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Sample records for single sharp peak

  1. Amorphous chalcogenides as random octahedrally bonded solids: I. Implications for the first sharp diffraction peak, photodarkening, and Boson peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, Alexey; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2017-09-01

    We develop a computationally efficient algorithm for generating high-quality structures for amorphous materials exhibiting distorted octahedral coordination. The computationally costly step of equilibrating the simulated melt is relegated to a much more efficient procedure, viz., generation of a random close-packed structure, which is subsequently used to generate parent structures for octahedrally bonded amorphous solids. The sites of the so-obtained lattice are populated by atoms and vacancies according to the desired stoichiometry while allowing one to control the number of homo-nuclear and hetero-nuclear bonds and, hence, effects of the mixing entropy. The resulting parent structure is geometrically optimized using quantum-chemical force fields; by varying the extent of geometric optimization of the parent structure, one can partially control the degree of octahedrality in local coordination and the strength of secondary bonding. The present methodology is applied to the archetypal chalcogenide alloys AsxSe1-x. We find that local coordination in these alloys interpolates between octahedral and tetrahedral bonding but in a non-obvious way; it exhibits bonding motifs that are not characteristic of either extreme. We consistently recover the first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) in our structures and argue that the corresponding mid-range order stems from the charge density wave formed by regions housing covalent and weak, secondary interactions. The number of secondary interactions is determined by a delicate interplay between octahedrality and tetrahedrality in the covalent bonding; many of these interactions are homonuclear. The present results are consistent with the experimentally observed dependence of the FSDP on arsenic content, pressure, and temperature and its correlation with photodarkening and the Boson peak. They also suggest that the position of the FSDP can be used to infer the effective particle size relevant for the configurational equilibration in

  2. Sharp or broad pulse peak for high resolution instruments? Choice of moderator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, M.; Watanabe, N.; Teshigawara, M.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate a concept how we should choose moderator performance to realize required performance for instruments. Neutron burst pulse can be characterized with peak intensity, peak width and tail. Those can be controllable by designing moderator, i.e. material, temperature, shape, decoupling, poisoning and having premoderator. Hence there are large number of variable parameters to be determined. Here we discuss the required moderator performance for some typical examples, i.e. high resolution powder instrument, chopper instrument, high resolution back scattering machine. (author)

  3. Single-peak solitary wave solutions for the variant Boussinesq ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ∈ H1 loc(R). (iii) Similar to the proof of the above (ii),we omit it here. This completes the proof. 3. Smooth and cusped single-peak solitary wave solutions. Theorem 2.4 gives a classification for all single-peak solitary wave solutions for eq. (2.4).

  4. Sharp Central Venous Recanalization in Hemodialysis Patients: A Single-Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arabi, Mohammad, E-mail: marabi2004@hotmail.com; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz [Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Division of Endovascular Interventional Radiology, Department of Medical Imaging (Saudi Arabia); Ahmed, Dildar; Aslam, Naveed [Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Department of Nephrology (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    PurposeWe report our institutional experience with sharp central venous recanalization in chronic hemodialysis patients who failed standard techniques.Materials and MethodsSince January 2014, a series of seven consecutive patients (four males and three females), mean age 35 years (18–65 years), underwent sharp central venous recanalization. Indications included obtaining hemodialysis access (n = 6) and restoration of superior vena cava (SVC) patency to alleviate occlusion symptoms and restore fistula function (n = 1). The transseptal needle was used for sharp recanalization in six patients, while it could not be introduced in one patient due to total occlusion of the inferior vena cava. Instead, transmediastinal SVC access using Chiba needle was obtained.ResultsTechnical success was achieved in all cases. SVC recanalization achieved symptoms’ relief and restored fistula function in the symptomatic patient. One patient underwent arteriovenous fistula creation on the recanalized side 3 months after the procedure. The remaining catheters were functional at median follow-up time of 9 months (1–14 months). Two major complications occurred including a right hemothorax and a small hemopericardium, which were managed by covered stent placement across the perforated SVC.ConclusionSharp central venous recanalization using the transseptal needle is feasible technique in patients who failed standard recanalization procedures. The potential high risk of complications necessitates thorough awareness of anatomy and proper technical preparedness.

  5. Nano-regime Length Scales Extracted from the First Sharp Diffraction Peak in Non-crystalline SiO2 and Related Materials: Device Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips James

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper distinguishes between two different scales of medium range order, MRO, in non-crystalline SiO2: (1 the first is ~0.4 to 0.5 nm and is obtained from the position of the first sharp diffraction peak, FSDP, in the X-ray diffraction structure factor, S(Q, and (2 the second is ~1 nm and is calculated from the FSDP full-width-at-half-maximum FWHM. Many-electron calculations yield Si–O third- and O–O fourth-nearest-neighbor bonding distances in the same 0.4–0.5 nm MRO regime. These derive from the availability of empty Si dπ orbitals for back-donation from occupied O pπ orbitals yielding narrow symmetry determined distributions of third neighbor Si–O, and fourth neighbor O–O distances. These are segments of six member rings contributing to connected six-member rings with ~1 nm length scale within the MRO regime. The unique properties of non-crystalline SiO2 are explained by the encapsulation of six-member ring clusters by five- and seven-member rings on average in a compliant hard-soft nano-scaled inhomogeneous network. This network structure minimizes macroscopic strain, reducing intrinsic bonding defects as well as defect precursors. This inhomogeneous CRN is enabling for applications including thermally grown ~1.5 nm SiO2 layers for Si field effect transistor devices to optical components with centimeter dimensions. There are qualitatively similar length scales in nano-crystalline HfO2 and phase separated Hf silicates based on the primitive unit cell, rather than a ring structure. Hf oxide dielectrics have recently been used as replacement dielectrics for a new generation of Si and Si/Ge devices heralding a transition into nano-scale circuits and systems on a Si chip.

  6. Single-peak solitary wave solutions for the variant Boussinesq ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhang and Chen [6] obtained new types of cusped solitons of a partial differential equation by setting the partial differential equation under inhomogeneous .... (ii) For g = 0. If ψ(0) = 0, by eq. (2.8) we know ψ (0) exists. According to the definition of peak point, we have ψ (0) = 0. However, by eq. (2.8) we must have ψ(0) = A, ...

  7. Sharps container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Angelene M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a system for use in disposing of potentially hazardous items and more particularly a Sharps receptacle for used hypodermic needles and the like. A Sharps container is constructed from lightweight alodined nonmagnetic metal material with a cup member having an elongated tapered shape and length greater than its transverse dimensions. A magnet in the cup member provides for metal retention in the container. A nonmagnetic lid member has an opening and spring biased closure flap member. The flap member is constructed from stainless steel. A Velcro patch on the container permits selective attachment at desired locations.

  8. Sharps and Needlestick Injuries Among Medical Students, Surgical Residents, Faculty, and Operating Room Staff at a Single Academic Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Lynn Y; Torres, Rosalicia; Syed, Sohail; Boyle, Sean; Ata, Ashar; Beyer, Todd D; Rosati, Carl

    The hospital is a place of high risk for sharps and needlestick injuries (SNI) and such injuries are historically underreported. This institutional review board approved study compares the incidence of SNI among all surgical personnel at a single academic institution via an anonymous electronic survey distributed to medical students, surgical residents, general surgery attendings, surgical technicians, and operating room nurses. The overall survey response rate was 37% (195/528). Among all respondents, 55% (107/195) had a history of a SNI in the workplace. The overall report rate following an initial SNI was 64%. Surgical staff reported SNIs more frequently, with an incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 1.33 (p = 0.085) when compared with attendings. When compared with surgical attendings, medical students (IRR of 2.86, p = 0.008) and residents (IRR of 2.21, p = 0.04) were more likely to cite fear as a reason for not reporting SNIs. Approximately 65% of respondents did not report their exposure either because of the time consuming process or the patient involved was perceived to be low-risk or both. The 2 most common reasons for not reporting SNIs at our institution are because of the inability to complete the time consuming reporting process and fear of embarrassment or punitive response because of admitting an injury. Further research is necessary to mitigate these factors. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Integration of neutron time-of-flight single-crystal Bragg peaks in reciprocal space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Arthur J [ORNL; Joergensen, Mads [ORNL; Wang, Xiaoping [ORNL; Mikkelson, Ruth L [ORNL; Mikkelson, Dennis J [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Peterson, Peter F [ORNL; Green, Mark L [ORNL; Hoffmann, Christina [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of single crystal Bragg peaks obtained by mapping neutron time-of-flight event data into reciprocal space and integrating in various ways are compared. These include spherical integration with a fixed radius, ellipsoid fitting and integrating of the peak intensity and one-dimensional peak profile fitting. In comparison to intensities obtained by integrating in real detector histogram space, the data integrated in reciprocal space results in better agreement factors and more accurate atomic parameters. Furthermore, structure refinement using integrated intensities from one-dimensional profile fitting is demonstrated to be more accurate than simple peak-minus-background integration.

  10. The Formation and Erosion History of Mt. Sharp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Dapremont, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    The Curiosity rover is exploring 155 km diameter Gale crater and Mt. Sharp, Gale's 5 km high central mound (Fig. 1). This study addresses the formation and erosion history of Mt. Sharp. Gale lies on the topographic dichotomy between the southern highlands and the northern plains - a drop of over 2 km [1,2]. Altitude differences between the north and south rim reflect this regional slope, as do altitude differences between the deep annulus north of Mt. Sharp and the southern crater floor. Orbiter and rover images demonstrate that most exposed areas on Mt. Sharp consist of thin, sub-parallel units interpreted as sedimentary layers [3]. Gale is typical of the 50 large martian craters that have been totally or partially filled with such layers [4,5]. In many craters these sediments have been deeply eroded. Central Peak and Peak Ring: The highest point on Mt. Sharp, near the crater's center, is interpreted as a central peak [6]. The peak has a massive lower portion and a thin, smooth capping deposit (Fig. 2). Gale's size is transitional between martian craters with single central peaks and craters with peak rings approximately half the crater's diameter [2,6]. The boundaries of Mt. Sharp, as well as an arc of hills to the southeast of the mountain, closely match a circle approximately 80 km in diameter (Fig. 3). This morphology suggests that the Gale impact may have formed both a central peak and a partial peak ring, which is covered by the sediments of Mt. Sharp in the north and possibly exposed in the arc of eroded hills in the southeast quadrant (Figs. 3,4).

  11. The acute effects of static stretching on peak force, peak rate of force development and muscle activity during single- and multiple-joint actions in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Raquel; Gurjão, André Luiz Demantova; Jambassi Filho, José Claudio; Farinatti, Paulo De Tarso Veras; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Gobbi, Sebastião

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the acute effects of static stretching on peak force, peak rate of force development and integrated electromyography (iEMG) in 27 older women (65 ± 4 years; 69 ± 9 kg; 157 ± 1 cm; 28 ± 4 kg · m(-2)). The participants were tested during two exercises (leg press and knee extension) after two conditions: stretching and control. The data were collected on four days (counterbalanced with a 24-hour rest period). In the stretching condition, the quadriceps muscle was stretched (knee flexion) for three sets of 30 s with 30 s rest intervals. No significant difference was detected for peak force and peak rate of force development during the single- and multiple-joint exercises, regardless of the following interactions: condition (stretching and control) vs. time (pre x post x 10 x 20 x 30 minutes post; P > 0.05) and exercise vs. time (P > 0.05). Additionally, no significant interaction was found for the iEMG activity (condition vs. time; P > 0.05) in the single- and multiple-joint exercises. In conclusion, a small amount of stretching of an agonist muscle (quadriceps) did not affect the peak force, peak rate of force development and EMG activity in older women during single- and multiple-joint exercises.

  12. Kondo peak splitting and Kondo dip in single molecular magnet junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Pengbin, E-mail: 120233951@qq.com [Institute of Solid State Physics, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China); Shi, Yunlong; Sun, Zhu [Institute of Solid State Physics, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China); Nie, Yi-Hang [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Luo, Hong-Gang [Center for Interdisciplinary Studies & Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the MoE, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Many factors containing bias, spin–orbit coupling, magnetic fields applied, and so on can strongly influence the Kondo effect, and one of the consequences is Kondo peak splitting (KPS). It is natural that KPS should also appear when another spin degree of freedom is involved. In this work we study the KPS effects of single molecular magnets (SMM) coupled with two metallic leads in low-temperature regime. It is found that the Kondo transport properties are strongly influenced by the exchange coupling and anisotropy of the magnetic core. By employing Green's function method in Hubbard operator representation, we give an analytical expression for local retarded Green's function of SMM and discussed its low-temperature transport properties. We find that the anisotropy term behaves as a magnetic field and the splitting behavior of exchange coupling is quite similar to the spin–orbit coupling. These splitting behaviors are explained by introducing inter-level or intra-level transitions, which account for the seven-peak splitting structure. Moreover, we find a Kondo dip at Fermi level under proper parameters. These Kondo peak splitting behaviors in SMM deepen our understanding to Kondo physics and should be observed in the future experiments. - Highlights: • We study Kondo peak splitting in single molecular magnets. • We study Kondo effect by Hubbard operator Green's function method. • We find Kondo peak splitting structures and a Kondo dip at Fermi level. • The exchange coupling and magnetic anisotropy induce fine splitting structure. • The splitting structures are explained by inter-level or intra-level transitions.

  13. Peak effect and vortex dynamics in superconducting MgB2 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun-Sook; Jang, Dong-Jin; Kim, Heon-Jung; Kang, Byeongwon; Lee, Sung-Ik

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic nature of the vortex state of MgB 2 single crystals near the peak effect (PE) region, which is very different either from that of conventional low-temperature superconductors or from that of high-temperature cuprate superconductors, is introduced in this article. Relaxation from a disordered, metastable field-cooled (FC) state to an ordered, stable zero-field-cooled (ZFC) state of the MgB 2 single crystals under an applied magnetic field and current is investigated. From an analysis of the noise properties in the ZFC state, a dynamic vortex phase diagram of the MgB 2 is obtained near the PE region. Between the onset and the peak region in the critical current vs. magnetic field diagram, crossovers from a high-noise state to a noise-free state are observed with increasing current. Above the peak, however, an opposite phenomenon, crossovers from a noise-free to a high-noise state, is observed which has not been observed in any other superconductors. The hysteresis in the I-V curves and the two-level random telegraph noise in the time evolution of the voltage response under an constant applied current at the ZFC state are also studied in detail

  14. Sharp low-energy feature in single-particle spectra due to forward scattering in d-wave cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung Hwan; Bok, Jin Mo; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhou, X J; Varma, C M; Choi, Han-Yong

    2014-08-01

    There is an enormous interest in the renormalization of the quasiparticle (qp) dispersion relation of cuprate superconductors both below and above the critical temperature T_{c} because it enables the determination of the fluctuation spectrum to which the qp's are coupled. A remarkable discovery by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a sharp low-energy feature (LEF) in qp spectra well below the superconducting energy gap but with its energy increasing in proportion to T_{c} and its intensity increasing sharply below T_{c}. This unexpected feature needs to be reconciled with d-wave superconductivity. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of ARPES data from Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+δ} (Bi2212) using Eliashberg equations to show that the qp scattering rate due to the forward scattering impurities far from the Cu-O planes is modified by the energy gap below T_{c} and shows up as the LEF. This is also a necessary step to analyze ARPES data to reveal the spectrum of fluctuations promoting superconductivity.

  15. Single Atomically Sharp Lateral Monolayer p-n Heterojunction Solar Cells with Extraordinarily High Power Conversion Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Lin; Li, Ming-Yang; Retamal, José Ramón Durán; Lam, Kai-Tak; Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazu; Chen, Lih-Juann; Liang, Gengchiau; Li, Lain-Jong; He, Jr-Hau

    2017-08-01

    The recent development of 2D monolayer lateral semiconductor has created new paradigm to develop p-n heterojunctions. Albeit, the growth methods of these heterostructures typically result in alloy structures at the interface, limiting the development for high-efficiency photovoltaic (PV) devices. Here, the PV properties of sequentially grown alloy-free 2D monolayer WSe 2 -MoS 2 lateral p-n heterojunction are explores. The PV devices show an extraordinary power conversion efficiency of 2.56% under AM 1.5G illumination. The large surface active area enables the full exposure of the depletion region, leading to excellent omnidirectional light harvesting characteristic with only 5% reduction of efficiency at incident angles up to 75°. Modeling studies demonstrate the PV devices comply with typical principles, increasing the feasibility for further development. Furthermore, the appropriate electrode-spacing design can lead to environment-independent PV properties. These robust PV properties deriving from the atomically sharp lateral p-n interface can help develop the next-generation photovoltaics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Single Atomically Sharp Lateral Monolayer p-n Heterojunction Solar Cells with Extraordinarily High Power Conversion Efficiency

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Meng-Lin

    2017-06-26

    The recent development of 2D monolayer lateral semiconductor has created new paradigm to develop p-n heterojunctions. Albeit, the growth methods of these heterostructures typically result in alloy structures at the interface, limiting the development for high-efficiency photovoltaic (PV) devices. Here, the PV properties of sequentially grown alloy-free 2D monolayer WSe-MoS lateral p-n heterojunction are explores. The PV devices show an extraordinary power conversion efficiency of 2.56% under AM 1.5G illumination. The large surface active area enables the full exposure of the depletion region, leading to excellent omnidirectional light harvesting characteristic with only 5% reduction of efficiency at incident angles up to 75°. Modeling studies demonstrate the PV devices comply with typical principles, increasing the feasibility for further development. Furthermore, the appropriate electrode-spacing design can lead to environment-independent PV properties. These robust PV properties deriving from the atomically sharp lateral p-n interface can help develop the next-generation photovoltaics.

  17. 2D IR cross peaks reveal hydrogen-deuterium exchange with single residue specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkelberger, Emily B; Woys, Ann Marie; Zanni, Martin T

    2013-12-12

    A form of chemical exchange, hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX), has long been used as a method for studying the secondary and tertiary structure of peptides and proteins using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we resolve cross peaks between the amide II band and a (13)C(18)O isotope-labeled amide I band, which we show measures HDX with site-specific resolution. By rapidly scanning 2D IR spectra using mid-IR pulse shaping, we monitor the kinetics of HDX exchange on-the-fly. For the antimicrobial peptide ovispirin bound to membrane bilayers, we find that the amide II peak decays with a biexponential with rate constants of 0.54 ± 0.02 and 0.12 ± 0.01 min(-1), which is a measure of the overall HDX in the peptide. The cross peaks between Ile-10-labeled ovispirin and the amide II mode, which specifically monitor HDX kinetics at Ile-10, decay with a single rate constant of 0.36 ± 0.1 min(-1). Comparing this exchange rate to theoretically determined exchange rates of Ile-10 for ovispirin in a solution random coil configuration, the exchange rate at Ile-10 is at least 100 times slower, consistent with the known α-helix structure of ovispirin in bilayers. Because backbone isotope labels produce only a very small shift of the amide II band, site-specific HDX cannot be measured with FTIR spectroscopy, which is why 2D IR spectroscopy is needed for these measurements.

  18. Influence of photo- and thermal bleaching on pre-irradiation low water peak single mode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jianchong; Wen, Jianxiang; Luo, Wenyun; Xiao, Zhongyin; Chen, Zhenyi; Wang, Tingyun

    2011-12-01

    Reducing the radiation-induced transmission loss in low water peak single mode fiber (LWP SMF) has been investigated by using photo-bleaching method with 980nm pump light source and using thermal-bleaching method with temperature control system. The results show that the radiation-induced loss of pre-irradiation optical fiber can be reduced effectively with the help of photo-bleaching or thermal-bleaching. Although the effort of photo-bleaching is not as significant as thermal-bleaching, by using photo-bleaching method, the loss of fiber caused by radiation-induced defects can be reduced best up to 49% at 1310nm and 28% at 1550nm in low pre-irradiation condition, the coating of the fiber are not destroyed, and the rehabilitating time is just several hours, while self-annealing usually costs months' time. What's more, the typical high power LASER for photo-bleaching can be 980nm pump Laser Diode, which is very accessible.

  19. A neutron polarisation analysis study of the 'central' peak in single-crystal praseodymium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, S.K.; Stirling, W.G.; McEwen, K.A.; Salford Univ.

    1981-01-01

    The technique of neutron polarisation analysis has been used to examine the broad 'central' peak in paramagnetic praseodymium. Measurements over the temperature range 1.2-25 K show that these peaks, observed at reciprocal space positions (Q 1 , 0, 2m + 1) with Q 1 = 0.11 tau 100 , are entirely magnetic in character. The relationship between these short-range magnetic correlations and the long-range antiferromagnetic ordering process is discussed. (author)

  20. Single-Ion Deconvolution of Mass Peak Overlaps for Atom Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Andrew J; Haley, Daniel; Moody, Michael P

    2017-04-01

    Due to the intrinsic evaporation properties of the material studied, insufficient mass-resolving power and lack of knowledge of the kinetic energy of incident ions, peaks in the atom probe mass-to-charge spectrum can overlap and result in incorrect composition measurements. Contributions to these peak overlaps can be deconvoluted globally, by simply examining adjacent peaks combined with knowledge of natural isotopic abundances. However, this strategy does not account for the fact that the relative contributions to this convoluted signal can often vary significantly in different regions of the analysis volume; e.g., across interfaces and within clusters. Some progress has been made with spatially localized deconvolution in cases where the discrete microstructural regions can be easily identified within the reconstruction, but this means no further point cloud analyses are possible. Hence, we present an ion-by-ion methodology where the identity of each ion, normally obscured by peak overlap, is resolved by examining the isotopic abundance of their immediate surroundings. The resulting peak-deconvoluted data are a point cloud and can be analyzed with any existing tools. We present two detailed case studies and discussion of the limitations of this new technique.

  1. Study of the peak effect phenomenon in single crystals of 2H-NbSe2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We sketch the generic vortex phase dia- gram of a weakly pinned superconductor, which also utilizes theoretical proposals. We also establish the connection between the metastability effects and pinning. Keywords. Peak effect; vortex phase diagram; order to disorder transformation; 2H-NbSe2. PACS Nos 74.25.Dw; 74.60.

  2. Study of the peak effect phenomenon in single crystals of 2H-NbSe2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (measurements were performed on a VSM), where the magnetization is shown against the applied field. The anomaly in the magnetization corresponds to the PE, with Hp marking the peak position of the PE. The expanded version of the PE region in sample A is shown in the left inset, where the magnetization is plotted for ...

  3. SHARP User Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Y. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shemon, E. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Thomas, J. W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mahadevan, Vijay S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rahaman, Ronald O. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Solberg, Jerome [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-31

    SHARP is an advanced modeling and simulation toolkit for the analysis of nuclear reactors. It is comprised of several components including physical modeling tools, tools to integrate the physics codes for multi-physics analyses, and a set of tools to couple the codes within the MOAB framework. Physics modules currently include the neutronics code PROTEUS, the thermal-hydraulics code Nek5000, and the structural mechanics code Diablo. This manual focuses on performing multi-physics calculations with the SHARP ToolKit. Manuals for the three individual physics modules are available with the SHARP distribution to help the user to either carry out the primary multi-physics calculation with basic knowledge or perform further advanced development with in-depth knowledge of these codes. This manual provides step-by-step instructions on employing SHARP, including how to download and install the code, how to build the drivers for a test case, how to perform a calculation and how to visualize the results. Since SHARP has some specific library and environment dependencies, it is highly recommended that the user read this manual prior to installing SHARP. Verification tests cases are included to check proper installation of each module. It is suggested that the new user should first follow the step-by-step instructions provided for a test problem in this manual to understand the basic procedure of using SHARP before using SHARP for his/her own analysis. Both reference output and scripts are provided along with the test cases in order to verify correct installation and execution of the SHARP package. At the end of this manual, detailed instructions are provided on how to create a new test case so that user can perform novel multi-physics calculations with SHARP. Frequently asked questions are listed at the end of this manual to help the user to troubleshoot issues.

  4. Dynamic vortex-phase diagram of MgB2 single crystals near the peak-effect region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Heon-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Sook; Kang, Byeongwon; Chowdhury, P.; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Park, Min-Seok; Lee, Sung-Ik

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic vortex-phase diagram of MgB 2 single crystals has been constructed by using voltage noise characteristics. Between the onset (H on ) and the peak (H p ) magnetic fields, crossovers from a state with large noises to a noise-free state were observed with increasing current while above H p , a reverse behavior was found. We will discuss the dynamic vortex phase diagram and the possible origins of the crossovers

  5. SHARP Multiphysics Tutorials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Y. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shemon, E. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mahadevan, Vijay S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rahaman, Ronald O. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-29

    SHARP, developed under the NEAMS Reactor Product Line, is an advanced modeling and simulation toolkit for the analysis of advanced nuclear reactors. SHARP is comprised of three physics modules currently including neutronics, thermal hydraulics, and structural mechanics. SHARP empowers designers to produce accurate results for modeling physical phenomena that have been identified as important for nuclear reactor analysis. SHARP can use existing physics codes and take advantage of existing infrastructure capabilities in the MOAB framework and the coupling driver/solver library, the Coupled Physics Environment (CouPE), which utilizes the widely used, scalable PETSc library. This report aims at identifying the coupled-physics simulation capability of SHARP by introducing the demonstration example called sahex in advance of the SHARP release expected by Mar 2016. sahex consists of 6 fuel pins with cladding, 1 control rod, sodium coolant and an outer duct wall that encloses all the other components. This example is carefully chosen to demonstrate the proof of concept for solving more complex demonstration examples such as EBR II assembly and ABTR full core. The workflow of preparing the input files, running the case and analyzing the results is demonstrated in this report. Moreover, an extension of the sahex model called sahex_core, which adds six homogenized neighboring assemblies to the full heterogeneous sahex model, is presented to test homogenization capabilities in both Nek5000 and PROTEUS. Some primary information on the configuration and build aspects for the SHARP toolkit, which includes capability to auto-download dependencies and configure/install with optimal flags in an architecture-aware fashion, is also covered by this report. A step-by-step instruction is provided to help users to create their cases. Details on these processes will be provided in the SHARP user manual that will accompany the first release.

  6. Structural defect induced peak splitting in gold-copper bimetallic nanorods during growth by single particle spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Sravan; Chen, Shutang; Zhou, Yadong; Zhang, Yong; Zou, Shengli; Zhao, Jing

    2015-09-21

    A single particle level study of bimetallic nanoparticle growth provides valuable information that is usually hidden in ensemble measurements, helping to improve the understanding of a reaction mechanism and overcome the synthetic challenges. In this study, we use single particle spectroscopy to monitor the changes in the scattering spectra of Au-Cu alloy nanorods during growth. We found that the unique features of the single particle scattering spectra were due to atomic level geometric defects in the nanorods. Electrodynamics simulations have demonstrated that small structural defects of a few atomic layers split the scattering peaks, giving rise to higher order modes, which do not exist in defect-free rods of similar geometry. The study shows that single particle scattering technique is as sensitive as high-resolution electron microscopy in revealing atomic level structural defects.

  7. Anelastic relaxation peaks in single crystals of zirconium-oxygen alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.; Sprungmann, K.W.; Atrens, A.; Rosinger, H.E.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38

    1977-01-01

    Relaxations of the compliances S 11 -S 12 and S 44 have been observed in single crystals of zirconium-oxygen alloys tested in flexure and in torsion respectively. The relaxations are attributed to the stress-induced reorientation of substitutional impurity atoms (s) paired with interstitial oxygen atoms (i). The results demonstrate that the jump of the interstitial parallel to the basal plane dominates in the reorientation of the s-i pair

  8. Peak effect studies in single crystals CeRu2 and 2H-NbS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulapurkar, A.A.; Grover, A.K.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Niazi, A.; Rastogi, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the peak effect (PE) phenomenon in single crystals of weakly pinned superconductors CeRu 2 and 2H-NbS 2 . 2H-NbS 2 is iso-structural and iso-electronic to 2H-NbSe 2 , whose similarity with CeRu 2 as regards the PE representing the order-to-disorder transformation of the flux line lattice was claimed some time ago. We report on the step change in equilibrium magnetization across the peak effect in CeRu 2 . We also present the vortex phase diagram of 2H-NbS 2 obtained from the magnetization data, and compare the PE phenomenon in 2H-NbS 2 and 2H-NbSe 2 . (author)

  9. Sharp spatially constrained inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vignoli, Giulio G.; Fiandaca, Gianluca G.; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.

    2013-01-01

    We present sharp reconstruction of multi-layer models using a spatially constrained inversion with minimum gradient support regularization. In particular, its application to airborne electromagnetic data is discussed. Airborne surveys produce extremely large datasets, traditionally inverted...... by using smoothly varying 1D models. Smoothness is a result of the regularization constraints applied to address the inversion ill-posedness. The standard Occam-type regularized multi-layer inversion produces results where boundaries between layers are smeared. The sharp regularization overcomes...... inversions are compared against classical smooth results and available boreholes. With the focusing approach, the obtained blocky results agree with the underlying geology and allow for easier interpretation by the end-user....

  10. Biphasic defibrillation using a single capacitor with large capacitance: reduction of peak voltages and ICD device size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, M; Hammel, D; Böcker, D; Borggrefe, M; Budde, T; Isbruch, F; Scheld, H H; Breithardt, G

    1996-02-01

    The volume of current implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) is not convenient for pectoral implantation. One way to reduce the size of the pulse generator is to find a more effective defibrillation pulse waveform generated from smaller volume capacitors. In a prospective randomized crossover study we compared the step-down defibrillation threshold (DFT) of a standard biphasic waveform (STD), delivered by two 250-microF capacitors connected in series with an 80% tilt, to an experimental biphasic waveform delivered by a single 450-microF capacitor with a 60% tilt. The experimental waveform delivered the same energy with a lower peak voltage and a longer duration (LVLD). Intraoperatively, in 25 patients receiving endocardial (n = 12) or endocardial-subcutaneous array (n = 13) defibrillation leads, the DFT was determined for both waveforms. Energy requirements did not differ at DFT for the STD and LVLD waveforms with the low impedance (32 +/- 4 omega) endocardial-subcutaneous array defibrillation lead system (6.4 +/- 4.4 J and 5.9 +/- 4.2 J, respectively) or increased slightly (P = 0.06) with the higher impedance (42 +/- 4 omega) endocardial lead system (10.4 +/- 4.6 J and 12.7 +/- 5.7 J, respectively). However, the voltage needed at DFT was one-third lower with the LVLD waveform than with the STD waveform for both lead systems (256 +/- 85 V vs 154 +/- 51 V and 348 +/- 76 V vs 232 +/- 54 V, respectively). Thus, a single capacitor with a large capacitance can generate a defibrillation pulse with a substantial lower peak voltage requirement without significantly increasing the energy requirements. The volume reduction in using a single capacitor can decrease ICD device size.

  11. Fatigue crack growth control in pressure vessel using single peak overload and load hold at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ling; Nakamura, Haruo; Kobayashi, Hideo

    1995-01-01

    Pressure vessels are periodically subjected to a proof test to assure structural integrity. During that period, it may be possible to control the fatigue crack growth by simultaneous heating globally or locally around a crack tip. From this viewpoint, retardation behavior of a fatigue crack due to a single peak overload at a high temperature (∼300degC) was examined in an A 533 B-1 steel. Parameters investigated were overload ratio, applied temperature, hold time at higher temperature, and unloading temperature of overload. The higher the applied temperature, the greater the effect of retardation especially when unloading of the overload is done at lower temperatures. Also, the hold time at maximum load promotes oxide-film-induced crack closure. To evaluate those effects, a simple model is proposed based on the Dugdale model. (author)

  12. Formation and conversion of defect centers in low water peak single mode optical fiber induced by gamma rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, J. X.; Luo, W. Y.; Xiao, Z. Y.; Wang, T. Y.; Chen, Z. Y.; Zeng, X. L.

    2010-01-01

    The formation and conversion processes of defect centers in low water peak single mode optical (LWPSM) fiber irradiated with gamma rays were investigated at room temperature using electron spin resonance. Germanium electron center (GEC) and self-trapped hole center (STH) occur when the fibers are irradiated with 1 and 5 kGy cumulative doses, respectively. With the increase in irradiation doses, the GEC defect centers disappear, and new defect centers such as E ' centers (Si and Ge) and nonbridge oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs) generate. The generation of GEC and STH is attributed to the electron transfer, which is completely balanced. This is the main reason that radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) of the LWPSM fiber is only 10 dB/km at communication window. The new defect centers come from the conversion of GEC and STH to E ' centers and NBOHC, and the conversion processes cause bond cleavage, which is the root cause that the RIA of the LWPSM fiber significantly increases up to 180 dB/km at working window. Furthermore, the concentration of new defect centers is saturated easily even by increasing cumulative doses.

  13. Constraining Viewing Geometries of Pulsars with Single-Peaked Gamma-ray Profiles Using a Multiwavelength Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyffert, A. S.; Venter, C.; Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Since the launch of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi spacecraft in June 2008, the number of observed gamma-ray pulsars has increased dramatically. A large number of these are also observed at radio frequencies. Constraints on the viewing geometries of 5 of 6 gamma-ray pulsars exhibiting single-peaked gamma-ray profiles were derived using high-quality radio polarization data [1]. We obtain independent constraints on the viewing geometries of 6 by using a geometric emission code to model the Fermi LAT and radio light curves (LCs). We find fits for the magnetic inclination and observer angles by searching the solution space by eye. Our results are generally consistent with those previously obtained [1], although we do find small differences in some cases. We will indicate how the gamma-ray and radio pulse shapes as well as their relative phase lags lead to constraints in the solution space. Values for the flux correction factor (f(omega)) corresponding to the fits are also derived (with errors).

  14. The Application of Multiobjective Genetic Algorithm to the Parameter Optimization of Single-Well Potential Stochastic Resonance Algorithm Aimed at Simultaneous Determination of Multiple Weak Chromatographic Peaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haishan Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous determination of multiple weak chromatographic peaks via stochastic resonance algorithm attracts much attention in recent years. However, the optimization of the parameters is complicated and time consuming, although the single-well potential stochastic resonance algorithm (SSRA has already reduced the number of parameters to only one and simplified the process significantly. Even worse, it is often difficult to keep amplified peaks with beautiful peak shape. Therefore, multiobjective genetic algorithm was employed to optimize the parameter of SSRA for multiple optimization objectives (i.e., S/N and peak shape and multiple chromatographic peaks. The applicability of the proposed method was evaluated with an experimental data set of Sudan dyes, and the results showed an excellent quantitative relationship between different concentrations and responses.

  15. System effects in sample self-stacking CZE: Single analyte peak splitting of salt-containing samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malá, Zdeňka; Gebauer, Petr; Boček, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 5 (2009), s. 866-874 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/1536; GA AV ČR IAA400310609; GA AV ČR IAA400310703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : CZE * peak splitting * self-stacking Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.077, year: 2009

  16. Abdominal Hollowing Reduces Lateral Trunk Displacement During Single-Leg Squats in Healthy Females But Does Not Affect Peak Hip Abduction Angle or Knee Abductio Angle/Moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Lukas D; Archibald, Jessica; Lampert, Eve C; Srbely, John Z

    2017-07-17

    Females suffer 4-6 times more non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than males due to neuromuscular control deficits of the hip musculature leading to increases in hip adduction angle, knee abduction angle, and knee abduction moment during dynamic tasks such as single-leg squats. Lateral trunk displacement has been further related to ACL injury risk in females, leading to the incorporation of core strength/stability exercises in ACL preventative training programs. However, the direct mechanism relating lateral trunk displacement and lower limb ACL risk factors is not well established. To assess the relationship between lateral trunk displacement and lower limb measures of ACL injury risk by altering trunk control through abdominal activation techniques during single-leg squats in healthy females. Interventional Study Setting: Movement and Posture Laboratory Participants: 13 healthy females (21.3±0.88y, 1.68±0.07m, 58.27±5.46kg) Intervention: Trunk position and lower limb kinematics were recorded using an optoelectric motion capture system during single-leg squats under differing conditions of abdominal muscle activation (abdominal hollowing, abdominal bracing, control), confirmed via surface electromyography. Lateral trunk displacement, peak hip adduction angle, peak knee abduction angle/moment, and average muscle activity from bilateral internal oblique, external oblique, and erector spinae muscles. No differences were observed for peak lateral trunk displacement, peak hip adduction angle or peak knee abduction angle/moment. Abdominal hollowing and bracing elicited greater muscle activation than the control condition, and bracing was greater than hollowing in four of six muscles recorded. The lack of reduction in trunk, hip, and knee measures of ACL injury risk during abdominal hollowing and bracing suggests that these techniques alone may provide minimal benefit in ACL injury prevention training.

  17. Peak effect studies in single crystals CeRu2 and 2H-NbS2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) (Oxford Instruments, UK) on single crystal sam- ples of CeRu2 and 2H-NbS2. All the measurements were carried out by cooling the sample in zero field (ZFC mode) and then by applying the magnetic field. The measurements were carried out with the magnetic field parallel to the cube ...

  18. Origin of a Raman scattering peak generated in single-walled carbon nanotubes by X-ray irradiation and subsequent thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Toshiya; Matsuda, Mitsuaki; Itoh, Chihiro, E-mail: citoh@sys.wakayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science, Wakayama University, 930 Sakaedani, Wakayama 640-8510 (Japan); Kisoda, Kenji [Department of Physics, Wakayama University, 930 Sakaedani, Wakayama 640-8510 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    We have found that a Raman scattering (RS) peak around 1870 cm{sup −1} was produced by the annealing of the X-ray irradiated film of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at 450 {sup o}C. The intensity of 1870-cm{sup −1} peak showed a maximum at the probe energy of 2.3 eV for the RS spectroscopy with various probe lasers. Both the peak position and the probe-energy dependence were almost identical to those of the one-dimensional carbon chains previously reported in multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Consequently, we concluded that the 1870-cm{sup −1} peak found in the present study is attributed to carbon chains. The formation of carbon chains by the annealing at temperature lower than 500 {sup o}C is firstly reported by the present study. The carbon chains would be formed by aggregation of the interstitial carbons, which are formed as a counterpart of carbon vacancies by X-ray irradiation diffused on SWNT walls. The result indicates that the combination of X-ray irradiation and subsequent thermal annealing is a feasible tool for generating new nanostructures in SWNT.

  19. Collective vortex pinning and merging of the irreversibility line and second peak effect in optimally doped Ba1-xKxBiO3 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yanjing; Cheng, Wang; Deng, Qiang; Yang, Huan; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2018-02-01

    Measurements on magnetization and relaxation have been carried out on an optimally doped Ba1-xKxBiO3+δ single crystal with Tc = 31.3 K. Detailed analysis is undertaken on the data. Both the dynamical relaxation and conventional relaxation have been measured leading to the self-consistent determination of the magnetization relaxation rate. It is found that the data are well described by the collective pinning model leading to the glassy exponent of about μ ≈ 1.64-1.68 with the magnetic fields of 1 and 3 T. The analysis based on Maley's method combining with the conventional relaxation data allows us to determine the current dependent activation energy U which yields a μ value of about 1.23-1.29 for the magnetic fields of 1 and 3 T. The second magnetization peaks appear in wide temperature region from 2 K to 24 K. The separation between the second peak field and the irreversibility field becomes narrow when temperature is increased. When the two fields are close to each other, we find that the second peak evolves into a step-like transition of magnetization. Finally, we present a vortex phase diagram and demonstrate that the vortex dynamics in Ba1-xKxBiO3 can be used as a model system for studying the collective vortex pining.

  20. Twin Peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.The image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) after its deployment on Sol 3. Mars Pathfinder was developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  1. Type 2 Active Galactic Nuclei with Double-peaked [O III] Lines. II. Single AGNs with Complex Narrow-line Region Kinematics are More Common than Binary AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yue; Liu, Xin; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2011-07-01

    Approximately 1% of low-redshift (z interpreted as either due to kinematics, such as biconical outflows and/or disk rotation of the narrow line region (NLR) around single black holes, or due to the relative motion of two distinct NLRs in a merging pair of AGNs. Here, we report follow-up near-infrared (NIR) imaging and optical slit spectroscopy of 31 double-peaked [O III] type 2 AGNs drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) parent sample presented in Liu et al. The NIR imaging traces the old stellar population in each galaxy, while the optical slit spectroscopy traces the NLR gas. These data reveal a mixture of origins for the double-peaked feature. Roughly 10% of our objects are best explained by binary AGNs at (projected) kpc-scale separations, where two stellar components with spatially coincident NLRs are seen. ~50% of our objects have [O III] emission offset by a few kpc, corresponding to the two velocity components seen in the SDSS spectra, but there are no spatially coincident double stellar components seen in the NIR imaging. For those objects with sufficiently high-quality slit spectra, we see velocity and/or velocity dispersion gradients in [O III] emission, suggestive of the kinematic signatures of a single NLR. The remaining ~40% of our objects are ambiguous and will need higher spatial resolution observations to distinguish between the two scenarios. Our observations therefore favor the kinematics scenario with a single AGN for the majority of these double-peaked [O III] type 2 AGNs. We emphasize the importance of combining imaging and slit spectroscopy in identifying kpc-scale binary AGNs, i.e., in no cases does one of these alone allow an unambiguous identification. We estimate that ~0.5%-2.5% of the z ~ 150 km s-1. Based in part on observations obtained with the 6.5 m Magellan telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research

  2. Deep tissue optical imaging of upconverting nanoparticles enabled by exploiting higher intrinsic quantum yield through use of millisecond single pulse excitation with high peak power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haichun; Xu, Can T.; Dumlupinar, Gökhan

    2013-01-01

    the possible thermal side-effects of the excitation light moderate. These key results facilitate means to break through the general shallow depth limit of upconverting-nanoparticle-based fluorescence techniques, necessary for a range of biomedical applications, including diffuse optical imaging, photodynamic......We have accomplished deep tissue optical imaging of upconverting nanoparticles at 800 nm, using millisecond single pulse excitation with high peak power. This is achieved by carefully choosing the pulse parameters, derived from time-resolved rate-equation analysis, which result in higher intrinsic...... quantum yield that is utilized by upconverting nanoparticles for generating this near infrared upconversion emission. The pulsed excitation approach thus promises previously unreachable imaging depths and shorter data acquisition times compared with continuous wave excitation, while simultaneously keeping...

  3. Decoding ChIP-seq with a double-binding signal refines binding peaks to single-nucleotides and predicts cooperative interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Antonio L.C.; Abeel, Thomas; Peterson, Matthew; Azizi, Elham; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Carvalho, Luís

    2014-01-01

    The comprehension of protein and DNA binding in vivo is essential to understand gene regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) provides a global map of the regulatory binding network. Most ChIP-seq analysis tools focus on identifying binding regions from coverage enrichment. However, less work has been performed to infer the physical and regulatory details inside the enriched regions. This research extends a previous blind-deconvolution approach to develop a post-peak–calling algorithm that improves binding site resolution and predicts cooperative interactions. At the core of our new method is a physically motivated model that characterizes the binding signal as an extreme value distribution. This model suggests a mathematical framework to study physical properties of DNA shearing from the ChIP-seq coverage. The model explains the ChIP-seq coverage with two signals: The first considers DNA fragments with only a single binding event, whereas the second considers fragments with two binding events (a double-binding signal). The model incorporates motif discovery and is able to detect multiple sites in an enriched region with single-nucleotide resolution, high sensitivity, and high specificity. Our method improves peak caller sensitivity, from less than 45% up to 94%, at a false positive rate ChIP-seq analysis: the identification of cooperative interaction. Predictions of known cooperative binding sites show a 0.85 area under an ROC curve. PMID:25024162

  4. Quality evaluation of extracted ion chromatograms and chromatographic peaks in liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenchao; Zhao, Patrick X

    2014-01-01

    Extracted ion chromatogram (EIC) extraction and chromatographic peak detection are two important processing procedures in liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-based metabolomics data analysis. Most commonly, the LC/MS technique employs electrospray ionization as the ionization method. The EICs from LC/MS data are often noisy and contain high background signals. Furthermore, the chromatographic peak quality varies with respect to its location in the chromatogram and most peaks have zigzag shapes. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop effective metrics for quality evaluation of EICs and chromatographic peaks in LC/MS based metabolomics data analysis. We investigated a comprehensive set of potential quality evaluation metrics for extracted EICs and detected chromatographic peaks. Specifically, for EIC quality evaluation, we analyzed the mass chromatographic quality index (MCQ index) and propose a novel quality evaluation metric, the EIC-related global zigzag index, which is based on an EIC's first order derivatives. For chromatographic peak quality evaluation, we analyzed and compared six metrics: sharpness, Gaussian similarity, signal-to-noise ratio, peak significance level, triangle peak area similarity ratio and the local peak-related local zigzag index. Although the MCQ index is suited for selecting and aligning analyte components, it cannot fairly evaluate EICs with high background signals or those containing only a single peak. Our proposed EIC related global zigzag index is robust enough to evaluate EIC qualities in both scenarios. Of the six peak quality evaluation metrics, the sharpness, peak significance level, and zigzag index outperform the others due to the zigzag nature of LC/MS chromatographic peaks. Furthermore, using several peak quality metrics in combination is more efficient than individual metrics in peak quality evaluation.

  5. Assessment of Sharp Injuries among Cameroonian Dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-10

    Jul 10, 2010 ... respondents who sustained injuries (59.0%) received post-exposure prophylaxis (Table. 5). The mode of disposal of sharps for most respondents. (85.4%, n 35) was into special containers (Table 6). Discussion. Sharps injuries potentially expose workers to deadly vi- ruses and other bloodborne pathogens.

  6. Optimization of sharp and viewing-angle-independent structural color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Miller, Owen D; Johnson, Steven G; Soljačić, Marin

    2015-04-06

    Structural coloration produces some of the most brilliant colors in nature and has many applications. Motivated by the recently proposed transparent displays that are based on wavelength-selective scattering, here we consider the new problem of transparent structural color, where objects are transparent under omnidirectional broad-band illumination but scatter strongly with a directional narrow-band light source. Transparent structural color requires two competing properties, narrow bandwidth and broad viewing angle, that have not been demonstrated simultaneously previously. Here, we use numerical optimization to discover geometries where a sharp 7% bandwidth in scattering is achieved, yet the peak wavelength varies less than 1%, and the peak height and peak width vary less than 6% over broad viewing angles (0-90°) under a directional illumination. Our model system consists of dipole scatterers arranged into several rings; interference among the scattered waves is optimized to yield the wavelength-selective and angle-insensitive response.

  7. Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The summer of 1997 will not only be noted by NASA for the mission to Mars by the Pathfinder but also for the 179 brilliant apprentices that participated in the SHARP Program. Apprentice participation increased 17% over last year's total of 153 participants. As indicated by the End-of-the-Program Evaluations, 96% of the programs' participants rated the summer experience from very good to excellent. The SHARP Management Team began the year by meeting in Cocoa Beach, Florida for the annual SHARP Planning Conference. Participants strengthened their Education Division Computer Aided Tracking System (EDCATS) skills, toured the world-renowned Kennedy Space Center, and took a journey into space during the Alien Encounter Exercise. The participants returned to their Centers with the same goals and objectives in mind. The 1997 SHARP Program goals were: (1) Utilize NASA's mission, unique facilities and specialized workforce to provide exposure, education, and enrichment experiences to expand participants' career horizons and inspire excellence in formal education and lifelong learning. (2) Develop and implement innovative education reform initiatives which support NASA's Education Strategic Plan and national education goals. (3) Utilize established statistical indicators to measure the effectiveness of SHARP's program goals. (4) Explore new recruiting methods which target the student population for which SHARP was specifically designed. (5) Increase the number of participants in the program. All of the SHARP Coordinators reported that the goals and objectives for the overall program as well as their individual program goals were achieved. Some of the goals and objectives for the Centers were: (1) To increase the students' awareness of science, mathematics, engineering, and computer technology; (2) To provide students with the opportunity to broaden their career objectives; and (3) To expose students to a variety of enrichment activities. Most of the Center goals and

  8. Knowledge Base Editor (SharpKBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikidjian, Raffi; James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    The SharpKBE software provides a graphical user interface environment for domain experts to build and manage knowledge base systems. Knowledge bases can be exported/translated to various target languages automatically, including customizable target languages.

  9. The Sharpe ratio of estimated efficient portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    Kourtis, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Investors often adopt mean-variance efficient portfolios for achieving superior risk-adjusted returns. However, such portfolios are sensitive to estimation errors, which affect portfolio performance. To understand the impact of estimation errors, I develop simple and intuitive formulas of the squared Sharpe ratio that investors should expect from estimated efficient portfolios. The new formulas show that the expected squared Sharpe ratio is a function of the length of the available data, the ...

  10. Facility Location with Double-peaked Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filos-Ratsikas, Aris; Li, Minming; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of locating a single facility on a real line based on the reports of self-interested agents, when agents have double-peaked preferences, with the peaks being on opposite sides of their locations. We observe that double-peaked preferences capture real-life scenarios and thus...... complement the well-studied notion of single-peaked preferences. We mainly focus on the case where peaks are equidistant from the agents’ locations and discuss how our results extend to more general settings. We show that most of the results for single-peaked preferences do not directly apply to this setting...

  11. A sharp cutting liposuction cannula for gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamas, R S; Williams, C W

    1998-01-01

    Liposuction is often used for the treatment of gynecomastia. Blunt liposuction cannulas can remove the fat but are not very effective in fibrous breast tissue, which requires open excision. Ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty has been advocated for gynecomastia because it effectively removes the fat from fibrous areas. An alternative treatment is a sharp cutting liposuction cannula that easily penetrates and removes the fibrous breast tissue along with the fatty component. The early experience of 22 surgeons who used this cannula in 88 cases of gynecomastia is reported. For 19 of the 22 surgeons, liposuction with sharp cutting cannulas alone gave a satisfactory result in 81% of their patients.

  12. Weighting of field heights for sharpness and noisiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelan, Brian W.; Jin, Elaine W.

    2009-01-01

    Weighting of field heights is important in cases when a single numerical value needs to be calculated that characterizes an attribute's overall impact on perceived image quality. In this paper we report an observer study to derive the weighting of field heights for sharpness and noisiness. One-hundred-forty images were selected to represent a typical consumer photo space distribution. Fifty-three sample points were sampled per image, representing field heights of 0, 14, 32, 42, 51, 58, 71, 76, 86% and 100%. Six observers participated in this study. The field weights derived in this report include both: the effect of area versus field height (which is a purely objective, geometric factor); and the effect of the spatial distribution of image content that draws attention to or masks each of these image structure attributes. The results show that relative to the geometrical area weights, sharpness weights were skewed to lower field heights, because sharpness-critical subject matter was often positioned relatively near the center of an image. Conversely, because noise can be masked by signal, noisiness-critical content (such as blue skies, skin tones, walls, etc.) tended to occur farther from the center of an image, causing the weights to be skewed to higher field heights.

  13. Acoustic streaming of a sharp edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Zhou, Jianbo; Yalamanchili, Satish

    2014-07-01

    Anomalous acoustic streaming is observed emanating from sharp edges of solid bodies that are vibrating in fluids. The streaming velocities can be orders of magnitude higher than expected from the Rayleigh streaming at similar amplitudes of vibration. Acoustic velocity of fluid relative to a solid body diverges at a sharp edge, giving rise to a localized time-independent body force acting on the fluid. This force results in a formation of a localized jet. Two-dimensional numerical simulations are performed to predict acoustic streaming for low amplitude vibration using two methods: (1) Steady-state solution utilizing perturbation theory and (2) direct transient solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Both analyses agree with each other and correctly predict the streaming of a sharp-edged vibrating blade measured experimentally. The origin of the streaming can be attributed to the centrifugal force of the acoustic fluid flow around a sharp edge. The dependence of this acoustic streaming on frequency and velocity is examined using dimensional analysis. The dependence law is devised and confirmed by numerical simulations.

  14. Sharp inequalities for tangent function with applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hui-Lin; Yang, Zhen-Hang; Luo, Tian-Qi; Zheng, Shen-Zhou

    2017-01-01

    In the article, we present new bounds for the function [Formula: see text] on the interval [Formula: see text] and find sharp estimations for the Sine integral and the Catalan constant based on a new monotonicity criterion for the quotient of power series, which refine the Redheffer and Becker-Stark type inequalities for tangent function.

  15. Sharp embeddings of Besov-type spaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gurka, P.; Opic, Bohumír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 208, č. 1 (2007), s. 1-43 ISSN 0377-0427 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/05/2033 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Besov spaces with slowly varying smoothness * Lorentz-Karamata spaces * sharp embeddings Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.943, year: 2007

  16. Assessment of Sharp Injuries among Cameroonian Dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To assess the prevalence of sharp injury among Cameroonian dental professionals. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study of 41 dental professionals recruited from 4 out of 10 provinces in Cameroon was conducted in the second half of 2009. A self-administered questionnaire was used to capture ...

  17. Relation between peak knee flexion angle and knee ankle kinetics in single-leg jump landing from running: a pilot study on male handball players to prevent ACL injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameer, Mariam A; Muaidi, Qassim I

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between knee kinematics and knee-ankle kinetics during the landing phase of single leg jumping has been widely studied to identify proper strategies for preventing non-contact ACL injury. However, there is a lack of study on knee-ankle kinetics at peak knee flexion angle during jumping from running. Hence, the purpose of this study is to establish the relationship between peak knee flexion angle, knee extension moment, ankle plantar flexion moment and ground reaction force in handball players in order to protect ACL from excessive stress during single leg jumping. In addition, the study also clarifies the role of calf muscles in relieving part of ACL stresses with different knee flexion angles during landing. Fifteen active male elite handball players of Saudi Arabia have participated in this study (Age = 22.6 ± 3.5years, Height = 182 ± 3.7 cm, Weight = 87.5 ± 10.2 kg). The players performed three successful landings of single-leg jump following running a fixed distance of about 450cm. The data were collected using a 3D motion capture and analysis system (VICON). Pearson product moment correlation coefficients showed that greater peak knee flexion angle is related significantly to both lesser knee extension moment (r = -.623, P = .013) and vertical component of ground reaction force (VGRF) (r = -.688, P = .005) in landing phase. Moreover, increasing the peak knee flexion angle in landing phase tends to increase the ankle plantar flexion moment significantly (r = .832, P = .000). With an increase of the peak knee flexion angle during single leg jump landing from running, there would be less knee extension moment, low impact force and more plantar flexion moment. As such, the clinical implication of this study is that there may be a possible protective mechanism by increasing the knee flexion angle during landing phase, which tends to protect the ACL from vigorous strain and injuries.

  18. SHARP/PRONGHORN Interoperability: Mesh Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery Bingham; Javier Ortensi

    2012-09-01

    Progress toward collaboration between the SHARP and MOOSE computational frameworks has been demonstrated through sharing of mesh generation and ensuring mesh compatibility of both tools with MeshKit. MeshKit was used to build a three-dimensional, full-core very high temperature reactor (VHTR) reactor geometry with 120-degree symmetry, which was used to solve a neutron diffusion critical eigenvalue problem in PRONGHORN. PRONGHORN is an application of MOOSE that is capable of solving coupled neutron diffusion, heat conduction, and homogenized flow problems. The results were compared to a solution found on a 120-degree, reflected, three-dimensional VHTR mesh geometry generated by PRONGHORN. The ability to exchange compatible mesh geometries between the two codes is instrumental for future collaboration and interoperability. The results were found to be in good agreement between the two meshes, thus demonstrating the compatibility of the SHARP and MOOSE frameworks. This outcome makes future collaboration possible.

  19. Sharp inequalities for tangent function with applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Lin Lv

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the article, we present new bounds for the function e t cot ( t − 1 $e^{t\\cot(t-1}$ on the interval ( 0 , π / 2 $(0, \\pi/2$ and find sharp estimations for the Sine integral and the Catalan constant based on a new monotonicity criterion for the quotient of power series, which refine the Redheffer and Becker-Stark type inequalities for tangent function.

  20. Peak flow meter (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A peak flow meter is commonly used by a person with asthma to measure the amount of air that can be ... become narrow or blocked due to asthma, peak flow values will drop because the person cannot blow ...

  1. Doping evolution of the second magnetization peak and magnetic relaxation in (B a1 -xKx ) F e2A s2 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Lin; Sun, Kewei; Straszheim, Warren E.; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Lograsso, Thomas A.

    2018-02-01

    We present a thorough study of doping dependent magnetic hysteresis and relaxation characteristics in single crystals of (B a1 -xKx ) F e2A s2 (0.18 ≤x ≤1 ). The critical current density Jc reaches maximum in the underdoped sample x =0.26 and then decreases in the optimally doped and overdoped samples. Meanwhile, the magnetic relaxation rate S rapidly increases and the flux creep activation barrier U0 sharply decreases in the overdoped sample x =0.70 . These results suggest that vortex pinning is very strong in the underdoped regime, but it is greatly reduced in the optimally doped and overdoped regime. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements reveal the existence of dislocations and inclusions in all three studied samples x =0.38 , 0.46, and 0.65. An investigation of the paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME) suggests that spatial variations in Tc become small in the samples x =0.43 and 0.46, slightly above the optimal doping levels. Our results support that two types of pinning sources dominate the (B a1 -xKx ) F e2A s2 crystals: (i) strong δl pinning, which results from the fluctuations in the mean free path l and δ Tc pinning from the spatial variations in Tc in the underdoped regime, and (ii) weak δ Tc pinning in the optimally doped and overdoped regime.

  2. Convex Regression with Interpretable Sharp Partitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ashley; Simon, Noah; Witten, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of predicting an outcome variable on the basis of a small number of covariates, using an interpretable yet non-additive model. We propose convex regression with interpretable sharp partitions (CRISP) for this task. CRISP partitions the covariate space into blocks in a data-adaptive way, and fits a mean model within each block. Unlike other partitioning methods, CRISP is fit using a non-greedy approach by solving a convex optimization problem, resulting in low-variance fits. We explore the properties of CRISP, and evaluate its performance in a simulation study and on a housing price data set.

  3. After an exposure to sharps or body fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... htm After an exposure to sharps or body fluids To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Being exposed to sharps (needles) or body fluids means that another person's blood or other body ...

  4. Sharp injuries among hospital waste handlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaitan, P B; Odu, O O; Olaitan, J O; Oseni, O G

    2012-01-01

    Health care workers are generally predisposed to injuries from sharps as a health hazard. This is more pronounced among waste handlers. It is therefore important to assess these injuries among this group of people with a view to identifying the risk factors and suggesting preventive methods. Questionnaires were administered to People handling wastes in our hospital to assess their level of education on injury prevention, immunization status and preventive methods used by them to prevent these injuries and subsequent infections. Forty three waste handlers were interviewed. Twenty eight (65.8%) of them received training before commencing on the job while 14 (32.5%) never received any training. Only thirty nine (90.7%) of them always use hand gloves before carrying wastes. Only three (7.0%) of the respondents have been screened for Hepatitis B, 19 (44.2%) for HIV, while 10 (23.3%) were screened for Hepatitis B, C, and HIV. Eleven (25.6%) of them have been injured with sharps. The finger was the most injured in 7 (93%) of them. Training and re-training of health workers is important and should be encouraged. All health workers should have pre-employment immunization against Hepatitis B, C as well as other before commencing on their jobs. Workers should be screened for infective diseases that can be of legal problem while at the job and the workers should be effectively immunized.

  5. Status report on SHARP coupling framework.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caceres, A.; Tautges, T. J.; Lottes, J.; Fischer, P.; Rabiti, C.; Smith, M. A.; Siegel, A.; Yang, W. S.; Palmiotti, G.

    2008-05-30

    This report presents the software engineering effort under way at ANL towards a comprehensive integrated computational framework (SHARP) for high fidelity simulations of sodium cooled fast reactors. The primary objective of this framework is to provide accurate and flexible analysis tools to nuclear reactor designers by simulating multiphysics phenomena happening in complex reactor geometries. Ideally, the coupling among different physics modules (such as neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, and structural mechanics) needs to be tight to preserve the accuracy achieved in each module. However, fast reactor cores in steady state mode represent a special case where weak coupling between neutronics and thermal-hydraulics is usually adequate. Our framework design allows for both options. Another requirement for SHARP framework has been to implement various coupling algorithms that are parallel and scalable to large scale since nuclear reactor core simulations are among the most memory and computationally intensive, requiring the use of leadership-class petascale platforms. This report details our progress toward achieving these goals. Specifically, we demonstrate coupling independently developed parallel codes in a manner that does not compromise performance or portability, while minimizing the impact on individual developers. This year, our focus has been on developing a lightweight and loosely coupled framework targeted at UNIC (our neutronics code) and Nek (our thermal hydraulics code). However, the framework design is not limited to just using these two codes.

  6. Sharp fronts within geochemical transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindrod, P.

    1995-01-01

    The authors consider some reactive geochemical transport problems in groundwater systems. When incoming fluid is in disequilibrium with the mineralogy sharp transition fronts may develop. They show that this is a generic property for a class of systems where the timescales associated with reaction and diffusion phenomena are much shorter than those associated with advective transport. Such multiple timescale problems are relevant to a variety of processes in natural systems: mathematically methods of singular perturbation theory reduce the dimension of the problems to be solved locally. Furthermore, they consider how spatial heterogeneous mineralogy can impact upon the propagation of sharp geochemical fronts. The authors developed an asymptotic approach in which they solve equations for the evolving geometry of the front and indicate how the non-smooth perturbations due to natural heterogeneity of the mineralogy on underlying ground water flow field are balanced against the smoothing effect of diffusion/dispersive processes. Fronts are curvature damped, and the results here indicate the generic nature of separate front propagation within both model (idealized) and natural (heterogeneous) geochemical systems

  7. Strategic Management Plan for Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse 2002

    OpenAIRE

    State of Utah, Department of Natural Resoures, Division of Wildlife Resources

    2002-01-01

    The Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) is one of seven subspecies of Sharp-tailed Grouse. Historically, Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse occurred within sagebrush-native bunch grass habitat throughout the intermountain region, extending from British Columbia, Washington, Idaho and Montana south through portions of Oregon, California, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico. Sharp-tailed Grouse populations range-wide began declining during 1880-1920 (Bart ...

  8. Assessment of sharps waste management practices in a referral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Sharps waste, sharps waste container, overfilled safety box, sharps waste proportion, infectious waste, incinerator ash, fuel effectiveness. .... cost consideration, efficacy of treatment method, skills requirements and availability of ..... A Preliminary Study of Medical Waste. Management in Lagos Metropolis, Nigeria.

  9. The SHARP Program: Giving Kids Chances to Excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Rich

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the Sports, Habilitation, and Recreation Program (SHARP), a program of the Foundation for Blind Children in Phoenix, Arizona. The SHARP program aims to help children, who have visual impairments, achieve goals, develop independence, and make friends. One of the unique features of the SHARP program is that it…

  10. Assessment of sharps waste management practices in a referral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sharps waste is part of infectious waste generated in health facilities, management of which is critical. This study aimed at assessing the sharps waste management practices in a referral hospital. The study was conducted at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Data on sharps waste containers ...

  11. Asymptotic Sharpness of Bounds on Hypertrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The hypertree can be defined in many different ways. Katona and Szabó introduced a new, natural definition of hypertrees in uniform hypergraphs and investigated bounds on the number of edges of the hypertrees. They showed that a k-uniform hypertree on n vertices has at most (nk−1$\\left( {\\matrix{n \\cr {k - 1} } } \\right$ edges and they conjectured that the upper bound is asymptotically sharp. Recently, Szabó verified that the conjecture holds by recursively constructing an infinite sequence of k-uniform hypertrees and making complicated analyses for it. In this note we give a short proof of the conjecture by directly constructing a sequence of k-uniform k-hypertrees.

  12. Peak Experience Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel G.; Evans, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This paper emerges from the continued analysis of data collected in a series of international studies concerning Childhood Peak Experiences (CPEs) based on developments in understanding peak experiences in Maslow's hierarchy of needs initiated by Dr Edward Hoffman. Bridging from the series of studies, Canadian researchers explore collected…

  13. Relationship between sharps disposal containers and Clostridium difficile infections in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika

    2015-10-01

    Sharps disposal containers are ubiquitous in health care facilities; however, there is paucity of data on their potential role in pathogen transmission. This study assessed the relationship between use of single-use versus reusable sharps containers and rates of Clostridium difficile infections in a national sample of hospitals. A 2013 survey of 1,990 hospitals collected data on the use of sharps containers. Responses were linked to the 2012 Medicare Provider Analysis and Review dataset. Bivariate and multivariable negative binomial regression were conducted to examine differences in C difficile rates between hospitals using single-use versus reusable containers. There were 604 hospitals who completed the survey; of these, 539 provided data on use of sharps containers in 2012 (27% response rate). Hospitals had, on average, 289 beds (SD ± 203) and were predominantly non-for-profit (67%) and nonteaching (63%). Most used reusable sharps containers (72%). In bivariate regression, hospitals using single-use containers had significantly lower rates of C difficile versus hospitals using reusable containers (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.846, P = .001). This relationship persisted in multivariable regression (IRR = 0.870, P = .003) after controlling for other hospital characteristics. This is the first study to show a link between use of single-use sharps containers and lower C difficile rates. Future research should investigate the potential for environmental contamination of reusable containers and the role they may play in pathogen transmission. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hopkinson peak and superparamagnetic effects in BaFe12-xGaxO19 nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bsoul I.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the thermomagnetic properties of a system of Ga-substituted barium hexaferrite nanoparticles (BaFe12-xGaxO19 prepared by ball milling were investigated. The thermomagnetic curves for the samples with x ranging from 0.0 to 1.0 exhibited sharp peaks with high magnetization just below TC (Hopkinson peaks. The height of the peak for our samples was similar or larger than previously observed or calculated values. Theoretical treatment of the experimental data demonstrated that the peaks are due to the effect of superparamagnetic relaxations of the magnetic particle. This effect was confirmed by hysteresis measurements at, and just below the temperature at which the peak occurred. Consequently, the particle diameters were calculated from the experimental data using a theoretical model based on the superparamagnetic behavior of a system of uniaxial, randomly oriented, single domain, non-interacting particles. The calculated diameters of 11 – 26 nm are less than the physical diameters determined from TEM measurements. The factors responsible for the low calculated values are discussed.

  15. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule spectroscopy. (SMS), confocal microscopy,. FCS, sm-FRET, FLIM. 1 High-resolution spectrum re- fers to a spectrum consisting of very sharp lines. The sharp lines clearly display transitions to ...

  16. Peak power ratio generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  17. PEROLD-SHARPE REBALANCING STRATEGIES IN PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentyn Khokhlov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate the different strategies for portfolio rebalanc-ing (buy-and-hold, constant weights, and constant-proportion portfolio insurance (CPPI suggested by Perold and Sharpe in a reallife environment using the actual market data and considering trans-action costs. Methodology. Exchange-traded funds were used to represent asset classes, and actual market prices in 2007-2015 for the ETFs used to conduct the research. The Monte-Carlo simulations were used to generate 400 portfolios over 3 different time horizons in order to get a representative sample. Two actual fee structures were used from the leading U.S. brokerage firms. Results of the portfolio dynamics research show outperformance of CPPI over other strategies on holding periods over 36 months, and on shorter time horizons CPPI and constant weights strategies clearly dominate over buyand- hold strategy. Contrary to the previous conclusions by Perold and Sharpe, there was no definite link between the stock market dynamics or volatility and the preferred strategy. We also see that after a bull market period the CPPI portfolio allocation shifts to 100% equity. The portfolio turnover is typically higher and much more dispersed for CPPI strategy than for constant weights strategy. We also found a strong negative correlation between the CPPI portfolio turnover and the initial equity allocation, whereas for constant weights strategy the turnover is higher at 50% allocation to both stocks and bonds. Practical implications. The strategy choice is shown to be more a matter of the holding period; CPPI seems the best choice over longer periods. Contrary to the widespread perception, our research shows that brokerage fees has not had a material influence on the simulated portfolio performance and, thus, should not be a factor for choosing a strategy. Originality/value. Unlike previous studies in this area that focused on analytical derivation based on sample statistics

  18. Peak Oil, Peak Coal and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Research on future climate change is driven by the family of scenarios developed for the IPCC assessment reports. These scenarios create projections of future energy demand using different story lines consisting of government policies, population projections, and economic models. None of these scenarios consider resources to be limiting. In many of these scenarios oil production is still increasing to 2100. Resource limitation (in a geological sense) is a real possibility that needs more serious consideration. The concept of 'Peak Oil' has been discussed since M. King Hubbert proposed in 1956 that US oil production would peak in 1970. His prediction was accurate. This concept is about production rate not reserves. For many oil producing countries (and all OPEC countries) reserves are closely guarded state secrets and appear to be overstated. Claims that the reserves are 'proven' cannot be independently verified. Hubbert's Linearization Model can be used to predict when half the ultimate oil will be produced and what the ultimate total cumulative production (Qt) will be. US oil production can be used as an example. This conceptual model shows that 90% of the ultimate US oil production (Qt = 225 billion barrels) will have occurred by 2011. This approach can then be used to suggest that total global production will be about 2200 billion barrels and that the half way point will be reached by about 2010. This amount is about 5 to 7 times less than assumed by the IPCC scenarios. The decline of Non-OPEC oil production appears to have started in 2004. Of the OPEC countries, only Saudi Arabia may have spare capacity, but even that is uncertain, because of lack of data transparency. The concept of 'Peak Coal' is more controversial, but even the US National Academy Report in 2007 concluded only a small fraction of previously estimated reserves in the US are actually minable reserves and that US reserves should be reassessed using modern methods. British coal production can be

  19. A computational method for sharp interface advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredmose, Henrik; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    We devise a numerical method for passive advection of a surface, such as the interface between two incompressible fluids, across a computational mesh. The method is called isoAdvector, and is developed for general meshes consisting of arbitrary polyhedral cells. The algorithm is based on the volume of fluid (VOF) idea of calculating the volume of one of the fluids transported across the mesh faces during a time step. The novelty of the isoAdvector concept consists of two parts. First, we exploit an isosurface concept for modelling the interface inside cells in a geometric surface reconstruction step. Second, from the reconstructed surface, we model the motion of the face–interface intersection line for a general polygonal face to obtain the time evolution within a time step of the submerged face area. Integrating this submerged area over the time step leads to an accurate estimate for the total volume of fluid transported across the face. The method was tested on simple two-dimensional and three-dimensional interface advection problems on both structured and unstructured meshes. The results are very satisfactory in terms of volume conservation, boundedness, surface sharpness and efficiency. The isoAdvector method was implemented as an OpenFOAM® extension and is published as open source. PMID:28018619

  20. Peak regulation right

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Z. |; Ren, Z.; Li, Z.; Zhu, R.

    2005-01-01

    A peak regulation right concept and corresponding transaction mechanism for an electricity market was presented. The market was based on a power pool and independent system operator (ISO) model. Peak regulation right (PRR) was defined as a downward regulation capacity purchase option which allowed PRR owners to buy certain quantities of peak regulation capacity (PRC) at a specific price during a specified period from suppliers. The PRR owner also had the right to decide whether or not they would buy PRC from suppliers. It was the power pool's responsibility to provide competitive and fair peak regulation trading markets to participants. The introduction of PRR allowed for unit capacity regulation. The PRR and PRC were rated by the supplier, and transactions proceeded through a bidding process. PRR suppliers obtained profits by selling PRR and PRC, and obtained downward regulation fees regardless of whether purchases are made. It was concluded that the peak regulation mechanism reduced the total cost of the generating system and increased the social surplus. 6 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  1. Sharp Gronwall-Bellman type integral inequalities with delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Győri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Various attempts have been made to give an upper bound for the solutions of the delayed version of the Gronwall-Bellman integral inequality, but the obtained estimations are not sharp. In this paper a new approach is presented to get sharp estimations for the nonnegative solutions of the considered delayed inequalities. The results are based on the idea of the generalized characteristic inequality. Our method gives sharp estimation, and therefore the results are more exact than the earlier ones.

  2. SHARP: The SHARC-II polarimeter at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillancourt, John E.; Attard, M.; Dowell, C. D.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Houde, M.; Kirby, L.; Krejny, M.; Li, H.; Novak, G.; Shinnaga, H.

    2006-12-01

    The Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC-II) is a 12 × 32 pixel camera used with the 10 meter diameter Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). We have deployed an optics module between the telescope and camera which converts SHARC-II into a sensitive imaging polarimeter, "SHARP." The camera and polarimeter currently operate at wavelengths of 350 and 450 μm we are planning an additional passband at 620 μm. The incident beam is split into two orthogonally polarized components by the SHARP optics module and re-imaged onto opposite ends of the SHARC-II array. The result is a dual-beam 12 × 12 pixel polarimeter. The modular nature of the optics design allows the user to easily switch between polarimeter and camera modes during a single observing session. Here we review the optical design of SHARP, report on the instrument's performance, and review our data reduction methodology. SHARP will be used to study the magnetic field structure and dust emission properties in young stellar objects, Galactic clouds, and external galaxies. We present the first polarimetric maps of celestial sources made from SHARP observations and compare them to previous results. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST 02-41356 and 05-05230 to Northwestern University and 05-05124 to the University of Chicago.

  3. Peak-interviewet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raalskov, Jesper; Warming-Rasmussen, Bent

    Peak-interviewet er en særlig effektiv metode til at gøre ubevidste menneskelige ressourcer bevidste. Fokuspersonen (den interviewede) interviewes om en selvvalgt, personlig succesoplevelse. Terapeuten/coachen (intervieweren) spørger ind til processen, som ledte hen til denne succes. Herved afdæk...

  4. Automated asteroseismic peak detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Saravia Ortiz de Montellano, Andrés; Hekker, S.; Themeßl, N.

    2018-05-01

    Space observatories such as Kepler have provided data that can potentially revolutionize our understanding of stars. Through detailed asteroseismic analyses we are capable of determining fundamental stellar parameters and reveal the stellar internal structure with unprecedented accuracy. However, such detailed analyses, known as peak bagging, have so far been obtained for only a small percentage of the observed stars while most of the scientific potential of the available data remains unexplored. One of the major challenges in peak bagging is identifying how many solar-like oscillation modes are visible in a power density spectrum. Identification of oscillation modes is usually done by visual inspection that is time-consuming and has a degree of subjectivity. Here, we present a peak-detection algorithm especially suited for the detection of solar-like oscillations. It reliably characterizes the solar-like oscillations in a power density spectrum and estimates their parameters without human intervention. Furthermore, we provide a metric to characterize the false positive and false negative rates to provide further information about the reliability of a detected oscillation mode or the significance of a lack of detected oscillation modes. The algorithm presented here opens the possibility for detailed and automated peak bagging of the thousands of solar-like oscillators observed by Kepler.

  5. Hydrodynamic processes in sharp meander bends and their morphological implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanckaert, K.

    2011-01-01

    The migration rate of sharp meander bends exhibits large variance and indicates that some sharply curved bends tend to stabilize. These observations remain unexplained. This paper examines three hydrodynamic processes in sharp bends with fixed banks and discusses their morphological implications:

  6. 'Sharpe', a new Armillaria resistant rootstock for peach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe clonal rootstock for peach is jointly released for grower trial by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (Byron, GA) and Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. Sharpe, previously tested as FLA1-1, was discovered in the wild and appears to be a hybrid of Chickasa...

  7. Sharp compared with blunt fascial incision at cesarean delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabakke, Anna J M; Hare, Kristine J; Krebs, Lone

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare patient preference for either sharp incision with scissors or blunt manual cleavage of the fascia at cesarean delivery in a randomized controlled trial in which each woman was her own control. STUDY DESIGN: Women undergoing primary cesarean delivery (n=34) were randomized...... to side distribution of sharp or blunt incision of the fascia (sharp right and blunt left or blunt right and sharp left) and followed three months postoperatively. The primary outcome was patient preference for the right or left side of the scar 3 months postoperatively and modeled by polytomous logistic...... difference was found in patient preference with regard to sharp or blunt incision of the fascia, nor was there a significant difference in postoperative pain scores. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: www.clinicaltrials.org;NCT01297725....

  8. Application of the SHARP Toolkit to Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Challenge Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemon, E. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Yu, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Kim, T. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2017-09-30

    The Simulation-based High-efficiency Advanced Reactor Prototyping (SHARP) toolkit is under development by the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy. To better understand and exploit the benefits of advanced modeling simulations, the NEAMS Campaign initiated the “Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) Challenge Problems” task, which include the assessment of hot channel factors (HCFs) and the demonstration of zooming capability using the SHARP toolkit. If both challenge problems are resolved through advanced modeling and simulation using the SHARP toolkit, the economic competitiveness of a SFR can be significantly improved. The efforts in the first year of this project focused on the development of computational models, meshes, and coupling procedures for multi-physics calculations using the neutronics (PROTEUS) and thermal-hydraulic (Nek5000) components of the SHARP toolkit, as well as demonstration of the HCF calculation capability for the 100 MWe Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR-100) design. Testing the feasibility of the SHARP zooming capability is planned in FY 2018. The HCFs developed for the earlier SFRs (FFTF, CRBR, and EBR-II) were reviewed, and a subset of these were identified as potential candidates for reduction or elimination through high-fidelity simulations. A one-way offline coupling method was used to evaluate the HCFs where the neutronics solver PROTEUS computes the power profile based on an assumed temperature, and the computational fluid dynamics solver Nek5000 evaluates the peak temperatures using the neutronics power profile. If the initial temperature profile used in the neutronics calculation is reasonably accurate, the one-way offline method is valid because the neutronics power profile has weak dependence on small temperature variation. In order to get more precise results, the proper temperature profile for initial neutronics calculations was obtained from the

  9. Displaced spectra techniques as a tool for peak identification in PSD-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineyro, J.; Behringer, K.

    1987-10-01

    Sharp peaks in the power spectral density function can be due to periodic components in the noise signal or due to narrowband random contributions. A novel method based on Fourier transform techniques is presented which allows under certain limitations to identify the peak type. (author)

  10. Twin Peaks - 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  11. Sharp Vision Reveals Intimacy of Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Sharp Vision Reveals Intimacy of Stars AMBER instrument on VLTI Probes Environment of Stars Using the newly installed AMBER instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer, which combines the light from two or three 8.2-m Unit Telescopes thereby amounting to observe with a telescope of 40 to 90 metres in diameter, two international teams of astronomers observed with unprecedented detail the environment of two stars. One is a young, still-forming star and the new results provide useful information on the conditions leading to the creation of planets. The other is on the contrary a star entering the latest stages of its life. The astronomers found, in both cases, evidence for a surrounding disc. ESO PR Photo 36a/05 ESO PR Photo 36a/05 The Young Stellar Object MWC 297 (Artist's View) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 502 pix - 50k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1004 pix - 330k] A first group of astronomers [1], led by Fabien Malbet from the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble, France, studied the young 10-solar mass stellar object MWC 297, which is still in the very early stage of its life [2]. "This scientific breakthrough opens the doors to an especially detailed scrutiny of the very close environment of young stars and will bring us invaluable knowledge on how planets form", says Malbet. It is amazing to see the amount of details the astronomers could achieve while observing an object located more than 800 light-years away and hidden by a large amount of gas and dust. They found the object to be surrounded by a proto-planetary disc extending to about the size of our Solar System, but truncated in his inner part until about half the distance between the Earth and the Sun. Moreover, the scientists found the object to be surrounded by an outflowing wind, the velocity of which increased by a factor 9, from about 70 km/s near the disc to 600 km/s in the polar regions [3]. "The reason why the inner part of the disc should be truncated is not clear", adds Malbet. "This raises

  12. The effectiveness of sharp end and rounded end bristle toothbrush

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulus Januar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous designs of manual toothbrush are available in the market with the claims of superiority in plaque removal. It often makes the public confuse which is the best design. The sharp end bristle toothbrush is a modification that commercially available in the market. Purpose: The objective of the study was to compare the effectiveness in plaque removal of the sharp end bristle toothbrush and the rounded end bristle toothbrush. Methods: This clinical trial was a double blind crossover design. The subjects were 65 dental students, divided into two groups for comparing the 2 types of  toothbrush. On the 1st day, the allocated toothbrushes were distributedto each group according to their designation, and the subjects were instructed to use the toothbrushes according their normal daily practices. On the 1st, 7th, and 14th day, the subjects were scored using the patient hygiene performance index (PHP index and the gingival index. Based on cross over design, the same procedure was repeated during the 2 week second test periods using different type of toothbrush respectively. Results: The mean scores of the 2 groups showed no significant difference on the beginning the study. Though minor differences were observed in the effectiveness of toothbrush, but the comparison of the two types of toothbrush showed no statistically significant differences on 7th and 14th day. Conclusion: There were no significant differences between sharp end and rounded end bristle toot brusher. There is no manual toothbrush superiorly designed than the others single superior design of manual toothbrush.Latar belakang: Berbagai jenis desain sikat gigi saat ini terdapat di pasaran, dengan masing-masing menyatakan keunggulannya dalam membersihkan plak. Penelitian ini dilakukan terhadap dua jenis sikat gigi manual yaitu sikat gigi dengan ujung bulu sikat runcing dan ujung bulus sikat bulat. Tujuan: Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk membandingkan efektivitas membersihkan

  13. Organization and use of a Software/Hardware Avionics Research Program (SHARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmarkar, J. S.; Kareemi, M. N.

    1975-01-01

    The organization and use is described of the software/hardware avionics research program (SHARP) developed to duplicate the automatic portion of the STOLAND simulator system, on a general-purpose computer system (i.e., IBM 360). The program's uses are: (1) to conduct comparative evaluation studies of current and proposed airborne and ground system concepts via single run or Monte Carlo simulation techniques, and (2) to provide a software tool for efficient algorithm evaluation and development for the STOLAND avionics computer.

  14. Effect of different levels of sharpness processing filter on the measurement accuracy of endodontic file length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Farhadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of different levels of sharpness processing filter on the accuracy of endodontic file length determination using digital periapical radiography. Materials and Methods: Forty human single-rooted permanent teeth were selected and International Organization for Standardization (ISO #08 K-files were inserted into the root canals of the teeth. The file lengths were measured with a digital caliper as the gold standard. Digital periapical images were obtained using a phosphor storage plate as a detector. Three levels of sharpness tool of Scanora software program version 5.1 was used to produce enhanced images: Sharpen 1 (mild level, Sharpen 2 (moderate level, and Sharpen 3 (high level. Two radiologists and two endodontists measured file lengths on the original and enhanced images. The measurements were compared using repeated measures ANOVA and Bonferroni tests (α = 0.05. Results: There were no significant differences between the measurement accuracy of original images and that of the Sharpen 1 and Sharpen 2 enhanced images (P > 0.05. However, significant differences were found between the measurement accuracy of original and that of the Sharpen 3 enhanced images (P 0.05. Conclusion: The application of mild and moderate levels of sharpness processing filter did not influence the accuracy of endodontic file length determination. However, high-level sharpness processing filter is not recommended due to its unfavorable effects on measurement accuracy.

  15. Sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedle array by microinjection moulding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, K. L.; Xu, Yan; Kang, Chunlei; Liu, H.; Tam, K. F.; Ko, S. M.; Kwan, F. Y.; Lee, Thomas M. H.

    2012-01-01

    A method of producing sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedle arrays using microinjection moulding is presented in this paper. Unlike traditional approaches, three mould inserts were used to create the sharp tips of the microneedles. Mould inserts with low surface roughness were fabricated using a picosecond laser machine. Sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedles 500 µm in height were fabricated using a microinjection moulding machine developed by the authors’ group. In addition, the strength of the microneedle was studied by simulation and penetration experiments. Results show that the microneedles can penetrate into skin, delivering liquid successfully without any breakage or severe deformation. Techniques presented in this paper can be used to fabricate sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedle arrays massively with low cost.

  16. Sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedle array by microinjection moulding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yung, K L; Xu, Yan; Kang, Chunlei; Liu, H; Tam, K F; Ko, S M; Kwan, F Y; Lee, Thomas M H

    2012-01-01

    A method of producing sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedle arrays using microinjection moulding is presented in this paper. Unlike traditional approaches, three mould inserts were used to create the sharp tips of the microneedles. Mould inserts with low surface roughness were fabricated using a picosecond laser machine. Sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedles 500 µm in height were fabricated using a microinjection moulding machine developed by the authors’ group. In addition, the strength of the microneedle was studied by simulation and penetration experiments. Results show that the microneedles can penetrate into skin, delivering liquid successfully without any breakage or severe deformation. Techniques presented in this paper can be used to fabricate sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedle arrays massively with low cost. (paper)

  17. Revision of the Genus Piestoneus SHARP (Coleoptera : Staphylinidae) from Japan

    OpenAIRE

    ShunIchiro, NAOMI; Natural History Museum and Institute

    1995-01-01

    This is the fourth part on a series of the taxonomic studies of the subfamily Piestinae from Japan, and the genus Piestoneus SHARP is treated. Three new species, Piestoneus deboiseae, P. monticola and P. oharai are described. The lectotype is designated for P. lewisii SHARP. A key to the species is provided. The important characters for the definition of the genus and the aedeagi for identification are illustrated.

  18. A Sharpe-ratio-based measure for currencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Prado-Dominguez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Sharpe Ratio offers an excellent summary of the excess return required per unit of risk invested. This work presents an adaptation of the ex-ante Sharpe Ratio for currencies where we consider a random walk approach for the currency behavior and implied volatility as a proxy for market expectations of future realized volatility. The outcome of the proposed measure seems to gauge some information on the expected required return attached to the “peso problem”.

  19. The Impact of Manifold-to-Orifice Turning Angle on Sharp-Edge Orifice Flow Characteristics in both Cavitation and Non-Cavitation Turbulent Flow Regimes (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nurick, W. H; Ohanian, T; Talley, D. G; Strakey, P. A

    2007-01-01

    .... This paper deals with predicting the initiation of cavitation, cavitation impacts on Cc, and non-cavitation impacts on Cd from L/D of 5 sharp-edge orifices with both single angle and compound angle directional flow...

  20. Electrochemical Single-Molecule Transistors with Optimized Gate Coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, Henrry M.; Catarelli, Samantha; Cea, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    . These data are rationalized in terms of a two-step electrochemical model for charge transport across the redox bridge. In this model the gate coupling in the ionic liquid is found to be fully effective with a modeled gate coupling parameter, ξ, of unity. This compares to a much lower gate coupling parameter......Electrochemical gating at the single molecule level of viologen molecular bridges in ionic liquids is examined. Contrary to previous data recorded in aqueous electrolytes, a clear and sharp peak in the single molecule conductance versus electrochemical potential data is obtained in ionic liquids...

  1. Sunset over Twin Peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) about one minute after sunset on Mars on Sol 21. The prominent hills dubbed 'Twin Peaks' form a dark silhouette at the horizon, while the setting sun casts a pink glow over the darkening sky. The image was taken as part of a twilight study which indicates how the brightness of the sky fades with time after sunset. Scientists found that the sky stays bright for up to two hours after sunset, indicating that Martian dust extends very high into the atmosphere.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  2. Use of Lentinan To Control Sharp Eyespot of Wheat, and the Mechanism Involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongxiao; Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Kaiyun; Jiang, Lili; Wang, Dong

    2017-12-20

    Lentinan (LNT), a complex polysaccharide with a β-(1→3)-linked backbone of d-glucose residues, has been reported to inhibit plant diseases. Our objective was to explore the efficacy and action mechanism of LNT used as a seed dressing to control sharp eyespot of wheat. Seed dressing promoted wheat growth. At control germination rates of 50%, 8 g of LNT/100 kg of seeds of the Jimai 22, Shannong 23, and Luyuan 502 cultivars significantly increased seed germination to 54%, 52%, and 51%, respectively. Seven days after emergence, the heights and root activity of wheat treated with LNT were significantly greater than those of controls. These effects were dose-dependent. At this time, the plant heights of Jimai 22, Shannong 23, and Luyuan 502 cultivars were 9.52, 8.52, and 10.52 cm, respectively, significantly higher than that of the controls. LNT prevented the development of wheat sharp eyespot. In the highly susceptible Jimai 22 cultivar, sharp eyespot development was reduced by 33.7%, 31.9%, and 30.4% at 7, 14, and 21 days after germination. LNT somewhat increased phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activity; reduced the malondialdehyde content; increased chlorophyll a and b levels; and enhanced the root vigor of wheat. These effects peaked 7 days after germination. LNT increased transcription of the genes encoding alternative oxidase (AOX) and β-1,3-glucanase (GLU), the salicylic acid signaling pathway-related gene NbPR1a, and the sharp eyespot resistance-related gene RS33. A significant dose-effect relationship was evident in terms of AOX transcription; we thus speculate that AOX may be the target gene.

  3. Sharps injury reduction using a sharps container with enhanced engineering: a 28 hospital nonrandomized intervention and cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmond, Terry; Bylund, Suzann; Anglea, Candace; Beeke, Lou; Callahan, Angela; Christiansen, Erik; Flewelling, Kelly; McIntosh, Kathleen; Richter, Kay; Vitale, Monica

    2010-12-01

    The decrease in reported sharps injuries (SI) in the United States has markedly slowed. Additional devices and strategies need investigation. Sharps containers are associated with SI, and more than 90% of these injuries are related to container design. This study addresses the hypothesis that containers with enhanced engineering can reduce SI. In a before/after intervention study from 2006 to 2008, we examined the impact of conversion to a sharps container with enhanced engineering (the Device) on SI categories in 14 Ascension Health hospitals (study group). The Device's safety features included large horizontal aperture, sensitive counterbalanced door, large atrium, and passive overfill prevention. Study group results were also compared with a control cohort of 14 contemporaneous size-matched, Ascension Health hospitals (control group). The Device was associated with significant reductions in after-procedure (-30%), disposal-related (-57%), and container-associated (-81%) SI in the study group. No significant reductions occurred in container-associated sharps injuries in the control group. Hospitals using the Device had significantly fewer total SI than control hospitals. Enhanced aperture design can significantly reduce container-associated sharps injuries. Other factors contributing to reduced injuries may include 1-hand deposit, safe closure, hand restriction, and preassembly. These results, from a country where sharps safety devices are widespread, are particularly applicable to countries where safety devices are not extensively used. Copyright © 2010 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessing peak aerobic capacity in Dutch law enforcement officers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittink, H.; Takken, T.; Groot, J.F. de; Reneman, M.; Peters, R.; Vanhees, L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To cross-validate the existing peak rate of oxygen consumption (VO2peak) prediction equations in Dutch law enforcement officers and to determine whether these prediction equations can be used to predict VO2peak for groups and in a single individual. A further objective was to report

  5. Assessing peak aerobic capacity in Dutch law enforcement officers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittink, Harriet; Takken, Tim; de Groot, Janke; Reneman, Michiel; Peters, Roelof; Vanhees, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To cross-validate the existing peak rate of oxygen consumption (VO2peak) prediction equations in Dutch law enforcement officers and to determine whether these prediction equations can be used to predict VO2peak for groups and in a single individual. A further objective was to report

  6. The 64-MSCT study of relationship between renal corticomedullary differentiation, contrast between renal cortex and medulla, renal cortex and medulla CT peak value with the single renal function in hydronephrotic kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yunhua; Hou Weiwei; Liu Ruihong; He Jianjun; Zhi Ke

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study 64-MSCT perfusion imaging features about renal corticomedullary differentiation, contrast between renal cortex and medulla (CMC), renal cortex and medulla CT peak value in normal and hydronephrotic kidneys, and to explore the relationship between them and the unilateral renal function. Methods: Thirty-six patients with obstructive nephrohydrosis underwent 64-MSCT perfusion scanning. The split renal glomerular filtration rates (GFR) of their kidneys were measured by SPECT renal dynamic imaging. The 72 kidneys were divided into groups of normal renal function group, mild and severe renal impairment groups according to GFR. Renal corticomedullary differentiation on CT images was graded as clear, obscure, part clear. The CT intensity of cortex and medulla was measured in order to calculate contrast between renal cortex and medulla (CMC). Using Pearson correlation test, the correlation between them and renal GFR were examined. Results: (1) In the 24 kidneys of normal group, all kidneys showed clear CMD. In the 21 kidneys of mild renal impairment group, 14 kidneys showed clear CMD, 2 showed obscure CMD and 5 showed part clear of CMD. In the 27 kidneys of severe renal impairment group, 7 kidneys showed clear CMD, 5 showed obscure CMD and 15 showed part clear of CMD. (2)The CMC of normal group was 0.62 ± 0.20, while it was 0.52 ± 0.14 and 0.37 ± 0.11 for mild renal impairment group and severe renal impairment group CMC respectively. The CMC had positive linear correlation with GFR (r=0.536,P<0.05). (3) The renal cortex and medulla CT peak value of normal group were (133 ± 22) and (104 ± 16) HU; The renal cortex and medulla CT peak value of mild renal impairment group were (91 ± 29) and (76 ± 25) HU; The renal cortex and medulla CT peak value of severe renal impairment group were (68 ± 24) and (57 ± 21) HU(F=42.76 and 32.68,P<0.05). The renal cortex and medulla CT peak value had positive linear correlation with GFR (r=0.672 and 0.623, P<0

  7. Peak flow meter use - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100202.htm Peak flow meter use - Series—Peak flow meter use - part one To use the sharing ... slide 7 out of 7 Overview A peak flow meter helps you check how well your asthma ...

  8. Sharp Adams-type inequality invoking Hardy inequalities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohamed Khalil Zghal

    2018-03-22

    Mar 22, 2018 ... and they proved independently that the maximal growth is of exponential type. Thereafter,. Moser improved these works by establishing a sharp result known as the Trudinger–Moser inequality (see [22]) and since then, this subject has continued to interest researchers and Trudinger–Moser inequality has ...

  9. Assessment of sharps waste management practices in a referral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    incinerator is more effective in weight reduction, rated at 94.6% efficient. Key words: .... wastes incinerated, for example plastic materials, drinking .... consumption costs. Fuel control is an important area to consider during incineration of medical waste containing sharps waste. High fuel consumption occurs when burning ...

  10. Ultrathin 90-degree sharp bends for spoof surface plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yihao; Chen, Hongsheng; Xiao, Sanshui

    2015-01-01

    surface plasmons around 90-degree sharp bends on ultrathin metallic films in the microwave regime. We demonstrate that by judiciously engineering the structure, the dispersion relation can be designed to reduce the scattering. Furthermore, the reflection can be suppressed by proper structural decoration...

  11. Study of sharp bends in anisotropic potassium double tungstate waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbink, T.; Sefünç, Mustafa; Pollnau, Markus; García Blanco, Sonia Maria

    Rare earth ion doped potassium double tungstate gain materials have recently shown a great promise for the development of waveguide amplifiers and lasers exhibiting excellent performance. To enable the use of this material in larger nanophotonic platforms, sharp bends are required. In this work we

  12. Two New Sharp Ostrowski-Grüss Type Inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to use a variant of the Grüss inequality to derive two new sharp Ostrowski-Grüss type inequalities related to a perturbed trapezoidal type rule and a perturbed generalized interior point rule, respectively, which provide improvements of some previous results in the literatures.

  13. SHARP: the SHARC-II polarimeter for CSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Attard, M.; Dowell, C. D.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Houde, M.; Kirby, L.; Novak, G.; Vaillancourt, J. E.

    2006-06-01

    SHARC-II is a 32 × 12 pixel submillimeter camera that is used with the ten-meter diameter Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) on Mauna Kea. This camera can be operated at either 350 or 450 microns. We developed a module that is installed at the CSO Nasmyth focus in order to convert SHARC-II into a sensitive imaging polarimeter, which we refer to as "SHARP". SHARP splits the incident beam into two orthogonal polarized beams that are then re-imaged onto different halves of the SHARC-II bolometer array. When this removable polarimetry module is in use, SHARC-II becomes a dual-beam 12 × 12 pixel polarimeter. Sky noise is a significant source of error for submillimeter continuum observations. Because SHARP will simultaneously observe two orthogonal polarization components, we are able to eliminate or greatly reduce this source of error. Here we describe the design of SHARP and report preliminary results of tests and observations carried out during our first two runs at CSO in August 2005 and January 2006.

  14. The Management of Sharp Wastes in a Tertiary Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with two-handed recapping of used needles very common. In view of the importance of the standards to occupational safety and community health, strict enforcement is advocated, especially the education of relevant health workers, and the provision of needed supplies. Keywords: Injection safety, sharps management, ...

  15. Sharp Embeddings of Besov Spaces with Logarithmic Smoothness

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gurka, P.; Opic, Bohumír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2005), s. 81-110 ISSN 1139-1138 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/01/0333 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Besov spaces wirh logarithmic smoothness * Lorentz-Zygmund spaces * sharp embeddings Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  16. Homicide by sharp force in two Scandinavian capitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogde, S; Hougen, H P; Poulsen, K

    2000-01-01

    In the Oslo and Copenhagen capital areas, 141 homicides by sharp force were committed in the ten-year period 1985-1994. This method accounted for 33% of the homicides in this period. Thirty-five percent of the victims were female, and most of the victims were between 20 and 50 years of age...

  17. Improvement in perception of image sharpness through the addition of noise and its relationship with memory texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiazi; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Naokazu

    2015-03-01

    In a preceding study, we investigated the effects of image noise on the perception of image sharpness using white noise, and one- and two-dimensional single-frequency sinusoidal patterns as stimuli. This study extends our preceding study by evaluating natural color images, rather than black-and-white patterns. The results showed that the effect of noise in improving image sharpness perception is more evident in blurred images than in sharp images. This is consistent with the results of the preceding study. In another preceding study, we proposed "memory texture" to explain the preferred granularity of images, as a concept similar to "memory color" for preferred color reproduction. We observed individual differences in type of memory texture for each object, that is, white or 1/f noise. This study discusses the relationship between improvement of sharpness perception by adding noise, and the memory texture, following its individual differences. We found that memory texture is one of the elements that affect sharpness perception.

  18. PRACTICES FOR PREVENTION NEEDLESTICK AND SHARPS INJURIES AMONG NURSING STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh Tran Thi Quynh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Needlestick and sharp injuries are a serious hazard in any health care setting for health care workers and students during clinical practice. Thus, the efforts to prevent the needlestick and sharps injuries are needed and considered a part of the routine practice. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the frequency of nursing students in doing the correct practice in prevention needlestick and sharps injuries. Methods: This cross- sectional study was conducted between 2013 and 2014 in nursing students of Tien Giang Medical College who participated in clinical practice. There were 360 students participated in the study using simple random sampling. Data were collected using the practical assessment checklist and demographic characteristics questionnaire. Data were processed using STATA 12.0, and analyzed using Chi-square and Fisher test. Results: The students who did general practice correctly accounted for 52.50%, and those who did practice incorrectly was 47.5%. The students who used gauze or wool wrap in inhaler were 59.7%, wearing gloves in practice (39.2%, do not disassemble needles from syringes after injection 50%, and removing needles into barrel after injection (65.6%. There was statistically significant relationship between time of participation in clinical practice and correct practice with p-value 0.04 (<0.05 Conclusion: The correct practice of nursing students related to the prevention of needlestick and sharps injuries remains low. There was a significant relationship between time of participation in clinical practice and correct nursing practice. It is suggested that students must be taught about the risk of infection at the beginning of clinical practice, and constantly reminded throughout the learning process, especially for injection safety awareness, knowledge and techniques about the risk of transmission of HBV, HCV and HIV by sharp objects in the healthcare facility.

  19. Sharp edge broad-band lasers for ``white-light`` cooling in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atutov, S.N.; Calabrese, R.; Guidi, V.; Lenisa, P.; Petruio, S. [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Ferrara (Italy); Mariotti, E.; Moi, L. [INFM, Siena (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Siena (Italy)

    1997-04-01

    We have developed broad-band laser sources which show a sharp edge in their spectra and are particularly suitable for ``white-laser`` cooling of ions in storage rings. They allow for a very large velocity capture range by maintaining the same cooling rate allowed by the single mode lasers. A large fraction of the circulating ions are expected to be cooled both in coasting and bunched beams. The device, which does not use an active medium, can easily operate at any frequency from UV to IR spectral region. (orig.). 13 refs.

  20. Spatial bistability generates hunchback expression sharpness in the Drosophila embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J P Lopes

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic development, the positional information provided by concentration gradients of maternal factors directs pattern formation by providing spatially dependent cues for gene expression. In the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, a classic example of this is the sharp on-off activation of the hunchback (hb gene at midembryo, in response to local concentrations of the smooth anterior-posterior Bicoid (Bcd gradient. The regulatory region for hb contains multiple binding sites for the Bcd protein as well as multiple binding sites for the Hb protein. Some previous studies have suggested that Bcd is sufficient for properly sharpened Hb expression, yet other evidence suggests a need for additional regulation. We experimentally quantified the dynamics of hb gene expression in flies that were wild-type, were mutant for hb self-regulation or Bcd binding, or contained an artificial promoter construct consisting of six Bcd and two Hb sites. In addition to these experiments, we developed a reaction-diffusion model of hb transcription, with Bcd cooperative binding and hb self-regulation, and used Zero Eigenvalue Analysis to look for multiple stationary states in the reaction network. Our model reproduces the hb developmental dynamics and correctly predicts the mutant patterns. Analysis of our model indicates that the Hb sharpness can be produced by spatial bistability, in which hb self-regulation produces two stable levels of expression. In the absence of self-regulation, the bistable behavior vanishes and Hb sharpness is disrupted. Bcd cooperative binding affects the position where bistability occurs but is not itself sufficient for a sharp Hb pattern. Our results show that the control of Hb sharpness and positioning, by hb self-regulation and Bcd cooperativity, respectively, are separate processes that can be altered independently. Our model, which matches the changes in Hb position and sharpness observed in different experiments, provides a

  1. PEAK SHAVING CONSIDERING STREAMFLOW UNCERTAINTIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Abstract. The main thrust of this paper is peak shaving with a Stochastic hydro model. In peak sharing, the amount of hydro energy scheduled may be a minimum but it serves to replace less efficient thermal units. The sample system is die Kainji hydro plant and the thermal units of the National Electric. Power Authority.

  2. Twin and triple peaks papilledema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Jodhbir S; Plant, Gordon T; Acheson, James F

    2005-07-01

    To describe 2 adult patients who presented with papilledema after band atrophy (i.e., twin and triple peaks papilledema). Retrospective small case series. Two outpatients. Observations made on 2 patients whose cases were reviewed in the neuro-ophthalmology clinic. The first patient had a pituitary tumor presenting with papilledema, causing a triple peaks clinical sign. Color photographs, optical coherence tomograms, and magnetic resonance images are shown. The second patient developed twin peaks papilledema due to a chiasmal glioma causing secondary raised intracranial pressure. Twin peaks papilledema is a rare clinical sign that may develop in adults as well as in children. The first report and optical coherence tomography features of triple peaks papilledema illustrate a new clinical sign.

  3. Sharp bounds for periodic solutions of Lipschitzian differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zevin, A A

    2009-01-01

    A general system of Lipschitzian differential equations, containing simultaneously terms without delay and with arbitrary constant and time-varying delays, is considered. For the autonomous case, a lower bound for the period of nonconstant periodic solutions, expressed in the respective supremum Lipschitz constants, is found. For nonautonomous periodic equations, explicit upper bounds for the amplitudes and maximum derivatives of periodic solutions are obtained. For all n ≥ 2, the bounds do not depend on n and, in general, are different from that for n = 1. All the bounds are sharp; they are attained in linear differential equations with piece-wise constant deviating arguments. A relation between the obtained bounds and the sharp bounds in other metrics is established

  4. Optimizing 3D Triangulations to Recapture Sharp Edges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2006-01-01

    sharp edges. The energy is minimized using edge swapping, and this can be done either in a greedy fashion or using simulated annealing. The latter is more costly, but effectively avoids local minima. The method has been used on a number of models. Particularly good results have been obtained on digital......In this report, a technique for optimizing 3D triangulations is proposed. The method seeks to minimize an energy defined as a sum of energy terms for each edge in a triangle mesh. The main contribution is a novel per edge energy which strikes a balance between penalizing dihedral angle yet allowing...... terrain models. It is demonstrated how the method has been able to recapture sharp edges which are clearly present in the data but not reflected by the original triangulation of the elevation points....

  5. A Constructive Sharp Approach to Functional Quantization of Stochastic Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Junglen, Stefan; Luschgy, Harald

    2010-01-01

    We present a constructive approach to the functional quantization problem of stochastic processes, with an emphasis on Gaussian processes. The approach is constructive, since we reduce the infinite-dimensional functional quantization problem to a finite-dimensional quantization problem that can be solved numerically. Our approach achieves the sharp rate of the minimal quantization error and can be used to quantize the path space for Gaussian processes and also, for example, Lévy processes.

  6. SHARP - a framework for incorporating human interactions into PRA studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannaman, G.W.; Joksimovich, V.; Spurgin, A.J.; Worledge, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    Recently, increased attention has been given to understanding the role of humans in the safe operation of nuclear power plants. By virtue of the ability to combine equipment reliability with human reliability probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology was deemed capable of providing significant insights about the contributions of human interations in accident scenarios. EPRI recognized the need to strengthen the methodology for incorporating human interactions into PRAs as one element of their broad research program to improve the credibility of PRAs. This research project lead to the development and detailed description of SHARP (Systematic Human Application Reliability Procedure) in EPRI NP-3583. The objective of this paper is to illustrate the SHARP framework. This should help PRA analysts state more clearly their assumptions and approach no matter which human reliability assessment technique is used. SHARP includes a structure of seven analysis steps which can be formally or informally performed during PRAs. The seven steps are termed definition, screening, breakdown, representation, impact assessment, quantification, and documentation

  7. SHARP1: A revised systematic human action reliability procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakefield, D.J.; Parry, G.W.; Hannaman, G.W.; Spurgin, A.J.

    1990-12-01

    Individual plant examinations (IPE) are being performed by utilities to evaluate plant-specific vulnerabilities to severe accidents. A major tool in performing an IPE is a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). The importance of human interactions in determining the plant response in past PRAs is well documented. The modeling and quantification of the probabilities of human interactions have been the subjects of considerable research by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). A revised framework, SHARP1, for incorporating human interactions into PRA is summarized in this report. SHARP1 emphasizes that the process stages are iterative and directed at specific goals rather than being performed sequentially in a stepwise procedure. This expanded summary provides the reader with a flavor of the full report content. Excerpts from the full report are presented, following the same outline as the full report. In the full report, the interface of the human reliability analysis with the plant logic model development in a PRA is given special attention. In addition to describing a methodology framework, the report also discusses the types of human interactions to be evaluated, and how to formulate a project team to perform the human reliability analysis. A concise description and comparative evaluation of the selected existing methods of quantification of human error are also presented. Four case studies are also provided to illustrate the SHARP1 process

  8. Is there a sharp phase transition for deterministic cellular automata?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootters, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that there is a kind of phase transition between deterministic automata exhibiting periodic behavior and those exhibiting chaotic behavior. However, unlike the usual phase transitions of physics, this transition takes place over a range of values of the parameter rather than at a specific value. The present paper asks whether the transition can be made sharp, either by taking the limit of an infinitely large rule table, or by changing the parameter in terms of which the space of automata is explored. We find strong evidence that, for the class of automata we consider, the transition does become sharp in the limit of an infinite number of symbols, the size of the neighborhood being held fixed. Our work also suggests an alternative parameter in terms of which it is likely that the transition will become fairly sharp even if one does not increase the number of symbols. In the course of our analysis, we find that mean field theory, which is our main tool, gives surprisingly good predictions of the statistical properties of the class of automata we consider. 18 refs., 6 figs

  9. Fabrication of single-crystalline plasmonic nanostructures on transparent and flexible amorphous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tomohiro; Mori, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Suzaki, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Kenzo

    2017-02-01

    A new experimental technique is developed for producing a high-performance single-crystalline Ag nanostructure on transparent and flexible amorphous substrates for use in plasmonic sensors and circuit components. This technique is based on the epitaxial growth of Ag on a (001)-oriented single-crystalline NaCl substrate, which is subsequently dissolved in ultrapure water to allow the Ag film to be transferred onto a wide range of different substrates. Focused ion beam milling is then used to create an Ag nanoarray structure consisting of 200 cuboid nanoparticles with a side length of 160 nm and sharp, precise edges. This array exhibits a strong signal and a sharp peak in plasmonic properties and Raman intensity when compared with a polycrystalline Ag nanoarray.

  10. Measuring Your Peak Flow Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your child so they can help monitor your child's asthma symptoms . Why Should I Measure My Flow Rate? ... help parents determine what might be triggering their child's asthma. How Do You Use a Peak Flow Meter? ...

  11. 1.55 Micron High Peak Power Fiber Amplifier Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal, we propose to demonstrate and build a 1.55 micron single frequency high energy and high peak power fiber amplifier by developing an innovative...

  12. Ultrasonic Transducer Peak-to-Peak Optical Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skarvada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Possible optical setups for measurement of the peak-to-peak value of an ultrasonic transducer are described in this work. The Michelson interferometer with the calibrated nanopositioner in reference path and laser Doppler vibrometer were used for the basic measurement of vibration displacement. Langevin type of ultrasonic transducer is used for the purposes of Electro-Ultrasonic Nonlinear Spectroscopy (EUNS. Parameters of produced mechanical vibration have to been well known for EUNS. Moreover, a monitoring of mechanical vibration frequency shift with a mass load and sample-transducer coupling is important for EUNS measurement.

  13. Investigation of Sharp Injuries in an Educational Hospital, Ahvaz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Geravandi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: The Sharp Injuries (SIs are a percutaneous piercing wound caused by a sharp instrument. Needle Sticks and Sharp Injuries (NSSIs can increase the incidence of cases of Hepatitis B, C and HIV. The purpose of this study was to Investigation of the relative frequency of NSSIs in healthcare workers (HCWs in Ahvaz, Iran (Razi hospital over 3-year period (2011–2013. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study during 2011-2013 was conducted on 600 HCWs at Razi Hospital, Ahvaz, Iran. To measure NSSIs, has been diagnosis and categorized based on the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS. Data about health workers’ age, sex, site of NSIs injury, ward of hospitalization and case of needle stick were collected. Descriptive statistical by SPSS version 16 used for analyzed data in this study. Results: According to the results of this study, among all nurses, the maximum cases of NSIs were HCWs. Regarding the finding, recapping needle were found in 34.17%, handling needle in 20.25%, suturing in 16.45%, passing needle in 13.92%, transit disposal in 8.86% and dissembling needle in 6.32% of cases. Findings showed that the most NSIs in Razi Hospital were general surgery, emergency, Intensive Care Unit (ICU, Obstetrics and Gynecology (OBGYN, operating room, orthopedic and infectious diseases wards during 2011-2013. Conclusion: Based on these findings, the number of health care-associated with NSIs between nurses in our study may be due to the shortage of nurses, long working hours during the night shift, fatigue and failure to use an appropriate equipment.

  14. Temporal Modulation Detection Depends on Sharpness of Spatial Tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ning; Cadmus, Matthew; Dong, Lixue; Mathews, Juliana

    2018-04-25

    Prior research has shown that in electrical hearing, cochlear implant (CI) users' speech recognition performance is related in part to their ability to detect temporal modulation (i.e., modulation sensitivity). Previous studies have also shown better speech recognition when selectively stimulating sites with good modulation sensitivity rather than all stimulation sites. Site selection based on channel interaction measures, such as those using imaging or psychophysical estimates of spread of neural excitation, has also been shown to improve speech recognition. This led to the question of whether temporal modulation sensitivity and spatial selectivity of neural excitation are two related variables. In the present study, CI users' modulation sensitivity was compared for sites with relatively broad or narrow neural excitation patterns. This was achieved by measuring temporal modulation detection thresholds (MDTs) at stimulation sites that were significantly different in their sharpness of the psychophysical spatial tuning curves (PTCs) and measuring MDTs at the same sites in monopolar (MP) and bipolar (BP) stimulation modes. Nine postlingually deafened subjects implanted with Cochlear Nucleus® device took part in the study. Results showed a significant correlation between the sharpness of PTCs and MDTs, indicating that modulation detection benefits from a more spatially restricted neural activation pattern. There was a significant interaction between stimulation site and mode. That is, using BP stimulation only improved MDTs at stimulation sites with broad PTCs but had no effect or sometimes a detrimental effect on MDTs at stimulation sites with sharp PTCs. This interaction could suggest that a criterion number of nerve fibers is needed to achieve optimal temporal resolution, and, to achieve optimized speech recognition outcomes, individualized selection of site-specific current focusing strategies may be necessary. These results also suggest that the removal of

  15. An Intersection–Union Test for the Sharpe Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Frahm

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An intersection–union test for supporting the hypothesis that a given investment strategy is optimal among a set of alternatives is presented. It compares the Sharpe ratio of the benchmark with that of each other strategy. The intersection–union test takes serial dependence into account and does not presume that asset returns are multivariate normally distributed. An empirical study based on the G–7 countries demonstrates that it is hard to find significant results due to the lack of data, which confirms a general observation in empirical finance.

  16. Homicide by sharp force in two Scandinavian capitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogde, S; Hougen, H P; Poulsen, K

    2000-01-01

    In the Oslo and Copenhagen capital areas, 141 homicides by sharp force were committed in the ten-year period 1985-1994. This method accounted for 33% of the homicides in this period. Thirty-five percent of the victims were female, and most of the victims were between 20 and 50 years of age......% of the males were killed in their own home. The most common circumstance was family row when the victim was female, while a fight was the most common circumstance when the victim was male. Three offenders committed suicide after having committed homicide(s) (seven victims; three offenders)....

  17. Sharp nonlinear stability for centrifugal filtration convection in magnetizable media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, S; Brindha, D

    2011-11-01

    A nonlinear stability theory is adopted to study centrifugal thermal convection in a magnetic-fluid-saturated and differentially heated porous layer placed in a zero-gravity environment. The axis of rotation of the layer is placed within its boundaries that leads to an alternating direction of the centrifugal body force. An analysis through the variational principles is made to find the unconditional and sharp nonlinear limits. The compound matrix method is employed to solve the eigenvalue problems of the nonlinear and corresponding linear theories. The importance of nonlinear theory is established by demonstrating the failure of the linear theory in capturing the physics of the onset of convection.

  18. Sharp Bounds by Probability-Generating Functions and Variable Drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doerr, Benjamin; Fouz, Mahmoud; Witt, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    We introduce to the runtime analysis of evolutionary algorithms two powerful techniques: probability-generating functions and variable drift analysis. They are shown to provide a clean framework for proving sharp upper and lower bounds. As an application, we improve the results by Doerr et al....... (GECCO 2010) in several respects. First, the upper bound on the expected running time of the most successful quasirandom evolutionary algorithm for the OneMax function is improved from 1.28nln n to 0.982nlnn, which breaks the barrier of nln n posed by coupon-collector processes. Compared to the classical...

  19. Endovascular Sharp Recanalization for Calcified Femoropopliteal Artery Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Li Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular intervention of peripheral chronic total occlusion (CTO is technically challenging and time consuming. Various techniques and devices are used to facilitate lesion crossing and improve the success rate of the procedure. However, these new devices are quite expensive and not readily available. We report 2 cases of peripheral CTO wherein the occlusions were successfully crossed by using stiff end of Terumo glidewire. This sharp recanalization may be a useful technique for the recanalization of calcified peripheral CTOs when conventional techniques fail and new devices are not readily available, but it is accompanied by the risk of distal atheroembolism.

  20. An Experimental Study into the Scaling of an Unswept-Sharp-Fin-Generated Shock/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Influence Scaling of 2D and 3D Shock/Turbulent ioundary Layer Interactions at Compression Corners." AIM Paper 81-334, January 1981. 5. Kubota, H...generating 3D shock wave/boundary layer interactions 2 Unswept sharp fin interaction and coordinate system 3 Cobra probe measurements of Peake (4) at Mach 4...were made by two Druck 50 PSI transducers, each in- stalled in a computer-controlled 48-port Model 48J4 Scani- valve and referenced to vacuum. A 250

  1. Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation

  2. Hybridization between Dusky Grouse and Sharp-tailed Grouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Ryan P.

    2015-01-01

    Cache County, Utah, 7 April 2013: rare hybrid combination of grouse noted. Hybridization between Dusky Grouse (Dendragapus obscurus) and Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) has been rarely documented in the wild. The only published record was of one collected from Osoyoos, British Columbia, in 1906 (Brooks 1907, Lincoln 1950). There is also one record of this hybrid in captivity (McCarthy 2006)...Although hybridization within genera is more common than between genera, it is perhaps not all too remarkable that these species would hybridize, given that Dendragapus and Tympanuchus are each other’s closest relatives (Drovetski 2002). The ranges of these two species overlap over a broad area ranging roughly from parts of northern Utah and Colorado to Yukon and the Northwest Territories. Given the close relatedness and extent of overlap of their ranges, it is perhaps surprising that there have not been more reports of this hybrid combination in the over-100 years since Brooks (1907) first described one. The species may be segregated by habitat use, as Sharp-tailed prefer open grassland sites for lekking and shrub areas for nesting, and Dusky are often found in more densely forested conifer stands—although Dusky often use more open habitats in the spring.

  3. Unexceptional sharpness of frequency tuning in the human cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggero, Mario A.; Temchin, Andrei N.

    2005-12-01

    The responses to sound of auditory-nerve fibers are well known in many animals but are topics of conjecture for humans. Some investigators have claimed that the auditory-nerve fibers of humans are more sharply tuned than are those of various experimental animals. Here we invalidate such claims. First, we show that forward-masking psychophysical tuning curves, which were used as the principal support for those claims, greatly overestimate the sharpness of cochlear tuning in experimental animals and, hence, also probably in humans. Second, we calibrate compound action potential tuning curves against the tuning of auditory-nerve fibers in experimental animals and use compound action potential tuning curves recorded in humans to show that the sharpness of tuning in human cochleae is not exceptional and that it is actually similar to tuning in all mammals and birds for which comparisons are possible. Third, we note that the similarity of frequency of tuning across species with widely diverse cochlear lengths and auditory bandwidths implies that for any given stimulus frequency the "cochlear amplifier" is confined to a highly localized region of the cochlea. auditory nerve | basilar membrane | masking | compound action potential | psychophysical tuning curve

  4. Consistency relations for sharp inflationary non-Gaussian features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mooij, Sander; Palma, Gonzalo A.; Panotopoulos, Grigoris; Soto, Alex

    2016-01-01

    If cosmic inflation suffered tiny time-dependent deviations from the slow-roll regime, these would induce the existence of small scale-dependent features imprinted in the primordial spectra, with their shapes and sizes revealing information about the physics that produced them. Small sharp features could be suppressed at the level of the two-point correlation function, making them undetectable in the power spectrum, but could be amplified at the level of the three-point correlation function, offering us a window of opportunity to uncover them in the non-Gaussian bispectrum. In this article, we show that sharp features may be analyzed using only data coming from the three point correlation function parametrizing primordial non-Gaussianity. More precisely, we show that if features appear in a particular non-Gaussian triangle configuration (e.g. equilateral, folded, squeezed), these must reappear in every other configuration according to a specific relation allowing us to correlate features across the non-Gaussian bispectrum. As a result, we offer a method to study scale-dependent features generated during inflation that depends only on data coming from measurements of non-Gaussianity, allowing us to omit data from the power spectrum.

  5. Near-field edge fringes at sharp material boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babicheva, V E; Gamage, S; Stockman, M I; Abate, Y

    2017-10-02

    We have studied the formation of near-field fringes when sharp edges of materials are imaged using scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM). The materials we have investigated include dielectrics, metals, a near-perfect conductor, and those that possess anisotropic permittivity and hyperbolic dispersion. For our theoretical analysis, we use a technique that combines full-wave numerical simulations of tip-sample near-field interaction and signal demodulation at higher orders akin to what is done in typical s-SNOM experiments. Unlike previous tip-sample interaction near-field models, our advanced technique allows simulation of the realistic tip and sample structure. Our analysis clarifies edge imaging of recently emerged layered materials such as hexagonal boron nitride and transition metal dichalcogenides (in particular, molybdenum disulfide), as well as traditional plasmonic materials such as gold. Hexagonal boron nitride is studied at several wavelengths, including the wavelength where it possesses excitation of phonon-polaritons and hyperbolic dispersion. Based on our results of s-SNOM imaging in different demodulation orders, we specify resonant and non-resonant types of edges and describe the edge fringes for each case. We clarify near-field edge-fringe formation at material sharp boundaries, both outside bright fringes and the low-contrast region at the edge, and elaborate on the necessity of separating them from propagating waves on the surface of polaritonic materials.

  6. Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP): The fiscal year 1989 SHARP portability evaluations task for NASA Solar System Exploration Division's Voyager project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, David J.; Doyle, Richard J.; James, Mark L.; Kaufman, Tim; Martin, R. Gaius

    1990-01-01

    A Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP) portability study is presented. Some specific progress is described on the portability studies, plans for technology transfer, and potential applications of SHARP and related artificial intelligence technology to telescience operations. The application of SHARP to Voyager telecommunications was a proof-of-capability demonstration of artificial intelligence as applied to the problem of real time monitoring functions in planetary mission operations. An overview of the design and functional description of the SHARP system is also presented as it was applied to Voyager.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, HVLP COATING EQUIPMENT, SHARPE MANUFACTURING COMPANY PLATINUM 2012 HVLP SPRAY GUN

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents the results of the verification test of the Sharpe Platinum 2013 high-volume, low-pressure gravity-feed spray gun, hereafter referred to as the Sharpe Platinum, which is designed for use in automotive refinishing. The test coating chosen by Sharpe Manufacturi...

  8. Occupational exposure to sharps injury among healthcare providers in Ethiopia regional hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharew, Nigussie Tadesse; Mulu, Getaneh Baye; Habtewold, Tesfa Dejenie; Gizachew, Kefyalew Dagne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sharps injury is a penetrating stab wound from a needle, scalpel, or another sharp object that may result in exposure to blood or other body fluids. According to World Health Organization pooled estimate, the annual incidence of sharps injury in Africa was ranged from 2.10 to 4.68 per

  9. Super-Sharp Radio 'Eye' Remeasuring the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Using the super-sharp radio "vision" of astronomy's most precise telescope, scientists have extended a directly-measured "yardstick" three times farther into the cosmos than ever before, an achievement with important implications for numerous areas of astrophysics, including determining the nature of Dark Energy, which constitutes 70 percent of the Universe. The continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) also is redrawing the map of our home Galaxy and is poised to yield tantalizing new information about extrasolar planets, among many other cutting-edge research projects. The VLBA provides the greatest ability to see fine detail, called resolving power, of any telescope in the world. It can produce images hundreds of times more detailed than those from the Hubble Space Telescope -- power equivalent to sitting in New York and reading a newspaper in Los Angeles. This power allows astronomers to make precise cosmic measurements with far-ranging implications for research within our own Galaxy and far beyond. New measurements with the VLBA have placed a galaxy called NGC 6264 at a distance of 450 million light-years from Earth, with an uncertainty of no more than 9 percent. This is the farthest distance ever directly measured, surpassing a measurement of 160 million light-years to another galaxy in 2009. Previously, distances beyond our own Galaxy have been estimated through indirect methods. "Our direct, geometric measurements are independent of the assumptions and complications inherent in other techniques," said James Braatz, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), who worked with Cheng-Yu Kuo, of the University of Virginia and NRAO. Fine-tuning the measurement of ever-greater distances is vital to determining the expansion rate of the Universe, which helps theorists narrow down possible explanations for the nature of Dark Energy. Different models of Dark Energy predict different values for the expansion rate, known as the Hubble Constant. "Solving

  10. Localness of energy cascade in hydrodynamic turbulence, II. Sharp spectral filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluie, Hussein [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eyink, Gregory L [JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the scale-locality of subgrid-scale (SGS) energy flux and interband energy transfers defined by the sharp spectral filter. We show by rigorous bounds, physical arguments, and numerical simulations that the spectral SGS flux is dominated by local triadic interactions in an extended turbulent inertial range. Interband energy transfers are also shown to be dominated by local triads if the spectral bands have constant width on a logarithmic scale. We disprove in particular an alternative picture of 'local transfer by nonlocal triads,' with the advecting wavenumber mode at the energy peak. Although such triads have the largest transfer rates of all individual wavenumber triads, we show rigorously that, due to their restricted number, they make an asymptotically negligible contribution to energy flux and log-banded energy transfers at high wavenumbers in the inertial range. We show that it is only the aggregate effect of a geometrically increasing number of local wavenumber triads which can sustain an energy cascade to small scales. Furthermore, nonlocal triads are argued to contribute even less to the space-average energy flux than is implied by our rigorous bounds, because of additional cancellations from scale-decorrelation effects. We can thus recover the -4/3 scaling of nonlocal contributions to spectral energy flux predicted by Kraichnan's abridged Lagrangian-history direct-interaction approximation and test-field model closures. We support our results with numerical data from a 512{sup 3} pseudospectral simulation of isotropic turbulence with phase-shift dealiasing. We also discuss a rigorous counterexample of Eyink [Physica D 78, 222 (1994)], which showed that nonlocal wavenumber triads may dominate in the sharp spectral flux (but not in the SGS energy flux for graded filters). We show that this mathematical counter example fails to satisfy reasonable physical requirements for a turbulent velocity field, which are employed in our

  11. Dose ratio proton radiography using the proximal side of the Bragg peak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolan, P J; Royle, G; Gibson, A; Lu, H-M; Prieels, D; Bentefour, E H

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a movement toward single-detector proton radiography, due to its potential ease of implementation within the clinical environment. One such single-detector technique is the dose ratio method in which the dose maps from two pristine Bragg peaks are recorded beyond the patient. To date, this has only been investigated on the distal side of the lower energy Bragg peak, due to the sharp falloff. The authors investigate the limits and applicability of the dose ratio method on the proximal side of the lower energy Bragg peak, which has the potential to allow a much wider range of water-equivalent thicknesses (WET) to be imaged. Comparisons are made with the use of the distal side of the Bragg peak. Using the analytical approximation for the Bragg peak, the authors generated theoretical dose ratio curves for a range of energy pairs, and then determined how an uncertainty in the dose ratio would translate to a spread in the WET estimate. By defining this spread as the accuracy one could achieve in the WET estimate, the authors were able to generate lookup graphs of the range on the proximal side of the Bragg peak that one could reliably use. These were dependent on the energy pair, noise level in the dose ratio image and the required accuracy in the WET. Using these lookup graphs, the authors investigated the applicability of the technique for a range of patient treatment sites. The authors validated the theoretical approach with experimental measurements using a complementary metal oxide semiconductor active pixel sensor (CMOS APS), by imaging a small sapphire sphere in a high energy proton beam. Provided the noise level in the dose ratio image was 1% or less, a larger spread of WETs could be imaged using the proximal side of the Bragg peak (max 5.31 cm) compared to the distal side (max 2.42 cm). In simulation, it was found that, for a pediatric brain, it is possible to use the technique to image a region with a square field equivalent size

  12. PIXIE III: a very large area photon-counting CMOS pixel ASIC for sharp X-ray spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Spandre, G.; Minuti, M.; Pinchera, M.; Delogu, P.; de Ruvo, P. L.; Vincenzi, A.

    2015-01-01

    PIXIE III is the third generation of very large area (32 × 25 mm2) pixel ASICs developed by Pixirad Imaging Counters s.r.l. to be used in combination with suitable X-ray sensor materials (Silicon, CdTe, GaAs) in hybrid assemblies using flip-chip bonding. A Pixirad unit module based on PIXIE III shows several advances compared to what has been available up to now. It has a very broad energy range (from 2 to 100 keV before full pulse saturation), high speed (100 ns peaking time), high frame rate (larger than 500 fps), dead-time-free operation, good energy resolution (around 2 keV at 20 keV), high photo-peak fraction and sharp spectral separation between the color images. In this paper the results obtained with PIXIE III both in a test bench set-up as well in X-ray imaging applications are discussed.

  13. Evaluation of postoperative sharp waveforms through EEG and magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Woo; Tanaka, Naoaki; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Milligan, Tracey A; Dworetzky, Barbara A; Khoshbin, Shahram; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Bromfield, Edward B

    2010-02-01

    EEGs obtained after craniotomy are difficult to read because of a breach rhythm consisting of unfiltered sharply contoured physiologic waveforms that can mimic interictal epileptiform discharges. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is less affected by the skull breach. The postcraniotomy EEG and MEG scans of 20 patients were reviewed by two experienced electroencephalographers. Larger interrater variability was found for EEG as compared with MEG. Review of patients who had postoperative seizures suggested that EEG was more sensitive but less specific than MEG in detecting interictal epileptiform discharges. Furthermore, several instances of sharp waveforms that were difficult to evaluate on EEG were found to be more easily interpretable on MEG. MEG may also help determine whether asymmetries in physiologic rhythms on EEG result from the skull defect or are pathologic. MEG should be considered as an adjunctive study in patients with a breach rhythm for evaluation of interictal epileptiform discharges and cerebral dysfunction.

  14. SHARP - Automated monitoring of spacecraft health and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, David J.; James, Mark L.; Martin, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    Briefly discussed here are the spacecraft and ground systems monitoring process at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Some of the difficulties associated with the existing technology used in mission operations are highlighted. A new automated system based on artificial intelligence technology is described which seeks to overcome many of these limitations. The system, called the Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP), is designed to automate health and status analysis for multi-mission spacecraft and ground data systems operations. The system has proved to be effective for detecting and analyzing potential spacecraft and ground systems problems by performing real-time analysis of spacecraft and ground data systems engineering telemetry. Telecommunications link analysis of the Voyager 2 spacecraft was the initial focus for evaluation of the system in real-time operations during the Voyager spacecraft encounter with Neptune in August 1989.

  15. SHARP: Automated monitoring of spacecraft health and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, David J.; James, Mark L.; Martin, R. Gaius

    1991-01-01

    Briefly discussed here are the spacecraft and ground systems monitoring process at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Some of the difficulties associated with the existing technology used in mission operations are highlighted. A new automated system based on artificial intelligence technology is described which seeks to overcome many of these limitations. The system, called the Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP), is designed to automate health and status analysis for multi-mission spacecraft and ground data systems operations. The system has proved to be effective for detecting and analyzing potential spacecraft and ground systems problems by performing real-time analysis of spacecraft and ground data systems engineering telemetry. Telecommunications link analysis of the Voyager 2 spacecraft was the initial focus for evaluation of the system in real-time operations during the Voyager spacecraft encounter with Neptune in August 1989.

  16. Diagenetic Crystal Clusters and Dendrites, Lower Mount Sharp, Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kah, L. C.; Kronyak, R.; Van Beek, J.; Nachon, M.; Mangold, N.; Thompson, L.; Wiens, R.; Grotzinger, J.; Farmer, J.; Minitti, M.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Since approximately Sol 753 (to sol 840+) the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover has been investigating the Pahrump locality. Mapping of HiRise images suggests that the Pahrup locality represents the first occurrence of strata associated with basal Mount Sharp. Considerable efforts have been made to document the Pahrump locality in detail, in order to constrain both depositional and diagenetic facies. The Pahrump succession consists of approximately 13 meters of recessive-weathering mudstone interbedded with thin (decimeter-scale) intervals of more erosionally resistant mudstone, and crossbedded sandstone in the upper stratigraphic levels. Mudstone textures vary from massive, to poorly laminated, to well-laminated. Here we investigate the distribution and structure of unusual diagenetic features that occur in the lowermost portion of the Pahrump section. These diagenetic features consist of three dimensional crystal clusters and dendrites that are erosionally resistant with respect to the host rock.

  17. Taking a SHARP look at mask 3D effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benk, Markus P.; Chao, Weilun; Miyakawa, Ryan; Goldberg, Kenneth; Naulleau, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Mask 3D effects are an area of active research in EUV mask technology. Mask-side numerical aperture, illumination, feature size and absorber thickness are key factors modulating mask 3D effects and affecting printability and process window. Variable mask-side NA and flexible illumination make the SHARP actinic EUV microscope a powerful instrument for the study of mask 3D effects. We show an application example, comparing mask 3D effects for a standard Tantalum Nitride absorber and a thinner, 40-nm Nickel absorber. Data is presented for 0.33 4xNA and anamorphic 0.55 4x/8xNA. The influence of different illumination settings on mask 3D effects is discussed.

  18. Triomicrus Sharp of Eastern China (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Pselaphinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jia-Wei; Yin, Zi-Wei; Li, Li-Zhen

    2015-08-31

    Twelve species of the genus Triomicrus Sharp are here recognized in eastern China, with eleven of them described as new: T. Inaequalis Shen & Yin, sp. n. and T. mirus Shen & Yin, sp. n. from Anhui, T. abhorridus Shen & Yin, sp. n., T. aculeus Shen & Yin, sp. n., T. damingensis Shen & Yin, sp. n., T. frondosus Shen & Yin, sp. n., T. gutianensis Shen & Yin, sp. n. and T. tibialis Shen & Yin, sp. n. from Zhejiang, T. anfractus Shen & Yin, sp. n. from Anhui and Zhejiang, T. Hamus Shen & Yin, sp. n. from Jiangxi, and T. contus Shen & Yin, sp. n. from Jiangxi and Zhejiang. New distributional data for T. rougemonti Löbl, Kurbatov &Nomura is given. A key for the identification of the Triomicrus species in eastern China is presented.

  19. Sharp Interface Tracking in Rotating Microflows of Solvent Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glimm, James; Almeida, Valmor de; Jiao, Xiangmin; Sims, Brett

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a specialized sharp interface tracking simulation capability for predicting interaction of micron-sized drops and bubbles in rotating flows relevant to optimized design of contactor devices used in solvent extraction processes of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. The primary outcomes of this project include the capability to resolve drops and bubbles micro-hydrodynamics in solvent extraction contactors, determining from first principles continuum fluid mechanics how micro-drops and bubbles interact with each other and the surrounding shearing fluid for realistic flows. In the near term, this effort will play a central role in providing parameters and insight into the flow dynamics of models that average over coarser scales, say at the millimeter unit length. In the longer term, it will prove to be the platform to conduct full-device, detailed simulations as parallel computing power reaches the exaflop level. The team will develop an accurate simulation tool for flows containing interacting droplets and bubbles with sharp interfaces under conditions that mimic those found in realistic contactor operations. The main objective is to create an off-line simulation capability to model drop and bubble interactions in a domain representative of the averaged length scale. The technical approach is to combine robust interface tracking software, subgrid modeling, validation quality experiments, powerful computational hardware, and a team with simulation modeling, physical modeling and technology integration experience. Simulations will then fully resolve the microflow of drops and bubbles at the microsecond time scale. This approach is computationally intensive but very accurate in treating important coupled physical phenomena in the vicinity of interfaces. The method makes it possible to resolve spatial scales smaller than the typical distance between bubbles and to model some non-equilibrium thermodynamic features such as finite

  20. Sharp Interface Tracking in Rotating Microflows of Solvent Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glimm, James [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Almeida, Valmor de [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiao, Xiangmin [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Sims, Brett [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States). Borough of Manhattan Community College; Li, Xaiolin [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2013-01-08

    The objective of this project is to develop a specialized sharp interface tracking simulation capability for predicting interaction of micron-sized drops and bubbles in rotating flows relevant to optimized design of contactor devices used in solvent extraction processes of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. The primary outcomes of this project include the capability to resolve drops and bubbles micro-hydrodynamics in solvent extraction contactors, determining from first principles continuum fluid mechanics how micro-drops and bubbles interact with each other and the surrounding shearing fluid for realistic flows. In the near term, this effort will play a central role in providing parameters and insight into the flow dynamics of models that average over coarser scales, say at the millimeter unit length. In the longer term, it will prove to be the platform to conduct full-device, detailed simulations as parallel computing power reaches the exaflop level. The team will develop an accurate simulation tool for flows containing interacting droplets and bubbles with sharp interfaces under conditions that mimic those found in realistic contactor operations. The main objective is to create an off-line simulation capability to model drop and bubble interactions in a domain representative of the averaged length scale. The technical approach is to combine robust interface tracking software, subgrid modeling, validation quality experiments, powerful computational hardware, and a team with simulation modeling, physical modeling and technology integration experience. Simulations will then fully resolve the microflow of drops and bubbles at the microsecond time scale. This approach is computationally intensive but very accurate in treating important coupled physical phenomena in the vicinity of interfaces. The method makes it possible to resolve spatial scales smaller than the typical distance between bubbles and to model some non-equilibrium thermodynamic features such as finite

  1. The Galapagos archipelago: A natural laboratory to examine sharp hydroclimatic, geologic and anthropogenic gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Madelyn; Schmitt, Sarah; Riveros-Iregui, Diego; Mirus, Benjamin B.

    2016-01-01

    Poor understanding of the water cycle in tropical ecosystems has the potential to exacerbate water shortages and water crises in the region. We suggest that the Galápagos Islands provide an excellent proxy to regions across the tropics as a result of sharp hydroclimatic, anthropogenic, and pedohydrologic gradients across the archipelago. Hydroclimatic and pedohydrologic gradients are found across different elevations on single islands, as well as across the archipelago, whereas anthropogenic gradients reflect land use and land cover change across islands as population and growth in tourism have affected individual islands differently. This article highlights specific opportunities to further examine our understanding of the interactions between water and critical zone processes in tropical ecosystems, making connections between the Galápagos archipelago and much of the understudied tropics. The Galápagos archipelago offers a natural laboratory through which we can examine current threats to freshwater security as well as the dynamics of coupled natural and human systems.

  2. Neurofeedback training for peak performance

    OpenAIRE

    Marek Graczyk; Maria Pąchalska; Artur Ziółkowski; Grzegorz Mańko; Beata Łukaszewska; Kazimierz Kochanowicz; Andrzej Mirski; Iurii D. Kropotov

    2014-01-01

    [b]aim[/b]. One of the applications of the Neurofeedback methodology is peak performance in sport. The protocols of the neurofeedback are usually based on an assessment of the spectral parameters of spontaneous EEG in resting state conditions. The aim of the paper was to study whether the intensive neurofeedback training of a well-functioning Olympic athlete who has lost his performance confidence after injury in sport, could change the brain functioning reflected in changes in spontaneou...

  3. Twin Peaks (B/W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Twin Peaks are modest-size hills to the southwest of the Mars Pathfinder landing site. They were discovered on the first panoramas taken by the IMP camera on the 4th of July, 1997, and subsequently identified in Viking Orbiter images taken over 20 years ago. The peaks are approximately 30-35 meters (-100 feet) tall. North Twin is approximately 860 meters (2800 feet) from the lander, and South Twin is about a kilometer away (3300 feet). The scene includes bouldery ridges and swales or 'hummocks' of flood debris that range from a few tens of meters away from the lander to the distance of the South Twin Peak. The large rock at the right edge of the scene is nicknamed 'Hippo'. This rock is about a meter (3 feet) across and 25 meters (80 feet) distant.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  4. Drivers of peak sales for pharmaceutical brands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Marc; Leeflang, Peter S. H.; Verhoef, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Peak sales are an important metric in the pharmaceutical industry. Specifically, managers are focused on the height-of-peak-sales and the time required achieving peak sales. We analyze how order of entry and quality affect the level of peak sales and the time-to-peak-sales of pharmaceutical brands.

  5. Treatment of sharp mandibular alveolar process with hybrid prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukaedi Sukaedi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Losing posterior teeth for a long time would occasionally lead to the sharpening of alveolar process. The removable partial denture usually have problems when used during mastication, because of the pressure on the mucosa under the alveolar ridge. Purpose: The purpose of this case report was to manage patients with sharp mandibular alveolar process by wearing hybrid prosthesis with extra coronal precision attachment retention and soft liner on the surface base beneath the removable partial denture. Case: A 76 years old woman visited the Prosthodontic Clinic Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University. The patient had a long span bridge on the upper jaw and a free end acrylic removable partial denture on the lower jaw. She was having problems with mastication. The patient did not wear her lower denture because of the discomfort with it during mastication. Hence, she would like to replace it with a new removable partial denture. Case management: The patient was treated by wearing a hybrid prosthesis with extra coronal precision attachment on the lower jaw. Soft liner was applied on the surface of the removable partial denture. Hybrid prosthesis is a complex denture consisting of removable partial denture and fixed bridge. Conclusion: It concluded that after restoration, the patient had no problems with sharp alveolar process with her new denture, and she was able to masticate well.Latar belakang: Kehilangan geligi posterior dapat menimbulkan processus alveolaris tajam. Gigi tiruan sebagian lepasan mempunyai masalah selama pengunyahan karena adanya tekanan di mukosa di bawah alveolar ridge. Tujuan: Tujuan laporan kasus ini adalah untuk menjelaskan cara menangani pasien yang mempunyai prosesus alveolaris yang tajam di rahang bawah dengan dibuatkan protesis hybrid dengan daya tahan extra coronal precision attachment dan soft liner di permukaan bawah basis gigi tiruan sebagian lepasan. Kasus: Pasien wanita berumur 76 tahun datang di klinik

  6. Application of active electrode compensation to perform continuous voltage-clamp recordings with sharp microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-González, J F; Destexhe, A; Bal, T

    2014-10-01

    Electrophysiological recordings of single neurons in brain tissues are very common in neuroscience. Glass microelectrodes filled with an electrolyte are used to impale the cell membrane in order to record the membrane potential or to inject current. Their high resistance induces a high voltage drop when passing current and it is essential to correct the voltage measurements. In particular, for voltage clamping, the traditional alternatives are two-electrode voltage-clamp technique or discontinuous single electrode voltage-clamp (dSEVC). Nevertheless, it is generally difficult to impale two electrodes in a same neuron and the switching frequency is limited to low frequencies in the case of dSEVC. We present a novel fully computer-implemented alternative to perform continuous voltage-clamp recordings with a single sharp-electrode. To reach such voltage-clamp recordings, we combine an active electrode compensation algorithm (AEC) with a digital controller (AECVC). We applied two types of control-systems: a linear controller (proportional plus integrative controller) and a model-based controller (optimal control). We compared the performance of the two methods to dSEVC using a dynamic model cell and experiments in brain slices. The AECVC method provides an entirely digital method to perform continuous recording and smooth switching between voltage-clamp, current clamp or dynamic-clamp configurations without introducing artifacts.

  7. Sharps Injuries and Other Blood and Body Fluid Exposures Among Home Health Care Nurses and Aides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markkanen, Pia K.; Galligan, Catherine J.; Kriebel, David; Chalupka, Stephanie M.; Kim, Hyun; Gore, Rebecca J.; Sama, Susan R.; Laramie, Angela K.; Davis, Letitia

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We quantified risks of sharp medical device (sharps) injuries and other blood and body fluid exposures among home health care nurses and aides, identified risk factors, assessed the use of sharps with safety features, and evaluated underreporting in workplace-based surveillance. Methods. We conducted a questionnaire survey and workplace-based surveillance, collaborating with 9 home health care agencies and 2 labor unions from 2006 to 2007. Results. Approximately 35% of nurses and 6.4% of aides had experienced at least 1 sharps injury during their home health care career; corresponding figures for other blood and body fluid exposures were 15.1% and 6.7%, respectively. Annual sharps injuries incidence rates were 5.1 per 100 full-time equivalent (FTE) nurses and 1.0 per 100 FTE aides. Medical procedures contributing to sharps injuries were injecting medications, administering fingersticks and heelsticks, and drawing blood. Other contributing factors were sharps disposal, contact with waste, and patient handling. Sharps with safety features frequently were not used. Underreporting of sharps injuries to the workplace-based surveillance system was estimated to be about 50%. Conclusions. Sharps injuries and other blood and body fluid exposures are serious hazards for home health care nurses and aides. Improvements in hazard intervention are needed. PMID:19890177

  8. Sharp transition towards shared vocabularies in multi-agent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Felici, Maddalena; Loreto, Vittorio; Caglioti, Emanuele; Steels, Luc

    2006-06-01

    What processes can explain how very large populations are able to converge on the use of a particular word or grammatical construction without global coordination? Answering this question helps to understand why new language constructs usually propagate along an S-shaped curve with a rather sudden transition towards global agreement. It also helps to analyse and design new technologies that support or orchestrate self-organizing communication systems, such as recent social tagging systems for the web. The article introduces and studies a microscopic model of communicating autonomous agents performing language games without any central control. We show that the system undergoes a disorder/order transition, going through a sharp symmetry breaking process to reach a shared set of conventions. Before the transition, the system builds up non-trivial scale-invariant correlations, for instance in the distribution of competing synonyms, which display a Zipf-like law. These correlations make the system ready for the transition towards shared conventions, which, observed on the timescale of collective behaviours, becomes sharper and sharper with system size. This surprising result not only explains why human language can scale up to very large populations but also suggests ways to optimize artificial semiotic dynamics.

  9. Effect of sharp maximum in ion diffusivity for liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankin, A. V.; Orekhov, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    Ion diffusion in a liquid usually could be treated as a movement of an ion cluster in a viscous media. For small ions this leads to a special feature: diffusion coefficient is either independent of the ion size or increases with it. We find a different behavior for small ions in liquid xenon. Calculation of the dependence of an ion diffusion coefficient in liquid xenon on the ion size is carried out. Classical molecular dynamics method is applied. Calculated dependence of the ion diffusion coefficient on its radius has sharp maximums at the ion radiuses 1.75 and 2 Å. Every maximum is placed between two regions with different stable ion cluster configurations. This leads to the instability of these configurations in a small region between them. Consequently ion with radius near 1.75 or 2 Å could jump from one configuration to another. This increases the speed of the diffusion. A simple qualitative model for this effect is suggested. The decomposition of the ion movement into continuous and jump diffusion shows that continuous part of the diffusion is the same as for the ion cluster in the stable region.

  10. An evaluation of sharp safety blood evacuation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Joanna; Phillips, Peter

    This article describes an evaluation of three sharp safety blood evacuation devices in seven Welsh NHS boards and the Welsh Blood Service. Products consisted of two phlebotomy needles possessing safety shields and one phlebotomy device with wings, tubing and a retractable needle. The device companies provided the devices and appropriate training. Participating healthcare workers used the safety device instead of the conventional device to sample blood during the evaluation period and each type of device was evaluated in random order. Participants filled in a questionnaire for each type of device and then a further questionnaire comparing the two shielded evacuation needles with each other Results showed that responses to all three products were fairly positive, although each device was not liked by everyone who used it. When the two shielded evacuation devices were compared with each other, most users preferred the device with the shield positioned directly above the needle to the device with the shield at the side. However, in laboratory tests, the preferred device produced more fluid splatter than the other shielded device on activation.

  11. Time-clustering behavior of sharp fluctuation sequences in Chinese stock markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Ying; Zhuang Xintian; Liu Zhiying; Huang Weiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Sharp fluctuations (in particular, extreme fluctuations) of asset prices have a great impact on financial markets and risk management. Therefore, investigating the time dynamics of sharp fluctuation is a challenge in the financial fields. Using two different representations of the sharp fluctuations (inter-event times and series of counts), the time clustering behavior in the sharp fluctuation sequences of stock markets in China is studied with several statistical tools, including coefficient of variation, Allan Factor, Fano Factor as well as R/S (rescaled range) analysis. All of the empirical results indicate that the time dynamics of the sharp fluctuation sequences can be considered as a fractal process with a high degree of time-clusterization of the events. It can help us to get a better understanding of the nature and dynamics of sharp fluctuation of stock price in stock markets.

  12. Diffraction peaks in x-ray spectroscopy: Friend or foe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissot, R.G.; Goehner, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Diffraction peaks can occur as unidentifiable peaks in the energy spectrum of an x-ray spectrometric analysis. Recently, there has been increased interest in oriented polycrystalline films and epitaxial films on single crystal substrates for electronic applications. Since these materials diffract x-rays more efficiently than randomly oriented polycrystalline materials, diffraction peaks are being observed more frequently in x-ray fluorescent spectra. In addition, micro x-ray spectrometric analysis utilizes a small, intense, collimated x-ray beam that can yield well defined diffraction peaks. In some cases these diffraction peaks can occur at the same position as elemental peaks. These diffraction peaks, although a possible problem in qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis, can give very useful information about the crystallographic structure and orientation of the material being analyzed. The observed diffraction peaks are dependent on the geometry of the x-ray spectrometer, the degree of collimation and the distribution of wavelengths (energies) originating from the x-ray tube and striking the sample

  13. Assessing peak aerobic capacity in Dutch law enforcement officers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet Wittink

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To cross-validate the existing peak rate of oxygen consumption (VO2peak prediction equations in Dutch law enforcement officers and to determine whether these prediction equations can be used to predict VO2peak for groups and in a single individual. A further objective was to report normative absolute and relative VO2peak values of a sample of law enforcement officers in the Netherlands. Material and Methods: The peak rate of oxygen consumption (ml×kg–1×min–1 was measured using a maximal incremental bicycle test in 1530 subjects, including 1068 male and 461 female police officers. Validity of the prediction equations for groups was assessed by comparing predicted VO2peak with measured VO2peak using paired t-tests. For individual differences limits of agreement (LoA were calculated. Equations were considered valid for individuals when the difference between measured and predicted VO2peak did not exceed ±1 metabolic equivalent (MET in 95% of individuals. Results: None of the equations met the validity criterion of 95% of individuals having ±1 MET difference or less than the measured value. Limits of agreement (LoAs were large in all predictions. At the individual level, none of the equations were valid predictors of VO2peak (ml×kg–1×min–1. Normative values for Dutch law enforcement officers were presented. Conclusions: Substantial differences between measured and predicted VO2peak (ml×kg–1×min–1 were found. Most tested equations were invalid predictors of VO2peak at group level and all were invalid at individual levels.

  14. Measuring grinding surface roughness based on the sharpness evaluation of colour images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huaian, Y I; Jian, L I U; Enhui, L U; Peng, A O

    2016-01-01

    Current machine vision-based detection methods for metal surface roughness mainly use the grey values of images for statistical analysis but do not make full use of the colour information and ignore the subjective judgment of the human vision system. To address these problems, this paper proposes a method to measure surface roughness through the sharpness evaluation of colour images. Based on the difference in sharpness of virtual images of colour blocks that are formed on grinding surfaces with different roughness, an algorithm for evaluating the sharpness of colour images that is based on the difference of the RGB colour space was used to develop a correlation model between the sharpness and the surface roughness. The correlation model was analysed under two conditions: constant illumination and varying illumination. The effect of the surface textures of the grinding samples on the image sharpness was also considered, demonstrating the feasibility of the detection method. The results show that the sharpness is strongly correlated with the surface roughness; when the illumination and the surface texture have the same orientation, the sharpness clearly decreases with increasing surface roughness. Under varying illumination, this correlation between the sharpness and surface roughness was highly robust, and the sharpness of each virtual image increased linearly with the illumination. Relative to the detection method for surface roughness using gray level co-occurrence matrix or artificial neural network, the proposed method is convenient, highly accurate and has a wide measurement range. (paper)

  15. ASSESSMENT OF THE MANAGEMENT OF SHARPS INJURIES IN GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS: THE MALAYSIAN SITUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Siti Haniza M.D PhD

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Management of occupational hazards has been a priority and sharps injuries is a known potential risk to health care workers. With the known risks of potential infections, to the workers as well as the patients, our workers need protection from further danger. Objective: This study looked at the measures taken on managing the affected healthcare workers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey using self-administered questionnaire was sent to 55 hospital directors. They were required to inform on their management practices on sharps injuries. Results: The findings showed variations in the management of sharps injuries during and after office hours, variation in the site of keeping the records, person responsible and variation in the frequency of data analysis and presentation to hospital directors. Discussion: According to OSHA Act 1994, it is the responsibility of the employer to ensure safety, health and welfare of the employee. In management of sharps injury data from injury reporting should be compiled and assessed. Reporting feedback need to be encouraged with timely follow-up of all sharps injury cases. Reporting of sharps injuries is essential to ensure that all healthcare workers receive appropriate post-exposure medical treatment. Conclusion & Recommendation: A uniform management of sharps injuries protocol need to be established to improve reporting. An avenue to present sharps injuries data regularly is needed so as appropriate management of workers be ensured. Therefore adherence to the available guidelines need to be ensured. Key words: management, sharps injuries, healthcare workers

  16. Automatic fitting of Gaussian peaks using abductive machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aal, R. E.

    1998-02-01

    Analytical techniques have been used for many years for fitting Gaussian peaks in nuclear spectroscopy. However, the complexity of the approach warrants looking for machine-learning alternatives where intensive computations are required only once (during training), while actual analysis on individual spectra is greatly simplified and quickened. This should allow the use of simple portable systems for fast and automated analysis of large numbers of spectra, particularly in situations where accuracy may be traded for speed and simplicity. This paper proposes the use of abductive networks machine learning for this purpose. The Abductory Induction Mechanism (AIM) tool was used to build models for analyzing both single and double Gaussian peaks in the presence of noise depicting statistical uncertainties in collected spectra. AIM networks were synthesized by training on 1000 representative simulated spectra and evaluated on 500 new spectra. A classifier network determines the multiplicity of single/double peaks with an accuracy of 5.8%. With statistical uncertainties corresponding to a peak count of 100, average percentage absolute errors for the height, position, and width of single peaks are 4.9, 2.9, and 4.2%, respectively. For double peaks, these average errors are within 7.0, 3.1, and 5.9%, respectively. Models have been developed which account for the effect of a linear background on a single peak. Performance is compared with a neural network application and with an analytical curve-fitting routine, and the new technique is applied to actual data of an alpha spectrum.

  17. Automatic fitting of Gaussian peaks using abductive machine learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aal, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    Analytical techniques have been used for many years for fitting Gaussian peaks in nuclear spectroscopy. However, the complexity of the approach warrants looking for machine-learning alternatives where intensive computations are required only once (during training), while actual analysis on individual spectra is greatly simplified and quickened. This should allow the use of simple portable systems for fast and automated analysis of large numbers of spectra, particularly in situations where accuracy may be traded for speed and simplicity. This paper proposes the use of abductive networks machine learning for this purpose. The Abductory Induction Mechanism (AIM) tool was used to build models for analyzing both single and double Gaussian peaks in the presence of noise depicting statistical uncertainties in collected spectra. AIM networks were synthesized by training on 1,000 representative simulated spectra and evaluated on 500 new spectra. A classifier network determines the multiplicity of single/double peaks with an accuracy of 98%. With statistical uncertainties corresponding to a peak count of 100, average percentage absolute errors for the height, position, and width of single peaks are 4.9, 2.9, and 4.2%, respectively. For double peaks, these average errors are within 7.0, 3.1, and 5.9%, respectively. Models have been developed which account for the effect of a linear background on a single peak. Performance is compared with a neural network application and with an analytical curve-fitting routine, and the new technique is applied to actual data of an alpha spectrum

  18. Preparation and photoluminescence characterization of high-purity CdTe single crystals: purification effect of normal freezing on tellurium and cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, S. H.; Wang, J.; Isshiki, M.

    2002-03-01

    Extremely high-purity CdTe single crystals have been obtained by the traditional vertical Bridgman technique, beginning with the refining of tellurium material by the normal freezing method. The purification effect of normal freezing on tellurium has been confirmed to be very effective. This effect was also used to prepare extremely high-purity CdTe single crystals. The crystals were characterized by low temperature high-resolution photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Only a sharp peak at 1.5896 eV was detected in the PL spectrum. The full-width at half-maximum is prepared by the Bridgman method.

  19. Serotonin dependent masking of hippocampal sharp wave ripples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ul Haq, Rizwan; Anderson, Marlene L; Hollnagel, Jan-Oliver; Worschech, Franziska; Sherkheli, Muhammad Azahr; Behrens, Christoph J; Heinemann, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    Sharp wave ripples (SPW-Rs) are thought to play an important role in memory consolidation. By rapid replay of previously stored information during slow wave sleep and consummatory behavior, they result from the formation of neural ensembles during a learning period. Serotonin (5-HT), suggested to be able to modify SPW-Rs, can affect many neurons simultaneously by volume transmission and alter network functions in an orchestrated fashion. In acute slices from dorsal hippocampus, SPW-Rs can be induced by repeated high frequency stimulation that induces long-lasting LTP. We used this model to study SPW-R appearance and modulation by 5-HT. Although stimulation in presence of 5-HT permitted LTP induction, SPW-Rs were "masked"--but appeared after 5-HT wash-out. This SPW-R masking was dose dependent with 100 nM 5-HT being sufficient--if the 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor citalopram was present. Fenfluramine, a serotonin releaser, could also mask SPW-Rs. Masking was due to 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/C receptor activation. Neither membrane potential nor membrane conductance changes in pyramidal cells caused SPW-R blockade since both remained unaffected by combining 5-HT and citalopram. Moreover, 10 and 30 μM 5-HT mediated SPW-R masking preceded neuronal hyperpolarization and involved reduced presynaptic transmitter release. 5-HT, as well as a 5-HT1A agonist, augmented paired pulse facilitation and affected the coefficient of variance. Spontaneous SPW-Rs in mice hippocampal slices were also masked by 5-HT and fenfluramine. While neuronal ensembles can acquire long lasting LTP during higher 5-HT levels, lower 5-HT levels enable neural ensembles to replay previously stored information and thereby permit memory consolidation memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neurofeedback training for peak performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczyk, Marek; Pąchalska, Maria; Ziółkowski, Artur; Mańko, Grzegorz; Łukaszewska, Beata; Kochanowicz, Kazimierz; Mirski, Andrzej; Kropotov, Iurii D

    2014-01-01

    One of the applications of the Neurofeedback methodology is peak performance in sport. The protocols of the neurofeedback are usually based on an assessment of the spectral parameters of spontaneous EEG in resting state conditions. The aim of the paper was to study whether the intensive neurofeedback training of a well-functioning Olympic athlete who has lost his performance confidence after injury in sport, could change the brain functioning reflected in changes in spontaneous EEG and event related potentials (ERPs). The case is presented of an Olympic athlete who has lost his performance confidence after injury in sport. He wanted to resume his activities by means of neurofeedback training. His QEEG/ERP parameters were assessed before and after 4 intensive sessions of neurotherapy. Dramatic and statistically significant changes that could not be explained by error measurement were observed in the patient. Neurofeedback training in the subject under study increased the amplitude of the monitoring component of ERPs generated in the anterior cingulate cortex, accompanied by an increase in beta activity over the medial prefrontal cortex. Taking these changes together, it can be concluded that that even a few sessions of neurofeedback in a high performance brain can significantly activate the prefrontal cortical areas associated with increasing confidence in sport performance.

  1. Neurofeedback training for peak performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Graczyk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]aim[/b]. One of the applications of the Neurofeedback methodology is peak performance in sport. The protocols of the neurofeedback are usually based on an assessment of the spectral parameters of spontaneous EEG in resting state conditions. The aim of the paper was to study whether the intensive neurofeedback training of a well-functioning Olympic athlete who has lost his performance confidence after injury in sport, could change the brain functioning reflected in changes in spontaneous EEG and event related potentials (ERPs. [b]case study[/b]. The case is presented of an Olympic athlete who has lost his performance confidence after injury in sport. He wanted to resume his activities by means of neurofeedback training. His QEEG/ERP parameters were assessed before and after 4 intensive sessions of neurotherapy. Dramatic and statistically significant changes that could not be explained by error measurement were observed in the patient. [b]conclusion[/b]. Neurofeedback training in the subject under study increased the amplitude of the monitoring component of ERPs generated in the anterior cingulate cortex, accompanied by an increase in beta activity over the medial prefrontal cortex. Taking these changes together, it can be concluded that that even a few sessions of neurofeedback in a high performance brain can significantly activate the prefrontal cortical areas associated with increasing confidence in sport performance.

  2. Effects of equipment and technique on peak flow measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Driscoll B Ronan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different lung function equipment and different respiratory manoeuvres may produce different Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF results. Although the PEF is the most common lung function test, there have been few studies of these effects and no previous study has evaluated both factors in a single group of patients. Methods We studied 36 subjects (PEF range 80–570 l/min. All patients recorded PEF measurements using a short rapid expiration following maximal inspiration (PEF technique or a forced maximal expiration to residual volume (FVC technique. Measurements were made using a Wright's peak flow meter, a turbine spirometer and a Fleisch pneumotachograph spirometer. Results The mean PEF was 8.7% higher when the PEF technique was used (compared with FVC technique, p Conclusion Peak flow measurements are affected by the instruction given and by the device and Peak Flow scale used. Patient management decisions should not be based on PEF measurement made on different instruments.

  3. Advancements of ultra-high peak power laser diode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, D.; Thiagarajan, P.; Goings, J.; Caliva, B.; Smith, S.; Walker, R.

    2018-02-01

    Enhancements of laser diode epitaxy in conjunction with process and packaging improvements have led to the availability of 1cm bars capable of over 500W peak power at near-infrared wavelengths (770nm to 1100nm). Advances in cooler design allow for multi-bar stacks with bar-to-bar pitches as low as 350μm and a scalable package architecture enabled a single diode assembly with total peak powers of over 1MegaWatt of peak power. With the addition of micro-optics, overall array brightness greater than 10kW/cm2 was achieved. Performance metrics of barbased diode lasers specifically engineered for high peak power and high brightness at wavelengths and pulse conditions commonly used to pump a variety of fiber and solid-state materials are presented.

  4. Dual Peak Cholera transmission in South Asia: A Hydroclimatological Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A.; Islam, S.

    2009-04-01

    Cholera has reemerged as a global killer with the world witnessing an unprecedented rise in cholera infection and transmission since the 1990s. Cholera outbreaks across most affected areas show infection patterns with a single annual peak. However, cholera incidences in the Bengal Delta region, the native homeland of cholera, show bi-annual peaks. The mechanisms behind this unique seasonal dual peak phenomenon in cholera dynamics, especially the role of climatic and hydrologic variables, are not fully understood. We disaggregate regional streamflow and sea surface temperature data into seasonal components, and analyze their correlation with the two seasonal peaks in Bangladesh cholera incidence records. Low flow in the Brahmaputra and the Ganges during spring is associated with inward plankton transport from the ocean and the first cholera outbreaks of the year. Peak streamflow of these rivers, on the other hand, create a different cholera transmission environment; peak flood volumes and extent of flood-affected areas during monsoon are responsible for widespread water contamination and subsequent cholera outbreaks. Our preliminary results demonstrate that the seasonality and dual peaks of cholera transmission in this region may be explained by two distinctly different hydroclimatological drivers. We will quantify the roles of these processes and explain the nature of these drivers.

  5. Sharp-1 regulates TGF-β signaling and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharjee, Sujata; Chung, Teng-Kai; Gopinadhan, Suma; Shankar, Shilpa Rani; Wang, Yaju; Li, Li; Vercherat, Cecile; Gulbagci, Neriman Tuba; Rossner, Moritz; Taneja, Reshma

    2014-02-01

    Sharp-1 is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional repressor that is involved in a number of cellular processes. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Sharp-1 is a negative regulator of skeletal myogenesis and it blocks differentiation of muscle precursor cells by modulating the activity of MyoD. In order to understand its role in pre- and post-natal myogenesis, we assessed skeletal muscle development and freeze-injury-induced regeneration in Sharp-1-deficient mice. We show that embryonic skeletal muscle development is not impaired in the absence of Sharp-1; however, post-natally, the regenerative capacity is compromised. Although the initial phases of injury-induced regeneration proceed normally in Sharp-1(-/-) mice, during late stages, the mutant muscle exhibits necrotic fibers, calcium deposits and fibrosis. TGF-β expression, as well as levels of phosphorylated Smad2 and Smad3, are sustained in the mutant tissue and treatment with decorin, which blocks TGF-β signaling, improves the histopathology of Sharp-1(-/-) injured muscles. In vitro, Sharp-1 associates with Smad3, and its overexpression inhibits TGF-β- and Smad3-mediated expression of extracellular matrix genes in myofibroblasts. These results demonstrate that Sharp-1 regulates muscle regenerative capacity, at least in part, by modulation of TGF-β signaling.

  6. On the sharp front-type solution of the Nagumo equation with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    One of the methods is to solve the travelling wave equations and compute an exact solution which describes the sharp travelling wavefront. The second method is to solve numer- ically an initial-moving boundary-value problem for the partial differential equation and obtain an approximation for this sharp front-type solution.

  7. Insulin stimulates the expression of the SHARP-1 gene via multiple signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, K; Asano, K; Haneishi, A; Ono, M; Komatsu, Y; Yamamoto, T; Tanaka, T; Ueno, H; Ogawa, W; Tomita, K; Noguchi, T; Yamada, K

    2014-06-01

    The rat enhancer of split- and hairy-related protein-1 (SHARP-1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor. An issue of whether SHARP-1 is an insulin-inducible transcription factor was examined. Insulin rapidly increased the level of SHARP-1 mRNA both in vivo and in vitro. Then, signaling pathways involved with the increase of SHARP-1 mRNA by insulin were determined in H4IIE rat hepatoma cells. Pretreatments with LY294002, wortmannin, and staurosporine completely blocked the induction effect, suggesting the involvement of both phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K) and protein kinase C (PKC) pathways. In fact, overexpression of a dominant negative form of atypical protein kinase C lambda (aPKCλ) significantly decreased the induction of the SHARP-1 mRNA. In addition, inhibitors for the small GTPase Rac or Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) also blocked the induction of SHARP-1 mRNA by insulin. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Rac1 prevented the activation by insulin. Furthermore, actinomycin D and cycloheximide completely blocked the induction of SHARP-1 mRNA by insulin. Finally, when a SHARP-1 expression plasmid was transiently transfected with various reporter plasmids into H4IIE cells, the promoter activity of PEPCK reporter plasmid was specifically decreased. Thus, we conclude that insulin induces the SHARP-1 gene expression at the transcription level via a both PI 3-K/aPKCλ/JNK- and a PI 3-K/Rac/JNK-signaling pathway; protein synthesis is required for this induction; and that SHARP-1 is a potential repressor of the PEPCK gene expression. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Measurements of system sharpness for two digital breast tomosynthesis systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, N. W.; Bosmans, H.

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this work was to propose system sharpness parameters for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems that include the influence of focus size and focus motion for use in quality assurance protocols. X-ray focus size was measured using a multiple pinhole test object, while detector presampling modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured from projection images of a 10 cm × 10 cm, 1 mm thick steel edge, for the Siemens Inspiration and Hologic Selenia Dimensions DBT systems. The height of the edge above the table was then varied from 1 to 78 mm. The MTF expected from theory for the projection images was calculated from the measured detector MTF, focus size MTF and focus motion MTF and was compared against measured curves. Two methods were used to measure the in-plane MTF in the DBT volume: a tungsten wire of diameter 25 µm and an Al edge 0.2 mm thick, both imaged with a 15 mm thick poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plate. The in-depth point spread function (PSF) was measured using an angled tungsten wire. The full 3D MTF was estimated with a 0.5 mm diameter aluminium bead held in a 45 mm thick PMMA phantom, with the bead 15 and 65 mm above the table. Inspiration DBT projection images are saved at native detector resolution (85 µm), while the Dimensions re-bins projections to 140 µm pixels (2 × 2 binning); both systems used 2 × 2 binning of projection data before reconstruction. The 50% point for the MTF (MTF0.50) measured in the DBT projection images for the tube-travel direction fell as a function of height above the table from 3.60 to 0.90 mm-1 for the Inspiration system and from 2.50 to 1.20 mm-1 for the Dimensions unit. The maximum deviation of measured MTF0.50 from the calculated value was 13%. MTF0.50 measured in-plane (tube-travel direction) fell as a function of height above the table from 1.66 to 0.97 mm-1 for the Inspiration system and from 2.21 to 1.31 mm-1 for the Dimensions system. The full-width half-maximum for the in-depth PSF was 3

  9. Dopamine receptor activation reorganizes neuronal ensembles during hippocampal sharp waves in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeyuki Miyawaki

    Full Text Available Hippocampal sharp wave (SW/ripple complexes are thought to contribute to memory consolidation. Previous studies suggest that behavioral rewards facilitate SW occurrence in vivo. However, little is known about the precise mechanism underlying this enhancement. Here, we examined the effect of dopaminergic neuromodulation on spontaneously occurring SWs in acute hippocampal slices. Local field potentials were recorded from the CA1 region. A brief (1 min treatment with dopamine led to a persistent increase in the event frequency and the magnitude of SWs. This effect lasted at least for our recording period of 45 min and did not occur in the presence of a dopamine D1/D5 receptor antagonist. Functional multineuron calcium imaging revealed that dopamine-induced SW augmentation was associated with an enriched repertoire of the firing patterns in SW events, whereas the overall tendency of individual neurons to participate in SWs and the mean number of cells participating in a single SW were maintained. Therefore, dopaminergic activation is likely to reorganize cell assemblies during SWs.

  10. Evaluation of Effects of Warning Sign Position on Driving Behavior in Horizontal Sharp Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hua Zhao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In present time, the guidelines on warning sign position in the China National Standard lack detailed and standard regulations of placing warning signs on sharp curves, which may cause road safety problems. Therefore, this paper briefly discussed how to optimize the position of a warning sign on a sharp curve through a driving simulator experiment. This study concluded that a warning sign placed at different positions prior to a sharp curve will have different influence ranges for drivers approaching and negotiating the curve. Meanwhile, different positions of a warning sign imposed different effect obviously on the adjustment of vehicle's lane position on sharp curves with the same radius, especially at the midpoint of a sharp curve. The evaluation results of five positions (0 m, 50 m, 100 m, 200 m, and 400 m in advance showed that only when the warning signs were placed 100 m or 200 m prior to sharp curves, can they achieve positive influence on driving behavior. On this basis, the authors look forward to providing rationalization proposals in selecting the best position of a warning sign on a sharp curve for the engineering implementation and national standard.

  11. Dual peak cholera transmission in Bengal Delta: A hydroclimatological explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanda, Ali Shafqat; Jutla, Antarpreet Singh; Islam, Shafiqul

    2009-10-01

    Cholera has reemerged as a global killer with the world witnessing an unprecedented rise in cholera infection and transmission since the 1990s. Cholera outbreaks across most affected areas show infection patterns with a single annual peak. However, cholera incidences in the Bengal Delta region, the native homeland of cholera, show bi-annual peaks. The mechanisms behind this unique seasonal dual peak phenomenon in cholera dynamics, especially the role of climatic and hydrologic variables, are not fully understood. Here, we show that low flow in the Brahmaputra and the Ganges during spring is associated with the first outbreaks of cholera in Bangladesh; elevated spring cholera outbreaks are seen in low discharge years. Peak streamflow of these rivers, on the other hand, create a different cholera transmission environment; peak flood volumes and extent of flood-affected areas during monsoon are responsible for autumn cholera outbreaks. Our results demonstrate how regional hydroclimatology may explain the seasonality and dual peaks of cholera incidence in the Bengal Delta region. A quantitative understanding of the relationships among the hydroclimatological drivers and seasonal cholera outbreaks will help early cholera detection and prevention efforts.

  12. Motion compensation in extremity cone-beam CT using a penalized image sharpness criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Zbijewski, W.

    2017-05-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) for musculoskeletal imaging would benefit from a method to reduce the effects of involuntary patient motion. In particular, the continuing improvement in spatial resolution of CBCT may enable tasks such as quantitative assessment of bone microarchitecture (0.1 mm-0.2 mm detail size), where even subtle, sub-mm motion blur might be detrimental. We propose a purely image based motion compensation method that requires no fiducials, tracking hardware or prior images. A statistical optimization algorithm (CMA-ES) is used to estimate a motion trajectory that optimizes an objective function consisting of an image sharpness criterion augmented by a regularization term that encourages smooth motion trajectories. The objective function is evaluated using a volume of interest (VOI, e.g. a single bone and surrounding area) where the motion can be assumed to be rigid. More complex motions can be addressed by using multiple VOIs. Gradient variance was found to be a suitable sharpness metric for this application. The performance of the compensation algorithm was evaluated in simulated and experimental CBCT data, and in a clinical dataset. Motion-induced artifacts and blurring were significantly reduced across a broad range of motion amplitudes, from 0.5 mm to 10 mm. Structure similarity index (SSIM) against a static volume was used in the simulation studies to quantify the performance of the motion compensation. In studies with translational motion, the SSIM improved from 0.86 before compensation to 0.97 after compensation for 0.5 mm motion, from 0.8 to 0.94 for 2 mm motion and from 0.52 to 0.87 for 10 mm motion (~70% increase). Similar reduction of artifacts was observed in a benchtop experiment with controlled translational motion of an anthropomorphic hand phantom, where SSIM (against a reconstruction of a static phantom) improved from 0.3 to 0.8 for 10 mm motion. Application to a clinical dataset of a lower extremity showed dramatic reduction

  13. Quasispecies evolution on a fitness landscape with a fluctuating peak

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Martin; Snoad, Nigel

    2000-01-01

    A quasispecies evolving on a fitness landscape with a single peak of fluctuating height is studied. In the approximation that back mutations can be ignored, the rate equations can be solved analytically. It is shown that the error threshold on this class of dynamic landscapes is defined by the time average of the selection pressure. In the case of a periodically fluctuating fitness peak we also study the phase-shift and response amplitude of the previously documented low-pass filter effect. T...

  14. The sharp reductions in medicare payments for noninvasive diagnostic imaging in recent years: will they satisfy the federal policymakers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, David C; Rao, Vijay M; Parker, Laurence; Frangos, Andrea J

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine recent trends in Medicare reimbursements for noninvasive diagnostic imaging (NDI). The Medicare Part B databases for 2000 to 2010 were used. For each procedure code, these files provide payment and other data. All NDI codes were selected. Medicare physician specialty codes were used to identify radiologists, cardiologists, all other nonradiologist physicians as a group, and independent diagnostic testing facilities. Part B NDI payment trends were tracked. Overall Part B spending for NDI rose from $5.921 billion in 2000 to $11.910 billion in 2006 (+101%). There was then a sharp drop in 2007, resulting from the implementation of the Deficit Reduction Act. This was followed by a slight rise in 2008, then successive smaller drops the next 2 years, reaching $9.457 billion in 2010 (-21% vs 2006). Radiologists' payments were $2.936 billion in 2000, rose to a peak of $5.3 billion in 2006 (+81%), then dropped to $4.712 billion in 2010 (-11% vs 2006). Cardiologists' NDI payments were $1.327 billion in 2000, peaking at $2.998 billion in 2006 (+126%), then dropping to $1.996 billion in 2010 (-33% vs 2006). Other physicians' payments were $1.106 billion in 2000, peaking at $2.378 billion in 2006 (+115%), then dropping to $1.968 billion in 2010 (-17% vs 2006). Similar trends occurred in independent diagnostic testing facilities. After years of rapid growth in Medicare NDI payments, an abrupt reversal occurred starting in 2007. By 2010, overall NDI costs to Medicare Part B were down 21% compared with their 2006 peak. It is unclear whether this large payment reduction will satisfy federal policymakers. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional turbulence and the energy spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, E.A.; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2010-01-01

    Formation of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic turbulence and their influence on the turbulent spectra are considered. The analog of the vortex line representation as a transformation to the curvilinear system of coordinates moving together with the di-vorticity lines...... is developed and compressibility of this mapping appears as the main reason for the formation of the sharp vorticity gradients at high Reynolds numbers. In the case of strong anisotropy the sharp vorticity gradients can generate spectra which fall off as k −3 at large k, which appear to take the same form...

  16. Fast clustering using adaptive density peak detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Yifan

    2017-12-01

    Common limitations of clustering methods include the slow algorithm convergence, the instability of the pre-specification on a number of intrinsic parameters, and the lack of robustness to outliers. A recent clustering approach proposed a fast search algorithm of cluster centers based on their local densities. However, the selection of the key intrinsic parameters in the algorithm was not systematically investigated. It is relatively difficult to estimate the "optimal" parameters since the original definition of the local density in the algorithm is based on a truncated counting measure. In this paper, we propose a clustering procedure with adaptive density peak detection, where the local density is estimated through the nonparametric multivariate kernel estimation. The model parameter is then able to be calculated from the equations with statistical theoretical justification. We also develop an automatic cluster centroid selection method through maximizing an average silhouette index. The advantage and flexibility of the proposed method are demonstrated through simulation studies and the analysis of a few benchmark gene expression data sets. The method only needs to perform in one single step without any iteration and thus is fast and has a great potential to apply on big data analysis. A user-friendly R package ADPclust is developed for public use.

  17. Facile Synthesis of Silver Nanocubes with Sharp Corners and Edges in an Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shan; Li, Jianhua; Gilroy, Kyle D; Tao, Jing; Zhu, Chunlei; Yang, Xuan; Sun, Xiaojun; Xia, Younan

    2016-11-22

    It remains a challenge to synthesize Ag nanocubes in an aqueous system, although the polyol process was successfully adopted more than one decade ago. Here, we report an aqueous method for the synthesis of Ag nanocubes with an average edge length of 35-95 nm. It involves the formation of AgCl octahedra by mixing CF 3 COOAg with cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, followed by the nucleation and growth of Ag nanocrystals in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA) and FeCl 3 . The Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ redox pair is responsible for the removal of multiply twinned seeds through oxidative etching. The Cl - ions play two critical roles in the nucleation and growth of Ag nanocubes with a single-crystal structure. First, the Cl - ions react with Ag + ions to generate nanometer-sized AgCl octahedra in the initial stage of a synthesis. In the presence of room light and a proper reducing agent such as AA, the AgCl can be reduced to generate Ag n nuclei followed by their evolution into single-crystal seeds and then Ag nanocrystals. Second, the Cl - ions can act as a specific capping agent toward the Ag(100) surface, enabling the formation of Ag nanocubes with sharp corners and edges. Based on the results from a set of time-lapse studies and control experiments, we formulate a plausible mechanism to account for the formation of Ag nanocubes that resembles the formation and development of latent image centers in silver halide grains in the photographic process.

  18. Comparative Effectiveness on Cognitive Asthma Outcomes of the SHARP Academic Asthma Health Education and Counseling Program and a Non-Academic Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, Eileen; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C Nathan; Stoddard, Debbie; Gomes, Melissa; Harmon, Phyllis; Van Egeren, Laurie A

    2015-12-01

    Asthma morbidity and mortality is higher among older school-age children and early adolescents than other age groups across the lifespan. NIH recommended expanding asthma education to schools and community settings to meet cognitive outcomes that have an impact on morbidity and mortality. Guided by the acceptance of asthma model, an evidence-guided, comprehensive school-based academic health education and counseling program, Staying Healthy-Asthma Responsible & Prepared™ (SHARP), was developed. The program complements existing school curricula by integrating biology, psychology, and sociology content with related spelling, math, and reading and writing assignments. Feasibility, benefits, and efficacy have been established. We compared the effectiveness of SHARP to a non-academic program, Open Airways for Schools, in improving asthma knowledge and reasoning about symptom management. A two-group, cluster-randomized, single-blinded design was used with a sample of 205 students in grades 4-5 with asthma and their caregivers. Schools were matched prior to randomization. The unit of analysis was the student. Certified elementary school teachers delivered the programs during instructional time. Data were collected from student/caregiver dyads at baseline and at 1, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. In multilevel modeling, students enrolled in the academic SHARP program demonstrated significant (pimprovement in asthma knowledge and reasoning over students enrolled in the non-academic program. Knowledge advantages were retained at 24 months. Findings support delivery in schools of the SHARP academic health education program for students with asthma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A comparison of peak expiratory flow measured from forced vital capacity and peak flow meter manoeuvres in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Dipti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spirometry measures the mechanical function of lungs, chest wall and respiratory muscles by assessing the total volume of air exhaled from total lung capacity to residual volume. Spirometry and peak flow measurements have usually been carried out on separate equipments using different expiratory maneuvers. Aims: The present study was carried out to determine whether there is a significant difference between peak expiratory flow (PEF derived from a short sharp exhalation (PEF maneuver and that derived from a full forced vital capacity (FVC maneuver in healthy volunteers. Settings: A medical college and tertiary level hospital. Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out during the period from January 2006 to July 2006. The study included 80 healthy volunteers with no coexisting illnesses, who were in the 15-45 years age group and belonging to either sex. They were asked to perform two sets of PEF and FVC maneuvers using the same turbine spirometer; the order was randomly assigned.th Statistical Analysis: The difference between PEF obtained from a peak flow maneuver (PEFPF and that obtained from a forced vital capacity maneuver (PEFVC in healthy volunteers was analyzed separately for males and females, as well as for both groups combined, and statistical significance of its correlations with study data parameters was analyzed.th Results: The difference between PEF obtained from a peak flow maneuver (PEFPF and that obtained from a forced vital capacity maneuver (PEFVC was statistically significant ( P < 0.001 in males and in females separately and also for both groups combined. PEFPF (517.25 ± 83.22 liters/min was significantly greater than PEFVC (511.09 ± 83.54 liters/min, as found on combined group mean analysis. However, the difference was small (6.16 + 7.09 liters/min. Conclusions: FVC maneuver can be used over spirometers to detect the PEF; and on follow-up subsequently, the same maneuver should be used to derive PEF

  20. Jasper Sharp - mees, kes jättis varasema töö, et vaadata Jaapani filme / Jasper Sharp ; intervjueerinud Helen Merila

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sharp, Jasper, 1971-

    2011-01-01

    Euroopa kultuuripealinn Tallinn 2011 programmi osana ning koostöös Zipangu Fest'iga korraldatakse Tallinna Kinomajas 25.-28. aug.-ni Aasia sõltumatute filmide festival EVA - East via Asia. Festivali kuraator, veebisaidi Midnight Eye kaastoimetaja Jasper Sharp endast, festivalist, Jaapani sõltumatust kinost tänapäeval. Festivali kava

  1. Parameter Estimation of a Ground Moving Target Using Image Sharpness Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Li, Yaan

    2016-06-30

    Motion parameter estimation of a ground moving target is an important issue in synthetic aperture radar ground moving target indication (SAR-GMTI) which has significant applications for civilian and military. The SAR image of a moving target may be displaced and defocused due to the radial and along-track velocity components, respectively. The sharpness cost function presents a measure of the degree of focus of the image. In this work, a new ground moving target parameter estimation algorithm based on the sharpness optimization criterion is proposed. The relationships between the quadratic phase errors and the target's velocity components are derived. Using two-dimensional searching of the sharpness cost function, we can obtain the velocity components of the target and the focused target image simultaneously. The proposed moving target parameter estimation method and image sharpness metrics are analyzed in detail. Finally, numerical results illustrate the effective and superior velocity estimation performance of the proposed method when compared to existing algorithms.

  2. Needles and Other Sharps (Safe Disposal Outside of Health Care Settings)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sharps disposal container) in the household or public trash cans or recycling bins, and never flush them down the toilet. This puts trash and sewage workers, janitors, housekeepers, household members, and ...

  3. Effects of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, E.A.; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence and their influence on the turbulent spectra are considered. We have developed the analog of the vortex line representation as a transformation to the curvilinear system of coordinates moving together with the ......The appearance of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence and their influence on the turbulent spectra are considered. We have developed the analog of the vortex line representation as a transformation to the curvilinear system of coordinates moving together...... with the divorticity lines. Compressibility of this mapping can be considered as the main reason for the formation of the sharp vorticity gradients at high Reynolds numbers. For two-dimensional turbulence in the case of strong anisotropy the sharp vorticity gradients can generate spectra which fall off as k−3 at large...

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on periodic metal nanotips with tunable sharpness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linn, Nicholas C; Sun, C-H; Arya, Ajay; Jiang Peng; Jiang Bin

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a scalable bottom-up technology for producing periodic gold nanotips with tunable sharpness as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. Inverted silicon pyramidal pits, which are templated from non-close-packed colloidal crystals prepared by a spin-coating technology, are used as structural templates to replicate arrays of polymer nanopyramids with nanoscale sharp tips. The deposition of a thin layer of gold on the polymer nanopyramids leads to the formation of SERS-active substrates with a high enhancement factor (up to 10 8 ). The thickness of the deposited metal determines the sharpness of the nanotips and the resulting Raman enhancement factor. Finite-element electromagnetic modeling shows that the nanotips can significantly enhance the local electromagnetic field and the sharpness of nanotips greatly affects the SERS enhancement.

  5. Shocked materials from the Dutch Peak diamictite, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerz, F.; Bunch, T. E.; Oberbeck, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence of shock metamorphism in the Dutch Peak diamictite in the Sheeprock Mountains, Utah, is reported. The Dutch Peak diamictite is of Proterozoic age and is a minor part of the Dutch Peak formation. A shocked sample, specimen A250, was collected during a brief visit of the Harker Canyon area of the Sheeprock Mountains. This sample consists of equant, anhedral grains of quartz, K-feldspar, and plagioclase. The crystallographic orientation of 244 lamellae systems in 106 grains was measured. It is presently difficult to evaluate the significance of this single specimen. Without additional and substantial field work, and petrographic characterization of this formation, a number of scenarios for the presence of a shocked clast and the emplacement of the entire formation remain viable.

  6. PIXIE III: a very large area photon-counting CMOS pixel ASIC for sharp X-ray spectral imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Spandre, G.; Minuti, M.; Pinchera, M.; Delogu, P.; De Ruvo, P.L.; Vincenzi, A.

    2015-01-01

    PIXIE III is the third generation of very large area (32 × 25 mm 2 ) pixel ASICs developed by Pixirad Imaging Counters s.r.l. to be used in combination with suitable X-ray sensor materials (Silicon, CdTe, GaAs) in hybrid assemblies using flip-chip bonding. A Pixirad unit module based on PIXIE III shows several advances compared to what has been available up to now. It has a very broad energy range (from 2 to 100 keV before full pulse saturation), high speed (100 ns peaking time), high frame rate (larger than 500 fps), dead-time-free operation, good energy resolution (around 2 keV at 20 keV), high photo-peak fraction and sharp spectral separation between the color images. In this paper the results obtained with PIXIE III both in a test bench set-up as well in X-ray imaging applications are discussed

  7. Passive radio frequency peak power multiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Zoltan D.; Wilson, Perry B.

    1977-01-01

    Peak power multiplication of a radio frequency source by simultaneous charging of two high-Q resonant microwave cavities by applying the source output through a directional coupler to the cavities and then reversing the phase of the source power to the coupler, thereby permitting the power in the cavities to simultaneously discharge through the coupler to the load in combination with power from the source to apply a peak power to the load that is a multiplication of the source peak power.

  8. Inverse problems and sharp eigenvalue asymptotics for Euler–Bernoulli operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badanin, Andrey; Korotyaev, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    We consider Euler–Bernoulli operators with real coefficients on the unit interval. We prove the following results: (i) The Ambarzumyan-type theorem about the inverse problems for the Euler–Bernoulli operator. (ii) The sharp asymptotics of eigenvalues for the Euler–Bernoulli operator when its coefficients converge to the constant function. (iii) The sharp eigenvalue asymptotics for both the Euler–Bernoulli operator and fourth-order operators (with complex coefficients) on the unit interval at high energy. (paper)

  9. Pengembangan Aplikasi E-commerce Dengan Konsep Berorientasi Objek Pada PT Sharp Cabang Semarang

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Arifian; Suhartono, Suhartono; Bahtiar, Nurdin

    2012-01-01

    PT Sharp Semarang branch is engage in the marketing of electronic items like air conditioners, refrigerators, televisions, and others. Business competition is increasingly fierce, especially in the electronics field requires the selection of advertising media that can market their goods quickly and easily. E-commerce as a new method that uses the Internet media is the right solution to market their goods easily and quickly. Application E-commerce Sharp Semarang developed using method of objec...

  10. Sharp-front wave of strong magnetic field diffusion in solid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Bo; Gu, Zhuo-wei; Kan, Ming-xian; Wang, Gang-hua; Zhao, Jian-heng [Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-105, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-08-15

    When a strong magnetic field diffuses into a solid metal, if the metal's resistance possesses an abrupt rise at some critical temperature and the magnetic field strength is above some critical value, the magnetic field will diffuse into the metal in the form of a sharp-front wave. Formulas for the critical conditions under which a sharp-front magnetic diffusion wave emerges and a formula for the wave-front velocity are derived in this work.

  11. The geomorphic structure of the runoff peak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rigon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a theoretical framework to investigate the core dependence of peak flows on the geomorphic properties of river basins. Based on the theory of transport by travel times, and simple hydrodynamic characterization of floods, this new framework invokes the linearity and invariance of the hydrologic response to provide analytical and semi-analytical expressions for peak flow, time to peak, and area contributing to the peak runoff. These results are obtained for the case of constant-intensity hyetograph using the Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF curves to estimate extreme flow values as a function of the rainfall return period. Results show that, with constant-intensity hyetographs, the time-to-peak is greater than rainfall duration and usually shorter than the basin concentration time. Moreover, the critical storm duration is shown to be independent of rainfall return period as well as the area contributing to the flow peak. The same results are found when the effects of hydrodynamic dispersion are accounted for. Further, it is shown that, when the effects of hydrodynamic dispersion are negligible, the basin area contributing to the peak discharge does not depend on the channel velocity, but is a geomorphic propriety of the basin. As an example this framework is applied to three watersheds. In particular, the runoff peak, the critical rainfall durations and the time to peak are calculated for all links within a network to assess how they increase with basin area.

  12. A report on SHARP (Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype) and the Voyager Neptune encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R. G. (Editor); Atkinson, D. J.; James, M. L.; Lawson, D. L.; Porta, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    The development and application of the Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP) for the operations of the telecommunications systems and link analysis functions in Voyager mission operations are presented. An overview is provided of the design and functional description of the SHARP system as it was applied to Voyager. Some of the current problems and motivations for automation in real-time mission operations are discussed, as are the specific solutions that SHARP provides. The application of SHARP to Voyager telecommunications had the goal of being a proof-of-capability demonstration of artificial intelligence as applied to the problem of real-time monitoring functions in planetary mission operations. AS part of achieving this central goal, the SHARP application effort was also required to address the issue of the design of an appropriate software system architecture for a ground-based, highly automated spacecraft monitoring system for mission operations, including methods for: (1) embedding a knowledge-based expert system for fault detection, isolation, and recovery within this architecture; (2) acquiring, managing, and fusing the multiple sources of information used by operations personnel; and (3) providing information-rich displays to human operators who need to exercise the capabilities of the automated system. In this regard, SHARP has provided an excellent example of how advanced artificial intelligence techniques can be smoothly integrated with a variety of conventionally programmed software modules, as well as guidance and solutions for many questions about automation in mission operations.

  13. RBP-Jkappa/SHARP recruits CtIP/CtBP corepressors to silence Notch target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Franz; Winkler, Michael; Cao, Ying; Astrahantseff, Kathy; Bourteele, Soizic; Knöchel, Walter; Borggrefe, Tilman

    2005-12-01

    Notch is a transmembrane receptor that determines cell fates and pattern formation in all animal species. After ligand binding, proteolytic cleavage steps occur and the intracellular part of Notch translocates to the nucleus, where it targets the DNA-binding protein RBP-Jkappa/CBF1. In the absence of Notch, RBP-Jkappa represses Notch target genes through the recruitment of a corepressor complex. We and others have identified SHARP as a component of this complex. Here, we functionally demonstrate that the SHARP repression domain is necessary and sufficient to repress transcription and that the absence of this domain causes a dominant negative Notch-like phenotype. We identify the CtIP and CtBP corepressors as novel components of the human RBP-Jkappa/SHARP-corepressor complex and show that CtIP binds directly to the SHARP repression domain. Functionally, CtIP and CtBP augment SHARP-mediated repression. Transcriptional repression of the Notch target gene Hey1 is abolished in CtBP-deficient cells or after the functional knockout of CtBP. Furthermore, the endogenous Hey1 promoter is derepressed in CtBP-deficient cells. We propose that a corepressor complex containing CtIP/CtBP facilitates RBP-Jkappa/SHARP-mediated repression of Notch target genes.

  14. Do the ball-ended probe cause less damage than sharp explorers?-An ultrastructural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos-Silveira, Juliana; Oliveira, Marina Monreal; Matos, Ronilza; Moura-Netto, Cacio; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Braga, Mariana Minatel

    2016-03-22

    No evidence about damage caused by ball-ended probes on tooth is available. No study compared probing defects caused by ball-ended probes with sharp explorers during tactile examinations of primary teeth. This exploratory study aimed to compare ultrastructural defects caused by ball-ended probes with sharp explorers during tactile examinations of primary teeth. Forty-nine primary extracted teeth were tactile examined as performed for caries activity assessment. Surfaces were randomly divided into groups based on probe type (ball-ended probe or sharp explorer). Two examiners probed different surfaces using the sharp explorer and the ball-ended probe. The order for examination was randomly determined. Images were captured using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) before and after probing. Two external examiners evaluated independently the ESEM images and scored them as: 0) no damage, 1) slight marks, 2) distinct marks, 3) marks with discontinuity, 4) enamel break-offs. Multilevel Poisson regression models were used to analyze associations between probing ultrastructural damage and surface type, baseline condition and probe type. Prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated with 95 % confidence interval (CI). The most common defects observed on the dental surfaces were probing marks without discontinuity (scores 1 and 2). Ball-ended probes caused significantly less severe damage than sharp explorers (PR: 0.28; CI: 0.11-0.76, p = 0.01). Ball-ended probes cause less damage than sharp explorers when probing gently dental surfaces of primary teeth.

  15. Measurement of cone beam CT coincidence with megavoltage isocentre and image sharpness using the QUASAR(TM) Penta-Guide phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, J R; Lindsay, R; Dean, C J; Thwaites, D I; Brettle, D S; Magee, D R

    2008-01-01

    For image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems based on cone beam CT (CBCT) integrated into a linear accelerator, the reproducible alignment of imager to x-ray source is critical to the registration of both the x-ray-volumetric image with the megavoltage (MV) beam isocentre and image sharpness. An enhanced method of determining the CBCT to MV isocentre alignment using the QUASAR(TM) Penta-Guide phantom was developed which improved both precision and accuracy. This was benchmarked against our existing method which used software and a ball-bearing (BB) phantom provided by Elekta. Additionally, a method of measuring an image sharpness metric (MTF 50 ) from the edge response function of a spherical air cavity within the Penta-Guide phantom was developed and its sensitivity was tested by simulating misalignments of the kV imager. Reproducibility testing of the enhanced Penta-Guide method demonstrated a systematic error of 50 for five measurements was 0.278 ± 0.004 lp mm -1 with no applied misalignment. Simulated misalignments exhibited a clear peak in the MTF 50 enabling misalignments greater than 0.4 mm to be detected. The Penta-Guide phantom can be used to precisely measure CBCT-MV coincidence and image sharpness on CBCT-IGRT systems

  16. Characterization of carbonaceous matter in xenolithic clasts from the Sharps (H3.4) meteorite: Constraints on the origin and thermal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kebukawa, Yoko [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan); Zolensky, Michael E. [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chan, Queenie H. S. [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (United States); Nagao, Keisuke [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Kilcoyne, A. L. David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bodnar, Robert J. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Farley, Charles [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Rahman, Zia [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (United States); Le, Loan [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cody, George D. [Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-09-25

    Primitive xenolithic clasts, often referred to as “dark clasts”, are well known in many regolith breccias. The Sharps H3.4 ordinary chondrite contains unusually large dark clasts up to ~1 cm across. Poorly-graphitized carbon (PGC), with Fe, Ni metal and described as “carbon-rich aggregates”, has been found in these clasts (Brearley, 1990). We report detailed analyses of carbonaceous matter in several identical Sharps clasts using FTIR, Raman, C-XANES, and TEM that provide insight on the extent of thermal processing and possible origin of such clasts. We also prepared acid residues of the clasts using the HCl/HF method and conducted mass spectrometric analysis of the entrained noble gases. Carbonaceous matter is often used to infer thermal history due to its sensitivity to thermal processes. The FTIR spectra of the acid residue from the Sharps clast suggest that carbonaceous matter in the clast contains less hydrogen and oxygen compared to acid residues from typical type 3.4 ordinary chondrites. The metamorphic temperatures obtained by Raman spectroscopy ranges between ~380 °C and ~490 °C. TEM observations indicate that the clasts experienced a peak temperature of 300 °C to 400 °C, based on the carbon d 002 layer lattice spacing of C-rich aggregates. These estimates are consistent with an earlier estimate of 330 ± 50 °C, that is also estimated by the d 002 layer lattice spacing (Brearley, 1990). It should be noted that the lattice spacing thermometer is based on terrestrial metamorphose rocks, and thus temperature was probably underestimated. Meanwhile, the C-XANES spectra of the C-rich aggregates show high exciton intensities, indicative of graphene structures that developed at around 700–800 °C following an extensive period of time (millions of years), however, the surrounding matrix areas experienced lower temperatures of less than 300–500 °C. Noble gas analysis of the acid residue from the Sharps clasts shows that the residue is

  17. Peak Shaving Considering Streamflow Uncertainties | Iwuagwu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main thrust of this paper is peak shaving with a Stochastic hydro model. In peak sharing, the amount of hydro energy scheduled may be a minimum but it serves to replace less efficient thermal units. The sample system is die Kainji hydro plant and the thermal units of the National Electric Power Authority. The random ...

  18. Exploring Moho sharpness in Northeastern North China Craton with frequency-dependence analysis of Ps receiver function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Yao, H.; Chen, L.; WANG, X.; Fang, L.

    2017-12-01

    The North China Craton (NCC), one of the oldest cratons in the world, has attracted wide attention in Earth Science for decades because of the unusual Mesozoic destruction of its cratonic lithosphere. Understanding the deep processes and mechanism of this craton destruction demands detailed knowledge about the deep structure of this region. In this study, we calculate P-wave receiver functions (RFs) with two-year teleseismic records from the North China Seismic Array ( 200 stations) deployed in the northeastern NCC. We observe both diffused and concentered PpPs signals from the Moho in RF waveforms, which indicates heterogeneous Moho sharpness variations in the study region. Synthetic Ps phases generated from broad positive velocity gradients at the depth of the Moho (referred as Pms) show a clear frequency dependence nature, which in turn is required to constrain the sharpness of the velocity gradient. Practically, characterizing such a frequency dependence feature in real data is challenging, because of low signal-to-noise ratio, contaminations by multiples generated from shallow structure, distorted signal stacking especially in double-peak Pms signals, etc. We attempt to address these issues by, firstly, utilizing a high-resolution Moho depth model of this region to predict theoretical delay times of Pms that facilitate more accurate Pms identifications. The Moho depth model is derived by wave-equation based poststack depth migration on both Ps phase and surface-reflected multiples in RFs in our previous study (Zhang et al., submitted to JGR). Second, we select data from a major back azimuth range of 100° - 220° that includes 70% teleseismic events due to the uneven data coverage and to avoid azimuthal influence as well. Finally, we apply an adaptive cross-correlation stacking of Pms signals in RFs for each station within different frequency bands. High-quality Pms signals at different frequencies will be selected after careful visual inspection and adaptive

  19. Developmental characteristics of temporal sharp transients in the EEG of normal preterm and term newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes Magda Lahorgue

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe developmental characteristics, morphological aspects and incidence of temporal sharp transients (TST in normal preterm and term newborns at matched conceptional ages (CA. METHOD: Neonatal EEGs from two groups of normal newborns were evaluated in order to identify and characterize TST. Group I (n=40 consisted of newborns from 34 to 40 weeks of gestational age (GA that were submitted to a single EEG between 24 and 48 hours of life. Group II consisted of 10 preterm newborns with GA between 30-32 weeks, followed with a weekly EEG until they reached term. Morphology of TST was divided in 3 groups (temporal sawtooth, isolated transients or repetitive transients. TST index, density and total number were calculated in each polysomnography and related to sleep stages and CA. Laterality (right/left was also evaluated. The groups were compared at 34, 36, 38 and 40 weeks of CA. RESULTS: TST index and density decreased with the increase of CA in both groups (p<0.0001. The temporal sawtooth feature was registered in both groups only at 34 weeks. Although rare, repetitive and isolated TST were the most prevalent morphology between 36 - 40 weeks CA. Significant intragroup difference was observed in the comparison of TST density in REM and transitional sleep in GI. Moreover, isolated TST morphology was significant higher in GI at 34 weeks when compared to the others CA. No intragroup differences were observed on GII. No significant differences between the groups were observed considering TST number, index, density, morphology or laterality, at the matched CA. CONCLUSION: TST are normal features of neonatal EEG, as they are registered in normal newborns. Its incidence varies accordingly to morphology and they tend to disappear following the increase of CA. Temporal sawtooth appears more often in preterm newborns. Our results suggest that TST index, density and morphology variability may be a function of CA.

  20. The role of Bicoid cooperative binding in the patterning of sharp borders in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Francisco J P; Spirov, Alexander V; Bisch, Paulo M

    2012-10-15

    In Drosophila embryonic development, the Bicoid (Bcd) protein establishes positional information of downstream developmental genes like hunchback (hb), which has a strong anterior expression and a sharp on-off boundary in the mid-embryo. The role of Bcd cooperative binding in the positioning of the Hb pattern has been previously demonstrated. However, there are discrepancies in the reported results about the role of this mechanism in the sharp Hb border. Here, we determined the Hill coefficient (nH) required for Bcd to generate the sharp border of Hb in wild-type (WT) embryos. We found that an n(H) of approximately 6.3 (s.d. 1.4) and 10.8 (s.d. 4.0) is required to account for Hb sharpness at early and late cycle 14A, respectively. Additional mechanisms are possibly required because the high nH is likely unachievable for Bcd binding to the hb promoter. To test this idea, we determined the nH required to pattern the Hb profile of 15 embryos expressing an hb14F allele that is defective in self-activation and found nH to be 3.0 (s.d. 1.0). This result indicates that in WT embryos, the hb self-activation is important for Hb sharpness. Corroborating our results, we also found a progressive increase in the required value of n(H) spanning from 4.0 to 9.2 by determining this coefficient from averaged profiles of eight temporal classes at cycle 14A (T1 to T8). Our results indicate that there is a transition in the mechanisms responsible for the sharp Hb border during cycle 14A: in early stages of this cycle, Bcd cooperative binding is primarily responsible for Hb sharpness; in late cycle 14A, hb self-activation becomes the dominant mechanism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ventricular beat detection in single channel electrocardiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotsinsky, Ivan A; Stoyanov, Todor V

    2004-01-29

    Detection of QRS complexes and other types of ventricular beats is a basic component of ECG analysis. Many algorithms have been proposed and used because of the waves' shape diversity. Detection in a single channel ECG is important for several applications, such as in defibrillators and specialized monitors. The developed heuristic algorithm for ventricular beat detection includes two main criteria. The first of them is based on steep edges and sharp peaks evaluation and classifies normal QRS complexes in real time. The second criterion identifies ectopic beats by occurrence of biphasic wave. It is modified to work with a delay of one RR interval in case of long RR intervals. Other algorithm branches classify already detected QRS complexes as ectopic beats if a set of wave parameters is encountered or the ratio of latest two RR intervals RRi-1/RRi is less than 1:2.5. The algorithm was tested with the AHA and MIT-BIH databases. A sensitivity of 99.04% and a specificity of 99.62% were obtained in detection of 542014 beats. The algorithm copes successfully with different complicated cases of single channel ventricular beat detection. It is aimed to simulate to some extent the experience of the cardiologist, rather than to rely on mathematical approaches adopted from the theory of signal analysis. The algorithm is open to improvement, especially in the part concerning the discrimination between normal QRS complexes and ectopic beats.

  2. Peak Dose Assessment for Proposed DOE-PPPO Authorized Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, Delis [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2012-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct a peak dose assessment in support of the Authorized Limits Request for Solid Waste Disposal at Landfill C-746-U at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE-PPPO 2011a). The peak doses were calculated based on the DOE-PPPO Proposed Single Radionuclides Soil Guidelines and the DOE-PPPO Proposed Authorized Limits (AL) Volumetric Concentrations available in DOE-PPPO 2011a. This work is provided as an appendix to the Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document for the Authorized Limits Request for the C-746-U Landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky (ORISE 2012). The receptors evaluated in ORISE 2012 were selected by the DOE-PPPO for the additional peak dose evaluations. These receptors included a Landfill Worker, Trespasser, Resident Farmer (onsite), Resident Gardener, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and an Offsite Resident Farmer. The RESRAD (Version 6.5) and RESRAD-OFFSITE (Version 2.5) computer codes were used for the peak dose assessments. Deterministic peak dose assessments were performed for all the receptors and a probabilistic dose assessment was performed only for the Offsite Resident Farmer at the request of the DOE-PPPO. In a deterministic analysis, a single input value results in a single output value. In other words, a deterministic analysis uses single parameter values for every variable in the code. By contrast, a probabilistic approach assigns parameter ranges to certain variables, and the code randomly selects the values for each variable from the parameter range each time it calculates the dose (NRC 2006). The receptor scenarios, computer codes and parameter input files were previously used in ORISE 2012. A few modifications were made to the parameter input files as appropriate for this effort. Some of these changes

  3. Peak Dose Assessment for Proposed DOE-PPPO Authorized Limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, Delis

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct a peak dose assessment in support of the Authorized Limits Request for Solid Waste Disposal at Landfill C-746-U at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE-PPPO 2011a). The peak doses were calculated based on the DOE-PPPO Proposed Single Radionuclides Soil Guidelines and the DOE-PPPO Proposed Authorized Limits (AL) Volumetric Concentrations available in DOE-PPPO 2011a. This work is provided as an appendix to the Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document for the Authorized Limits Request for the C-746-U Landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky (ORISE 2012). The receptors evaluated in ORISE 2012 were selected by the DOE-PPPO for the additional peak dose evaluations. These receptors included a Landfill Worker, Trespasser, Resident Farmer (onsite), Resident Gardener, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and an Offsite Resident Farmer. The RESRAD (Version 6.5) and RESRAD-OFFSITE (Version 2.5) computer codes were used for the peak dose assessments. Deterministic peak dose assessments were performed for all the receptors and a probabilistic dose assessment was performed only for the Offsite Resident Farmer at the request of the DOE-PPPO. In a deterministic analysis, a single input value results in a single output value. In other words, a deterministic analysis uses single parameter values for every variable in the code. By contrast, a probabilistic approach assigns parameter ranges to certain variables, and the code randomly selects the values for each variable from the parameter range each time it calculates the dose (NRC 2006). The receptor scenarios, computer codes and parameter input files were previously used in ORISE 2012. A few modifications were made to the parameter input files as appropriate for this effort. Some of these changes

  4. Sharps injury reduction: a six-year, three-phase study comparing use of a small patient-room sharps disposal container with a larger engineered container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmond, T; Naisoro, W

    2014-09-01

    A 350-bed Sydney hospital noted excessive container-associated sharps injuries (CASI) using small sharps containers and compared the effect from 2004 to 2010 of using a larger container engineered to reduce CASI. In Phase 1 (Ph1), disposable 1.4L containers (BD Australia) were carried to/from patients' rooms. In Phase 2 (Ph2), this stopped and a safety-engineered 32L reusable container (the Device; Sharpsmart, SteriHealth) was mounted in medication stations only and sharps were carried to and from patient rooms using kidney dishes. In Phase 3 (Ph3), the Device was wall-mounted in patient rooms. Sharps injuries were categorised as 'during-procedure', 'after-procedure but before disposal', 'CASI', and 'improper disposal SI'. Disposal-related SI comprised CASI plus improper-disposal SI. Injuries per 100 full-time-equivalent staff were analysed using Chi 2 ; p ≤ 0.05; and relative risk and 95% confidence limits were calculated. In Ph1 (small containers) 19.4% of SI were CASI and transport injuries were zero. In Ph2 (Device in medication station) CASI fell 94.9% ( p <0.001); Disposal-related SI fell 71.1% ( p =0.002) but transport injuries rose significantly. In Ph3 (Device in patient room) zero CASI occurred ( p <0.001); Disposal-related SI fell 83.1% ( p =0.001). Recapping SI fell 85.1% ( p =0.01) with the Device. The Device's volume, large aperture, passive overfill-protection and close-at-hand siting are postulated as SI reduction factors.

  5. SHARP: A multi-mission artificial intelligence system for spacecraft telemetry monitoring and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Denise L.; James, Mark L.

    1989-01-01

    The Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP) is a system designed to demonstrate automated health and status analysis for multi-mission spacecraft and ground data systems operations. Telecommunications link analysis of the Voyager 2 spacecraft is the initial focus for the SHARP system demonstration which will occur during Voyager's encounter with the planet Neptune in August, 1989, in parallel with real time Voyager operations. The SHARP system combines conventional computer science methodologies with artificial intelligence techniques to produce an effective method for detecting and analyzing potential spacecraft and ground systems problems. The system performs real time analysis of spacecraft and other related telemetry, and is also capable of examining data in historical context. A brief introduction is given to the spacecraft and ground systems monitoring process at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The current method of operation for monitoring the Voyager Telecommunications subsystem is described, and the difficulties associated with the existing technology are highlighted. The approach taken in the SHARP system to overcome the current limitations is also described, as well as both the conventional and artificial intelligence solutions developed in SHARP.

  6. Analysis of regulatory mechanisms of an insulin-inducible SHARP-2 gene by (S)-Equol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneishi, Ayumi; Takagi, Katsuhiro; Asano, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Taichi; Tanaka, Takashi; Nakamura, Soichiro; Noguchi, Tamio; Yamada, Kazuya

    2012-09-01

    Small compounds that activate the insulin-dependent signaling pathway have potential therapeutic applications in controlling type 2 diabetes mellitus. The rat enhancer of split- and hairy-related protein-2 (SHARP-2) is an insulin-inducible transcription factor that decreases expression of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene, a gluconeogenic enzyme gene. In this study, we screened for soybean isoflavones that can induce the rat SHARP-2 gene expression and analyzed their mechanism(s). Genistein and (S)-Equol, a metabolite of daidzein, induced rat SHARP-2 gene expression in H4IIE rat hepatoma cells. The (S)-Equol induction was mediated by both the phosphoinositide 3-kinase- and protein kinase C (PKC)-pathways. When a dominant negative form of atypical PKC lambda (aPKCλ) was expressed, the induction of SHARP-2 mRNA level by (S)-Equol was inhibited. In addition, Western blot analyses showed that (S)-Equol rapidly activated both aPKCλ and classical PKC alpha. Furthermore, the (S)-Equol induction was inhibited by treatment with a RNA polymerase inhibitor or a protein synthesis inhibitor. Finally, a reporter gene assay revealed that the transcriptional stimulation by (S)-Equol was mediated by nucleotide sequences located between -4687 and -4133 of the rat SHARP-2 gene. Thus, we conclude that (S)-Equol is an useful dietary supplement to control type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Objective assessment of knife sharpness over a working day cutting meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savescu, Adriana; Cuny-Guerrier, Aude; Wild, Pascal; Reno, Gilles; Aublet-Cuvelier, Agnès; Claudon, Laurent

    2018-04-01

    Knife sharpness is one of multiple factors involved in musculoskeletal disorders in industrial meat cutting. The aim of this study was to objectively evaluate, in real working situations, how knife sharpness changed over a working day cutting meat, and to analyse the impact of sharpening, steeling and meat-cutting activities on these variations. Twenty-two meat-cutting workers from three different companies participated in the study. The methods included measurements of knife sharpness in relation to real work situations and consideration of the way meat-cutting and sharpening operations were organised. Results showed that the type of meat-cutting activities, the steeling strategy adopted by the worker, including the types of tool used, and the overall organisation of the sharpening task all had a significant influence on how knife sharpness evolved over a 2-h period and over an entire working day. To improve MSD prevention, sharpening and steeling operations should not be considered as independent activities, but taken into account as a continuity of working actions. Appropriate assessment of knife sharpness by meat cutters affects how they organise meat-cutting and sharpening tasks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Automated Peak Picking and Peak Integration in Macromolecular NMR Spectra Using AUTOPSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koradi, Reto; Billeter, Martin; Engeli, Max; Güntert, Peter; Wüthrich, Kurt

    1998-12-01

    A new approach for automated peak picking of multidimensional protein NMR spectra with strong overlap is introduced, which makes use of the program AUTOPSY (automatedpeak picking for NMRspectroscopy). The main elements of this program are a novel function for local noise level calculation, the use of symmetry considerations, and the use of lineshapes extracted from well-separated peaks for resolving groups of strongly overlapping peaks. The algorithm generates peak lists with precise chemical shift and integral intensities, and a reliability measure for the recognition of each peak. The results of automated peak picking of NOESY spectra with AUTOPSY were tested in combination with the combined automated NOESY cross peak assignment and structure calculation routine NOAH implemented in the program DYANA. The quality of the resulting structures was found to be comparable with those from corresponding data obtained with manual peak picking.

  9. Magnetic ordering in single crystals of PrBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta

    CERN Document Server

    Uma, S; Gmelin, E; Rangarajan, G; Skanthakumar, S; Lynn, J W; Walter, R; Lorenz, T; Büchner, B; Walker, E; Erb, A

    1998-01-01

    Heat capacity measurements on pure but twinned single crystals of PrBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta reveal a sharp peak at T sub N sup P sup sub T =16.6 K, which according to thermal expansion, neutron diffraction, and magnetic susceptibility measurements originates from an antiferromagnetic ordering of the Pr-ion moments. A modest coupling to the Cu(2) spin system is observed. Below T sub N sup P sup sub T a first-order transition in the magnetic structure of the Pr spin system (at 13.4 K in warming; approx. 11 K in cooling) is found. Field-dependent heat capacity data show anisotropic temperature dependences of the c sub p -peaks and recover a Schottky-like anomaly due to the crystal-field-split ground state of the Pr sup 3 sup +. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  10. Bayesian Peak Picking for NMR Spectra

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yichen

    2014-02-01

    Protein structure determination is a very important topic in structural genomics, which helps people to understand varieties of biological functions such as protein-protein interactions, protein–DNA interactions and so on. Nowadays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has often been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of protein in vivo. This study aims to automate the peak picking step, the most important and tricky step in NMR structure determination. We propose to model the NMR spectrum by a mixture of bivariate Gaussian densities and use the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm as the computational tool to solve the problem. Under the Bayesian framework, the peak picking problem is casted as a variable selection problem. The proposed method can automatically distinguish true peaks from false ones without preprocessing the data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort in the literature that tackles the peak picking problem for NMR spectrum data using Bayesian method.

  11. Global Earthquake Hazard Distribution - Peak Ground Acceleration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Earthquake Hazard Distribution-Peak Ground Acceleration is a 2.5 by 2.5 minute grid of global earthquake hazards developed using Global Seismic Hazard Program...

  12. Helping System Engineers Bridge the Peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungta, Neha; Tkachuk, Oksana; Person, Suzette; Biatek, Jason; Whalen, Michael W.; Castle, Joseph; Castle, JosephGundy-Burlet, Karen

    2014-01-01

    In our experience at NASA, system engineers generally follow the Twin Peaks approach when developing safety-critical systems. However, iterations between the peaks require considerable manual, and in some cases duplicate, effort. A significant part of the manual effort stems from the fact that requirements are written in English natural language rather than a formal notation. In this work, we propose an approach that enables system engineers to leverage formal requirements and automated test generation to streamline iterations, effectively "bridging the peaks". The key to the approach is a formal language notation that a) system engineers are comfortable with, b) is supported by a family of automated V&V tools, and c) is semantically rich enough to describe the requirements of interest. We believe the combination of formalizing requirements and providing tool support to automate the iterations will lead to a more efficient Twin Peaks implementation at NASA.

  13. Bayesian Peak Picking for NMR Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichen Cheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein structure determination is a very important topic in structural genomics, which helps people to understand varieties of biological functions such as protein-protein interactions, protein–DNA interactions and so on. Nowadays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR has often been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of protein in vivo. This study aims to automate the peak picking step, the most important and tricky step in NMR structure determination. We propose to model the NMR spectrum by a mixture of bivariate Gaussian densities and use the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm as the computational tool to solve the problem. Under the Bayesian framework, the peak picking problem is casted as a variable selection problem. The proposed method can automatically distinguish true peaks from false ones without preprocessing the data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort in the literature that tackles the peak picking problem for NMR spectrum data using Bayesian method.

  14. How to use your peak flow meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack . This can tell you how bad your asthma attack is and if your medicine is working. Any ... Make peak flow a habit! Signs of an asthma attack Stay away from asthma triggers Review Date 2/ ...

  15. Global Earthquake Hazard Distribution - Peak Ground Acceleration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Earthquake Hazard Distribution-peak ground acceleration is a 2.5 minute grid of global earthquake hazards developed using Global Seismic Hazard Program...

  16. Peak-Seeking Control for Trim Optimization

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovators have developed a peak-seeking algorithm that can reduce drag and improve performance and fuel efficiency by optimizing aircraft trim in real time. The...

  17. Improved peak shape fitting in alpha spectra

    OpenAIRE

    POMME Stefaan; CARO MARROYO BELEN

    2014-01-01

    Peak overlap is a recurrent issue ina lpha-particle spectrometry, not only in routine analyses but also in the high-resolution spectra from which reference values for alpha emission probabilities are derived. In this work, improved peak shape formulae are presented for the deconvolution of alpha-particle spectra. They have been implemented as fit functions in a spreadsheet application and optimum fit parameters were searched with built-in optimisation routines. Deconvolution results are shown...

  18. Structure and correlations of the flux line lattice in crystalline Nb through the peak effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammel, P.L.; Yaron, U.; Ramirez, Y.P.

    1998-01-01

    We have measured the structure of the field cooled flux line lattice (FLL) in single crystal Nb using small angle neutron scattering. Augmented by transport and thermodynamic data, a scenario for the dramatic disordering of the FLL near the peak effect emerges. A precursor to the peak effect is a...

  19. Instream flow needs below peaking hydroelectric projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milhous, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a method developed to assist in the determination of instream flow needs below hydroelectric projects operated in a peaking mode. Peaking hydroelectric projects significantly change streamflow over a short period of time; consequently, any instream flow methodology must consider the dual flows associated with peaking projects. The dual flows are the lowest flow and the maximum generation flow of a peaking cycle. The methodology is based on elements of the Physical Habitat Simulation System of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and uses habitat, rather than fish numbers or biomas, as at basic response variable. All aquatic animals are subject to the rapid changes in streamflow which cause rapid swings in habitat quality. Some aquatic organisms are relatively fixed in location in the stream while others can move when flows change. The habitat available from a project operated in peaking mode is considered to be the minimum habitat occurring during a cycle of habitat change. The methodology takes in to consideration that some aquatic animals can move and others cannot move during a peaking cycle

  20. A No-Reference Sharpness Metric Based on Structured Ringing for JPEG2000 Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a no-reference image sharpness metric based on human blur perception for JPEG2000 compressed image. The metric mainly uses a ringing measure. And a blurring measure is used for compensation when the blur is so severe that ringing artifacts are concealed. We used the anisotropic diffusion for the preliminary ringing map and refined it by considering the property of ringing structure. The ringing detection of the proposed metric does not depend on edge detection, which is suitable for high degraded images. The characteristics of the ringing and blurring measures are analyzed and validated theoretically and experimentally. The performance of the proposed metric is tested and compared with that of some existing JPEG2000 sharpness metrics on three widely used databases. The experimental results show that the proposed metric is accurate and reliable in predicting the sharpness of JPEG2000 images.

  1. Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    A total of 125 talented high school students had the opportunity to gain first hand experience about science and engineering careers by working directly with a NASA scientist or engineer during the summer. This marked the fifth year of operation for NASA's Summer High School Apprenticehsip Research Program (SHARP). Ferguson Bryan served as the SHARP contractor and worked closely with NASA staff at Headquarters and the eight participating sites to plan, implement, and evaluate the Program. The main objectives were to strengthen SHARP and expand the number of students in the Program. These eight sites participated in the Program: Ames Research Center North, Ames' Dryden Flight Research Facility, Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard's Wallops Flight Facility, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center.

  2. Infrared Peak Splitting from Phonon Localization in Solid Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdău, Ioan B; Ackland, Graeme J

    2017-04-07

    We show that the isotope effect leads to a completely different spectroscopic signal in hydrogen-deuterium mixtures, compared to pure elements that have the same crystal structure. This is particularly true for molecular vibrations, which are the main source of information about the structure of high-pressure hydrogen. Mass disorder breaks translational symmetry, meaning that vibrations are localized almost to single molecules, and are not zone-center phonons. In mixtures, each observable infrared (IR) peak corresponds to a collection of many such molecular vibrations, which have a distribution of frequencies depending on local environment. Furthermore discrete groups of environments cause the peaks to split. We illustrate this issue by considering the IR spectrum of the high-pressure phase III structure of hydrogen, recently interpreted as showing novel phases in isotopic mixtures. We calculate the IR spectrum of hydrogen-deuterium mixtures in the C2/c and Cmca-12 structures, showing that isotopic disorder gives rise to mode localization of the high-frequency vibrons. The local coordination of the molecules leads to discrete IR peaks. The spread of frequencies is strongly enhanced with pressure, such that more peaks become resolvable at higher pressures, in agreement with the recent measurements.

  3. MERGERS IN DOUBLE-PEAKED [O III] ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Hai; Djorgovski, S. G.; Myers, Adam D.; Yan Lin

    2011-01-01

    As a natural consequence of galaxy mergers, binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) should be commonplace. Nevertheless, observational confirmations are rare, especially for binaries with separations less than 10 kpc. Such a system may show two sets of narrow emission lines in a single spectrum owing to the orbital motion of the binary. We have obtained high-resolution near-infrared images of 50 double-peaked [O III]λ5007 AGNs with the Keck II laser guide star adaptive optics system. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample is compiled from the literature and consists of 17 type-1 AGNs between 0.18 BH -σ * relation because of overestimated stellar velocity dispersions, illustrating the importance of removing mergers from the samples defining the M BH -σ * relations. Finally, we find that the emission-line properties are indistinguishable for spatially resolved and unresolved sources, emphasizing that scenarios involving a single AGN can produce the same double-peaked line profiles and they account for at least 70% of the double-peaked [O III] AGNs.

  4. Soft yet Sharp Interfaces in a Vertex Model of Confluent Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Daniel M.; Schwarz, J. M.; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Manning, M. Lisa

    2018-01-01

    How can dense biological tissue maintain sharp boundaries between coexisting cell populations? We explore this question within a simple vertex model for cells, focusing on the role of topology and tissue surface tension. We show that the ability of cells to independently regulate adhesivity and tension, together with neighbor-based interaction rules, lets them support strikingly unusual interfaces. In particular, we show that mechanical- and fluctuation-based measurements of the effective surface tension of a cellular aggregate yield different results, leading to mechanically soft interfaces that are nevertheless extremely sharp.

  5. A sharp recovery condition for block sparse signals by block orthogonal multi-matching pursuit

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wengu; Ge, Huanmin

    2016-01-01

    We consider the block orthogonal multi-matching pursuit (BOMMP) algorithm for the recovery of block sparse signals. A sharp bound is obtained for the exact reconstruction of block $K$-sparse signals via the BOMMP algorithm in the noiseless case, based on the block restricted isometry constant (block-RIC). Moreover, we show that the sharp bound combining with an extra condition on the minimum $\\ell_2$ norm of nonzero blocks of block $K-$sparse signals is sufficient to recover the true support ...

  6. Efficient electrochemical etching method to fabricate sharp metallic tips for scanning probe microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Pilkyu; Kim, Jun Ho; Jeong, Mun Seok; Ko, Do-Kyeong; Lee, Jongmin; Jeong, Sungho

    2006-01-01

    A new technique based on electrochemical etching for the fabrication of sharp metallic tips for scanning probe microscopes is introduced. In the proposed method, a small Teflon mass is attached to the end of an immersed tungsten wire using an aluminum tape, which leads to a significant enhancement of yield rate of sharp tungsten tips with an apex size below 100 nm to over 60%. The functionality of the tungsten tips fabricated by the proposed method is verified by measuring the topography of a standard sample using a shear-force scanning probe microscope

  7. Inference for the Sharpe Ratio Using a Likelihood-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sharpe ratio is the prominent risk-adjusted performance measure used by practitioners. Statistical testing of this ratio using its asymptotic distribution has lagged behind its use. In this paper, highly accurate likelihood analysis is applied for inference on the Sharpe ratio. Both the one- and two-sample problems are considered. The methodology has O(n−3/2 distributional accuracy and can be implemented using any parametric return distribution structure. Simulations are provided to demonstrate the method's superior accuracy over existing methods used for testing in the literature.

  8. Needlestick and Sharps Injuries in Dermatologic Surgery: A Review of Preventative Techniques and Post-exposure Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Christopher; Monroe, Holly; Orengo, Ida; Rosen, Theodore

    2016-10-01

    Background: Needlestickand sharps injuries are the leading causes of morbidity in the dermatologicfield. Among medical specialties, surgeons and dermatologists have the highest rates of needlestickand sharps injuries.The high rates of needlestickand sharps injuries in dermatology not only apply to physicians, but also to nurses, physician assistants, and technicians in the demnatologic field. Needlestickand sharps injuries are of great concern due to the monetary, opportunity, social, and emotional costs associated with their occurrence. Objective: A review of preventative techniques and post-exposure protocols for the majortypes of sharps injuries encountered in dermatologic practice. Design: The terms "needle-stick injuryT'sharps injuryTdermatologic surgery? "post-exposure prophylaxis,"and "health-care associated injury" were used in combinations to search the PubMed database. Relevant studies were reviewed for validity and included. Results The authors discuss the major types of sharps injuries that occur in the dermatologic surgery setting and summarize preventative techniques with respect to each type of sharps injury.The authors also summarize and discuss relevant post-exposure protocols in the event of a sharps injury. Conclusion: The adoption of the discussed methods, techniques, practices, and attire can result in the elimination of the vast majority of dermatologic sharps injuries.

  9. Predicting Peak Flows following Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, William J.; Miller, Mary Ellen; Dobre, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Following forest fires, peak flows in perennial and ephemeral streams often increase by a factor of 10 or more. This increase in peak flow rate may overwhelm existing downstream structures, such as road culverts, causing serious damage to road fills at stream crossings. In order to predict peak flow rates following wildfires, we have applied two different tools. One is based on the U.S.D.A Natural Resource Conservation Service Curve Number Method (CN), and the other is by applying the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) to the watershed. In our presentation, we will describe the science behind the two methods, and present the main variables for each model. We will then provide an example of a comparison of the two methods to a fire-prone watershed upstream of the City of Flagstaff, Arizona, USA, where a fire spread model was applied for current fuel loads, and for likely fuel loads following a fuel reduction treatment. When applying the curve number method, determining the time to peak flow can be problematic for low severity fires because the runoff flow paths are both surface and through shallow lateral flow. The WEPP watershed version incorporates shallow lateral flow into stream channels. However, the version of the WEPP model that was used for this study did not have channel routing capabilities, but rather relied on regression relationships to estimate peak flows from individual hillslope polygon peak runoff rates. We found that the two methods gave similar results if applied correctly, with the WEPP predictions somewhat greater than the CN predictions. Later releases of the WEPP model have incorporated alternative methods for routing peak flows that need to be evaluated.

  10. Detecting and accounting for multiple sources of positional variance in peak list registration analysis and spin system grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelter, Andrey; Rouchka, Eric C; Moseley, Hunter N B

    2017-08-01

    Peak lists derived from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are commonly used as input data for a variety of computer assisted and automated analyses. These include automated protein resonance assignment and protein structure calculation software tools. Prior to these analyses, peak lists must be aligned to each other and sets of related peaks must be grouped based on common chemical shift dimensions. Even when programs can perform peak grouping, they require the user to provide uniform match tolerances or use default values. However, peak grouping is further complicated by multiple sources of variance in peak position limiting the effectiveness of grouping methods that utilize uniform match tolerances. In addition, no method currently exists for deriving peak positional variances from single peak lists for grouping peaks into spin systems, i.e. spin system grouping within a single peak list. Therefore, we developed a complementary pair of peak list registration analysis and spin system grouping algorithms designed to overcome these limitations. We have implemented these algorithms into an approach that can identify multiple dimension-specific positional variances that exist in a single peak list and group peaks from a single peak list into spin systems. The resulting software tools generate a variety of useful statistics on both a single peak list and pairwise peak list alignment, especially for quality assessment of peak list datasets. We used a range of low and high quality experimental solution NMR and solid-state NMR peak lists to assess performance of our registration analysis and grouping algorithms. Analyses show that an algorithm using a single iteration and uniform match tolerances approach is only able to recover from 50 to 80% of the spin systems due to the presence of multiple sources of variance. Our algorithm recovers additional spin systems by reevaluating match tolerances in multiple iterations. To facilitate evaluation of the

  11. Systematic control of edge length, tip sharpness, thickness, and localized surface plasmon resonance of triangular Au nanoprisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Yuta; Hayakawa, Tomokatsu, E-mail: hayatomo@nitech.ac.jp [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Department of Frontier Materials, Field of Advanced Energy Conversion (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    Triangular gold (Au) nanoprisms of various sizes were synthesized in a controlled way using a modified three-step seed-mediated method with different volumes of starting seed solution and subsequent first step’s growth solution. The structures and optical properties of the triangular Au nanoprisms were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy, and UV–Vis–NIR spectrophotometry. The Au nanoprisms synthesized also varied in optical response frequency of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) owing to electric dipole polarizations of the Au nanoprisms. This variation depended nonlinearly on the volume of the seed solution. From optical extinction spectra and careful TEM observations, the dipole LSPR peak frequency was found to be linearly proportional to the edge length of the Au nanoprisms. Consequently, it was experimentally shown that the LSPR optical response frequency of their colloidal solutions could be controlled in the near-infrared region (700–1200 nm), corresponding to an edge length of 40–180 nm of the Au nanoprisms. It was also demonstrated that the tip sharpness of triangular Au nanoprisms was improved by using fine Au seeds instead of coarse Au seeds, and the resulting Au nanoprisms were smaller and thinner. A formation mechanism of triangular Au nanoprisms shall also be discussed with a prospect of synthesizing very tiny Au nanoprisms.Graphical Abstract.

  12. Sharp green electroluminescence from 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline-based light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y. T.; Balasubramaniam, E.; Danel, A.; Jarosz, B.; Tomasik, P.

    2000-09-01

    A multilayer organic light-emitting diode was fabricated using a fluorescent compound {6-N,N-diethylamino-1-methyl-3-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline} (PAQ-NEt2) doped into the hole-transporting layer of NPB {4,4'-bis[N-(1-naphthyl-1-)-N-phenyl-amino]-biphenyl}, with the TPBI {2,2',2″-(1,3,5-phenylene)tris[1-phenyl-1H-benzimidazole]} as an electrontransporting material. At 16% PAQ-NEt2 doping concentration, the device gave a sharp, bright, and efficient green electroluminescence (EL) peaked at around 530 nm. The full width at half maximum of the EL is 60 nm, which is 60% of the green emission from typical NPB/AlQ [where AlQ=tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum] device. For the same concentration, a maximum luminance of 37 000 cd/m2 was obtained at 10.0 V and the maximum power, luminescence, and external quantum efficiencies were obtained 4.2 lm/W, 6.0 cd/A, and 1.6%, respectively, at 5.0 V.

  13. Analysis of fuel end-temperature peaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z.; Jiang, Q.; Lai, L.; Shams, M. [CANDU Energy Inc., Fuel Engineering Dept., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    During normal operation and refuelling of CANDU® fuel, fuel temperatures near bundle ends will increase due to a phenomenon called end flux peaking. Similar phenomenon would also be expected to occur during a postulated large break LOCA event. The end flux peaking in a CANDU fuel element is due to the fact that neutron flux is higher near a bundle end, in contact with a neighbouring bundle or close to heavy water coolant, than in the bundle mid-plane, because of less absorption of thermal neutrons by Zircaloy or heavy water than by the UO{sub 2} material. This paper describes Candu Energy experience in analysing behaviour of bundle due to end flux peaking using fuel codes FEAT, ELESTRES and ELOCA. (author)

  14. Layout of NALM fiber laser with adjustable peak power of generated pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Sergey; Kobtsev, Sergey; Ivanenko, Alexey; Kokhanovskiy, Alexey; Kemmer, Anna; Gervaziev, Mikhail

    2017-05-01

    The Letter proposes a new layout of a passively mode-locked fiber laser based on a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror (NALM) with two stretches of active fiber and two independently controlled pump modules. In contrast with conventional NALM configurations using a single piece of active fiber that yields virtually constant peak power, the proposed novel laser features larger than a factor of 2 adjustment range of peak power of generated pulses. The proposed layout also provides independent adjustment of duration and peak power of generated pulses as well as power-independent control of generated pulse spectral width impossible in NALM lasers with a single piece of active fiber.

  15. Strategies for mapping synaptic inputs on dendrites in vivo by combining two-photon microscopy, sharp intracellular recording and pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eLevy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Uncovering the functional properties of individual synaptic inputs on single neurons is critical for understanding the computational role of synapses and dendrites. Previous studies combined whole-cell patch recording to load neurons with a fluorescent calcium indicator and two-photon imaging to map subcellular changes in fluorescence upon sensory stimulation. By hyperpolarizing the neuron below spike threshold, the patch electrode ensured that changes in fluorescence associated with synaptic events were isolated from those caused by back-propagating action potentials. This technique holds promise for determining whether the existence of unique cortical feature maps across different species may be associated with distinct wiring diagrams. However, the use of whole-cell patch for mapping inputs on dendrites is challenging in large mammals, due to brain pulsations and the accumulation of fluorescent dye in the extracellular milieu. Alternatively, sharp intracellular electrodes have been used to label neurons with fluorescent dyes, but the current passing capabilities of these high impedance electrodes may be insufficient to prevent spiking. In this study, we tested whether sharp electrode recording is suitable for mapping functional inputs on dendrites in the cat visual cortex. We compared three different strategies for suppressing visually evoked spikes: (1 hyperpolarization by intracellular current injection, (2 pharmacological blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels by intracellular QX-314, and (3 GABA iontophoresis from a perisomatic electrode glued to the intracellular electrode. We found that functional inputs on dendrites could be successfully imaged using all three strategies. However, the best method for preventing spikes was GABA iontophoresis with low currents (5 to 10 nA, which minimally affected the local circuit. Our methods advance the possibility of determining functional connectivity in preparations where whole-cell patch may be

  16. SHARP hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy is well tolerated in prostate cancer. Toxicity and quality of life assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinska, Monika; Kieszkowska-Grudny, Anna; Nawrocki, Sergiusz

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is one of the most significant issues in prostate cancer treatment decisions. This study aimed to investigate the toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) and QoL after treatment in localized prostate cancer patients. A prospective single-center clinical study was performed in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. Patients received 33.5 Gy in 5 fractions (SHARP regimen). Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to RTOG/EORTC score. Patients filled out EORTC QLQ-C30 and prostate cancer-specific QLQ-PR25 questionnaires. The analysis included 68 prostate cancer patients (55-83 years, median 73) with clinical stage T1c-T2cN0M0, median combined Gleason score of 6 (3-8), and median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 10 ng/mL (4-20 ng/mL). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy was given to 52 patients (76.5 %), and stopped in 31 patients (45.5 %) after 6 months; in 21 patients (31 %) after 2-3 years. Average and median follow-up was 24 months (18-45). Median nadir PSA level was 0.03 ng/mL for all patients and 0.6 ng/mL for patients without hormone treatment. No patients had PSA failure. There were no acute grade IV toxicities. One patient (1.5 %) developed grade III and 24 patients (35.3 %) grade II acute bladder toxicity. No one developed grade III and 7 patients (10.3 %) grade II acute rectal toxicity. No grade III or IV late gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities were reported. Grade II late urinary symptoms were observed in 8 patients (11.8 %) and gastrointestinal symptoms in 3 patients (4.4 %). Global health status/QoL was good and improved during the observational period. SBRT for prostate cancer patients is a well-tolerated treatment in terms of toxicity and QoL, has no negative impact on functioning and everyday life, with the important benefit of a short treatment period. However, long-term follow-up data are needed. (orig.) [de

  17. Cloning and characterization of canine SHARP1 and its evaluation as a positional candidate for canine early retinal degeneration (erd).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukekova, Anna V; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M

    2003-07-17

    Canine early retinal degeneration (erd) is an early onset form of canine progressive retinal atrophy phenotypically similar to human retinitis pigmentosa. In a previous study, the locus responsible for erd was mapped to canine chromosome 27 in the region corresponding to HSA12p, a region where no human retinal degeneration loci have been mapped. Canine SHARP1 gene has been localized on CFA27 in the erd interval by RH mapping, and considered as a positional candidate gene for erd. SHARP1 was cloned and sequenced from normal and erd affected dogs, and no disease-causing mutations were identified. Genotyping of 117 dogs from informative pedigrees did not reveal any recombinants between SHARP1 and erd. To date SHARP1 gene is the closest gene-specific marker to erd; genotyping additional informative pedigrees, and sequencing SHARP1 upstream regions from normal and affected dogs will be necessary to establish if SHARP1 is involved in this canine retinal disease.

  18. On the sharp front-type solution of the Nagumo equation with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper is concerned with the Nagumo equation with nonlinear degenerate diffusion and convection which arises in several problems of population dynamics, chemical reactions and others. A sharp front-type solution with a minimum speed to this model equation is analysed using different methods. One of the methods ...

  19. Parameter Estimation of a Ground Moving Target Using Image Sharpness Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Motion parameter estimation of a ground moving target is an important issue in synthetic aperture radar ground moving target indication (SAR-GMTI which has significant applications for civilian and military. The SAR image of a moving target may be displaced and defocused due to the radial and along-track velocity components, respectively. The sharpness cost function presents a measure of the degree of focus of the image. In this work, a new ground moving target parameter estimation algorithm based on the sharpness optimization criterion is proposed. The relationships between the quadratic phase errors and the target’s velocity components are derived. Using two-dimensional searching of the sharpness cost function, we can obtain the velocity components of the target and the focused target image simultaneously. The proposed moving target parameter estimation method and image sharpness metrics are analyzed in detail. Finally, numerical results illustrate the effective and superior velocity estimation performance of the proposed method when compared to existing algorithms.

  20. Hydrovatus caraibus Sharp, 1882 (Dytiscidae, Hydroporinae, Hydrovatini new for the fauna of South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benetti, C. J.

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The species Hydrovatus caraibus Sharp, 1882 is recorded for the first time for South America, after the recollection of specimens of this species in the municipality of Gramado, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The range of distribution of the species, previously restricted to the Caribbean, is now extended to the latitude 29º 26’ South, approximately.

  1. A sharp Rogers–Shephard type inequality for Orlicz-difference body ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we prove a sharp Rogers–Shephard type inequality for the Orlicz-difference body of planar convex bodies, which extend the works of Bianchini and Colesanti (Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 138(7) (2008) 2575–2582).

  2. A sharp Rogers–Shephard type inequality for Orlicz-difference body ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (Math. Sci.) Vol. 124, No. 4, November 2014, pp. 573–580. c Indian Academy of Sciences. A sharp Rogers–Shephard type inequality for Orlicz-difference body of planar convex bodies. HAILIN JIN1 and SHUFENG YUAN2. 1Department of Mathematics, Suzhou University of Science and Technology,. Suzhou, 215009, China.

  3. The Pattern of Sharps Injury to Health Care Workers at Witbank ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 76.9% of all needlestick/sharps injuries were inflicted by injection needles. 3. Taking blood ... at Witbank Hospital. The areas of activity, procedures and occupational groups that result in a high risk of transmission of bloodborne infections to HCWs were identified, and will be used to design the preventive strategies.

  4. Cryptic species of sharp-nosed reed frogs in the Hyperolius nasutus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sharp-nosed reed frog is widespread in Africa. Although currently recognized as one species, suggestions have been made that more than one species might exist. We analysed 237 calls of 69 males from 19 localities in the western to southern parts of Africa. Calls fall into three groups, which we recognize as cryptic ...

  5. Current status of sharps waste management in the lower-level ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Chemical & Mining Engineering, College of Engineering and Technology, University of Dar es Salaam, P.O. Box 35131, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania .... Though sharps waste constitutes a small fraction of the solid medical waste, the potential environmental and health hazards could be deleterious if not properly ...

  6. Load modeling for sharp V-cutter cutting litchi ( Litchi chinensis Sonn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    harvesting. Cutting load is a key parameter for 'hand-held auto-picker' operation. However, there is still no suitable model for cutting load setting. Hence, a model describing the relationship among cutting load, blade angle and friction coefficient was developed for cutting operation by sharp V-cutters. The model was based ...

  7. Thermoresponsive poly(N-vinyl caprolactam)-coated gold nanoparticles: sharp reversible response and easy tunability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beija, Mariana; Marty, Jean-Daniel; Destarac, Mathias

    2011-03-14

    Narrowly distributed poly(N-vinyl caprolactam) obtained by the MADIX/RAFT process was used for the preparation of novel thermoresponsive gold nanoparticles presenting a sharp reversible response to temperature, which can be easily modulated near the physiological temperature by simply changing the polymer molecular weight or concentration.

  8. On the sharp front-type solution of the Nagumo equation with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A sharp front-type solution with a minimum speed to this model equation is analysed using different methods. One of the methods .... Dirichlet boundary condition u = 1. At the moving right-hand boundary, there is the boundary condition u = 0. The equation of moving boundary can be derived to take the following form: dx∗ dt.

  9. Conformal coating by photoresist of sharp corners of anisotropically etched through-holes in silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heschel, Matthias; Bouwstra, Siebe

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe a photoresist treatment yielding conformal coating of three-dimensional silicon structures. This even includes the sharp corners of through-holes obtained by anisotropic etching in (100)-silicon. Resist reflow from these corners is avoided by replacing the common baking...

  10. Space-time adaptive hp-FEM for problems with traveling sharp fronts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolín, Pavel; Korous, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 1 (2013), S709-S722 ISSN 0010-485X Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : adaptive hp-FEM * transient problems * sharp fronts Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.055, year: 2013

  11. Sharp force fatalities at the Pretoria Medico-Legal Laboratory, 2012 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: South Africa's crude death rate was recorded as the highest in the world in 2014. In 2013, 47 murders occurred daily nationwide, and it was confirmed that sharp force fatalities were frequent events. The aim of our study was to review the fatalities of persons admitted to the Pretoria Medico-Legal Laboratory ...

  12. Sharpness of the percolation transition in the two-dimensional contact process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, J.

    2011-01-01

    For ordinary (independent) percolation on a large class of lattices it is well known that below the critical percolation parameter pc the cluster size distribution has exponential decay and that power-law behavior of this distribution can only occur at pc. This behavior is often called "sharpness of

  13. Intercomparison of field measurements of nitrous acid (HONO) during the SHARP Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because of the importance of HONO as a radical reservoir, consistent and accurate measurements of its concentration are needed. As part of the SHARP (Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors), time series of HONO were obtained by five different measurement techniques on th...

  14. Short-term responses of Dutch vacationers to a sharp increase in transport costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cranenburgh, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates vacationers’ short-term responses to a sharp increase in transport costs. It aims to (1) acquire an understanding of the relative popularity of the different types of responses among vacationers and (2) explore whether there are distinct market segments of vacationers that

  15. Notes on breeding sharp-shinned hawks and cooper’s hawks in Barnwell County, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Vukovich; John C. Kilgo

    2009-01-01

    Breeding records of Accipiter striatus (Sharp-shinned Hawks) in the southeastern US are scattered and isolated. We documented a Sharp-shinned Hawk and Accipiter cooperii (Cooper’s Hawk) nest while conducting a telemetry study on Melanerpes erythrocephalus (Red-headed Woodpeckers) in Barnwell County, SC in 2006 and 2007. We report the first known nest of a Sharp-shinned...

  16. Fourier transforms of single-particle wave functions in cylindrical coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizea, M.; Carjan, N.

    2016-01-01

    A formalism and the corresponding numerical procedures that calculate the Fourier transform of a single-particle wave function defined on a grid of cylindrical (ρ, z) coordinates is presented. Single-particle states in spherical and deformed nuclei have been chosen in view of future applications in the field of nuclear reactions. Bidimensional plots of the probability that the nucleon's momentum has a given value K = √(k ρ 2 +k z 2 ) are produced and from them the K -distributions are deduced. Three potentials have been investigated: (a) a sharp surface spherical well (i.e., of constant depth), (b) a spherical Woods-Saxon potential (i.e., diffuse surface) and (c) a deformed potential of Woods-Saxon type. In the first case the momenta are as well defined as allowed by the uncertainty principle. Depending on the state, their distributions have up to three separated peaks as a consequence of the up to three circular ridges of the bidimensional probabilities plots. In the second case the diffuseness allows very low momenta to be always populated thus creating tails towards the origin (K = 0). The peaks are still present but not well separated. In the third case the deformation transforms the above mentioned circular ridges into ellipses thus spreading the K-values along them. As a consequence the K-distributions have only one broad peak. (orig.)

  17. SHARP-2 gene silencing by lentiviral-based short hairpin RNA interference prolonged rat kidney transplant recipients' survival time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, Y; Wang, Y; Yang, Y; Jiang, H; Chen, J; Yamada, K; Miyamoto, K

    2009-01-01

    Split- and hairy-related protein-2 (SHARP-2) controls the expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), which both play a key role in transplant rejection. This study was designed to investigate whether SHARP-2 short hairpin RNA interference (shRNAi) could prolong the survival of rat kidney transplant recipients. A lentiviral-based shRNAi construct, LV-SHARP-2iC, showed a SHARP-2 gene silencing efficiency of 84% in normal rat kidney cells. In activated T-cells, SHARP-2 gene silencing with the LV-SHARP-2iC construct resulted in 61% and 69% down-regulation of IL-2 and IFN-gamma, respectively, compared with a scramble control construct. When donor kidney was perfused with 5 x 10(7) transforming units of the LV-SHARP-2iC construct, the median survival time of the transplant recipients was prolonged by 4 - 5 days compared with control groups. In conclusion, recombinant lentiviral LV-SHARP-2iC construct effectively silenced SHARP-2 gene expression, which reduced IL-2 and IFN-gamma mRNA expression and prolonged rat kidney transplant recipients' survival.

  18. Peaked and Smooth Solitons for K*(4,1 Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongan Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is contributed to explore all possible single peak solutions for the K*(4,1 equation ut=uxu2+2α(uuxxx+2uxuxx. Our procedure shows that the K*(4,1 equation either has peakon, cuspon, and smooth soliton solutions when sitting on a nonzero constant pedestal limξ→±∞u=A≠0 or possesses compacton solutions only when limξ→±∞u=A=0. We present a new smooth soliton solution in an explicit form. Mathematical analysis and numeric graphs are provided for those soliton solutions of the K*(4,1 equation.

  19. Norfolk Schools Talked to Astronaut Tim Peake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Tim Peake's mission to the International Space Station captured the imagination of the UK and this article describes a live radio link with him, to help him to reach out to pupils across the country and inspire them in STEM subjects. It describes the project, from bidding for the opportunity to host it, to the planning and realisation of the…

  20. Generalized Eck peak in inhomogeneous Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fistul, Mikhail V.; Giuliani, Gabriele F.

    1997-02-01

    In inhomogeneous Josephson junctions the Eck peak characterizing the current-voltage characteristics is predicted to be replaced by a rather different yet prominent feature whose location and shape strongly depend on the strength of the applied magnetic field and the spatial correlations of the associated distorted Abrikosov flux lattice.

  1. Prediction of peak overlap in NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hefke, Frederik; Schmucki, Roland; Güntert, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peak overlap is one of the major factors complicating the analysis of biomolecular NMR spectra. We present a general method for predicting the extent of peak overlap in multidimensional NMR spectra and its validation using both, experimental data sets and Monte Carlo simulation. The method is based on knowledge of the magnetization transfer pathways of the NMR experiments and chemical shift statistics from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Assuming a normal distribution with characteristic mean value and standard deviation for the chemical shift of each observable atom, an analytic expression was derived for the expected overlap probability of the cross peaks. The analytical approach was verified to agree with the average peak overlap in a large number of individual peak lists simulated using the same chemical shift statistics. The method was applied to eight proteins, including an intrinsically disordered one, for which the prediction results could be compared with the actual overlap based on the experimentally measured chemical shifts. The extent of overlap predicted using only statistical chemical shift information was in good agreement with the overlap that was observed when the measured shifts were used in the virtual spectrum, except for the intrinsically disordered protein. Since the spectral complexity of a protein NMR spectrum is a crucial factor for protein structure determination, analytical overlap prediction can be used to identify potentially difficult proteins before conducting NMR experiments. Overlap predictions can be tailored to particular classes of proteins by preparing statistics from corresponding protein databases. The method is also suitable for optimizing recording parameters and labeling schemes for NMR experiments and improving the reliability of automated spectra analysis and protein structure determination.

  2. Quantifying the margin sharpness of lesions on radiological images for content-based image retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jiajing; Napel, Sandy; Greenspan, Hayit; Beaulieu, Christopher F.; Agrawal, Neeraj; Rubin, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to quantify the margin sharpness of lesions on CT and to evaluate it in simulations and CT scans of liver and lung lesions. Methods: The authors computed two attributes of margin sharpness: the intensity difference between a lesion and its surroundings, and the sharpness of the intensity transition across the lesion boundary. These two attributes were extracted from sigmoid curves fitted along lines automatically drawn orthogonal to the lesion margin. The authors then represented the margin characteristics for each lesion by a feature vector containing histograms of these parameters. The authors created 100 simulated CT scans of lesions over a range of intensity difference and margin sharpness, and used the concordance correlation between the known parameter and the corresponding computed feature as a measure of performance. The authors also evaluated their method in 79 liver lesions (44 patients: 23 M, 21 F, mean age 61) and 58 lung nodules (57 patients: 24 M, 33 F, mean age 66). The methodology presented takes into consideration the boundary of the liver and lung during feature extraction in clinical images to ensure that the margin feature do not get contaminated by anatomy other than the normal organ surrounding the lesions. For evaluation in these clinical images, the authors created subjective independent reference standards for pairwise margin sharpness similarity in the liver and lung cohorts, and compared rank orderings of similarity used using our sharpness feature to that expected from the reference standards using mean normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG) over all query images. In addition, the authors compared their proposed feature with two existing techniques for lesion margin characterization using the simulated and clinical datasets. The authors also evaluated the robustness of their features against variations in delineation of the lesion margin by simulating five types of deformations of the lesion margin

  3. Predictors of the peak width for networks with exponential links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutman, B.M.; Karlinger, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    We investigate optimal predictors of the peak (S) and distance to peak (T) of the width function of drainage networks under the assumption that the networks are topologically random with independent and exponentially distributed link lengths. Analytical results are derived using the fact that, under these assumptions, the width function is a homogeneous Markov birth-death process. In particular, exact expressions are derived for the asymptotic conditional expectations of S and T given network magnitude N and given mainstream length H. In addition, a simulation study is performed to examine various predictors of S and T, including N, H, and basin morphometric properties; non-asymptotic conditional expectations and variances are estimated. The best single predictor of S is N, of T is H, and of the scaled peak (S divided by the area under the width function) is H. Finally, expressions tested on a set of drainage basins from the state of Wyoming perform reasonably well in predicting S and T despite probable violations of the original assumptions. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Effect of gear ratio on peak power and time to peak power in BMX cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylands, Lee P; Roberts, Simon J; Hurst, Howard T

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain if gear ratio selection would have an effect on peak power and time to peak power production in elite Bicycle Motocross (BMX) cyclists. Eight male elite BMX riders volunteered for the study. Each rider performed three, 10-s maximal sprints on an Olympic standard indoor BMX track. The riders' bicycles were fitted with a portable SRM power meter. Each rider performed the three sprints using gear ratios of 41/16, 43/16 and 45/16 tooth. The results from the 41/16 and 45/16 gear ratios were compared to the current standard 43/16 gear ratio. Statistically, significant differences were found between the gear ratios for peak power (F(2,14) = 6.448; p = .010) and peak torque (F(2,14) = 4.777; p = .026), but no significant difference was found for time to peak power (F(2,14) = 0.200; p = .821). When comparing gear ratios, the results showed a 45/16 gear ratio elicited the highest peak power,1658 ± 221 W, compared to 1436 ± 129 W and 1380 ± 56 W, for the 43/16 and 41/16 ratios, respectively. The time to peak power showed a 41/16 tooth gear ratio attained peak power in -0.01 s and a 45/16 in 0.22 s compared to the 43/16. The findings of this study suggest that gear ratio choice has a significant effect on peak power production, though time to peak power output is not significantly affected. Therefore, selecting a higher gear ratio results in riders attaining higher power outputs without reducing their start time.

  5. Ionoacoustic characterization of the proton Bragg peak with submillimeter accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, W., E-mail: walter.assmann@lmu.de; Reinhardt, S.; Lehrack, S.; Edlich, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Parodi, K. [Department for Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Am Coulombwall 1, Garching 85748 (Germany); Kellnberger, S.; Omar, M.; Ntziachristos, V. [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Technische Universität München and Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, Neuherberg 85764 (Germany); Moser, M.; Dollinger, G. [Institute for Applied Physics and Measurement Technology, Universität der Bundeswehr, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, Neubiberg 85577 (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Range verification in ion beam therapy relies to date on nuclear imaging techniques which require complex and costly detector systems. A different approach is the detection of thermoacoustic signals that are generated due to localized energy loss of ion beams in tissue (ionoacoustics). Aim of this work was to study experimentally the achievable position resolution of ionoacoustics under idealized conditions using high frequency ultrasonic transducers and a specifically selected probing beam. Methods: A water phantom was irradiated by a pulsed 20 MeV proton beam with varying pulse intensity and length. The acoustic signal of single proton pulses was measured by different PZT-based ultrasound detectors (3.5 and 10 MHz central frequencies). The proton dose distribution in water was calculated by Geant4 and used as input for simulation of the generated acoustic wave by the matlab toolbox k-WAVE. Results: In measurements from this study, a clear signal of the Bragg peak was observed for an energy deposition as low as 10{sup 12} eV. The signal amplitude showed a linear increase with particle number per pulse and thus, dose. Bragg peak position measurements were reproducible within ±30 μm and agreed with Geant4 simulations to better than 100 μm. The ionoacoustic signal pattern allowed for a detailed analysis of the Bragg peak and could be well reproduced by k-WAVE simulations. Conclusions: The authors have studied the ionoacoustic signal of the Bragg peak in experiments using a 20 MeV proton beam with its correspondingly localized energy deposition, demonstrating submillimeter position resolution and providing a deep insight in the correlation between the acoustic signal and Bragg peak shape. These results, together with earlier experiments and new simulations (including the results in this study) at higher energies, suggest ionoacoustics as a technique for range verification in particle therapy at locations, where the tumor can be localized by ultrasound

  6. Improved peak shape fitting in alpha spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommé, S; Caro Marroyo, B

    2015-02-01

    Peak overlap is a recurrent issue in alpha-particle spectrometry, not only in routine analyses but also in the high-resolution spectra from which reference values for alpha emission probabilities are derived. In this work, improved peak shape formulae are presented for the deconvolution of alpha-particle spectra. They have been implemented as fit functions in a spreadsheet application and optimum fit parameters were searched with built-in optimisation routines. Deconvolution results are shown for a few challenging spectra with high statistical precision. The algorithm outperforms the best available routines for high-resolution spectrometry, which may facilitate a more reliable determination of alpha emission probabilities in the future. It is also applicable to alpha spectra with inferior energy resolution. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Peak Oil, Food Systems, and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Cindy L.; Kirschenmann, Frederick L.; Tinch, Jennifer; Lawrence, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Peak oil is the phenomenon whereby global oil supplies will peak, then decline, with extraction growing increasingly costly. Today's globalized industrial food system depends on oil for fueling farm machinery, producing pesticides, and transporting goods. Biofuels production links oil prices to food prices. We examined food system vulnerability to rising oil prices and the public health consequences. In the short term, high food prices harm food security and equity. Over time, high prices will force the entire food system to adapt. Strong preparation and advance investment may mitigate the extent of dislocation and hunger. Certain social and policy changes could smooth adaptation; public health has an essential role in promoting a proactive, smart, and equitable transition that increases resilience and enables adequate food for all. PMID:21778492

  8. First diffraction peak in alkali metaphosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, S.; Bionducci, M.; Ecolivet, C.; Marchand, R.; Le Sauze, A.

    2000-11-01

    The structure factor of the alkali metaphosphate glasses LiPO 3 and Na 0.5Li 0.5PO 3 has been measured at 300 K for both systems and up to 800 K for the latter. The first diffraction peak of alkali metaphosphate glasses merges at lower Q (around 1.1 Å -1) than in other covalent glasses, with the highest intensity for Li-containing glasses. These points are discussed following the hypothesis of voids ordering in the structure and contrasts effects due to the negative neutron Li scattering length. The intensity of the prepeak is significantly growing with temperature, in case of Na 0.5Li 0.5PO 3, in contrast to the other peaks of the structure factor. This point is discussed in relation with literature data from flow birefringence indicating structural changes in these glassy systems.

  9. Implementing peak load reduction algorithms for household electrical appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlamini, Ndumiso G.; Cromieres, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    Considering household appliance automation for reduction of household peak power demand, this study explored aspects of the interaction between household automation technology and human behaviour. Given a programmable household appliance switching system, and user-reported appliance use times, we simulated the load reduction effectiveness of three types of algorithms, which were applied at both the single household level and across all 30 households. All three algorithms effected significant load reductions, while the least-to-highest potential user inconvenience ranking was: coordinating the timing of frequent intermittent loads (algorithm 2); moving period-of-day time-flexible loads to off-peak times (algorithm 1); and applying short-term time delays to avoid high peaks (algorithm 3) (least accommodating). Peak reduction was facilitated by load interruptibility, time of use flexibility and the willingness of users to forgo impulsive appliance use. We conclude that a general factor determining the ability to shift the load due to a particular appliance is the time-buffering between the service delivered and the power demand of an appliance. Time-buffering can be ‘technologically inherent’, due to human habits, or realised by managing user expectations. There are implications for the design of appliances and home automation systems. - Highlights: ► We explored the interaction between appliance automation and human behaviour. ► There is potential for considerable load shifting of household appliances. ► Load shifting for load reduction is eased with increased time buffering. ► Design, human habits and user expectations all influence time buffering. ► Certain automation and appliance design features can facilitate load shifting.

  10. Reducing Peak Power in Automated Weapon Laying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    LAYING Joshua Stapp Matthew Tomik February 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited...PEAK POWER IN AUTOMATED WEAPON LAYING 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHORS Joshua Stapp and...aiming a weapon is referred to as gun laying . This report describes a method to calculate motion profiles that reach a given lay within the least

  11. Peaking for optimal performance: Research limitations and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, David B; Mujika, Iñigo; Reilly, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    A key element of the physical preparation of athletes is the taper period in the weeks immediately preceding competition. Existing research has defined the taper, identified various forms used in contemporary sport, and examined the prescription of training volume, load, intensity, duration, and type (progressive or step). Current limitations include: the lack of studies on team, combative, racquet, and precision (target) sports; the relatively small number of randomized controlled trials; the narrow focus on a single competition (single peak) compared with multiple peaking for weekly, multi-day or multiple events; and limited understanding of the physiological, neuromuscular, and biomechanical basis of the taper. Future research should address these limitations, together with the influence of prior training on optimal tapering strategies, and the interactions between the taper and long-haul travel, heat, and altitude. Practitioners seek information on how to prescribe tapers from season to season during an athlete's career, or a team's progression through a domestic league season, or multi-year Olympic or World Cup cycle. Practical guidelines for planning effective tapers for the Vancouver 2010 and London 2012 Olympics will evolve from both experimental investigations and modelling of successful tapers currently employed in a wide range of sports.

  12. METing SUSY on the Z peak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barenboim, G.; Bernabeu, J.; Vives, O.; Mitsou, V.A.; Romero, E.

    2016-01-01

    Recently the ATLAS experiment announced a 3 σ excess at the Z-peak consisting of 29 pairs of leptons together with two or more jets, E T miss > 225 GeV and HT > 600 GeV, to be compared with 10.6 ± 3.2 expected lepton pairs in the Standard Model. No excess outside the Z-peak was observed. By trying to explain this signal with SUSY we find that only relatively light gluinos, m g or similar 400 GeV decaying predominantly to Z-boson plus a light gravitino, such that nearly every gluino produces at least one Z-boson in its decay chain, could reproduce the excess. We construct an explicit general gauge mediation model able to reproduce the observed signal overcoming all the experimental limits. Needless to say, more sophisticated models could also reproduce the signal, however, any model would have to exhibit the following features: light gluinos, or heavy particles with a strong production cross section, producing at least one Z-boson in its decay chain. The implications of our findings for the Run II at LHC with the scaling on the Z peak, as well as for the direct search of gluinos and other SUSY particles, are pointed out. (orig.)

  13. Ten Reasons to Take Peak Oil Seriously

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Brecha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Forty years ago, the results of modeling, as presented in The Limits to Growth, reinvigorated a discussion about exponentially growing consumption of natural resources, ranging from metals to fossil fuels to atmospheric capacity, and how such consumption could not continue far into the future. Fifteen years earlier, M. King Hubbert had made the projection that petroleum production in the continental United States would likely reach a maximum around 1970, followed by a world production maximum a few decades later. The debate about “peak oil”, as it has come to be called, is accompanied by some of the same vociferous denials, myths and ideological polemicizing that have surrounded later representations of The Limits to Growth. In this review, we present several lines of evidence as to why arguments for a near-term peak in world conventional oil production should be taken seriously—both in the sense that there is strong evidence for peak oil and in the sense that being societally unprepared for declining oil production will have serious consequences.

  14. METing SUSY on the Z peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, G.; Bernabeu, J.; Vives, O. [Universitat de Valencia, Departament de Fisica Teorica, Burjassot (Spain); Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Parc Cientific U.V., IFIC, Paterna (Spain); Mitsou, V.A.; Romero, E. [Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Parc Cientific U.V., IFIC, Paterna (Spain)

    2016-02-15

    Recently the ATLAS experiment announced a 3 σ excess at the Z-peak consisting of 29 pairs of leptons together with two or more jets, E{sub T}{sup miss} > 225 GeV and HT > 600 GeV, to be compared with 10.6 ± 3.2 expected lepton pairs in the Standard Model. No excess outside the Z-peak was observed. By trying to explain this signal with SUSY we find that only relatively light gluinos, m{sub g} or similar 400 GeV decaying predominantly to Z-boson plus a light gravitino, such that nearly every gluino produces at least one Z-boson in its decay chain, could reproduce the excess. We construct an explicit general gauge mediation model able to reproduce the observed signal overcoming all the experimental limits. Needless to say, more sophisticated models could also reproduce the signal, however, any model would have to exhibit the following features: light gluinos, or heavy particles with a strong production cross section, producing at least one Z-boson in its decay chain. The implications of our findings for the Run II at LHC with the scaling on the Z peak, as well as for the direct search of gluinos and other SUSY particles, are pointed out. (orig.)

  15. Do the ball-ended probe cause less damage than sharp explorers?—An ultrastructural analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mattos-Silveira, Juliana; Oliveira, Marina Monreal; Matos, Ronilza; Moura-Netto, Cacio; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Fraga, Mariana Minatel Braga

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background No evidence about damage caused by ball-ended probes on tooth is available. No study compared probing defects caused by ball-ended probes with sharp explorers during tactile examinations of primary teeth. This exploratory study aimed to compare ultrastructural defects caused by ball-ended probes with sharp explorers during tactile examinations of primary teeth. Me...

  16. Multi-Physics Demonstration Problem with the SHARP Reactor Simulation Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzari, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shemon, E. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yu, Y. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Thomas, J. W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Obabko, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jain, Rajeev [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mahadevan, Vijay [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tautges, Timothy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Solberg, Jerome [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferencz, Robert Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whitesides, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-21

    This report describes to employ SHARP to perform a first-of-a-kind analysis of the core radial expansion phenomenon in an SFR. This effort required significant advances in the framework Multi-Physics Demonstration Problem with the SHARP Reactor Simulation Toolkit used to drive the coupled simulations, manipulate the mesh in response to the deformation of the geometry, and generate the necessary modified mesh files. Furthermore, the model geometry is fairly complex, and consistent mesh generation for the three physics modules required significant effort. Fully-integrated simulations of a 7-assembly mini-core test problem have been performed, and the results are presented here. Physics models of a full-core model of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor have also been developed for each of the three physics modules. Standalone results of each of the three physics modules for the ABTR are presented here, which provides a demonstration of the feasibility of the fully-integrated simulation.

  17. Study of hydrodynamic characteristics of a Sharp Eagle wave energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-qun; Sheng, Song-wei; You, Ya-ge; Huang, Zhen-xin; Wang, Wen-sheng

    2017-06-01

    According to Newton's Second Law and the microwave theory, mechanical analysis of multiple buoys which form Sharp Eagle wave energy converter (WEC) is carried out. The movements of every buoy in three modes couple each other when they are affected with incident waves. Based on the above, mechanical models of the WEC are established, which are concerned with fluid forces, damping forces, hinge forces, and so on. Hydrodynamic parameters of one buoy are obtained by taking the other moving buoy as boundary conditions. Then, by taking those hydrodynamic parameters into the mechanical models, the optimum external damping and optimal capture width ratio are calculated out. Under the condition of the optimum external damping, a plenty of data are obtained, such as the displacements amplitude of each buoy in three modes (sway, heave, pitch), damping forces, hinge forces, and speed of the hydraulic cylinder. Research results provide theoretical references and basis for Sharp Eagle WECs in the design and manufacture.

  18. "Secrets of the female sex": Jane Sharp, the reproductive female body, and early modern midwifery manuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobby, E

    2001-01-01

    Early modern midwifery manuals in Britain were usually the work of men. These books were a significant source of information about the body to the wider reading public: many sold well, and their prefatory materials include injunctions to readers not to make improper use of them. What is particularly interesting about Jane Sharp's Midwives Book (1671) is that it both provides a compendium of current beliefs concerning reproduction, and indicates the author's ironic perception of the misogyny that underpinned accepted ideas about the female reproductive body. This article gives key examples of Sharp's interventions, and also refers to Thomas Bartholin, Bartholinus Anatomy (1688); Richard Bunworth, The Doctresse (1656); Hugh Chamberlen, The Accomplisht Midwife (1673); The Compleat Midwifes Practice (1656); Helkiah Crooke, Microcosmographia (1615); Nicholas Culpeper, A Directory for Midwives (1651); Jacques Guillemeau, Childbirth (1612); Jean Riolan, A Sure Guide (1657); Daniel Sennert, Practical Physick (1664); William Sermon, The Ladies Companion (1671); and Percival Willughby, Observations in Midwifery (c. 1675).

  19. The 1985 National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    In 1985, a total of 126 talented high school students gained first hand knowledge about science and engineering careers by working directly with a NASA scientist or engineer during the summer. This marked the sixth year of operation for NASA's Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP). The major priority of maintaining the high standards and success of prior years was satisfied. The following eight sites participated in the Program: Ames Research Center, Ames' Dryden Flight Research Facility, Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard's Wallop Flight Facility, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Tresp Associates served as the SHARP contractor and worked closely with NASA staff at headquarters and the sites just mentioned to plan, implement, and evaluate the program.

  20. Do ward and department managers know their responsibilities in relation to the management of sharps, and is this reflected in the way that they practise sharps management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Sheena

    2014-05-01

    Needlestick injuries (NSIs) involving hollowbore needles are the most commonly reported occupational exposure within the healthcare sector in the United Kingdom (HPA, 2012). It is estimated that at least 100,000 NSIs occur each year but due to under-reporting the figure may be much higher (RCN, 2008). Many strategies aimed at preventing NSIs have been implemented in the healthcare environment, including administrative controls, safer work practices and engineering controls, but despite these measures NSIs remain a serious health and safety threat (EU, 2010). New legislation has now been introduced as part of EU Directive 2010/32/EU, which requires UK and all EU member states to bring into force regulations, laws and administrative provisions to further protect healthcare workers from sustaining NSIs (EU Directive, 2010). The aim of this study was to determine the degree of responsibility that NHS ward/department managers felt they have in relation to the prevention and management of NSIs and if this was reflected in the way that they carry out relevant practices in their clinical environment. The study also aimed to identify factors which might impact on the ward/department managers' ability to manage sharps effectively. The study found that although ward/department managers did acknowledge a high degree of responsibility overall for the prevention and management of NSIs, there were some concerns highlighted in relation to certain practices. These included not ensuring that all staff had received up to date training on the safe use and disposal of sharps and not disseminating information on NSI incidences and outcomes to staff in their clinical areas. The findings of this study have the potential to inform and enhance future training and education schedules that relate to NSI prevention and management and to improve the corporate strategic commitment to reducing NSIs across healthcare organisations.

  1. Feeding ecology of sharp-shinned hawks in deciduous and coniferous forests in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzanne M. Joy; Richard T. Reynolds; Richard L. Knight; Richard W. Hoffman

    1994-01-01

    Feeding ecology of 11 Sharp-skinned Hawk (Accipiter striates) pairs nesting in aspen (Populus tremuloides), conifer (Abies, Picea spp.), and mixed aspen-conifer habitats in southwest Colorado was investigated during 1988-1989. Small birds (x-bar = 20.9 g, SE = 0.8 g) and mammals (x-bar = 41.1 g, SE = 3.3 g) comprised 91 and 9% of...

  2. Sharp gene pool transition in a population affected by phenotype-based selective hunting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigatti, E.; Sá Martins, J. S.; Roditi, I.

    2005-06-01

    We use a microscopic model of population dynamics, a modified version of the well known Penna model, to study some aspects of microevolution. This research is motivated by recent reports on the effect of selective hunting on the gene pool of bighorn sheep living in the Ram Mountain region, in Canada. Our model finds a sharp transition in the structure of the gene pool as some threshold for the number of animals hunted is reached.

  3. A sharp companion of Ostrowski's inequality for the Riemann-Stieltjes integral and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad W. Alomari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A sharp companion of Ostrowski's inequality for the Riemann-Stieltjes integral ∫ab f(tdu(t, where f is assumed to be of r-H-Hölder type on [a,b] and u is of bounded variation on [a,b], is proved. Applications to the approximation problem of the Riemann-Stieltjesintegral in terms of Riemann-Stieltjes sums are also pointed out.

  4. Re-engineering forensic anthropology : new techniques in sharp force trauma analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, D. G.; Burnett, B.; Gibbons, G. J.; Barnes-Warden, J.; Williams, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    In forensic anthropology the analysis of microscopic tool marks found in skeletal sharp force trauma is a challenging area. Many different imaging methods have been employed to measure cut mark characteristics in aid of developing diagnostic tools for estimating knife type used for these marks. Furthermore numerous experimental methods for creating tool marks for analysis have been used. A novel method for creating, analysing and presenting tool marks using reverse engineering and metrology w...

  5. Building Subsurface Velocity Models with Sharp Interfaces Using Interface-Guided Seismic Full-Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Youzuo; Huang, Lianjie

    2017-11-01

    Reverse-time migration has the potential to image complex subsurface structures, including steeply-dipping fault zones, but the method requires an accurate velocity model. Acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion is a promising tool for high-resolution velocity model building. Because of the ill-posedness of acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion, it is a great challenge to obtain accurate velocity models containing sharp interfaces. To improve velocity model building, we develop an acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion method with an interface-guided modified total-variation regularization scheme to improve the inversion accuracy and robustness, particularly for models with sharp interfaces and steeply-dipping fault zones with widths much smaller than the seismic wavelength. The new regularization scheme incorporates interface information into seismic full-waveform inversion. The interface information of subsurface interfaces is obtained iteratively using migration imaging during waveform inversion. Seismic migration is robust for subsurface imaging. Our new acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion takes advantage of the robustness of migration imaging to improve velocity estimation. We use synthetic seismic data for a complex model containing sharp interfaces and several steeply-dipping fault zones to validate the improved capability of our new acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion method. Our inversion results are much better than those produced without using interface-guided regularization. Acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion with an interface-guided modified total-variation regularization scheme has the potential to accurately build subsurface velocity models with sharp interfaces and/or steep fault zones.

  6. Driving Skills Training for Older Adults: An Assessment of DriveSharp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Katherine A; Borkenhagen, David; Scialfa, Charles T

    2015-12-01

    RÉSUMÉ Les procédures de formation cognitive informatique visent à augmenter la sécurité en améliorant les compétences relatives à la conduite, comme la vitesse-de-traitement et le Useful Field of View. L'étude actuelle a évalué l'efficacité du DriveSharp dans la formation des conducteurs âgés dans un cadre de classe réaliste. Les participants (n = 24) ont assisté à 10 heures de cours de DriveSharp pendant 5 semaines. Les séances pré- et post-test ont evalués améliorations sur un essai dynamique de la perception du risque, Trails A et Trails B. Un groupe de contrôle (n = 18) a terminé seulement les séances pré- et post-test. En classe, les temps de formation étaient plus bas que prévus. L'amélioration des participants aux jeux ont stabilisée après la première évaluation, et le groupe de DriveSharp n'a pas démontré une amélioration significative des performances sur les tests, par rapport au groupe de contrôle. Parmi plusieurs questions relatives à la facilité d'utilisation, les plus problématiques étaient le malentendudes objectifs de la tâche et la différence entre la formation et l'évaluation. Il y a plusieurs implications pour ceux qui utilisent DriveSharp pour améliorer la sécurité des conducteurs âgés.

  7. Hippocampal sharp wave bursts coincide with neocortical “up-state” transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Battaglia, Francesco P.; Sutherland, Gary R.; McNaughton, Bruce L.

    2004-01-01

    The sleeping neocortex shows nested oscillatory activity in different frequency ranges, characterized by fluctuations between “up-states” and “down-states.” High-density neuronal ensemble recordings in rats now reveal the interaction between synchronized activity in the hippocampus and neocortex: Electroencephalographic sharp waves in the hippocampus were more probable during down-states than during up-states, and tended to coincide with transitions from down-states to up-states. The form of ...

  8. On sharp estimates of the convergence of double Fourier-Bessel series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abilov, V. A.; Abilova, F. V.; Kerimov, M. K.

    2017-11-01

    The problem of approximation of a differentiable function of two variables by partial sums of a double Fourier-Bessel series is considered. Sharp estimates of the rate of convergence of the double Fourier-Bessel series on the class of differentiable functions of two variables characterized by a generalized modulus of continuity are obtained. The proofs of four theorems on this issue, which can be directly applied to solving particular problems of mathematical physics, approximation theory, etc., are presented.

  9. Portfolio Optimization under Local-Stochastic Volatility: Coefficient Taylor Series Approximations & Implied Sharpe Ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Lorig, Matthew; Sircar, Ronnie

    2015-01-01

    We study the finite horizon Merton portfolio optimization problem in a general local-stochastic volatility setting. Using model coefficient expansion techniques, we derive approximations for the both the value function and the optimal investment strategy. We also analyze the `implied Sharpe ratio' and derive a series approximation for this quantity. The zeroth-order approximation of the value function and optimal investment strategy correspond to those obtained by Merton (1969) when the risky...

  10. Sharp correlations in the ARPES spectra of strongly disordered topological boundary modes

    OpenAIRE

    Ringel, Zohar

    2015-01-01

    Data from angle resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) often serves as a smoking-gun evidence for the existence of topological materials. It provides the energy dispersion curves of the topological boundary modes which characterize these phases. Unfortunately this method requires a sufficiently regular boundary such that these boundary modes remain sharp in momentum space. Here the seemingly random data obtained from performing ARPES on strongly disordered topological insulators and Wey...

  11. Sharp transition between thermal and quantum tunneling regimes in magnetization relaxation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, J.; Zhang, X. X.; Barbara, B.

    1993-03-01

    In this paper we describe experiments involving measurements of the dependence on time of the thermoremanence magnetization of 2-dimensional random magnets. The low temperature values for the magnetic viscosity agree well with both current theories of tunneling of the magnetization vector (Chudnovsky et al.) and the work of Grabert et al. who predicted that the transition from classical to quantum regime is rather sharp for undamped systems.

  12. Wayward youth: trans-beringian movement and differential southward migration by juvenile sharp-tailed sandpipers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Colleen M.; Gill, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The sharp-tailed sandpiper (Calidris acuminata) is a long-distance migrant that travels each year from breeding grounds in the Russian Arctic to nonbreeding areas in Australasia. Most adults migrate rapidly from breeding grounds along a largely inland route through Asia. Here we report on the highly unusual migratory strategy of this species in which some juveniles, but virtually no adults, take a pronounced detour to western Alaska before proceeding on southward migration. We

  13. Chinese emissions peak: Not when, but how

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, Thomas; Colombier, Michel; Wang, Xin; Sartor, Oliver; Waisman, Henri

    2016-07-01

    It seems highly likely that China will overachieve its 2020 and 2030 targets, and peak its emissions before 2030 and possibly at a lower level than often assumed. This paper argues that the debate on the timing of the peak is misplaced: what matters is not when by why. For the peak to be seen as a harbinger of deep transformation, it needs to be based on significant macro-economic reform and restructuring, with attendant improvement in energy intensity. The Chinese economic model has been extraordinarily investment and resource intensive, and has driven the growth in GHG emissions. That model is no longer economically or environmentally sustainable. Therefore Chinese policy-makers are faced with a trade-off between slower short-term growth and economic reform, versus supporting short-term growth but slowing economic reform. The outcome will be crucial for the transition to a low-carbon economy. Overall, the 13. FYP (2016-2020) gives the impression of a cautious reflection of the new normal paradigm on the economic front, and a somewhat conservative translation of this shift into the energy and climate targets. Nonetheless, the 13. FYP targets set China well on the way to overachieving its 2020 pledge undertaken at COP15 in Copenhagen, and to potentially overachieving its INDC. It thus seems likely that China will achieve its emissions peak before 2030. However, the crucial question is not when China peaks, but whether the underlying transformation of the Chinese economy and energy system lays the basis for deep decarbonization thereafter. Thorough assessments of the implications of the 'new normal' for Chinese emissions and energy system trajectories, taking into account the link with the Chinese macro-economy, are needed. Scenarios provide a useful framework and should focus on a number of short-term uncertainties. Most energy system and emissions scenarios published today assume a continuity of trends between 2010-2015 and 2015-2020, which is at odds

  14. Notes on breeding sharp-shinned hawks and Cooper’s hawks in Barnwell County, South Carolina.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovich, Mark; Kilgo, John, C.

    2009-07-01

    Abstract - Breeding records of Accipiter striatus (Sharp-shinned Hawks) in the southeastern US are scattered and isolated. We documented a Sharp-shinned Hawk and Accipiter cooperii (Cooper’s Hawk) nest while conducting a telemetry study on Melanerpes erythrocephalus (Red-headed Woodpeckers) in Barnwell County, SC in 2006 and 2007. We report the first known nest of a Sharp-shinned Hawk in Barnwell County, SC and the first report of Sharp-shinned Hawks preying upon Red-headed Woodpeckers. Thirteen of 93 (13.9 %) woodpeckers were killed by accipiters in the summers of 2006 and 2007. Large, contiguous forests managed for Picoides borealis (Red-cockaded Woodpeckers) may be used by breeding Sharp-shinned Hawks. The bright plumage, loud calls, and behavior of Red-headed Woodpeckers, particularly during the nestling stage, may make them conspicuous prey for accipiters.

  15. Adaptive moving mesh methods for simulating one-dimensional groundwater problems with sharp moving fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W.; Zheng, Lingyun; Zhan, X.

    2002-01-01

    Accurate modelling of groundwater flow and transport with sharp moving fronts often involves high computational cost, when a fixed/uniform mesh is used. In this paper, we investigate the modelling of groundwater problems using a particular adaptive mesh method called the moving mesh partial differential equation approach. With this approach, the mesh is dynamically relocated through a partial differential equation to capture the evolving sharp fronts with a relatively small number of grid points. The mesh movement and physical system modelling are realized by solving the mesh movement and physical partial differential equations alternately. The method is applied to the modelling of a range of groundwater problems, including advection dominated chemical transport and reaction, non-linear infiltration in soil, and the coupling of density dependent flow and transport. Numerical results demonstrate that sharp moving fronts can be accurately and efficiently captured by the moving mesh approach. Also addressed are important implementation strategies, e.g. the construction of the monitor function based on the interpolation error, control of mesh concentration, and two-layer mesh movement. Copyright ?? 2002 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  16. Development of a Silicon Microneedle with Three-Dimensional Sharp Tip by Electrochemical Etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hayato; Okamoto, Tokusuke; Suzuki, Masato; Aoyagi, Seiji

    Aiming at the use in low-invasive medical treatments, this paper reports a fabrication technique of silicon microneedle of conical sharp point. The electrochemical etching technique is employed for sharpening the tip of a pillar, which is diced from a silicon wafer. A finely smooth tip surface is obtained due to electrochemical etching reactions, and is effective for easy insertion. The fabrication method is based on inexpensive wet etching, which does not require expensive fabrication facilities such as deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). A sharp needle was successfully fabricated, the tip angle of which was considerably small and was distributed within the range from 15 to 30 deg. An experiment of inserting the fabricated needle into an artificial skin of silicone rubber was carried out. As the results, the resistance force during insertion was much reduced compared to those of two-dimensional sharp needles. Imitating mosquito's motion, the effectiveness of applying vibration to the fabricated needle during insertion was also confirmed. After biocompatible Parylene coating, puncturing a human skin was demonstrated assuming a lancet usage for the diabetics, in which the bleeding was surely observed.

  17. Towards a sharp-interface volume-of-fluid methodology for modeling evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2017-11-01

    In modeling evaporation, the diffuse-interface (one-domain) formulation yields inaccurate results. Recent efforts approaching the problem via a sharp-interface (two-domain) formulation have shown significant improvements. The reasons behind their better performance are discussed in the present work. All available sharp-interface methods, however, exclusively employ the level-set. In the present work, we develop a sharp-interface evaporation model in a volume-of-fluid (VOF) framework in order to leverage its mass-conserving property as well as its ability to handle large topographical changes. We start with a critical review of the assumptions underlying the mathematical equations governing evaporation. For example, it is shown that the assumption of incompressibility can only be applied in special circumstances. The famous D2 law used for benchmarking is valid exclusively to steady-state test problems. Transient is present over significant lifetime of a micron-size droplet. Therefore, a 1D spherical fully transient model is developed to provide a benchmark transient solution. Finally, a 3D Cartesian Navier-Stokes evaporation solver is developed. Some preliminary validation test-cases are presented for static and moving drop evaporation. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the Department of Defense, Tank and Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center, under Award Number DEEE0007292.

  18. Sharp interfaces in p+-AlGaAs/n-GaAs epitaxial structures obtained by MOCVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakiv N. M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of forming sharp and high-quality boundaries in p+AlGaAs/n-GaAs systems by MOCVD method is caused by differing on 80—120°С optimal crystallization temperature of GaAs layers and n-AlGaAs solid solutions. A method of forming qualitative hetero boundaries under conditions of continuous growth at changing crystallization temperature from 600—700°C has been developed. It has been determined that the crystallization of p+-AlGaAs: Zn solid solution layer on the surface of n-GaAs:Si layer, with increasing the crystallization temperature in the temperature range of 600—760°C at a rate 8—10 °C/min allows to crystallize sharp impurity boundary between the layers of p- and n-type conductivity. The method of forming sharp hetero boundaries in p-GaAs:Zn/n-GaAs:Si systems can be used for manufacturing wide range of epitaxial structures.

  19. Focusing optical waves with a rotationally symmetric sharp-edge aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanwen; Fu, Shenhe; Li, Zhen; Yin, Hao; Zhou, Jianying; Chen, Zhenqiang

    2018-04-01

    While there has been various kinds of patterned structures proposed for wave focusing, these patterned structures usually involve complicated lithographic techniques since the element size of the patterned structures should be precisely controlled in microscale or even nanoscale. Here we propose a new and straightforward method for focusing an optical plane wave in free space with a rotationally symmetric sharp-edge aperture. The focusing phenomenon of wave is realized by superposition of a portion of the higher-order symmetric plane waves generated from the sharp edges of the apertures, in contrast to previously focusing techniques which usually depend on a curved phase. We demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically the focusing effect with a series of apertures having different rotational symmetry, and find that the intensity of the hotspots could be controlled by the symmetric strength of the sharp-edge apertures. The presented results would advance the conventional wisdom that light would diffract in all directions and become expanding when it propagates through an aperture. The proposed method is easy to be processed, and might open potential applications in interferometry, image, and superresolution.

  20. The Influence of the Sharpe Ratio on Appreciation Savings Intended for the Payment of Lifetime Pensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Kupčík

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the payment of lifetime pensions paid by pension companies based on the selected mortality table of the Czech Statistical Office. We assume different input values depending on the size of the Sharpe ratio pension companies from selected countries. This paper aims to identify and assess the impact of the Sharpe ratio on the payment of lifetime pensions in postproduction period. We used data of nominal appreciation of pension companies from the Visegrad countries and Sweden, Switzerland and the Netherlands in the period 2005–2013. In the empirical analysis we additionally distinguished between guaranteed and non-guaranteed pension funds. For the purpose of calculating lifetime pensions, we used the formula early paid pension by the pension company on the Czech market down in its her pension plan with an expected median payment period of r years. We found link between the value of the Sharpe ratio and the size of lifetime pensions. Conclusion of the paper shows the effects of low performance of pension funds on lifetime pension with a focus on the Czech Republic. The scientific paper describes partial results reached within the project no. 54/2014 of the Internal Grant Agency of the Faculty of Business and Economics of the Mendel University in Brno following the aims and methodology of the given project.

  1. Adjusted Empirical Likelihood Method in the Presence of Nuisance Parameters with Application to the Sharpe Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuejiao Fu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Sharpe ratio is a widely used risk-adjusted performance measurement in economics and finance. Most of the known statistical inferential methods devoted to the Sharpe ratio are based on the assumption that the data are normally distributed. In this article, without making any distributional assumption on the data, we develop the adjusted empirical likelihood method to obtain inference for a parameter of interest in the presence of nuisance parameters. We show that the log adjusted empirical likelihood ratio statistic is asymptotically distributed as the chi-square distribution. The proposed method is applied to obtain inference for the Sharpe ratio. Simulation results illustrate that the proposed method is comparable to Jobson and Korkie’s method (1981 and outperforms the empirical likelihood method when the data are from a symmetric distribution. In addition, when the data are from a skewed distribution, the proposed method significantly outperforms all other existing methods. A real-data example is analyzed to exemplify the application of the proposed method.

  2. Practical load management - Peak shaving using photovoltaics; Peak Shaving mit der Fotovoltaik. Praktisches Lastmanagement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, W.

    2009-07-01

    This article takes a look at how photovoltaic (PV) power generation can be used in a practical way to meet peak demands for electricity. Advice is provided on how photovoltaics can provide peak load 'shaving' through the correlation between its production and the peak loads encountered during the day. The situation regarding feed-in tariffs in Italy is discussed, as are further examples of installations in Germany and Austria. Further, an initiative of the American Southern California Edison utility is discussed which foresees the installation of large PV plant on the roofs of commercial premises to provide local generation of peak energy and thus relieve demands on their power transportation network.

  3. Single crystal growth and neutron study of Bi-2212 high temperature superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, G.D.; Miles, P.A.; Russell, G. J.; Ivanov, A.; Koshizuka, N.; Kennedy, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Many physical properties of the cuprate high temperature superconductors appear to defy the conventional (one-electron) theory of metals. The neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering of the high T c single crystals can provides incisive information about collective magnetic excitations which is required to guide the development of new theories incorporating strong electron correlations. For lack of the suitably large single crystals, inelastic neutron scattering measurements have thus far proven possible for only two of the many families of high temperature superconductors, La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 and YBa 2 Cu 3 O x . While the magnetic pronounced differences that have hampered a unified description of the spin dynamics in the cuprates. In particular, a sharp resonant spin excitation dominates the spectrum in the superconducting state of YBa 2 Cu 3 0 x , but is not found in La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 . We have successfully grown large size Bi-2212 single crystals up to 10*5*1.2 mm 3 by floating zone method, and have studied neutron diffraction and neutron scattering in the single crystals. The Neutron diffraction of the single crystals shows that the crystals are high quality. Here we report the discovery of a magnetic resonance peak in the superconducting state of a third high temperature superconductor of Bi-2212 single crystal by modern neutron optics. The discovery provides evidence of the generality of this unusual phenomenon among the cuprates and greatly extends the empirical basis for its theoretical description. The magnetic resonance peak in Bi-2212 single crystals rules out the possibility or chemical parameters peculiar to YBCO superconductor. Rather, it is an intrinsic feature of the copper oxides whose explanation must be in an integral part of any theory of high temperature superconductivity

  4. The hippocampal CA3 region can generate two distinct types of sharp wave-ripple complexes, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Katharina T; Kandrács, Ágnes; Ulbert, István; Pál, Ildikó; Szabó, Csilla; Héja, László; Wittner, Lucia

    2015-02-01

    Hippocampal sharp wave-ripples (SPW-Rs) occur during slow wave sleep and behavioral immobility and are thought to play an important role in memory formation. We investigated the cellular and network properties of SPW-Rs with simultaneous laminar multielectrode and intracellular recordings in a rat hippocampal slice model, using physiological bathing medium. Spontaneous SPW-Rs were generated in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA3, and CA1 regions. These events were characterized by a local field potential gradient (LFPg) transient, increased fast oscillatory activity and increased multiple unit activity (MUA). Two types of SPW-Rs were distinguished in the CA3 region based on their different LFPg and current source density (CSD) pattern. Type 1 (T1) displayed negative LFPg transient in the pyramidal cell layer, and the associated CSD sink was confined to the proximal dendrites. Type 2 (T2) SPW-Rs were characterized by positive LFPg transient in the cell layer, and showed CSD sinks involving both the apical and basal dendrites. In both types, consistent with the somatic CSD source, only a small subset of CA3 pyramidal cells fired, most pyramidal cells were hyperpolarized, while most interneurons increased firing rate before the LFPg peak. Different neuronal populations, with different proportions of pyramidal cells and distinct subsets of interneurons were activated during T1 and T2 SPW-Rs. Activation of specific inhibitory cell subsets-with the possible leading role of perisomatic interneurons-seems to be crucial to synchronize distinct ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells finally resulting in the expression of different SPW-R activities. This suggests that the hippocampus can generate dynamic changes in its activity stemming from the same excitatory and inhibitory circuits, and so, might provide the cellular and network basis for an input-specific and activity-dependent information transmission. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. New View of Twin Peaks Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This image taken on Sol 74 ( September 17) from the Sojourner rover's right front camera shows areas of the Pathfinder landing site never before seen. The shadow of the rover and its antenna is visible in the foreground. On the horizon at right are the Twin Peaks, about 1 kilometer away.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  6. Recent considerations of the GSI positron peaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soff, G.; Reinhardt, J.; Reus, J. de; Ionescu, D.; Schramm, S.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.

    1987-08-01

    In this report we examine various attempts to explain the GSI positron peaks. After the presentation of recent experimental data we briefly sketch theoretical investigations concerning the new particle hypothesis. The failure of standard models employing a linear coupling led to more exotic scenarios for particle production. One exciting recent idea is outlined. After that we treat the possible formation of a resonance in ordinary Bhabha scattering which could represent a time-reversed channel to the observations in heavy-ion collisions. Finally we discuss the poly-positronium model and a purely atomic physics model to interprete the GSI positron events. (orig./HSI)

  7. Engineering training-success at Comanche Peak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, M.G.; Preston, W.D.; McMahon, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    The engineering training program at Comanche Peak steam electric station (CPSES) has received favorable industry recognition. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations has recommended the CPSES program as a source of information for plants trying to build their own successful programs and has featured the program in an article in the spring 1993 issue of The Nuclear Professional. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission described the program as superior in a preoperational review and assessment team inspection report and in the most recent systematic assessment of licensee performance. This industry recognition is an important measure of the program's success

  8. Electromechanical Peak Devices of Distributed Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Konstantinova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The power world crises (1973, 1979 have demonstrated that mankind entered the expensive energy epoch. More and more attitude is given to power saving problem by including renewable power sources in energy balance of the countries. The paper analyzes a power system inBelarusand a typical chart of the active load is cited in the paper. Equalization of load chart is considered as one of measures directed on provision of higher operational efficiency of power system and power saving.  This purpose can be obtained while including electromechanical peak devices of the distributed generation in the energy balance.

  9. Particle creation by peak electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorno, T.C. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Gavrilov, S.P. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia, Department of General and Experimental Physics, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gitman, D.M. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, CP 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-08-15

    The particle creation by the so-called peak electric field is considered. The latter field is a combination of two exponential parts, one exponentially increasing and another exponentially decreasing. We find exact solutions of the Dirac equation with the field under consideration with appropriate asymptotic conditions and calculate all the characteristics of particle creation effect, in particular, differential mean numbers of created particle, total number of created particles, and the probability for a vacuum to remain a vacuum. Characteristic asymptotic regimes are discussed in detail and a comparison with the pure asymptotically decaying field is considered. (orig.)

  10. Probable Values of Current Solar Cycle Peak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Silbergleit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of multiple linear regression method applied to solar cycles 4 to 23 using lagged values of smoothed monthly mean sunspot numbers as independent variables is presented. According to that, the amplitude of current solar cycle 24 is estimated providing a quantitative prediction result. Our adjustment shows that the current cycle would have a sunspot peak less than the biggest one observed during the cycle 19 giving an additional support to the declination in solar activity which is currently happening.

  11. Validity of a trunk-mounted accelerometer to assess peak accelerations during walking, jogging and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wundersitz, Daniel W T; Gastin, Paul B; Richter, Chris; Robertson, Samuel J; Netto, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate peak acceleration data from an accelerometer contained within a wearable tracking device while walking, jogging and running. Thirty-nine participants walked, jogged and ran on a treadmill while 10 peak accelerations per movement were obtained (n = 390). A single triaxial accelerometer measured resultant acceleration during all movements. To provide a criterion measure of acceleration, a 12-camera motion analysis (MA) system tracked the position of a retro-reflective marker affixed to the wearable tracking device. Peak raw acceleration recorded by the accelerometer significantly overestimated peak MA acceleration (P jog compared with walk and for run compared to both other movements. As the magnitude of acceleration increased, the strength of the relationship between the accelerometer and the criterion measure decreased. These results indicate that filtered accelerometer data provide an acceptable means of assessing peak accelerations, in particular for walking and jogging.

  12. PeakVizor: Visual Analytics of Peaks in Video Clickstreams from Massive Open Online Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Chen, Yuanzhe; Liu, Dongyu; Shi, Conglei; Wu, Yingcai; Qu, Huamin

    2016-10-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) aim to facilitate open-access and massive-participation education. These courses have attracted millions of learners recently. At present, most MOOC platforms record the web log data of learner interactions with course videos. Such large amounts of multivariate data pose a new challenge in terms of analyzing online learning behaviors. Previous studies have mainly focused on the aggregate behaviors of learners from a summative view; however, few attempts have been made to conduct a detailed analysis of such behaviors. To determine complex learning patterns in MOOC video interactions, this paper introduces a comprehensive visualization system called PeakVizor. This system enables course instructors and education experts to analyze the "peaks" or the video segments that generate numerous clickstreams. The system features three views at different levels: the overview with glyphs to display valuable statistics regarding the peaks detected; the flow view to present spatio-temporal information regarding the peaks; and the correlation view to show the correlation between different learner groups and the peaks. Case studies and interviews conducted with domain experts have demonstrated the usefulness and effectiveness of PeakVizor, and new findings about learning behaviors in MOOC platforms have been reported.

  13. Outreach Plans for Storm Peak Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation 10,500 ft. SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. We plan to create a unique summer undergraduate education experiences for students of diversity at Storm Peak Laboratory. As stressed by the College Pathways to Science Education Standards [Siebert and McIntosh, 2001], to support changes in K-12 science education transformations must first be made at the college level, including inquiry-oriented opportunities to engage in meaningful research. These workshops will be designed to allow students to experience the excitement of science, increasing their likelihood of pursing careers within the fields of scientific education or research.

  14. Peak heart rates at extreme altitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Van Hall, Gerrit

    2001-01-01

    We have measured maximal heart rate during a graded maximal bicycle exercise test to exhaustion in five healthy climbers before and during an expedition to Mt. Everest. Maximal heart rates at sea level were 186 (177-204) beats/min(-1) at sea level and 170 (169-182) beats/min(-1) with acute hypoxia....... After 1, 4 and 6 weeks of acclimatization to 5400 m, maximal heart rates were 155 (135-182), 158 (144-182), and 155 (140-183) beats/min(-1), respectively. Heart rates of two of the climbers were measured during their attempt to reach the summit of Mt. Everest without the use of supplemental oxygen....... The peak heart rates at 8,750 m for the two climbers were 142 and 144 beats/min(-1), which were similar to their maximal heart rates during exhaustive bicycle exercise at 5,400 m, the values being 144 and 148 beats/min(-1), respectively. The peak heart rates at 8,750 m are in agreement with other field...

  15. Monitoring device for local power peaking coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhashi, Ishi

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the local power peaking coefficients obtained by the method not depending on the combination of fuel types. Method: A plurality of representative values for the local power distribution determined by the nuclear constant calculation for one fuel assembly are memorized regarding each of the burn-up degree and the void coefficient on every positions and fuel types in fuel rod assemblies. While on the other hand, the representative values for the local power distribution as described above are compensated by a compensation coefficient considering the effect of adjacent segments and a control rod compensation coefficient considering the effect due to the control rod insertion relative to the just-mentioned compensation coefficient. Then, the maximum value among them is selected to determine the local power peaking coefficient at each of the times and each of the segments, which is monitored. According to this system, the calculation and the working required for the fitting work depending on the combination of fuel types are no more required at all to facilitate the maintenance as well. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Peak capacity and peak capacity per unit time in capillary and microchip zone electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Joe P; Blackney, Donna M; Ennis, Erin J

    2017-11-10

    The origins of the peak capacity concept are described and the important contributions to the development of that concept in chromatography and electrophoresis are reviewed. Whereas numerous quantitative expressions have been reported for one- and two-dimensional separations, most are focused on chromatographic separations and few, if any, quantitative unbiased expressions have been developed for capillary or microchip zone electrophoresis. Making the common assumption that longitudinal diffusion is the predominant source of zone broadening in capillary electrophoresis, analytical expressions for the peak capacity are derived, first in terms of migration time, diffusion coefficient, migration distance, and desired resolution, and then in terms of the remaining underlying fundamental parameters (electric field, electroosmotic and electrophoretic mobilities) that determine the migration time. The latter expressions clearly illustrate the direct square root dependence of peak capacity on electric field and migration distance and the inverse square root dependence on solute diffusion coefficient. Conditions that result in a high peak capacity will result in a low peak capacity per unit time and vice-versa. For a given symmetrical range of relative electrophoretic mobilities for co- and counter-electroosmotic species (cations and anions), the peak capacity increases with the square root of the electric field even as the temporal window narrows considerably, resulting in a significant reduction in analysis time. Over a broad relative electrophoretic mobility interval [-0.9, 0.9], an approximately two-fold greater amount of peak capacity can be generated for counter-electroosmotic species although it takes about five-fold longer to do so, consistent with the well-known bias in migration time and resolving power for co- and counter-electroosmotic species. The optimum lower bound of the relative electrophoretic mobility interval [μ r,Z , μ r,A ] that provides the maximum

  17. Danger in the streets: exposures to bloodborne pathogens after community sharp injuries in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marcellus Dias; Rapparini, Cristiane; Schmaltz, Carolina Arana Stanis; Tuyama, Mari; Lauria, Lilian de Mello; Saraceni, Valeria; Barroso, Paulo Feijó

    Exposures to sharps injuries occurring in the community are relatively frequent. We describe characteristics of community sharp exposures reported in the city of Rio de Janeiro from 1997 to 2010. A cross-sectional analysis of exposure reports to sharps in the community reported to a surveillance system, designed for health care workers, of the Municipal Health Department of Rio de Janeiro. The characteristics of exposed individuals analyzed included types of exposure, the circumstances of the accident, and the prophylaxis offered. 582 exposures were studied. Median age was 30 years and 83 (14%) involved children with less than 10 years of age. Two hundred and seventeen (37%) occurred with sharps found in the streets. The exposure was percutaneous in 515 (89%) and needles where involved in 406 (70%) of them. The sharps were present in the trash in 227 (39%) or in the environment in 167 (29%) of the reports. Professionals who work with frequent contact with domestic or urban waste were 196 (38%). The source was known in 112 (19%) of the exposures and blood was involved in 269 (46%). Only 101 (19%) of the injured subjects reported a complete course of vaccination for hepatitis B. Antiretroviral prophylaxis was prescribed for 392 (68%) of the exposed subjects. Sharps injuries occurring in the community are an important health problem. A great proportion would be avoided if practices on how to dispose needles and sharps used outside health units were implemented. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Joe H., III

    2010-01-01

    The expected peak wind speed of the day is an important forecast element in the 45th Weather Squadron's (45 WS) daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts. The forecasts are used for ground and space launch operations at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45 WS also issues wind advisories for KSC/CCAFS when they expect wind gusts to meet or exceed 25 kt, 35 kt and 50 kt thresholds at any level from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated peak wind speeds are challenging to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October - April. In Phase I of this task, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a tool to help the 45 WS forecast non-convective winds at KSC/CCAFS for the 24-hour period of 0800 to 0800 local time. The tool was delivered as a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI displayed the forecast of peak wind speed, 5-minute average wind speed at the time of the peak wind, timing of the peak wind and probability the peak speed would meet or exceed 25 kt, 35 kt and 50 kt. For the current task (Phase II ), the 45 WS requested additional observations be used for the creation of the forecast equations by expanding the period of record (POR). Additional parameters were evaluated as predictors, including wind speeds between 500 ft and 3000 ft, static stability classification, Bulk Richardson Number, mixing depth, vertical wind shear, temperature inversion strength and depth and wind direction. Using a verification data set, the AMU compared the performance of the Phase I and II prediction methods. Just as in Phase I, the tool was delivered as a Microsoft Excel GUI. The 45 WS requested the tool also be available in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS). The AMU first expanded the POR by two years by adding tower observations, surface observations and CCAFS (XMR) soundings for the cool season months of March 2007 to April 2009. The POR was expanded

  19. Simulation-Based Analysis of Reentry Dynamics for the Sharp Atmospheric Entry Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillier, Clemens Emmanuel

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes the analysis of the reentry dynamics of a high-performance lifting atmospheric entry vehicle through numerical simulation tools. The vehicle, named SHARP, is currently being developed by the Thermal Protection Materials and Systems branch of NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. The goal of this project is to provide insight into trajectory tradeoffs and vehicle dynamics using simulation tools that are powerful, flexible, user-friendly and inexpensive. Implemented Using MATLAB and SIMULINK, these tools are developed with an eye towards further use in the conceptual design of the SHARP vehicle's trajectory and flight control systems. A trajectory simulator is used to quantify the entry capabilities of the vehicle subject to various operational constraints. Using an aerodynamic database computed by NASA and a model of the earth, the simulator generates the vehicle trajectory in three-dimensional space based on aerodynamic angle inputs. Requirements for entry along the SHARP aerothermal performance constraint are evaluated for different control strategies. Effect of vehicle mass on entry parameters is investigated, and the cross range capability of the vehicle is evaluated. Trajectory results are presented and interpreted. A six degree of freedom simulator builds on the trajectory simulator and provides attitude simulation for future entry controls development. A Newtonian aerodynamic model including control surfaces and a mass model are developed. A visualization tool for interpreting simulation results is described. Control surfaces are roughly sized. A simple controller is developed to fly the vehicle along its aerothermal performance constraint using aerodynamic flaps for control. This end-to-end demonstration proves the suitability of the 6-DOF simulator for future flight control system development. Finally, issues surrounding real-time simulation with hardware in the loop are discussed.

  20. Comparison of manual vacuum aspiration and sharp curettage in the treatment of first trimester abortions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iftikhar, G.; Tanveer, S.; Gilani, T.A.; Gilani, S.T.A.

    2014-01-01

    To compare the safety and efficacy of manual vacuum aspiration and sharp curettage in the treatment of first trimester abortions. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Gynecology, Social Security Hospital Shahdra Lahore in collaboration with Family Health Hospital Johar Town Lahore, from May 2007 to May 2012. Patients and Methods: Six hundred women admitted with the diagnosis of first trimester less than or equal to 12 weeks abortions were randomly assigned, 300 to manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) and 300 to traditional sharp curettage. Diagnosis of abortion was confirmed by last menstrual period, physical examination and ultrasonography. Results: In total of 600 patients, 300 randomly assigned to MVA and another 300 patients assigned to sharp curettage management were having mean age of 31.8 and 33 yrs respectively. Mean parity was in both groups, mean gestational age 8.9 and 8.2 weeks, mean duration of procedure was 6.4 and 5.8 minutes, duration of hospital stay was 4 and 40 hrs, missed abortion in 47% and 43% patients, incomplete abortion in 53% and 57% patients, cervical dilatation was needed in 1% against 53%, 10% against 8 % experienced mild pain in both groups, no patient of incomplete evacuation against 0.6%, uterine perforation in none against 0.3 %, excessive bleeding was experienced by 0.3% against 0.6% patients in both groups, and patient satisfaction rate was 99% against 99.4% in the two groups respectively. Conclusion: In the management of first trimester pregnancy loss, MVA offers a quick solution to the problem with reduced hospital stay and lower rate of complications. (author)

  1. SHARP pre-release v1.0 - Current Status and Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Vijay S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rahaman, Ronald O. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The NEAMS Reactor Product Line effort aims to develop an integrated multiphysics simulation capability for the design and analysis of future generations of nuclear power plants. The Reactor Product Line code suite’s multi-resolution hierarchy is being designed to ultimately span the full range of length and time scales present in relevant reactor design and safety analyses, as well as scale from desktop to petaflop computing platforms. In this report, building on a several previous report issued in September 2014, we describe our continued efforts to integrate thermal/hydraulics, neutronics, and structural mechanics modeling codes to perform coupled analysis of a representative fast sodium-cooled reactor core in preparation for a unified release of the toolkit. The work reported in the current document covers the software engineering aspects of managing the entire stack of components in the SHARP toolkit and the continuous integration efforts ongoing to prepare a release candidate for interested reactor analysis users. Here we report on the continued integration effort of PROTEUS/Nek5000 and Diablo into the NEAMS framework and the software processes that enable users to utilize the capabilities without losing scientific productivity. Due to the complexity of the individual modules and their necessary/optional dependency library chain, we focus on the configuration and build aspects for the SHARP toolkit, which includes capability to autodownload dependencies and configure/install with optimal flags in an architecture-aware fashion. Such complexity is untenable without strong software engineering processes such as source management, source control, change reviews, unit tests, integration tests and continuous test suites. Details on these processes are provided in the report as a building step for a SHARP user guide that will accompany the first release, expected by Mar 2016.

  2. Sharp inflaton potentials and bi-spectra: effects of smoothening the discontinuity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Jérôme; Sriramkumar, L.; Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Sharp shapes in the inflaton potentials often lead to short departures from slow roll which, in turn, result in deviations from scale invariance in the scalar power spectrum. Typically, in such situations, the scalar power spectrum exhibits a burst of features associated with modes that leave the Hubble radius either immediately before or during the epoch of fast roll. Moreover, one also finds that the power spectrum turns scale invariant at smaller scales corresponding to modes that leave the Hubble radius at later stages, when slow roll has been restored. In other words, the imprints of brief departures from slow roll, arising out of sharp shapes in the inflaton potential, are usually of a finite width in the scalar power spectrum. Intuitively, one may imagine that the scalar bi-spectrum too may exhibit a similar behavior, i.e. a restoration of scale invariance at small scales, when slow roll has been reestablished. However, in the case of the Starobinsky model (viz. the model described by a linear inflaton potential with a sudden change in its slope) involving the canonical scalar field, it has been found that, a rather sharp, though short, departure from slow roll can leave a lasting and significant imprint on the bi-spectrum. The bi-spectrum in this case is found to grow linearly with the wavenumber at small scales, a behavior which is clearly unphysical. In this work, we study the effects of smoothening the discontinuity in the Starobinsky model on the scalar bi-spectrum. Focusing on the equilateral limit, we analytically show that, for smoother potentials, the bi-spectrum indeed turns scale invariant at suitably large wavenumbers. We also confirm the analytical results numerically using our newly developed code BINGO. We conclude with a few comments on certain related points

  3. The visibility of IQHE at sharp edges: experimental proposals based on interactions and edge electrostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkarslan, U; Oylumluoglu, G; Grayson, M; Siddiki, A

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the incompressible strips on the integer quantized Hall effect (IQHE) is investigated, considering a cleaved-edge overgrown (CEO) sample as an experimentally realizable sharp edge system. We propose a set of experiments to clarify the distinction between the large-sample limit when bulk disorder defines the IQHE plateau width and the small-sample limit smaller than the disorder correlation length, when self-consistent edge electrostatics define the IQHE plateau width. The large-sample or bulk quantized Hall (QH) regime is described by the usual localization picture, whereas the small-sample or edge regime is discussed within the compressible/incompressible strips picture, known as the screening theory of QH edges. Utilizing the unusually sharp edge profiles of the CEO samples, a Hall bar design is proposed to manipulate the edge potential profile from smooth to extremely sharp. By making use of a side-gate perpendicular to the two-dimensional electron system, it is shown that the plateau widths can be changed or even eliminated altogether. Hence, the visibility of IQHE is strongly influenced when adjusting the edge potential profile and/or changing the dc current direction under high currents in the nonlinear transport regime. As a second investigation, we consider two different types of ohmic contacts, namely highly transmitting (ideal) and highly reflecting (non-ideal) contacts. We show that if the injection contacts are non-ideal, but still ohmic, it is possible to measure directly the non-quantized transport taking place at the bulk of the CEO samples. The results of the experiments we propose will clarify the influence of the edge potential profile and the quality of the contacts, under QH conditions. (paper)

  4. Peak Electric Load Relief in Northern Manhattan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildegaard D. Link

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aphorism “Think globally, act locally,” attributed to René Dubos, reflects the vision that the solution to global environmental problems must begin with efforts within our communities. PlaNYC 2030, the New York City sustainability plan, is the starting point for this study. Results include (a a case study based on the City College of New York (CCNY energy audit, in which we model the impacts of green roofs on campus energy demand and (b a case study of energy use at the neighborhood scale. We find that reducing the urban heat island effect can reduce building cooling requirements, peak electricity loads stress on the local electricity grid and improve urban livability.

  5. Twin Peaks in 360-degree panorama

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The prominent hills dubbed 'Twin Peaks' approximately 1-2 kilometers away were imaged by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) as part of a 360-degree color panorama, taken over sols 8, 9 and 10. A lander petal and deflated airbag are at the bottom of the image.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  6. Tim Peake and Britain's road to space

    CERN Document Server

    Seedhouse, Erik

    2017-01-01

    This book puts the reader in the flight suit of Britain’s first male astronaut, Tim Peake. It chronicles his life, along with the Principia mission and the down-to-the-last-bolt descriptions of life aboard the ISS, by way of the hurdles placed by the British government and the rigors of training at Russia’s Star City military base. In addition, this book discusses the learning curves required in astronaut and mission training and the complexity of the technologies required to launch an astronaut and keep them alive for months on end. This book underscores the fact that technology and training, unlike space, do not exist in a vacuum; complex technical systems, like the ISS, interact with the variables of human personality, and the cultural background of the astronauts. .

  7. Optimal loading range for the development of peak power output in the hexagonal barbell jump squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Thomas S; Tobin, Daniel P; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies indicate that the utilization of the hexagonal barbell jump squat (HBJS) compared with the traditional barbell jump squat may offer a superior method of developing peak power. The notion that a single optimal load may be prescribed in training programs aiming to develop peak power is subject to debate. The purpose of this study was to identify the optimal load corresponding with peak power output during the HBJS in professional rugby union players. Seventeen professional rugby union players participated in this study. Participants performed 3 unloaded countermovement jumps on a force plate and 3 HBJS at each of the following randomized loads: 10, 20, 30, and 40% of box squat 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Peak power output was the dependent variable of interest. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance was conducted to compare peak power output across each load. Peak power output was the dependent variable of interest. A significant main effect for load was observed (Wilk's Lambda = 0.11, F(4,13) = 18.07, p < 0.01, partial η2 = 0.88). Results of the Bonferroni-adjusted pairwise comparisons indicated that peak power output in the HBJS is optimized at a load range between 10 and 20% of box squat 1RM. The results of this study indicate that the use of the HBJS with a training load between 10 and 20% of box squat 1RM optimizes peak power output in professional rugby union players.

  8. Comparison of five portable peak flow meters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Nency Takara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the measurements of spirometric peak expiratory flow (PEF from five different PEF meters and to determine if their values are in agreement. Inaccurate equipment may result in incorrect diagnoses of asthma and inappropriate treatments. METHODS: Sixty-eight healthy, sedentary and insufficiently active subjects, aged from 19 to 40 years, performed PEF measurements using Air Zone®, Assess®, Galemed®, Personal Best® and Vitalograph® peak flow meters. The highest value recorded for each subject for each device was compared to the corresponding spirometric values using Friedman's test with Dunn's post-hoc (p<0.05, Spearman's correlation test and Bland-Altman's agreement test. RESULTS: The median and interquartile ranges for the spirometric values and the Air Zone®, Assess®, Galemed®, Personal Best® and Vitalograph® meters were 428 (263-688 L/min, 450 (350-800 L/min, 420 (310-720 L/min, 380 (300-735 L/min, 400 (310-685 L/min and 415 (335-610 L/min, respectively. Significant differences were found when the spirometric values were compared to those recorded by the Air Zone® (p<0.001 and Galemed ® (p<0.01 meters. There was no agreement between the spirometric values and the five PEF meters. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the values recorded from Galemed® meters may underestimate the actual value, which could lead to unnecessary interventions, and that Air Zone® meters overestimate spirometric values, which could obfuscate the need for intervention. These findings must be taken into account when interpreting both devices' results in younger people. These differences should also be considered when directly comparing values from different types of PEF meters.

  9. Comparison of five portable peak flow meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Glaucia Nency; Ruas, Gualberto; Pessoa, Bruna Varanda; Jamami, Luciana Kawakami; Di Lorenzo, Valéria Amorim Pires; Jamami, Mauricio

    2010-05-01

    To compare the measurements of spirometric peak expiratory flow (PEF) from five different PEF meters and to determine if their values are in agreement. Inaccurate equipment may result in incorrect diagnoses of asthma and inappropriate treatments. Sixty-eight healthy, sedentary and insufficiently active subjects, aged from 19 to 40 years, performed PEF measurements using Air Zone, Assess, Galemed, Personal Best and Vitalograph peak flow meters. The highest value recorded for each subject for each device was compared to the corresponding spirometric values using Friedman's test with Dunn's post-hoc (p<0.05), Spearman's correlation test and Bland-Altman's agreement test. The median and interquartile ranges for the spirometric values and the Air Zone, Assess, Galemed, Personal Best and Vitalograph meters were 428 (263-688 L/min), 450 (350-800 L/min), 420 (310-720 L/min), 380 (300-735 L/min), 400 (310-685 L/min) and 415 (335-610 L/min), respectively. Significant differences were found when the spirometric values were compared to those recorded by the Air Zone(R) (p<0.001) and Galemed (p<0.01) meters. There was no agreement between the spirometric values and the five PEF meters. The results suggest that the values recorded from Galemed meters may underestimate the actual value, which could lead to unnecessary interventions, and that Air Zone meters overestimate spirometric values, which could obfuscate the need for intervention. These findings must be taken into account when interpreting both devices' results in younger people. These differences should also be considered when directly comparing values from different types of PEF meters.

  10. Evaluation of peak-to-total ratio for germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tamaki; Oi, Yoshihiro; Taki, Mitsumasa; Kawasaki, Katsuya; Yoshida, Makoto

    1999-01-01

    An equation for the peak-to-total ratio, P, of a germanium detector is proposed in the following form. P=ε p /ε t +a(V/A)+b(V/A) 2 /2 where ε p /ε t is the ratio of the photoelectric to the total detection efficiency for a germanium detector, V/A is the volume-to-surface ratio of the detector, and the parameters of a and b are experimentally given as a function of incident photon energy. The first term in the right side of the equation expresses the fractional single photoelectric-to-total interaction between photons and the detector. The second and third terms correspond to the multiple interactions. The peak-to-total ratios for the germanium detector with a sensitive volume up to 200 cm 3 were calculated by the equation. They coincide with the experimental values to within an uncertainty of several percent in the energy region 0.3-3 MeV

  11. Percutaneous sharp recanalization of a membranous IVC occlusion with an occlusion balloon as a needle target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Rivers-Bowerman, MD, MSc, FRCPC

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old male with right upper quadrant symptoms and hepatic dysfunction was found to have multiple dilated hepatic veins (HVs with intrahepatic collateralization and membranous occlusion of the intrahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC consistent with primary Budd–Chiari syndrome. Venacavograms depicted drainage of the intrahepatic collaterals through a left-sided HV entering the IVC above the level of the occlusion. Sharp recanalization of the membranous IVC occlusion was performed with an occlusion balloon as a needle target under echocardiographic monitoring followed by balloon angioplasty with restoration of IVC patency. Clinical, laboratory, and venographic procedural success has been demonstrated to 9 months with minimal residual stenosis.

  12. Timbral Sharpness and Modulations in Frequency and Amplitude: Implications for the Fusion of Musical Sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goad, Pamela Joy

    The fusion of musical voices is an important aspect of musical blend, or the mixing of individual sounds. Yet, little research has been done to explicitly determine the factors involved in fusion. In this study, the similarity of timbre and modulation were examined for their contribution to the fusion of sounds. It is hypothesized that similar timbres will fuse better than dissimilar timbres, and, voices with the same kind of modulation will fuse better than voices of different modulations. A perceptually-based measure, known as sharpness was investigated as a measure of timbre. The advantages of using sharpness are that it is based on hearing sensitivities and masking phenomena of inner ear processing. Five musical instrument families were digitally recorded in performances across a typical playing range at two extreme dynamic levels. Analyses reveal that sharpness is capable of uncovering subtle changes in timbre including those found in musical dynamics, instrument design, and performer-specific variations. While these analyses alone are insufficient to address fusion, preliminary calculations of timbral combinations indicate that sharpness has the potential to predict the fusion of sounds used in musical composition. Three experiments investigated the effects of modulation on the fusion of a harmonic major sixth interval. In the first experiment using frequency modulation, stimuli varied in deviation about a mean fundamental frequency and relative modulation phase between the two tones. Results showed smaller frequency deviations promoted fusion and relative phase differences had a minimal effect. In a second experiment using amplitude modulation, stimuli varied in deviation about a mean amplitude level and relative phase of modulation. Results showed smaller amplitude deviations promoted better fusion, but unlike frequency modulation, relative phase differences were also important. In a third experiment, frequency modulation, amplitude modulation and mixed

  13. Lacosamide and Levetiracetam Have No Effect on Sharp-Wave Ripple Rate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudláček, Jan; Chvojka, Jan; Pošusta, Antonín; Kováčová, Ľubica; Hong, S.B.; Weiss, S.; Volná, K.; Marusič, P.; Otáhal, Jakub; Jiruška, Přemysl

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Dec 21 (2017), č. článku 687. ISSN 1664-2295 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02634S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08565S; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29835A; GA MZd(CZ) NV17-28427A Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : high-frequency oscillations * sharp-wave ripples * levetiracetam * lacosamide * antiepileptic drugs Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 3.552, year: 2016

  14. Thermally induced high frequency random amplitude fatigue damage at sharp notches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.W.J.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been performed using the SUPERSOMITE facility to investigate the initiation and growth of fatigue cracks at the tips of sharp surface notches subjected to random thermally-induced stress. The experimental situation is complex involving plasticity, random amplitude loading and heat transfer medium/surface coupling. Crack initiation and growth prediction have been considered using the Creager and Neuber methods to compute the strain ranges in the vicinity of the notch root. Good agreement has been obtained between the experimental results and theoretical predictions. The paper reports the results of the analysis of the notch behavior

  15. Pressure-standardised mammography does not affect visibility, contrast and sharpness of stable lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, J.E. de, E-mail: jerry.degroot@sigmascreening.com [Sigmascreening, Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hopman, I.G.M., E-mail: ingrid-hopman@hetnet.nl [University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lier, M.G.J.T.B. van, E-mail: monique.vanlier@sigmascreening.com [Sigmascreening, Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Branderhorst, W., E-mail: w.branderhorst@amc.uva.nl [Sigmascreening, Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Grimbergen, C.A., E-mail: c.a.grimbergen@amc.nl [Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heeten, G.J. den, E-mail: denheeten@gmail.com [Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-01-15

    Introduction: A recent technological development allows pressure-standardised mammography by personalizing the compression force to the breast size and firmness. The technique has been shown to reduce pain and compression variability between consecutive exams, but also results in a slightly thicker compressed breast during exposure. This raises the question whether visibility, contrast and sharpness of lesions are affected? Methods: Four experienced radiologists compared 188 stable lesions and structures including (clusters of) calcifications, (oil) cysts and lymph nodes that were visible in mammograms obtained in 2009 with a pain-tolerance limited 18 daN target force compression protocol, and in 2014/2015 obtained with a 10 kPa (75 mmHg) pressure-standardised compression protocol. Observers were blinded for all DICOM metadata and rated which of the randomly ordered, side by side presented images had better lesion visibility, contrast and sharpness, or whether they saw no difference. They also indicated which overall image they preferred, if any, and whether the non-preferred image was still adequate. Statistical non-inferiority is concluded when the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval of the 4-rater averaged ‘new protocol better’ proportions exceed the non-inferiority limit of 0.463. Results: In 2014/2015, the compressions were significantly milder, with on average 17% (mediolateral oblique) to 29% (craniocaudal) lower forces. Breasts remained on average 2.4% (1.4 mm) thicker. Dose was significantly lower (6.5%), which is explained by glandular atrophy. The 95% confidence interval lower limits are 0.479 for visibility, 0.473 for contrast, 0.488 for sharpness and 0.486 for preference, all exceeding the non-inferiority limit. Of the 60 non-preferred mammograms, multiple observers found only five to be inadequate: 4 obtained with the force protocol and 1 with the pressure protocol. Conclusion: Pain-reduced mammography with 10 kPa pressure

  16. Four new species and first nominal record of Chasmogenus Sharp, 1882 (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae) from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Bruno; Ferreira, Nelson

    2014-02-20

    The genus Chasmogenus Sharp, 1882 (Hydrophilidae: Acidocerinae) is recorded from Brazil for the first time. Four new species are described and illustrated from the Southeastern Region of the country: C. fluminensis sp. nov. (Rio de Janeiro State), C. lilianae sp. nov. (Rio de Janeiro State), C. itatiaia sp. nov. (Minas Gerais and Rio de Janeiro States), and C. ubatuba sp. nov. (São Paulo State). Chasmogenus sapucay Fernández, 1986 is recorded for the first time from Northern and Southeastern Brazil. Notes on morphology and an updated key for the South American species are provided.

  17. A contribuição de Ann Sharp: uma conversa com Matthew Lipman

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, David Knowles; Montclair State University

    2010-01-01

    A recente morte de Ann Sharp, co-fundadora e diretora associada do Instituto para o Desenvolvimento da Filosofia para Crianças, aos 68 anos de idade, deixou muitos dos comprometidos com o movimento de filosofia para/com crianças despojados, sem dúvida de diferentes formas. A afetividade e a intensidade de sua dedicação pessoal e profissional, a claridade de seu pensamento e sua ilimitada energia no trabalho pela disseminação da concepção e prática do filosofar com crianças ressoa ainda mais ...

  18. Pressure-standardised mammography does not affect visibility, contrast and sharpness of stable lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, J.E. de; Hopman, I.G.M.; Lier, M.G.J.T.B. van; Branderhorst, W.; Grimbergen, C.A.; Heeten, G.J. den

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: A recent technological development allows pressure-standardised mammography by personalizing the compression force to the breast size and firmness. The technique has been shown to reduce pain and compression variability between consecutive exams, but also results in a slightly thicker compressed breast during exposure. This raises the question whether visibility, contrast and sharpness of lesions are affected? Methods: Four experienced radiologists compared 188 stable lesions and structures including (clusters of) calcifications, (oil) cysts and lymph nodes that were visible in mammograms obtained in 2009 with a pain-tolerance limited 18 daN target force compression protocol, and in 2014/2015 obtained with a 10 kPa (75 mmHg) pressure-standardised compression protocol. Observers were blinded for all DICOM metadata and rated which of the randomly ordered, side by side presented images had better lesion visibility, contrast and sharpness, or whether they saw no difference. They also indicated which overall image they preferred, if any, and whether the non-preferred image was still adequate. Statistical non-inferiority is concluded when the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval of the 4-rater averaged ‘new protocol better’ proportions exceed the non-inferiority limit of 0.463. Results: In 2014/2015, the compressions were significantly milder, with on average 17% (mediolateral oblique) to 29% (craniocaudal) lower forces. Breasts remained on average 2.4% (1.4 mm) thicker. Dose was significantly lower (6.5%), which is explained by glandular atrophy. The 95% confidence interval lower limits are 0.479 for visibility, 0.473 for contrast, 0.488 for sharpness and 0.486 for preference, all exceeding the non-inferiority limit. Of the 60 non-preferred mammograms, multiple observers found only five to be inadequate: 4 obtained with the force protocol and 1 with the pressure protocol. Conclusion: Pain-reduced mammography with 10 kPa pressure

  19. The Next Generation of Ground Operations Command and Control; Scripting in C Sharp and Visual Basic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, George; Pedoto, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of scripting languages in Ground Operations Command and Control. It describes the use of scripting languages in a historical context, the advantages and disadvantages of scripts. It describes the Enhanced and Redesigned Scripting (ERS) language, that was designed to combine the features of a scripting language and the graphical and IDE richness of a programming language with the utility of scripting languages. ERS uses the Microsoft Visual Studio programming environment and offers custom controls that enable an ERS developer to extend the Visual Basic and C sharp language interface with the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) telemetry and command system.

  20. Validity of the "sharp-kink approximation" for water and other fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, R.; Osborne, K.; Subashi, E.

    2007-01-01

    The contact angle of a liquid droplet on a solid surface is a direct measure of fundamental atomic-scale forces acting between liquid molecules and the solid surface. In this work, the validity is assessed of a simple equation, which approximately relates the contact angle of a liquid on a surface to its density, its surface tension, and the effective molecule-surface potential. This equation is derived in the sharp-kink approximation, where the density profile of the liquid is assumed to dro...

  1. Single carrier trapping and de-trapping in scaled silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuo; Khaled Husain, Muhammad; Yoshimoto, Hiroyuki; Tani, Kazuki; Sasago, Yoshitaka; Hisamoto, Digh; Fletcher, Jonathan David; Kataoka, Masaya; Tsuchiya, Yoshishige; Saito, Shinichi

    2017-07-01

    The scaling of Silicon (Si) technology is approaching the physical limit, where various quantum effects such as direct tunnelling and quantum confinement are observed, even at room temperatures. We have measured standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (CMOSFETs) with wide and short channels at low temperatures to observe single electron/hole characteristics due to local structural disturbances such as roughness and defects. In fact, we observed Coulomb blockades in sub-threshold regimes of both p-type and n-type Si CMOSFETs, showing the presence of quantum dots in the channels. The stability diagrams for the Coulomb blockade were explained by the potential minima due to poly-Si grains. We have also observed sharp current peaks at narrow bias windows at the edges of the Coulomb diamonds, showing resonant tunnelling of single carriers through charge traps.

  2. Peak expiratory flow rate and Pulse Pressure values during the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the peak expiratory flow rate and pulse pressure during the luteal and menstruation phases of the menstrual cycle. The peak expiratory flow rate and pulse pressure were measured using the Wright's Peak Flow Meter and Mercury Sphygmomanometer respectively. The peak expiratory flow rate and ...

  3. Creation of giant two-dimensional crystal of zinc oxide nanodisk by method of single-particle layer of organo-modified inorganic fine particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qi; Honda, Nanami; Uchida, Saki; Hashimoto, Kazuaki; Shibata, Hirobumi; Fujimori, Atsuhiro

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the formation and structure of a single-particle layer of organo-zinc oxide are investigated using surface-pressure-area (π-A) isotherms, out-of-plane X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Further, techniques for achieving the solubilization of inorganic fine particles in general solvents have been proposed, and a single-particle layer has been formed using such an inorganic solution as a "spreading solution" for an interfacial film. Surface modification of ZnO is performed using a long-chain carboxylic acid. Accordingly, a regular arrangement of ZnO can be easily achieved in order to overcome the relatively weak van der Walls interactions between inorganic materials. A condensed Langmuir monolayer of these particles is also formed. A multiparticle layered structure is constructed by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. Out-of-plane XRD measurement results for a single-particle layer of organo-ZnO clearly show a sharp peak at 42 Å. This peak is attributed to the distance between ZnO layers. The AFM image of this single-particle layer of organo-ZnO shows a particle assembly with a uniform height of 60 nm. These aggregated particles form large two-dimensional crystals. In other words, a regular periodic structure along the c-axis and a condensed single-particle layer had been fabricated using Langmuir and LB techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. KiDS-450: cosmological constraints from weak-lensing peak statistics - II: Inference from shear peaks using N-body simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, Nicolas; Schneider, Peter; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Shan, HuanYuan; Asgari, Marika; Dietrich, Jörg P.; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Erben, Thomas; Grado, Aniello; Heymans, Catherine; Hoekstra, Henk; Klaes, Dominik; Kuijken, Konrad; Merten, Julian; Nakajima, Reiko

    2018-02-01

    We study the statistics of peaks in a weak-lensing reconstructed mass map of the first 450 deg2 of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS-450). The map is computed with aperture masses directly applied to the shear field with an NFW-like compensated filter. We compare the peak statistics in the observations with that of simulations for various cosmologies to constrain the cosmological parameter S_8 = σ _8 √{Ω _m/0.3}, which probes the (Ωm, σ8) plane perpendicularly to its main degeneracy. We estimate S8 = 0.750 ± 0.059, using peaks in the signal-to-noise range 0 ≤ S/N ≤ 4, and accounting for various systematics, such as multiplicative shear bias, mean redshift bias, baryon feedback, intrinsic alignment, and shear-position coupling. These constraints are ˜ 25 per cent tighter than the constraints from the high significance peaks alone (3 ≤ S/N ≤ 4) which typically trace single-massive haloes. This demonstrates the gain of information from low-S/N peaks. However, we find that including S/N S8 compared to the shear two-point correlation functions alone, highlighting the great potential of peaks as a cosmological probe.

  5. Peak-valley-peak pattern of histone modifications delineates active regulatory elements and their directionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pundhir, Sachin; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Lauridsen, Felicia Kathrine Bratt

    2016-01-01

    Formation of nucleosome free region (NFR) accompanied by specific histone modifications at flanking nucleosomes is an important prerequisite for enhancer and promoter activity. Due to this process, active regulatory elements often exhibit a distinct shape of histone signal in the form of a peak......-valley-peak (PVP) pattern. However, different features of PVP patterns and their robustness in predicting active regulatory elements have never been systematically analyzed. Here, we present PARE, a novel computational method that systematically analyzes the H3K4me1 or H3K4me3 PVP patterns to predict NFRs. We show...

  6. Touch stimulated pulse generation in biomimetic single-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Onejae; Chun, Hyunsuk; Choi, Eunseok; Choi, Jungbong; Cho, Kyeongwon; Jang, Dongpyo; Chun, Sungwoo; Park, Wanjun; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2016-02-01

    Detecting variation in contact pressure is a separate sensing mode in the human somatosensory system that differs from the detection of pressure magnitude. If pressure magnitude and variation sensing can be achieved simultaneously, an advanced biomimetic tactile system that better emulates human senses may be developed. We report on a novel single-layer graphene based artificial mechanoreceptor that generates a resistance pulse as the contact stimulus passes a specific threshold pressure, mimicking the generation of action potentials in a biological fast-adapting mechanoreceptor. The electric field from a flexible membrane gate electrode placed above a graphene channel raises the Fermi level from the valence band as pressure deflects the membrane. The threshold pressure is reached when the Fermi level crosses the Dirac point in the graphene energy band, which generates a sharp peak in the measured resistance. We found that by changing the gate potential it was possible to modulate the threshold pressure and using a series of graphene channels, a train of pulses were generated during a transient pressurizing stimulus demonstrating biomimetic behaviour.Detecting variation in contact pressure is a separate sensing mode in the human somatosensory system that differs from the detection of pressure magnitude. If pressure magnitude and variation sensing can be achieved simultaneously, an advanced biomimetic tactile system that better emulates human senses may be developed. We report on a novel single-layer graphene based artificial mechanoreceptor that generates a resistance pulse as the contact stimulus passes a specific threshold pressure, mimicking the generation of action potentials in a biological fast-adapting mechanoreceptor. The electric field from a flexible membrane gate electrode placed above a graphene channel raises the Fermi level from the valence band as pressure deflects the membrane. The threshold pressure is reached when the Fermi level crosses the Dirac

  7. THE DETERMINATION OF THE SHARPNESS DEPTH BORDERS AND CORRESPONDING PHOTOGRAPHY AND VIDEO RECORDING PARAMETERS FOR CONTEMPORARY VIDEO TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Zaytseva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of determination of the sharpness depth borders was improved for contemporary video technology. The computer programme for determination of corresponding video recording parameters was created.

  8. Core Promoter Plasticity Between Maize Tissues and Genotypes Contrasts with Predominance of Sharp Transcription Initiation Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Guerra, María Katherine; Li, Wei; Galeano, Narmer F; Vidal, Mabel; Gray, John; Doseff, Andrea I; Grotewold, Erich

    2015-12-01

    Core promoters are crucial for gene regulation, providing blueprints for the assembly of transcriptional machinery at transcription start sites (TSSs). Empirically, TSSs define the coordinates of core promoters and other regulatory sequences. Thus, experimental TSS identification provides an essential step in the characterization of promoters and their features. Here, we describe the application of CAGE (cap analysis of gene expression) to identify genome-wide TSSs used in root and shoot tissues of two maize (Zea mays) inbred lines (B73 and Mo17). Our studies indicate that most TSS clusters are sharp in maize, similar to mice, but distinct from Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, or zebra fish, in which a majority of genes have broad-shaped TSS clusters. We established that ∼38% of maize promoters are characterized by a broader TATA-motif consensus, and this motif is significantly enriched in genes with sharp TSSs. A noteworthy plasticity in TSS usage between tissues and inbreds was uncovered, with ∼1500 genes showing significantly different dominant TSSs, sometimes affecting protein sequence by providing alternate translation initiation codons. We experimentally characterized instances in which this differential TSS utilization results in protein isoforms with additional domains or targeted to distinct subcellular compartments. These results provide important insights into TSS selection and gene expression in an agronomically important crop. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  9. Account for the surface tension in hydraulic modeling of the weir with a sharp threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medzveliya Manana Levanovna

    Full Text Available In the process of calculating and simulating water discharge in free channels it is necessary to know the flow features in case of small values of Reynolds and Weber numbers. The article considers the influence of viscosity and surface tension on the coefficient of a weir flow with sharp threshold. In the article the technique of carrying out experiments is stated, the equation is presented, which considers the influence of all factors: pressure over a spillway threshold, threshold height over a course bottom, speed of liquid, liquid density, dynamic viscosity, superficial tension, gravity acceleration, unit discharge, the width of the course. The surface tension and liquid density for the applied liquids changed a little. In the rectangular tray (6000x100x200 spillway with a sharp threshold was established. It is shown that weir flow coefficient depends on Reynolds number (in case Re < ~ 2000 and Webers number. A generalized expression for determining weir flow coefficient considering the influence of the forces of viscosity and surface tension is received.

  10. Design and experimentation of an empirical multistructure framework for accurate, sharp and reliable hydrological ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiller, G.; Anctil, F.; Roy, R.

    2017-09-01

    This paper outlines the design and experimentation of an Empirical Multistructure Framework (EMF) for lumped conceptual hydrological modeling. This concept is inspired from modular frameworks, empirical model development, and multimodel applications, and encompasses the overproduce and select paradigm. The EMF concept aims to reduce subjectivity in conceptual hydrological modeling practice and includes model selection in the optimisation steps, reducing initial assumptions on the prior perception of the dominant rainfall-runoff transformation processes. EMF generates thousands of new modeling options from, for now, twelve parent models that share their functional components and parameters. Optimisation resorts to ensemble calibration, ranking and selection of individual child time series based on optimal bias and reliability trade-offs, as well as accuracy and sharpness improvement of the ensemble. Results on 37 snow-dominated Canadian catchments and 20 climatically-diversified American catchments reveal the excellent potential of the EMF in generating new individual model alternatives, with high respective performance values, that may be pooled efficiently into ensembles of seven to sixty constitutive members, with low bias and high accuracy, sharpness, and reliability. A group of 1446 new models is highlighted to offer good potential on other catchments or applications, based on their individual and collective interests. An analysis of the preferred functional components reveals the importance of the production and total flow elements. Overall, results from this research confirm the added value of ensemble and flexible approaches for hydrological applications, especially in uncertain contexts, and open up new modeling possibilities.

  11. The Vioxx pharmaceutical scandal: Peterson v Merke Sharpe & Dohme (Aust) Pty Ltd (2010) 184 FCR 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas; Townsend, Ruth; McEwan, Alexandra

    2010-09-01

    In early March 2010, Federal Court Justice Jessup in Peterson v Merke Sharpe & Dohme (Aust) Pty Ltd (2010) 184 FCR 1 ruled that Merke Sharpe & Dohme Pty Ltd had produced a defective product contrary to the Trade Practices Act 1974 (Cth), the anti-arthritic drug Vioxx. Promoted as relieving arthritic pain without the side effect of gastric ulceration, the drug also doubled the risk of heart attack in those prescribed it. The court also heard that the manufacturing company had engaged in misleading practices to promote the prescription and usage of Vioxx, including "fake" journals and guidelines to "drug reps" that minimised the adverse cardiovascular risks. The manufacturer had already settled a class action in the United States for more than US$7 billion for those harmed by the drug but this was the first such case to be decided in Australia. The court awarded the applicant, Graeme Peterson, A$300,000 in damages. This column examines this judgment and analyses evidence there presented that Merck may have misled the scientific community, the medical profession and Australia's drug regulation system to get Vioxx on the market and keep it there. It considers whether the case reveals the need for more rigorous post-marketing surveillance and other changes to Australia's drug regulatory system, including a replacement of self-regulation in pharmaceutical promotion with a United States-style system of rewarded informant-led criminal penalties and civil damages claims.

  12. On the sharpness of a superconvergence estimate in connection with one-dimensional Galerkin methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goebbels StJ

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper studies some aspects of approximation theory in the context of one-dimensional Galerkin methods. The phenomenon of superconvergence at the knots is well-known. Indeed, for smooth solutions the rate of convergence at these points is instead of , where is the degree of the finite element space. In order to achieve a corresponding result for less smooth functions, we apply K-functional techniques to a Jackson-type inequality and estimate the relevant error by a modulus of continuity. Furthermore, this error estimate requires no additional assumptions on the solution, and it turns out that it is sharp in connection with general Lipschitz classes. The proof of the sharpness is based upon a quantitative extension of the uniform boundedness principle in connection with some ideas of Douglas and Dupont [Numer. Math. 22] (1974 99–109. Here it is crucial to design a sequence of test functions such that a Jackson–Bernstein-type inequality and a resonance condition are satisfied simultaneously.

  13. Critical applied stresses for a crack initiation from a sharp V-notch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Náhlík

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to estimate a value of the critical applied stress for a crack initiation from a sharp V-notch tip. The classical approach of the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LELM was generalized, because the stress singularity exponent differs from 0.5 in the studied case. The value of the stress singularity exponent depends on the V-notch opening angle. The finite element method was used for a determination of stress distribution in the vicinity of the sharp V-notch tip and for the estimation of the generalized stress intensity factor depending on the V-notch opening angle. Critical value of the generalized stress intensity factor was obtained using stability criteria based on the opening stress component averaged over a critical distance d from the V-notch tip and generalized strain energy density factor. Calculated values of the critical applied stresses were compared with experimental data from the literature and applicability of the LEFM concept is discussed.

  14. Unusually sharp paramagnetic phase transition in thin film Fe3Pt invar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drisko, Jasper; Cumings, John

    2013-03-01

    Invar alloys, typically 3d transition metal rich systems, are most commonly known for their extremely low coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) over a wide range of temperatures close to room temperature. This anomalous behavior in the CTE lends Invar to a variety of important applications in precision mechanical devices, scientific instruments, and sensors, among others. Many theoretical models of Invar have been proposed over the years, the most promising of which is a system described by two coexisting phases, one high-spin high-volume and the other low-spin low-volume, that compete to stabilize the volume of the material as the temperature is changed. However, no theory has yet been able to explain all experimental observations across the range of Invar alloys, especially at finite temperature. We have fabricated thin films of a Fe3Pt Invar alloy and investigate them using Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). 23nm films are deposited onto SiN membrane substrates via radio-frequency magnetron sputtering from a pure Fe target decorated with Pt pieces. We observe novel magnetic domain structures and an unusually sharp phase transition between ferromagnetic (FM) and paramagnetic (PM) regions of the film under a temperature gradient. This sharp transition suggests that the FM-to-PM transition may be first order, perhaps containing a structural-elastic component to the order parameter. However, electron diffraction reveals that both the FM and PM regions have the same FCC crystal structure.

  15. Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  16. OccuPeak: ChIP-Seq peak calling based on internal background modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Bouke A.; van Duijvenboden, Karel; van den Boogaard, Malou; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Barnett, Phil; Ruijter, Jan M.

    2014-01-01

    ChIP-seq has become a major tool for the genome-wide identification of transcription factor binding or histone modification sites. Most peak-calling algorithms require input control datasets to model the occurrence of background reads to account for local sequencing and GC bias. However, the

  17. Can You Hear That Peak? Utilization of Auditory and Visual Feedback at Peak Limb Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loria, Tristan; de Grosbois, John; Tremblay, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: At rest, the central nervous system combines and integrates multisensory cues to yield an optimal percept. When engaging in action, the relative weighing of sensory modalities has been shown to be altered. Because the timing of peak velocity is the critical moment in some goal-directed movements (e.g., overarm throwing), the current study…

  18. [Somewhere in tertiary hospital clinical laboratory in pursuance of personnel sharp injury incidence status investigation and relative factor analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, E; Li, W H; Wang, P; Jian, X D

    2016-07-20

    Objective: Investigation in tertiary hospital clinical laboratory in pursuance of the current state of the sharp injury incidence and influencing factors, analyze the causes and discuss the control strategy. Methods: Application of cross-sectional survey method, according to the unified investigation questionnaire investigation, with chi-square test and the multi-factor Logistic regression analysis methods to analyze research data. Results: The work environment exit contact with injection needles, glass and other sharps, contact with noise, contact with chemicals, contact the patient's blood and other biological specimens, high-risk groups, the patient and family to negative emotions, by patients and their families complain or abuse related influencing factors. In the organization and management factors, in order to work strength is insufficient for the most dissatisfied, protective equipment, medical staff personal cognitive factors of occupational exposure, failing to abide by the medical care standard operation and high incidence after exposure to failed to report. Somewhere in tertiary hospital clinical laboratory in pursuance of the incidence of sharps injuries associated with five factors: different jobs, working strength, protective equipment perfect or not, sharp instrument use and disposal of medical wastes. Conclusion: Tertiary hospital clinical laboratory in pursuance of the incidence of sharp injury related to many factors, Hospitals should formulate corresponding rules and regulations, improve the working environment, the standard safety operation, reduced the incidence of sharps injuries.

  19. Analysis of induction mechanisms of an insulin-inducible transcription factor SHARP-2 gene by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneishi, Ayumi; Takagi, Katsuhiro; Asano, Kosuke; Nakamura, Soichiro; Yamada, Kazuya

    2012-10-03

    The rat enhancer of split- and hairy-related protein-2 (SHARP-2) is an insulin-inducible transcription factor. In this study, we examined the mechanism(s) involved in the regulation of the rat SHARP-2 gene expression by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). The induction of SHARP-2 mRNA by EGCG was repressed by pretreatments with inhibitors for either phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) or RNA polymerase II. Then, we examined a biological relationship between EGCG and transcription factor NF-κB interfering with the insulin action. The protein levels of the NF-κB were rapidly decreased by an EGCG treatment. Finally, the mechanism(s) of transcriptional activation of the rat SHARP-2 gene by both NF-κB and EGCG was analyzed. While overexpression of the NF-κB p65 protein decreased the promoter activity of the SHARP-2 gene, EGCG did not affect it. Thus, we conclude that EGCG induces the expression of the rat SHARP-2 gene via both the PI3K pathway and degradation of the NF-κB p65 protein.

  20. Lander petal & Twin Peaks - 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes. A lander petal, airbag, and the rear ramp are at the lower area of the image.The image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) after its deployment on Sol 3. Mars Pathfinder was developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  1. North Twin Peak in super resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This pair of images shows the result of taking a sequence of 25 identical exposures from the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) of the northern Twin Peak, with small camera motions, and processing them with the Super-Resolution algorithm developed at NASA's Ames Research Center.The upper image is a representative input image, scaled up by a factor of five, with the pixel edges smoothed out for a fair comparison. The lower image allows significantly finer detail to be resolved.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.The super-resolution research was conducted by Peter Cheeseman, Bob Kanefsky, Robin Hanson, and John Stutz of NASA's Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA. More information on this technology is available on the Ames Super Resolution home page athttp://ic-www.arc.nasa.gov/ic/projects/bayes-group/ group/super-res/

  2. Prediction of iodine activity peak during refuelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hozer, Z.; Vajda, N.

    2001-01-01

    The increase of fission product activities in the primary circuit of a nuclear power plant indicates the existence of defects in some fuel rods. The power change leads to the cooling down of the fuel and results in the fragmentation of the UO 2 pellets, which facilitates the release of fission products from the intergranular regions. Furthermore the injection of boric acid after shutdown will increase the primary activity, due to the solution of deposited fission products from the surface of the core components. The calculation of these phenomena usually is based on the evaluation of activity measurements and power plant data. The estimation of iodine spiking peak during reactor transients is based on correlation with operating parameters, such as reactor power and primary pressure. The approach used in the present method was applied for CANDU reactors. The VVER-440 specific correlations were determined using the activity measurements of the Paks NPP and the data provided by the Russian fuel supplier. The present method is used for the evaluation of the iodine isotopes, as well as the noble gases. A numerical model has been developed for iodine spiking simulation and has been validated against several shutdown transients, measured at Paks NPP. (R.P.)

  3. Human behavioral complexity peaks at age 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Random Item Generation tasks (RIG) are commonly used to assess high cognitive abilities such as inhibition or sustained attention. They also draw upon our approximate sense of complexity. A detrimental effect of aging on pseudo-random productions has been demonstrated for some tasks, but little is as yet known about the developmental curve of cognitive complexity over the lifespan. We investigate the complexity trajectory across the lifespan of human responses to five common RIG tasks, using a large sample (n = 3429). Our main finding is that the developmental curve of the estimated algorithmic complexity of responses is similar to what may be expected of a measure of higher cognitive abilities, with a performance peak around 25 and a decline starting around 60, suggesting that RIG tasks yield good estimates of such cognitive abilities. Our study illustrates that very short strings of, i.e., 10 items, are sufficient to have their complexity reliably estimated and to allow the documentation of an age-dependent decline in the approximate sense of complexity. PMID:28406953

  4. Human behavioral complexity peaks at age 25.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Gauvrit

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Random Item Generation tasks (RIG are commonly used to assess high cognitive abilities such as inhibition or sustained attention. They also draw upon our approximate sense of complexity. A detrimental effect of aging on pseudo-random productions has been demonstrated for some tasks, but little is as yet known about the developmental curve of cognitive complexity over the lifespan. We investigate the complexity trajectory across the lifespan of human responses to five common RIG tasks, using a large sample (n = 3429. Our main finding is that the developmental curve of the estimated algorithmic complexity of responses is similar to what may be expected of a measure of higher cognitive abilities, with a performance peak around 25 and a decline starting around 60, suggesting that RIG tasks yield good estimates of such cognitive abilities. Our study illustrates that very short strings of, i.e., 10 items, are sufficient to have their complexity reliably estimated and to allow the documentation of an age-dependent decline in the approximate sense of complexity.

  5. Quantifying the effects of zoned cooling systems on household peak electricity demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomanowski, Bartosz; Haddad, Kamel [Cammet, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    In Canada, significant temperature changes occur during the year with important peaks. Most residential apartments use a single thermostat to control heating and cooling, however those systems result in unbalanced delivery and high costs. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential benefits of a zoned cooling system during peak summer days. A building energy simulation model was developed and simulations were performed on the Canadian Centre for Housing Technology's representative test house with different control strategies for peak summer days in Southern Ontario. Results showed that the effectiveness of a control strategy depends on the capacity of the system to meet the peak loads and that gradually decreasing the set point is better than a sudden drop. In addition, the implementation of passive cooling measures was found to reduce power consumption considerably and increase the effectiveness of the control strategy.

  6. Peak fitting and identification software library for high resolution gamma-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uher, Josef; Roach, Greg; Tickner, James

    2010-01-01

    A new gamma-ray spectral analysis software package is under development in our laboratory. It can be operated as a stand-alone program or called as a software library from Java, C, C++ and MATLAB TM environments. It provides an advanced graphical user interface for data acquisition, spectral analysis and radioisotope identification. The code uses a peak-fitting function that includes peak asymmetry, Compton continuum and flexible background terms. Peak fitting function parameters can be calibrated as functions of energy. Each parameter can be constrained to improve fitting of overlapping peaks. All of these features can be adjusted by the user. To assist with peak identification, the code can automatically measure half-lives of single or multiple overlapping peaks from a time series of spectra. It implements library-based peak identification, with options for restricting the search based on radioisotope half-lives and reaction types. The software also improves the reliability of isotope identification by utilizing Monte-Carlo simulation results.

  7. Dispersion-convolution model for simulating peaks in a flow injection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Su-Cheng; Lai, Yee-Hwong; Chiao, Ling-Yun; Yu, Tiing

    2007-01-12

    A dispersion-convolution model is proposed for simulating peak shapes in a single-line flow injection system. It is based on the assumption that an injected sample plug is expanded due to a "bulk" dispersion mechanism along the length coordinate, and that after traveling over a distance or a period of time, the sample zone will develop into a Gaussian-like distribution. This spatial pattern is further transformed to a temporal coordinate by a convolution process, and finally a temporal peak image is generated. The feasibility of the proposed model has been examined by experiments with various coil lengths, sample sizes and pumping rates. An empirical dispersion coefficient (D*) can be estimated by using the observed peak position, height and area (tp*, h* and At*) from a recorder. An empirical temporal shift (Phi*) can be further approximated by Phi*=D*/u2, which becomes an important parameter in the restoration of experimental peaks. Also, the dispersion coefficient can be expressed as a second-order polynomial function of the pumping rate Q, for which D*(Q)=delta0+delta1Q+delta2Q2. The optimal dispersion occurs at a pumping rate of Qopt=sqrt[delta0/delta2]. This explains the interesting "Nike-swoosh" relationship between the peak height and pumping rate. The excellent coherence of theoretical and experimental peak shapes confirms that the temporal distortion effect is the dominating reason to explain the peak asymmetry in flow injection analysis.

  8. Research Opportunities at Storm Peak Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation of 3210 m MSL (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. The ridge-top location produces almost daily transition from free tropospheric to boundary layer air which occurs near midday in both summer and winter seasons. Long-term observations at SPL document the role of orographically induced mixing and convection on vertical pollutant transport and dispersion. During winter, SPL is above cloud base 25% of the time, providing a unique capability for studying aerosol-cloud interactions (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). A comprehensive set of continuous aerosol measurements was initiated at SPL in 2002. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a cold room for precipitation and cloud rime ice sample handling and ice crystal microphotography, a 150 m2 roof deck area for outside sampling equipment, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. The laboratory is currently well equipped for aerosol and cloud measurements. Particles are sampled from an insulated, 15 cm diameter manifold within approximately 1 m of its horizontal entry point through an outside wall. The 4 m high vertical section outside the building is capped with an inverted can to exclude large particles.

  9. Ultrasonic attenuation peak in steel and aluminum alloy during rotating bending fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogi, Hirotsugu; Hamaguchi, Takayuki; Hirao, Masahiko

    2000-04-01

    Using electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR), the authors studied the evolution of the surface shear wave attenuation and phase velocity in a 0.45 pct C steel and a 5052 aluminum alloy exposed to rotating bending fatigue. In the EMAR method, they used electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) for the contactless measurements of the axial shear wave, which is a surface shear wave that propagates along a cylindrical surface in the circumferential direction, with an axial polarization. There has been no precious report of continuous and contactless monitoring of the surface wave attenuation and velocity being performed without interrupting the fatigue. The attenuation coefficient always showed sharp peaks around 90 pct of the fatigue life, independent of the fatigue-stress amplitude. To interpret this phenomenon, the authors made crack-growth observations using replicas and measurements of recovery of attenuation and velocity by stopping the cyclic loading before and after the peak. From these results, they concluded that the evolution of the ultrasonic properties is caused by a drastic change in dislocation mobility being accompanied by the crack growth at the final stage of the fatigue life.

  10. Ultrasonic attenuation peak in steel and aluminum alloy during rotating bending fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogi, Hirotsugu; Hamaguchi, Takayuki; Hirao, Masahiko

    2000-04-01

    Using electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR), we studied the evolution of the surface shearwave attenuation and phase velocity in a 0.45 pct C steel and a 5052 aluminum alloy exposed to rotating bending fatigue. In the EMAR method, we used electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) for the contactless measurements of the axial shear wave, which is a surface shear wave that propagates along a cylindrical surface in the circumferential direction, with an axial polarization. There has been no previous report of continuous and contactless monitoring of the surface wave attenuation and velocity being performed without interrupting the fatigue. The attenuation coefficient always showed sharp peaks around 90 pct of the fatigue life, independent of the fatigue-stress amplitude. To interpret this phenomenon, we made crack-growth observations using replicas and measurements of recovery of attenuation and velocity by stopping the cyclic loading before and after the peak. From these results, we concluded that the evolution of the ultrasonic properties is caused by a drastic change in dislocation mobility being accompanied by the crack growth at the final stage of the fatigue life.

  11. Evaluation of peak overlap in migration-time distributions determined by organelle capillary electrophoresis: Type-II error analogy based on statistical-overlap theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joe M; Arriaga, Edgar A

    2009-08-28

    Organelles commonly are separated by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser-induced-fluorescence detection. Usually, it is assumed that peaks observed in the CE originate from single organelles, with negligible occurrence of peak overlap. Under this assumption, migration-time and mobility distributions are obtained by partitioning the CE into different regions and counting the number of observed peaks in each region. In this paper, criteria based on statistical-overlap theory (SOT) are developed to test the assumption of negligible peak overlap and to predict conditions for its validity. For regions of the CE having constant peak density, the numbers of peaks (i.e., intensity profiles of single organelles) and observed peaks (i.e., maxima) are modeled by probability distributions. For minor peak overlap, the distributions partially merge, and their mergence is described by an analogy to the Type-II error of hypothesis testing. Criteria are developed for the amount of peak overlap, at which the number of observed peaks has an 85% or 90% probability of lying within the 95% confidence interval of the number of peaks of single organelles. For this or smaller amounts of peak overlap, the number of observed peaks is a good approximation to the number of peaks. A simple procedure is developed for evaluating peak overlap, requiring determination of only the peak standard deviation, the duration of the region occupied by peaks, and the number of observed peaks in the region. The procedure can be applied independently to each region of the partitioned CE. The procedure is applied to a mitochondrial CE.

  12. Analysis of the same day of the week increases in peak electricity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modelling of the same day of the week increases in peak electricity demand improves the reliability of a power network if an accurate assessment of the level and frequency of future extreme load forecasts is carried out. Key words: Gibbs sampling, generalized single pareto, generalized pareto distribution, pareto quantile ...

  13. Analysis of the same day of the week increases in peak electricity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Modelling of the same day of the week increases in peak electricity demand using the Gener- alized Pareto-type (GP-type) distribution is discussed. The GP-type distribution discussed in this paper has one parameter to estimate and as such, it is referred to as the Generalized. Single Pareto (GSP). The data is from ...

  14. Plasmid DNA damage by heavy ions at spread-out Bragg peak energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dang, H. M.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlatholter, T.

    2010-01-01

    Interaction of ionizing radiation with plasmid DNA can lead to formation of single strand breaks, double strand breaks and clustered lesions. We have investigated the response of the synthetic plasmid pBR322 in aqueous solution upon irradiation with (12)C ions under spread-out Bragg peak conditions

  15. Impact of peak electricity demand in distribution grids: a stress test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteen, Gerwin; Molderink, Albert; Hurink, Johann L.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Schuring, Friso; Kootstra, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The number of (hybrid) electric vehicles is growing, leading to a higher demand for electricity in distribution grids. To investigate the effects of the expected peak demand on distribution grids, a stress test with 15 electric vehicles in a single street is conducted and described in this paper.

  16. Choquet and Shilov Boundaries, Peak Sets, and Peak Points for Real Banach Function Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Alimohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Let be a compact Hausdorff space and let be a topological involution on . In 1988, Kulkarni and Arundhathi studied Choquet and Shilov boundaries for real uniform function algebras on . Then in 2000, Kulkarni and Limaye studied the concept of boundaries and Choquet sets for uniformly closed real subspaces and subalgebras of or . In 1971, Dales obtained some properties of peak sets and p-sets for complex Banach function algebras on . Later in 1990, Arundhathi presented some results on peak sets for real uniform function algebras on . In this paper, while we present a brief account of the work of others, we extend some of their results, either to real subspaces of or to real Banach function algebras on .

  17. Sharp error terms and neccesary conditions for exponential hitting times in mixing processes

    CERN Document Server

    Abadi, M G

    2001-01-01

    We prove an upper bound for the error in the exponential approximation of the hitting time law of a rare event in $\\alpha$-mixing processes with exponential decay, $\\phi$-mixing processes with a summable function $\\phi$ and for general $\\psi$-mixing processes with a finite alphabet. In the first case the bound is uniform as a function of the measure of the event. In the last two cases the bound depends also on the time scale $t$. This allow us to get further statistical properties as the ratio convergence of the expected hitting time and the expected return time. A uniform bound is a consequence. We present an example that shows that this bound is sharp. We also prove that second moments are not necessary for having the exponential law. Moreover, we prove a necessary condition for having the exponential limit law.

  18. Imaging diagnostics of pulsed plasma discharges in saline generated with various sharp pin powered electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimakoulas, L.; Karim, M. L.; Dostal, L.; Krcma, F.; Graham, W. G.; Field, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    Plasmas formed by 1 ms pulses of between 180 and 300 V applied to sharp pin-like electrodes immersed in saline solution have been imaged with a Photron SA-X2 fast framing camera and an Andor iStar 510 ICCD camera. Stainless steel, Tungsten and Gold electrodes were investigated with tip diameters of 30 μm, 1 μm and volume, which appears to move about, but remains close to the tip. In the case of Tungsten with higher voltages or longer pulses the tip of the needle can heat up to incandescent temperatures. At higher voltages shock wave fronts appear to be observed as the vapour layer collapses at the end of the voltage pulse. Backlighting and no lighting to observe bubble/vapour layer formation and emission due to plasma formation were employed. Sometimes at higher voltages a thicker vapour layer engulfs the tip and no plasma emission/current is observed.

  19. Sharp asymptotic estimates for vorticity solutions of the 2D Navier-Stokes equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuncheng You

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The asymptotic dynamics of high-order temporal-spatial derivatives of the two-dimensional vorticity and velocity of an incompressible, viscous fluid flow in $mathbb{R}^2$ are studied, which is equivalent to the 2D Navier-Stokes equation. It is known that for any integrable initial vorticity, the 2D vorticity solution converges to the Oseen vortex. In this paper, sharp exterior decay estimates of the temporal-spatial derivatives of the vorticity solution are established. These estimates are then used and combined with similarity and $L^p$ compactness to show the asymptotical attraction rates of temporal-spatial derivatives of generic 2D vorticity and velocity solutions by the Oseen vortices and velocity solutions respectively. The asymptotic estimates and the asymptotic attraction rates of all the derivatives obtained in this paper are independent of low or high Reynolds numbers.

  20. On the Photometric Variability of Very Sharp-lined Cool mCP Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyper, Diane M.; Adelman, Saul J.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the photometric variability of very sharp-lined cool mCP stars from a list published in 1970 by Dr. George W. Preston who suggested that some belonged to the long-period tail of the period distribution. In this study, we discuss our Strömgren uvby observations obtained with the Four College Automated Photometric Telescope (FCAPT) at the Fairborn Observatory for 22 of the stars in Preston’s list. We improved the periods of 11 stars. Further, we discuss results from the literature concerning the light, magnetic, and spectrum variability of these stars. Eleven of the stars are found to have periods longer than 20 days, and all but one of these stars display variations in the u and v filters that cannot be explained by the simple oblique rotator theory. We discuss some possible causes of this behavior.

  1. Sharp tooth induced sublingual hematoma in a patient with elevated international normalized ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Baliah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sublingual hematoma secondary to anticoagulation is a rare fatal condition. Hemorrhagic complications of warfarin are well-known. This particular case is unique because the patient was on warfarin for the past 2 years but did not develop the sublingual hematoma. However, a trauma by an attrited sharp cusp triggered the episode of the sublingual hematoma in this patient. Being a medical emergency, patient was promptly hospitalized in cardiac care unit and managed by medical team. The patient was transfused with 2 units of fresh frozen plasma and warfarin was temporarily stopped for 4 days. Alternate day regimen of warfarin was started after 4 days, and international normalized ratio dropped to 3. In dental management, enameloplasty of the mandibular first molar tooth was done to prevent trauma and ulcer development in the floor of the mouth. The hematoma resolved, and no new hematoma formation was observed for a period of 6 months.

  2. An Eulerian method for computation of multimaterial impact with ENO shock-capturing and sharp interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Udaykumar, H S; Belk, D M; Vanden, K J

    2003-01-01

    A technique is presented for the numerical simulation of high-speed multimaterial impact. Of particular interest is the interaction of solid impactors with targets. The computations are performed on a fixed Cartesian mesh by casting the equations governing material deformation in Eulerian conservation law form. The advantage of the Eulerian setting is the disconnection of the mesh from the boundary deformation allowing for large distortions of the interfaces. Eigenvalue analysis reveals that the system of equations is hyperbolic for the range of materials and impact velocities of interest. High-order accurate ENO shock-capturing schemes are used along with interface tracking techniques to evolve sharp immersed boundaries. The numerical technique is designed to tackle the following physical phenomena encountered during impact: (1) high velocities of impact leading to large deformations of the impactor as well as targets; (2) nonlinear wave-propagation and the development of shocks in the materials; (3) modelin...

  3. Cutaneous cut sign: A clue to self inflicted carving on the body by sharp object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Namdeorao Ambade

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Suicide notes are usually written with pen or marker on a paper, notebook, wall or mirror. However, suicide notes written on one’s own body is very rare, and suicide note engraved with some metallic object on the body has not been reported yet. In the present suicidal death, the victim while carving some letters on the left arm with a razor had an incidental cut on right thumb. This incidental cut on the palm may be referred as “cutaneous cut sign” which gives a clue that the carving on the body with a sharp object was written by the victim himself. It also provides an additional importance of examination of palm for the presence of supportive evidences.

  4. Confidence Hills Mineralogy and Chemin Results from Base of Mt. Sharp, Pahrump Hills, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, P. D.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Achilles, C. N.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity recently completed its fourth drill sampling of sediments on Mars. The Confidence Hills (CH) sample was drilled from a rock located in the Pahrump Hills region at the base of Mt. Sharp in Gale Crater. The CheMin X-ray diffractometer completed five nights of analysis on the sample, more than previously executed for a drill sample, and the data have been analyzed using Rietveld refinement and full-pattern fitting to determine quantitative mineralogy. Confidence Hills mineralogy has several important characteristics: 1) abundant hematite and lesser magnetite; 2) a 10 angstrom phyllosilicate; 3) multiple feldspars including plagioclase and alkali feldspar; 4) mafic silicates including forsterite, orthopyroxene, and two types of clinopyroxene (Ca-rich and Ca-poor), consistent with a basaltic source; and 5) minor contributions from sulfur-bearing species including jarosite.

  5. Multiple sharp force injuries to the head - the crime of passion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The Institute of Forensic Medicine was founded by Professor Milovan Milovanović (1884- 1948 in 1923 as part of School of Medicine of the University of Belgrade, and also established the Institute’s forensic collection worthy of a museum. This paper illustrates the way Professor Milovanović made this collection into a teaching aid for student education. We present a case of crime of passion from the year 1931, from our Institute’s collection. Case Outline. The victim was a 30-year-old woman with multiple stab wounds of the head, neck and arms. It was noted in the case history that the deceased woman was a maid with a wealthy merchant, as well as that she had “dubious morals” for that time, with three wooers at the same time. Injuries to the forearms and the index finger prove that the victim tried to defend herself. In the autopsy record there is a drawn figure of a kitchen knife with a rounded blade tip, which explains the absence of stab wounds to the skull, and the presence of the impression skull fractures and crushed skull bones. It was concluded that the death occurred due to exsanguination, in turn due to transection of the left carotid artery, probably caused by sharp force, while the manner of death was homicide. Some of the most prominent autopsy findings were multiple mutilating overkill sharp force injuries, localized on the head, indicated sexually motivated murder. Conclusion. Combining the museum specimen, diagrams with injuries, drawn figure of the kitchen knife used, and photographs taken during the autopsy and the police investigation, Professor Milovanović was able to properly illustrate this intriguing case to students without a computer or a PowerPoint presentation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45005

  6. On the making of sharp longitudinal dose profiles with helical tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissick, Michael W.; Flynn, Ryan T.; Westerly, David C.; Rockwell Mackie, Thomas; Hoban, Peter W.

    2007-11-01

    Since the beam width on the helical tomotherapy machine produced by TomoTherapy Inc., is typically a few centimeters in the longitudinal direction (into the bore), the optimizer must choose to have a relatively high intensity local to the inside edge of a tumor or planning treatment volume (PTV) when avoiding an immediately adjacent organ at risk (OAR), either superior or inferior. By using a standalone version of the TomoTherapy dose calculator, a realistic beam is applied to idealized deconvolution schemes including the MATLAB Optimizer Toolbox™ for a simple one-dimensional PTV with adjacent OARs. The results are compared to a clinical example on the TomoTherapy planning station. It is learned that a Gibbs phenomenon type of oscillation in the dose within the tumor under these special circumstances is not unique to TomoTherapy, but is related to the attempt to form a sharp dose gradient—sharper than the beam profile with typical optimization constraints set to achieve a uniform dose as close as possible to the prescription. The clinical implication is that the Gibbs-induced cold spots force the dose to increase in the PTV if a typical PTV dose-volume constraint is used. It is recommended that the dose prescription be smoothed prior to optimization or the dosimetric goals for an OAR adjacent to the PTV are such that a sharp dose falloff is not demanded, especially if the user reduces the requirements that such an OAR be of both high importance and immediately adjacent to the PTV edge.

  7. Multiple Sharp Force Injuries to the Head - The Crime of Passion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Slobodan; Živković, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Forensic Medicine was founded by Professor Milovan Milovanovid (1884-1948) in 1923 as part of School of Medicine of the University of Belgrade, and also established the Institute's forensic collection worthy of a museum.This paper illustrates the way Professor Milovanovie made this collection into a teaching aid for student education. We present a case of crime of passion from the year 1931, from our Institute's collection. The victim was a 30-year-old woman with multiple stab wounds of the head, neck and arms. It was noted in the case history that the deceased woman was a maid with a wealthy merchant, as well as that she had "dubious morals" for that time, with three wooers at the same time. Injuries to the forearms and the index finger prove that the victim tried to defend herself. In the autopsy record there is a drawn figure of a kitchen knife with a rounded blade tip, which explains the absence of stab wounds to the skull, and the presence of the impression skull fractures and crushed skull bones. It was concluded that the death occurred due to exsanguination, in turn due to transection of the left carotid artery, probably caused by sharp force, while the manner of death was homicide. Some of the most prominent autopsy findings were multiple mutilating overkill sharp force injuries, localized on the head, indicated sexually motivated murder. Combining the museum specimen, diagrams with injuries, drawn figure of the kitchen knife used, and photographs taken during the autopsy and the police investigation, Professor Milovanovie was able to properly illustrate this intriguing case to students without a computer or a PowerPoint presentation.

  8. Towards machine learned quality control: A benchmark for sharpness quantification in digital pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, Gabriele; Rajanna, Arjun R; Corsale, Lorraine; Schüffler, Peter J; Yagi, Yukako; Fuchs, Thomas J

    2017-09-25

    Pathology is on the verge of a profound change from an analog and qualitative to a digital and quantitative discipline. This change is mostly driven by the high-throughput scanning of microscope slides in modern pathology departments, reaching tens of thousands of digital slides per month. The resulting vast digital archives form the basis of clinical use in digital pathology and allow large scale machine learning in computational pathology. One of the most crucial bottlenecks of high-throughput scanning is quality control (QC). Currently, digital slides are screened manually to detected out-of-focus regions, to compensate for the limitations of scanner software. We present a solution to this problem by introducing a benchmark dataset for blur detection, an in-depth comparison of state-of-the art sharpness descriptors and their prediction performance within a random forest framework. Furthermore, we show that convolution neural networks, like residual networks, can be used to train blur detectors from scratch. We thoroughly evaluate the accuracy of feature based and deep learning based approaches for sharpness classification (99.74% accuracy) and regression (MSE 0.004) and additionally compare them to domain experts in a comprehensive human perception study. Our pipeline outputs spacial heatmaps enabling to quantify and localize blurred areas on a slide. Finally, we tested the proposed framework in the clinical setting and demonstrate superior performance over the state-of-the-art QC pipeline comprising commercial software and human expert inspection by reducing the error rate from 17% to 4.7%. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. High yield polyol synthesis of round- and sharp-end silver nanowires with high aspect ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekahi, A.; Marashi, S.P.H., E-mail: pmarashi@aut.ac.ir; Fatmesari, D. Haghshenas

    2016-12-01

    Long silver nanowires (average length of 28 μm, average aspect ratio of 130) with uniform diameter along their length were produced by polyol synthesis of AgNO{sub 3} in ethylene glycol in the presence of PVP as preferential growth agent. Nanowires were produced with no addition of chloride salts such as NaCl or CuCl{sub 2} (or other additives such as Na{sub 2}S) which are usually used for lowering reduction rate of Ag ions by additional etchant of O{sub 2}/Cl{sup −}. Lower reduction rate was obtained by increasing the injection time of PVP and AgNO{sub 3} solutions, which was the significant factor in the formation of nanowires. Therefore, there was enough time for reduced Ag atoms to be deposited preferentially in the direction of PVP chains, resulting in high yield (the fraction of nanowires in the products) of nanowires (more than 95%) with high aspect ratio. The produced nanowires had both round- and sharp-ends with pentagonal cross section. Higher energy level of Ag atoms in borders of MTPs, which increases the dissolution rate of precipitated atoms, in addition to partial melting of MTPs at high synthesis temperatures, leads to the curving of the surfaces of exposed (111) crystalline planes in some MTPs and the formation of round-end silver nanowires. - Highlights: • Long silver nanowires with high aspect ratio of 130 were produced. • More than 95% nanowires were produced in products. • The produced nanowires had round- and sharp-ends with pentagonal cross section. • Additives were needed neither for high yield synthesis nor for round-end nanowires. • Melting and etching of MTPs in high energy borders resulted to round-end nanowires.

  10. Improving EEG signal peak detection using feature weight learning ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asrul Adam

    Neural network with random weights (NNRW); feature weight learning (FWL); electroencephalogram (EEG); peak detection algorithm; pattern recognition; particle swarm optimization (PSO). 1. Introduction. The utilization of peak detection algorithms has emerged as a useful tool in several physiological signal applications,.

  11. PEAK TRACKING WITH A NEURAL NETWORK FOR SPECTRAL RECOGNITION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COENEGRACHT, PMJ; METTING, HJ; VANLOO, EM; SNOEIJER, GJ; DOORNBOS, DA

    1993-01-01

    A peak tracking method based on a simulated feed-forward neural network with back-propagation is presented. The network uses the normalized UV spectra and peak areas measured in one chromatogram for peak recognition. It suffices to train the network with only one set of spectra recorded in one

  12. Determination of the upper limit of a peak area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helene, O.

    1990-03-01

    This paper reports the procedure to extract an upper limit of a peak area in a multichannel spectrum. This procedure takes into account the finite shape of the peak and the uncertanties in the background and in the expected position of the peak. (author) [pt

  13. Design and initial performance of SHARP, a polarimeter for the SHARC-II camera at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Dowell, C. D.; Kirby, L.; Novak, G.; Vaillancourt, J. E.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a foreoptics module that converts the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera generation II (SHARC-II) camera at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory into a sensitive imaging polarimeter at wavelengths of 350 and 450 μm. We refer to this module as "SHARP." SHARP splits the incident radiation into two orthogonally polarized beams that are then reimaged onto opposite ends of the 32×12 pixel detector array in SHARC-II. A rotating half-wave plate is used just upstream from the polarization-splitting optics. The effect of SHARP is to convert SHARC-II into a dual-beam 12×12 pixel polarimeter. A novel feature of SHARP's design is the use of a crossed grid in a submillimeter polarimeter. Here we describe the detailed optical design of SHARP and present results of tests carried out during our first few observing runs. At 350 μm, the beam size (9 arc sec), throughput (75%), and instrumental polarization (<1%) are all very close to our design goals.

  14. Revisiting quasiparticle scattering interference in high-temperature superconductors: The problem of narrow peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulangi, Miguel Antonio; Allan, Milan P.; Zaanen, Jan

    2017-10-01

    We revisit the interpretation of quasiparticle scattering interference in cuprate high-Tc superconductors. This phenomenon has been very successful in reconstructing the dispersions of d -wave Bogoliubov excitations, but the successful identification and interpretation of quasiparticle interference (QPI) in scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) experiments rely on theoretical results obtained for the case of isolated impurities. We introduce a highly flexible technique to simulate STS measurements by computing the local density of states using real-space Green's functions defined on two-dimensional lattices with as many as 100 000 sites. We focus on the following question: to what extent can the experimental results be reproduced when various forms of distributed disorder are present? We consider randomly distributed pointlike impurities, smooth "Coulombic" disorder, and disorder arising from random on-site energies and superconducting gaps. We find an apparent paradox: the QPI peaks in the Fourier-transformed local density of states appear to be sharper and better defined in experiment than those seen in our simulations. We arrive at a no-go result for smooth-potential disorder since this does not reproduce the QPI peaks associated with large-momentum scattering. An ensemble of pointlike impurities gets closest to experiment, but this goes hand in hand with impurity cores that are not seen in experiment. We also study the effects of possible measurement artifacts (the "fork mechanism"), which turn out to be of relatively minor consequence. It appears that a more microscopic model of the tunneling process needs to be incorporated in order to account for the sharpness of the experimentally obtained QPI peaks.

  15. Study of power peak migration due to insertion of control bars in a PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Costa, Danilo Leite; Borges, Diogo da Silva; Lava, Deise Diana; Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to present a study on the power distribution behavior in a PWR reactor, considering the intensity and the migration of power peaks as is the insertion of control rods in the core banks. For this, the study of the diffusion of neutrons in the reactor was adopted by computer simulation that uses the finite difference method for numerically solving the neutron diffusion equation to two energy groups in steady state and in symmetry of a fourth quarter core. We decided to add the EPRI-9R 3D benchmark thermal-hydraulic parameters of a typical power PWR. With a new configuration for the reactor, the positions of the control rods banks were also modified. Due to the new positioning of these banks in the reactor, there was intense power gradients, favoring the occurrence of critical situations and logically unconventional for operation of a nuclear reactor. However, these facts have led interesting times for the study on the power distribution behavior in the reactor, showing axial migration of power peaks and mainly the effect of the geometry of the core on the latter. Based on the distribution of power was evident the increase of the power in elements located in the central region of the reactor core and, concomitantly, the reduction in elements of its periphery. Of course, the behavior exhibited by the simulated reactor is not in agreement with that expected in an actual reactor, where the insertion of control rods banks should lead to reduced power throughout the core as evenly as possible, avoiding sharp power peaks, standardizing the burning fuel, controlling reactivity deviations and acting in reactor shutdown

  16. Detection and quantitative characterization of artificial extra peaks following polymerase chain reaction amplification of 14 short tandem repeat systems used in forensic investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meldgaard, Michael; Morling, N

    1997-01-01

    , while Hum-TH01, HumCD4, and D12S391 were virtually unaffected by low-stringency conditions. Replacement of the Taq DNA polymerase with DNA polymerases with lower processivity resulted in higher levels of extra peaks. Our results support the hypothesis that extra peaks are produced due to slipped-strand......Detection on automated DNA sequencers of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of tetra- and penta-nucleotide short tandem repeat (STR) loci frequently reveals one or more extra peaks along with the true, major allele peak. The most frequent extra peak pattern is a single smaller peak which...... is one repeat unit shorter than the true allele peak. The existence of such artificial peaks is of special importance when the methods are used for forensic investigations because the artificial extra peaks may simulate true alleles when samples containing mixtures of DNA from different individuals...

  17. Features of an annealing-induced thermoluminescence peak in α-Al2O3:C,Mg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, J. M.; Chithambo, M. L.

    2017-08-01

    We report the thermoluminescence glow curves of beta irradiated single crystal α-Al2O3:C,Mg after annealing at 700 and 900 °C. A glow curve measured at 1 °C/s from samples irradiated to 1 Gy following annealing at 700 and 900 °C shows a high intensity peak at 163 °C and seven secondary peaks of weaker intensity at 43, 73, 100, 195, 280, 329 and 370 °C. Comparing the position of the peaks in the annealed samples with those in an un-annealed one, it is observed that the peak at 100 °C appears only after annealing at and above 700 °C. Kinetic analysis of this annealing-induced peak was carried out using the initial rise, whole glow peak, peak shape, curve fitting and variable heating rate methods. The order of kinetics of the peak was determined as first order using various methods including the Tm-Tstop technique and the dependence of Tm on irradiation dose. The activation energy of the peak is about 1.01 eV and the frequency factor of the order of 1012 s-1. The peak was found to be affected by thermal quenching in analysis based on change of peak intensity with heating rate. The activation energy of thermal quenching was evaluated as 1.06 ± 0.08 eV. We speculate that the annealing-induced peak is due to formation of a new electron trap after destruction of the F22+(2 Mg) centre when the sample is annealed at 700 °C. The annealing-induced peak fades with storage between irradiation and measurement. It was also concluded that electrons from traps corresponding to secondary peaks get re-trapped at the main electron trap.

  18. Dosimetric Properties of Plasma Density Effects on Laser-Accelerated VHEE Beams Using a Sharp Density-Transition Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Hoon; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Park, Jeong Hoon; Jung, Won-Gyun; Kim, Geun Beom; Kim, Kum Bae [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byung Jun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jaehoon [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hojin [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kitae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Yong [Karmanos Cancer Institute, Michigan (United States)

    2017-01-15

    In this paper, the effects of the plasma density on laser-accelerated electron beams for radiation therapy with a sharp density transition are investigated. In the sharp density-transition scheme for electron injection, the crucial issue is finding the optimum density conditions under which electrons injected only during the first period of the laser wake wave are accelerated further. In this paper, we report particle-in-cell simulation results for the effects of both the scale length and the density transition ratio on the generation of a quasi-mono-energetic electron bunch. The effects of both the transverse parabolic channel and the plasma length on the electron-beam's quality are investigated. Also, we show the experimental results for the feasibility of a sharp density-transition structure. The dosimetric properties of these very high-energy electron beams are calculated using Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. The influence of surface stress on dislocation emission from sharp and blunt cracks in f.c.c. metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    with respect to the emission of a dislocation from the crack tip, whereas for all other metals studied the sharp crack is unstable. This result cannot be explained by existing criteria for the intrinsic ductile/brittle behaviour of crack tips, but is probably caused by surface stresses. When the crack...... is no longer atomically sharp dislocation emission becomes easier in all the studied metals. The effect is relatively strong; the critical stress intensity factor for emission to occur is reduced by up to 20%. This behaviour appears to be caused by the surface stress near the crack tip. The surface stress...... is a consequence of the many-body nature of the interatomic interactions. The enhanced dislocation emission can cause an order-of-magnitude increase in the fracture toughness of certain materials, in which a sharp crack would propagate by cleavage. Collisions with already existing dislocations will blunt the crack...

  20. Short-Term Power Load Point Prediction Based on the Sharp Degree and Chaotic RBF Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxiao Niu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize the predicting and positioning of short-term load inflection point, this paper made reference to related research in the field of computer image recognition. It got a load sharp degree sequence by the transformation of the original load sequence based on the algorithm of sharp degree. Then this paper designed a forecasting model based on the chaos theory and RBF neural network. It predicted the load sharp degree sequence based on the forecasting model to realize the positioning of short-term load inflection point. Finally, in the empirical example analysis, this paper predicted the daily load point of a region using the actual load data of the certain region to verify the effectiveness and applicability of this method. Prediction results showed that most of the test sample load points could be accurately predicted.

  1. Hydroclimatology of Dual-Peak Annual Cholera Incidence: Insights from a Spatially Explicit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Righetto, L.; Gatto, M.; Casagrandi, R.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2012-12-01

    Cholera incidence in some regions of the Indian subcontinent may exhibit two annual peaks although the main environmental drivers that have been linked to the disease (e.g. sea surface temperature, zooplankton abundance, river discharge) peak once per year during the summer. An empirical hydroclimatological explanation relating cholera transmission to river flows and to the disease spatial spreading has been recently proposed. We specifically support and substantiate mechanistically such hypothesis by means of a spatially explicit model of cholera transmission. Our framework directly accounts for the role of the river network in transporting and redistributing cholera bacteria among human communities as well as for spatial and temporal annual fluctuations of precipitation and river flows. To single out the single out the hydroclimatologic controls on the prevalence patterns in a non-specific geographical context, we first apply the model to Optimal Channel Networks as a general model of hydrological networks. Moreover, we impose a uniform distribution of population. The model is forced by seasonal environmental drivers, namely precipitation, temperature and chlorophyll concentration in the coastal environment, a proxy for Vibrio cholerae concentration. Our results show that these drivers may suffice to generate dual-peak cholera prevalence patterns for proper combinations of timescales involved in pathogen transport, hydrologic variability and disease unfolding. The model explains the possible occurrence of spatial patterns of cholera incidence characterized by a spring peak confined to coastal areas and a fall peak involving inland regions. We then proceed applying the model to the specific settings of Bay of Bengal accounting for the actual river networks (derived from digital terrain map manipulations), the proper distribution of population (estimated from downscaling of census data based on remotely sensed features) and precipitation patterns. Overall our

  2. Relation between Peak Power Output in Sprint Cycling and Maximum Voluntary Isometric Torque Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, Mehdi; Goodall, Stuart; Barratt, Paul; Rowley, Nicola; Leeder, Jonathan; Howatson, Glyn

    2017-08-01

    From a cycling paradigm, little has been done to understand the relationships between maximal isometric strength of different single joint lower body muscle groups and their relation with, and ability to predict PPO and how they compare to an isometric cycling specific task. The aim of this study was to establish relationships between maximal voluntary torque production from isometric single-joint and cycling specific tasks and assess their ability to predict PPO. Twenty male trained cyclists participated in this study. Peak torque was measured by performing maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) of knee extensors, knee flexors, dorsi flexors and hip extensors whilst instrumented cranks measured isometric peak torque from MVC when participants were in their cycling specific position (ISOCYC). A stepwise regression showed that peak torque of the knee extensors was the only significant predictor of PPO when using SJD and accounted for 47% of the variance. However, when compared to ISOCYC, the only significant predictor of PPO was ISOCYC, which accounted for 77% of the variance. This suggests that peak torque of the knee extensors was the best single-joint predictor of PPO in sprint cycling. Furthermore, a stronger prediction can be made from a task specific isometric task. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Automatic Peak Selection by a Benjamini-Hochberg-Based Algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Abbas, Ahmed

    2013-01-07

    A common issue in bioinformatics is that computational methods often generate a large number of predictions sorted according to certain confidence scores. A key problem is then determining how many predictions must be selected to include most of the true predictions while maintaining reasonably high precision. In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based protein structure determination, for instance, computational peak picking methods are becoming more and more common, although expert-knowledge remains the method of choice to determine how many peaks among thousands of candidate peaks should be taken into consideration to capture the true peaks. Here, we propose a Benjamini-Hochberg (B-H)-based approach that automatically selects the number of peaks. We formulate the peak selection problem as a multiple testing problem. Given a candidate peak list sorted by either volumes or intensities, we first convert the peaks into p-values and then apply the B-H-based algorithm to automatically select the number of peaks. The proposed approach is tested on the state-of-the-art peak picking methods, including WaVPeak [1] and PICKY [2]. Compared with the traditional fixed number-based approach, our approach returns significantly more true peaks. For instance, by combining WaVPeak or PICKY with the proposed method, the missing peak rates are on average reduced by 20% and 26%, respectively, in a benchmark set of 32 spectra extracted from eight proteins. The consensus of the B-H-selected peaks from both WaVPeak and PICKY achieves 88% recall and 83% precision, which significantly outperforms each individual method and the consensus method without using the B-H algorithm. The proposed method can be used as a standard procedure for any peak picking method and straightforwardly applied to some other prediction selection problems in bioinformatics. The source code, documentation and example data of the proposed method is available at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/pages/software.aspx. © 2013

  4. Peak muscle mass in young men and sarcopenia in the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk; Nielsen, T L; Brixen, K

    2015-01-01

    -based reference data on lean body mass (LBM) in young men during the time of peak levels of GH/IGF-1 and testosterone and further to apply the reference data on a population-based sample of men aged 60-74 years to estimate the prevalence of sarcopenia. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional, population-based single...... of sarcopenia in men. INTRODUCTION: The ageing population increases the prevalence of sarcopenia. Estimation of normative data on muscle mass in young men during the peak of anabolic hormones is necessary for the diagnosis of sarcopenia in ageing males. The purposes of this study were to provide population...

  5. SHARP's systems engineering challenge: rectifying integrated product team requirements with performance issues in an evolutionary spiral development acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, C. Stephen

    2003-08-01

    Completing its final development and early deployment on the Navy's multi-role aircraft, the F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet, the SHAred Reconnaissance Pod (SHARP) provides the war fighter with the latest digital tactical reconnaissance (TAC Recce) Electro-Optical/Infrared (EO/IR) sensor system. The SHARP program is an evolutionary acquisition that used a spiral development process across a prototype development phase tightly coupled into overlapping Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) and Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) phases. Under a tight budget environment with a highly compressed schedule, SHARP challenged traditional acquisition strategies and systems engineering (SE) processes. Adopting tailored state-of-the-art systems engineering process models allowd the SHARP program to overcome the technical knowledge transition challenges imposed by a compressed program schedule. The program's original goal was the deployment of digital TAC Recce mission capabilities to the fleet customer by summer of 2003. Hardware and software integration technical challenges resulted from requirements definition and analysis activities performed across a government-industry led Integrated Product Team (IPT) involving Navy engineering and test sites, Boeing, and RTSC-EPS (with its subcontracted hardware and government furnished equipment vendors). Requirements development from a bottoms-up approach was adopted using an electronic requirements capture environment to clarify and establish the SHARP EMD product baseline specifications as relevant technical data became available. Applying Earned-Value Management (EVM) against an Integrated Master Schedule (IMS) resulted in efficiently managing SE task assignments and product deliveries in a dynamically evolving customer requirements environment. Application of Six Sigma improvement methodologies resulted in the uncovering of root causes of errors in wiring interconnectivity drawings, pod manufacturing processes, and avionics

  6. [Clinical Trials for Observing the Influence of Acupuncture Needle-stimulation Induced Sharp Pain on Curative Effect in Primary Dysmenorrhea Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Shang-qing; Zhang, Peng; Li, Jing; Wang, Pei; Lin, Chi; Hu, Ni-juan; Hao, Jie; Hao, Mian-yi; Sun, Jon-jun; Wang, Ya-feng; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-04-01

    To observe the influence of acupuncture needle stimulation-induced sharp pain on the curative effect of acupuncture therapy for primary dysmenorrhea (PD) patients with cold damp stagnation syndrome (CDSS). A total of 87 PD patients with CDSS experiencing abdominal pain (> or =40 mm in visual analogue scale, VAS) were randomly asigned to deqi-expectation group and no-deqi-expectation group which were further divided into deqi-expectation + sharp pain (n = 31), deqi-expectation + no-sharp pain (n = 12), no-deqi-expectation + sharp pain (n = 17), no-deqi-expectation + no- sharp pain (n =27) groups. On the first day of abdominal pain attack, bilateral Sanyinjiao (SP 6) were punctured respectively with thicker needles with deeper insertion for deqi-expectation patients and thin filiform needles with shallow insertion for no-deqi-expectation patients. The needles were manipulated for 30 s with uniform reinforcing-reducing method for all the deqi-expectation patients, which was repeated once again every 10 min during 30 min of needle retention. The VAS was used to evaluate the patients' abdominal pain severity before treatment and 0, 10 min after acupuncture needle withdrawal. Following acupuncture stimulation of SP 6, the VAS scores of menstrual pain at both 0 min and 10 min after withdrawing acupuncture needles were significantly decreased in the deqi-expectation + sharp pain group, deqi-expectation + no-sharp pain group, no-deqi-expectation+sharp pain group and no-deqi-expectation + no-sharp pain group (Ppain group ( Ppain and deqi- expectation + no-sharp pain groups, and between no-deqi-expectation + sharp pain and no-deqi-expectation + no-sharp pain groups (P>0.05). Acupuncture stimulation of SP 6 has an immediate analgesic effect in PD women with cold damp stagnation syndrome, which was not affected by needling-induced sharp pain, deqi-expectation, and thicker or thinner needle with shallow and deeper insertion.

  7. Particle in cell simulation of peaking switch for breakdown evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umbarkar, Sachin B.; Bindu, S.; Mangalvedekar, H.A.; Saxena, A.; Singh, N.M., E-mail: sachin.b.umbarkar@gmail.com [Department of Electric Engineering, Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute, Mumbai (India); Sharma, Archana; Saroj, P.C.; Mittal, K.C. [Accelerator Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-07-01

    Marx generator connected to peaking capacitor and peaking switch can generate Ultra-Wideband (UWB) radiation. A new peaking switch is designed for converting the existing nanosecond Marx generator to a UWB source. The paper explains the particle in cell (PIC) simulation for this peaking switch, using MAGIC 3D software. This peaking switch electrode is made up of copper tungsten material and is fixed inside the hermitically sealed derlin material. The switch can withstand a gas pressure up to 13.5 kg/cm{sup 2}. The lower electrode of the switch is connected to the last stage of the Marx generator. Initially Marx generator (without peaking stage) in air; gives the output pulse with peak amplitude of 113.75 kV and pulse rise time of 25 ns. Thus, we design a new peaking switch to improve the rise time of output pulse and to pressurize this peaking switch separately (i.e. Marx and peaking switch is at different pressure). The PIC simulation gives the particle charge density, current density, E counter plot, emitted electron current, and particle energy along the axis of gap between electrodes. The charge injection and electric field dependence on ionic dissociation phenomenon are briefly analyzed using this simulation. The model is simulated with different gases (N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and Air) under different pressure (2 kg/cm{sup 2}, 5 kg/cm{sup 2}, 10 kg/cm{sup 2}). (author)

  8. QRS peak detection for heart rate monitoring on Android smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pambudi Utomo, Trio; Nuryani, Nuryani; Darmanto

    2017-11-01

    In this study, Android smartphone is used for heart rate monitoring and displaying electrocardiogram (ECG) graph. Heart rate determination is based on QRS peak detection. Two methods are studied to detect the QRS complex peak; they are Peak Threshold and Peak Filter. The acquisition of ECG data is utilized by AD8232 module from Analog Devices, three electrodes, and Microcontroller Arduino UNO R3. To record the ECG data from a patient, three electrodes are attached to particular body’s surface of a patient. Patient’s heart activity which is recorded by AD8232 module is decoded by Arduino UNO R3 into analog data. Then, the analog data is converted into a voltage value (mV) and is processed to get the QRS complex peak. Heart rate value is calculated by Microcontroller Arduino UNO R3 uses the QRS complex peak. Voltage, heart rate, and the QRS complex peak are sent to Android smartphone by Bluetooth HC-05. ECG data is displayed as the graph by Android smartphone. To evaluate the performance of QRS complex peak detection method, three parameters are used; they are positive predictive, accuracy and sensitivity. Positive predictive, accuracy, and sensitivity of Peak Threshold method is 92.39%, 70.30%, 74.62% and for Peak Filter method are 98.38%, 82.47%, 83.61%, respectively.

  9. Gamma-Ray Peak Integration: Accuracy and Precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard M. Lindstrom

    2000-01-01

    The accuracy of singlet gamma-ray peak areas obtained by a peak analysis program is immaterial. If the same algorithm is used for sample measurement as for calibration and if the peak shapes are similar, then biases in the integration method cancel. Reproducibility is the only important issue. Even the uncertainty of the areas computed by the program is trivial because the true standard uncertainty can be experimentally assessed by repeated measurements of the same source. Reproducible peak integration was important in a recent standard reference material certification task. The primary tool used for spectrum analysis was SUM, a National Institute of Standards and Technology interactive program to sum peaks and subtract a linear background, using the same channels to integrate all 20 spectra. For comparison, this work examines other peak integration programs. Unlike some published comparisons of peak performance in which synthetic spectra were used, this experiment used spectra collected for a real (though exacting) analytical project, analyzed by conventional software used in routine ways. Because both components of the 559- to 564-keV doublet are from 76 As, they were integrated together with SUM. The other programs, however, deconvoluted the peaks. A sensitive test of the fitting algorithm is the ratio of reported peak areas. In almost all the cases, this ratio was much more variable than expected from the reported uncertainties reported by the program. Other comparisons to be reported indicate that peak integration is still an imperfect tool in the analysis of gamma-ray spectra

  10. Reference Values for Peak Exercise Cardiac Output in Healthy Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Vignati, Carlo; Gentile, Piero; Boiti, Costanza; Farina, Stefania; Salvioni, Elisabetta; Mapelli, Massimo; Magrì, Damiano; Paolillo, Stefania; Corrieri, Nicoletta; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Cattadori, Gaia

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac output (Q˙) is a key parameter in the assessment of cardiac function, its measurement being crucial for the diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic evaluation of all heart diseases. Until recently, Q˙ determination at peak exercise has been possible through invasive methods, so that normal values were obtained in studies based on small populations. Nowadays, peak Q˙ can be measured noninvasively by means of the inert gas rebreathing (IGR) technique. The present study was undertaken to provide reference values for peak Q˙ in the normal general population and to obtain a formula able to estimate peak exercise Q˙ from measured peak oxygen uptake (V˙o 2 ). We studied 500 normal subjects (age, 44.9 ± 1.5 years; range, 18-77 years; 260 men, 240 women) who underwent a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test with peak Q˙ measurement by IGR. In the overall study sample, peak Q˙ was 13.2 ± 3.5 L/min (men, 15.3 ± 3.3 L/min; women, 11.0 ± 2.0 L/min; P exercise was (4.4 × peak V˙o 2 ) + 4.3 in the overall study cohort, (4.3 × peak V˙o 2 ) + 4.5 in men, and (4.9 × peak V˙o 2 ) + 3.6 in women. The simultaneous measurement of Q˙ and V˙o 2 at peak exercise in a large sample of healthy subjects provided an equation to predict peak Q˙ from peak V˙o 2 values. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sharp phase variations from the plasmon mode causing the Rabi-analogue splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yujia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Rabi-analogue splitting in nanostructures resulting from the strong coupling of different resonant modes is of importance for lasing, sensing, switching, modulating, and quantum information processes. To give a clearer physical picture, the phase analysis instead of the strong coupling is provided to explain the Rabi-analogue splitting in the Fabry-Pérot (FP cavity, of which one end mirror is a metallic nanohole array and the other is a thin metal film. The phase analysis is based on an analytic model of the FP cavity, in which the reflectance and the reflection phase of the end mirrors are dependent on the wavelength. It is found that the Rabi-analogue splitting originates from the sharp phase variation brought by the plasmon mode in the FP cavity. In the experiment, the Rabi-analogue splitting is realized in the plasmonic-photonic coupling system, and this splitting can be continually tuned by changing the length of the FP cavity. These experimental results agree well with the analytic and simulation data, strongly verifying the phase analysis based on the analytic model. The phase analysis presents a clear picture to understand the working mechanism of the Rabi-analogue splitting; thus, it may facilitate the design of the plasmonic-photonic and plasmonic-plasmonic coupling systems.

  12. Smooth leader or sharp follower? Playing the mirror game with a robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashi, Shir; Levy-Tzedek, Shelly

    2018-01-01

    The increasing number of opportunities for human-robot interactions in various settings, from industry through home use to rehabilitation, creates a need to understand how to best personalize human-robot interactions to fit both the user and the task at hand. In the current experiment, we explored a human-robot collaborative task of joint movement, in the context of an interactive game. We set out to test people's preferences when interacting with a robotic arm, playing a leader-follower imitation game (the mirror game). Twenty two young participants played the mirror game with the robotic arm, where one player (person or robot) followed the movements of the other. Each partner (person and robot) was leading part of the time, and following part of the time. When the robotic arm was leading the joint movement, it performed movements that were either sharp or smooth, which participants were later asked to rate. The greatest preference was given to smooth movements. Half of the participants preferred to lead, and half preferred to follow. Importantly, we found that the movements of the robotic arm primed the subsequent movements performed by the participants. The priming effect by the robot on the movements of the human should be considered when designing interactions with robots. Our results demonstrate individual differences in preferences regarding the role of the human and the joint motion path of the robot and the human when performing the mirror game collaborative task, and highlight the importance of personalized human-robot interactions.

  13. Needlestick and sharps injuries among housekeeping workers in hospitals of Shiraz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakbala, Parvin; Azar, Farbood Ebadi; Kamali, Hajeb

    2012-06-07

    Needlestick and sharps injuries (NSSIs) are one of the major risk factors for blood-borne infections (BBPs) at healthcare facilities. This study examines the current prevalence of NSSIs among housekeeping workers engaged in the handling and disposal of biomedical waste (BMW) at government and private hospitals in Shiraz, Iran, and furthermore, explores strategies for preventing these injuries. Using a cross-sectional study design, NSSI's and associated protective measures for housekeeping workers throughout hospitals in Shiraz were evaluated from 2009 onwards. Using a questionnaire, data was collected for 92 workers who had engaged directly with BMW. Data was analyzed using Chi-square, student t-test and where appropriate, SPSS version 12. 90.2 % of housekeeping workers were warned of the dangers associated with waste, 87.5 % in government and 93.2 % in private hospitals (P = 0.0444). 83.7 % had attended educational programs on biomedical waste (BMW) management and injury prevention at their hospital in the preceding year. 16.3 % had not been trained in biomedical waste management (P = 0.0379) and 88.9 % had a sufficient supply of safety wear. NSSIs are a common risk factor for infection among health care workers within hospitals in Iran. For the effective prevention of these injuries, health boards and hospital trusts need to formulate strategies to improve the working conditions of health care workers, discourage the excessive use of injections, and increase their adherence to universal precautions.

  14. Modeling and determination of directionality of the kerf in epifluorescence sharp bone trauma analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuani, Caroline; Telmon, Norbert; Moscovici, Jacques; Molinier, François; Aymeric, Andre; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Rougé, Daniel; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline

    2014-11-01

    Characteristics of sharp bone trauma can be extremely useful to determine the origin of cut marks and to provide information regarding the context of death. Using human ribs and clavicle bones, this study analyzes the characteristics of bone kerfs made by different bladed implements, thanks to epifluorescence macroscopy. This technique, which is a nondestructive tool that uses autofluorescence of bones, documents bone damage precisely with high resolution. Both qualitative and quantitative criteria are analyzed. Our results identify unique class characteristics on bone lesions, allowing modeling kerf depending on the weapon, regardless of the type of bone that is wounded. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time microscopic criteria of directionality, using fluorescence excitation. Orientation of cracks, flakes, and lateral pushing back especially helps in determining the tip and the end of the lesion, leading to the position of the aggressor. Kerf wall characteristics and striation location are also very useful. Epifluorescence macroscopy could be a new tool of choice in anthropology through cut mark analysis in establishing how the blade was used and providing details about the blow.

  15. Ultrastructure and morphology of antennal sensilla of the adult diving beetle Cybister japonicus Sharp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Mei Song

    Full Text Available The morphology and distribution of the antennal sensilla of adult diving beetle Cybister japonicus Sharp (Dytiscidae, Coleoptera, have been examined. Five types of sensilla on the antennae were identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. Sensilla placodea and elongated s. placodea are the most abundant types of sensilla, distributing only on the flagellum. Both these types of sensilla carry multiple pore systems with a typical function as chemoreceptors. Three types of s. coeloconica (Type I-III were also identified, with the characterization of the pit-in-pit style, and carrying pegs externally different from each other. Our data indicated that both type I and type II of s. coleconica contain two bipolar neurons, while the type III of s. coleconica contains three dendrites in the peg. Two sensory dendrites in the former two sensilla are tightly embedded inside the dendrite sheath, with no space left for sensilla lymph. There are no specific morphological differences in the antennal sensilla observed between males and females, except that the males have longer antennae and more sensilla than the females.

  16. The hydraulic mechanism in the hind wing veins of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyu Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The diving beetles (Dytiscidae, Coleoptera are families of water beetles. When they see light, they fly to the light source directly from the water. Their hind wings are thin and fragile under the protection of their elytra (forewings. When the beetle is at rest the hind wings are folded over the abdomen of the beetle and when in flight they unfold to provide the necessary aerodynamic forces. In this paper, the unfolding process of the hind wing of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera was investigated. The motion characteristics of the blood in the veins of the structure system show that the veins have microfluidic control over the hydraulic mechanism of the unfolding process. A model is established, and the hind wing extending process is simulated. The blood flow and pressure changes are discussed. The driving mechanism for hydraulic control of the folding and unfolding actions of beetle hind wings is put forward. This can assist the design of new deployable micro air vehicles and bioinspired deployable systems.

  17. Driving Risk Affected Areas and Distribution Function of Sharp Horizontal Curves of Expressway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-fei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The average death and injury intensity on sharp horizontal curves (SHCs are much higher than those of straight sections of the expressway in China. In this paper, the statistics of crashes from 2008 to 2012 on 2200 km expressways in Guangdong province are collected, and the relationships between the radius of plane curves and the crash rate are analyzed. After that, the curved expressway section with radius equal to or less than 1000 m is defined as SHCs. According to the results of the test of the operating speed, the heart rate change of drivers, and the vehicle acceleration, the distribution patterns of driving risks on the certain SHCs were theoretically analyzed. Hence, the driving risk affected areas on adjacent line units of SHCs are determined as 200 m sections before entering or after exiting the SHCs. Combining with surveyed data, the spatial distribution of crashes on SHCs is analyzed, and the driving risk distribution function of SHCs in expressway is finally deduced. The result of this research provides a theoretical basis to enhance expressway safety management and to improve the driving safety on SHCs.

  18. The hydraulic mechanism in the hind wing veins of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiyu; Wu, Wei; Ling, Mingze; Bhushan, Bharat; Tong, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The diving beetles (Dytiscidae, Coleoptera) are families of water beetles. When they see light, they fly to the light source directly from the water. Their hind wings are thin and fragile under the protection of their elytra (forewings). When the beetle is at rest the hind wings are folded over the abdomen of the beetle and when in flight they unfold to provide the necessary aerodynamic forces. In this paper, the unfolding process of the hind wing of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera) was investigated. The motion characteristics of the blood in the veins of the structure system show that the veins have microfluidic control over the hydraulic mechanism of the unfolding process. A model is established, and the hind wing extending process is simulated. The blood flow and pressure changes are discussed. The driving mechanism for hydraulic control of the folding and unfolding actions of beetle hind wings is put forward. This can assist the design of new deployable micro air vehicles and bioinspired deployable systems.

  19. Analysing and interpreting routinely collected data on sharps injuries in assessing preventative actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, G; Mylle, G; Johannik, K; Van Hoof, R; Helsen, G

    2004-06-01

    Sharps injuries (SI) occur frequently in hospitals and are a risk for exposure to bloodborne pathogens. During the 1990s, the safety service of a university general hospital introduced, in collaboration with the occupational health service, specific measures to reduce the number of SI. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence and evolution of SI during this period and to evaluate the effectiveness of the preventative measures taken, making use of routinely collected data. In a retrospective study, we analysed the number of SI recorded from 1990 to 1997. The study population was all employees at risk of SI. Because the introduction of intensive preventative measures dates from 1996, an effect on the incidence of SI can be expected from 1996. To assess this effect, mean incidence rates for 1990-1995 and for 1996-1997 were compared. In the study period, a total of 4230 SI were recorded. The global SI incidence rate decreased from 33.4 SI per 100 occupied beds per year in 1990-1995 to 30.1 in 1996-1997 (P hotel service from 4.8 to 3.7 (not significant). Although this study has various restraints, these results suggest that intensive preventative actions, in combination with technological advances, may have contributed to a drop of 67 SI cases per year.

  20. The Prevalence of Needlestick and Sharps Injuries among Health Care Workers in Hamadan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Hashemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Needlestick and sharps injuries (NSSIs is an important occupational risk among health care workers (HCWs; and it is an important cause of transmission of blood-borne pathogens to this population. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of NSSI among HCWs in the teaching hospitals in Hamadan. Materials & Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 700 HCWs between 2009 and 2010. A questionnaire was designed for data collection. Questionnaires were distributed in 5 hospitals to collect self-reported NSSI in the past 12- months. Results: The rate of accidental NSSI was 24.1% for one year prior the study. Totally, 83.6% of the participants had a full vaccination course against hepatitis B. The majority of NSSIs occurred in the 30-34 age group (33.3% and most of them were female. Also, 48.5% of NSSIs were during blood sampling or IV catheter insertion.Conclusion: Developing appropriate educational programs regarding prophylactic tasks, disposal of medical wastes, and using safe needle devices can reduce the risk of NSSIs among HCWs. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;18(4:41-46

  1. Learning-induced plasticity regulates hippocampal sharp wave-ripple drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardeau, Gabrielle; Cei, Anne; Zugaro, Michaël

    2014-04-09

    Hippocampal sharp wave-ripples (SPW-Rs) and associated place-cell reactivations are crucial for spatial memory consolidation during sleep and rest. However, it remains unclear how learning and consolidation requirements influence and regulate subsequent SPW-R activity. Indeed, SPW-R activity has been observed not only following complex behavioral tasks, but also after random foraging in familiar environments, despite markedly different learning requirements. Because transient increases in SPW-R rates have been reported following training on memory tasks, we hypothesized that SPW-R activity following learning (but not routine behavior) could involve specific regulatory processes related to ongoing consolidation. Interfering with ripples would then result in a dynamic compensatory response only when initial memory traces required consolidation. Here we trained rats on a spatial memory task, and showed that subsequent sleep periods where ripple activity was perturbed by timed electrical stimulation were indeed characterized by increased SPW-R occurrence rates compared with control sleep periods where stimulations were slightly delayed in time and did not interfere with ripples. Importantly, this did not occur following random foraging in a familiar environment. We next showed that this dynamic response was abolished following injection of an NMDA receptor blocker (MK-801) before, but not after training. Our results indicate that NMDA receptor-dependent processes occurring during learning, such as network "tagging" and plastic changes, regulate subsequent ripple-mediated consolidation of spatial memory during sleep.

  2. Rapid and sharp decline in HCV upon monotherapy with NS3 protease inhibitor, ACH-1625.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Atul; Zhang, Bao; Olek, Elizabeth; Robison, Heather; Robarge, Lisa; Deshpande, Milind

    2012-01-01

    ACH-1625 is a linear peptidomimetic inhibitor that non-covalently binds to HCV NS3 protease with high potency and specificity. Short-term monotherapy of HCV genotype-1 infection with ACH-1625 was found to be safe and resulted in ≥3.3 log(10) IU/ml mean viral load reduction. These viral load decay data were analysed to compare HCV dynamics with prior reports and estimate the antiviral efficiency of ACH-1625. Drug efficiency was estimated by analysing the viral decay following initiation of up to 5 days of monotherapy with ACH-1625 in 36 chronically infected HCV genotype-1 patients. During this monotherapy study, ACH-1625 was administered either twice-a-day for 4.5 days or once daily for 5 days at 5 different dose levels in 36 patients. A sharp viral decay during the first 48 h following the initiation of ACH-1625 treatment afforded high drug efficiency estimates (≥0.9934). In addition, an increase in the estimated drug efficiency was observed with increasing ACH-1625 dose. The observed anti-HCV response was fairly uniform in this proof-of-concept study across the population of 36 patients. Estimates of the treatment-independent viral kinetics parameters were consistent with prior reports and the estimated drug efficiency of ACH-1625 monotherapy was very high (≥0.9934) in fasted and fed states.

  3. A repeatable and scalable fabrication method for sharp, hollow silicon microneedles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Theogarajan, L. S.; Pennathur, S.

    2018-03-01

    Scalability and manufacturability are impeding the mass commercialization of microneedles in the medical field. Specifically, microneedle geometries need to be sharp, beveled, and completely controllable, difficult to achieve with microelectromechanical fabrication techniques. In this work, we performed a parametric study using silicon etch chemistries to optimize the fabrication of scalable and manufacturable beveled silicon hollow microneedles. We theoretically verified our parametric results with diffusion reaction equations and created a design guideline for a various set of miconeedles (80-160 µm needle base width, 100-1000 µm pitch, 40-50 µm inner bore diameter, and 150-350 µm height) to show the repeatability, scalability, and manufacturability of our process. As a result, hollow silicon microneedles with any dimensions can be fabricated with less than 2% non-uniformity across a wafer and 5% deviation between different processes. The key to achieving such high uniformity and consistency is a non-agitated HF-HNO3 bath, silicon nitride masks, and surrounding silicon filler materials with well-defined dimensions. Our proposed method is non-labor intensive, well defined by theory, and straightforward for wafer scale mass production, opening doors to a plethora of potential medical and biosensing applications.

  4. Fabrication process for tall, sharp, hollow, high aspect ratio polymer microneedles on a platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceyssens, Frederik; Chaudhri, Buddhadev Paul; Van Hoof, Chris; Puers, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a new lithographic process for fabricating arrays of tall, high aspect ratio (defined as height/wall thickness), hollow, polymer microneedles on a platform. The microneedles feature a high sharpness (down to 3 µm tip radius) and aspect ratio (>65) which is a factor 2 and 4 better than the state of the art, respectively. The maximum achievable needle shaft length is over 1 mm. The improved performance was obtained by using an anisotropically patterned silicon substrate covered with an antireflective layer as mold for the needle tip and an optimized SU-8 lithographic process. Furthermore, a platform containing liquid feedthroughs holding an arbitrary number of needles out of plane can be manufactured with only one additional process step. The high aspect ratio microneedles undergo failure at the critical load of around 230 mN in the case of 1 mm long hollow needles with triangular cross section and a base of 175 µm. Penetration into human skin is demonstrated as well. (paper)

  5. Growth of aluminum oxide on silicon carbide with an atomically sharp interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Ana Gomes; Pedersen, Kjeld; Li, Zheshen

    2017-01-01

    The development of SiC wafers with properties suitable for electronic device fabrication is now well established commercially. A critical issue for developing metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor devices of SiC is the choice of dielectric materials for surface passivation and insulat......The development of SiC wafers with properties suitable for electronic device fabrication is now well established commercially. A critical issue for developing metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor devices of SiC is the choice of dielectric materials for surface passivation...... this system up to around 600 °C (all in ultrahigh vacuum). This converts all the SiO2 into a uniform layer of Al2O3 with an atomically sharp interface between the Al2O3 and the Si surface. In the present work, the same procedures are applied to form Al2O3 on a SiC film grown on top of Si (111). The results...

  6. Self-consistent modeling of laminar electrohydrodynamic plumes from ultra-sharp needles in cyclohexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Marley; Frid, Henrik; Vázquez, Pedro A.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a self-consistent model of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) laminar plumes produced by electron injection from ultra-sharp needle tips in cyclohexane. Since the density of electrons injected into the liquid is well described by the Fowler-Nordheim field emission theory, the injection law is not assumed. Furthermore, the generation of electrons in cyclohexane and their conversion into negative ions is included in the analysis. Detailed steady-state characteristics of EHD plumes under weak injection and space-charge limited injection are studied. It is found that the plume characteristics far from both electrodes and under weak injection can be accurately described with an asymptotic simplified solution proposed by Vazquez et al. ["Dynamics of electrohydrodynamic laminar plumes: Scaling analysis and integral model," Phys. Fluids 12, 2809 (2000)] when the correct longitudinal electric field distribution and liquid velocity radial profile are used as input. However, this asymptotic solution deviates from the self-consistently calculated plume parameters under space-charge limited injection since it neglects the radial variations of the electric field produced by a high-density charged core. In addition, no significant differences in the model estimates of the plume are found when the simulations are obtained either with the finite element method or with a diffusion-free particle method. It is shown that the model also enables the calculation of the current-voltage characteristic of EHD laminar plumes produced by electron field emission, with good agreement with measured values reported in the literature.

  7. DETECTION OF SHARP SYMMETRIC FEATURES IN THE CIRCUMBINARY DISK AROUND AK Sco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janson, Markus; Asensio-Torres, Ruben [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Thalmann, Christian; Meyer, Michael R.; Garufi, Antonio [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Boccaletti, Anthony [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris—Meudon, CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Paris Didierot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Maire, Anne-Lise; Henning, Thomas; Pohl, Adriana [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Zurlo, Alice [Núcleo de Astronomía, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejercito 441, Santiago (Chile); Marzari, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Carson, Joseph C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Charleston, 66 George Street, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Augereau, Jean-Charles [Université Grenoble Alpes, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Desidera, Silvano [INAF—Osservatorio Astromonico di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy)

    2016-01-01

    The Search for Planets Orbiting Two Stars survey aims to study the formation and distribution of planets in binary systems by detecting and characterizing circumbinary planets and their formation environments through direct imaging. With the SPHERE Extreme Adaptive Optics instrument, a good contrast can be achieved even at small (<300 mas) separations from bright stars, which enables studies of planets and disks in a separation range that was previously inaccessible. Here, we report the discovery of resolved scattered light emission from the circumbinary disk around the well-studied young double star AK Sco, at projected separations in the ∼13–40 AU range. The sharp morphology of the imaged feature is surprising, given the smooth appearance of the disk in its spectral energy distribution. We show that the observed morphology can be represented either as a highly eccentric ring around AK Sco, or as two separate spiral arms in the disk, wound in opposite directions. The relative merits of these interpretations are discussed, as well as whether these features may have been caused by one or several circumbinary planets interacting with the disk.

  8. Why Compositional Convection Cannot Explain Substellar Objects’ Sharp Spectral-type Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, Jérémy

    2018-02-01

    As brown dwarfs and young giant planets cool down, they are known to experience various chemical transitions—for example, from {CO} rich L-dwarfs to methane rich T-dwarfs. Those chemical transitions are accompanied by spectral transitions with sharpness that cannot be explained by chemistry alone. In a series of articles, Tremblin et al. proposed that some of the yet-unexplained features associated with these transitions could be explained by a reduction of the thermal gradient near the photosphere. To explain, in turn, this more isothermal profile, they invoke the presence of an instability analogous to fingering convection—compositional convection—triggered by the change in mean molecular weight of the gas due to the chemical transitions mentioned above. In this Letter, we use existing arguments to demonstrate that any turbulent transport, if present, would in fact increase the thermal gradient. This misinterpretation comes from the fact that turbulence mixes/homogenizes entropy (potential temperature) instead of temperature. So, while increasing transport, turbulence in an initially stratified atmosphere actually carries energy downward, whether it is due to fingering or any other type of compositional convection. These processes therefore cannot explain the features observed along the aforementioned transitions by reducing the thermal gradient in the atmosphere of substellar objects. Understanding the microphysical and dynamical properties of clouds at these transitions thus probably remains our best way forward.

  9. Three-dimensional frictionless contact between layered elastic bodies and incorporating sharp edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordesillas, A. A.; Hill, J. M.

    1991-07-01

    The roller coating system used in industry to apply paint to sheet metal involves two contacting rolling cylinders, one of which is rubber covered and through which the sheet metal travels. Of particular concern in the industry is the effect of high pressures upon the flow of paint at the ends of the rollers. In an elastohydrodynamic-lubrication analysis of the paint flow, it is the corresponding “dry-contact pressure” which is of major concern. In this paper we present a numerical solution to the three-dimensional contact problem for both smooth profiled layered bodies and those which involve sharp edges but in both cases ignoring the effects of curvature. The procedure adopted is based on one previously developed by a number of authors for homogeneous bodies. An understanding of the consequences of changing the operating variables is of prime importance in an industrial scenario. The numerical scheme described here provides complete measurements of both the deformation and the contact pressure distribution for given operating variables, which are the elastic properties and dimensions of both rolls and the total applied force.

  10. HDAC4 regulates satellite cell proliferation and differentiation by targeting P21 and Sharp1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroncelli, Nicoletta; Bianchi, Marzia; Bertin, Marco; Consalvi, Silvia; Saccone, Valentina; De Bardi, Marco; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Palacios, Daniela; Adamo, Sergio; Moresi, Viviana

    2018-02-22

    Skeletal muscle exhibits a high regenerative capacity, mainly due to the ability of satellite cells to replicate and differentiate in response to appropriate stimuli. Epigenetic control is effective at different stages of this process. It has been shown that the chromatin-remodeling factor HDAC4 is able to regulate satellite cell proliferation and commitment. However, its molecular targets are still uncovered. To explain the signaling pathways regulated by HDAC4 in satellite cells, we generated tamoxifen-inducible mice with conditional inactivation of HDAC4 in Pax7 + cells (HDAC4 KO mice). We found that the proliferation and differentiation of HDAC4 KO satellite cells were compromised, although similar amounts of satellite cells were found in mice. Moreover, we found that the inhibition of HDAC4 in satellite cells was sufficient to block the differentiation process. By RNA-sequencing analysis we identified P21 and Sharp1 as HDAC4 target genes. Reducing the expression of these target genes in HDAC4 KO satellite cells, we also defined the molecular pathways regulated by HDAC4 in the epigenetic control of satellite cell expansion and fusion.

  11. Introduction of a New Suture Method in Repair of Peripheral Nerves Injured with a Sharp Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Saied

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The standard method for repair of an injured peripheal nerve is epineural repair with separate sutures. Herein we describe a method in which the nerve is sutured with continous sutures. In fact this method has not been utilized for nerve repair previously and our purpose was to compare it to the standard method. If it proved to be successful it would replace the standard method in certain circumstances. Methods: The proposal of the clinical trial was given a reference number form the ethics comitee. 25 dogs in which the scaitic nerve was cut by a sharp blade under genaeral anesthesia were divided randomly into three groups: control (5 dogs, repair of sciatic nerve with simple sutures (10 and repair with continous sutures (10. In the control group the nerve was not repaired at all. After 6 weeks the dogs were killed and the nerve was studied by light and electronic microscopes. The amount of consumed suture material, time of repair, myelin thickness and axon diiameter were examined. Ultrastructural studies were performed to assess degeneration and regeneration findings. Results: Time of repair and the amount of consumed suture material were significantly lower in the continous group (P

  12. On Rainbow k-Connection Number of Special Graphs and It’s Sharp Lower Bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesti Agustin, Ika; Dafik; Gembong, A. W.; Alfarisi, Ridho

    2017-06-01

    Let G = (V, E) be a simple, nontrivial, finite, connected and undirected graph. Let c be a coloring c : E(G) → {1, 2, …, s}, s ∈ N. A path of edge colored graph is said to be a rainbow path if no two edges on the path have the same color. An edge colored graph G is said to be a rainbow connected graph if there exists a rainbow u - v path for every two vertices u and v of G. The rainbow connection number of a graph G, denoted by rc(G), is the smallest number of k colors required to edge color the graph such that the graph is rainbow connected. Furthermore, for an l-connected graph G and an integer k with 1 ≤ k ≤ l, the rainbow k-connection number rck (G) of G is defined to be the minimum number of colors required to color the edges of G such that every two distinct vertices of G are connected by at least k internally disjoint rainbow paths. In this paper, we determine the exact values of rainbow connection number of some special graphs and obtain a sharp lower bound.

  13. Effect of cardiac function on aortic peak time and peak enhancement during coronary CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Shuji; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Chishaki, Akiko; Okafuji, Takashi; Matsuo, Yoshio; Kamitani, Takeshi; Setoguchi, Taro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the manner in which cardiac function affects the magnitude and timing of aortic contrast enhancement during coronary CT angiography (CTA). Materials and methods: Twenty-nine patients (21 men, 8 women; mean age, 64.4 ± 13.4 years; mean weight, 59.4 ± 10.3 kg) underwent measurement of cardiac output within 2 weeks of coronary CTA. The cardiac output of each patient was measured by the thermodilution technique and the cardiac index was calculated from the body surface area. During coronary CTA, attenuation of the descending aorta was measured at the workstation every 3 s. The aortic peak time (APT) and aortic peak enhancement (APE) of each patient were calculated. Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis was used to investigate the relationships between the cardiac output or cardiac index and APT or APE. Furthermore, the relationship between patient factors or parameters on test bolus injection and APT or APE was also evaluated. Results: The range of cardiac output, cardiac index, APT, and APE was 1.55-10.46 L/min (mean: 4.77 ± 2.13), 1.11-5.30 L/(min-m 2 ) (mean: 3.28 ± 1.08), 25-51 s (mean: 38.3 ± 7.5), and 273.1-598.1 HU (mean: 390.4 ± 72.1), respectively. With an increase in the cardiac index, both APT (r = -0.698, p < 0.0001) and APE (r = -0.573, p = 0.0009) decreased. There were significant correlations between the patient body weight and APT and APE with the test bolus injection, and with APT and APE during coronary CTA. Conclusion: The APT and APE during coronary CTA are closely related to cardiac function.

  14. Evaluation of peak power prediction equations in male basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Lyons, Mark; Nevill, Alan M

    2008-07-01

    This study compared peak power estimated using 4 commonly used regression equations with actual peak power derived from force platform data in a group of adolescent basketball players. Twenty-five elite junior male basketball players (age, 16.5 +/- 0.5 years; mass, 74.2 +/- 11.8 kg; height, 181.8 +/- 8.1 cm) volunteered to participate in the study. Actual peak power was determined using a countermovement vertical jump on a force platform. Estimated peak power was determined using countermovement jump height and body mass. All 4 prediction equations were significantly related to actual peak power (all p jump prediction equations, 12% for the Canavan and Vescovi equation, and 6% for the Sayers countermovement jump equation. In all cases peak power was underestimated.

  15. Strength Comparison of Flawed Single-Layer and Multilayer AISI 301 Stainless Steel Pressure Vessels at Cryogenic Temperatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pierce, William

    1965-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the strengths of single-layer and multilayer scale model tanks of AISI 301 stainless steel containing sharp notches and having the same total wall thickness...

  16. Local detection efficiency of a NbN superconducting single photon detector explored by a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Renema, Jelmer J; Engel, Andreas; van Exter, Martin P; de Dood, Michiel J A

    2015-09-21

    We propose an experiment to directly probe the local response of a superconducting single photon detector using a sharp metal tip in a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope. The optical absorption is obtained by simulating the tip-detector system, where the tip-detector is illuminated from the side, with the tip functioning as an optical antenna. The local detection efficiency is calculated by considering the recently introduced position-dependent threshold current in the detector. The calculated response for a 150 nm wide detector shows a peak close to the edge that can be spatially resolved with an estimated resolution of ∼ 20 nm, using a tip with parameters that are experimentally accessible.

  17. Electron-Beam Switches For A High Peak Power Sled-II Pulse Compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay, L. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-12-02

    Omega-P demonstrated triggered electron-beam switches on the L=2 m dual-delay-line X-band pulse compressor at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). In those experiments, with input pulses of up to 9 MW from the Omega-P/NRL X-band magnicon, output pulses having peak powers of 140-165 MW and durations of 16-20 ns were produced, with record peak power gains M of 18-20. Switch designs are described based on the successful results that should be suitable for use with the existing SLAC SLED-II delay line system, to demonstrate C=9, M=7, and n>>78%, yielding 173ns compressed pulses with peak powers up to 350MW with input of a single 50-MW.

  18. Multi-resonance peaks fiber Bragg gratings based on largely-chirped structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xuan-Yu; Wei, Wei-Hua; Chen, Yong-Yi; Qin, Li; Ning, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Yong-Sen

    2018-04-01

    A composite fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with multi-resonance peaks (MRPs) has been realized by using femtosecond (fs) laser point-by-point inscription in single-mode fiber. This device contains a segment of largely-chirped gratings with the ultrahigh chirp coefficients and a segment of uniform high-order gratings. The observed MRPs are distributed in an ultra-broadband wavelength range from 1200 nm to 1700 nm in the form of quasi-period or multi-peak-group. For the 8th-order MRPs-FBG, we studied the axial strain and high-temperature sensing characteristics of different resonance peaks experimentally. Moreover, we have demonstrated a multi-wavelength fiber lasers with three-wavelength stable output by using a 9th-order MRPs-FBG as the wavelength selector. This work is significant for the fabrication and functionalization of FBGs with complicated spectra characteristics.

  19. Peak and ceiling effects in final-product analysis of mastoidectomy performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, N; Konge, L; Cayé-Thomasen, P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virtual reality surgical simulation of mastoidectomy is a promising training tool for novices. Final-product analysis for assessing novice mastoidectomy performance could be limited by a peak or ceiling effect. These may be countered by simulator-integrated tutoring. METHODS: Twenty......-two participants completed a single session of self-directed practice of the mastoidectomy procedure in a virtual reality simulator. Participants were randomised for additional simulator-integrated tutoring. Performances were assessed at 10-minute intervals using final-product analysis. RESULTS: In all, 45.5 per...... cent of participants peaked before the 60-minute time limit. None of the participants achieved the maximum score, suggesting a ceiling effect. The tutored group performed better than the non-tutored group but tutoring did not eliminate the peak or ceiling effects. CONCLUSION: Timing and adequate...

  20. Estimating site occupancy and detection probabilities for cooper's and sharp-shinned hawks in the Southern Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer E. Carlson; Douglas D. Piirto; John J. Keane; Samantha J. Gill

    2015-01-01

    Long-term monitoring programs that can detect a population change over time can be useful for managers interested in assessing population trends in response to forest management activities for a particular species. Such long-term monitoring programs have been designed for the Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis), but not for the more elusive Sharp...

  1. Influence and evolution mechanism of different sharpness contact forms to mechanical property of cortical bone by nanoindentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingdong Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on different damage forms of various contact forms to bone, the mechanical response and mechanism were investigated by nanoindentation under different sharpness contact forms. For the purpose of simulating the different sharpness contact forms, two kinds of indenters were used in experiments and finite elements simulations. Through nanoindentation experiments, it was concluded that the residual depth of sharp indenter was bigger than that of blunt indenter with small penetration depth. However, the contrary law was obtained with bigger penetration depth. There was a turning point of transition from blunt tendency to sharp tendency. By calculation, it was concluded that the sharper the indenter was, the bigger the proportion of plastic energy in total energy was. Basically, results of finite elements simulation could correspond with the experimental conclusions. By the observation of FE-SEM, the surface of cortical bone compressed was more seriously directly below the blunt indenter than the lateral face. For the berkovich indenter, the surface of indentation compressed was less directly below the indenter, but seriously on three lateral faces. This research may provide some new references to the studies of bone fracture mechanism in different load patterns in the initial press-in stage and offer new explanation for bone trauma diagnosis in clinical treatment and criminal investigation.

  2. Influence and evolution mechanism of different sharpness contact forms to mechanical property of cortical bone by nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingdong; Guo, Yue; Li, Lijia; Liu, Zeyang; Wu, Di; Shi, Dong; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Shizhong

    2018-03-01

    Based on different damage forms of various contact forms to bone, the mechanical response and mechanism were investigated by nanoindentation under different sharpness contact forms. For the purpose of simulating the different sharpness contact forms, two kinds of indenters were used in experiments and finite elements simulations. Through nanoindentation experiments, it was concluded that the residual depth of sharp indenter was bigger than that of blunt indenter with small penetration depth. However, the contrary law was obtained with bigger penetration depth. There was a turning point of transition from blunt tendency to sharp tendency. By calculation, it was concluded that the sharper the indenter was, the bigger the proportion of plastic energy in total energy was. Basically, results of finite elements simulation could correspond with the experimental conclusions. By the observation of FE-SEM, the surface of cortical bone compressed was more seriously directly below the blunt indenter than the lateral face. For the berkovich indenter, the surface of indentation compressed was less directly below the indenter, but seriously on three lateral faces. This research may provide some new references to the studies of bone fracture mechanism in different load patterns in the initial press-in stage and offer new explanation for bone trauma diagnosis in clinical treatment and criminal investigation.

  3. Sharp IV bounds on average treatment effects on the treated and other populations under endogeneity and noncompliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Martin; Laffers, Lukas; Mellace, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    subpopulations has been widely ignored in econometrics. We invoke treatment monotonicity and/or dominance assumptions to derive sharp bounds on the average treatment effects on the treated, as well as on other groups. Furthermore, we use our methods to assess the educational impact of a school voucher program...

  4. 77 FR 52061 - Notice of Proposed Exemption Involving Sharp HealthCare Located in San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration [Application No. L-11688] Notice of Proposed Exemption Involving Sharp HealthCare Located in San Diego, CA AGENCY: Employee Benefits Security... be sent to the Office of Exemption Determinations, Employee Benefits Security Administration, Room N...

  5. Group Elevator Peak Scheduling Based on Robust Optimization Model

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, J.; ZONG, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Scheduling of Elevator Group Control System (EGCS) is a typical combinatorial optimization problem. Uncertain group scheduling under peak traffic flows has become a research focus and difficulty recently. RO (Robust Optimization) method is a novel and effective way to deal with uncertain scheduling problem. In this paper, a peak scheduling method based on RO model for multi-elevator system is proposed. The method is immune to the uncertainty of peak traffic flows, optimal scheduling is re...

  6. Hydroclimatology of Dual Peak Cholera Incidence in Bengal Region: Inferences from a Spatial Explicit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Righetto, L.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2010-12-01

    The seasonality of cholera and its relation with environmental drivers are receiving increasing interest and research efforts, yet they remain unsatisfactorily understood. A striking example is the observed annual cycle of cholera incidence in the Bengal region which exhibits two peaks despite the main environmental drivers that have been linked to the disease (air and sea surface temperature, zooplankton density, river discharge) follow a synchronous single-peak annual pattern. A first outbreak, mainly affecting the coastal regions, occurs in spring and it is followed, after a period of low incidence during summer, by a second, usually larger, peak in autumn also involving regions situated farther inland. A hydroclimatological explanation for this unique seasonal cycle has been recently proposed: the low river spring flows favor the intrusion of brackish water (the natural environment of the causative agent of the disease) which, in turn, triggers the first outbreak. The summer rising river discharges have a temporary dilution effect and prompt the repulsion of contaminated water which lowers the disease incidence. However, the monsoon flooding, together with the induced crowding of the population and the failure of the sanitation systems, can possibly facilitate the spatial transmission of the disease and promote the autumn outbreak. We test this hypothesis using a mechanistic, spatially explicit model of cholera epidemic. The framework directly accounts for the role of the river network in transporting and redistributing cholera bacteria among human communities as well as for the annual fluctuation of the river flow. The model is forced with the actual environmental drivers of the region, namely river flow and temperature. Our results show that these two drivers, both having a single peak in the summer, can generate a double peak cholera incidence pattern. Besides temporal patterns, the model is also able to qualitatively reproduce spatial patterns characterized

  7. Nonlinear preprocessing method for detecting peaks from gas chromatograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hyeyoung

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The problem of locating valid peaks from data corrupted by noise frequently arises while analyzing experimental data. In various biological and chemical data analysis tasks, peak detection thus constitutes a critical preprocessing step that greatly affects downstream analysis and eventual quality of experiments. Many existing techniques require the users to adjust parameters by trial and error, which is error-prone, time-consuming and often leads to incorrect analysis results. Worse, conventional approaches tend to report an excessive number of false alarms by finding fictitious peaks generated by mere noise. Results We have designed a novel peak detection method that can significantly reduce parameter sensitivity, yet providing excellent peak detection performance and negligible false alarm rates from gas chromatographic data. The key feature of our new algorithm is the successive use of peak enhancement algorithms that are deliberately designed for a gradual improvement of peak detection quality. We tested our approach with real gas chromatograms as well as intentionally contaminated spectra that contain Gaussian or speckle-type noise. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve near perfect peak detection performance while maintaining very small false alarm probabilities in case of gas chromatograms. Given the fact that biological signals appear in the form of peaks in various experimental data and that the propose method can easily be extended to such data, our approach will be a useful and robust tool that can help researchers highlight valid signals in their noisy measurements.

  8. Evaluation of peak-fitting software for gamma spectrum analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahn, Guilherme S.; Genezini, Frederico A.; Moralles, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    In all applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy, one of the most important and delicate parts of the data analysis is the fitting of the gamma-ray spectra, where information as the number of counts, the position of the centroid and the width, for instance, are associated with each peak of each spectrum. There's a huge choice of computer programs that perform this type of analysis, and the most commonly used in routine work are the ones that automatically locate and fit the peaks; this fit can be made in several different ways - the most common ways are to fit a Gaussian function to each peak or simply to integrate the area under the peak, but some software go far beyond and include several small corrections to the simple Gaussian peak function, in order to compensate for secondary effects. In this work several gamma-ray spectroscopy software are compared in the task of finding and fitting the gamma-ray peaks in spectra taken with standard sources of 137 Cs, 60 Co, 133 Ba and 152 Eu. The results show that all of the automatic software can be properly used in the task of finding and fitting peaks, with the exception of GammaVision; also, it was possible to verify that the automatic peak-fitting software did perform as well as - and sometimes even better than - a manual peak-fitting software. (author)

  9. Determination of kinetic energy release from metastable peak widths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Allan Christian; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2017-01-01

    The kinetic energy that is released upon bond rupture is often represented as T1/2. A value that is derived from the FWHM of a fragment peak by the use of two different conversion formulas. The choice of formula depends on whether the peak is recorded by scanning a magnetic sector or an electrost......The kinetic energy that is released upon bond rupture is often represented as T1/2. A value that is derived from the FWHM of a fragment peak by the use of two different conversion formulas. The choice of formula depends on whether the peak is recorded by scanning a magnetic sector...

  10. Use of an iterative convolution approach for qualitative and quantitative peak analysis in low resolution gamma-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, Robin P.; Ai Xianyun; Peeples, Cody R.; Wang, Jiaxin; Lee, Kyoung; Peeples, Johanna L.; Calderon, Adan

    2011-01-01

    In many applications, low resolution gamma-ray spectrometers, such as sodium iodide scintillation detectors, are widely used primarily due to their relatively low cost and high detection efficiency. There is widespread interest in improved methods for analyzing spectral data acquired with such devices, using inverse analysis. Peak means and peak areas in gamma- and X-ray spectra are needed for both qualitative and quantitative analysis. This paper introduces the PEAKSI code package that was developed at the Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR). The basic approach described here is to use accurate forward models and iterative convolution instead of direct deconvolution. Rather than smoothing and differentiation a combination of linear regression and non-linear searching is used to minimize the reduced chi-square, since this approach retains the capability of establishing uncertainties in the estimated peak parameters. The PEAKSI package uses a Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) non-linear search method combined with multiple linear regression (MLR) to minimize the reduced chi-square value for fitting single or multiple overlapping peaks to determine peak parameters, including peak means, peak standard deviations or full width at half maximum (FWHM), net peak counts, and background counts of peaks in experimental gamma-ray spectra. This approach maintains the natural error structure so that parameter uncertainties can be estimated. The plan is to release this code to the public in the near future.

  11. Decadal oscillations and extreme value distribution of river peak flows in the Meuse catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Niel, Jan; Willems, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    In flood risk management, flood probabilities are often quantified through Generalized Pareto distributions of river peak flows. One of the main underlying assumptions is that all data points need to originate from one single underlying distribution (i.i.d. assumption). However, this hypothesis, although generally assumed to be correct for variables such as river peak flows, remains somehow questionable: flooding might indeed be caused by different hydrological and/or meteorological conditions. This study confirms these findings from previous research by showing a clear indication of the link between atmospheric conditions and flooding for the Meuse river in The Netherlands: decadal oscillations of river peak flows can (at least partially) be attributed to the occurrence of westerly weather types. The study further proposes a method to take this correlation between atmospheric conditions and river peak flows into account when calibrating an extreme value distribution for river peak flows. Rather than calibrating one single distribution to the data and potentially violating the i.i.d. assumption, weather type depending extreme value distributions are derived and composed. The study shows that, for the Meuse river in The Netherlands, such approach results in a more accurate extreme value distribution, especially with regards to extrapolations. Comparison of the proposed method with a traditional extreme value analysis approach and an alternative model-based approach for the same case study shows strong differences in the peak flow extrapolation. The design-flood for a 1,250 year return period is estimated at 4,800 m3s-1 for the proposed method, compared with 3,450 m3s-1 and 3,900 m3s-1 for the traditional method and a previous study. The methods were validated based on instrumental and documentary flood information of the past 500 years.

  12. Sharp at any Age: Moho boundary thickness estimates along a trans-sect through 2 Ga of tectonic history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servali, A.; Levin, V. L.; VanTongeren, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we evaluate crustal thickness and Moho sharpness beneath seismic stations in three different tectonic units of the North American continent: the Archean Superior Province, the Proterozoic Grenville Province, and the Paleozoic Appalachian Orogen. Our analysis involves two steps. First, for each site, we produce P-to-S receiver functions (RFs) organized by backazimuth and epicentral distance, and use them to identify the phase most likely representing a conversion from the Moho. Second, we construct averaged RFs for groups of telesismic events located in a similar geographic region, which we employ to examine shapes of Moho P-to-S converted phases in time series with maximum frequencies increasing from 0.25Hz to 2-3 Hz. At some sites we observe a progressive narrowing of a simple Moho converted phase with an increase in frequency, typical of a vertically instantaneous boundary, while at others the converted phase becomes progressively more complex, typical of a diffuse Moho. Thus, we adopt this difference in converted wave shape dependence on increasing frequency as a measure of Moho thickness. Our estimates of Moho thickness range from less than 300 m to over 2 km, with some locations showing evidence for multiple converting boundaries in the 35-50 km depth range. In this study we define "sharp" Moho at those sites where its vertical thickness is less than 1 km. Our results show that sharp Moho is universal in the Archean terranes regardless of surface lithology, likely due to higher Moho temperatures facilitating wide-spread delamination of dense lower crustal rocks. While a sharp Moho is not unique to the Superior Province, all Grenville and Appalachians sites where we find sharp Moho are in regions of granitic plutonism, suggesting a possible general association with reworking and density sorting of the crustal material (e.g. volcanic arc).

  13. A Wheat Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase TaCAD12 Contributes to Host Resistance to the Sharp Eyespot Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Wei; Luo, Meiying; Shan, Tianlei; Wei, Xuening; Du, Lipu; Xu, Huijun; Zhang, Zengyan

    2016-01-01

    Sharp eyespot, caused mainly by the necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia cerealis, is a destructive disease in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In Arabidopsis, certain cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases (CADs) have been implicated in monolignol biosynthesis and in defense response to bacterial pathogen infection. However, little is known about CADs in wheat defense responses to necrotrophic or soil-borne pathogens. In this study, we isolate a wheat CAD gene TaCAD12 in response to R. cerealis infection through microarray-based comparative transcriptomics, and study the enzyme activity and defense role of TaCAD12 in wheat. The transcriptional levels of TaCAD12 in sharp eyespot-resistant wheat lines were significantly higher compared with those in susceptible wheat lines. The sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that TaCAD12 belongs to IV group in CAD family. The biochemical assay proved that TaCAD12 protein is an authentic CAD enzyme and possesses catalytic efficiencies toward both coniferyl aldehyde and sinapyl aldehyde. Knock-down of TaCAD12 transcript significantly repressed resistance of the gene-silenced wheat plants to sharp eyespot caused by R. cerealis, whereas TaCAD12 overexpression markedly enhanced resistance of the transgenic wheat lines to sharp eyespot. Furthermore, certain defense genes (Defensin, PR10, PR17c, and Chitinase1) and monolignol biosynthesis-related genes (TaCAD1, TaCCR, and TaCOMT1) were up-regulated in the TaCAD12-overexpressing wheat plants but down-regulated in TaCAD12-silencing plants. These results suggest that TaCAD12 positively contributes to resistance against sharp eyespot through regulation of the expression of certain defense genes and monolignol biosynthesis-related genes in wheat. PMID:27899932

  14. A wheat cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase TaCAD12 contributes to host resistance to the sharp eyespot disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Rong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sharp eyespot, caused mainly by the necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia cerealis, is a destructive disease in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. In Arabidopsis, certain cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases (CADs have been implicated in monolignol biosynthesis and in defense response to bacterial pathogen infection. However, little is known about CADs in wheat defense responses to necrotrophic or soil-borne pathogens. In this study, we isolate a wheat CAD gene TaCAD12 in response to R. cerealis infection through microarray-based comparative transcriptomics, and study the enzyme activity and defense role of TaCAD12 in wheat. The transcriptional levels of TaCAD12 in sharp eyespot-resistant wheat lines were significantly higher compared with those in susceptible wheat lines. The sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that TaCAD12 belongs to IV group in CAD family. The biochemical assay proved that TaCAD12 protein is an authentic CAD enzyme and possesses catalytic efficiencies towards both coniferyl aldehyde and sinapyl aldehyde. Knock-down of TaCAD12 transcript significantly repressed resistance of the gene-silenced wheat plants to sharp eyespot caused by R. cerealis, whereas TaCAD12 overexpression markedly enhanced resistance of the transgenic wheat lines to sharp eyespot. Furthermore, certain defense genes (Defensin, PR10, PR17c, and Chitinase1 and monolignol biosynthesis-related genes (TaCAD1, TaCCR, and TaCOMT1 were up-regulated in the TaCAD12-overexpressing wheat plants but down-regulated in TaCAD12-silencing plants. These results suggest that TaCAD12 positively contributes to resistance against sharp eyespot through regulation of the expression of certain defense genes and monolignol biosynthesis-related genes in wheat.

  15. A Wheat Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase TaCAD12 Contributes to Host Resistance to the Sharp Eyespot Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Wei; Luo, Meiying; Shan, Tianlei; Wei, Xuening; Du, Lipu; Xu, Huijun; Zhang, Zengyan

    2016-01-01

    Sharp eyespot, caused mainly by the necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia cerealis , is a destructive disease in hexaploid wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.). In Arabidopsis , certain cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases (CADs) have been implicated in monolignol biosynthesis and in defense response to bacterial pathogen infection. However, little is known about CADs in wheat defense responses to necrotrophic or soil-borne pathogens. In this study, we isolate a wheat CAD gene TaCAD12 in response to R. cerealis infection through microarray-based comparative transcriptomics, and study the enzyme activity and defense role of TaCAD12 in wheat. The transcriptional levels of TaCAD12 in sharp eyespot-resistant wheat lines were significantly higher compared with those in susceptible wheat lines. The sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that TaCAD12 belongs to IV group in CAD family. The biochemical assay proved that TaCAD12 protein is an authentic CAD enzyme and possesses catalytic efficiencies toward both coniferyl aldehyde and sinapyl aldehyde. Knock-down of TaCAD12 transcript significantly repressed resistance of the gene-silenced wheat plants to sharp eyespot caused by R. cerealis , whereas TaCAD12 overexpression markedly enhanced resistance of the transgenic wheat lines to sharp eyespot. Furthermore, certain defense genes ( Defensin, PR10, PR17c , and Chitinase1 ) and monolignol biosynthesis-related genes ( TaCAD1, TaCCR , and TaCOMT1 ) were up-regulated in the TaCAD12 -overexpressing wheat plants but down-regulated in TaCAD12 -silencing plants. These results suggest that TaCAD12 positively contributes to resistance against sharp eyespot through regulation of the expression of certain defense genes and monolignol biosynthesis-related genes in wheat.

  16. Single-hole spectral function and spin-charge separation in the t-J model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, A. S.; Prokof'ev, N. V.; Svistunov, B. V.

    2001-07-01

    Worm algorithm Monte Carlo simulations of the hole Green function with subsequent spectral analysis were performed for 0.1hole spectral function in the thermodynamic limit. Spectral analysis reveals a δ-function-sharp quasiparticle peak at the lower edge of the spectrum that is incompatible with the power-law singularity and thus rules out the possibility of spin-charge separation in this parameter range. Spectral continuum features two peaks separated by a gap ~4÷5 t.

  17. SHARP: A Spatially Higher-order, Relativistic Particle-in-cell Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalaby, Mohamad; Broderick, Avery E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Chang, Philip [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1900 E. Kenwood Boulevard, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Pfrommer, Christoph [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Lamberts, Astrid [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Puchwein, Ewald, E-mail: mshalaby@live.ca [Institute of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Cosmology, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-20

    Numerical heating in particle-in-cell (PIC) codes currently precludes the accurate simulation of cold, relativistic plasma over long periods, severely limiting their applications in astrophysical environments. We present a spatially higher-order accurate relativistic PIC algorithm in one spatial dimension, which conserves charge and momentum exactly. We utilize the smoothness implied by the usage of higher-order interpolation functions to achieve a spatially higher-order accurate algorithm (up to the fifth order). We validate our algorithm against several test problems—thermal stability of stationary plasma, stability of linear plasma waves, and two-stream instability in the relativistic and non-relativistic regimes. Comparing our simulations to exact solutions of the dispersion relations, we demonstrate that SHARP can quantitatively reproduce important kinetic features of the linear regime. Our simulations have a superior ability to control energy non-conservation and avoid numerical heating in comparison to common second-order schemes. We provide a natural definition for convergence of a general PIC algorithm: the complement of physical modes captured by the simulation, i.e., those that lie above the Poisson noise, must grow commensurately with the resolution. This implies that it is necessary to simultaneously increase the number of particles per cell and decrease the cell size. We demonstrate that traditional ways for testing for convergence fail, leading to plateauing of the energy error. This new PIC code enables us to faithfully study the long-term evolution of plasma problems that require absolute control of the energy and momentum conservation.

  18. A karyosystematic analysis of some water beetles related to Deronectes Sharp (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Angus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An account is given of the karyotypes of five species and one additional subspecies of Deronectes Sharp, 1882, three species of Stictotarsus Zimmermann, 1919, one species of Trichonectes Guignot, 1941, four species of Scarodytes Gozis, 1914 and 17 species of Nebrioporus Régimbart, 1906. Deronectes species are characterised by a neo-Xy system of sex chromosomes and autosome numbers ranging from 60 (D. ferrugineus Fery et Brancucci, 1987 and D. wewalkai Fery et Fresneda, 1988 through 48 (D. latus (Stephens, 1829, D. angusi Fery et Brancucci, 1990 to 28 (D. costipennis Brancucci, 1983, D. costipennis gignouxi Fery et Brancucci, 1989 and D. platynotus (Germar, 1834. The three species of Stictotarsus, S. duodecimpustulatus (Fabricius, 1792, S. procerus (Aubé, 1838 and S. bertrandi (Legros, 1956, all belonging to the S. duodecimpustulatus group of species, have karyotypes comprising 54 autosomes and neo-Xy sex chromosomes. Trichonectes otini Guignot, 1941 has 48 autosomes and an X0 system of sex chromosomes, an arrangement shared with the 17 species of Nebrioporus Régimbart. The four Scarodytes species, S. halensis (Fabricius, 1787, S. nigriventris (Zimmermann, 1919, S. fuscitarsis (Aubé, 1838 and S. malickyi Wewalka, 1997, all have 54 autosomes and X0 sex chromosomes. The karyotypes of the various species are found to be distinctive and to support separation of these species from one another. In two cases (Nebrioporus martinii (Fairmaire, 1858 and N. sardus (Gemminger et Harold, 1868, and Scarodytes halensis and S. fuscitarsis the karyotypes require the recognition of the taxa as full species, not subspecies. The implications of these data for the generic classification are considered. The data are found to be compatible with the DNA-based phylogeny proposed by Ribera (2003, where the enlarged Stictotarsus proposed by Nilsson and Angus (1992 is found to be unsatisfactory.

  19. Clinical and diagnostic methods for evaluation of sharp foreign body syndrome in buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasr-Eldin M. Aref

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was designed to evaluate clinically and under laboratory condition the sharp foreign body syndrome (SFBS in buffaloes with special emphasis on the diagnostic value of radiography, ultrasonography and blood gases and acidbase balance. Materials and Methods: 196 buffaloes with a history of anorexia, reduction of milk production and no response to previous medical treatment were included in the present study. These animals were subjected to clinical and radiographical examinations. Positive cases for SFBS were further evaluated by sonography, hemato-biochemical and blood gas and acid base balance analysis.Results: Out of 196 admitted cases, 49 (25% cases were confirmed as SFBS by clinical and radiographical examination. Positive cases were subsequently divided into two main categories (complicated and non complicated according to radiographical and sonographical findings. SFBS with no complication was diagnosed in 16 cases while 33 cases showed various degrees of complication including reticular adhesion (abdominal and diaphragmatic, n= 23, diaphragmatic hernia (n = 6 and traumatic pericarditis (n = 4. Leukocytosis, hyperprotenemia and increased activity of AST and ALT were of additional values in the diagnosis of SFBS. A consistent finding of primary metabolic alkalosis was recorded in all cases except one with advanced traumatic pericarditis that showed metabolic acidosis. Conclusion: While there is no substitution for clinical examination, using of ultrasonography and radiography simultaneously are essential for proper evaluation and differentiation between various sequelae of SFBS in buffaloes. Radiography is an efficient tool for visualization of metallic foreign body while ultrasonography is an excellent device in assessing fibrinous deposits. Hemato-biochemical and blood gases and acid base balance are of additional values in discriminating between various outcomes of SFBS.

  20. Occupational exposure to sharp injuries among medical and dental house officers in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosayaba Osazuwa-Peters

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sharp injuries constitute important occupational exposure in hospital environment, and perhaps the newly graduated medical and dental students, known as House Officers, in the first twelve months of their practice, are the most vulnerable of all health workers. This study was designed to examine the nature and prevalence of occupational injuries among medical and dental house officers and factors associated with reporting these injuries. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to obtain information on demography, types of exposure, and barriers to official reporting of occupational injuries. One hundred and forty-four medical and dental house officers in 3 government owned hospitals in Edo State, Nigeria participated in the study, between April and May, 2010. Descriptive and multivariable analyses were performed. Results: The overall response rate was 96%. Out of all participants, 69.4% were male; 82.6% were medical house officers. Prevalence of percutaneous injury was 56.9%; where needlestick injury constituted one-third of all injuries. Mean frequency of injury was 1.86±2.24, with medicals having more injuries (p = 0.043. The ward was the most common location for the injury and 14.8% of exposures occurred as a result of lapse in concentration. At least 77.0% did not formally report their injury and perceived low injury risk was the most common reason given (51.67%. Conclusion: This study shows that a substantial number of House Officers are exposed to occupational injuries and that the majority of them does not formally report these. Safer work environment may be achieved by implementing adequate educational programs tailored specifically to house officers, and policies encouraging exposure reporting should be developed.

  1. SHARP: genome-scale identification of gene-protein-reaction associations in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, S; Durai, Dilip A; Wangikar, Pramod P; Viswanathan, Ganesh A

    2013-11-01

    Genome scale metabolic model provides an overview of an organism's metabolic capability. These genome-specific metabolic reconstructions are based on identification of gene to protein to reaction (GPR) associations and, in turn, on homology with annotated genes from other organisms. Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes which have diverged appreciably from their nonphotosynthetic counterparts. They also show significant evolutionary divergence from plants, which are well studied for their photosynthetic apparatus. We argue that context-specific sequence and domain similarity can add to the repertoire of the GPR associations and significantly expand our view of the metabolic capability of cyanobacteria. We took an approach that combines the results of context-specific sequence-to-sequence similarity search with those of sequence-to-profile searches. We employ PSI-BLAST for the former, and CDD, Pfam, and COG for the latter. An optimization algorithm was devised to arrive at a weighting scheme to combine the different evidences with KEGG-annotated GPRs as training data. We present the algorithm in the form of software "Systematic, Homology-based Automated Re-annotation for Prokaryotes (SHARP)." We predicted 3,781 new GPR associations for the 10 prokaryotes considered of which eight are cyanobacteria species. These new GPR associations fall in several metabolic pathways and were used to annotate 7,718 gaps in the metabolic network. These new annotations led to discovery of several pathways that may be active and thereby providing new directions for metabolic engineering of these species for production of useful products. Metabolic model developed on such a reconstructed network is likely to give better phenotypic predictions.

  2. A sharp Moho step under the Central and Eastern Betics, Western Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lis Mancilla, Flor; Heit, Benjamin; Morales, Jose; Heit, Xiaohui; Molina-Aguilera, Antonio; Stich, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We map the lithospheric structure under the central and eastern Betics (western Mediterranean region) interpreting P-receiver functions obtained from two dense seismic profiles (HIRE and Transcorbe profiles of ~120 km and 160 km of length, respectively). The goal is to study the lithospheric structure and its variations between the different geological domains, from the Alboran domain in the south (metamorphic rocks), the External zones (sedimentary rocks) and the Variscan terrains of the Iberian Massif in the north. One of the profiles (HIRE), North-South oriented, crosses the Sierra Nevada Mountains, one of the prominent features in the Western Mediterranean tectonic region with the highest topography of the Iberia peninsula (~3400 m). The spacing between stations, around 2km, allows mapping with high accuracy of the variations of the crustal structure. We observe a sharp Moho step of ~15 km under the Internal zones of the Alboran domain coinciding the thinner crust with the highest topography along the profile. This agrees with the prior hypothesis about the lack of crustal root underneath Sierra Nevada Mountains and opens a question about the source of the dynamic compensation of its topography. Previous studies showed that the Iberian crust understrust the Alboran domain under its contact with the External zones observing the presence of slab-type feature of Iberian lithosphere at the western Betics while tearing and delamination of this Iberian slab is proposed at eastern Betics. We observe that the Iberian crust undertrust the Alboran domain and terminate sharply under the contact between the Alpujarride and the Nevado-Filabre complexes (Alboran domain).

  3. Sharp Boundary Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data using Bayesian Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S.; Huang, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Normally magnetotelluric(MT) inversion method cannot show the distribution of underground resistivity with clear boundary, even if there are obviously different blocks. Aiming to solve this problem, we develop a Bayesian structure to inverse 2D MT sharp boundary data, using boundary location and inside resistivity as the random variables. Firstly, we use other MT inversion results, like ModEM, to analyze the resistivity distribution roughly. Then, we select the suitable random variables and change its data format to traditional staggered grid parameters, which can be used to do finite difference forward part. Finally, we can shape the posterior probability density(PPD), which contains all the prior information and model-data correlation, by Markov Chain Monte Carlo(MCMC) sampling from prior distribution. The depth, resistivity and their uncertainty can be valued. It also works for sensibility estimation. We applied the method to a synthetic case, which composes two large abnormal blocks in a trivial background. We consider the boundary smooth and the near true model weight constrains that mimic joint inversion or constrained inversion, then we find that the model results a more precise and focused depth distribution. And we also test the inversion without constrains and find that the boundary could also be figured, though not as well. Both inversions have a good valuation of resistivity. The constrained result has a lower root mean square than ModEM inversion result. The data sensibility obtained via PPD shows that the resistivity is the most sensible, center depth comes second and both sides are the worst.

  4. Standardized methodological assessment of research presentations (SHARP): development of a new instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhyar, Forough; Dath, Deepak; Amin, Nalin; Bhandari, Mohit; Kelly, Stephen; Kolkin, Ann; Gill Pottruff, Catherine; Reid, Susan

    2014-06-01

    There are currently no validated guidelines to assess the quality of the content and the delivery style of scientific podium surgical presentations. We have developed a simple, short, and reliable instrument to objectively assess the overall quality of scientific podium presentations. A simple and efficient rating instrument was developed to assess the scientific content and presentation style/skills of the surgical residents' presentations from 1996 to 2013. Absolute and consistency agreement for the different sections of the instrument was determined and assessed overtime, by stage of the project and study design. Intraclass correlation coefficients with 95% confidence intervals were calculated and reported using a mixed-effects model. Inter-rater reliability for both absolute and consistency agreement was substantial for total score and for each of the 3 sections of the instrument. The absolute agreement for the overall rating of the presentations was .87 (.63 to .98) and .78 (.50 to .95), and the consistency agreement was .90 (.70 to .99) and .87 (.67 to .97) for the 2012 and 2013 institutional research presentations, respectively. Rater agreement for evaluating project stage and different study designs varied from .70 to .81 and was consistent over the years. The consistency agreement in rating of the presentation was .77 for both faculty and resident raters. Standardized methodological assessment of research presentations (SHARP) instrument rates the scientific quality of the research and style of the delivered presentation. It is highly reliable in scoring the quality of the all study designs regardless of their stage. We recommend that researchers focus on presenting the key concepts and significant elements of their evidence using visually simple slides in a professionally engaging manner for effective delivery of their research and better communication with the audience. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Outcome following nerve repair of high isolated clean sharp injuries of the ulnar nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Post

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The detailed outcome of surgical repair of high isolated clean sharp (HICS ulnar nerve lesions has become relevant in view of the recent development of distal nerve transfer. Our goal was to determine the outcome of HICS ulnar nerve repair in order to create a basis for the optimal management of these lesions. METHODS: High ulnar nerve lesions are defined as localized in the area ranging from the proximal forearm to the axilla just distal to the branching of the medial cord of the brachial plexus. A meta-analysis of the literature concerning high ulnar nerve injuries was performed. Additionally, a retrospective study of the outcome of nerve repair of HICS ulnar nerve injuries at our institution was performed. The Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer and the Rosén-Lundborg protocol were used. RESULTS: The literature review identified 46 papers. Many articles presented outcomes of mixed lesion groups consisting of combined ulnar and median nerves, or the outcome of high and low level injuries was pooled. In addition, outcome was expressed using different scoring systems. 40 patients with HICS ulnar nerve lesions were found with sufficient data for further analysis. In our institution, 15 patients had nerve repair with a median interval between trauma and reconstruction of 17 days (range 0-516. The mean score of the motor and sensory domain of the Rosen's Scale instrument was 58% and 38% of the unaffected arm, respectively. Two-point discrimination never reached less then 12 mm. CONCLUSION: From the literature, it was not possible to draw a definitive conclusion on outcome of surgical repair of HICS ulnar nerve lesions. Detailed neurological function assessment of our own patients showed that some ulnar nerve function returned. Intrinsic muscle strength recovery was generally poor. Based on this study, one might cautiously argue that repair strategies of HICS ulnar nerve lesions need to be improved.

  6. Sharp Morphological Transitions from Nanoscale Mixed-Anchoring Patterns in Confined Nematic Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas-Pérez, Julio C; Li, Xiao; Martínez-González, José A; Smith, Coleman; Hernández-Ortiz, J P; Nealey, Paul F; de Pablo, Juan J

    2017-10-31

    Liquid crystals are known to be particularly sensitive to orientational cues provided at surfaces or interfaces. In this work, we explore theoretically, computationally, and experimentally the behavior of liquid crystals on isolated nanoscale patterns with controlled anchoring characteristics at small length scales. The orientation of the liquid crystal is controlled through the use of chemically patterned polymer brushes that are tethered to a surface. This system can be engineered with remarkable precision, and the central question addressed here is whether a characteristic length scale exists at which information encoded on a surface is no longer registered by a liquid crystal. To do so, we adopt a tensorial description of the free energy of the hybrid liquid-crystal-surface system, and we investigate its morphology in a systematic manner. For long and narrow surface stripes, it is found that the liquid crystal follows the instructions provided by the pattern down to 100 nm widths. This is accomplished through the creation of line defects that travel along the sides of the stripes. We show that a "sharp" morphological transition occurs from a uniform undistorted alignment to a dual uniform/splay-bend morphology. The theoretical and numerical predictions advanced here are confirmed by experimental observations. Our combined analysis suggests that nanoscale patterns can be used to manipulate the orientation of liquid crystals at a fraction of the energetic cost that is involved in traditional liquid crystal-based devices. The insights presented in this work have the potential to provide a new fabrication platform to assemble low power bistable devices, which could be reconfigured upon application of small external fields.

  7. Present and future thermal environments available to Sharp-tailed Grouse in an intact grassland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Raynor

    Full Text Available Better understanding animal ecology in terms of thermal habitat use has become a focus of ecological studies, in large part due to the predicted temperature increases associated with global climate change. To further our knowledge on how ground-nesting endotherms respond to thermal landscapes, we examined the thermal ecology of Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus during the nesting period. We measured site-specific iButton temperatures (TiB and vegetation characteristics at nest sites, nearby random sites, and landscape sites to assess thermal patterns at scales relevant to nesting birds. We asked if microhabitat vegetation characteristics at nest sites matched the characteristics that directed macrohabitat nest-site selection. Grouse selected sites sheltered by dense vegetation for nesting that moderated TiB on average up to 2.7°C more than available landscape sites. Successful nests were positioned in a way that reduced exposure to thermal extremes by as much as 4°C relative to failed nests with an overall mean daytime difference (±SE of 0.4 ±0.03°C. We found that macrohabitat nest-site selection was guided by dense vegetation cover and minimal bare ground as also seen at the microhabitat scale. Global climate projections for 2080 suggest that TiB at nest sites may approach temperatures currently avoided on the landscape, emphasizing a need for future conservation plans that acknowledge fine-scale thermal space in climate change scenarios. These data show that features of grassland landscapes can buffer organisms from unfavorable microclimatic conditions and highlight how thermal heterogeneity at the individual-level can drive decisions guiding nest site selection.

  8. Sharp Morphological Transitions from Nanoscale Mixed-Anchoring Patterns in Confined Nematic Liquid Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armas-Pérez, Julio C. [Institute; División; Li, Xiao [Institute; Martínez-González, José A. [Institute; Smith, Coleman [Institute; Hernández-Ortiz, J. P. [Departamento; Nealey, Paul F. [Institute; Materials; de Pablo, Juan J. [Institute; Materials

    2017-08-17

    Liquid crystals are known to be particularly sensitive to orientational cues provided at surfaces or interfaces. In this work, we explore theoretically, computationally, and experimentally the behavior of liquid crystals on isolated nanoscale patterns with controlled anchoring characteristics at small length scales. The orientation of the liquid crystal is controlled through the use of chemically patterned polymer brushes that are tethered to a surface. This system can be engineered with remarkable precision, and the central question addressed here is whether a characteristic length scale exists at which information encoded on a surface is no longer registered by a liquid crystal. To do so, we adopt a tensorial description of the free energy of the hybrid liquidcrystal surface system, and we investigate its morphology in a systematic manner. For long and narrow surface stripes, it is found that the liquid crystal follows the instructions provided by the pattern down to 100 nm widths. This is accomplished through the creation of line defects that travel along the sides of the stripes. We show that a "sharp" morphological transition occurs from a uniform undistorted alignment to a dual uniform/splay-bend morphology. The theoretical and numerical predictions advanced here are confirmed by experimental observations. Our combined analysis suggests that nanoscale patterns can be used to manipulate the orientation of liquid crystals at a fraction of the energetic cost that is involved in traditional liquid crystal-based devices. The insights presented in this work have the potential to provide a new fabrication platform to assemble low power bistable devices, which could be reconfigured upon application of small external fields.

  9. Megawatt-peak-power picosecond all-fiber-based laser in MOPA using highly Yb3+-doped LMA phosphate fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guannan; Fu, Shijie; Sheng, Quan; Li, Jinhui; Fang, Qiang; Liu, Huixian; Chavez-Pirson, Arturo; Peyghambarian, N.; Shi, Wei; Yao, Jianquan

    2018-03-01

    A megawatt-peak-power picosecond all-fiber-based laser in master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) is experimentally demonstrated. Only 34-cm-long highly Yb3+-doped large mode area (LMA) phosphate fiber was used as the gain fiber in the amplification stage to alleviate nonlinearity and achieve high peak power. Picosecond pulses with single pulse energy of 21.2 μJ and peak power of 0.96 MW were achieved at the repetition rate of 500 kHz. Evident spectral degradation can be observed as the peak power approached 1 MW, and a stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) free peak power of 0.51 MW was obtained in the experiment. Moreover, the output power under different repetition rates was investigated.

  10. Centers responsible for the TL peaks of willemite mineral estimated by EPR analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundu Rao, T.K. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cano, Nilo F., E-mail: nilo.cano@unifesp.br [Departamento de Ciências do Mar, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Doutor Carvalho de Mendonça, 144, CEP 11070-102, Santos, SP (Brazil); Silva-Carrera, Betzabel N.; Ferreira, Reinaldo M. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Javier-Ccallata, Henry S., E-mail: henrysjc@gmail.com [Escuela Profesional de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Formales, Universidad Nacional de San Agustín (UNSA), Av. Independencia S/N, Arequipa (Peru); Watanabe, Shigueo, E-mail: watanabe@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    The mineral willemite (Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) exhibits five thermoluminescence (TL) peaks approximately at 160, 225, 260, 310 and 400 °C. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies were carried out to study the defect centers induced in the mineral by gamma irradiation and also to identify the centers responsible for the TL process. Room temperature EPR spectrum of irradiated mineral is a superposition of at least four distinct centers. One of the centers (center I) with an isotropic g factor 2.0114 is attributable to an intrinsic O{sup −} type center and the center correlates with the TL peak at 160 °C. Center II exhibiting hyperfine lines is also tentatively assigned to an O{sup −} ion and is related to the low temperature TL peak at 160 °C. Center III is characterized by an axially symmetric g-tensor with principal values g{sub ||}=2.0451 and g{sub ⊥}=2.011 and is identified as an O{sub 2}{sup −} ion. This center appears to be related to 160, 225 and 260 °C TL peaks. Center IV with principal g-values g{sub ||}=2.0025 and g{sub ⊥}=2.0088 is attributed to an F{sup +}-type center (singly ionized oxygen vacancy) and is the likely recombination center for TL peaks between 160 and 310 °C.

  11. Detecting broad domains and narrow peaks in ChIP-seq data with hiddenDomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starmer, Joshua; Magnuson, Terry

    2016-03-24

    Correctly identifying genomic regions enriched with histone modifications and transcription factors is key to understanding their regulatory and developmental roles. Conceptually, these regions are divided into two categories, narrow peaks and broad domains, and different algorithms are used to identify each one. Datasets that span these two categories are often analyzed with a single program for peak calling combined with an ad hoc method for domains. We developed hiddenDomains, which identifies both peaks and domains, and compare it to the leading algorithms using H3K27me3, H3K36me3, GABP, ESR1 and FOXA ChIP-seq datasets. The output from the programs was compared to qPCR-validated enriched and depleted sites, predicted transcription factor binding sites, and highly-transcribed gene bodies. With every method, hiddenDomains, performed as well as, if not better than algorithms dedicated to a specific type of analysis. hiddenDomains performs as well as the best domain and peak calling algorithms, making it ideal for analyzing ChIP-seq datasets, especially those that contain a mixture of peaks and domains.

  12. The replacement principle in networked economies with single-peaked preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szwagrzak, Karol

    2016-01-01

    We study the transfer of a resource from a group of suppliers to a group of demanders through links in a network. The analysis is relevant to situations where institutional constraints bar the use of the price mechanism: the allocation of workloads under fixed salaries, a commodity under disequil...

  13. Single Peak Soliton and Periodic Cusp Wave of the Generalized Schrodinger-Boussinesq Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Li-Jing; Tang, Sheng-Qiang; Zhao, Hai-Xia

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we study peakon, cuspon, smooth soliton and periodic cusp wave of the generalized Schrödinger-Boussinesq equations. Based on the method of dynamical systems, the generalized Schrödinger-Boussinesq equations are shown to have new the parametric representations of peakon, cuspon, smooth soliton and periodic cusp wave solutions. Under different parametric conditions, various sufficient conditions to guarantee the existence of the above solutions are given. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11361017, 11161013 and Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi under Grant Nos. 2012GXNSFAA053003, 2013GXNSFAA019010, and Program for Innovative Research Team of Guilin University of Electronic Technology

  14. Item analysis of single-peaked response data : the psychometric evaluation of bipolar measurement scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polak, Maaike Geertruida

    2011-01-01

    The thesis explains the fundamental difference between unipolar and bipolar measurement scales for psychological characteristics. We explore the use of correspondence analysis (CA), a technique that is similar to principal component analysis and is available in SAS and SPSS, to select items that

  15. Cadence, peak vertical acceleration, and peak loading rate during ambulatory activities: implications for activity prescription for bone health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Alex V; Schuna, John M; Stiles, Victoria H; Tudor-Locke, Catrine

    2014-09-01

    Previous research has reported peak vertical acceleration and peak loading rate thresholds beneficial to bone mineral density (BMD). Such thresholds are difficult to translate into meaningful recommendations for physical activity. Cadence (steps/min) is a more readily interpretable measure of ambulatory activity. To examine relationships between cadence, peak vertical acceleration and peak loading rate during ambulation and identify the cadence associated with previously reported bone-beneficial thresholds for peak vertical acceleration (4.9 g) and peak loading rate (43 BW/s). Ten participants completed 8 trials each of: slow walking, brisk walking, slow running, and fast running. Acceleration data were captured using a GT3×+ accelerometer worn at the hip. Peak loading rate was collected via a force plate. Strong relationships were identified between cadence and peak vertical acceleration (r = .96, P acceleration and 43 BW/s peak loading rate thresholds, respectively. Cadences ≥ 2.0 to 2.6 steps/s equate to acceleration and loading rate thresholds related to bone health. Further research is needed to investigate whether the frequency of daily occurrences of this cadence is associated with BMD.

  16. Peak effect in surface resistance at microwave frequencies in Dy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the measurements at both frequencies the induced microwave current was always less than the critical current of the films. The reason for observation of this peak effect in these films has been explained in our earlier publication [5]. Comparing figures 1 and 2, it is observed that the peaks in sample S1 are broader and.

  17. Psychological Preparation for Peak Performance in Sports Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohuruogu, Ben; Jonathan, Ugwuanyi I.; Ikechukwu, Ugwu Jude

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts to make an overview of various techniques, sport psychologist adopt in psychological preparation of athletes for peak performance. To attain peak performance in sports competitions, coaches and athletes should not base their prospect on physical training on sport skills alone rather should integrate both the mental and physical…

  18. Online junction temperature measurement using peak gate current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Nick; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Iannuzzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A new method for junction temperature measurement of MOS-gated power semiconductor switches is presented. The measurement method involves detecting the peak voltage over the external gate resistor of an IGBT or MOSFET during turn-on. This voltage is directly proportional to the peak gate current...

  19. Flood Peak Estimation Using Rainfall Run off Models | Matondo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The design of hydraulic structures such as road culverts, road bridges and dam spillways requires the determination of the design food peak. Two approaches are available in the determination of the design flood peak and these are: flood frequency analysis and rainfall runoff models. Flood frequency analysis requires a ...

  20. Probabilistic Analysis of Peak Daily Rainfall for Prediction purposes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The obtained peak daily rainfall values were subjected to Gumbel, Log-Gumbel, Normal, Log-Normal, Pearson and Log-Pearson probability distributions. Mathematical equation for probability distribution functions were established for each town and used to predict peak rainfall. The predicted values were subjected to ...