 3 days and 6, 12, and 24 weeks after therapy. MR sequences included T1-w gradient echo (GRE) enhanced by hepatocyte-targeted gadobenate dimeglumine. All MRI data sets were merged with 3D dosimetry data and evaluated by two radiologists. The reviewers indicated the border of hyperintensity on T2-w images (edema) or hypointensity on T1-w images (loss of hepatocyte function). Based on the total 3D data, a dose-volume histogram was calculated. We estimated the threshold dose for either edema or function loss as the D 90 , i.e., the dose achieved in at least 90% of the pseudolesion volume. Results: Between 3 days and 6 weeks, the extension of the edema increased significantly from the 12.9 Gy isosurface to 9.9 Gy (standard deviation [SD], 3.3 and 2.6). No significant change was detected between 6 and 12 weeks. After 24 weeks, the edematous tissue had shrunk significantly to 14.7 Gy (SD, 4.2). Three days postbrachytherapy, the D 90 for hepatocyte function loss reached the 14.9 Gy isosurface (SD, 3.9). At 6 weeks, the respective zone had increased significantly to 9.9 Gy (SD, 2.3). After 12 and 24 weeks, the dysfunction volume had decreased significantly to the 11.9 Gy and 15.2 Gy isosurface, respectively (SD, 3 and 4.1). Conclusions: The 95% interval from 7.6 to 12.2 Gy found as the minimal hepatocyte tolerance after 6 weeks accounts for the radiobiologic variations found in CT-guided brachytherapy, including heterogeneous dose rates by variable catheter arrays

  12. Gas phase synthesis of non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes with near-armchair chiralities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustonen, K.; Laiho, P.; Kaskela, A.; Zhu, Z.; Reynaud, O.; Houbenov, N.; Tian, Y.; Jiang, H.; Kauppinen, E. I., E-mail: esko.kauppinen@aalto.fi [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Susi, T. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nasibulin, A. G. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Nobel str. 3, 143026 (Russian Federation); Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 29 Polytechniheskaya st., St. Petersburg, 195251 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-06

    We present a floating catalyst synthesis route for individual, i.e., non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a narrow chiral angle distribution peaking at high chiralities near the armchair species. An ex situ spark discharge generator was used to form iron particles with geometric number mean diameters of 3–4 nm and fed into a laminar flow chemical vapour deposition reactor for the continuous synthesis of long and high-quality SWCNTs from ambient pressure carbon monoxide. The intensity ratio of G/D peaks in Raman spectra up to 48 and mean tube lengths up to 4 μm were observed. The chiral distributions, as directly determined by electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope, clustered around the (n,m) indices (7,6), (8,6), (8,7), and (9,6), with up to 70% of tubes having chiral angles over 20°. The mean diameter of SWCNTs was reduced from 1.10 to 1.04 nm by decreasing the growth temperature from 880 to 750 °C, which simultaneously increased the fraction of semiconducting tubes from 67% to 80%. Limiting the nanotube gas phase number concentration to ∼10{sup 5 }cm{sup −3} prevented nanotube bundle formation that is due to collisions induced by Brownian diffusion. Up to 80% of 500 as-deposited tubes observed by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy were individual. Transparent conducting films deposited from these SWCNTs exhibited record low sheet resistances of 63 Ω/□ at 90% transparency for 550 nm light.

  13. The overshoot problem in inflation after tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Koushik; Vaudrevange, Pascal M.; Westphal, Alexander

    2011-09-15

    We show the absence of the usual parametrically large overshoot problem of small-field inflation if initiated by a Coleman-De Luccia (CDL) tunneling transition from an earlier vacuum in the limit of small inflationary scale compared to the tunneling scale. For low-power monomial exit potentials V({phi}){proportional_to} {phi}{sup n}; n<4, we derive an expression for the amount of overshoot. This is bounded from above by the width of the steep barrier traversed after emerging from tunneling and before reaching a slow-roll region of the potential. For n{>=}4 we show that overshooting is entirely absent. We extend this result through binomials to a general potential written as a series expansion, and to the case of arbitrary finite initial speed of the inflaton. This places the phase space of initial conditions for small-field and large-field inflation on the same footing in a landscape of string theory vacua populated via CDL tunneling. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of single-grain and small-aliquot OSL dose estimates in <3000 years old river sediments from South India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.J.; Jain, M.; Juyal, N.; Singhvi, A.K.

    2005-01-01

    We report on OSL dose distributions derived from small-aliquot and single grains of quartz in young fluvial sediments sampled from the Penner River basin, South India. The single-grain dose distributions suggest that 13 out of 19 samples were well bleached. In many well-bleached samples, there was an underestimation in the single-aliquot dose estimates as compared to those from the single grain-the difference between average dose estimates determined by the two methods ranged from ∼1% to 31%. Such a dose underestimation was not detectable in poorly bleached samples. Various possible reasons for the discrepancy between single-grain and small-aliquot dose estimates are discussed. Although there is no satisfactory explanation for this discrepancy, we speculate that the difference in the stimulation wavelengths, 470+/-30nm in the case of single-aliquot and 532nm in the case of single grains, could perhaps be one of the reasons; this may occur because the stimulation wavelength affects the proportion of the medium and slow components in the initial signal

  15. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  16. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  17. INCAS TRISONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin MUNTEANU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The 1.2 m x 1.2 m Trisonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel is the largest of the experimental facilities at the National Institute for Aerospace Research - I.N.C.A.S. "Elie Carafoli", Bucharest, Romania. The tunnel has been designed by the Canadian company DSMA (now AIOLOS and since its commissioning in 1978 has performed high speed aerodynamic tests for more than 120 projects of aircraft, missiles and other objects among which the twin jet fighter IAR-93, the jet trainer IAR-99, the MIG-21 Lancer, the Polish jet fighter YRYDA and others. In the last years the wind tunnel has been used mostly for experimental research in European projects such as UFAST. The high flow quality parameters and the wide range of testing capabilities ensure the competitivity of the tunnel at an international level.

  18. The ISI Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    DP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr dark -star TCP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr dak’star ICMP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr quark MDP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr quark ...drax-net-yp 128.9.32.2 1 route add quark -net-yp 128.9.32.3 1 route add vlsi-net-yp 128.9.32.4 1 route add darkstar-net-yp 128.9.32.3 1 route add rocky...TCP /etc/tunnel-visa p zephyr quark ICMP /etc/tunnel-visa p zephyr drax tTI)P /etc/tunnel-visa p zephyr drax TCP /etc/tunnel_visa p zephyr drax ICMP

  19. Wind Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This ARDEC facility consists of subsonic, transonic, and supersonic wind tunnels to acquire aerodynamic data. Full-scale and sub-scale models of munitions are fitted...

  20. Water Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility in Pittsburgh, PA, re-creates the conditions found 3,000 meters beneath the ocean’s surface, allowing scientists to study...

  1. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in a dc SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.C.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of macroscopic quantum tunneling is applied to a current-biased dc SQUID whose dynamics can be described by a two-dimensional mechanical system with a dissipative environment. Based on the phenomenological model proposed by Caldeira and Leggett, the dissipative environment is represented by a set of harmonic oscillators coupling to the system. After integrating out the environmental degrees of freedom, an effective Euclidean action is found for the two-dimensional system. The action is used to provide the quantum tunneling rate formalism for the dc SQUID. Under certain conditions, the tunneling rate reduces to that of a single current-biased Josephson junction with an adjustable effective critical current

  2. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  3. Characterization of an endoprotease from rat small intestinal mucosal secretory granules which generates somatostatin-28 from prosomatostatin by cleavage after a single arginine residue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beinfeld, M. C.; Bourdais, J.; Kuks, P.; Morel, A.; Cohen, P.

    1989-01-01

    We have extracted, characterized, and partially purified an enzyme from secretory granules from rat small intestinal mucosa which cleaves a synthetic prosomatostatin substrate on the carboxyl side of a single arginine residue. This substrate Leu-Gln-Arg-Ser-Ala-Asn-Ser-NH2 contains the monobasic

  4. Comparison of light out-coupling enhancements in single-layer blue-phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes using small-molecule or polymer hosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yung-Ting [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shun-Wei [Department of Electronic Engineering, Mingchi University of Technology, New Taipei, Taiwan 24301, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Chih-Hsien; Lee, Chih-Chien [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan 10607, Taiwan (China); Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Wei, Pei-Kuen [Research Center for Applied Science Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 11527, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuan-Yu [Chilin Technology Co., LTD, Tainan City, Taiwan 71758, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yi-Ting; Wu, Min-Fei; Chen, Chin-Ti, E-mail: cchen@chem.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 11529, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-I, E-mail: cchen@chem.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-07

    Single-layer blue phosphorescence organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with either small-molecule or polymer hosts are fabricated using solution process and the performances of devices with different hosts are investigated. The small-molecule device exhibits luminous efficiency of 14.7 cd/A and maximum power efficiency of 8.39 lm/W, which is the highest among blue phosphorescence OLEDs with single-layer solution process and small molecular hosts. Using the same solution process for all devices, comparison of light out-coupling enhancement, with brightness enhancement film (BEF), between small-molecule and polymer based OLEDs is realized. Due to different dipole orientation and anisotropic refractive index, polymer-based OLEDs would trap less light than small molecule-based OLEDs internally, about 37% better based simulation results. In spite of better electrical and spectroscopic characteristics, including ambipolar characteristics, higher carrier mobility, higher photoluminescence quantum yield, and larger triplet state energy, the overall light out-coupling efficiency of small molecule-based devices is worse than that of polymer-based devices without BEF. However, with BEF for light out-coupling enhancement, the improved ratio in luminous flux and luminous efficiency for small molecule based device is 1.64 and 1.57, respectively, which are significantly better than those of PVK (poly-9-vinylcarbazole) devices. In addition to the theoretical optical simulation, the experimental data also confirm the origins of differential light-outcoupling enhancement. The maximum luminous efficiency and power efficiency are enhanced from 14.7 cd/A and 8.39 lm/W to 23 cd/A and 13.2 lm/W, respectively, with laminated BEF, which are both the highest so far for single-layer solution-process blue phosphorescence OLEDs with small molecule hosts.

  5. Comparison of light out-coupling enhancements in single-layer blue-phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes using small-molecule or polymer hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yung-Ting; Liu, Shun-Wei; Yuan, Chih-Hsien; Lee, Chih-Chien; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Lee, Yi-Ting; Wu, Min-Fei; Chen, Chin-Ti; Wu, Chih-I

    2013-01-01

    Single-layer blue phosphorescence organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with either small-molecule or polymer hosts are fabricated using solution process and the performances of devices with different hosts are investigated. The small-molecule device exhibits luminous efficiency of 14.7 cd/A and maximum power efficiency of 8.39 lm/W, which is the highest among blue phosphorescence OLEDs with single-layer solution process and small molecular hosts. Using the same solution process for all devices, comparison of light out-coupling enhancement, with brightness enhancement film (BEF), between small-molecule and polymer based OLEDs is realized. Due to different dipole orientation and anisotropic refractive index, polymer-based OLEDs would trap less light than small molecule-based OLEDs internally, about 37% better based simulation results. In spite of better electrical and spectroscopic characteristics, including ambipolar characteristics, higher carrier mobility, higher photoluminescence quantum yield, and larger triplet state energy, the overall light out-coupling efficiency of small molecule-based devices is worse than that of polymer-based devices without BEF. However, with BEF for light out-coupling enhancement, the improved ratio in luminous flux and luminous efficiency for small molecule based device is 1.64 and 1.57, respectively, which are significantly better than those of PVK (poly-9-vinylcarbazole) devices. In addition to the theoretical optical simulation, the experimental data also confirm the origins of differential light-outcoupling enhancement. The maximum luminous efficiency and power efficiency are enhanced from 14.7 cd/A and 8.39 lm/W to 23 cd/A and 13.2 lm/W, respectively, with laminated BEF, which are both the highest so far for single-layer solution-process blue phosphorescence OLEDs with small molecule hosts

  6. Tunnelling of a molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, P.D.; Bulte, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical description of tunnelling is presented for a one-dimensional system with internal oscillator degrees of freedom. The 'charged diatomic molecule' is frustrated on encountering a barrier potential by its centre of charge not being coincident with its centre of mass, resulting in transitions amongst internal states. In an adiabatic limit, the tunnelling of semiclassical coherent-like oscillator states is shown to exhibit the Hartman and Bueuttiker-Landauer times t H and t BL , with the time dependence of the coherent state parameter for the tunnelled state given by α(t) = α e -iω(t+Δt) , Δt = t H - it BL . A perturbation formalism is developed, whereby the exact transfer matrix can be expanded to any desired accuracy in a suitable limit. An 'intrinsic' time, based on the oscillator transition rate during tunnelling, transmission or reflection, is introduced. In simple situations the resulting intrinsic tunnelling time is shown to vanish to lowest order. In the general case a particular (nonzero) parametrisation is inferred, and its properties discussed in comparison with the literature on tunnelling times for both wavepackets and internal clocks. Copyright (1998) CSIRO Australia

  7. A new family of 1D exchange biased heterometal single-molecule magnets: observation of pronounced quantum tunneling steps in the hysteresis loops of quasi-linear {Mn2Ni3} clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Animesh; Gieb, Klaus; Krupskaya, Yulia; Demeshko, Serhiy; Dechert, Sebastian; Klingeler, Rüdiger; Kataev, Vladislav; Büchner, Bernd; Müller, Paul; Meyer, Franc

    2011-03-16

    First members of a new family of heterometallic Mn/Ni complexes [Mn(2)Ni(3)X(2)L(4)(LH)(2)(H(2)O)(2)] (X = Cl: 1; X = Br: 2) with the new ligand 2-{3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl}ethanol (H(2)L) have been synthesized, and single crystals obtained from CH(2)Cl(2) solutions have been characterized crystallographically. The molecular structures feature a quasi-linear Mn(III)-Ni(II)-Ni(II)-Ni(II)-Mn(III) core with six-coordinate metal ions, where elongated axes of all the distorted octahedral coordination polyhedra are aligned parallel and are fixed with respect to each other by intramolecular hydrogen bonds. 1 and 2 exhibit quite strong ferromagnetic exchange interactions throughout (J(Mn-Ni) ≈ 40 K (1) or 42 K (2); J(Ni-Ni) ≈ 22 K (1) or 18 K (2)) that lead to an S(tot) = 7 ground state, and a sizable uniaxial magnetoanisotropy with D(mol) values -0.55 K (1) and -0.45 K (2). These values are directly derived also from frequency- and temperature-dependent high-field EPR spectra. Slow relaxation of the magnetization at low temperatures and single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior are evident from frequency-dependent peaks in the out-of-phase ac susceptibilities and magnetization versus dc field measurements, with significant energy barriers to spin reversal U(eff) = 27 K (1) and 22 K (2). Pronounced quantum tunnelling steps are observed in the hysteresis loops of the temperature- and scan rate-dependent magnetization data, but with the first relaxation step shifted above (1) or below (2) the zero crossing of the magnetic field, despite the very similar molecular structures. The different behavior of 1 and 2 is interpreted in terms of antiferromagnetic (1) or ferromagnetic (2) intermolecular interactions, which are discussed in view of the subtle differences of intermolecular contacts within the crystal lattice.

  8. Safety of cardiac magnetic resonance and contrast angiography for neonates and small infants: a 10-year single-institution experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangamani, Sheela; Li, Ling; Harvey, Lisa; Fletcher, Scott E.; Danford, David A.; Kutty, Shelby [University of Nebraska College of Medicine/Creighton University School of Medicine, Joint Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Omaha, NE (United States); Varghese, Joby [Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Cardiac Anesthesia, Omaha, NE (United States); Hammel, James M.; Duncan, Kim F. [Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2012-11-15

    With increasing applications of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for evaluation of congenital heart disease (CHD), safety of this technology in the very young is of particular interest. We report our 10-year experience with CMR in neonates and small infants with particular focus on the safety profile and incidence of adverse events (AEs). We reviewed clinical, anesthesia and nursing records of all children {<=}120 days of age who underwent CMR. We recorded variables including cardiac diagnosis, study duration, anesthesia type and agents, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) dependence and gadolinium (Gd) use. Serially recorded temperature, systemic saturation (SpO{sub 2}) and cardiac rhythm were analyzed. Primary outcome measure was any AE during or <24 h after the procedure, including minor AEs such as hypothermia (axillary temperature {<=}95 F), desaturation (SpO{sub 2} drop {>=}10% below baseline) and bradycardia (heart rate {<=}100 bpm). Secondary outcome measure was unplanned overnight hospitalization of outpatients. Children (n = 143; 74 boys, 69 girls) had a median age of 6 days (1-117), and 98 were {<=}30 days at the time of CMR. The median weight was 3.4 kg (1.4-6 kg) and body surface area 0.22 m{sup 2} (0.13-0.32 m{sup 2}). There were 118 (83%) inpatients (108 receiving intensive care) and 25 (17%) outpatients. Indications for CMR were assessment of aortic arch (n = 57), complex CHD (n = 41), pulmonary veins (n = 15), vascular ring (n = 8), intracardiac mass (n = 8), pulmonary artery (n = 7), ventricular volume (n = 4), and systemic veins (n = 3). CMR was performed using a 1.5-T scanner and a commercially available coil. CMR utilized general anesthesia (GA) in 86 children, deep sedation (DS) in 50 and comforting methods in seven. MRA was performed in 136 children. Fifty-nine children were PGE1-dependent and 39 had single-ventricle circulation. Among children on PGE1, 43 (73%) had GA and 10 (17%) had DS. Twelve children (9%) had

  9. Safety of cardiac magnetic resonance and contrast angiography for neonates and small infants: a 10-year single-institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangamani, Sheela; Li, Ling; Harvey, Lisa; Fletcher, Scott E.; Danford, David A.; Kutty, Shelby; Varghese, Joby; Hammel, James M.; Duncan, Kim F.

    2012-01-01

    With increasing applications of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for evaluation of congenital heart disease (CHD), safety of this technology in the very young is of particular interest. We report our 10-year experience with CMR in neonates and small infants with particular focus on the safety profile and incidence of adverse events (AEs). We reviewed clinical, anesthesia and nursing records of all children ≤120 days of age who underwent CMR. We recorded variables including cardiac diagnosis, study duration, anesthesia type and agents, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) dependence and gadolinium (Gd) use. Serially recorded temperature, systemic saturation (SpO 2 ) and cardiac rhythm were analyzed. Primary outcome measure was any AE during or 2 drop ≥10% below baseline) and bradycardia (heart rate ≤100 bpm). Secondary outcome measure was unplanned overnight hospitalization of outpatients. Children (n = 143; 74 boys, 69 girls) had a median age of 6 days (1-117), and 98 were ≤30 days at the time of CMR. The median weight was 3.4 kg (1.4-6 kg) and body surface area 0.22 m 2 (0.13-0.32 m 2 ). There were 118 (83%) inpatients (108 receiving intensive care) and 25 (17%) outpatients. Indications for CMR were assessment of aortic arch (n = 57), complex CHD (n = 41), pulmonary veins (n = 15), vascular ring (n = 8), intracardiac mass (n = 8), pulmonary artery (n = 7), ventricular volume (n = 4), and systemic veins (n = 3). CMR was performed using a 1.5-T scanner and a commercially available coil. CMR utilized general anesthesia (GA) in 86 children, deep sedation (DS) in 50 and comforting methods in seven. MRA was performed in 136 children. Fifty-nine children were PGE1-dependent and 39 had single-ventricle circulation. Among children on PGE1, 43 (73%) had GA and 10 (17%) had DS. Twelve children (9%) had adverse events (AEs) - one major and 11 minor. Of those 12, nine children had GA (10%) and three had DS (6%). The single major AE was

  10. RITD – Wind tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukka, Harri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Koryanov, Valeri; Schmidt, Walter; Heilimo, Jyri; Finchenko, Valeri; Martynov, Maxim; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Victor; Arruego, Ignazio

    2015-04-01

    An atmospheric re-entry and descent and landing system (EDLS) concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques is highly promising for the Earth re-entry missions. We developed such EDLS for the Earth re-entry utilizing a concept that was originally developed for Mars. This EU-funded project is called RITD - Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development - and it was to assess the bene¬fits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develope a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. The RITD entry and descent system utilizes an inflatable hypersonic decelerator. Development of such system requires a combination of wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations. This included wind tunnel tests both in transsonic and subsonic regimes. The principal aim of the wind tunnel tests was the determination of the RITD damping factors in the Earth atmosphere and recalculation of the results for the case of the vehicle descent in the Mars atmosphere. The RITD mock-up model used in the tests was in scale of 1:15 of the real-size vehicle as the dimensions were (midsection) diameter of 74.2 mm and length of 42 mm. For wind tunnel testing purposes the frontal part of the mock-up model body was manufactured by using a PolyJet 3D printing technology based on the light curing of liquid resin. The tail part of the mock-up model body was manufactured of M1 grade copper. The structure of the mock-up model placed th center of gravity in the same position as that of the real-size RITD. The wind tunnel test program included the defining of the damping factor at seven values of Mach numbers 0.85; 0.95; 1.10; 1.20; 1.25; 1.30 and 1.55 with the angle of attack ranging from 0 degree to 40 degrees with the step of 5 degrees. The damping characteristics of

  11. An air-breathing single cell small proton exchange membrane fuel cell system with AB5-type metal hydride and an ultra-low voltage input boost converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Miyasaka, Akihiro; Shodai, Takahisa [NTT Energy and Environment System Laboratories, 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    A new strategy for increasing the power density of an air-breathing small proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system for the main energy source of portable consumer electronics is presented. The small PEMFC system is composed of a single cell. Utilizing the output voltage of the single cell, we introduce a newly designed ultra-low voltage input boost converter. The boost converter can generate 4.1 V output from input sources with low voltage ranges, such as under 1.0 V. The cathode plate is made from a thin SUS 316L stainless steel plate and has ribs that prevent the cathode from bending. The hydrogen is supplied by a metal hydride (MH) tank cartridge. The MH tank contains highly packed AB5-type MH. The MH tank cartridge has a volume of 13.2 cm{sup 3} and can absorb 6.7 L of hydrogen. The maximum power of the small PEMFC is 4.42 W at room temperature. Using 6.7 L of hydrogen, the small PEMFC can generate 11 Wh of electricity. The power density of the small PEMFC reaches 0.51 Wh cm{sup -3}. And the power density of the whole small PEMFC system, which contains the boost converter, a small Li-ion battery for a load absorber, and a case for the system, reaches 0.14 Wh cm{sup -3}. This value matches that of external Li-ion battery chargers for cell phones. We installed the small PEMFC system in a cell phone and confirmed the operations of calling, receiving, videophone, connecting to the Internet, and watching digital TV. And also confirmed that the small PEMFC system provides approximately 8.25 h of talk time, which is about three times as long as that for the original Li-ion battery. (author)

  12. Comparison of single-grain and small-aliquot OSL dose estimates in < 3000 years old river sediments from South India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, P.J.; Jain, M.; Juyal, N.

    2005-01-01

    We report on OSL dose distributions derived from small-aliquot and single grains of quartz in young fluvial sediments sampled from the Penner River basin, South India. The single-grain dose distributions suggest that 13 out of 19 samples were well bleached. In many well-bleached samples, there wa......We report on OSL dose distributions derived from small-aliquot and single grains of quartz in young fluvial sediments sampled from the Penner River basin, South India. The single-grain dose distributions suggest that 13 out of 19 samples were well bleached. In many well-bleached samples......, there was an underestimation in the single-aliquot dose estimates as compared to those from the single grain-the difference between average dose estimates determined by the two methods ranged from similar to 1% to 31%. Such a dose underestimation was not detectable in poorly bleached samples. Various possible reasons...... perhaps be one of the reasons; this may occur because the stimulation wavelength affects the proportion of the medium and slow components in the initial signal. (c) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  13. Scanning tunneling microscope with two-dimensional translator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J; Ng, K-W

    2011-01-01

    Since the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), it has been a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of materials. Typically STM designs capable of obtaining resolution on the atomic scale are limited to a small area which can be probed. We have built an STM capable of coarse motion in two dimensions, the z- and x-directions which are, respectively, parallel and perpendicular to the tip. This allows us to image samples with very high resolution at sites separated by macroscopic distances. This device is a single unit with a compact design making it very stable. It can operate in either a horizontal or vertical configuration and at cryogenic temperatures.

  14. Output voltage calculations in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with asymmetric voltage behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2011-10-22

    In this paper we study the asymmetric voltage behavior (AVB) of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) for single and double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) in range of a quasi-classical free electron model. Numerical calculations of the TMR-V curves, output voltages and I-V characteristics for negative and positive values of applied voltages were carried out using MTJs with CoFeB/MgO interfaces as an example. Asymmetry of the experimental TMR-V curves is explained by different values of the minority and majority Fermi wave vectors for the left and right sides of the tunnel barrier, which arises due to different annealing regimes. Electron tunneling in DMTJs was simulated in two ways: (i) Coherent tunneling, where the DMTJ is modeled as one tunnel system and (ii) consecutive tunneling, where the DMTJ is modeled by two single barrier junctions connected in series. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Highly functional tunnelling devices integrated in 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Lars-Erik; Lind, Erik; Lindström, Peter

    2003-01-01

    a new type of tunnelling transistor, namely a resonant-tunnelling permeable base transistor. A simple model based on a piece-wise linear approximation is used in Cadence to describe the current-voltage characteristics of the transistor. This model is further introduced into a small signal equivalent...... simultaneously on both tunnelling structures and the obtained characteristics are the result of the interplay between the two tunnelling structures and the gate. An equivalent circuit model is developed and we show how this interaction influences the current-voltage characteristics. The gate may be used......We present a new technology for integrating tunnelling devices in three dimensions. These devices are fabricated by the combination of the growth of semiconductor heterostructures with the controlled introduction of metallic elements into an epitaxial layer by an overgrowth technique. First, we use...

  16. Resonant tunneling measurements of size-induced strain relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, Can Deniz

    Lattice mismatch strain available in such semiconductor heterostructures as Si/SiGe or GaAs/AlGaAs can be employed to alter the electronic and optoelectronic properties of semiconductor structures and devices. When deep submicron structures are fabricated from strained material, strained layers relax by sidewall expansion giving rise to size- and geometry-dependent strain gradients throughout the structure. This thesis describes a novel experimental technique to probe the size-induced strain relaxation by studying the tunneling current characteristics of strained p-type Si/SiGe resonant tunneling diodes. Our current-voltage measurements on submicron strained p-Si/SiGe double- and triple-barrier resonant tunneling structures as a function of device diameter, D, provide experimental access to both the average strain relaxation (which leads to relative shifts in the tunneling current peak positions) and strain gradients (which give rise to a fine structure in the current peaks due to inhomogeneous strain-induced lateral quantization). We find that strain relaxation is significant, with a large fraction of the strain energy relaxed on average in D ≤ 0.25 m m devices. Further, the in-plane potentials that arise from inhomogeneous strain gradients are large. In the D ˜ 0.2 m m devices, the corresponding lateral potentials are approximately parabolic exceeding ˜ 25 meV near the perimeter. These potentials create discrete hole states in double-barrier structures (single well), and coupled hole states in triple-barrier structures (two wells). Our results are in excellent agreement with finite-element strain calculations in which the strained layers are permitted to relax to a state of minimum energy by sidewall expansion. Size-induced strain relaxation will undoubtedly become a serious technological issue once strained devices are scaled down to the deep submicron regime. Interestingly, our calculations predict and our measurements are consistent with the appearance of

  17. Chaos-assisted tunneling in the presence of Anderson localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggen, Elmer V H; Georgeot, Bertrand; Lemarié, Gabriel

    2017-10-01

    Tunneling between two classically disconnected regular regions can be strongly affected by the presence of a chaotic sea in between. This phenomenon, known as chaos-assisted tunneling, gives rise to large fluctuations of the tunneling rate. Here we study chaos-assisted tunneling in the presence of Anderson localization effects in the chaotic sea. Our results show that the standard tunneling rate distribution is strongly modified by localization, going from the Cauchy distribution in the ergodic regime to a log-normal distribution in the strongly localized case, for both a deterministic and a disordered model. We develop a single-parameter scaling description which accurately describes the numerical data. Several possible experimental implementations using cold atoms, photonic lattices, or microwave billiards are discussed.

  18. The possibility to determine a constant of spin-orbit interaction by scanning tunneling microscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khotkevich, N.V.; Kolesnichenko, Yu.A.; Vovk, N.P.

    2016-01-01

    The electron tunneling from the quasi-two-dimensional (surface) states with the spin-orbit interaction into bulk-mode states is studied in the framework of a model of an infinitely thin inhomogeneous tunnel magnetic barrier. The influence of the scattering of quasi-two-dimensional electrons by a single magnetic defect on the tunnel current is analyzed. Analytic formulas for the conductance of a tunnel point-contact as a function of its distance from the defect are obtained. It is shown that the analysis of the local magnetization density around the defect by means of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy allows finding the constant of spin orbit interaction.

  19. Coupled Boundary and Finite Element Analysis of Vibration from Railway Tunnels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Jones, C.J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of vibration from railway tunnels is of growing interest as new and higher-speed railways are built under the ground to address the transport problems of growing modern urban areas around cities. Such analysis can be carried out using numerical methods but models and therefore comput...... body vibration (about 4 to 80 Hz). A coupled finite element and boundary element scheme is applied in both two and three dimensions. Two tunnel designs are considered: a cut-and-cover tunnel for a double track and a single-track tunnel dug with the New Austrian Tunnelling Method (NATM)....

  20. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in a double magnetic tunnel junction

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Useinov, Niazbeck Kh H; Tagirov, Lenar R.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    We present quasi-classical approach to calculate a spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in double magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJ) FML/I/FMW/I/FMR, where the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer FMW can

  1. Quantum tunneling observed without its characteristic large kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Tetsuya; Ueta, Hirokazu; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki

    2015-06-16

    Classical transition-state theory is fundamental to describing chemical kinetics; however, quantum tunneling is also important in explaining the unexpectedly large reaction efficiencies observed in many chemical systems. Tunneling is often indicated by anomalously large kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), because a particle's ability to tunnel decreases significantly with its increasing mass. Here we experimentally demonstrate that cold hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms can add to solid benzene by tunneling; however, the observed H/D KIE was very small (1-1.5) despite the large intrinsic H/D KIE of tunneling (≳ 100). This strong reduction is due to the chemical kinetics being controlled not by tunneling but by the surface diffusion of the H/D atoms, a process not greatly affected by the isotope type. Because tunneling need not be accompanied by a large KIE in surface and interfacial chemical systems, it might be overlooked in other systems such as aerosols or enzymes. Our results suggest that surface tunneling reactions on interstellar dust may contribute to the deuteration of interstellar aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, which could represent a major source of the deuterium enrichment observed in carbonaceous meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. These findings could improve our understanding of interstellar physicochemical processes, including those during the formation of the solar system.

  2. Quantum Calculations of Electron Tunneling in Respiratory Complex III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagras, Muhammad A; Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2015-11-19

    The most detailed and comprehensive to date study of electron transfer reactions in the respiratory complex III of aerobic cells, also known as bc1 complex, is reported. In the framework of the tunneling current theory, electron tunneling rates and atomistic tunneling pathways between different redox centers were investigated for all electron transfer reactions comprising different stages of the proton-motive Q-cycle. The calculations reveal that complex III is a smart nanomachine, which under certain conditions undergoes conformational changes gating electron transfer, or channeling electrons to specific pathways. One-electron tunneling approximation was adopted in the tunneling calculations, which were performed using hybrid Broken-Symmetry (BS) unrestricted DFT/ZINDO levels of theory. The tunneling orbitals were determined using an exact biorthogonalization scheme that uniquely separates pairs of tunneling orbitals with small overlaps out of the remaining Franck-Condon orbitals with significant overlap. Electron transfer rates in different redox pairs show exponential distance dependence, in agreement with the reported experimental data; some reactions involve coupled proton transfer. Proper treatment of a concerted two-electron bifurcated tunneling reaction at the Q(o) site is given.

  3. Interaction between groundwater and TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) excavated tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Font Capó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    A number of problems, e.g. sudden inflows are encountered during tunneling under the piezometric level, especially when the excavation crosses high transmissivity areas. These inflows may drag materials when the tunnel crosses low competent layers, resulting in subsidence, chimney formation and collapses. Moreover, inflows can lead to a decrease in head level because of aquifer drainage. Tunnels can be drilled by a tunnel boring machine (TBM) to minimize inflows and groundwater impacts, restr...

  4. Microelectromechanical System-Based Sensing Arrays for Comparative in Vitro Nanotoxicity Assessment at Single Cell and Small Cell-Population Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pratikkumar; Zhu, Xuena; Zhang, Xueji; He, Jin; Li, Chen-zhong

    2016-03-09

    The traditional in vitro nanotoxicity assessment approaches are conducted on a monolayer of cell culture. However, to study a cell response without interference from the neighbor cells, a single cell study is necessary; especially in cases of neuronal, cancerous, and stem cells, wherein an individual cell's fate is often not explained by the whole cell population. Nonetheless, a single cell does not mimic the actual in vivo environment and lacks important information regarding cell communication with its microenvironment. Both a single cell and a cell population provide important and complementary information about cells' behaviors. In this research, we explored nanotoxicity assessment on a single cell and a small cell population using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device. We demonstrated a controlled capture of PC12 cells in different-sized microwells (to capture a different number of cells) using a combined method of surface functionalization and dielectrophoresis. The present approach provides a rapid nanotoxicity response as compared to other conventional approaches. This is the first study, to our knowledge, which demonstrates a comparative response of a single cell and small cell colonies on the same MEMS platform, when exposed to metaloxide nanoparticles. We demonstrated that the microenvironment of a cell is also accountable for cells' behaviors and their responses to nanomaterials. The results of this experimental study open up a new hypothesis to be tested for identifying the role of cell communication in spreading toxicity in a cell population.

  5. The rewritable effects of bonded magnet for large starting torque and high efficiency in the small power single-phase written pole motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Hak; Lee, Sung-Ho

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents a single-phase written pole motor using a bonded ring magnet for the small power home application. The motor has an exciter pole structure inside the stator and hybrid characteristics of an induction motor and permanent magnet motor. The design parameters and operating characteristics of the hybrid concept motor are investigated to increase starting torque and efficiency, which is most important for the small power home application. Larger starting torque and higher efficiency than those of the conventional induction motor could be obtained by using the rewritable characteristics of bonded magnet on the starting and running conditions.

  6. Seepage into PEP tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, H.

    1990-01-01

    The current rate of seepage into the PEP tunnel in the vicinity of IR-10 is very low compared to previous years. Adequate means of handling this low flow are in place. It is not clear whether the reduction in the flow is temporary, perhaps due to three consecutive dry years, or permanent due to drainage of a perched water table. During PEP construction a large amount of effort was expended in attempts to seal the tunnel, with no immediate effect. The efforts to ''manage'' the water flow are deemed to be successful. By covering equipment to protect it from dripping water and channeling seepage into the drainage gutters, the seepage has been reduced to a tolerable nuisance. There is no sure, safe procedure for sealing a leaky shotcreted tunnel

  7. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane. The resulting infrared sensor can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. An alternative embodiment is implemented using a corrugated membrane to permit large deflection without complicated clamping and high deflection voltages. The alternative embodiment also employs a pinhole aperture in a membrane to accommodate environmental temperature variation and a sealed chamber to eliminate environmental contamination of the tunneling electrodes and undesireable accoustic coupling to the sensor.

  8. Calculation of quantum tunneling for a spatially extended defect: The dislocation kink in copper has a low effective mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Tejs; Sethna, J.P.; Cheong, S.-A.

    2001-01-01

    , and quantum tunneling rates fur dislocation kinks and jogs in copper screw dislocations. We find that jugs are unlikely to tunnel, but the kinks should have large quantum fluctuations. The kink motion involves hundreds of atoms each shifting a tiny amount, leading to a small effective mass and tunneling...

  9. Instabilities in thin tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konkin, M.K.; Adler, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    Tunnel junctions prepared for inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy are often plagued by instabilities in the 0-500-meV range. This paper relates the bias at which the instability occurs to the barrier thickness

  10. An analytical gate tunneling current model for MOSFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazerouni, Iman Abaspur, E-mail: imanabaspur@gmail.com; Hosseini, Seyed Ebrahim [Sabzevar Tarbiat Moallem University, Electrical and Computer Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Gate tunneling current of MOSFETs is an important factor in modeling ultra small devices. In this paper, gate tunneling in present-generation MOSFETs is studied. In the proposed model, we calculate the electron wave function at the semiconductor-oxide interface and inversion charge by treating the inversion layer as a potential well, including some simplifying assumptions. Then we compute the gate tunneling current using the calculated wave function. The proposed model results have an excellent agreement with experimental results in the literature.

  11. Hard-rock tunneling using pulsed electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.T.; Keefe, D.; Brekke, T.L.; Finnie, I.

    1975-01-01

    Intense sub-microsecond bursts of energetic electrons cause significant pulverization and surface spalling of a variety of rock types. The spall debris generally consists of sand, dust, and small flakes. If carried out at rapid repetition rate, this technique appears promising for increasing the speed and reducing the cost of underground excavation of tunnels, mines, and storage spaces. The conceptual design features of a pulsed electron tunnel excavator, capable of tunneling approximately ten times faster than conventional drill/blast methods, is presented. (auth)

  12. Heavy-Atom Tunneling Calculations in Thirteen Organic Reactions: Tunneling Contributions are Substantial, and Bell's Formula Closely Approximates Multidimensional Tunneling at ≥250 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubleday, Charles; Armas, Randy; Walker, Dana; Cosgriff, Christopher V; Greer, Edyta M

    2017-10-09

    Multidimensional tunneling calculations are carried out for 13 reactions, to test the scope of heavy-atom tunneling in organic chemistry, and to check the accuracy of one-dimensional tunneling models. The reactions include pericyclic, cycloaromatization, radical cyclization and ring opening, and S N 2. When compared at the temperatures that give the same effective rate constant of 3×10 -5  s -1 , tunneling accounts for 25-95 % of the rate in 8 of the 13 reactions. Values of transmission coefficients predicted by Bell's formula, κ Bell  , agree well with multidimensional tunneling (canonical variational transition state theory with small curvature tunneling), κ SCT . Mean unsigned deviations of κ Bell vs. κ SCT are 0.08, 0.04, 0.02 at 250, 300 and 400 K. This suggests that κ Bell is a useful first choice for predicting transmission coefficients in heavy-atom tunnelling. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Electrical resistivity borehole measurements: application to an urban tunnel site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, A.; Marache, A.; Obellianne, T.; Breysse, D.

    2002-06-01

    This paper shows how it is possible to use wells drilled during geotechnical pre-investigation of a tunneling site to obtain a 2-D image of the resistivity close to a tunnel boring machine. An experimental apparatus is presented which makes it possible to perform single and borehole-to-borehole electrical measurements independent of the geological and hydrogeological context, which can be activated at any moment during the building of the tunnel. This apparatus is first demonstrated through its use on a test site. Numerical simulations and data inversion are used to analyse the experimental results. Finally, electrical resistivity tomography and single-borehole measurements on a tunneling site are presented. Experimental results show the viability of the apparatus and the efficiency of the inverse algorithm, and also highlight the limitations of the electrical resistivity tomography as a tool for geotechnical investigation in urban areas.

  14. Tunnel magnetoresistance of magnetic molecules with spin-vibron coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Kenawy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of molecular vibrations on the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR of a magnetic tunnel junction with a single spin-anisotropic molecule interconnecting its electrodes is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate that if these vibrations couple at the same time to the charge of tunneling electrons and to the spin of the molecule, the spin anisotropy of such a molecule becomes enhanced. This has, in turn, a profound impact on the TMR of such a device showing that molecular vibrations lead to a significant change of spin-polarized transport, differing for the parallel and antiparallel magnetic configuration of the junction.

  15. Ferroelectric tunnel junctions with multi-quantum well structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhijun; Zhang, Tianjin, E-mail: zhangtj@hubu.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Liang, Kun; Qi, Yajun; Wang, Duofa; Wang, Jinzhao; Jiang, Juan [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2014-06-02

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) with multi-quantum well structures are proposed and the tunneling electroresistance (TER) effect is investigated theoretically. Compared with conventional FTJs with monolayer ferroelectric barriers, FTJs with single-well structures provide TER ratio improvements of one order of magnitude, while FTJs with optimized multi-well structures can enhance this improvement by another order of magnitude. It is believed that the increased resonant tunneling strength combined with appropriate asymmetry in these FTJs contributes to the improvement. These studies may help to fabricate FTJs with large TER ratio experimentally and put them into practice.

  16. A single-center audit of the indications and clinical impact of prolonged ambulatory small intestinal manometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, D; Pannemans, J; Vanuytsel, T; Tack, J

    2018-05-01

    Small bowel manometry is a diagnostic test available only in a few specialized referral centers. Its exact place in the management of refractory symptoms is controversial. The records of all patients who underwent 24-hour ambulatory duodenojejunal manometry over a 6-year period were retrospectively reviewed. We studied the clinical indications for small bowel manometry, and reviewed the impact of manometric findings on the clinical outcome. One hundred and forty-six studies were performed in 137 patients (46M, 91F) with a mean age of 44.9 ± 15.7 years. Mean follow-up duration was 15.1 ± 22.6 months. Appropriate endoscopic, radiological and gastric scintigraphy studies were performed in all patients prior to small bowel manometry. Criteria for abnormal motor activity were based on Bharucha's classification. The indications for small bowel manometry were chronic abdominal pain (n = 43), slow-transit constipation (n = 17), refractory gastroparesis (n = 16), chronic diarrhea (n = 7), recurrent episodes of subocclusion (n = 16), postsurgical evaluation (n = 36), suspicion of gut involvement in systemic disease (n = 9), and unexplained nausea (n = 2). The most common finding was a normal 24-hour ambulatory small bowel manometry (n = 113). Thirty-three studies yielded abnormal findings which included extrinsic neuropathy (n = 6), intrinsic neuropathy (n = 18), intestinal myopathy (n = 2), and subocclusion (n = 7). Ambulatory small bowel manometry excluded a generalized motility disorder in 77% and had a significant impact on the subsequent clinical course in 23%. Ambulatory small bowel manometry is a useful and safe diagnostic tool to complement traditional investigative modalities in patients with severe unexplained abdominal symptoms. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Tunneling in axion monodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Jon; Cottrell, William; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin,Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-10-06

    The Coleman formula for vacuum decay and bubble nucleation has been used to estimate the tunneling rate in models of axion monodromy in recent literature. However, several of Coleman’s original assumptions do not hold for such models. Here we derive a new estimate with this in mind using a similar Euclidean procedure. We find that there are significant regions of parameter space for which the tunneling rate in axion monodromy is not well approximated by the Coleman formula. However, there is also a regime relevant to large field inflation in which both estimates parametrically agree. We also briefly comment on the applications of our results to the relaxion scenario.

  18. LEP tunnel monorail

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    A monorail from CERN's Large Electron Positron collider (LEP, for short). It ran around the 27km tunnel, transporting equipment and personnel. With its 27-kilometre circumference, LEP was the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built and ran from 1989 to 2000. During 11 years of research, LEP's experiments provided a detailed study of the electroweak interaction. Measurements performed at LEP also proved that there are three – and only three – generations of particles of matter. LEP was closed down on 2 November 2000 to make way for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider in the same tunnel.

  19. Excavating a transfer tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The transfer tunnel being dug here will take the 450 GeV beam from the SPS and inject it into the LHC where the beam energies will be increased to 7 TeV. In order to transfer this beam from the SPS to the LHC, two transfer tunnels are used to circulate the beams in opposite directions. When excavated, the accelerator components, including magnets, beam pipes and cryogenics will be installed and connected to both the SPS and LHC ready for operation to begin in 2008.

  20. Construction of a restriction map and gene map of the lettuce chloroplast small single-copy region using Southern cross-hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchelson, K R

    1996-01-01

    The small single-copy region (SSCR) of the chloroplast genome of many higher plants typically contain ndh genes encoding proteins that share homology with subunits of the respiratory-chain reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase complex of mitochondria. A map of the lettuce chloroplast SSCR has been determined by Southern cross-hybridization, taking advantage of the high degree of homology between a tobacco small single-copy fragment and a corresponding lettuce chloroplast fragment. The gene order of the SSCR of lettuce and tobacco chloroplasts is similar. The cross-hybridization method can rapidly create a primary gene map of unknown chloroplast fragments, thus providing detailed information of the localization and arrangement of genes and conserved open reading frame regions.

  1. Breaking through the tranfer tunnel

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the tunnel boring machine breaking through the transfer tunnel into the LHC tunnel. Proton beams will be transferred from the SPS pre-accelerator to the LHC at 450 GeV through two specially constructed transfer tunnels. From left to right: LHC Project Director, Lyn Evans; CERN Director-General (at the time), Luciano Maiani, and Director for Accelerators, Kurt Hubner.

  2. Control of tunneling in heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volokhov, V M; Tovstun, C A; Ivlev, B

    2007-01-01

    A tunneling current between two rectangular potential wells can be effectively controlled by applying an external ac field. A variation of the ac frequency by 10% may lead to the suppression of the tunneling current by two orders of magnitude, which is a result of quantum interference under the action of the ac field. This effect of destruction of tunneling can be used as a sensitive control of tunneling current across nanosize heterostructures

  3. A single molecule switch based on two Pd nanocrystals linked

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Conducting molecule; nanocrystals; scanning tunneling microscopy; negative differential resistance. Abstract. Tunneling spectroscopy measurements have been carried out on a single molecule device formed by two Pd ... Current Issue : Vol.

  4. Design, Construction, and Use of a Single Board Computer Beowulf Cluster: Application of the Small-Footprint, Low-Cost, InSignal 5420 Octa Board

    OpenAIRE

    Cusick, James J.; Miller, William; Laurita, Nicholas; Pitt, Tasha

    2014-01-01

    In recent years development in the area of Single Board Computing has been advancing rapidly. At Wolters Kluwer's Corporate Legal Services Division a prototyping effort was undertaken to establish the utility of such devices for practical and general computing needs. This paper presents the background of this work, the design and construction of a 64 core 96 GHz cluster, and their possibility of yielding approximately 400 GFLOPs from a set of small footprint InSignal boards created for just o...

  5. Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors Resources with in Superconductors Measured by Electron Tunneling; Physical Review Letters, Vol. 5 Issue 4: 147 - 148 ; August 15, 1960 Electron Tunneling Between Two Superconductors; Physical Review Letters, Vol. 5 Issue 10

  6. Scanning tunneling microscope nanoetching method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Zhong; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Andres, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming uniform nanometer sized depressions on the surface of a conducting substrate. A tunneling tip is used to apply tunneling current density sufficient to vaporize a localized area of the substrate surface. The resulting depressions or craters in the substrate surface can be formed in information encoding patterns readable with a scanning tunneling microscope.

  7. Physics of optimal resonant tunneling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Racec, P.N.; Stoica, T.; Popescu, C.; Lepsa, M.I.; Roer, van de T.G.

    1997-01-01

    The optimal resonant tunneling, or the complete tunneling transparence of a biased double-barrier resonant-tunneling (DBRT) structure, is discussed. It is shown that its physics does not rest on the departure from the constant potential within the barriers and well, due to the applied electric

  8. Tunneling spectroscopy on semiconductors with a low surface state density

    OpenAIRE

    Sommerhalter, Christof; Matthes, Thomas W.; Boneberg, Johannes; Leiderer, Paul; Lux-Steiner, Martha Christina

    1997-01-01

    A detailed study of tunneling spectroscopy concerning semiconductors with a low surface state density is presented. For this purpose, I V curves under dark conditions and under illumination were measured on the (0001) van der Waals surface of a p-type WS2 single crystal, which is known to be free of intrinsic surface states. The measurements are interpreted by an analytical one-dimensional metal-insulator-semiconductor model, which shows that the presence of the finite tunneling current has ...

  9. Solid-State Quantum Computer Based on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, G. P.; Brown, G. W.; Hawley, M. E.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2001-08-27

    We propose a solid-state nuclear-spin quantum computer based on application of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and well-developed silicon technology. It requires the measurement of tunneling-current modulation caused by the Larmor precession of a single electron spin. Our envisioned STM quantum computer would operate at the high magnetic field ({approx}10 T) and at low temperature {approx}1 K .

  10. Solid-State Quantum Computer Based on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, G. P.; Brown, G. W.; Hawley, M. E.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a solid-state nuclear-spin quantum computer based on application of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and well-developed silicon technology. It requires the measurement of tunneling-current modulation caused by the Larmor precession of a single electron spin. Our envisioned STM quantum computer would operate at the high magnetic field (∼10 T) and at low temperature ∼1 K

  11. A retrospective study comparing the outcome of horses undergoing small intestinal resection and anastomosis with a single layer (Lembert) or double layer (simple continuous and Cushing) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Kristyn; Epstein, Kira L; Sherlock, Ceri E

    2014-05-01

    To (1) compare postoperative complications and survival in horses after small intestinal resection and anastomosis using 2 anastomosis techniques (single layer Lembert; double layer simple continuous oversewn with Cushing), and (2) to compare outcome by anastomosis type (jejunoileostomy; jejunojejunostomy). Retrospective case series. Horses (n = 53). Medical records (July 2006-July 2010) of all horses that had small intestinal resection and anastomosis. Horses were divided into groups based on technique and type of anastomosis. Comparisons of pre- and intraoperative findings (disease severity), postoperative complications, and survival rates were made between groups. There were no differences in disease severity, postoperative complications, or survival between single layer (n = 23) or double layer (n = 31) anastomoses. There were no differences in disease severity or survival between jejunoileostomy (n = 16) or jejunojejunostomy (n = 38). There was a higher incidence of postoperative colic in hospital after jejunoileostomy (13/16) compared with jejunojejunostomy (18/38) (P = .0127). Postoperative complications and survival are comparable between horses undergoing single layer and double layer small intestinal end-to-end anastomoses. With the exception of increased postoperative colic in the hospital, postoperative complications and survival after jejunoileostomy and jejunojejunostomy are also comparable. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  12. Modeling single-scattering properties of small cirrus particles by use of a size-shape distribution of ice spheroids and cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Cairns, Brian; Carlson, Barbara E.; Travis, Larry D.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we model single-scattering properties of small cirrus crystals using mixtures of polydisperse, randomly oriented spheroids and cylinders with varying aspect ratios and with a refractive index representative of water ice at a wavelength of 1.88 μm. The Stokes scattering matrix elements averaged over wide shape distributions of spheroids and cylinders are compared with those computed for polydisperse surface-equivalent spheres. The shape-averaged phase function for a mixture of oblate and prolate spheroids is smooth, featureless, and nearly flat at side-scattering angles and closely resembles those typically measured for cirrus. Compared with the ensemble-averaged phase function for spheroids, that for a shape distribution of cylinders shows a relatively deeper minimum at side-scattering angles. This may indicate that light scattering from realistic cirrus crystals can be better represented by a shape mixture of ice spheroids. Interestingly, the single-scattering properties of shape-averaged oblate and prolate cylinders are very similar to those of compact cylinders with a diameter-to-length ratio of unity. The differences in the optical cross sections, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter between the spherical and the nonspherical particles studied appear to be relatively small. This may suggest that for a given optical thickness, the influence of particle shape on the radiative forcing caused by a cloud composed of small ice crystals can be negligible

  13. Directed selective-tunneling of bosons with periodically modulated interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Gengbiao; Fu, Li-Bin; Hai, Wenhua; Zou, Mingliang; Guo, Yu

    2015-01-01

    We study the tunneling dynamics of bosons with periodically modulated interaction held in a triple-well potential. In high-frequency approximation, we derive a set of reduced coupled equations and the corresponding Floquet solutions are obtained. Based on the analytical results and their numerical correspondence, the directed selective-tunneling effect of a single atom is demonstrated when all bosons are prepared in middle well initially. A scheme for separating a single atom from N bosons is presented, in which the atom can be trapped in right or left well by adjusting the modulation strength. - Highlights: • The Floquet solutions in a modulating triple-well are obtained analytically. • The directed selective-tunneling effect of a single atom is demonstrated. • We present a manipulation scheme for separating a single atom from N bosons

  14. Tunneling path toward spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Guoxing; Moodera, Jagadeesh S; Muenzenberg, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenon of quantum tunneling, which was discovered almost a century ago, has led to many subsequent discoveries. One such discovery, spin polarized tunneling, was made 40 years ago by Robert Meservey and Paul Tedrow (Tedrow and Meservey 1971 Phys. Rev. Lett. 26 192), and it has resulted in many fundamental observations and opened up an entirely new field of study. Until the mid-1990s, this field developed at a steady, low rate, after which a huge increase in activity suddenly occurred as a result of the unraveling of successful spin tunneling between two ferromagnets. In the past 15 years, several thousands of papers related to spin polarized tunneling and transport have been published, making this topic one of the hottest areas in condensed matter physics from both fundamental science and applications viewpoints. Many review papers and book chapters have been written in the past decade on this subject. This paper is not exhaustive by any means; rather, the emphases are on recent progress, technological developments and informing the reader about the current direction in which this topic is moving.

  15. Magnetic Fluxtube Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Antiochos,, Spiro K.; Norton, D.

    1996-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of two initially orthogonal, twisted, force free field magnetic fluxtubes. The simulations were carried out using a new three dimensional explicit parallelized Fourier collocation algorithm for solving the viscoresistive equations of compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the fluxtubes can 'tunnel' through each other. Two key conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch much greater than 1, and the magnetic Lundquist number must be somewhat large, greater than or equal to 2880. This tunneling behavior has not been seen previously in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic fluxtube interactions. An examination of magnetic field lines shows that tunneling is due to a double reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections and 'pass' through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed.

  16. Tunnel nitrogen spill experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageyev, A.I.; Alferov, V.N.; Mulholland, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    The Energy Saver Safety Analysis Report (SAR) found the tunnel oxygen deficiency considerations emphasized helium spills. These reports concluded the helium quickly warms and because of its low denisty, rises to the apex of the tunnel. The oxygen content below the apex and in all but the immediate vicinity of the helium spill is essentially unchanged and guarantees an undisturbed source of oxygen especially important to fallen personnel. In contrast nitrogen spills warm slower than helium due to the ratio of the enthalpy changes per unit volume spilled spread more uniformly across the tunnel cross-section when warmed because of the much smaller density difference with air, and generally provides a greater hazard than helium spills as a result. In particular there was concern that personnel that might fall to the floor for oxygen deficiency or other reasons might find less, and not more, oxygen with dire consequences. The SAR concluded tunnel nitrogen spills were under-investigated and led to this work

  17. The scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvan, F.

    1986-01-01

    A newly conceived microscope, based on a pure quantum phenomenon, is an ideal tool to study atom by atom the topography and properties of surfaces. Applications are presented: surface ''reconstruction'' of silicon, lamellar compound study, etc... Spectroscopy by tunnel effect will bring important information on electronic properties; it is presented with an application on silicon [fr

  18. Supramolecular tunneling junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wimbush, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    In this study a variety of supramolecular tunneling junctions were created. The basis of these junctions was a self-assembled monolayer of heptathioether functionalized ß-cyclodextrin (ßCD) formed on an ultra-flat Au surface, i.e., the bottom electrode. This gave a well-defined hexagonally packed

  19. Time evolution of tunneling in a thermal medium: Environment-driven excited tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Sh.; Yoshimura, M.

    2004-01-01

    Time evolution of tunneling phenomena proceeding in a thermal medium is studied using a standard model of environmental interaction. A semiclassical probability formula for the particle motion in a metastable state of a one-dimensional system put in a thermal medium is combined with the formula of the quantum penetration factor through a potential barrier to derive the tunneling rate in the medium. The effect of environment, its influence on time evolution in particular, is clarified in our real-time formalism. A nonlinear resonance effect is shown to enhance the tunneling rate at finite times of order 2/η, with η the friction coefficient unless η is too small. In the linear approximation this effect has relevance to the parametric resonance. This effect enhances the possibility of early termination of the cosmological phase transition much prior to the typical Hubble time

  20. Monitoring pilot projects on bored tunnelling : The Second Heinenoord Tunnel and the Botlek Rail Tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, K.J.; De Boer, F.; Admiraal, J.B.M.; Van Jaarsveld, E.P.

    1999-01-01

    Two pilot projects for bored tunnelling in soft soil have been undertaken in the Netherlands. The monitoring was commissioned under the authority of the Centre for Underground Construction (COB). A description of the research related to the Second Heinenoord Tunnel and the Botlek Rail Tunnel will be

  1. Electron accelerator for tunneling through hard rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.T.; Keefe, D.

    1975-10-01

    Earlier work demonstrated that intense sub-microsecond bursts of energetic electrons cause significant pulverization and spalling of a variety of rock types. The spall debris generally consists of sand, dust, and small flakes. If carried out at rapid repetition rate, this can lead to a promising technique for increasing the speed and reducing the cost of underground excavation of tunnels, mines, and storage spaces. The conceptual design features of a Pulsed Electron Tunnel Excavator capable of tunneling approximately ten times faster than conventional drill/blast methods are presented, with primary emphasis on the electron accelerator and only a brief description of the tunneling aspects. Of several candidate types of accelerators, a linear induction accelerator producing electron pulses (5 MV, 5 kA, 1.0 μs = 25 kJ) at a 360 Hz rate was selected for the conceptual example. This provides the required average electron beam power output of 9 MW. The feasibility of such an accelerator is discussed

  2. Electron accelerator for tunneling through hard rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.T.; Keefe, D.

    1975-01-01

    Earlier work demonstrated that intense sub-microsecond bursts of energetic electrons cause significant pulverization and spalling of a variety of rock types. The spall debris generally consists of sand, dust, and small flakes. If carried out at rapid repetition rate, this can lead to a promising technique for increasing the speed and reducing the cost of underground excavation of tunnels, mines, and storage spaces. The conceptual design features of a Pulsed Electron Tunnel Excavator capable of tunneling approximately ten times faster than conventional drill/blast methods are presented with primary emphasis on the electron accelerator and only a brief description of the tunneling aspects. Of several candidate types of accelerators, a linear induction accelerator producing electron pulses (5 MV, 5 kA, 1.0 μs = 25 kJ) at a 360 Hz rate was selected for the conceptual example. This provides the required average electron beam power output of 9 MW. The feasibility of such an accelerator is discussed

  3. Josephson tunneling in bilayer quantum Hall system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezawa, Z.F.; Tsitsishvili, G.; Sawada, A.

    2012-01-01

    A Bose–Einstein condensation is formed by composite bosons in the quantum Hall state. A composite boson carries the fundamental charge (−e). We investigate Josephson tunneling of such charges in the bilayer quantum Hall system at the total filling ν=1. We show the existence of the critical current for the tunneling current to be coherent and dissipationless. Our results explain recent experiments due to [L. Tiemann, Y. Yoon, W. Dietsche, K. von Klitzing, W. Wegscheider, Phys. Rev. B 80 (2009) 165120] and due to [Y. Yoon, L. Tiemann, S. Schmult, W. Dietsche, K. von Klitzing, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104 (2010) 116802]. We predict also how the critical current changes as the sample is tilted in the magnetic field. -- Highlights: ► Composite bosons undergo Bose–Einstein condensation to form the bilayer quantum Hall state. ► A composite boson is a single electron bound to a flux quantum and carries one unit charge. ► Quantum coherence develops due to the condensation. ► Quantum coherence drives the supercurrent in each layer and the tunneling current. ► There exists the critical input current so that the tunneling current is coherent and dissipationless.

  4. Mechanical stability of repository tunnels and factors to be considered for determining tunnel spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Kunifumi

    1994-01-01

    Kristallin-1 organized by Nagra is currently advanced as a synthetic project regarding a high level radioactive waste (HLW) repository in Switzerland. Its host rock is granitic rocks, and the potential siting area is located in northern Switzerland. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the long term safety of a HLW repository under more site-specific conditions than before. As the detailed geological data were investigated, the average size of undisturbed crystalline rock blocks is limited horizontally to about several hundred meter, therefore, the HLW repository area must be divided into several panels to avoid fracture zones. It is necessary to make tunnel spacing as small as possible for the purpose of reasonably designing the entire layout of repository tunnels. The main factors to be considered for determining repository tunnel spacing are listed. Rock mass modeling, rock mass material properties, the analysis model and parameters, the numerical analysis of repository tunnel stability and its main conclusion are reported. The numerical analysis of the temperature distribution in near field was carried out. Tunnel spacing should be set more than 20 m in view of the maximum temperature. (K.I.)

  5. A Single Session of rTMS Enhances Small-Worldness in Writer’s Cramp: Evidence from Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Multi-Modal Brain Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose D. Bharath

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS induces widespread changes in brain connectivity. As the network topology differences induced by a single session of rTMS are less known we undertook this study to ascertain whether the network alterations had a small-world morphology using multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI.Method: Simultaneous EEG-fMRI was acquired in duplicate before (R1 and after (R2 a single session of rTMS in 14 patients with Writer’s Cramp (WC. Whole brain neuronal and hemodynamic network connectivity were explored using the graph theory measures and clustering coefficient, path length and small-world index were calculated for EEG and resting state fMRI (rsfMRI. Multi-modal graph theory analysis was used to evaluate the correlation of EEG and fMRI clustering coefficients.Result: A single session of rTMS was found to increase the clustering coefficient and small-worldness significantly in both EEG and fMRI (p < 0.05. Multi-modal graph theory analysis revealed significant modulations in the fronto-parietal regions immediately after rTMS. The rsfMRI revealed additional modulations in several deep brain regions including cerebellum, insula and medial frontal lobe.Conclusion: Multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI can supplement motor physiology methods in understanding the neurobiology of rTMS in vivo. Coinciding evidence from EEG and rsfMRI reports small-world morphology for the acute phase network hyper-connectivity indicating changes ensuing low-frequency rTMS is probably not “noise”.

  6. Small-Signal Modeling, Stability Analysis and Design Optimization of Single-Phase Delay-Based PLLs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Guerrero, Josep M.; Vidal, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Generally speaking, designing single-phase phaselocked loops (PLLs) is more complicated than three-phase ones, as their implementation often involves the generation of a fictitious orthogonal signal for the frame transformation. In recent years, many approaches to generate the orthogonal signal...... these issues and explore new methods to enhance their performance. The stability analysis, control design guidelines and performance comparison with the state-of-the-art PLLs are presented as well....

  7. Lateral manipulation of small clusters on the Cu and Ag(1 1 1) surfaces with the single-atom and trimer-apex tips: Reliability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yiqun; Liu Fen; Huang Lei

    2010-01-01

    We study the reliability of the lateral manipulation of small Cu clusters (dimer and trimer) on the flat Cu(1 1 1) surface with both the single-atom and trimer-apex tips and that for the Ag/Ag(1 1 1) system, and compare the results between the two systems as well as with the single-atom manipulation on these surfaces. Manipulations are simulated using molecular statics method with semi-empirical potentials. The dependence of the manipulation reliability on the tip height and tip orientation are investigated. Overall, the manipulation reliability increases with decreasing tip height although it depends obviously on the tip orientation. For the Cu/Cu(1 1 1) system, the manipulation of the dimmer and trimer can be successful with both tips. The manipulation reliability can be improved by the trimer-apex tip, and the tip-height range for the successful manipulation is also broader, as compared to the single-atom apex tip. Differently from the single-atom manipulation, the tip orientation has a noticeable influence on the manipulation reliability even for the single-atom tip due to the stronger tip-cluster and surface-adatom interactions in cluster manipulation. For the Ag/Ag(1 1 1) system, successful manipulations only be achieved with the trimer-apex tip, and the manipulation reliability is worse than that of the Cu/Cu(1 1 1) system, indicating the difference in mechanic properties between the two surfaces at the atomic level.

  8. Cooling-history effects on magnetic relaxation through quantum tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Julio; Alonso, Juan

    2003-03-01

    Magnetic clusters, such as Fe8 and Mn_12, that make up the core of large organometallic molecules, behave at low temperatures as large single spins S. In crystals, magnetic anisotropy energies U inhibit magnetic relaxation of these spins, which can then proceed at very small temperatures (at k_BT tunneling (MQT). Magnetic dipolar interactions then play an essential role. We study how an Ising system of spins that interact through magnetic dipolar fields relaxes. A spin is allowed to flip, at rate Γ, only if the magnetic field h acting on it is within some tunnel window -hw < h< h_w. We let (1) this system be initially held for some time at some temperature Ta that is above both the long-range ordering temperature and T ˜ U/S, and (2) apply a magnetic field at t=0, inmediately after the system is quenched to T < 0.1U/S. This is somewhat as in the experiments of Wernsdorfer et al on Fe_8. The time evolution of the magnetiztion m and field distributions after the field is applied at t=0 is studied. For small applied fields H, m ˜= hw HF(Γ t). In addition, F(Γ t)˜= cΓ t for Γ t < 1 and F(Γ t)˜= cΓ t for 1 <Γ t < (h_d/h_w)^2, where hd is a nearest neighbor dipolar field. We will show how c depends on the cooling protocol. Finally, m saturates at m_s˜= 0.13\\varepsilon_aH.

  9. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and High PressureX-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of Adsorbate Structure,Composition and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions on A Model SingleCrystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montano, Max O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Our research focuses on taking advantage of the ability of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to operate at high-temperatures and high-pressures while still providing real-time atomic resolution images. We also utilize high-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HPXPS) to monitor systems under identical conditions thus giving us chemical information to compare and contrast with the structural and dynamic data provided by STM.

  10. Energy Tunneling Behavior in Geometrically Separated Wave Guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Omar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, characteristics of energy tunneling channel between the waveguides geometrically separated by a coaxial cable are studied.  The novel aspect of design is use of coaxial channel to connect the waveguides while maintaining the energy tunneling phenomena. As anticipated the tunneling frequency depends upon the length of wire inside the waveguide and the length of the coaxial cable. The tunneling frequency also depends upon the dielectric constant of the material inside the waveguide and coaxial cable.  At tunneling frequency the field strength (E and H in the channel is extremely high, making the channel extremely sensitive to small change in permittivity of dielectric occupying the channel.  The advantage of the proposed design is, its ability to tune to desired tunneling frequency just by changing the length of the coaxial cable without the need to redesign the waveguide height to accommodate the long tunneling wires. This structure can be used as dielectric sensor both for solid or liquid dielectrics just by placing the sample in coaxial cable cavity, contrary to previously report work where the sample has to be placed inside the waveguide.

  11. Enzyme dynamics and hydrogen tunnelling in a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, Amnon; Cannio, Raffaele; Bartolucci, Simonetta; Klinman, Judith P.; Klinman, Judith P.

    1999-06-01

    Biological catalysts (enzymes) speed up reactions by many orders of magnitude using fundamental physical processes to increase chemical reactivity. Hydrogen tunnelling has increasingly been found to contribute to enzyme reactions at room temperature. Tunnelling is the phenomenon by which a particle transfers through a reaction barrier as a result of its wave-like property. In reactions involving small molecules, the relative importance of tunnelling increases as the temperature is reduced. We have now investigated whether hydrogen tunnelling occurs at elevated temperatures in a biological system that functions physiologically under such conditions. Using a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), we find that hydrogen tunnelling makes a significant contribution at 65°C this is analogous to previous findings with mesophilic ADH at 25°C ( ref. 5). Contrary to predictions for tunnelling through a rigid barrier, the tunnelling with the thermophilic ADH decreases at and below room temperature. These findings provide experimental evidence for a role of thermally excited enzyme fluctuations in modulating enzyme-catalysed bond cleavage.

  12. Proximity-effect and tunneling in YBa2Cu3O7/metal layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, L.H.; Feldmann, W.L.; Barner, J.B.; Farrow, L.A.; Miceli, P.F.; Ramesh, R.; Wilkens, B.J.; Bagley, B.G.; Giroud, M.; Rowell, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Superconducting thin films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 are prepared in-situ by on-axis sputter deposition from a single, composite target. The planar magnetron target composition of YBa:Cu = 1.08:1.76:4.5 sputtered onto MgO at T ∼ 750 degrees C in a 600 mTorr Ar-O 2 atmosphere yields reproducible superconducting films having T c (R = 0) > 80 K and stoichiometry 1:2:3, that are shiny and of near epitaxial crystalline quality. In order to ensure clean interfaces, YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 /normal metal bilayers (to form SNS' Josephson junctions) and YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 /normal metal/insulating barrier trilayers (to form SNIS' proximity tunnel junctions) are grown completely in-situ. (The S' = Pb counter electrode is evaporated ex-situ.) A supercurrent and Shapiro steps are observed in microwave irradiated SNS' (N = Ag) small area (5 x 10 -5 cm 2 junctions. In SNIS' tunnel junctions, high-quality Pb tunnelling is observed

  13. Transcriptome Analysis on Single Small Yellow Follicles Reveals That Wnt4 Is Involved in Chicken Follicle Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiya Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian follicle selection is an important process impacting the laying performance and fecundity of hens, and is regulated by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH through binding to its receptor [follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR]. In laying hens, the small yellow follicle (6–8 mm in diameter with the highest expression of FSHR will be recruited into the preovulatory hierarchy during ovarian follicle development. The study of molecular mechanism of chicken follicle selection is helpful for the identification of genes underlying egg-laying traits in chicken and other poultry species. Herein, the transcriptomes of chicken small yellow follicles differing in the mRNA expression of FSHR were compared, and a total of 17,993 genes were identified in 3 pairs of small yellow follicles. The Wnt signaling pathway was significantly enriched in the follicles with the greatest fold change in FSHR expression. In this pathway, the expression level of Wnt4 mRNA was significantly upregulated with a log2(fold change of 2.12. We further investigated the expression, function, and regulation of Wnt4 during chicken follicle selection and found that Wnt4 mRNA reached its peak in small yellow follicles; Wnt4 stimulated the proliferation of follicular granulosa cells (GCs, increased the expression of StAR and CYP11A1 mRNA in prehierarchical and hierarchical follicles, increased the expression of FSHR mRNA, and decreased the expression of anti-Müllerian hormone and OCLN mRNA. Treatment with FSH significantly increased Wnt4 expression in GCs. Moreover, Wnt4 facilitated the effects of FSH on the production of progesterone (P4 and the mRNA expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes in the GCs of hierarchical follicles, but inhibited the effects of FSH in the GCs of prehierarchical follicles. Collectively, these data suggest that Wnt4 plays an important role in chicken follicle selection by stimulating GC proliferation and steroidogenesis. This study provides a

  14. Single-molecule tracking of small GTPase Rac1 uncovers spatial regulation of membrane translocation and mechanism for polarized signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sulagna; Yin, Taofei; Yang, Qingfen; Zhang, Jingqiao; Wu, Yi I.; Yu, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Polarized Rac1 signaling is a hallmark of many cellular functions, including cell adhesion, motility, and cell division. The two steps of Rac1 activation are its translocation to the plasma membrane and the exchange of nucleotide from GDP to GTP. It is, however, unclear whether these two processes are regulated independent of each other and what their respective roles are in polarization of Rac1 signaling. We designed a single-particle tracking (SPT) method to quantitatively analyze the kinetics of Rac1 membrane translocation in living cells. We found that the rate of Rac1 translocation was significantly elevated in protrusions during cell spreading on collagen. Furthermore, combining FRET sensor imaging with SPT measurements in the same cell, the recruitment of Rac1 was found to be polarized to an extent similar to that of the nucleotide exchange process. Statistical analysis of single-molecule trajectories and optogenetic manipulation of membrane lipids revealed that Rac1 membrane translocation precedes nucleotide exchange, and is governed primarily by interactions with phospholipids, particularly PI(3,4,5)P3, instead of protein factors. Overall, the study highlights the significance of membrane translocation in spatial Rac1 signaling, which is in addition to the traditional view focusing primarily on GEF distribution and exchange reaction. PMID:25561548

  15. Analysis of photogenerated random telegraph signal in single electron detector (photo-SET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troudi, M; Sghaier, Na; Kalboussi, A; Souifi, A

    2010-01-04

    In this paper, we analyzed slow single traps, situated inside the tunnel oxide of small area single electron photo-detector (photo-SET or nanopixel). The relationship between excitation signal (photons) and random-telegraph-signal (RTS) was evidenced. We demonstrated that photoinduced RTS observed on a photo-detector is due to the interaction between single photogenerated charges that tunnel from dot to dot and current path. Based on RTS analysis for various temperatures, gate bias and optical power we determined the characteristics of these single photogenerated traps: the energy position within the silicon bandgap, capture cross section and the position within the Si/SiO(x = 1.5) interfaces.

  16. Tunnel boring machine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, K.K.; McDonald, R.; Saunders, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that characterization of Yucca Mountain for a potential repository requires construction of an underground Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Mechanical excavating methods have been proposed for construction of the ESF as they offer a number of advantages over drilling and blasting at the Yucca Mountain site, including; less ground disturbance and therefore a potential for less adverse effects on the integrity of the site, creation of a more stable excavation cross section requiring less ground support, and an inherently safer and cleaner working environment. The tunnel boring machine (TBM) provides a proven technology for excavating the welded and unwelded Yucca Mountain tuffs. The access ramps and main underground tunnels form the largest part of the ESF underground construction work, and have been designed for excavation by TBM

  17. Programmable ferroelectric tunnel memristor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy eQuindeau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report an analogously programmable memristor based on genuine electronic resistive switching combining ferroelectric switching and electron tunneling. The tunnel current through an 8 unit cell thick epitaxial Pb(Zr[0.2]Ti[0.8]O[3] film sandwiched between La[0.7]Sr[0.3]MnO[3] and cobalt electrodes obeys the Kolmogorov-Avrami-Ishibashi model for bidimensional growth with a characteristic switching time in the order of 10^-7 seconds. The analytical description of switching kinetics allows us to develop a characteristic transfer function that has only one parameter viz. the characteristic switching time and fully predicts the resistive states of this type of memristor.

  18. A Cable-tunnel Inspecting Robot for Dangerous Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Zhuang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a kind of mobile robot used for inspecting the cable tunnel online in the dangerous environment. Usually, the calble tunnel is full of poisonous gases after fire, such as CO,CH4, CO2 and so on. Then, the mobile robot is able to tell us whether the tunnel environment is safe or not. In this paper the architecture of the robot is designed at first to meet the motion requirement in the tunnel. These characteristics distinguish the mobile robot from others like compact structure,small size,little weight and easily being carried. Next, the moving mechanism and its kinematics are described. And thus, the operating procedure and experiments are introuduced to validate its reliablity.

  19. A cable-tunnel inspecting robot for dangerous environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Zhuang

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a kind of mobile robot used for inspecting the cable tunnel online in the dangerous environment. Usually, the calble tunnel is full of poisonous gases after fire, such as CO, CH4, CO2 and so on. Then, the mobile robot is able to tell us whether the tunnel environment is safe or not. In this paper the architecture of the robot is designed at first to meet the motion requirement in the tunnel. These characteristics distinguish the mobile robot from others like compact structure, small size, little weight and easily being carried. Next, the moving mechanism and its kinematics are described. And thus, the operating procedure and experiments are introuduced to validate its reliablity.

  20. First principles studies of electron tunneling in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    A first principles study of electronic tunneling along the chain of seven Fe/S clusters in respiratory complex I, a key enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain, is described. The broken-symmetry states of the Fe/S metal clusters calculated at both DFT and semi-empirical ZINDO levels were utilized to examine both the extremely weak electronic couplings between Fe/S clusters and the tunneling pathways, which provide a detailed atomistic-level description of the charge transfer process in the protein. One-electron tunneling approximation was found to hold within a reasonable accuracy, with only a moderate induced polarization of the core electrons. The method is demonstrated to be able to calculate accurately the coupling matrix elements as small as 10−4 cm−1. A distinct signature of the wave properties of electrons is observed as quantum interferences of multiple tunneling pathways. PMID:25383312