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Sample records for single session radiosurgery

  1. Tolerance of the human spinal cord to single dose radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, S.; Zhu, G.; Yin, F.-F.; Ajlouni, M.; Kim, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Tolerance of the spinal cord to the single dose of radiation is not well defined. Although there are cases of human spinal cord tolerance from re-irradiation to the same cord level, the information about the tolerance of human spinal cord to single large dose of radiosurgery is not available. We carried out spinal radiosurgery to treat spinal metastasis and studied the single dose tolerance of the human spinal cord in an ongoing dose escalation paradigm. A total of 39 patients with 48 lesions of spinal metastasis were treated with single dose radiosurgery at Henry Ford Hospital. The radiosurgery dose was escalated from 8 Gy to 16 Gy at 2 Gy increment. The radiation dose was prescribed to periphery of the spinal tumor. The radiation dose to the spinal cord was estimated by computerized dosimetry. The median follow-up time was 10 months (range 6-18 months) from the radiosurgery. The endpoint of the study was to demonstrate the efficacy of the spinal radiosurgery and to determine the tolerance of human spinal cord to single dose radiosurgery. The dose to the spinal cord was generally less than 50 % of the prescribed radiation dose. The volume of the spinal cord that received higher than this dose was less than 20 % of the anterior portion of the spinal cord. Maximum single dose of 8 Gy was delivered to the anterior 20 % of the spinal cord in this dose escalation study. The dose volume histogram will be presented. There was no acute or subacute radiation toxicity detected clinically and radiologically during the maximum follow-up of 20 months. Further dose escalation is in progress. The single tolerance dose of the human spinal cord appears to be at least 8 Gy when it was given to the 20 % of the cord volume, although the duration of follow up is not long enough to detect severe late cord toxicity. This study offers a valuable radiobiological basis of the normal spinal cord tolerance, and opens spinal radiosurgery as a safe treatment for spinal metastasis

  2. Treatment of malignant tumors of the skull base with multi-session radiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagnon Gregory J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Malignant tumors that involve the skull base pose significant challenges to the clinician because of the proximity of critical neurovascular structures and limited effectiveness of surgical resection without major morbidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of multi-session radiosurgery in patients with malignancies of the skull base. Methods Clinical and radiographic data for 37 patients treated with image-guided, multi-session radiosurgery between January 2002 and December 2007 were reviewed retrospectively. Lesions were classified according to involvement with the bones of the base of the skull and proximity to the cranial nerves. Results Our cohort consisted of 37 patients. Six patients with follow-up periods less than four weeks were eliminated from statistical consideration, thus leaving the data from 31 patients to be analyzed. The median follow-up was 37 weeks. Ten patients (32% were alive at the end of the follow-up period. At last follow-up, or the time of death from systemic disease, tumor regression or stable local disease was observed in 23 lesions, representing an overall tumor control rate of 74%. For the remainder of lesions, the median time to progression was 24 weeks. The median progression-free survival was 230 weeks. The median overall survival was 39 weeks. In the absence of tumor progression, there were no cranial nerve, brainstem or vascular complications referable specifically to CyberKnife® radiosurgery. Conclusion Our experience suggests that multi-session radiosurgery for the treatment of malignant skull base tumors is comparable to other radiosurgical techniques in progression-free survival, local tumor control, and adverse effects.

  3. BILATERAL SINGLE SESSION URETEROSCOPY FOR URETERAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the feasibility, safety and success rate of bilateral single session rigid retrograde ureteroscopy (URS) for bilateral ureteral calculi. Patients and Methods: Thirty-five patients underwent bilateral single session ureteroscopic calculus removal. Results: Out of 70 renal units in 35 patients treated, ...

  4. Therapeutic profile of single-fraction radiosurgery of vestibular schwannoma: unrelated malignancy predicts tumor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wowra, Berndt; Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph; Schichor, Christian; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2012-07-01

    Radiosurgery has become an accepted treatment option for vestibular schwannomas. Nevertheless, predictors of tumor control and treatment toxicity in current radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas are not well understood. To generate new information on predictors of tumor control and cranial nerve toxicity of single-fraction radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas, we conducted a single-institution long-term observational study of radiosurgery for sporadic vestibular schwannomas. Minimum follow-up was 3 years. Investigated as potential predictors of tumor control and cranial nerve toxicity were treatment technology; tumor resection preceding radiosurgery; tumor size; gender; patient age; history of cancer, vascular disease, or metabolic disease; tumor volume; radiosurgical prescription dose; and isodose line. Three hundred eighty-six patients met inclusion criteria. Treatment failure was observed in 27 patients. History of unrelated cancer (strongest predictor) and prescription dose significantly predicted tumor control. The cumulative incidence of treatment failure was 30% after 6.5 years in patients with unrelated malignancy and 10% after ≥15 years in patients without such cancer (P < .02). Tumor volume was the only predictor of trigeminal neuropathy (observed in 6 patients). No predictor of facial nerve toxicity was found. On the House and Brackmann scale, 1 patient had a permanent one-level drop and 7 a transient drop of 1 to 3 levels. Serviceable hearing was preserved in 75.1%. Tumor hearing before radiosurgery, recurrence, and prescription isodose predicted ototoxicity. Unrelated malignancy is a strong predictor of tumor control. Tumor recurrence predominantly predicts ototoxicity. These findings potentially will aid future clinical decision making in ambiguous cases.

  5. Stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of brain metastases; results from a single institution experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, D

    2013-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is frequently used for the treatment of brain metastases. This study provides a retrospective evaluation of patients with secondary lesions of the brain treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) at our institution.

  6. Spinal Cord Tolerance to Reirradiation With Single-Fraction Radiosurgery: A Swine Model

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    Medin, Paul M., E-mail: Paul.medin@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Foster, Ryan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Kogel, Albert J. van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sayre, James W. [Department of Biostatistics and Radiology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); McBride, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Solberg, Timothy D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to determine swine spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction, partial-volume irradiation 1 year after receiving uniform irradiation to 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Methods and Materials: A 10-cm length of spinal cord (C3-T1) was uniformly irradiated to 30 Gy in 10 consecutive fractions and reirradiated 1 year later with a single radiosurgery dose centered within the previously irradiated segment. Radiosurgery was delivered to a cylindrical volume approximately 5 cm in length and 2 cm in diameter, which was positioned laterally to the cervical spinal cord, resulting in a dose distribution with the 90%, 50%, and 10% isodose lines traversing the ipsilateral, central, and contralateral spinal cord, respectively. Twenty-three pigs were stratified into six dose groups with mean maximum spinal cord doses of 14.9 {+-} 0.1 Gy (n = 2), 17.1 {+-} 0.3 Gy (n = 3), 19.0 {+-} 0.1 Gy (n = 5), 21.2 {+-} 0.1 Gy (n = 5), 23.4 {+-} 0.2 Gy (n = 5), and 25.4 {+-} 0.4 Gy (n = 3). The mean percentage of spinal cord volumes receiving {>=}10 Gy for the same groups were 34% {+-} 1%, 40% {+-} 1%, 46% {+-} 3%, 52% {+-} 1%, 56 {+-} 3%, and 57% {+-} 1%. The study endpoint was motor neurologic deficit as determined by a change in gait during a 1- year follow-up period. Results: A steep dose-response curve was observed with a 50% incidence of paralysis (ED{sub 50}) for the maximum point dose of 19.7 Gy (95% confidence interval, 17.4-21.4). With two exceptions, histology was unremarkable in animals with normal neurologic status, while all animals with motor deficits showed some degree of demyelination and focal white matter necrosis on the irradiated side, with relative sparing of gray matter. Histologic comparison with a companion study of de novo irradiated animals revealed that retreatment responders had more extensive tissue damage, including infarction of gray matter, only at prescription doses >20 Gy. Conclusion: Pigs receiving spinal radiosurgery 1 year after

  7. The effectiveness of bevacizumab in radionecrosis after radiosurgery of a single brain metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durim Delishaj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Radionecrosis (RN of brain tissue is a serious late complication of brain irradiation and historically has been treated with corticosteroid therapy and alternatively surgical decompression. Recently, bevacizumab has been suggested for treatment of cerebral radiation necrosis. We present a case of a 73-years-old women affected by a primary non-small cell lung cancer with a single brain metastasis treated with radiosurgery. Two years after radiosurgery the patient referred neurological symptoms and a brain magnetic resonance confirmed the presence of RN. The patient refused surgical decompression so underwent at the treatment with bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg/2 weeks for a total of 4 cycles. After two months of treatment the patient reported strumental and clinical improvement. Ten months after bevacizumab discontinuation the patient experienced a recurrence of RN with evident clinical manifestation and confirmed by radiological imaging. A new treatment with bevacizumab was not performed due to the systemic progression disease and the worsening of clinical status. Despite limited to only one clinical case, our study suggests the efficacy of bevacizumab to treat RN. Future studies are needed to confirm its mechanism and to properly define the optimal scheduling, dosage and duration of therapy.

  8. A cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of radiosurgery vs. resection for single-brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Minesh; Noyes, William; Craig, Bruce; Lamond, John; Auchter, Richard; French, Molly; Johnson, Mark; Levin, Allan; Badie, Behnam; Robbins, Ian; Kinsella, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The median survival of well-selected patients with single-brain metastases treated with whole-brain irradiation and resection or radiosurgery is comparable, although a randomized trial of these two modalities has not been performed. In this era of cost containment, it is imperative that health-care professionals make fiscally prudent decisions. The present environment necessitates a critical appraisal of apparently equi-efficacious therapeutic modalities, and it is within this context that we present a comparison of the actual costs of resection and radiosurgery for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Survival and quality of life outcome data for radiation alone or with surgery were obtained from two randomized trials, and radiosurgical results were obtained from a multiinstitutional analysis that specifically evaluated patients meeting surgical criteria. Only linear accelerator radiosurgery data were considered. Cost analysis was performed from a societal view point, and the following parameters were evaluated: actual cost, cost ratios, cost effectiveness, incremental cost effectiveness, cost utility, incremental cost utility, and national cost burden. The computerized billing records for all patients undergoing resection or radiosurgery for single-brain metastases from January 1989 to July 1994 were reviewed. A total of 46 resections and 135 radiosurgery procedures were performed. During the same time period, 454 patients underwent whole-brain radiation alone. An analysis of the entire bill was performed for each procedure, and each itemized cost was assigned a proportionate figure. The relative cost ratios of resection and radiosurgery were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Cost effectiveness of each modality, defined as the cost per year of median survival, was evaluated. Incremental cost effectiveness, defined as the additional cost per year of incremental gain in median survival, compared to the next least expensive modality, was also

  9. Long-term Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Single-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery

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    Leavitt, Jacqueline A., E-mail: leavitt.jacqueline@mayo.edu [Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Stafford, Scott L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) in patients having single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for benign skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 222 patients having Gamma Knife radiosurgery for benign tumors adjacent to the anterior visual pathway (AVP) between 1991 and 1999. Excluded were patients with prior or concurrent external beam radiation therapy or SRS. One hundred twenty-nine patients (58%) had undergone previous surgery. Tumor types included confirmed World Health Organization grade 1 or presumed cavernous sinus meningioma (n=143), pituitary adenoma (n=72), and craniopharyngioma (n=7). The maximum dose to the AVP was ≤8.0 Gy (n=126), 8.1-10.0 Gy (n=39), 10.1-12.0 Gy (n=47), and >12 Gy (n=10). Results: The mean clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 83 and 123 months, respectively. One patient (0.5%) who received a maximum radiation dose of 12.8 Gy to the AVP developed unilateral blindness 18 months after SRS. The chance of RION according to the maximum radiation dose received by the AVP was 0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-3.6%), 0 (95% CI 0-10.7%), 0 (95% CI 0-9.0%), and 10% (95% CI 0-43.0%) for patients receiving ≤8 Gy, 8.1-10.0 Gy, 10.1-12.0 Gy, and >12 Gy, respectively. The overall risk of RION in patients receiving >8 Gy to the AVP was 1.0% (95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions: The risk of RION after single-fraction SRS in patients with benign skull base tumors who have no prior radiation exposure is very low if the maximum dose to the AVP is ≤12 Gy. Physicians performing single-fraction SRS should remain cautious when treating lesions adjacent to the AVP, especially when the maximum dose exceeds 10 Gy.

  10. Single-Session Radiofrequency Ablation of Bilateral Lung Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palussière, Jean; Gómez, Fernando; Cannella, Matthieu; Ferron, Stéphane; Descat, Edouard; Fonck, Marianne; Brouste, Véronique; Avril, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This retrospective study examined the feasibility and efficacy of bilateral lung radiofrequency ablation (RFA) performed in a single session. Methods: From 2002–2009, patients with bilateral lung metastases were treated by RFA, where possible in a single session under general anesthesia with CT guidance. The second lung was punctured only if no complications occurred after treatment of the first lung. Five lung metastases maximum per patient were treated by RFA and prospectively followed. The primary endpoint was the evaluation of acute and delayed complications. Secondary endpoints were calculation of hospitalization duration, local efficacy, median survival, and median time to tumor progression. Local efficacy was evaluated on CT or positron emission tomography (PET) CT. Results: Sixty-seven patients were treated for bilateral lung metastases with RFA (mean age, 62 years). Single-session treatment was not possible in 40 due to severe pneumothoraces (n = 24), bilateral pleural contact (n = 14), and operational exclusions (n = 2). Twenty-seven (41%) received single-session RFA of lesions in both lungs for 66 metastases overall. Fourteen unilateral and four bilateral pneumothoraces occurred (18 overall, 66.7%). Unilateral (n = 13) and bilateral (n = 2) chest tube drainage was required. Median hospitalization was 3 (range, 2–8) days. Median survival was 26 months (95% confidence interval (CI), 19–33). Four recurrences on RFA sites were observed (4 patients). Median time to tumor progression was 9.5 months (95% CI, 4.2–23.5). Conclusions: Although performing single-session bilateral lung RFA is not always possible due to pneumothoraces after RFA of first lung, when it is performed, this technique is safe and effective.

  11. Single-Session Radiofrequency Ablation of Bilateral Lung Metastases

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    Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: palussiere@bergonie.org; Gomez, Fernando; Cannella, Matthieu; Ferron, Stephane; Descat, Edouard [Institut Bergonie, Department of Radiology, Regional Cancer Centre (France); Fonck, Marianne [Institut Bergonie, Department of Digestive Oncology (France); Brouste, Veronique [Institut Bergonie, Clinical and Epidemiological Research Unit (France); Avril, Antoine [Institut Bergonie, Department of Surgery (France)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: This retrospective study examined the feasibility and efficacy of bilateral lung radiofrequency ablation (RFA) performed in a single session. Methods: From 2002-2009, patients with bilateral lung metastases were treated by RFA, where possible in a single session under general anesthesia with CT guidance. The second lung was punctured only if no complications occurred after treatment of the first lung. Five lung metastases maximum per patient were treated by RFA and prospectively followed. The primary endpoint was the evaluation of acute and delayed complications. Secondary endpoints were calculation of hospitalization duration, local efficacy, median survival, and median time to tumor progression. Local efficacy was evaluated on CT or positron emission tomography (PET) CT. Results: Sixty-seven patients were treated for bilateral lung metastases with RFA (mean age, 62 years). Single-session treatment was not possible in 40 due to severe pneumothoraces (n = 24), bilateral pleural contact (n = 14), and operational exclusions (n = 2). Twenty-seven (41%) received single-session RFA of lesions in both lungs for 66 metastases overall. Fourteen unilateral and four bilateral pneumothoraces occurred (18 overall, 66.7%). Unilateral (n = 13) and bilateral (n = 2) chest tube drainage was required. Median hospitalization was 3 (range, 2-8) days. Median survival was 26 months (95% confidence interval (CI), 19-33). Four recurrences on RFA sites were observed (4 patients). Median time to tumor progression was 9.5 months (95% CI, 4.2-23.5). Conclusions: Although performing single-session bilateral lung RFA is not always possible due to pneumothoraces after RFA of first lung, when it is performed, this technique is safe and effective.

  12. Radiosurgery of spinal meningiomas and schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufeld, M; Wowra, B; Muacevic, A; Zausinger, Stefan; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2012-02-01

    Purpose of this study is to analyze local control, clinical symptoms and toxicity after image-guided radiosurgery of spinal meningiomas and schwannomas. Standard treatment of benign spinal lesions is microsurgical resection. While a few publications have reported about radiosurgery for benign spinal lesions, this is the first study analyzing the outcome of robotic radiosurgery for benign spinal tumors, treated exclusively with a non-invasive, fiducial free, single-fraction setup. Thirty-six patients with spinal meningiomas or schwannomas were treated, utilizing a robotic radiosurgery system (CyberKnife®, Accuray Inc. Sunnyvale CA), and were followed prospectively. Medical history, histology, clinical symptoms and radiographic outcome were recorded. Thirty-nine spinal lesions were treated because of tumor recurrence, remnants after microsurgery, multiple lesions, or rejection of open surgery. Median age was 45 years (range 18-80 years). Median target volume was 3.4 cm(3) (range 0.2-43.4 cm(3)). Histology revealed 28 schwannomas and 11 meningiomas (WHO grade I). All spinal levels were affected. Median prescription dose was 14 Gray (95% C.I. 13.4-14 Gy) to the 70% isodose. After a median follow-up of 18 months (range 6-50 months) no local tumor progression was detected. 20 lesions (51%) remained stable, 19 tumors (49%) decreased in size. One patient with schwannomatosis was treated repeatedly for three new tumor locations. Pain was the initial symptom in 16 of 25 schwannoma patients, and in 3 of 11 patients with meningiomas. Pain levels decreased in 8/19 patients. All but one patient with motor deficits remained clinically stable. No myelopathic signs where found. Single-session radiosurgery for benign spinal tumors in selected patients has proven to inhibit tumor progression within the observed period without signs of early toxicity. Radiosurgery offers an additional treatment option, if microsurgery is not feasible in cases of tumor recurrence, post

  13. Quality of radiosurgery for single brain metastases with respect to treatment technology: a matched-pair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wowra, Berndt; Muacevic, Alexander; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2009-08-01

    A comparison of treatment parameters and quality of clinical outcome in patients with single brain metastases treated with two different technologies for radiosurgery (Gamma Knife and CyberKnife). Treatment parameters were statistically analyzed. Clinical outcome was assessed by matched-pair analysis based on the treatment device, differences in dose prescription, and the date of the treatment. Patients were matched according to their tumor size, age, gender, primary cancer, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group score. Survival post-radiosurgery, local and distant tumor control, and complications were analyzed. Predictive factors were investigated. 423 single brain metastases were treated with Gamma Knife and 73 with CyberKnife. Tumor volumes were similar. The parameters minimum tumor dose, maximum tumor dose, prescription isodose volume, conformality index, homogeneity index, volume of tissue receiving a dose of 10 Gy or more were significantly larger in Gamma Knife group. Sixty-three patients were good matches. These showed the same pattern in parameters. Concerning the outcome analysis, only overall survival differed significantly between groups, twice as long with CyberKnife (P new brain metastases, including whole brain radiation therapy. The most important result of this study was the finding that the obvious differences in treatment-related parameters between Gamma Knife and CyberKnife had no impact on the quality of the clinical outcome after radiosurgery. Survival time increased chronologically, presumably due to an intensified anti-cancer therapy in the more recent era of the CyberKnife treatments.

  14. Outpatient single-session yttrium-90 glass microsphere radioembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Vanessa L; Marshall, Karen G; Salzig, Krystina; Williams, Melissa; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the feasibility of yttrium-90 ((90)Y) glass microsphere radioembolization (including angiography, lung shunt assessment, and treatment) as a single-session, outpatient procedure. Between January 2008 and June 2013, 14 patients underwent outpatient, single-session radioembolization with (90)Y glass microspheres. As part of the routine diagnostic work-up, all patients underwent either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging of the liver with three-dimensional analysis and had laboratory results forwarded to our center for confirmation of candidacy before treatment. On treatment day, all patients underwent planning mesenteric angiography with flat panel cone-beam CT imaging. Patients were administered 33-85 MBq of technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin ((99m)Tc-MAA) via a microcatheter positioned in a hepatic artery supplying the tumor of interest. Planar scintigraphy was initiated within 2 hours after the administration of (99m)Tc-MAA and lung shunt fraction was determined. Final dosimetry calculations were performed while the patient was being transferred back from nuclear medicine to interventional radiology. All patients successfully underwent planning angiography with administration of (99m)Tc-MAA and (90)Y radioembolization as a single-session treatment. There were no reportable or recordable medical events; treatment was carried out to the desired dose in all cases. The mean total procedure time was 2.70 hours ± 0.72 (range, 1.63-3.97 h). This study reports a novel proof of concept for performing radioembolization in a single-session setting. By using the described method, time between initial clinical assessments and radioembolization treatment is decreased, and costs are minimized. © 2014 Published by SIR on behalf of SIR.

  15. Radiosurgery of multiple brain metastases with single-isocenter dynamic conformal arcs (SIDCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yimei; Chin, Karen; Robbins, Jared R.; Kim, Jinkoo; Li, Haisen; Amro, Hanan; Chetty, Indrin J.; Gordon, James; Ryu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose single-isocenter dynamic conformal arcs (SIDCA), a novel technique for radiosurgery of multiple brain metastases, and to compare SIDCA with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and multiple-isocenter dynamic conformal arcs (MIDCA) for plan quality. Methods and materials: SIDCA, MIDCA, and VMAT plans were created on 6 patients with 3–5 metastases. Plans were evaluated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (RCI), Paddick conformity index (PCI), gradient index (GI), volumes that received more than 100% (V 100% ), 50% (V 50% ), 25% (V 25% ) and 10% (V 10% ) of prescription dose, total monitor units (MUs), and delivery time (DT). Results: SIDCA achieved conformal plans (RCI = 1.38 ± 0.12, PCI = 0.72 ± 0.06) with steep dose fall-off (GI = 3.97 ± 0.51). MIDCA plans had comparable plan quality and MUs as SIDCA, but 52% longer DT. The VMAT plans had better conformity (RCI = 1.15 ± 0.09, p < 0.01 and PCI = 0.86 ± 0.06, p < 0.01) than SIDCA, worse GI (4.34 ± 0.46, p < 0.01), higher V 25% (p = 0.05) and V 10% (p = 0.02), 49% less MUs and 46% shorter DT. Conclusions: All three techniques achieved conformal plans with steep dose fall-off from targets. SIDCA plans had similar plan quality as MIDCA but more efficient to delivery. SIDCA plans had lower peripheral dose spread than VMAT; VMAT plans had better conformity and faster delivery time than SIDCA

  16. Single-Isocenter Multiple-Target Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Risk of Compromised Coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roper, Justin; Chanyavanich, Vorakarn; Betzel, Gregory; Switchenko, Jeffrey; Dhabaan, Anees

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the dosimetric effects of rotational errors on target coverage using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for multitarget stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: This retrospective study included 50 SRS cases, each with 2 intracranial planning target volumes (PTVs). Both PTVs were planned for simultaneous treatment to 21 Gy using a single-isocenter, noncoplanar VMAT SRS technique. Rotational errors of 0.5°, 1.0°, and 2.0° were simulated about all axes. The dose to 95% of the PTV (D95) and the volume covered by 95% of the prescribed dose (V95) were evaluated using multivariate analysis to determine how PTV coverage was related to PTV volume, PTV separation, and rotational error. Results: At 0.5° rotational error, D95 values and V95 coverage rates were ≥95% in all cases. For rotational errors of 1.0°, 7% of targets had D95 and V95 values <95%. Coverage worsened substantially when the rotational error increased to 2.0°: D95 and V95 values were >95% for only 63% of the targets. Multivariate analysis showed that PTV volume and distance to isocenter were strong predictors of target coverage. Conclusions: The effects of rotational errors on target coverage were studied across a broad range of SRS cases. In general, the risk of compromised coverage increased with decreasing target volume, increasing rotational error and increasing distance between targets. Multivariate regression models from this study may be used to quantify the dosimetric effects of rotational errors on target coverage given patient-specific input parameters of PTV volume and distance to isocenter.

  17. Five-Year Outcomes of High-Dose Single-Fraction Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

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    Moussazadeh, Nelson [Division of Neurological Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Katsoulakis, Evangelia [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Kahn, Sweena; Svoboda, Marek; DiStefano, Natalie M.; McLaughlin, Lily [Division of Neurological Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bilsky, Mark H. [Division of Neurological Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Laufer, Ilya, E-mail: lauferi@mskcc.org [Division of Neurological Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To characterize local tumor control and toxicity risk in very long-term survivors (>5 years) after high-dose spinal image guided, intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered as single-dose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Previously published spinal SRS outcome analyses have included a heterogeneous population of cancer patients, mostly with short survival. This is the first study reporting the long-term tumor control and toxicity profiles after high-dose single-fraction spinal SRS. Methods and Materials: The study population included all patients treated from June 2004 to July 2009 with single-fraction spinal SRS (dose 24 Gy) who had survived at least 5 years after treatment. The endpoints examined included disease progression, surgical or radiation retreatment, in-field fracture development, and radiation-associated toxicity, scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Local control and fracture development were assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: Of 278 patients, 31 (11.1%), with 36 segments treated for spinal tumors, survived at least 5 years after treatment and were followed up radiographically and clinically for a median of 6.1 years (maximum 102 months). The histopathologic findings for the 5-year survivors included radiation-resistant metastases in 58%, radiation-sensitive metastases in 22%, and primary bone tumors in 19%. In this selected cohort, 3 treatment failures occurred at a median of 48.6 months, including 2 recurrences in the radiation field and 1 patient with demonstrated progression at the treatment margins. Ten lesions (27.8%) were associated with acute grade 1 cutaneous or gastrointestinal toxicity. Delayed toxicity ≥3 months after treatment included 8 cases (22.2%) of mild neuropathy, 2 (5.6%) of gastrointestinal discomfort, 8 (22.2%) of dermatitides, and 3 (8.3%) of myalgias/myositis. Thirteen

  18. Single-fraction Radiosurgery for Presumed Intracranial Meningiomas: Efficacy and Complications From a 22-Year Experience

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    Pollock, Bruce E., E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Stafford, Scott L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the rate of tumor control and factors associated with radiation-related complications after single-fraction radiosurgery (SRS) for patients with imaging defined intracranial meningiomas. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of 251 patients (192 women, 59 men) having SRS for imaging-defined intracranial meningiomas between 1990 and 2008. Excluded were patients with radiation-induced tumors, meningiomatosis, or neurofibromatosis. The mean patient age was 58.6 {+-} 13.4 years. The majority of tumors involved the skull base/tentorium (n = 210, 83.7%). The mean treatment volume was 7.7 {+-} 6.2 cm{sup 3}; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.8 {+-} 2.0 Gy. Follow-up (mean, 62.9 {+-} 43.9 months) was censored at last evaluation (n = 224), death (n = 22), or tumor resection (n = 5). Results: No patient died from tumor progression or radiation-related complications. Tumor size decreased in 181 patients (72.1%) and was unchanged in 67 patients (26.7%). Three patients (1.2%) had in-field tumor progression noted at 28, 145, and 150 months, respectively. No patient had a marginal tumor progression. The 3- and 10-year local control rate was 99.4%. One patient had distant tumor progression at 105 months and underwent repeat SRS. Thirty-one patients (12.4%) had either temporary (n = 8, 3.2%) or permanent (n = 23, 9.2%) symptomatic radiation-related complications including cranial nerve deficits (n = 14), headaches (n = 5), hemiparesis (n = 5), new/worsened seizure (n = 4), cyst-formation (n = 1), hemifacial spasm (n = 1), and stroke (n = 1). The 1- and 5-year complication rates were 8.3% and 11.5%, respectively. Radiation-related complications were associated with convexity/falx tumors (HR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-6.1, p = 0.009) and increasing tumor volume (HR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.0-1.1, p = 0.04) on multivariate analysis. No patient developed a radiation-induced tumor. Conclusions: Single-fraction SRS at the used dose range provides a high rate of tumor control for

  19. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy and single high-dose radiosurgery for acoustic neuroma: early results of a prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, O.W.M.; Wolbers, J.G.; Baayen, J.C.; Slotman, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the local control and toxicity rate in acoustic neuroma patients treated with linear accelerator-based radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 37 consecutive patients treated with stereotactic radiation therapy for acoustic neuroma. All patients had progressive tumors, progressive symptoms, or both. Mean tumor diameter was 2.3 cm (range 0.8-3.3) on magnetic resonance (MR) scan. Dentate patients were given a dose of 5 x 4 Gy or 5 x 5 Gy and edentate patients were given a dose of 1 x 10 Gy or 1 x 12.50 Gy prescribed to the 80% isodose. All patients were treated with a single isocenter. Results: With a mean follow-up period of 25 months (range 12-61), the actuarial local control rate at 5 years was 91% (only 1 patient failed). The actuarial rate of hearing preservation at 5 years was 66% in previously-hearing patients. The actuarial rate of freedom from trigeminal nerve toxicity was 97% at 5 years. No patient developed facial nerve toxicity or other complications. Conclusion: In this unselected series, fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy and linear accelerator-based radiosurgery give excellent local control in acoustic neuroma. It combines a high rate of preservation of hearing with a very low rate of other toxicity, although follow-up is relatively short

  20. Intractable trigeminal neuralgia: A single institution experience in 26 patients treated with stereotactic gamma knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, Rufus J.; Duma, Christopher M.; Jacques, Dean B.; Kopyov, Oleg V.; Copcutt, Brian

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In patients with trigeminal neuralgia, severe pain can persist, or recur despite aggressive medical management and open surgery. Recently, Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used with promising results. We report on our series of 26 patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Materials and Methods: Between 1991 and 1995, 26 patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia were treated at our institution using stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Medical management had failed in all cases. In addition, 13 patients underwent a total of 20 open surgeries, with transient, or no pain relief. There were 19 females, and 7 males. Patient ages ranged from 37 to 87 years, with a median of 74 years. All patients were treated with a 201 source Cobalt-60 Gamma Knife unit. All patients underwent placement of the Leksell frame, followed by MRI scanning and computer treatment planning. The target in all patients was the fifth cranial nerve root entry zone into the brainstem. Twenty-five patients received between 64.3 to 70 Gy prescribed to Dmax in one shot. One patient received 120 Gy to Dmax in one shot. The 4 mm collimator was used in 22 cases, and the 8 mm in 4 cases. Follow-up ranged from 5 to 55 months, with a median of 19 months. Complete resolution (CR) of pain was scored when the patient reported being pain free off all medication. Partial resolution (PR) was scored when the patient reported > 50% pain reduction after Gamma Knife treatment. Results: At last follow-up, 84.6% ((22(26))) reported CR or PR of pain after Gamma Knife treatment. Forty-two percent ((11(26))) of patients reported CR, and 42%((11(26))) reported PR of pain. There was a dose response. In patients receiving < 70 Gy, 25% ((3(12))) reported CR, while 57% ((8(14))) of those receiving ≥ 70 Gy reported CR. Complications occurred in two (8%) patients. One patient developed transient numbness of the face after 70 Gy, and a second patient

  1. The current status of radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Minesh P.

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: Review the role of radiosurgery in recurrent malignant gliomas for palliative purposes. Review the role of radiosurgery in newly diagnosed malignant glioma as boost therapy and emphasize the randomized clinical trials underway. Review the role of radiosurgery in the management of patients with brain metastases and emphasize the major prognostic factors. Review the recently initiated clinical trials for brain metastases using radiosurgery. Review the role of radiosurgery in the management of benign tumors with specific emphasis on meningioma and acoustic neuroma. Emphasize the rationale for fractionation and present the preliminary results of fractionated stereotactic radiation. Stereotactic localization techniques, originally designed for neurosurgery, have been used to delivery high single doses of radiation to small intracranial targets for more than 25 years, a technique referred to as stereotactic radiosurgery. Radiosurgery has proven to be an attractive alternative to surgery in the management of several benign tumors, such as vestibular schwannomas with better preservation of hearing and facial nerve function than microsurgical resection. For other benign tumors such as meningioma and pituitary adenoma, preliminary results are promising, but longer range studies to confirm high tumor control rates are necessary. For patients with malignant glioma, radiosurgery has been used to escalate the radiation dose to enhance tumor control following surgery and radiation therapy. The rationale for this is grounded in the recent confirmatory randomized prospective trial verifying the value of brachytherapy in this disease. The results of radiosurgery from single institutional experiences for primary and recurrent malignant glioma indicate a palliative benefit as well as a potential survival benefit in a select sub-group of patients based on the appropriate mix of prognostic criteria such as patient age, performance status, tumor size and extent of resection

  2. Heuristic knowledge-based planning for single-isocenter stereotactic radiosurgery to multiple brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Sanghvi, Parag; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona; Moore, Kevin L

    2017-10-01

    Single-isocenter, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for multiple brain metastases (multimets) can deliver highly conformal dose distributions and reduce overall patient treatment time compared to other techniques. However, treatment planning for multimet cases is highly complex due to variability in numbers and sizes of brain metastases, as well as their relative proximity to organs-at-risk (OARs). The purpose of this study was to automate the VMAT planning of multimet cases through a knowledge-based planning (KBP) approach that adapts single-target SRS dose predictions to multiple target predictions. Using a previously published artificial neural network (ANN) KBP system trained on single-target, linac-based SRS plans, 3D dose distribution predictions for multimet patients were obtained by treating each brain lesion as a solitary target and subsequently combining individual dose predictions into a single distribution. Spatial dose distributions di(r→) for each of the i = 1…N lesions were merged using the combination function d(r→)=∑iNdin(r→)1/n. The optimal value of n was determined by minimizing root-mean squared (RMS) difference between clinical multimet plans and predicted dose per unit length along the line profile joining each lesion in the clinical cohort. The gradient measure GM=[3/4π]1/3V50%1/3-V100%1/3 is the primary quality metric for SRS plan evaluation at our institution and served as the main comparative metric between clinical plans and the KBP results. A total of 41 previously treated multimet plans, with target numbers ranging from N = 2-10, were used to validate the ANN predictions and subsequent KBP auto-planning routine. Fully deliverable KBP plans were developed by converting predicted dose distribution into patient-specific optimization objectives for the clinical treatment planning system (TPS). Plan parity was maintained through identical arc configuration and target normalization. Overall

  3. Stereotactic radiosurgery in the palliative treatment of brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Souhami, Luis; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Clark, Brenda; Adamson, Nelson; Podgorsak, Ervin B.; Caron, Jean-Louis; Villemure, Jean-Guy; Olivier, Andre

    1995-01-01

    Between October, 1988 and November, 1993, 57 patients with metastatic brain disease underwent stereotactic radiosurgery at McGill University, canada. Four patients were excluded from this analysis leaving a total of 53 evaluable patients (with 57 lesions). Radiosurgery was performed with the dynamic rotation technique which uses an isocentric, 10 MV, linear accelerator. A median dose of 1,800 c Gy was given in a single session. In 89% of the cases radiosurgery was used after failure to conventional brain radiotherapy. With a median follow-up of 6 months, the response rate was 65% . Treatments were well tolerated and only 4 patients (7%) developed late complications related to the therapy, with one patient requiring a surgical resection of an area of radionecrose. Radiosurgery appears to be and effective and safe treatment for selected patients with metastatic brain disease, recurrent post-conventional radiotherapy. Its value as a single treatment modality for patients with isolated brain metastasis is now being studied in prospective trials. (author). 29 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Single-session vs multiple-session pattern scanning laser panretinal photocoagulation in proliferative diabetic retinopathy: The Manchester Pascal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muqit, Mahiul M K; Marcellino, George R; Henson, David B; Young, Lorna B; Patton, Niall; Charles, Stephen J; Turner, George S; Stanga, Paulo E

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the effects of pattern scanning laser (Pascal; OptiMedica, Santa Clara, California) multispot panretinal photocoagulation given in a single-session (SS-PRP) vs single-spot multiple-session PRP (MS-PRP) on proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Single-center, randomized clinical trial of 40 eyes. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy was treated with a 400-mum spot size in 1500 burns given either as Pascal in 20-millisecond SS-PRP or in 3 sessions (100-millisecond MS-PRP) during a 4-week period. Visual acuity, central subfield retinal thickness (CRT), and 24-2 Swedish interactive thresholding algorithm visual fields were recorded at baseline and 4 and 12 weeks. Central subfield retinal thickness, mean deviation, and PDR grade at 12 weeks. There was a significant increase in mean CRT with MS-PRP (22 mum at 4 weeks, 95% CI, -32.25 to -10.75; 20 mum at 12 weeks, 95% CI, -28.75 to -10.82; P Pascal SS-PRP was as effective as MS-PRP in the treatment of PDR. Twenty-millisecond Pascal SS-PRP may be safely and rapidly performed in 1500 burns with a similar efficacy to conventional MS-PRP. TRIAL IDENTIFIER: Research and Development Office PIN R00037, Central Manchester University Hospitals Foundation Trust.

  5. A Single-Institution Analysis of 126 Patients Treated with Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin B. Harris

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe objective of this study was to report our institutional experience with Gamma Knife® Radiosurgery (GKRS in the treatment of patients with brain metastases.MethodsRetrospectively collected demographic and clinical data on 126 patients with intracranial metastases were reviewed. The patients in our study underwent GKRS at Vidant Medical Center between 2009 and 2014. Kaplan–Meier curves were used to compare survival based on clinical characteristics for univariate analysis, and a Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis.ResultsThe median age of the patient population was 62 years. Medicare patients constituted 51% of our patient cohort and Medicaid patients 15%. The most common tumor histologies were non-small cell lung cancer (50%, breast cancer (12.7%, and melanoma (11.9%. The median overall survival time for all patients was 5.8 months. Patients with breast cancer had the longest median survival time of 9.15 months, while patients with melanoma had the shortest median survival time of 2.86 months. On univariate analysis, the following factors were predictors for improved overall survival, ECOG score 0 or 1 vs. 2 or greater (17.0 vs. 1.8 months, p < 0.001, controlled extracranial disease vs. progressive extracranial disease (17.4 vs. 4.6 months, p = 0.0001, recursive partitioning analysis Stage I vs. II–III (18.2 vs. 6.2 months, p < 0.007, multiple GKRS treatments (p = 0.002, prior brain metastasectomy (p = 0.012, and prior chemotherapy (p = 0.021. Age, ethnicity, gender, previous external beam radiation therapy, number of brain metastases, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic tumors were not predictors of longer median survival time. Number of metastatic brain lesions of 1–3 vs. ≥4 (p = 0.051 and insurance status of Medicare/Medicaid vs. commercial insurance approached significance (13.7 vs. 6.8 months, p = 0.08. On multivariate analysis, ECOG

  6. CyberKnife radiosurgery for brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wowra, Berndt; Muacevic, Alexander; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Classic radiosurgery is a neurosurgical treatment concept for single-fraction irradiation of cerebral lesions not amenable to open surgery. Until recently it has been realized mainly by frame-based technologies (Gamma Knife; stereotactic linear accelerators). The CyberKnife described in 1997 is an image-guided frameless robotic technology for whole-body radiosurgery. It can be used for classic single-fraction radiosurgery and for hypofractionated treatments. The CyberKnife treatment procedure is completely non-invasive and can be repeated throughout the body if necessary. Brain metastases are an important and frequently treated indication of modern radiosurgery. Data concerning radiosurgical treatment of brain metastases with the CyberKnife are reviewed. Scientific evidence shows that the full-body applicability of the CyberKnife is not at the expense of an inferior intracranial treatment quality when compared to standard frame-based technology. The clinical results of CyberKnife single-fraction radiosurgery are in line with the published literature. The attractive therapeutic profile of CyberKnife radiosurgery is reflected by a high tumor control and a low toxicity and the repeatability of the treatments for recurrent metastases. Although hypofractionated treatments (in 3-5 fractions) of brain metastases have been performed with the CyberKnife to treat large metastases, the clinical significance of this new radiosurgical concept is unclear and requires further study. A new approach is to treat the resection cavity with radiosurgery after surgical removal of brain metastases. In this concept radiosurgery replaces fractionated radiation therapy as an adjunct to surgery. The initial results are very promising. The CyberKnife has been established as a modern non-invasive technology for intra- and extracranial radiosurgery. It adds to the oncological armamentarium and confers upon radiosurgery a greater emphasis as an oncological treatment concept. Copyright © 2012 S

  7. SU-G-BRC-14: Multi-Lesion, Multi-Rx, Brain Radiosurgery with Novel Single Isocenter Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honig, N; Alani, S; Schlocker, A; Shtraus, N; Kanner, A [B Corn Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: There is a strong trend to treat multiple brain metastases with radiosurgery rather than whole brain irradiation. This feasibility study investigates a novel planning technique for radio-surgical treatment of multiple brain lesions with differing dose prescriptions, a single isocenter, and dynamic conformal arcs. The novel technique will be compared to the well-established single-isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique commonly used for treating brain lesions. Methods: Six patients with metastatic brain lesions were selected for a prospective treatment planning study to evaluate Interdigitating MLC Dynamic Conformal Arc (IMDCA) technique. Arcs were planned for simultaneous irradiation to maximize beam delivery efficiency. To accommodate varying PTV dose prescriptions, selected arcs were re-irradiated in reverse. Beam weights were adjusted until all prescription constraints were met. The number of lesions ranged between 2 to 4 (mode = 3). For comparison, SRS VMAT plans were generated utilizing an established single-isocenter, 3 arc planning template. All plans were compared by means of Paddick conformity index (PCI), RTOG Conformity Index (RCI), gradient index (GI), and the normal brain volume receiving 10% (V10) of the highest prescription dose. The monitor units and delivery time were tabulated for each plan. Results: IMDCA achieved conformal plans (PCI = 0.72±0.03, RCI = 1.33±0.03) with steep dose fall-off (GI = 3.79±0.03) on average for all of the plans evaluated. The VMAT plans had slightly better conformity (PCI = 0.85 ± 0.03, RCI = 1.13 ± 0.03) than IMDCA, but overall worse GI (4.29 ± 0.06). IMDCA plans had lower V10% values, required 50% fewer MUs, and had 34% shorter beam delivery time on average compared to VMAT plans. Conclusion: IMDCA plans with varying dose prescriptions for multiple lesions, had comparable dosimetric coverage as VMAT plans, but were obtained with significantly lower integral dose, fewer monitor units

  8. SU-G-BRC-14: Multi-Lesion, Multi-Rx, Brain Radiosurgery with Novel Single Isocenter Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honig, N; Alani, S; Schlocker, A; Shtraus, N; Kanner, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There is a strong trend to treat multiple brain metastases with radiosurgery rather than whole brain irradiation. This feasibility study investigates a novel planning technique for radio-surgical treatment of multiple brain lesions with differing dose prescriptions, a single isocenter, and dynamic conformal arcs. The novel technique will be compared to the well-established single-isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique commonly used for treating brain lesions. Methods: Six patients with metastatic brain lesions were selected for a prospective treatment planning study to evaluate Interdigitating MLC Dynamic Conformal Arc (IMDCA) technique. Arcs were planned for simultaneous irradiation to maximize beam delivery efficiency. To accommodate varying PTV dose prescriptions, selected arcs were re-irradiated in reverse. Beam weights were adjusted until all prescription constraints were met. The number of lesions ranged between 2 to 4 (mode = 3). For comparison, SRS VMAT plans were generated utilizing an established single-isocenter, 3 arc planning template. All plans were compared by means of Paddick conformity index (PCI), RTOG Conformity Index (RCI), gradient index (GI), and the normal brain volume receiving 10% (V10) of the highest prescription dose. The monitor units and delivery time were tabulated for each plan. Results: IMDCA achieved conformal plans (PCI = 0.72±0.03, RCI = 1.33±0.03) with steep dose fall-off (GI = 3.79±0.03) on average for all of the plans evaluated. The VMAT plans had slightly better conformity (PCI = 0.85 ± 0.03, RCI = 1.13 ± 0.03) than IMDCA, but overall worse GI (4.29 ± 0.06). IMDCA plans had lower V10% values, required 50% fewer MUs, and had 34% shorter beam delivery time on average compared to VMAT plans. Conclusion: IMDCA plans with varying dose prescriptions for multiple lesions, had comparable dosimetric coverage as VMAT plans, but were obtained with significantly lower integral dose, fewer monitor units

  9. Radiosurgery for Large Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Chul-Kee; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy and safety of radiosurgery in patients with large brain metastases treated with radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Eighty patients with large brain metastases (>14 cm 3 ) were treated with radiosurgery between 1998 and 2009. The mean age was 59 ± 11 years, and 49 (61.3%) were men. Neurologic symptoms were identified in 77 patients (96.3%), and 30 (37.5%) exhibited a dependent functional status. The primary disease was under control in 36 patients (45.0%), and 44 (55.0%) had a single lesion. The mean tumor volume was 22.4 ± 8.8 cm 3 , and the mean marginal dose prescribed was 13.8 ± 2.2 Gy. Results: The median survival time from radiosurgery was 7.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.343–10.46), and the 1-year survival rate was 39.2%. Functional improvement within 1–4 months or the maintenance of the initial independent status was observed in 48 (60.0%) and 20 (25.0%) patients after radiosurgery, respectively. Control of the primary disease, a marginal dose of ≥11 Gy, and a tumor volume ≥26 cm 3 were significantly associated with overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.479; p = .018; 95% CI, 0.261–0.880; hazard ratio, 0.350; p = .004; 95% CI, 0.171–0.718; hazard ratio, 2.307; p = .006; 95% CI, 1.274–4.180, respectively). Unacceptable radiation-related toxicities (Radiation Toxicity Oncology Group central nervous system toxicity Grade 3, 4, and 5 in 7, 6, and 2 patients, respectively) developed in 15 patients (18.8%). Conclusion: Radiosurgery seems to have a comparable efficacy with surgery for large brain metastases. However, the rate of radiation-related toxicities after radiosurgery should be considered when deciding on a treatment modality.

  10. Improved Outcomes Following a Single Session Web-Based Intervention for Problem Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, S N; Lubman, D I; Jackson, A C; Dowling, N A

    2017-03-01

    Research suggests online interventions can have instant impact, however this is yet to be tested with help-seeking adults and in particular those with problem gambling. This study seeks to determine the immediate impact of a single session web-based intervention for problem gambling, and to examine whether sessions evaluated positively by clients are associated with greater improvement. The current study involved 229 participants classified as problem gamblers who agreed to participate after accessing Gambling Help Online between November 2010 and February 2012. Almost half were aged under 35 years of age (45 %), male (57 %) as well as first time treatment seekers (62 %). Participants completed measures of readiness to change and distress both prior to and post-counselling. Following the provision of a single-session of counselling, participants completed ratings of the character of the session (i.e., degree of depth and smoothness) post-counselling. A significant increase in confidence to resist and urge to gamble and a significant decrease in distress (moderate effect size; d = .56 and .63 respectively) was observed after receiving online counselling. A hierarchical regression indicated the character of the session was a significant predictor of change in confidence, however only the sub-scale smoothness was a significant predictor of change in distress. This was the case even after controlling for pre-session distress, session word count and client characteristics (gender, age, preferred gambling activity, preferred mode of gambling, gambling severity, and preferred mode of help-seeking). These findings suggest that single session web-based counselling for problem gambling can have immediate benefits, although further research is required to examine the impact on longer-term outcomes.

  11. Three independent one-dimensional margins for single-fraction frameless stereotactic radiosurgery brain cases using CBCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qinghui; Chan, Maria F.; Burman, Chandra; Song, Yulin; Zhang, Mutian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Setting a proper margin is crucial for not only delivering the required radiation dose to a target volume, but also reducing the unnecessary radiation to the adjacent organs at risk. This study investigated the independent one-dimensional symmetric and asymmetric margins between the clinical target volume (CTV) and the planning target volume (PTV) for linac-based single-fraction frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).Methods: The authors assumed a Dirac delta function for the systematic error of a specific machine and a Gaussian function for the residual setup errors. Margin formulas were then derived in details to arrive at a suitable CTV-to-PTV margin for single-fraction frameless SRS. Such a margin ensured that the CTV would receive the prescribed dose in 95% of the patients. To validate our margin formalism, the authors retrospectively analyzed nine patients who were previously treated with noncoplanar conformal beams. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used in the patient setup. The isocenter shifts between the CBCT and linac were measured for a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator for three months. For each plan, the authors shifted the isocenter of the plan in each direction by ±3 mm simultaneously to simulate the worst setup scenario. Subsequently, the asymptotic behavior of the CTV V 80% for each patient was studied as the setup error approached the CTV-PTV margin.Results: The authors found that the proper margin for single-fraction frameless SRS cases with brain cancer was about 3 mm for the machine investigated in this study. The isocenter shifts between the CBCT and the linac remained almost constant over a period of three months for this specific machine. This confirmed our assumption that the machine systematic error distribution could be approximated as a delta function. This definition is especially relevant to a single-fraction treatment. The prescribed dose coverage for all the patients investigated was 96.1%± 5.5% with an extreme

  12. Single fraction radiosurgery using Rapid Arc for treatment of intracranial targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Hendrik A; Wagner, Daniela M; Christiansen, Hans; Hess, Clemens F; Vorwerk, Hilke

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic-Radio-Surgery (SRS) using Conformal-Arc-Therapy (CAT) is a well established irradiation technique for treatment of intracranial targets. Although small safety margins are required because of very high accuracy of patient positioning and exact online localisation, there are still disadvantages like long treatment time, high number of monitor units (MU) and covering of noncircular targets. This planning study analysed whether Rapid Arc (RA) with stereotactic localisation for single-fraction SRS can solve these problems. Ten consecutive patients were treated with Linac-based SRS. Eight patients had one or more brain metastases. The other patients presented a symptomatic vestibularis schwannoma and an atypic meningeoma. For all patients, two plans (CAT/RA) were calculated and analysed. Conformity was higher for RA with additional larger low-dose areas. Furthermore, RA reduced the number of MU and the treatment time for all patients. Dose to organs at risk were equal or slightly higher using RA in comparison to CAT. RA provides a new alternative for single-fraction SRS irradiation combining advantages of short treatment time with lower number of MU and better conformity in addition to accuracy of stereotactic localisation in selected cases with uncomplicated clinical realization

  13. Evaluation of a Single-Session Brief Motivational Enhancement Intervention for Partner Abusive Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Cory A.; Eckhardt, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    The current study evaluated the efficacy of a single-session brief motivational enhancement (BME) interview to increase treatment compliance and reduce recidivism rates in a sample of 82 recently adjudicated male perpetrators of intimate partner violence (IPV). Batterer intervention program attendance and completion as well as re-arrest records…

  14. Single session email consultation for parents : An evaluation of its effect on empowerment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    prof.dr. Jo Hermanns; prof.dr. Ruben Fukkink; dr. Christa C.C. Nieuwboer

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of single session email consultation on empowerment of parents. Practitioners in a control group (N = 19) received no training; practitioners in an experimental group (N = 21) were trained to use empowerment oriented techniques in online consultation. Parental

  15. Single Session Email Consultation for Parents: An Evaluation of Its Effect on Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwboer, Christa C.; Fukkink, Ruben G.; Hermanns, Jo M. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of single session email consultation (SSEC) on empowerment of parents. Practitioners in a control group (n = 19) received no training and practitioners in an experimental group (n = 21) were trained to use empowerment-oriented techniques in online consultation. Parental empowerment was measured (n = 96) through a…

  16. Clinical Perspective A case of effective single-session treatment for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reports a systematic clinical case study of the psychological assessment and treatment of Daniel (9), a coloured South African boy with a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (inattentive type). The case is of scientific interest because: (1) there was only a single treatment session, in which ...

  17. Single-session versus staged procedures for elective multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Toshiaki; Morimoto, Takeshi; Shiomi, Hiroki; Yamaji, Kyohei; Ando, Kenji; Ono, Koh; Shizuta, Satoshi; Saito, Naritatsu; Kato, Takao; Kaji, Shuichiro; Furukawa, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Kadota, Kazushige; Horie, Minoru; Kimura, Takeshi

    2017-11-16

    To clarify the effect of single-session multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) strategy relative to the staged multivessel strategy on clinical outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) or non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome. In the Coronary REvascularisation Demonstrating Outcome Study in Kyoto PCI/coronary artery bypass grafting registry cohort-2, there were 2018 patients who underwent elective multivessel PCI. Primary outcome measure was composite of all-cause death, myocardial infarction and stroke at 5-year follow-up. Single-session multivessel PCI and staged multivessel PCI were performed in 707 patients (35.0%) and 1311 patients (65.0%), respectively. The cumulative 5-year incidence of and adjusted risk for the primary outcome measure were not significantly different between the single-session and staged groups (26.7% vs 23.0%, p=0.45; HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.16, p=0.47). The 30-day incidence of all-cause death was significantly higher in the single-session group than in the staged group (1.1% vs 0.2%, p=0.009). However, the causes of death in 11 patients who died within 30 days were generally not related to the procedural complications, but related to the serious clinical status before PCI. For the subgroup analyses including age, gender, extent of CAD, severe chronic kidney disease and heart failure, there was no significant interaction between the subgroup factors and the effect of the single-session strategy relative to the staged strategy for the primary outcome measure. The single-session multivessel PCI strategy was associated with at least comparable 5-year clinical outcomes compared with the staged multivessel PCI, although the prevalence of the single-session strategy was low in the present study. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Linear Accelerator-Based Radiosurgery Alone for Arteriovenous Malformation: More Than 12 Years of Observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Takayuki, E-mail: takayuki@nagasaki-u.ac.jp; Kamada, Kensaku; Izumo, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Nagata, Izumi

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although radiosurgery is an accepted treatment method for intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), its long-term therapeutic effects have not been sufficiently evaluated, and many reports of long-term observations are from gamma-knife facilities. Furthermore, there are few reported results of treatment using only linear accelerator (LINAC)-based radiosurgery (LBRS). Methods and Materials: Over a period of more than 12 years, we followed the long-term results of LBRS treatment performed in 51 AVM patients. Results: The actuarial obliteration rates, after a single radiosurgery session, at 3, 5, 10, and 15 years were 46.9%, 54.0%, 64.4%, and 68.0%, respectively; when subsequent radiosurgeries were included, the rates were 46.9%, 61.3%, 74.2%, and 90.3%, respectively. Obliteration rates were significantly related to target volumes ≥4 cm{sup 3}, marginal doses ≥12 Gy, Spetzler-Martin grades (1 vs other), and AVM scores ≥1.5; multivariate analyses revealed a significant difference for target volumes ≥4 cm{sup 3}. The postprocedural actuarial symptomatic radiation injury rates, after a single radiation surgery session, at 5, 10, and 15 years were 12.3%, 16.8%, and 19.1%, respectively. Volumes ≥4 cm{sup 3}, location (lobular or other), AVM scores ≥1.5, and the number of radiosurgery were related to radiation injury incidence; multivariate analyses revealed significant differences associated with volumes ≥4 cm{sup 3} and location (lobular or other). Conclusions: Positive results can be obtained with LBRS when performed with a target volume ≤4 cm{sup 3}, an AVM score ≤1.5, and ≥12 Gy radiation. Bleeding and radiation injuries may appear even 10 years after treatment, necessitating long-term observation.

  19. Volumetric Radiosurgery for 1 to 10 Brain Metastases: A Multicenter, Single-Arm, Phase 2 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichol, Alan; Ma, Roy; Hsu, Fred; Gondara, Lovedeep; Carolan, Hannah; Olson, Robert; Schellenberg, Devin; Germain, François; Cheung, Arthur; Peacock, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Interest is growing in treating multiple brain metastases with radiosurgery. We report on the effectiveness and tolerability of volumetric radiosurgery (VRS). Methods and Materials: We enrolled patients with a ≥6-month estimated life expectancy and 1 to 10 brain metastases with a diameter of ≤3 cm at 5 cancer centers. Volumetric radiosurgery was delivered in 5 fractions with 98% target coverage, prescribed as 95% of 50 Gy (47.5 Gy in 5 fractions) to the metastases with no margin and 95% of 40 Gy (38 Gy in 5 fractions) to their 2-mm planning target volumes, concurrent with 20 Gy to the whole brain planning target volume. The treatment was delivered with daily image guidance using conventional linear accelerators and volumetric modulated arc therapy. A magnetic resonance imaging scan was obtained every 3 months. The primary endpoint was the 3-month objective response in the brain according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.1. The principal secondary endpoint was 1-year actuarial control of treated metastases. Toxicities were graded using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The present study is registered with (ClinicalTrials.gov) ( (clinicaltrials.gov) identifier (NCT01046123)). Results: From July 2010 to May 2013, 60 patients underwent VRS with 47.5 Gy in 5 fractions for 12 metastases in the thalamus and basal ganglia (deep metastases) and 207 non-deep metastases. The median follow-up period was 30.5 months, and the median survival was 10.1 months. For the 43 patients assessable at 3 months, the objective response in the brain was 56%. The treated metastases were controlled in 88% of patients at 1 year and 84% at 3 years. Overall survival did not differ for patients with 4 to 10 versus 1 to 3 metastases (hazard ratio 1.18, P=.6). The crude incidence of severe radionecrosis (grade 3-5) was 25% (3 of 12) per deep metastasis, 1.9% (4 of 219) per non-deep metastasis, and 10% (6 of 60

  20. Volumetric Radiosurgery for 1 to 10 Brain Metastases: A Multicenter, Single-Arm, Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichol, Alan, E-mail: anichol@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Ma, Roy [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Hsu, Fred [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Abbotsford Centre, Abbotsford, British Columbia (Canada); Gondara, Lovedeep [Department of Surveillance and Outcomes, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Carolan, Hannah [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Olson, Robert [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); Schellenberg, Devin [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Germain, François [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Sindi Ahluwalia Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Cheung, Arthur [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Peacock, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); and others

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: Interest is growing in treating multiple brain metastases with radiosurgery. We report on the effectiveness and tolerability of volumetric radiosurgery (VRS). Methods and Materials: We enrolled patients with a ≥6-month estimated life expectancy and 1 to 10 brain metastases with a diameter of ≤3 cm at 5 cancer centers. Volumetric radiosurgery was delivered in 5 fractions with 98% target coverage, prescribed as 95% of 50 Gy (47.5 Gy in 5 fractions) to the metastases with no margin and 95% of 40 Gy (38 Gy in 5 fractions) to their 2-mm planning target volumes, concurrent with 20 Gy to the whole brain planning target volume. The treatment was delivered with daily image guidance using conventional linear accelerators and volumetric modulated arc therapy. A magnetic resonance imaging scan was obtained every 3 months. The primary endpoint was the 3-month objective response in the brain according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.1. The principal secondary endpoint was 1-year actuarial control of treated metastases. Toxicities were graded using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The present study is registered with (ClinicalTrials.gov) ( (clinicaltrials.gov) identifier (NCT01046123)). Results: From July 2010 to May 2013, 60 patients underwent VRS with 47.5 Gy in 5 fractions for 12 metastases in the thalamus and basal ganglia (deep metastases) and 207 non-deep metastases. The median follow-up period was 30.5 months, and the median survival was 10.1 months. For the 43 patients assessable at 3 months, the objective response in the brain was 56%. The treated metastases were controlled in 88% of patients at 1 year and 84% at 3 years. Overall survival did not differ for patients with 4 to 10 versus 1 to 3 metastases (hazard ratio 1.18, P=.6). The crude incidence of severe radionecrosis (grade 3-5) was 25% (3 of 12) per deep metastasis, 1.9% (4 of 219) per non-deep metastasis, and 10% (6 of 60

  1. A single alcohol drinking session is sufficient to enable subsequent aversion-resistant consumption in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Kelly; Wegner, Scott A; Yu, Ji-Hwan; Simms, Jeffrey A; Hopf, F Woodward

    2016-09-01

    Addiction is mediated in large part by pathological motivation for rewarding, addictive substances, and alcohol-use disorders (AUDs) continue to extract a very high physical and economic toll on society. Compulsive alcohol drinking, where intake continues despite negative consequences, is considered a particular obstacle during treatment of AUDs. Aversion-resistant drives for alcohol have been modeled in rodents, where animals continue to consume even when alcohol is adulterated with the bitter tastant quinine, or is paired with another aversive consequence. Here, we describe a two-bottle choice paradigm where C57BL/6 mice first had 24-h access to 15% alcohol or water. Afterward, they drank quinine-free alcohol (alcohol-only) or alcohol with quinine (100 μM), in a limited daily access (LDA) two-bottle-choice paradigm (2 h/day, 5 days/week, starting 3 h into the dark cycle), and achieved nearly binge-level blood alcohol concentrations. Interestingly, a single, initial 24-h experience with alcohol-only enhanced subsequent quinine-resistant drinking. In contrast, mice that drank alcohol-quinine in the 24-h session showed significantly reduced alcohol-quinine intake and preference during the subsequent LDA sessions, relative to mice that drank alcohol-only in the initial 24-h session and alcohol-quinine in LDA sessions. Thus, mice could find the concentration of quinine we used aversive, but were able to disregard the quinine after a single alcohol-only drinking session. Finally, mice had low intake and preference for quinine in water, both before and after weeks of alcohol-drinking sessions, suggesting that quinine resistance was not a consequence of increased quinine preference after weeks of drinking of alcohol-quinine. Together, we demonstrate that a single alcohol-only session was sufficient to enable subsequent aversion-resistant consumption in C57BL/6 mice, which did not reflect changes in quinine taste palatability. Given the rapid development of quinine

  2. Single-session treatment of a major complication of dens invaginatus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldari, Mauro; Monaco, Carlo; Ciocca, Leonardo; Scotti, Roberto

    2006-05-01

    Dens invaginatus is a dental malformation that may give rise to several complications. Caries of the invagination can severely weaken the whole tooth, making it susceptible to fracture. Subgingival fractures are major complications threatening tooth survival and usually require periodontal/orthodontic/prosthetic treatment if long-term viability is to be ensured. This article describes a case of single-session restoration of a fractured invaginated tooth by means of endodontic treatment followed by fragment reattachment.

  3. Single session of integrated "Silver Yoga" program improves cardiovascular parameters in senior citizens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: There is a healthy reduction in HR, BP and derived cardiovascular indices following a single yoga session in geriatric subjects. These changes may be attributed to enhanced harmony of cardiac autonomic function as a result of coordinated breath-body work and mind-body relaxation due to an integrated and #8220;Silver Yoga and #8221; program. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(2.000: 134-137

  4. Micrograft and minigraft megasession hair transplantation results after a single session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, A

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to share observations made after performing 90 consecutive micrograft and minigraft megasessions for the treatment of male pattern baldness. Micrograft means grafts with 1 or 2 hairs, minigrafts are those with 3 or 4 hairs, and a megasession is a procedure in which more than 1000 micrografts and minigrafts are inserted in a single session. Between March of 1994 and June of 1996, the author performed 90 consecutive micrograft and minigraft megasessions on 86 men and 4 women ranging from 21 to 67 years of age (average age, 42 years). The surgical team consisted of three surgical assistants and a plastic surgeon. Today, usually between 1500 and 2000 grafts per session are performed in about 4 to 6 hours, with up to 2495 grafts done in a single session. All procedures were done under intravenous sedation and local anesthesia. A donor horizontal ellipse of scalp is harvested from the occipital area; the grafts are made out of it and then inserted through small slits. The procedure has been found to be safe and predictable with natural and aesthetically pleasing results, and there were no serious complications. The only complication found in this group was self-resolving inclusion cysts (ingrown hairs) occurring in 9 of 90 patients (10 percent). Even though the hair density achieved in a single megasession is limited, there is a high level of patient satisfaction: 83 of 85 patients were satisfied (97.65 percent).

  5. Oxygen saturation and heart rate monitoring during a single session of early rehabilitation after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Vittorio; Petrucci, Lucia; Monteleone, Serena; Dall'Angelo, Anna; Miracca, Stefania; Conte, Teresa; Carlisi, Ettore; Ricotti, Susanna; D'Armini, Andrea M; Dalla Toffola, Elena

    2016-02-01

    Early rehabilitation after cardiac surgery aims to prevent immobilization, to reduce the effects of surgery on the respiratory function and to facilitate the recovery of autonomy in the activities of daily living (ADL), after discharge. Nevertheless the optimal perioperative physical therapy care for patients undergoing cardiac surgery is not well established. Moreover, most of the studies monitored peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR) during surgery or focused only on their recovery after rehabilitation and not on their pathways during a session of exercises. To monitor peripheral oxygen saturation and HR before, during and at the end of a single session of early rehabilitation after cardiac surgery, so testing our protocol's safety. A case series. Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, inpatients. Forty-eight consecutive inpatients (35 M), mean age 61 years, with cardiovascular disease (CVD), who underwent cardiac surgery. We monitored SpO2%, HR, systemic blood pressure (BP), pain in the thoracic wound (VAS) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) during the rehabilitation session after weaning from oxygen therapy. During all phases mean SpO2 was 94% (±1.8) and mean HR was 85 bpm (±13.3). Number of desaturation events were 14 in total and mean of % of time with SpO2<90% was 3 (±6.5) during all the rehabilitative session. Moreover, mean BP after reaching the sitting position was 124.7 (±11.9)/78.6 (±8.4) and after ambulation was 131.5 (±11.5)/82.9 (±7.3). The monitoring peripheral oxygen saturation and HR during and not only before and at the end of a standardized early rehabilitation session helped us to ensure the safety of our protocol. Because of its feasibility, safety and reproducibility our rehabilitation treatment has been applied to different types of surgical inpatients in order to limit the negative consequences of immobilization.

  6. The effects of a single session of spinal manipulation on strength and cortical drive in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lykke; Niazi, Imran Khan; Holt, Kelly

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: The primary purpose of this study was to investigate whether a single session of spinal manipulation (SM) increases strength and cortical drive in the lower limb (soleus muscle) of elite Taekwondo athletes. METHODS: Soleus-evoked V-waves, H-reflex and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC......) of the plantar flexors were recorded from 11 elite Taekwondo athletes using a randomized controlled crossover design. Interventions were either SM or passive movement control. Outcomes were assessed at pre-intervention and at three post-intervention time periods (immediate post, post 30 min and post 60 min......). A multifactorial repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to assess within and between group differences. Time and session were used as factors. A post hoc analysis was carried out, when an interactive effect was present. Significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. RESULTS: SM increased MVC force [F(3,30) = 5.95, p 

  7. One night of partial sleep deprivation impairs recovery from a single exercise training session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Dale E; Chin, Tayla; Dikgomo, Kagiso; Hill, Lee; McKune, Andrew J; Kohn, Tertius A; Roden, Laura C

    2017-04-01

    The effects of sleep deprivation on physical performance are well documented, but data on the consequence of sleep deprivation on recovery from exercise are limited. The aim was to compare cyclists' recovery from a single bout of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) after which they were given either a normal night of sleep (CON, 7.56 ± 0.63 h) or half of their usual time in bed (DEP, 3.83 ± 0.33 h). In this randomized cross-over intervention study, 16 trained male cyclists (age 32 ± 7 years), relative peak power output (PPO 4.6 ± 0.7 W kg -1 ) performed a HIIT session at ±18:00 followed by either the CON or DEP sleep condition. Recovery from the HIIT session was assessed the following day by comparing pre-HIIT variables to those measured 12 and 24 h after the session. Following a 2-week washout, cyclists repeated the trial, but under the alternate sleep condition. PPO was reduced more 24 h after the HIIT session in the DEP (ΔPPO -0.22 ± 0.22 W kg -1 ; range -0.75 to 0.1 W kg -1 ) compared to the CON condition (ΔPPO -0.05 ± 0.09 W kg -1 , range -0.19 to 0.17 W kg -1 , p = 0.008, d = -2.16). Cyclists were sleepier (12 h: p = 0.002, d = 1.90; 24 h: p = 0.001, d = 1.41) and felt less motivated to train (12 h, p = 0.012, d = -0.89) during the 24 h recovery phase when the HIIT session was followed by the DEP condition. The exercise-induced 24 h reduction in systolic blood pressure observed in the CON condition was absent in the DEP condition (p = 0.039, d = 0.75). One night of partial sleep deprivation impairs recovery from a single HIIT session in cyclists. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms behind this observation.

  8. Bilateral Single-Session Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery for the Treatment of Bilateral Renal Stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Atis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bilateral single-session retrograde intrarenal surgery in the treatment of bilateral renal stones. Materials and Methods From December 2008 to February 2012, 42 patients who had undergone bilateral single-session retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS and laser lithotripsy were included in the study. The procedures were performed in the lithotomy position on an endoscopy table under general anesthesia, beginning on the side in which the stone size was smaller. Plain abdominal radiography, intravenous urograms (IVU, renal ultrasonography (USG and / or non-contrast tomography (CT scans were conducted for all patients. The success rate was defined as patients who were stone-free or only had residual fragment less than 4 mm. Results A total of 42 patients (28 male, 14 female with a mean age 39.2 ± 14.2 were included in the present study. The mean stone size was 24.09 ± 6.37 mm with a mean operative time of 51.08 ± 15.22 minutes. The stone-free rates (SFR were 92.8% and 97.6% after the first and second procedures, respectively. The average hospital stay was 1.37 ± 0.72 days. In two patients (4.7%, minor complications (Clavien I or II were observed, whereas no major complications (Clavien III-V or blood transfusions were noted in the studied group. Conclusions Bilateral single-session RIRS and laser lithotripsy can be performed safely and effectively with a high success rate and low complication rate in patients with bilateral renal stones.

  9. Radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, Toru

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) precisely delivers high-dose radiation to a small target (usually less than 3-4 cm in diameter), in a single session with steep dose-fall, employing various radiation methods. SRS provides good tumor control for small brain metastases from various primary cancers, with minimal untoward effects on surrounding normal brain. This excellent tumor control prevents neurological death and maintains good activity of daily life. Although surgery with whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) remains an important option for patients with a solitary brain metastasis, SRS with or without WBRT should be considered in patients with a limited number of small tumors and a good prognosis. Many reports, as well as both retrospective and prospective reviews, have shown WBRT before or after SRS to improve local control and reduce new distant lesion emergence. However, upfront WBRT does not improve survival. There are two major delivery techniques, Gamma Knife (GK; Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) SRS and linear accelerator (LINIAC)-based SRS. They are based on quite different concepts, and have different techniques and clinical applications. These differences complicate the discussion of the limitations of and indications for SRS and the necessity for prophylactic WBRT. This review discusses numerous aspects of SRS, its value as compared with other treatment modalities, the necessity for prophylactic WBRT with SRS, the limitations of and indications for SRS, and the difference between GK and LINIAC SRS, based on the literature and our experience, and proposes a new strategy for the treatment of brain metastases in view of the available clinical data and experience. (author)

  10. The effects of a single session of spinal manipulation on strength and cortical drive in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lykke; Niazi, Imran Khan; Holt, Kelly

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: The primary purpose of this study was to investigate whether a single session of spinal manipulation (SM) increases strength and cortical drive in the lower limb (soleus muscle) of elite Taekwondo athletes. METHODS: Soleus-evoked V-waves, H-reflex and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC.......01], and V-waves [F(3,30) = 4.25, p = 0.01] over time compared to the control intervention. Between group differences were significant for all time periods (p strength and corticospinal...

  11. Effects of a single-session assertiveness music therapy role playing protocol for psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement and measure the effectiveness of a single-session assertiveness music therapy role playing protocol for psychiatric inpatients. Participants (N=133) were randomly assigned by group to one of three conditions: (a) Assertiveness Music Therapy, (b) No Music Assertiveness, or (c) Music No Assertiveness. Participants in both assertiveness conditions role played a number of different commonly occurring scenarios at an inpatient psychiatric facility and in the community. There were no significant between-group differences in posttest quality of life, locus of control, or other subscales. However, participants in both assertiveness conditions tended to have slightly higher internal locus of control and overall quality of life scores than participants in the music no assertiveness condition. Additionally, the assertiveness music therapy condition had higher attendance rates than the other conditions. A higher percentage of participants from both the assertiveness music therapy and music no assertiveness conditions indicated they thought their session was the most helpful/therapeutic group therapy session in which they had participated; this was not the case for the assertiveness no music condition. Future research is warranted to measure the effects of protocols that can help psychiatric patients generalize skills learned in treatment.

  12. Aerobic and Anaerobic Swimming Force Evaluation in One Single Test Session for Young Swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Sousa, Filipe Antônio; Rodrigues, Natalia Almeida; Messias, Leonardo Henrique Dalcheco; Queiroz, Jair Borges; Manchado-Gobatto, Fulvia Barros; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to propose and validate the tethered swimming lactate minimum test (TSLacmin) estimating aerobic and anaerobic capacity in one single test session, using force as measurement parameter. 6 male and 6 female young swimmers (age=15.7±1.1 years; height=173.3±9.5 cm; weight=66.1±9.5 kg) performed 4 sessions comprising i) an all-out 30 s test and incremental test (TSLacmin); ii) 30 min of tethered swimming at constant intensity (2 sessions); iii) free-swimming time trials used to calculate critical velocity. Tethered swimming sessions used an acquisition system enabling maximum (Fmax) and mean (Fmean) force measurement and intensity variation. The tethered all-out test lasting 30 s resulted in hyperlactatemia of 7.9±2.0 mmol·l -1 . TSLacmin presented a 100% success applicability rate, which is equivalent to aerobic capacity in 75% of cases. TSLacmin intensity was 37.7±7.3 N, while maximum force in the all-out test was 105±27 N. Aerobic and anaerobic TSLacmin parameters were significantly related to free-swimming performance (r=-0.67 for 100 m and r=-0.80 for 200 m) and critical velocity (r=0.80). TSLacmin estimates aerobic capacity in most cases, and both aerobic and anaerobic force parameters are well related to critical velocity and free swimming performance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. The effects of a single session of spinal manipulation on strength and cortical drive in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lykke; Niazi, Imran Khan; Holt, Kelly; Nedergaard, Rasmus Wiberg; Duehr, Jens; Allen, Kathryn; Marshall, Paul; Türker, Kemal S; Hartvigsen, Jan; Haavik, Heidi

    2018-04-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate whether a single session of spinal manipulation (SM) increases strength and cortical drive in the lower limb (soleus muscle) of elite Taekwondo athletes. Soleus-evoked V-waves, H-reflex and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the plantar flexors were recorded from 11 elite Taekwondo athletes using a randomized controlled crossover design. Interventions were either SM or passive movement control. Outcomes were assessed at pre-intervention and at three post-intervention time periods (immediate post, post 30 min and post 60 min). A multifactorial repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to assess within and between group differences. Time and session were used as factors. A post hoc analysis was carried out, when an interactive effect was present. Significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. SM increased MVC force [F(3,30) = 5.95, p < 0.01], and V-waves [F(3,30) = 4.25, p = 0.01] over time compared to the control intervention. Between group differences were significant for all time periods (p < 0.05) except for the post60 force measurements (p = 0.07). A single session of SM increased muscle strength and corticospinal excitability to ankle plantar flexor muscles in elite Taekwondo athletes. The increased MVC force lasted for 30 min and the corticospinal excitability increase persisted for at least 60 min.

  14. Single session of Nd:YAG laser intracanal irradiation neutralizes endotoxin in dental root dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archilla, José R. F.; Moreira, Maria S. N. A.; Miyagi, Sueli P. H.; Bombana, Antônio C.; Gutknecht, Norbert; Marques, Márcia M.

    2012-11-01

    Endotoxins released in the dental root by Gram-negative microorganisms can be neutralized by calcium hydroxide, when this medication is applied inside the root canal for at least seven days. However, several clinical situations demand faster root canal decontamination. Thus, for faster endotoxin neutralization, endodontists are seeking additional treatments. The in vitro study tested whether or not intracanal Nd:YAG laser irradiation would be able to neutralize endotoxin within the human dental root canal in a single session. Twenty-four human teeth with one root were mounted between two chambers. After conventional endodontic treatment, root canals were contaminated with Escherichia coli endotoxin. Then they were irradiated or not (controls) in contact mode with an Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W, 15 Hz, 100 mJ and pulse fluency of 124 J/cm2). The endotoxin activity was measured using the limulus lysate technique and data were statistically compared (p≤0.05). The concentration of active endotoxin measured in the negative control group was significantly lower than that of the positive control group (p=0.04). The concentrations of endotoxin in both irradiated groups were significantly lower than that of the positive control group (p=0.027) and similar to that of negative control group (p=0.20). A single session of intracanal Nd:YAG laser irradiation is able to neutralize endotoxin in the dental root tissues.

  15. Single session of Nd:YAG laser intracanal irradiation neutralizes endotoxin in dental root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archilla, José R F; Moreira, Maria S N A; Miyagi, Sueli P H; Bombana, Antônio C; Gutknecht, Norbert; Marques, Márcia M

    2012-11-01

    Endotoxins released in the dental root by Gram-negative microorganisms can be neutralized by calcium hydroxide, when this medication is applied inside the root canal for at least seven days. However, several clinical situations demand faster root canal decontamination. Thus, for faster endotoxin neutralization, endodontists are seeking additional treatments. The in vitro study tested whether or not intracanal Nd:YAG laser irradiation would be able to neutralize endotoxin within the human dental root canal in a single session. Twenty-four human teeth with one root were mounted between two chambers. After conventional endodontic treatment, root canals were contaminated with Escherichia coli endotoxin. Then they were irradiated or not (controls) in contact mode with an Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W, 15 Hz, 100 mJ and pulse fluency of 124  J/cm2). The endotoxin activity was measured using the limulus lysate technique and data were statistically compared (p≤0.05). The concentration of active endotoxin measured in the negative control group was significantly lower than that of the positive control group (p=0.04). The concentrations of endotoxin in both irradiated groups were significantly lower than that of the positive control group (p=0.027) and similar to that of negative control group (p=0.20). A single session of intracanal Nd:YAG laser irradiation is able to neutralize endotoxin in the dental root tissues.

  16. Radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Shunsuke

    1994-01-01

    Steiner has first published a report of a case of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) treated with gamma knife radiosurgery in 1972. Since the mid-1980s, radiosurgery has increasingly received much attention. There have already been more than 6,000 radiosurgically treated AVM cases. This article reviews radiosurgery in the context of the following: (1) radiosurgery according to gamma knife, linear accelerator, heavy-charged particle Bragg-peak radiation and neutron; (2) therapeutic outcome in view of angiographically proven complete obliteration (CO) of AVM, including the time required for CO and factors regulating CO (such as the volume of AVM, radiation doses, correlation between the volume of AVM and radiation doses, age, and site of AVM), histopathological findings, and clinical complaints (such as headache and epilepsy) after radiosurgery; (3) bleeding after radiosurgery; (4) complications (including angiography-related complications, those immediately after radiosurgery, delayed complications, factors influencing delayed complications, and endocrine or growth retardation); (5) other problems (such as radiation doses, follow-up strategy, approaches to giant AVMs, and repeat irradiation); (6) indication of radiosurgery for lesions other than brain stem, and lesions of the mid-brain, pons and bulb. (N.K.) 134 refs

  17. Single session vs two sessions of flexible ureterosopy (FURS) for dusting of renal pelvic stones 2–3 cm in diameter: Does stone size or hardness play a role in number of sessions to be applied?”

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hamed, Ahmed Mamdouh Abd; Elmoghazy, Hazem; Aldahshoury, Mohamed; Riad, Ahmed; Mostafa, Mohammed; Farag, Fawzy; Gamal, Wael

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the stone hardness in predicting the need for single or two sessions of retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) for renal pelvis stones of 2–3 cm in size. Material and methods Ninety-six patients (64 male and 32 female) with only renal stones (2.5±0.3 cm) underwent RIRS using flexible 7.5 Fr ureteroscope (FURS). The stone hardness was evaluated by preoperative non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT). The patients were divided into two groups based on stone hardness: Group I (n=54) (hard stones - Hounsfield Unit (HU) >1000) and group II (n=42) (not hard stone - HU <1000). The stone-free rate, the operative time, any intra or postoperative complications and the need for second sessions of RIRS were evaluated. Results All stones were successfully accessed. Intraoperative complications were not reported. The initial stone-free rate was 40% in Group I and 95% in Group II after a single session (p=0.01). A second session FURS was needed in 32 cases of Group I (40%) where postoperative CT showed significant residual stone fragments of 6±2 mm, and stone-free rate up to 100 percent. On the contrary only 2 cases from Group II underwent second session FURS (p=0.01). The operative times were 75±15 minutes in Group I and 55±13 minutes in Group II (p<0.01). Six patients (4 in group I and 2 in group II) had postoperative high-grade fever (Clavien Grade II). Conclusion Stone hardness had a significant impact on the decision of performing single versus two sessions of FURS for renal pelvic stones of 2–3 cm rather than the stone size alone. PMID:28717539

  18. Single session vs two sessions of flexible ureterosopy (FURS) for dusting of renal pelvic stones 2-3 cm in diameter: Does stone size or hardness play a role in number of sessions to be applied?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hamed, Ahmed Mamdouh Abd; Elmoghazy, Hazem; Aldahshoury, Mohamed; Riad, Ahmed; Mostafa, Mohammed; Farag, Fawzy; Gamal, Wael

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the stone hardness in predicting the need for single or two sessions of retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) for renal pelvis stones of 2-3 cm in size. Ninety-six patients (64 male and 32 female) with only renal stones (2.5±0.3 cm) underwent RIRS using flexible 7.5 Fr ureteroscope (FURS). The stone hardness was evaluated by preoperative non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT). The patients were divided into two groups based on stone hardness: Group I (n=54) (hard stones - Hounsfield Unit (HU) >1000) and group II (n=42) (not hard stone - HU <1000). The stone-free rate, the operative time, any intra or postoperative complications and the need for second sessions of RIRS were evaluated. All stones were successfully accessed. Intraoperative complications were not reported. The initial stone-free rate was 40% in Group I and 95% in Group II after a single session (p=0.01). A second session FURS was needed in 32 cases of Group I (40%) where postoperative CT showed significant residual stone fragments of 6±2 mm, and stone-free rate up to 100 percent. On the contrary only 2 cases from Group II underwent second session FURS (p=0.01). The operative times were 75±15 minutes in Group I and 55±13 minutes in Group II (p<0.01). Six patients (4 in group I and 2 in group II) had postoperative high-grade fever (Clavien Grade II). Stone hardness had a significant impact on the decision of performing single versus two sessions of FURS for renal pelvic stones of 2-3 cm rather than the stone size alone.

  19. Irisin in blood increases transiently after single sessions of intense endurance exercise and heavy strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Håvard; Slettaløkken, Gunnar; Vegge, Geir; Hollan, Ivana; Whist, Jon Elling; Strand, Tor; Rønnestad, Bent R; Ellefsen, Stian

    2015-01-01

    Irisin is a recently identified exercise-induced hormone that increases energy expenditure, at least in rodents. The main purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Irisin increases acutely in blood after singular sessions of intense endurance exercise (END) and heavy strength training (STR). Secondary, we wanted to explore the relationship between body composition and exercise-induced effects on irisin, and the effect of END and STR on muscular expression of the irisin gene FNDC5. Nine moderately trained healthy subjects performed three test days using a randomized and standardized crossover design: one day with 60 minutes of END, one day with 60 minutes of STR, and one day without exercise (CON). Venous blood was sampled over a period of 24h on the exercise days. Both END and STR led to transient increases in irisin concentrations in blood, peaking immediately after END and one hour after STR, before gradually returning to baseline. Irisin responses to STR, but not END, showed a consistently strong negative correlation with proportions of lean body mass. Neither END nor STR affected expression of FNDC5, measured 4h after training sessions, though both protocols led to pronounced increases in PGC-1α expression, which is involved in transcriptional control of FNDC5. The results strongly suggest that single sessions of intense endurance exercise and heavy strength training lead to transient increases in irisin concentrations in blood. This was not accompanied by increased FNDC5 expression, measured 4h post-exercise. The results suggest that irisin responses to resistance exercise are higher in individuals with lower proportions of lean body mass.

  20. Auditory Cortex tACS and tRNS for Tinnitus: Single versus Multiple Sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Claes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of an external acoustic source, which often exerts a significant impact on the quality of life. Currently there is evidence that neuroplastic changes in both neural pathways are involved in the generation and maintaining of tinnitus. Neuromodulation has been suggested to interfere with these neuroplastic alterations. In this study we aimed to compare the effect of two upcoming forms of transcranial electrical neuromodulation: alternating current stimulation (tACS and random noise stimulation (tRNS, both applied on the auditory cortex. A database with 228 patients with chronic tinnitus who underwent noninvasive neuromodulation was retrospectively analyzed. The results of this study show that a single session of tRNS induces a significant suppressive effect on tinnitus loudness and distress, in contrast to tACS. Multiple sessions of tRNS augment the suppressive effect on tinnitus loudness but have no effect on tinnitus distress. In conclusion this preliminary study shows a possibly beneficial effect of tRNS on tinnitus and can be a motivation for future randomized placebo-controlled clinical studies with auditory tRNS for tinnitus. Auditory alpha-modulated tACS does not seem to be contributing to the treatment of tinnitus.

  1. Evaluation of Prognostic Factors for Early Mortality After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases: a Single Institutional Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, E Emily; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Barnett, Gene H; Angelov, Lilyana; Chao, Samuel; Murphy, Erin; Yu, Jennifer; Suh, John H; Elson, Paul; Stevens, Glen H J; Mohammadi, Alireza M

    2017-06-29

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is used commonly for patients with brain metastases (BM) to improve intracranial disease control. However, survival of these patients is often dictated by their systemic disease course. The value of SRS becomes less clear in patients with anticipated short survival. To evaluate prognostic factors, which may predict early death (within 90 d) after SRS. A total of 1427 patients with BM were treated with SRS at our institution (2000-2012). There were 1385 cases included in this study; 1057 patients underwent upfront SRS and 328 underwent salvage SRS. The primary endpoint of the study was all-cause mortality within 90 d after first SRS. Multivariate analyses were performed to develop prognostic indices. Two hundred sixty-six patients (19%, 95% confidence interval 17%-21%) died within 90 d after SRS. Multivariate analysis of upfront SRS patients showed that Karnofsky Performance Status, primary tumor type, extracranial metastases, age at SRS, boost treatment, total tumor volume, prior surgery, and interval from primary to BM were independent prognostic factors for 90-d mortality. The first 4 factors were also independent predictors in patients treated with salvage SRS. Based on these factors, an index was defined for each group that categorized patients into 3 and 2 prognostic groups, respectively. Ninety-day mortality was 5% to 7% in the most favorable cohort and 36% to 39% in the least favorable. Indices based on readily available patient, clinical, and treatment factors that are highly predictive of early death in patients treated with upfront or salvage SRS can be calculated and used to define well-separated prognostic groups. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  2. Containing psychotic patients with fragile boundaries: a single-session group case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavarenne, Anaïs; Segal, Emily; Sigman, Maxine

    2013-01-01

    This case study describes a single group psychotherapy session of six individuals suffering from schizophrenia or schizoaffective illness, which was characterized by numerous manifestations of fragile Ego boundaries. Based on these illustrations of fragile Ego boundaries, we explore some of the group's core therapeutic actions against psychosis. We discuss how the group (1) provides access to a structuring auxiliary Ego, (2) acts as a containing object by establishing firm boundaries and by mentalizing patients' psychotic productions, and (3) may become a solid object representation introjected by individuals wrestling with porous Ego boundaries and a poor sense of self. We conclude that, in addition to the known role of group therapy in increasing mature defenses, developing insight and providing social support, the group promotes healthier Ego boundaries, and eventually improves self-differentiation, and also tolerance to interpersonal proximity. This case study clarifies group therapy dynamics with individuals suffering from psychosis.

  3. Approach avoidance training in the eating domain: testing the effectiveness across three single session studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniela; Jostmann, Nils B; Wiers, Reinout W; Holland, Rob W

    2015-02-01

    Dual-process models propose that impulsive behavior plays a key role in the development and maintenance of maladaptive eating patterns. Research outside the eating domain suggests that approach avoidance training, a paradigm which aims to modify automatic behavioral dispositions toward critical stimuli, is an effective tool to weaken unhealthy impulses. The present research tested the effectiveness of approach avoidance training in the eating domain. We conducted three single session studies with varying methodologies in a normal-weight female student population (total N = 258), in which one group was always trained to avoid pictures of unhealthy food and to approach pictures of healthy food or neutral objects. We found no conclusive evidence that approach avoidance training can change participants' implicit and explicit food preferences and eating behavior. We discuss the potential and the limitations of approach avoidance training in the eating domain and provide suggestions for future research avenues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A single session of intraluminal brachytherapy in palliation of oesophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jager, Jos; Langendijk, Hans; Pannebakker, Martin; Rijken, Joop; Jong, Jos de

    1995-01-01

    Between September 1987 and September 1993, 88 patients with oesophageal cancer were treated by a single session of intraluminal brachytherapy of 15 Gy prescribed at 1 cm distance from the central axis, using MDR 137 Cs (n 51) during the first part of the study and HDR 192 Ir (n = 37) during the second part of the study. All patients were regarded as inoperable. Improvement of dysphagia, assessed 4-6 weeks after treatment, was noted in 50 of 75 (67%) evaluable patients, whereas swallowing ability was completely restored in 47% of them. Relapse of dysphagia occurred in 28 (37%) patients during follow-up. Additional palliative treatment consisted of endoprosthesis in 14 (19%), a second course of brachytherapy in 13 (17%), one or more dilatations only in 11 (15%) and laser treatment in four (5%) patients. One non-fatal haemorrhage and five fistulae occurred, all in the presence of tumour. Two severe ulcerations without evidence of tumour were noted, both managed by combined curative treatment. The median survival of the group investigated was 5.5 months. An exophytic, non-circular growth pattern was associated with a better response. In a multivariate analysis the presence of distant metastases (p = 0.0028), weight loss (p = 0.0051) and an exophytic growth pattern (p = 0.0199) were associated with a worse survival. The present data indicate that a single session of ILB is appropriate in the palliation of dysphagia in patients with inoperable oesophagal cancer showing bad prognostic signs. Up to now there has been no clear evidence for benefit of addition of ERT

  5. Hemodynamic responses to single sessions of aerobic exercise and resistance exercise in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov Fieril, Karolina; Glantz, Anna; Fagevik Olsen, Monika

    2016-09-01

    Previous research on maternal hemodynamic responses to a single exercise session during pregnancy is sparse, especially considering immediate responses to resistance exercise. The aim of the study was to examine blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, and Rating of Perceived Exertion in healthy pregnant women during single sessions of continuous submaximal exercise in pregnancy week 21. A cross-over design was used. Twenty healthy pregnant women from four prenatal clinics in Gothenburg, Sweden, were included. On day 1, the women did 30 min of aerobic exercise and on day 3 they did 30 min of resistance exercise. Blood pressure, heart rate, and Rating of Perceived Exertion were measured after 15 and 30 min of exercise. After 15 and 30 min of exercise, there was a significant increase in systolic blood pressure and heart rate (p aerobic exercise (p = 0.01) than resistance exercise (p = 0.03). Resistance exercise was perceived as more intense than aerobic exercise after 15 min (p = 0.02) and 30 min (p = 0.001) of exercise. Five minutes after completing the exercise, blood pressure quickly reverted to normal although heart rate was still increased (p = 0.001). There was no correlation between heart rate and Rating of Perceived Exertion (rs  = 0.05-0.43). Maternal hemodynamic responses were essentially the same, regardless of whether the exercise was submaximal aerobic or resistance exercise, although resistance exercise was perceived as more intense. Aerobic and resistance exercise corresponding to "somewhat hard" seems to have no adverse effect with regard to maternal hemodynamic responses in healthy pregnancy. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Combined embolization and gamma knife radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, W.Y.; Wikholm, G.; Karlsson, B.; Lindquist, C.; Svendsen, P.; Ericson, K.

    1993-01-01

    In a study of 46 patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) the value of combining embolization and gamma knife radiosurgery was assessed. In 35 patients with large grade III to V AVMs (Spetzler-Martin system) staged combined treatment was planned. In 11 patients, radiosurgery complemented embolization for a residual AVM. The number of embolization sessions ranged from 1 to 7 (median 2). Twenty-six patients needed multiple embolization sessions. In 28 patients the grade of AVMs decreased as a result of embolization. In 16 patients collateral feeding vessels developed after embolization which made delineation of the residual nidus difficult. The time lag between the last embolization and radiosurgery ranged from 1 to 24 months (median 4). Nineteen of 35 large grade III to V AVMs were possible to treat by radiosurgery following embolization. In the 46 patients complications occurred in 9 from embolization and in 2 from radiosurgery. Two patients had transient and 9 had permanent neurologic deficits. It is concluded that embolization facilitates radiosurgery for some large AVMs and therefore this combined treatment has a role in the management of AVMs. (orig.)

  7. Peritumoral hemorrhage immediately after radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Masafumi; Kitajima, Satoru; Miyazaki, Chikao; Otsuka, Takashi; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Shibata, Iekado

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of a 44-year-old woman with metastatic brain tumors who suffered peri-tumoral hemorrhage soon after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). She had been suffering from breast cancer with multiple systemic metastasis. She started to have headache, nausea, dizziness and speech disturbance 1 month before admission. There was no bleeding tendency in the hematological examination and the patient was normotensive. Neurological examination disclosed headache and slightly aphasia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a large round mass lesion in the left temporal lobe. It was a well-demarcated, highly enhanced mass, 45 mm in diameter. SRS was performed on four lesions in a single session (Main mass: maximum dose was 30 Gy in the center and 20 Gy in the margin of the tumor. Others: maximum 25 Gy margin 20 Gy). After radiosurgery, she had severe headache, nausea and vomiting and showed progression of aphasia. CT scan revealed a peritumoral hemorrhage. Conservative therapy was undertaken and the patient's symptoms improved. After 7 days, she was discharged, able to walk. The patient died of extensive distant metastasis 5 months after SRS. Acute transient swelling following conventional radiotherapy is a well-documented phenomenon. However, the present case indicates that such an occurrence is also possible in SRS. We have hypothesized that acute reactions such as brain swelling occur due to breakdown of the fragile vessels of the tumor or surrounding tissue. (author)

  8. Treatment planning optimization for linear accelerator radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeks, Sanford L.; Buatti, John M.; Bova, Francis J.; Friedman, William A.; Mendenhall, William M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Linear accelerator radiosurgery uses multiple arcs delivered through circular collimators to produce a nominally spherical dose distribution. Production of dose distributions that conform to irregular lesions or conformally avoid critical neural structures requires a detailed understanding of the available treatment planning parameters. Methods and Materials: Treatment planning parameters that may be manipulated within a single isocenter to provide conformal avoidance and dose conformation to ellipsoidal lesions include differential arc weighting and gantry start/stop angles. More irregular lesions require the use of multiple isocenters. Iterative manipulation of treatment planning variables can be difficult and computationally expensive, especially if the effects of these manipulations are not well defined. Effects of treatment parameter manipulation are explained and illustrated. This is followed by description of the University of Florida Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment Planning Algorithm. This algorithm organizes the manipulations into a practical approach for radiosurgery treatment planning. Results: Iterative treatment planning parameters may be efficiently manipulated to achieve optimal treatment plans by following the University of Florida Treatment Planning Algorithm. The ability to produce conformal stereotactic treatment plans using the algorithm is demonstrated for a variety of clinical presentations. Conclusion: The standard dose distribution produced in linear accelerator radiosurgery is spherical, but manipulation of available treatment planning parameters may result in optimal dose conformation. The University of Florida Treatment Planning Algorithm organizes available treatment parameters to efficiently produce conformal radiosurgery treatment plans

  9. Efficacy of static stretching and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretch on hamstrings length after a single session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hora, John; Cartwright, Abigail; Wade, Clive D; Hough, Alan D; Shum, Gary L K

    2011-06-01

    A number of studies have investigated the efficacy of several repetitions of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching (PNF) and static stretching (SS). However, there is limited research comparing the effects of a single bout of these stretching maneuvers. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a single bout of a therapist-applied 30-second SS vs. a single bout of therapist-applied 6-second hamstring (agonist) contract PNF. Forty-five healthy subjects between the ages of 21 and 35 were randomly allocated to 1 of the 2 stretching groups or a control group, in which no stretching was received. The flexibility of the hamstring was determined by a range of passive knee extension, measured using a universal goniometer, with the subject in the supine position and the hip at 90° flexion, before and after intervention. A significant increase in knee extension was found for both intervention groups after a single stretch (SS group = 7.53°, p < 0.01 and PNF group = 11.80°, p < 0.01). Both interventions resulted in a significantly greater increase in knee extension when compared to the control group (p < 0.01). The PNF group demonstrated significantly greater gains in knee extension compared to the SS group (mean difference 4.27°, p < 0.01). It can be concluded that a therapist applied SS or PNF results in a significant increase in hamstring flexibility. A hamstring (agonist) contract PNF is more effective than an SS in a single stretching session. These findings are important to physiotherapists or trainers working in clinical and sporting environments. Where in the past therapists may have spent time conducting multiple repetitions of a PNF and an SS, a single bout of either technique may be considered just as effective. A key component of the study methodology was the exclusion of a warm-up period before stretching. Therefore, the findings of efficacy of a single PNF are of particular relevance in sporting environments and busy clinical

  10. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases with Single-Isocenter VMAT: Optimizing Treatment Geometry to Reduce Normal Brain Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q; Snyder, K; Liu, C; Huang, Y; Li, H; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an optimization algorithm to reduce normal brain dose by optimizing couch and collimator angles for single isocenter multiple targets treatment of stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods: Three metastatic brain lesions were retrospectively planned using single-isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Three matrices were developed to calculate the projection of each lesion on Beam’s Eye View (BEV) by the rotating couch, collimator and gantry respectively. The island blocking problem was addressed by computing the total area of open space between any two lesions with shared MLC leaf pairs. The couch and collimator angles resulting in the smallest open areas were the optimized angles for each treatment arc. Two treatment plans with and without couch and collimator angle optimization were developed using the same objective functions and to achieve 99% of each target volume receiving full prescription dose of 18Gy. Plan quality was evaluated by calculating each target’s Conformity Index (CI), Gradient Index (GI), and Homogeneity index (HI), and absolute volume of normal brain V8Gy, V10Gy, V12Gy, and V14Gy. Results: Using the new couch/collimator optimization strategy, dose to normal brain tissue was reduced substantially. V8, V10, V12, and V14 decreased by 2.3%, 3.6%, 3.5%, and 6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the conformity index, gradient index, and homogeneity index between two treatment plans with and without the new optimization algorithm. Conclusion: We have developed a solution to the island blocking problem in delivering radiation to multiple brain metastases with shared isocenter. Significant reduction in dose to normal brain was achieved by using optimal couch and collimator angles that minimize total area of open space between any of the two lesions with shared MLC leaf pairs. This technique has been integrated into Eclipse treatment system using scripting API

  11. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases with Single-Isocenter VMAT: Optimizing Treatment Geometry to Reduce Normal Brain Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Snyder, K; Liu, C; Huang, Y; Li, H; Chetty, I; Wen, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an optimization algorithm to reduce normal brain dose by optimizing couch and collimator angles for single isocenter multiple targets treatment of stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods: Three metastatic brain lesions were retrospectively planned using single-isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Three matrices were developed to calculate the projection of each lesion on Beam’s Eye View (BEV) by the rotating couch, collimator and gantry respectively. The island blocking problem was addressed by computing the total area of open space between any two lesions with shared MLC leaf pairs. The couch and collimator angles resulting in the smallest open areas were the optimized angles for each treatment arc. Two treatment plans with and without couch and collimator angle optimization were developed using the same objective functions and to achieve 99% of each target volume receiving full prescription dose of 18Gy. Plan quality was evaluated by calculating each target’s Conformity Index (CI), Gradient Index (GI), and Homogeneity index (HI), and absolute volume of normal brain V8Gy, V10Gy, V12Gy, and V14Gy. Results: Using the new couch/collimator optimization strategy, dose to normal brain tissue was reduced substantially. V8, V10, V12, and V14 decreased by 2.3%, 3.6%, 3.5%, and 6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the conformity index, gradient index, and homogeneity index between two treatment plans with and without the new optimization algorithm. Conclusion: We have developed a solution to the island blocking problem in delivering radiation to multiple brain metastases with shared isocenter. Significant reduction in dose to normal brain was achieved by using optimal couch and collimator angles that minimize total area of open space between any of the two lesions with shared MLC leaf pairs. This technique has been integrated into Eclipse treatment system using scripting API.

  12. Results of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in Acromegaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzin, Alberto; Spatola, Giorgio; Losa, Marco; Picozzi, Piero; Mortini, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Single-session radiosurgery with Gamma Knife (GK) may be a potential adjuvant treatment in acromegaly. We analyzed the safety and efficacy of GK in patients who had previously received maximal surgical debulking at our hospital. Methods. The study was a retrospective analysis of hormonal, radiological, and ophthalmologic data collected in a predefined protocol from 1994 to 2009. The mean age at treatment was 42.3 years (range 22–67 yy). 103 acromegalic patients participated in the study. The median follow-up was 71 months (IQ range 43–107). All patients were treated with GK for residual or recurrent GH-secreting adenoma. Results. Sixty-three patients (61.2%) reached the main outcome of the study. The rate of remission was 58.3% at 5 years (95% CI 47.6–69.0%). Other 15 patients (14.6%) were in remission after GK while on treatment with somatostatin analogues. No serious side effects occurred after GK. Eight patients (7.8%) experienced a new deficit of pituitary function. New cases of hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, and hypoadrenalism occurred in 4 of 77 patients (5.2%), 3 of 95 patients (3.2%), and 6 of 100 patients at risk (6.0%), respectively. Conclusion. In a highly selected group of acromegalic patients, GK treatment had good efficacy and safety. PMID:22518119

  13. Results of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Franzin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Single-session radiosurgery with Gamma Knife (GK may be a potential adjuvant treatment in acromegaly. We analyzed the safety and efficacy of GK in patients who had previously received maximal surgical debulking at our hospital. Methods. The study was a retrospective analysis of hormonal, radiological, and ophthalmologic data collected in a predefined protocol from 1994 to 2009. The mean age at treatment was 42.3 years (range 22–67 yy. 103 acromegalic patients participated in the study. The median follow-up was 71 months (IQ range 43–107. All patients were treated with GK for residual or recurrent GH-secreting adenoma. Results. Sixty-three patients (61.2% reached the main outcome of the study. The rate of remission was 58.3% at 5 years (95% CI 47.6–69.0%. Other 15 patients (14.6% were in remission after GK while on treatment with somatostatin analogues. No serious side effects occurred after GK. Eight patients (7.8% experienced a new deficit of pituitary function. New cases of hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, and hypoadrenalism occurred in 4 of 77 patients (5.2%, 3 of 95 patients (3.2%, and 6 of 100 patients at risk (6.0%, respectively. Conclusion. In a highly selected group of acromegalic patients, GK treatment had good efficacy and safety.

  14. A single aerobic exercise session accelerates movement execution but not central processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Kit B; Sage, Michael D; Staines, W Richard; Middleton, Laura E; McIlroy, William E

    2017-03-27

    Previous research has demonstrated that aerobic exercise has disparate effects on speed of processing and movement execution. In simple and choice reaction tasks, aerobic exercise appears to increase speed of movement execution while speed of processing is unaffected. In the flanker task, aerobic exercise has been shown to reduce response time on incongruent trials more than congruent trials, purportedly reflecting a selective influence on speed of processing related to cognitive control. However, it is unclear how changes in speed of processing and movement execution contribute to these exercise-induced changes in response time during the flanker task. This study examined how a single session of aerobic exercise influences speed of processing and movement execution during a flanker task using electromyography to partition response time into reaction time and movement time, respectively. Movement time decreased during aerobic exercise regardless of flanker congruence but returned to pre-exercise levels immediately after exercise. Reaction time during incongruent flanker trials decreased over time in both an aerobic exercise and non-exercise control condition indicating it was not specifically influenced by exercise. This disparate influence of aerobic exercise on movement time and reaction time indicates the importance of partitioning response time when examining the influence of aerobic exercise on speed of processing. The decrease in reaction time over time independent of aerobic exercise indicates that interpreting pre-to-post exercise changes in behavior requires caution. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A single session of exercise as a modulator of short-term learning in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Michael D; Beyer, Kit B; Laylor, Mark; Liang, Carmen; Roy, Eric A; McIlroy, William E

    2016-08-26

    A single session of aerobic exercise is linked to faster motor responses; however, the effect on rate of short-term learning is less clear. The objective was to evaluate the influence of a single bout of aerobic exercise on the rate of short-term acquisition of a shape-letter association task requiring a motor response. 23 [11 females, age 20.8±2.7years] healthy young adults were evaluated using a randomly assigned crossover design which was counterbalanced for order before and after moderate (exercise) and light (control) intensity cycle ergometry. Participants performed 3 blocks, with each block consisting of one round of training and testing. During training, participants were tasked with learning 6 unique shape-letter associations. Subsequent testing required a key press response to a visually presented shape pattern. Response time and error rates were used to assess acquisition over the 3 blocks of testing. Mean response time was faster post-exercise relative to the other testing periods, and approached statistical significance compared to post-control (pexercise and control conditions). Error rate reduction (test block 1 minus test block 3) revealed that individuals had the smallest change in error rate post-exercise (pexercise which approached statistical significance (p=0.06) suggesting near-perfect error rates were obtained after only 2 testing blocks post-exercise compared to 3 blocks in the other testing periods. Support for augmentation of short-term learning was mixed as errors were reduced post-exercise while response time was not different between evaluations. Future work should include neurophysiological evaluation and a retention test to better elucidate the influence of aerobic exercise on rate of short-term learning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Differences in Clinical Results After LINAC-Based Single-Dose Radiosurgery Versus Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Welzel, Thomas; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) vs. those treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: This study is based on an analysis of 200 patients with 202 VSs treated with FSRT (n = 172) or SRS (n = 30). Patients with tumor progression and/or progression of clinical symptoms were selected for treatment. In 165 out of 202 VSs (82%), RT was performed as the primary treatment for VS, and for 37 VSs (18%), RT was conducted for tumor progression after neurosurgical intervention. For patients receiving FSRT, a median total dose of 57.6 Gy was prescribed, with a median fractionation of 5 x 1.8 Gy per week. For patients who underwent SRS, a median single dose of 13 Gy was prescribed to the 80% isodose. Results: FSRT and SRS were well tolerated. Median follow-up time was 75 months. Local control was not statistically different for both groups. The probability of maintaining the pretreatment hearing level after SRS with doses of ≤13 Gy was comparable to that of FSRT. The radiation dose for the SRS group (≤13 Gy vs. >13 Gy) significantly influenced hearing preservation rates (p = 0.03). In the group of patients treated with SRS doses of ≤13 Gy, cranial nerve toxicity was comparable to that of the FSRT group. Conclusions: FSRT and SRS are both safe and effective alternatives for the treatment of VS. Local control rates are comparable in both groups. SRS with doses of ≤13 Gy is a safe alternative to FSRT. While FSRT can be applied safely for the treatment of VSs of all sizes, SRS should be reserved for smaller lesions.

  17. Single Session of Functional Electrical Stimulation-Assisted Walking Produces Corticomotor Symmetry Changes Related to Changes in Poststroke Walking Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jacqueline A; Hsiao, HaoYuan; Wright, Tamara; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A

    2017-05-01

    Recent research demonstrated that the symmetry of corticomotor drive with the paretic and nonparetic plantarflexor muscles was related to the biomechanical ankle moment strategy that people with chronic stroke used to achieve their greatest walking speeds. Rehabilitation strategies that promote corticomotor balance might improve poststroke walking mechanics and enhance functional ambulation. The study objectives were to test the effectiveness of a single session of gait training using functional electrical stimulation (FES) to improve plantarflexor corticomotor symmetry and plantarflexion ankle moment symmetry and to determine whether changes in corticomotor symmetry were related to changes in ankle moment symmetry within the session. This was a repeated-measures crossover study. On separate days, 20 people with chronic stroke completed a session of treadmill walking either with or without the use of FES of their ankle dorsi- and plantarflexor muscles. We calculated plantarflexor corticomotor symmetry using transcranial magnetic stimulation and plantarflexion ankle moment symmetry during walking between the paretic and the nonparetic limbs before and after each session. We compared changes and tested relationships between corticomotor symmetry and ankle moment symmetry following each session. Following the session with FES, there was an increase in plantarflexor corticomotor symmetry that was related to the observed increase in ankle moment symmetry. In contrast, following the session without FES, there were no changes in corticomotor symmetry or ankle moment symmetry. No stratification was made on the basis of lesion size, location, or clinical severity. These findings demonstrate, for the first time (to our knowledge), the ability of a single session of gait training with FES to induce positive corticomotor plasticity in people in the chronic stage of stroke recovery. They also provide insight into the neurophysiologic mechanisms underlying improvements in

  18. From Catastrophizing to Recovery: a pilot study of a single-session treatment for pain catastrophizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darnall BD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Beth D Darnall, John A Sturgeon, Ming-Chih Kao, Jennifer M Hah, Sean C MackeyDivision of Pain Medicine, Stanford Systems Neuroscience and Pain Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USABackground: Pain catastrophizing (PC – a pattern of negative cognitive-emotional responses to real or anticipated pain – maintains chronic pain and undermines medical treatments. Standard PC treatment involves multiple sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy. To provide efficient treatment, we developed a single-session, 2-hour class that solely treats PC entitled “From Catastrophizing to Recovery”[FCR].Objectives: To determine 1 feasibility of FCR; 2 participant ratings for acceptability, understandability, satisfaction, and likelihood to use the information learned; and 3 preliminary efficacy of FCR for reducing PC.Design and methods: Uncontrolled prospective pilot trial with a retrospective chart and database review component. Seventy-six patients receiving care at an outpatient pain clinic (the Stanford Pain Management Center attended the class as free treatment and 70 attendees completed and returned an anonymous survey immediately post-class. The Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS was administered at class check-in (baseline and at 2, and 4 weeks post-treatment. Within subjects repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA with Student's t-test contrasts were used to compare scores across time points.Results: All attendees who completed a baseline PCS were included as study participants (N=57; F=82%; mean age =50.2 years; PCS was completed by 46 participants at week 2 and 35 participants at week 4. Participants had significantly reduced PC at both time points (P<0001 and large effect sizes were found (Cohen's d=0.85 and d=1.15.Conclusion: Preliminary data suggest that FCR is an acceptable and effective treatment for PC. Larger, controlled studies of longer duration are needed to determine durability of response, factors

  19. Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan Shuang; Swanson, Nathan; Chen Zhe [Department of Computer Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Ma Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)], E-mail: sluan@cs.unm.edu, E-mail: nate@cs.unm.edu, E-mail: zchen@cs.unm.edu, E-mail: lijunma@radonc.ucsf.edu

    2009-03-21

    Gamma knife has been the treatment of choice for various brain tumors and functional disorders. Current gamma knife radiosurgery is planned in a 'ball-packing' approach and delivered in a 'step-and-shoot' manner, i.e. it aims to 'pack' the different sized spherical high-dose volumes (called 'shots') into a tumor volume. We have developed a dynamic scheme for gamma knife radiosurgery based on the concept of 'dose-painting' to take advantage of the new robotic patient positioning system on the latest Gamma Knife C(TM) and Perfexion(TM) units. In our scheme, the spherical high dose volume created by the gamma knife unit will be viewed as a 3D spherical 'paintbrush', and treatment planning reduces to finding the best route of this 'paintbrush' to 'paint' a 3D tumor volume. Under our dose-painting concept, gamma knife radiosurgery becomes dynamic, where the patient moves continuously under the robotic positioning system. We have implemented a fully automatic dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning system, where the inverse planning problem is solved as a traveling salesman problem combined with constrained least-square optimizations. We have also carried out experimental studies of dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery and showed the following. (1) Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery is ideally suited for fully automatic inverse planning, where high quality radiosurgery plans can be obtained in minutes of computation. (2) Dynamic radiosurgery plans are more conformal than step-and-shoot plans and can maintain a steep dose gradient (around 13% per mm) between the target tumor volume and the surrounding critical structures. (3) It is possible to prescribe multiple isodose lines with dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, so that the treatment can cover the periphery of the target volume while escalating the dose for high tumor burden regions. (4) With dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, one can

  20. The Concept of a Single-sex Optional Discussion Session in Introductory Astronomy at a Publicly Funded University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawl, S.

    1996-12-01

    The concept of single-sex education for science and mathematics has recently received renewed discussion in both the popular and professional literature. So important is the topic within higher education that the Duke Journal of Gender Law and Policy sponsored a symposium called "Gender & The Higher Education Classroom: Maximizing the Learning Environment" in February 1996 (http://www.duke.edu/ jrd4/djgcnf96.htm). The concept is especially controversial in publicly supported educational institutions. The idea of offering an optional discussion session limited to a single sex in a university-level introductory astronomy course at a State-supported school was considered through discussions with a number of faculty and administrators, and through a questionnaire aimed at determining student attitudes toward the concept. The results of the student questionnaire will be presented. (While the questionnaire results will be seen to be in favor of such an optional discussion session, such sessions have not been offered.)

  1. The Risk of Radiation-Induced Tumors or Malignant Transformation After Single-Fraction Intracranial Radiosurgery: Results Based on a 25-Year Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Bruce E., E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Stafford, Scott L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Parney, Ian F. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk of radiation-induced tumors or malignant transformation after single-fraction intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 1837 patients who received single-fraction SRS for arteriovenous malformation or benign tumor (meningioma, vestibular schwannoma, pituitary adenoma, glomus tumor) at a single center between 1990 and 2009. Patients were excluded if they refused research authorization (n=31), had a genetic predisposition to tumor development (n=84), received prior or concurrent radiation therapy (n=79), or had less than 5 years of imaging follow-up after SRS (n=501). The median imaging follow-up period for the remaining 1142 patients was 9.0 years (range, 5-24.9 years). Results: No radiation-induced tumors were identified in 11,264 patient-years of follow-up after SRS. The risk of a radiation-induced tumor developing after SRS was 0.0% at 5 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.0%-0.4%), 0.0% at 10 years (95% CI, 0.0%-0.9%), and 0.0% at 15 years (95% CI, 0.0%-2.8%). Malignant transformation occurred in 7 of 316 meningioma patients (2.2%) and 1 of 358 vestibular schwannoma patients (0.3%) at a median of 4.9 years (range, 2.8-13.8 years) after SRS. No cases of malignant transformation were noted in patients with pituitary adenomas (n=188) or glomus tumors (n=47). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year risk of malignant transformation was 0.5% (95% CI, 0.0%-0.9%), 0.8% (95% CI, 0.0%-1.8%), and 2.4% (95% CI, 0.0%-5.5%), respectively. Patients who underwent prior resection (hazard ratio, 14.56; 95% CI, 1.79-118.33; P=.01) and who had meningioma pathology (hazard ratio, 11.72; 95% CI, 1.44-96.15; P=.02) were at increased risk of malignant transformation. Conclusions: The risk of radiation-induced tumors or malignant transformation after SRS is very low and should not be used as a justification for choosing alternative treatment approaches (surgical resection, observation) over SRS

  2. Single Session Web-Based Counselling: A Thematic Analysis of Content from the Perspective of the Client

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, S. N.; Lubman, D. I.; Cheetham, A.; Dowling, N. A.; Jackson, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the exponential growth of non-appointment-based web counselling, there is limited information on what happens in a single session intervention. This exploratory study, involving a thematic analysis of 85 counselling transcripts of people seeking help for problem gambling, aimed to describe the presentation and content of online…

  3. Stereotactic radiosurgery for hemangioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Yamada, Yasushi; Kida, Yoshihisa; Iwakoshi, Takayasu; Yoshimoto, Masayuki [Komaki City Hospital, Aichi (Japan). Gamma Knife Center

    2001-12-01

    We evaluated the treatment results of Gamma Knife radiosurgery for intracranial hemanigioblastoma of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome or sporadic disease. Stereotactic radiosurgery was performed in 20 patients with 35 hemangioblastomas over a 9-year interval. The mean age of the patients was 48.5 years (range, 18-79 years). The volume of the tumors varied from 0.03 to 19 ml (mean, 3.0 ml), and the mean tumor margin dose was 17.8 Gy (range, 14-24 Gy). Clinical and neuroimaging follow-up was obtained 6 to 58 months (mean 26.2 months) after radiosurgery. Thirty-one (89%) of 35 tumors were controlled locally. Two tumors (6%) disappeared and 11 (31%) decreased in size during follow-up period. Eighteen (52%) remained unchanged in size. Three out of four enlarged tumors were resected surgically after radiosurgery. Another tumor was resected surgically to improve the patient's symptoms of nausea and vomiting caused by persistent perifocal edema in spite of reduced tumor volume. Only one patient, who had a tumor in the 4th ventricle arising from the brainstem, died 12 months after radiosurgery. Although the treated tumor remained stable in size, he developed aspiration pneumonia due to brainstem dysfunction caused by perifocal edema. All tumors less than 1 cm in diameter did not progress during follow-up period. For small hemangioblastomas, radiosurgery is a safe and effective option to control disease. If a large tumor is treated by radiosurgery, careful observation of the patient's neurological condition is necessary. (author)

  4. Lymphocyte Redox Imbalance and Reduced Proliferation after a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tossige-Gomes, Rosalina; Costa, Karine Beatriz; Ottone, Vinícius de Oliveira; Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro; Rocha-Vieira, Etel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether an acute session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is sufficient to alter lymphocyte function and redox status. Sixteen young healthy men underwent a HIIT session on a cycloergometer, consisting of eight bouts of 1 min at 90-100% of peak power, with 75 seconds of active recovery at 30 W between bouts. Venous blood was collected before, immediately after, and 30 minutes after the HIIT session. In response to Staphylococcus aureus superantigen B (SEB) stimulation, lymphocyte proliferation decreased and the IL-2 concentration increased after the HIIT session. However, the HIIT session had no effect on lymphocyte proliferation or IL-2 response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation. The HIIT session also induced lymphocyte redox imbalance, characterized by an increase in the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and a decrease in the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase. Lymphocyte viability was not affected by the HIIT session. The frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ T helper and B lymphocytes in response to superantigen stimulation were lower after exercise, suggesting that superantigen-induced lymphocyte activation was reduced by HIIT. However, HIIT also led to a reduction in the frequency of CD4+ and CD19+ cells, so the frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ cells within the CD4 and CD19 cell populations were not affected by HIIT. These data indicate that the reduced lymphocyte proliferation observed after HIIT is not due to reduced early lymphocyte activation by superantigen. Our findings show that an acute HIIT session promotes lymphocyte redox imbalance and reduces lymphocyte proliferation in response to superantigenic, but not to mitogenic stimulation. This observation cannot be explained by alteration of the early lymphocyte activation response to superantigen. The manner in which lymphocyte function modulation by an acute HIIT session can affect individual immunity and susceptibility to infection is important

  5. Lymphocyte Redox Imbalance and Reduced Proliferation after a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalina Tossige-Gomes

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether an acute session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT is sufficient to alter lymphocyte function and redox status. Sixteen young healthy men underwent a HIIT session on a cycloergometer, consisting of eight bouts of 1 min at 90-100% of peak power, with 75 seconds of active recovery at 30 W between bouts. Venous blood was collected before, immediately after, and 30 minutes after the HIIT session. In response to Staphylococcus aureus superantigen B (SEB stimulation, lymphocyte proliferation decreased and the IL-2 concentration increased after the HIIT session. However, the HIIT session had no effect on lymphocyte proliferation or IL-2 response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation. The HIIT session also induced lymphocyte redox imbalance, characterized by an increase in the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and a decrease in the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase. Lymphocyte viability was not affected by the HIIT session. The frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ T helper and B lymphocytes in response to superantigen stimulation were lower after exercise, suggesting that superantigen-induced lymphocyte activation was reduced by HIIT. However, HIIT also led to a reduction in the frequency of CD4+ and CD19+ cells, so the frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ cells within the CD4 and CD19 cell populations were not affected by HIIT. These data indicate that the reduced lymphocyte proliferation observed after HIIT is not due to reduced early lymphocyte activation by superantigen. Our findings show that an acute HIIT session promotes lymphocyte redox imbalance and reduces lymphocyte proliferation in response to superantigenic, but not to mitogenic stimulation. This observation cannot be explained by alteration of the early lymphocyte activation response to superantigen. The manner in which lymphocyte function modulation by an acute HIIT session can affect individual immunity and susceptibility to

  6. SU-F-J-110: MRI-Guided Single-Session Simulation, Online Adaptation, and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P; Geurts, M; Mittauer, K; Bayouth, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a combined simulation and treatment workflow for MRI-guided radiation therapy using the ViewRay treatment planning and delivery system. Methods: Several features of the ViewRay MRIdian planning and treatment workflows are used to simulate and treat patients that require emergent radiotherapy. A simple “pre-plan” is created on diagnostic imaging retrieved from radiology PACS, where conformal fields are created to target a volume defined by a physician based on review of the diagnostic images and chart notes. After initial consult in radiation oncology, the patient is brought to the treatment room, immobilized, and imaged in treatment position with a volumetric MR. While the patient rests on the table, the pre-plan is applied to the treatment planning MR and dose is calculated in the treatment geometry. After physician review, modification of the plan may include updating the target definition, redefining fields, or re-balancing beam weights. Once an acceptable treatment plan is finalized and approved, the patient is treated. Results: Careful preparation and judicious choices in the online planning process allow conformal treatment plans to be created and delivered in a single, thirty-minute session. Several advantages have been identified using this process as compared to conventional urgent CT simulation and delivery. Efficiency gains are notable, as physicians appreciate the predictable time commitment and patient waiting time for treatment is decreased. MR guidance in a treatment position offers both enhanced contrast for target delineation and reduction of setup uncertainties. The MRIdian system tools designed for adaptive radiotherapy are particularly useful, enabling plan changes to be made in minutes. Finally, the resulting plans, typically 6 conformal beams, are delivered as quickly as more conventional AP/PA beam arrangements with comparatively superior dose distributions. Conclusion: The ViewRay treatment planning software and

  7. MO-G-201-04: Knowledge-Based Planning for Single-Isocenter Stereotactic Radiosurgery to Multiple Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemer, B [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Shiraishi, S [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Hattangadi-Gluth, J; Sanghvi, P; Moore, K

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Single-isocenter, linac-based SRS for multiple brain metastases (multi-mets) can deliver highly conformal radiation doses and reduce overall patient treatment time compared to other therapy techniques. This study aims to quantify the dosimetric benefits of knowledge-based planning (KBP) for multi-met treatments. Methods: Using a previously-published KBP methodology (an artificial neural network (ANN) trained on single-target linac-based SRS plans), 3D dose distribution predictions for multi-met patients were obtained by treating each brain lesion as a solitary target and subsequently combining individual predictions into a single distribution using a dose-weighted geometric averaging to obtain the best results in the inter-target space. 17 previously-treated multi-met plans, with target numbers ranging from N=2–5, were used to validate the ANN predictions and subsequent KBP auto-planning routine. The fully-deliverable KBP plans were developed by converting dose distribution predictions into patient-specific optimization objectives while maintaining identical target normalizations (typically PTV V100%=D98%). Plan quality improvements were quantified by the difference between SRS quality metrics (QMs): δdQM=QM(clinical)-QM(KBP). QMs of interest were: gradient measure (GM), conformity index (CI), brain V10 and V5, brainstem D0.1cc and heterogeneity index (HI). Finally, overall plan quality was judged via blinded plan comparison by SRS-specializing physicians. Results: Two clinical plans were found to be significant outliers wherein plan quality was dramatically worse than KBP. Despite indicating KBP superiority, these were removed from the QM analysis to prevent skewing the results. In the remaining cases, clinical and KBP QMs were nearly identical with modest improvements in the KBP sample: δGM=0.12±0.56mm, δCI=−0.01±0.04, Brain δV10=0.8±2.6cc, brain δV5=6.3 ±10.7cc, brainstem δD0.1cc=0.06±1.19Gy and δHI= −0.04±0.05. Ultimately, 13/17 KBP

  8. MO-G-201-04: Knowledge-Based Planning for Single-Isocenter Stereotactic Radiosurgery to Multiple Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemer, B; Shiraishi, S; Hattangadi-Gluth, J; Sanghvi, P; Moore, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Single-isocenter, linac-based SRS for multiple brain metastases (multi-mets) can deliver highly conformal radiation doses and reduce overall patient treatment time compared to other therapy techniques. This study aims to quantify the dosimetric benefits of knowledge-based planning (KBP) for multi-met treatments. Methods: Using a previously-published KBP methodology (an artificial neural network (ANN) trained on single-target linac-based SRS plans), 3D dose distribution predictions for multi-met patients were obtained by treating each brain lesion as a solitary target and subsequently combining individual predictions into a single distribution using a dose-weighted geometric averaging to obtain the best results in the inter-target space. 17 previously-treated multi-met plans, with target numbers ranging from N=2–5, were used to validate the ANN predictions and subsequent KBP auto-planning routine. The fully-deliverable KBP plans were developed by converting dose distribution predictions into patient-specific optimization objectives while maintaining identical target normalizations (typically PTV V100%=D98%). Plan quality improvements were quantified by the difference between SRS quality metrics (QMs): δdQM=QM(clinical)-QM(KBP). QMs of interest were: gradient measure (GM), conformity index (CI), brain V10 and V5, brainstem D0.1cc and heterogeneity index (HI). Finally, overall plan quality was judged via blinded plan comparison by SRS-specializing physicians. Results: Two clinical plans were found to be significant outliers wherein plan quality was dramatically worse than KBP. Despite indicating KBP superiority, these were removed from the QM analysis to prevent skewing the results. In the remaining cases, clinical and KBP QMs were nearly identical with modest improvements in the KBP sample: δGM=0.12±0.56mm, δCI=−0.01±0.04, Brain δV10=0.8±2.6cc, brain δV5=6.3 ±10.7cc, brainstem δD0.1cc=0.06±1.19Gy and δHI= −0.04±0.05. Ultimately, 13/17 KBP

  9. Effect of a single session of aerobic walking exercise on arterial pressure in community-living elderly individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Leandra G; Moriguti, Júlio C; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Lima, Nereida K C

    2012-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that one exercise session (ES) on a cycloergometer or ergometric treadmill causes a reduction in blood pressure (BP). However, there are few similar studies on walking, which is the exercise modality most available to the elderly. We investigated the immediate and 24-h effects of walking on BP in independent, community-living elderly individuals. Volunteers participated in a single ES and resting control session (CS). Before and after each session, BP was measured by auscultatory and oscillometric methods. After each session, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted. An accelerometer was installed 48 h before the sessions and left in place for 5 days. The mean volunteer age was 67.7±3.5 years; 11 were hypertensive patients under treatment, and 12 were normotensive. In the total sample, there were immediate 14mm Hg and 12 mm Hg reductions in systolic BP (SBP) after the ES according to the auscultatory and oscillometric methods, respectively. Diastolic BP (DBP) was reduced by 4 mm Hg after the ES according to both methods. SBP during wakefulness and sleep and DBP during wakefulness were lower after the ES than after the CS (Psleep were determined individually (variable-time pattern) using data from the activity monitors and provided by the volunteers. The variable-time pattern was more effective in detecting reductions in BP than the fixed-time pattern.

  10. Orthogonal image pairs coupled with OSMS for noncoplanar beam angle, intracranial, single-isocenter, SRS treatments with multiple targets on the Varian Edge radiosurgery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine A. Oliver, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Based on our study, CR-induced shifts with the Varian Edge radiosurgery system will not produce noticeable dosimetric effects for SRS treatments. Thus, replacing cone beam CT with orthogonal kV/kV pairs coupled with OSMS at the treatment couch angle could reduce the number of cone beam CT scans that are acquired during a standard SRS treatment while providing an accurate and safe treatment with negligible dosimetric effects on the treatment plan.

  11. A single session of meditation reduces of physiological indices of anger in both experienced and novice meditators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Alexander B; Benau, Erik M; Atchley, Ruth Ann

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the present study was to explore how anger reduction via a single session of meditation might be measured using psychophysiological methodologies. To achieve this, 15 novice meditators (Experiment 1) and 12 practiced meditators (Experiment 2) completed autobiographical anger inductions prior to, and following, meditation training while respiration rate, heart rate, and blood pressure were measured. Participants also reported subjective anger via a visual analog scale. At both stages, the experienced meditators' physiological reaction to the anger induction reflected that of relaxation: slowed breathing and heart rate and decreased blood pressure. Naïve meditators exhibited physiological reactions that were consistent with anger during the pre-meditation stage, while after meditation training and a second anger induction they elicited physiological evidence of relaxation. The current results examining meditation training show that the naïve group's physiological measures mimicked those of the experienced group following a single session of meditation training. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Single-Session Alcohol Interventions for Heavy Drinking College Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Jennifer E; Tanner-Smith, Emily E

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis summarizing the effectiveness of brief, single-session interventions to reduce alcohol use among heavy drinking college students. A comprehensive literature search identified 73 studies comparing the effects of single-session brief alcohol intervention with treatment-as-usual or no-treatment control conditions on alcohol use among heavy drinking college students. Random-effects meta-analyses with robust variance estimates were used to synthesize 662 effect sizes, estimating the average overall effect of the interventions and the variability in effects across a range of moderators. An overall mean effect size of ḡ = 0.18, 95% CI [0.12, 0.24] indicated that, on average, single-session brief alcohol interventions significantly reduced alcohol use among heavy drinking college students relative to comparison conditions. There was minimal variability in effects associated with study method and quality, general study characteristics, participant demographics, or outcome measure type. However, studies using motivational enhancement therapy/motivational interviewing (MET/MI) modalities reported larger effects than those using psychoeducational therapy (PET) interventions. Further investigation revealed that studies using MET/ MI and feedback-only interventions, but not those using cognitive-behavioral therapy or PET modalities, reported average effect sizes that differed significantly from zero. There was also evidence that long-term effects were weaker than short-term effects. Single-session brief alcohol interventions show modest effects for reducing alcohol consumption among heavy drinking college students and may be particularly effective when they incorporate MET/MI principles. More research is needed to directly compare intervention modalities, to develop more potent interventions, and to explore the persistence of long-term effects.

  13. Use of GPS TEC Maps for Calibrating Single Band VLBI Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David

    2010-01-01

    GPS TEC ionosphere maps were first applied to a series of K and Q band VLBA astrometry sessions to try to eliminate a declination bias in estimated source positions. Their usage has been expanded to calibrate X-band only VLBI observations as well. At K-band, approx.60% of the declination bias appears to be removed with the application of GPS ionosphere calibrations. At X-band however, it appears that up to 90% or more of the declination bias is removed, with a corresponding increase in RA and declination uncertainties of approx.0.5 mas. GPS ionosphere calibrations may be very useful for improving the estimated positions of the X-only and S-only sources in the VCS and RDV sessions.

  14. All-in-one interictal presurgical imaging in patients with epilepsy: single-session EEG/PET/(f)MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grouiller, Frederic; Delattre, Benedicte M.A.; Lazeyras, Francois; Ratib, Osman; Vargas, Maria I.; Garibotto, Valentina; Pittau, Francesca; Spinelli, Laurent; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliemoz, Serge; Heinzer, Susanne; Iannotti, Giannina R.

    2015-01-01

    In patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, resection of the epileptic focus can lead to freedom from seizures or significant improvement in well-selected candidates. Localization of the epileptic focus with multimodal concordance is crucial for a good postoperative outcome. Beyond the detection of epileptogenic lesions on structural MRI and focal hypometabolism on FDG PET, EEG-based Electric Source Imaging (ESI) and simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) are increasingly applied for mapping epileptic activity. We here report presurgical multimodal interictal imaging using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for single-session FDG PET, MRI, EEG-fMRI and ESI. This quadrimodal imaging procedure was performed in a single session in 12 patients using a high-density (256 electrodes) MR-compatible EEG system and a hybrid PET/MR scanner. EEG was used to exclude subclinical seizures during uptake of the PET tracer, to compute ESI on interictal epileptiform discharges and to guide fMRI analysis for mapping haemodynamic changes correlated with interictal epileptiform activity. The whole multimodal recording was performed in less than 2 hours with good patient comfort and data quality. Clinically contributory examinations with at least two modalities were obtained in nine patients and with all modalities in five patients. This single-session quadrimodal imaging procedure provided reliable and contributory interictal clinical data. This procedure avoids multiple scanning sessions and is associated with less radiation exposure than PET-CT. Moreover, it guarantees the same medication level and medical condition for all modalities. The procedure improves workflow and could reduce the duration and cost of presurgical epilepsy evaluations. (orig.)

  15. All-in-one interictal presurgical imaging in patients with epilepsy: single-session EEG/PET/(f)MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grouiller, Frédéric; Delattre, Bénédicte M A; Pittau, Francesca; Heinzer, Susanne; Lazeyras, François; Spinelli, Laurent; Iannotti, Giannina R; Seeck, Margitta; Ratib, Osman; Vargas, Maria I; Garibotto, Valentina; Vulliemoz, Serge

    2015-06-01

    In patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, resection of the epileptic focus can lead to freedom from seizures or significant improvement in well-selected candidates. Localization of the epileptic focus with multimodal concordance is crucial for a good postoperative outcome. Beyond the detection of epileptogenic lesions on structural MRI and focal hypometabolism on FDG PET, EEG-based Electric Source Imaging (ESI) and simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) are increasingly applied for mapping epileptic activity. We here report presurgical multimodal interictal imaging using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for single-session FDG PET, MRI, EEG-fMRI and ESI. This quadrimodal imaging procedure was performed in a single session in 12 patients using a high-density (256 electrodes) MR-compatible EEG system and a hybrid PET/MR scanner. EEG was used to exclude subclinical seizures during uptake of the PET tracer, to compute ESI on interictal epileptiform discharges and to guide fMRI analysis for mapping haemodynamic changes correlated with interictal epileptiform activity. The whole multimodal recording was performed in less than 2 hours with good patient comfort and data quality. Clinically contributory examinations with at least two modalities were obtained in nine patients and with all modalities in five patients. This single-session quadrimodal imaging procedure provided reliable and contributory interictal clinical data. This procedure avoids multiple scanning sessions and is associated with less radiation exposure than PET-CT. Moreover, it guarantees the same medication level and medical condition for all modalities. The procedure improves workflow and could reduce the duration and cost of presurgical epilepsy evaluations.

  16. All-in-one interictal presurgical imaging in patients with epilepsy: single-session EEG/PET/(f)MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grouiller, Frederic; Delattre, Benedicte M.A.; Lazeyras, Francois; Ratib, Osman; Vargas, Maria I.; Garibotto, Valentina [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Pittau, Francesca; Spinelli, Laurent; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliemoz, Serge [Geneva University Hospital, EEG and Epilepsy Unit, Department of Neurology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Heinzer, Susanne [Philips AG Healthcare, Zuerich (Switzerland); Iannotti, Giannina R. [Geneva University Hospital, Functional Brain Mapping Laboratory, Department of Fundamental Neurosciences, Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2015-04-17

    In patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, resection of the epileptic focus can lead to freedom from seizures or significant improvement in well-selected candidates. Localization of the epileptic focus with multimodal concordance is crucial for a good postoperative outcome. Beyond the detection of epileptogenic lesions on structural MRI and focal hypometabolism on FDG PET, EEG-based Electric Source Imaging (ESI) and simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) are increasingly applied for mapping epileptic activity. We here report presurgical multimodal interictal imaging using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for single-session FDG PET, MRI, EEG-fMRI and ESI. This quadrimodal imaging procedure was performed in a single session in 12 patients using a high-density (256 electrodes) MR-compatible EEG system and a hybrid PET/MR scanner. EEG was used to exclude subclinical seizures during uptake of the PET tracer, to compute ESI on interictal epileptiform discharges and to guide fMRI analysis for mapping haemodynamic changes correlated with interictal epileptiform activity. The whole multimodal recording was performed in less than 2 hours with good patient comfort and data quality. Clinically contributory examinations with at least two modalities were obtained in nine patients and with all modalities in five patients. This single-session quadrimodal imaging procedure provided reliable and contributory interictal clinical data. This procedure avoids multiple scanning sessions and is associated with less radiation exposure than PET-CT. Moreover, it guarantees the same medication level and medical condition for all modalities. The procedure improves workflow and could reduce the duration and cost of presurgical epilepsy evaluations. (orig.)

  17. Outcome of LINAC radiosurgery for a cavernous angioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Se Mie; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Il Han; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Suk Won [College of Medicine, Halym Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To establish the role of stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator for the treatment of patients with cavernous angioma. Between February 1995 and May 1997, 11 patients with cavernous angioma were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator. Diagnoses were based on the magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients, and the histological in 3. The vascular lesions were located in the brainstem (5 cases), cerebellum (2 cases) thalamus (1 case) and cerebrum (3 cases), The clinical presentation at onset included previous intracerebral hemorrhages (9 cases) and seizures (2 cases). All patients were treated with a linac-based radiosurgery. The median dose of radiation delivered was 16 Gy ranging from 14 to 24 Gy, which was typically prescribed to the 80% isodose surface (range 50-80%), corresponding to the periphery of the lesion with a single isocenter. Ten patients were followed-up. The median follow-up was 49 months ranging from 8 to 73 months, during which time two patients developed an intracerebral hemorrhage, 1 at 8 months, with the other at 64 months post radiosurgery. One patient developed neurological deficit after radiosurgery, and two developed an edema on the T2 weighted images of the MRI surrounding the radiosurgical target. The use of stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of a cavernous angioma may be effective in the prevention of rebleeding, and can be safely delivered. However, a longer follow-up period will be required.

  18. Single High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Session as a Whole Gland Primary Treatment for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: 10-Year Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Limani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the treatment outcomes of a single session of whole gland high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU for patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa. Methods. Response rates were defined using the Stuttgart and Phoenix criteria. Complications were graded according to the Clavien score. Results. At a median follow-up of 94months, 48 (44.4% and 50 (46.3% patients experienced biochemical recurrence for Phoenix and Stuttgart definition, respectively. The 5- and 10-year actuarial biochemical recurrence free survival rates were 57% and 40%, respectively. The 10-year overall survival rate, cancer specific survival rate, and metastasis free survival rate were 72%, 90%, and 70%, respectively. Preoperative high risk category, Gleason score, preoperative PSA, and postoperative nadir PSA were independent predictors of oncological failure. 24.5% of patients had self-resolving LUTS, 18.2% had urinary tract infection, and 18.2% had acute urinary retention. A grade 3b complication occurred in 27 patients. Pad-free continence rate was 87.9% and the erectile dysfunction rate was 30.8%. Conclusion. Single session HIFU can be alternative therapy for patients with low risk PCa. Patients with intermediate risk should be informed about the need of multiple sessions of HIFU and/or adjuvant treatments and HIFU performed very poorly in high risk patients.

  19. AN OVERVIEW OF TRAINING METHODS THAT PROMOTE THE HIGHEST LIPID OXIDATION DURING AND AFTER A SINGLE EXERCISE SESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Purkart

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Given that physical activity is the most effective way to increase lipid oxidation, its effects are influenced by several factors. The goal of this review was to identify the most effective methods that facilitate the highest lipid oxidation during and after a single exercise session. For this purpose, the available scientific literature was examined using PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar and Cochrane Library databases up to June 2013 with the following keywords: excess post exercise oxygen consumption, exercise fatty acid, energy expenditure exercise and interval training. From the identified 48,583 potentially relevant references, 172 of them met all the required criteria. It was found out that prolonged (> 30 min moderate intensity (55 − 70 % VO2max exercise such as walking, jogging or cycling is the most effective way to increase lipid oxidation during and after a single exercise session. Low-volume high-intensity interval exercise is supposed to be as effective as traditional exercise with continuous endurance, with the main effect on lipid oxidation after the session and similar long-term metabolic adaptations. However, more research is still needed to compare the effects of regular resistance exercise with traditional endurance and high-intensity interval exercise. Finally, nutrition is also a significant factor since food rich in fat and low in carbohydrates promotes greater lipid oxidation.

  20. Changes in Postural Sway After a Single Global Postural Reeducation Session in University Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Quijada, Carlos; Poveda-Pagán, Emilio J; Segura-Heras, José V; Hernández-Sánchez, Sergio; Prieto-Castelló, María J

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a single session of global postural reeducation (GPR) in postural sway in young adult university students who use data visualization screens. A randomized controlled trial with 2 parallel groups was performed. Sixty-four subjects were randomized in the experimental group (12 men and 20 women) who underwent the GPR session, and a control group (13 men and 19 women) that did not receive any intervention was included. Center of pressure (COP) was assessed using a stabilometric platform, with eyes open and eyes closed before, immediately after, 48 hours after, and 7 days after intervention in both groups. In the interaction of time and gender, statistically significant differences were found for the area covered by COP (P = .020) and for the standard deviation (SD) in the mediolateral axis (P = .035). Considering the complete interaction time, gender, and group, statistically significant differences were found (P = .015) for the anteroposterior rate covered by COP and the SD in the anteroposterior axis (P = .033). In eyes closed condition, the intersubject analysis showed statistically significant differences for the interaction between group and gender for the variable mediolateral SD (P = .043). Considering the interaction of time with group, statistically significant differences were found for full length covered by COP (P = .017). Changes in postural sway were observed after a single GPR session, mainly at 48 hours, with different behaviors between men and women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Impact of a single educational session on oral hygiene practices among children of a primary school of Meerut, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Parashar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Oral health promotion through schools is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO for improving knowledge, attitude, and behavior related to oral health and for prevention and control of dental diseases among school children. In low resource settings, it is important to develop evidence for health education methods in oral health behavioral practices. The objectives of this study were to assess both the baseline awareness and practices regarding oral hygiene and the impact of a single education session on the change in oral health behavior. A school based, cross-sectional study on 112 primary school children was conducted after obtaining the consent of the school authorities and parents. A pretested, structured proforma was used for baseline awareness and behavior regarding oral health. A 30 min educational session was imparted and after 1 month, and the oral health practices were reassessed to find out the impact of the education session. Baseline survey revealed the following findings. Self-reported dental problems were found in 48.22% of the children in the last 6 months. When asked about the risk factors for dental problems, 28.57% mentioned eating sweets followed by improper brushing, whereas 40.17% were not aware about any risk factor for dental problems. It was found that 28.57% of the children did not brush their teeth regularly, whereas 35.71% used a tooth-brush for brushing their teeth. After the intervention, it was observed that there was a significant improvement in the proportion of children using a toothbrush for cleaning their teeth and of those who rinsed their mouth after meals. In conclusion, even a single education session was found to be effective in bringing about a change in the oral health behavior of primary school children.

  2. Immediate effects of a single session of robot-assisted gait training using Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) for cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Mayumi; Mataki, Yuki; Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Takahashi, Kazushi; Enomoto, Keiko; Sano, Kumiko; Mizukami, Masafumi; Tomita, Kazuhide; Ohguro, Haruka; Iwasaki, Nobuaki

    2018-02-01

    [Purpose] Robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) using Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL, CYBERDYNE) was previously reported beneficial for stroke and spinal cord injury patients. Here, we investigate the immediate effect of a single session of RAGT using HAL on gait function for cerebral palsy (CP) patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve patients (average age: 16.2 ± 7.3 years) with CP received a single session of RAGT using HAL. Gait speed, step length, cadence, single-leg support per gait cycle, hip and knee joint angle in stance, and swing phase per gait cycle were assessed before, during, and immediately after HAL intervention. [Results] Compared to baseline values, single-leg support per gait cycle (64.5 ± 15.8% to 69.3 ± 12.1%), hip extension angle in mid-stance (149.2 ± 19.0° to 155.5 ± 20.1°), and knee extension angle in mid-stance (137.6 ± 20.2° to 143.1 ± 19.5°) were significantly increased immediately after intervention. Further, the knee flexion angle in mid-swing was significantly decreased immediately after treatment (112.0 ± 15.5° to 105.2 ± 17.1°). Hip flexion angle in mid-swing also decreased following intervention (137.2 ± 14.6° to 129.7 ± 16.6°), but not significantly. Conversely, gait speed, step length, and cadence were unchanged after intervention. [Conclusion] A single-time RAGT with HAL improved single-leg support per gait cycle and hip and knee joint angle during gait, therapeutically improving gait function in CP patients.

  3. Anxiolytic Effects of a Single Session of the Exergame Zumba®Fitness on Healthy Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Ricardo Borges; Alves, Claudia Lima; Vieira, Carlos Alexandre; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Campos, Mario Hebling; Gentil, Paulo; Andrade, Marília Santos; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa

    2017-12-01

    Exergames appear to be a promising tool to increase energy expenditure and physical fitness. However, less is known about the effect of a single session of an exergame on anxiety state. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a single session of the exergame Zumba ® Fitness (Xbox 360 Kinect ® ) on the anxiety state of healthy young women. Forty healthy young women (22.9 ± 3.7 years; 62.43 ± 8.75 kg; 1.64 ± 0.06 m; 23.05 ± 2.75 kg/m 2 ; [Formula: see text]O 2 max of 41.23 ± 10.61 mL/kg/min) performed ∼20 minutes of the exergame Zumba Fitness using the Xbox 360 Kinect. The state anxiety (State Anxiety Inventory) and level of enjoyment (Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale) were evaluated before and after intervention. Rating perceived exertion (Borg scale) and heart rate (HR) were also tracked and collected. A single exergame session significantly reduced the state anxiety of the participants (P = 0.0230, effect size = 0.62, CI 0.34-0.90). However, no statistically significant correlation was found between enjoyment and absolute (r = -0.10, P = 0.5345) or relative change in state anxiety (r = -0.17, P = 0.2869). A moderate positive correlation was found between enjoyment and performance in the exergame Zumba Fitness (r = 0.59, P = 0.0001). The mean HR during exergames was 137 ± 19 bpm (∼70% of predicted HRmax). The exergame Zumba Fitness seems to be a useful tool to reduce state anxiety in a nonclinical sample of healthy women.

  4. Single-Session CT-Guided Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Bilateral Adrenal Gland Hyperplasia Due to Ectopic ACTH Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarma, Asha, E-mail: ashasarma@gmail.com; Shyn, Paul B., E-mail: pshyn@partners.org [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Vivian, Mark A. [University of Manitoba, Department of Radiology (Canada); Ng, Ju-Mei [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology (United States); Tuncali, Kemal [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Lorch, Jorchen H. [Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine (United States); Zaheer, Sarah N.; Gordon, Michael S. [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Endocrinology (United States); Silverman, Stuart G. [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Bilateral adrenalectomy is currently the only available treatment for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing’s syndrome (ectopic ACTH syndrome) that is refractory to pharmacologic therapy. We describe two patients with refractory ectopic ACTH syndrome who were treated with CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of both hyperplastic adrenal glands in a single session: One was not a surgical candidate, and the other had undergone unsuccessful surgery. Following the procedure, both patients achieved substantial decreases in serum cortisol, symptomatic improvement, and decreased anti-hypertensive medication requirements.

  5. Gamma knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Mori, Yohsimasa; Kida, Yoshihisa

    2003-01-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery has become a new treatment modality in the field of neurosurgery since the first gamma knife was brought into Japan in 1990. Advances in applications of new indications and long-term results have been continued to evolve during the past 12 years. Based on the experience of more than 4,500 cases treated by gamma knife at Komaki City Hospital, long-term results of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), metastatic brain tumors, acoustic neurinomas, meningiomas and trigeminal neuralgias are presented. Radiosurgery has become a novel treatment modality, especially for AVM, acoustic neurinoma and meningioma, which were once only treatable by conventional surgery, and shows a high cure rate in AVM cases and high control rate in benign tumors without major complications. The effects of radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors have been thought to be superior to fractionated radiotherapy due to high response and control rates, and patients showed improved quality of life although no prolongation of the life span was obtained. Gamma knife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia has been shown to be effective and less invasive than microvascular decompression, and is useful for cases resistant to conventional therapies and as an initial treatment as well. (author)

  6. Gamma knife radiosurgery in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumann, G. S.; Wara, W. M.; Larson, D. A.; Sneed, P. K.; Gutin, P. H.; Ciricillo, S. F.; McDermott, M. W.; Park, E.; Stalpers, L. J.; Verhey, L. J.; Smith, V.; Petti, P. L.; Edwards, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    52 pediatric patients were treated with radiosurgery at the University of California, San Francisco. Arteriovenous malformations were treated in 27 patients. Complete obliteration was noted in 4 of 12 patients imaged more than 2 years after radiosurgery. Arteriovenous malformation rebleed was noted

  7. Treatment of Five or More Brain Metastases With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Grant K.; Suh, John H.; Reuther, Alwyn M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Barnett, Gene H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Weil, Robert J. [Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Neyman, Gennady [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chao, Samuel T., E-mail: chaos@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with five or more brain metastases treated in a single session with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with brain metastases treated with SRS to five or more lesions in a single session were reviewed. Primary disease type, number of lesions, Karnofsky performance score (KPS) at SRS, and status of primary and systemic disease at SRS were included. Patients were treated using dosing as defined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 90-05, with adjustments for critical structures. We defined prior whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as WBRT completed >1 month before SRS and concurrent WBRT as WBRT completed within 1 month before or after SRS. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression were used to determine which patient and treatment factors predicted overall survival (OS). Results: The median OS after SRS was 7.5 months. The median KPS was 80 (range, 60-100). A KPS of {>=}80 significantly influenced OS (median OS, 4.8 months for KPS {<=}70 vs. 8.8 months for KPS {>=}80, p = 0.0097). The number of lesions treated did not significantly influence OS (median OS, 6.6 months for eight or fewer lesions vs. 9.9 months for more than eight, p = nonsignificant). Primary site histology did not significantly influence median OS. On multivariate Cox modeling, KPS and prior WBRT significantly predicted for OS. Whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS compared with concurrent WBRT significantly influenced survival, with a risk ratio of 0.423 (95% confidence interval 0.191-0.936, p = 0.0338). No significant differences were observed when no WBRT was compared with concurrent WBRT or when the no WBRT group was compared with prior WBRT. A KPS of {<=}70 predicted for poorer outcomes, with a risk ratio of 2.164 (95% confidence interval 1.157-4.049, p = 0.0157). Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery to five or more brain lesions is an effective treatment option for patients with

  8. A Behavioral Analysis of Figurative Language in Psychotherapy: One Session in a Single Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollio, Howard R.; Barlow, Jack M.

    Assuming that all problem solving has both its rational and poetic aspects and that the solution to a problem is often found in the poetic well before it surfaces in the rational, this study examined in detail the ebb and flow of figurative language as it occurred in the course of a single, highly successful hour of gestalt therapy involving both…

  9. Privilege as a Social Determinant of Health in Medical Education: A Single Class Session Can Change Privilege Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Nash A K; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2015-09-01

    Accredited medical schools are required to prepare students to recognize the social determinants of health, such as privilege, yet privilege education has been overlooked in medical school curricula. The purpose of this study is to determine whether a single class session on privilege, within a social justice elective offered to first and second year medical students, is sufficient to change the perspective of medical students concerning their own personal privilege. A pre-class survey, followed by a class session on privilege, and post-class survey were conducted. Thirteen of the 18 students enrolled in the elective completed the pre-class survey. Ten students completed the post-class survey, although only 9 completed both the pre- and post-class surveys. The demographic profile of the participants was 93% Asian and 7% White ethnicity, with 57% identifying as being culturally American. There was no significant difference between average male and female or between age groups' self-assessed privilege amounts. For all characteristics tested, except hair color, participants had an increased self-assessed privilege perspective following the class. Three participants had an overall positive difference in privilege perspective, three participants had an overall negative difference in privilege perspective, and three participants had only a minimal change in privilege perspective. The absolute total difference in privilege perspective was 25 units of change. The single class session on privilege was sufficient to change significantly the perspective of medical students on their own personal privilege; however, future studies with larger groups of medical students are needed to elucidate other findings suggested by this study.

  10. Single-session percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy in simple renal cysts in children: long-term follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim; Gumus, Burcak; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akhan, Okan [Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-02-01

    Simple renal cysts are rare in children and managed conservatively unless symptomatic. To demonstrate the efficacy and long-term results of single-session ethanol sclerotherapy in symptomatic simple renal cysts in children. Three simple renal cysts in three children (age 1, 5 and 16 years) were included in the study. Indications for treatment were flank pain (n=1), hypertension (n=1), and increasing cyst size and urinary tract infection (n=1). The mean follow-up period was 5.5 years (range 3-7 years). The procedures were performed with the guidance of US and fluoroscopy and under IV sedation. After the cystogram, 95% ethanol with a volume of 40% of the cyst volume (but not more than 100 ml) was used as the sclerosing agent. Two cysts disappeared completely, while the volume reduction was 99% for the third cyst at the end of the first year. CT demonstrated calcification of the cyst without an enhancing soft-tissue component in the third one 7 years after sclerotherapy. After the procedures, hypertension and pain resolved without any medication. There were no complications during the procedures or during follow-up. Cytological examination was unremarkable in all patients. Percutaneous treatment of symptomatic simple renal cysts in children with single-session ethanol sclerotherapy is a safe, effective and minimally invasive procedure. Calcification owing to sclerotherapy can be observed on follow-up. (orig.)

  11. l-arginine modulates inflammation and muscle regulatory genes after a single session of resistance exercise in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, S R L; Brito, V G B; Mello, W G; Oliveira, S H P

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the skeletal muscle adaptation to l-arginine supplementation prior to a single session of resistance exercise (RE) during the early phase of muscle repair. Wistar rats were randomly assigned into non-exercised (Control), RE plus vehicle (RE); RE plus l-arginine (RE+L-arg) and RE plus aminoguanidine (RE+AG) groups. Animals received four doses of either vehicle (0.9% NaCl), l-arg (1 g/b.w.), or AG (iNOS inhibitor) (50 mg/b.w.). The animals performed a single RE session until the concentric failure (ladder climbing; 80% overload) and the skeletal muscles were harvested at 0, 8, 24, and 48 hours post-RE. The RE resulted in increased neutrophil infiltrate (24 hours post-RE) (3621 vs 11852; Pl-arginine supplementation attenuates neutrophil infiltration (5622; Pl-arginine supplementation seems to attenuate the resolution of RE-induced muscle inflammation and up-regulates MyoD expression during the early phase of muscle repair. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A pilot study of a single-session training to promote mindful eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jayme; Cardaciotto, LeeAnn; Block-Lerner, Jennifer; McMahon, Cori

    2013-01-01

    Although researchers have not yet examined the applicability of mindfulness for weight-gain prevention, mindfulness training has the potential to increase an individual's awareness of factors that enable an individual to avoid weight gain caused by overconsumption. The study intended to examine the effects of 1 h of mindfulness training on state mindfulness and food consumption. The research team performed a pilot study. The study occurred at an urban, northeastern, Catholic university. Participants were 26 undergraduate, English-speaking students who were at least 18 y old (77% female, 73% Caucasian). Students with food allergies, an inability to fast, or a current or past diagnosis of an eating disorder were ineligible. Participants fasted for 4 h. Between the third and fourth hours, they attended a 1-h session of mindfulness training that integrated three experiential mindfulness exercises with group discussion. Following training, they applied the skills they learned during a silent lunch. The Toronto Mindfulness Scale (TMS), the Awareness subscale of the Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale (PHLMS-AW), and a modified version of the Acting with Awareness subscale of the Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-AW) were used preand posttraining to assess changes in state mindfulness, present-moment awareness, and mealtime awareness, respectively. A postmeal, subjective hunger/fullness Likert scale was used to assess food consumption (healthy vs unhealthy consumption). The study found a statistically significant increase in state mindfulness (P=.002). Eighty-six percent of participants engaged in healthy food consumption. No statistically significant changes occurred in either present-moment awareness (P=.617) or mealtime awareness (P=.483). Preliminary results suggest promising benefits for use of mindfulness training on weight-gain prevention in healthy individuals. More research is needed to understand the impact that mindfulness may have on long-term, weight

  13. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy and LINAC radiosurgery in the treatment of vestibular schwannoma-report about both stereotactic methods from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Christine; Fauser, Claudius; Müller, Axel; Astner, Sabrina T; Jacob, Vesna; Lumenta, Christianto; Meyer, Bernhard; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Molls, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with radiosurgery (RS) and stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SFR) for vestibular schwannomas (VSs) in a group of patients treated at the same institution. Between May 1997 and June 2007, 115 consecutive cases of VS were treated in our department. The SFR group (47 patients), including larger tumors (maximum diameter >1.5 cm), received a total dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction. The RS group (68 patients, maximum diameter new trigeminal neuropathy occurred in 9 of 68 patients (13%). A high tumor control rate and low number of side effects are registered after SFR and RS of VS. These results confirm that considering tumor diameter, both RS and SFR are good treatment modalities for VS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Treating specific childhood phobia in a single session? A systematic review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fond, G; Franc, N

    2013-04-01

    phobias respond robustly to in vivo exposure, but this approach is associated with high dropout rates and low treatment acceptance. One Session Treatment, a variant of cognitive-behavioral therapy, combines graduated in vivo exposure, participant modeling, reinforcement, psychoeducation, cognitive challenges, and skills training in an intensive treatment model. The limited data available on medication shows little promise. Finally, relapse is a common phenomenon, and little is known on the long-term outcome of the illness. Copyright © 2012 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Can a single session of motor imagery promote motor learning of locomotion in older adults? A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholson VP

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaughan P Nicholson,1 Justin WL Keogh,2–4 Nancy L Low Choy1 1School of Physiotherapy, Australian Catholic University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Robina, QLD, Australia; 3Human Potential Centre, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand; 4Cluster for Health Improvement, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sunshine Coast, QLD, Australia Purpose: To investigate the influence of a single session of locomotor-based motor imagery training on motor learning and physical performance. Patients and methods: Thirty independent adults aged >65 years took part in the randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted within an exercise science laboratory. Participants were randomly divided into three groups following baseline locomotor testing: motor imagery training, physical training, and control groups. The motor imagery training group completed 20 imagined repetitions of a locomotor task, the physical training group completed 20 physical repetitions of a locomotor task, and the control group spent 25 minutes playing mentally stimulating games on an iPad. Imagined and physical performance times were measured for each training repetition. Gait speed (preferred and fast, timed-up-and-go, gait variability and the time to complete an obstacle course were completed before and after the single training session. Results: Motor learning occurred in both the motor imagery training and physical training groups. Motor imagery training led to refinements in motor planning resulting in imagined movements better matching the physically performed movement at the end of training. Motor imagery and physical training also promoted improvements in some locomotion outcomes as demonstrated by medium to large effect size improvements after training for fast gait speed and timed-up-and-go. There were no training effects on gait variability. Conclusion: A single session

  16. Rapid Response of Long-Standing, Treatment-Resistant Non-Catatonic Mutism in Paranoid Schizophrenia with Single ECT session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Mansoor Ahmad; Rather, Yasir Hassan; Shah, Majid Shafi; Wani, Rayees Ahmad; Hussain, Arshad

    2014-11-01

    Mutism is a common manifestation of catatonia, but mutism due to other forms of psychopathology and neurological disorders have also been described. Although not common, long-standing mutism has also been a feature of non-catatonic schizophrenia and traditionally responds less to conventional therapies. We describe a rare case of paranoid schizophrenia presenting with continuous mutism for about 4 years. This 26-year-old male had symptoms of schizophrenia without catatonia. After failed trial of adequate pharmacotherapy and psychological intervention and considering his level of dysfunction, he was started on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). To our surprise, he improved with a single session of ECT while he was on concurrent pharmacotherapy. We also discuss the possible explanation for this rapid effect of ECT in such clinical presentation. To our knowledge, this is the first case of non-catatonic mutism of schizophrenia of this long duration responding so promptly to ECT, although there are other reports as well in literature, but multiple ECT sessions were applied in those cases. Non-catatonic mutism is perhaps presenting as a cultural variant in this part of the world and whenever encountered, ECT should be an option. Further research should be carried out to validate this idea.

  17. Single-session combination treatment with intense pulsed light and nonablative fractional photothermolysis: a split-face study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Chris; Brew, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) and fractional photothermolysis (FP) are effective nonablative treatments for photoaging. To investigate the safety and efficacy of administering these two treatments in the same session with the aim of maximizing results while maintaining safety and minimizing downtime. We sought to compare the efficacy of the combination treatment with that of individual treatments of IPL and FP by conducting a split-face study. Twenty-nine subjects received a full-face standard-strength treatment with IPL immediately followed by treatment with 1550-nm FP. A further 14 patients underwent a split-face study comparing combined IPL and FP on one side of the face with these two treatments performed in isolation, 4 weeks apart, on the other side. The combination treatment achieved results statistically superior to treatment with IPL alone, FP alone, and treatment with IPL and FP performed 4 weeks apart. Downtime and adverse events were similar to those expected with individual treatments of IPL or FP alone. Intense pulsed light and PF appear to be synergistic when performed together in a single session, and the combination treatment is associated with a good safety profile and minimal downtime. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effects of a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Treadmill Training on Corticomotor Excitability following Stroke: Implications for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. High intensity interval treadmill training (HIITT has been gaining popularity for gait rehabilitation after stroke. In this study, we examined the changes in excitability of the lower limb motor cortical representation (M1 in chronic stroke survivors following a single session of HIITT. We also determined whether exercise-induced changes in excitability could be modulated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS enhanced with a paretic ankle skill acquisition task. Methods. Eleven individuals with chronic stroke participated in two 40-minute treadmill-training sessions: HIITT alone and HITT preceded by anodal tDCS enhanced with a skill acquisition task (e-tDCS+HIITT. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS was used to assess corticomotor excitability of paretic and nonparetic tibialis anterior (TA muscles. Results. HIIT alone reduced paretic TA M1 excitability in 7 of 11 participants by ≥ 10%. e-tDCS+HIITT increased paretic TA M1 excitability and decreased nonparetic TA M1 excitability. Conclusions. HIITT suppresses corticomotor excitability in some people with chronic stroke. When HIITT is preceded by tDCS in combination with a skill acquisition task, the asymmetry of between-hemisphere corticomotor excitability is reduced. Significance. This study provides preliminary data indicating that the cardiovascular benefits of HIITT may be achieved without suppressing motor excitability in some stroke survivors.

  19. Radiosurgery by Leksell gamma knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, Josef

    2008-01-01

    The learning objectives of the lecture were as follows: to learn basic principles of Leksell gamma knife (LGK) radiosurgery; to discuss imaging, treatment planning and optimization procedures; to discuss quality assurance for LGK treatments; and to present examples of diagnoses treated by LGK. The following topics were discussed: Radiosurgery - definition, components of selectivity, fundamentals; Leksell gamma knife - principles; Stereotactic target localization; Radiosurgery - imaging; Treatment planning; LGK treatment; Quality control - process tree, LGK, distortion of scanners, 3D phantom measurements; Physical and technical parameters; and Clinical applications. (P.A.)

  20. Stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery in pediatric patients: analysis of indications and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Bilal; Mønsted, Anne; Jensen, Josephine Harding

    2010-01-01

    We describe indications, outcomes, and risk profiles of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and single fraction "radiosurgery" (SRS) in pediatric patients compared to the adult population and evaluate the causal role of SRS and SRT in inducing new neurological complications....

  1. [Initial clinical experiences with the Storz Modulith SL 20 lithotripter: the results 3 months after a single session].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, N; Anidjar, M; Soussi, N; Gemayel, T; Hermieux, J F; Ravery, V; Nimier, M; Delmas, V; Boccon-Gibod, L

    1995-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performances of the Storz Modulith SL20 lithotriptor. Fifty patients with a total of 52 renal (31) or ureteric (21) stones were treated, in a single session, between June and October 1993. The mean stone diameter was 7.9 mm. All patients were reviewed after 3 months. The complete success rate, with radiological cure, was 65% at 3 months. The partial success rate, defined as fragmentation of the stone with persistence of residual fragments less than 3 mm in diameter, not requiring further treatment, was 12% at 3 months. The failure rate at 3 months was 23%. The commonest complication was renal colic in 12 patients (24%). Two patients developed an extrarenal haematoma. The Modulith SL20 possesses a good detection system: firing is well tolerated under minimal analgesia. Our success rates are slightly lower than those obtained by other teams using the same apparatus.

  2. Does a single session of reading literary fiction prime enhanced mentalising performance? Four replication experiments of Kidd and Castano (2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samur, Dalya; Tops, Mattie; Koole, Sander L

    2018-02-01

    Prior experiments indicated that reading literary fiction improves mentalising performance relative to reading popular fiction, non-fiction, or not reading. However, the experiments had relatively small sample sizes and hence low statistical power. To address this limitation, the present authors conducted four high-powered replication experiments (combined N = 1006) testing the causal impact of reading literary fiction on mentalising. Relative to the original research, the present experiments used the same literary texts in the reading manipulation; the same mentalising task; and the same kind of participant samples. Moreover, one experiment was pre-registered as a direct replication. In none of the experiments did reading literary fiction have any effect on mentalising relative to control conditions. The results replicate earlier findings that familiarity with fiction is positively correlated with mentalising. Taken together, the present findings call into question whether a single session of reading fiction leads to immediate improvements in mentalising.

  3. Hormonal, Metabolic and Cardiorespiratory Responses of Young and Adult Athletes to a Single Session of High Intensity Cycle Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Florian; Härtel, Sascha; Wagner, Matthias Oliver; Strahler, Jana; Bös, Klaus; Sperlich, Billy

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of a single High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) session on salivary cortisol (SC) levels, physiological responses and performance in trained boys and men. Twenty-three boys (11.5±0.8 years) and 25 men (29.7±4.6 years) performed HIIT (four consecutive Wingate Anaerobic Tests). SC in boys and men increased after HIIT from 5.55±3.3 nmol/l to 15.13±9.7 nmol/l (+173%) and from 7.07±4.7 nmol/l to 19.19±12.7 nmol/l (+171%), respectively (p

  4. Paralysis following stereotactic spinal irradiation in pigs suggests a tolerance constraint for single-session irradiation of the spinal nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, Paul M.; Foster, Ryan D.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Meyer, Jeffrey; Sayre, James W.; Huang, Hao; Öz, Orhan K.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Paralysis observed during a study of vertebral bone tolerance to single-session irradiation led to further study of the dose-related incidence of motor peripheral neuropathy. Materials and methods: During a bone tolerance study, cervical spinal nerves of 15 minipigs received bilateral irradiation to levels C5–C8 distributed into three dose groups with mean maximum spinal nerve doses of 16.9 ± 0.3 Gy (n = 5), 18.7 ± 0.5 Gy (n = 5), and 24.3 ± 0.8 Gy (n = 5). Changes developing in the gait of the group of pigs receiving a mean maximum dose of 24.3 Gy after 10–15 weeks led to the irradiation of two additional animals. They received mean maximum dose of 24.9 ± 0.2 Gy (n = 2), targeted to the left spinal nerves of C5–C8. The followup period was one year. Histologic sections from spinal cords and available spinal nerves were evaluated. MR imaging was performed on pigs in the 24.9 Gy group. Results: No pig that received a maximum spinal nerve point dose ⩽19.0 Gy experienced a change in gait while all pigs that received ⩾24.1 Gy experienced paralysis. Extensive degeneration and fibrosis were observed in irradiated spinal nerves of the 24.9 Gy animals. All spinal cord sections were normal. Irradiated spinal nerve regions showed increased thickness and hypointensity on MR imaging. Conclusion: The single-session tolerance dose of the cervical spinal nerves lies between 19.0 and 24.1 Gy for this model

  5. Radiosurgery of pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Yoshihisa

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy and role of gamma knife (GK) in the treatment of various pituitary adenomas are described on author's experience and discussed with literature. GK subjects are 328 patients (M 126/F 202, av. age of 47.8 y) in author's hospital, and satisfactory follow-up (32-44 mo) for evaluation has been possible in 253 cases, who had tumors non-functional (129 cases), producing ACTH (23), HGH (70) and PRL (31). Stereotactic GK radiosurgery is done with navigation by Gamma Plan based on enhanced MRI images at various doses, and evaluation in the follow-up period is performed by hormonal levels and MRI which give efficacy of complete response (CR), partial response (PR), MR and standard deviation (SD)/ progressive disease (PD) on the tumor size. The overall tumor control rate is found to be 95-100%. Effectiveness (CR and PR) is found as high as 77.4% in PRL-producing tumor (marginal dose 14-32 Gy), 65% in non-functioning (15-25 Gy), 61% in ACTH (19-30 Gy) and 60% in GH (19-31 Gy), of which tendency is similar to that in literature. Even in ACTH-producing tumor, low ACTH and cortisol levels persisted with tendency of improved obese and hypertensive symptoms. GK radiosurgery has limitations in the tissue size and distance between the tumor and optic nerve/chiasm, but for the enough small tumor, it gives satisfactorily long term efficacy. (R.T.)

  6. Linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery with micro multi-leaf collimator : technological advancement in precision radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayananda, S.; Kinhikar, R.A.; Saju, Sherley; Deshpande, D.D.; Jalali, R.; Sarin, R.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Dinshaw, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) is an advancement on precision radiotherapy, in which stereo tactically guided localized high dose is delivered to the lesion (target) in a single fraction, while sparing the surrounding normal tissue. Radiosurgery has been used to treat variety of benign and malignant lesions as well as functional disorders in brain such as arteriovenous malformation (AVM), acoustic neuroma, solitary primary brain tumor, single metastasis, pituitary adenoma etc

  7. Dedicated Linear Accelerator Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Single-Center Experience in 179 Patients With Varied Dose Prescriptions and Treatment Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Zachary A.; Gorgulho, Alessandra A.; Bezrukiy, Nikita; McArthur, David; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Selch, Michael T.; De Salles, Antonio A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Dedicated linear accelerator radiosurgery (D-LINAC) has become an important treatment for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Although the use of gamma knife continues to be established, few large series exist using D-LINAC. The authors describe their results, comparing the effects of varied target and dose regimens. Methods and Materials: Between August 1995 and January 2008, 179 patients were treated with D-LINAC radiosurgery. Ten patients (5.58%) had no clinical follow-up. The median age was 74.0 years (range, 32-90 years). A total of 39 patients had secondary or atypical pain, and 130 had idiopathic TN. Initially, 28 patients received doses between 70 and 85 Gy, with the 30% isodose line (IDL) touching the brainstem. Then, using 90 Gy, 82 consecutive patients were treated with a 30% IDL and 59 patients with a 50% IDL tangential to the pons. Results: Of 169 patients, 134 (79.3%) experienced significant relief at a mean of 28.8 months (range, 5-142 months). Average time to relief was 1.92 months (range, immediate to 6 months). A total of 31 patients (19.0%) had recurrent pain at 13.5 months. Of 87 patients with idiopathic TN without prior procedures, 79 (90.8%) had initial relief. Among 28 patients treated with 70 Gy and 30% IDL, 18 patients (64.3%) had significant relief, and 10 (35.7%) had numbness. Of the patients with 90 Gy and 30% IDL at the brainstem, 59 (79.0%) had significant relief and 48.9% had numbness. Among 59 consecutive patients with similar dose but the 50% isodoseline at the brainstem, 49 patients (88.0%) had excellent/good relief. Numbness, averaging 2.49 on a subjective scale of 1 to 5, was experienced by 49.7% of the patients, Conclusions: Increased radiation dose and volume of brainstem irradiation may improve clinical outcomes with the trade-off of trigeminal dysfunction. Further study of the implications of dose and target are needed to optimize outcomes and to minimize complications.

  8. Rapid improvement of depressive symptoms and cognition in an elderly patient with a single session of piano playing: a clinical treatment report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalai, Gul; Manalai, Partam; Dutta, Raja; Fegan, Gerald; Scrofani, Philip

    2012-06-01

    Music has been used as a non-pharmacological modality in the treatment of different conditions since ancient times. It has received attention in modern medicine in recent decades, particularly in geriatric population. The effects of music on mood and cognition are well documented. The aim of the current case report is to highlight the benefits of musical activities in the geriatric population. We report a naturalistic treatment outcome in an elderly patient on a geriatric psychiatric unit related to a single session of piano playing. A rapid and sustained improvement in mood and cognition of an elderly patient was observed after a single session of playing piano. Notwithstanding the limitations of a single subject, uncontrolled case study, the effect was dramatic. Our findings support previous claims regarding music therapy including effects of a single session music-based therapeutic interventions, and we conclude that music therapy for geriatric patients with mood and cognitive deficits is worth further systematic investigation.

  9. Stereotactic Fractionated Radiotherapy and LINAC Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma-Report About Both Stereotactic Methods From a Single Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, Christine; Fauser, Claudius; Mueller, Axel; Astner, Sabrina T.; Jacob, Vesna; Lumenta, Christianto; Meyer, Bernhard; Tonn, Joerg-Christian; Molls, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with radiosurgery (RS) and stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SFR) for vestibular schwannomas (VSs) in a group of patients treated at the same institution. Methods and Materials: Between May 1997 and June 2007, 115 consecutive cases of VS were treated in our department. The SFR group (47 patients), including larger tumors (maximum diameter >1.5 cm), received a total dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction. The RS group (68 patients, maximum diameter <1.5 cm) received a total dose of 12 Gy at the 100% isodose. Evaluation included serial imaging tests (magnetic resonance imaging) and neurologic and functional hearing examinations. Results: The tumor control rate was 97.9% in the SFR group for a mean follow-up time of 32.1 months and 98.5% in the RS group for a mean follow-up time of 30.1 months. Hearing function was preserved after RS in 85% of the patients and after SFR in 79%. Facial and trigeminal nerve function remained mostly unaffected after SFR. After RS, new trigeminal neuropathy occurred in 9 of 68 patients (13%). Conclusions: A high tumor control rate and low number of side effects are registered after SFR and RS of VS. These results confirm that considering tumor diameter, both RS and SFR are good treatment modalities for VS.

  10. Effects of one session radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy on post-stroke plantarflexor spasticity: a single-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radinmehr, Hojjat; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Naghdi, Soofia; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Tabatabaei, Azadeh

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To examine the effects of radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy (rESWT) on plantarflexor spasticity after stroke. Method Twelve patients with stroke were randomly included for this prospective, single-blind clinical trial. Patients received one rESWT session (0.340 mJ/mm 2 , 2000 shots) on plantarflexor muscle. The Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS), H-reflex tests, ankle range of motion (ROM), passive plantarflexor torque (PPFT) and timed up and go test (TUG) were measured at baseline (T 0 ), immediately after treatment (T 1 ) and one hour after the end of the treatment (T 2 ). Results Patients had improved the MMAS scores for both the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscles, active and passive ROM, PPFT and TUG over time after rESWT. For the PPFT, it was greater at high velocity than at low velocity, and there was a significant three-way interaction between time, knee position (extended/flexed) and velocity (low/high). The H-reflex latency had decreased at T 1 , but there was no significant effect on H max /M max ratio. Conclusions The rESWT improved plantarflexor spasticity, and the effects sustained for one hour, whereas it was not effective in improving spinal excitability. Implications for Rehabilitation One session radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) is safe and effective in improving post stroke plantarflexor spasticity, ankle active and passive range of motion, passive torque, and walking capability. The spasticity scores improved for both the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscles and persisted one hour after rESWT. The magnitude of resistive plantarflexor passive torque in the knee extended position and high velocity was larger over time suggesting greater gastrocnemius spasticity than soleus. The rESWT had no significant effects on alpha motorneuron excitability.

  11. Physiological effects of a single chest physiotherapy session in mechanically ventilated and extubated preterm neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Y; Shetye, J; Nanavati, R; Mehta, A

    2016-01-01

    To assess the changes on various physiological cardio-respiratory parameters with a single chest physiotherapy session in mechanically ventilated and extubated preterm neonates with respiratory distress syndrome. This is a prospective observational study in a neonatal intensive care unit setting. Sixty preterm neonates with respiratory distress syndrome, thirty mechanically ventilated and thirty extubated preterm neonates requiring chest physiotherapy were enrolled in the study. Parameters like heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), Silverman Anderson score (SA score in extubated), oxygen saturation (SpO2) and auscultation findings were noted just before, immediately after chest physiotherapy but before suctioning, immediately after suctioning and after 5 minutes of the session. The mean age of neonates was 9.55±5.86 days and mean birth weight was 1550±511.5 g. As there was no significant difference in the change in parameters on intergroup comparison, further analysis was done considering two groups together (n = 60) except for SA score. As SA score was measured only in extubated neonates. HR did not change significantly during chest physiotherapy compared to the baseline but significantly decreased after 15 minutes (p = 0.01). RR and SA score significantly increased after suctioning (p = 0.014) but reduced after 15 minutes (p = physiotherapy (p = physiotherapy may help facilitate the overall well-being of a fragile preterm neonate. Lung auscultation finding suggests that after suctioning, there was a significant reduction in crepitation (p = 0.0000) but significant increase in crepitation after 15 minutes (p = physiotherapy. Chest physiotherapy is safe in preterm neonates. Suctioning causes significant cardio-respiratory parameter changes, but within normal physiological range. Thus, chest physiotherapy should be performed with continuous monitoring only when indicated and not as a routine procedure. More research is needed

  12. Comparative Efficacy and Mechanisms of a Single-Session Pain Psychology Class in Chronic Low Back Pain: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnall, Beth D; Ziadni, Maisa S; Roy, Anuradha; Kao, Ming-Chih; Sturgeon, John A; Cook, Karon F; Lorig, Kate; Burns, John W; Mackey, Sean C

    2018-03-06

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) reported that chronic pain affects about 100 million U.S. adults, with chronic low back pain (CLBP) cited as the most prevalent type. Pain catastrophizing is a psychological construct shown to predict the development and trajectory of chronic pain and patient response to pain treatments. While effective treatment for pain catastrophizing typically includes eight-session groups of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), a single-session targeted treatment class yielded promising results which, if replicated and extended, could prove to efficiently and cost-effectively reduce pain catastrophizing. In this trial, we seek to determine the comparative efficacy of this novel single-session pain catastrophizing class to an eight-session course of pain CBT and a single-session back pain health education class. We will also explore the psychosocial mechanisms and outcomes of pain catastrophizing treatment. In this trial we will randomize 231 individuals with CLBP to one of three treatment arms: (1) pain-CBT (eight weekly 2-h group sessions with home exercises and readings); (2) a single 2-h pain catastrophizing class; or (3) a single 2-h back pain health education class (active control). For the primary outcome of pain catastrophizing, the trial is designed as a non-inferiority test between pain-CBT and the single-session pain catastrophizing class, and as a superiority test between the single-session pain catastrophizing class and the health education class. Team researchers masked to treatment assignment will assess outcomes up to six months post treatment. If the single-session targeted pain catastrophizing class is found to be an effective treatment for patients with CLBP, this low cost and low burden treatment could dismantle many of the current barriers and burdens of effective pain care. Further, elucidation of the mechanisms of pain catastrophizing treatments will facilitate future research on the topic as well as further development and

  13. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastasis: Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuvret, L.; Germain, I.; Cornu, P.; Boisserie, G.; Dormont, D.; Hardiman, C.; Tep, B.; Faillot, T.; Duffau, H.; Simon, J.M.; Dendale, R.; Delattre, J.Y.; Poisson, M.; Marsault, C.; Philippon, J.; Fohanno, D.; Baillet, F.; Mazeron, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the influence of clinical and technical factors on local control and survival after radiosurgery for brain metastasis. From january 1994 to December 1996, 42 patients presenting with 71 metastases underwent radiosurgery for brain metastasis. The median age was 56 years and the median Karnofsky index 80. Primary sites included: lung (20 patients), kidney (seven), breast (five), colon (two), melanoma (three), osteosarcoma (one) and it was unknown for three patients. Seventeen patients had extracranial metastasis. Twenty-four patients were treated at recurrence which occurred after whole brain irradiation (12 patients), surgical excision (four) or after both treatments (eight). Thirty-six sessions of radiosurgery have been realized for one metastasis and 13 for two, three or four lesions. The median metastasis diameter was 21 mm and the median volume 1.7 cm 3 . The median peripheral dose to the lesion was 14 Gy, and the median dose at the isocenter 20 Gy. Sixty-five metastasis were evaluable for response analysis. The overall local control rate was 82% and the 1-year actuarial rate was 72%. In univariate analysis, theoretical radioresistance (P = 0.001), diameter less than 3 cm (P = 0.039) and initial treatment with radiosurgery (P 0.041) were significantly associated with increased local control. Only the first two factors remained significant in multivariate analysis. No prognostic factor of overall survival was identified. The median survival was 12 months. Six patients had a symptomatic oedema (RTOG grade 2), only one of which requiring a surgical excision. In conclusion, 14 Gy delivered at the periphery of metastasis seems to be a sufficient dose to control most brain metastases, with a minimal toxicity. Better results were obtained for lesions initially treated with radiosurgery, theoretically radioresistant and with a diameter less than 3 cm. (authors)

  14. A single blind, clinical trial to investigate the effects of a single session extracorporeal shock wave therapy on wrist flexor spasticity after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliri, Seyedeh Somayeh; Forogh, Bijan; Emami Razavi, Seyedeh Zahra; Ahadi, Tannaz; Madjlesi, Faezeh; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin

    2015-01-01

    Spasticity is a common, serious symptom after stroke. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been suggested for the treatment of muscle spasticity. To investigate the effects of ESWT on post stroke wrist flexor spasticity. Fifteen patients with poststroke wrist flexor spasticity (12 male and 3 female with a mean age of 54 years) were enrolled. Patients received 1 sham ESWT followed by 1 active ESWT 1 week later. The outcome measures were the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS), the Hmax/Mmax ratio, and the Brunnstrom motor recovery stage. The sham ESWT had not effects on the outcome measures. After active ESW, the MMAS scores of spasticity and the Hmax/Mmax ratio improved. The improvements were maintained 5 weeks after active ESWT. No significant improvements were observed for the motor recovery after sham or active ESWT. In adult patients after stroke, a single session of active ESWT resulted in significant improvement in the wrist flexor spasticity and alpha motor neuron excitability.

  15. One-session treatment for specific phobias: a review of Öst's single-session exposure with children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Davis, Thompson E

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this brief paper is to review the current status of one-session treatment (OST) for specific phobias in children and adolescents. Following a brief historical overview and description of OST, we systematically describe eight studies that have examined its efficacy in children and adolescents aged between 7 and17 years. We also explore phobia subtypes, age, gender, and comorbidity as possible moderators of treatment outcome. Studies have been conducted in Australia, Austria, the Netherlands, the USA, and Sweden. Although there is limited evidence that OST works better for animal phobias than other subtypes of phobias and for girls than boys, across studies there is considerable evidence that it is generally effective across phobia subtypes and for both boys and girls. No age differences in outcomes were noted, nor were any differences noted due to comorbidity. OST was found to be equally effective with children and adolescents with co-occurring multiple phobias and other anxiety disorders. Moreover, in at least one study, it was found to reduce untreated phobic and anxiety disorders in addition to the treated phobias. It is concluded that OST is a highly effective intervention for the treatment of specific phobias in children and adolescents.

  16. Does a single session of electroconvulsive therapy alter the neural response to emotional faces in depression? A randomised sham-controlled functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Kessing, Lars V; Ott, Caroline V

    2017-01-01

    expression recognition and dot-probe tasks. A single electroconvulsive therapy session had no effect on amygdala response to emotional faces. Whole-brain analysis revealed no effects of electroconvulsive therapy versus sham therapy after family-wise error correction at the cluster level, using a cluster...... neurocognitive bias in major depressive disorder. Patients with major depressive disorder were randomised to one active ( n=15) or sham electroconvulsive therapy ( n=12). The following day they underwent whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T while viewing emotional faces and performed facial...... to faces after a single electroconvulsive therapy session, the observed trend changes after a single electroconvulsive therapy session point to an early shift in emotional processing that may contribute to antidepressant effects of electroconvulsive therapy....

  17. Radiosurgery without whole brain radiotherapy in melanoma brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grob, J.J.; Regis, J.; Laurans, R.; Delaunay, M.; Wolkenstein, P.; Paul, K.; Souteyrand, P.; Koeppel, M.C.; Murraciole, X.; Perragut, J.C.; Bonerandi, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of radiosurgery without whole brain radiotherapy in the palliative treatment of melanoma brain metastases, we retrospectively assessed the results in 35 patients: 4 with a solitary brain metastasis, 13 with a single brain metastasis and metastases elsewhere and 18 with multiple brain metastases. The local control rate was 98.2% (55/56 metastases) at 3 months. Median survival was 22 months in patients with a solitary brain metastasis, 7.5 months in patients with a single brain metastasis and metastases elsewhere, and 4 months in patients with multiple brain metastases. Complications were unusual and surgery was required in 2 of 35 patients. These results show for the first time that melanoma patients with a unique brain metastasis with or without metastases elsewhere clearly benefit from tumour control easily obtained by radiosurgery. Although the comparison of radiosurgery with surgery and/or whole brain radiotherapy cannot be adequately addressed, radiosurgery alone seems to provide similar results with lower morbidity and impact on quality of life. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  18. Single-Session Hematoma Removal and Transcranial Coil Embolization for a Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: A Technical Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Yosuke; Sato, Kenichi; Endo, Hidenori; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-08-01

    Patients with cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (CS dAVFs) with cortical venous varix are indicated for aggressive treatment because of the associated risk for intracranial hemorrhage. We present a case of surgical transvenous embolization in an 84-year-old woman with CS dAVF who presented with massive intracerebral hematoma. Cerebral angiograms revealed the dural AVF drained only into the superficial middle cerebral vein. Because an emergent mass reduction and prevention of rebleeding were necessary, single-session hematoma removal and transcranial embolization of a CS dAVF were performed in the neurosurgical operating room, using a mobile C-arm fluoroscopy. After the right frontotemporal craniotomy, intracerebral hematoma was removed and coil packing of the affected cavernous sinus was successfully performed via the dilated superficial middle cerebral vein. The transcortical vein approach enables occlusion of CS dAVF with isolated cortical venous drainage and may be a valuable alternative approach for some cases needed emergency craniotomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Single-session emotion regulation skills training to reduce aggression in combat veterans: A clinical innovation case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Shannon R; Thompson, Karin E; Stanley, Melinda A; Kent, Thomas A

    2016-05-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common among returning veterans, and aggression frequently co-occurs with PTSD. Veterans with PTSD most commonly engage in impulsive aggression, or aggression that is emotionally charged, unplanned, and uncontrolled, rather than premeditated aggression, which is planned and controlled. Previous research demonstrated a variety of emotions can result in aggression, rather than the traditional conceptualization that only anger leads to aggression. In a veteran sample, deficiencies in the ability to regulate emotions (emotion dysregulation) mediated the relationship between PTSD and impulsive aggression. These results suggest that teaching veterans with PTSD and impulsive aggression how to regulate emotions may decrease aggression. The cases presented illustrate the use of an innovative, single-session emotion regulation treatment for combat veterans with PTSD. Two cases are presented to generate hypotheses on who might benefit from this treatment in the future. The two male veterans treated with this protocol differed in how frequently they used the emotion regulation skills after the treatment and in their treatment outcomes. Teaching veterans how to regulate their emotions in a condensed time frame may be beneficial for certain veterans, and further research on this brief treatment is warranted. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Stereotactic Radiosurgery with Neoadjuvant Embolization of Larger Arteriovenous Malformations: An Institutional Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Dalyai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study investigates the safety and efficacy of a multimodality approach combining staged endovascular embolizations with subsequent SRS for the management of larger AVMs. Methods. Ninety-five patients with larger AVMs were treated with staged endovascular embolization followed by SRS between 1996 and 2011. Results. The median volume of AVM in this series was 28 cm3 and 47 patients (48% were Spetzler-Martin grade IV or V. Twenty-seven patients initially presented with hemorrhage. Sixty-one patients underwent multiple embolizations while a single SRS session was performed in 64 patients. The median follow-up after SRS session was 32 months (range 9–136 months. Overall procedural complications occurred in 14 patients. There were 13 minor neurologic complications and 1 major complication (due to embolization while four patients had posttreatment hemorrhage. Thirty-eight patients (40% were cured radiographically. The postradiosurgery actuarial rate of obliteration was 45% at 5 years, 56% at 7 years, and 63% at 10 years. In multivariate analysis, larger AVM size, deep venous drainage, and the increasing number of embolization/SRS sessions were negative predictors of obliteration. The number of embolizations correlated positively with the number of stereotactic radiosurgeries (P<0.005. Conclusions. Multimodality endovascular and radiosurgical approach is an efficacious treatment strategy for large AVM.

  1. Tolerance of the Spinal Cord to Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Insights From Hemangioblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, Megan E.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Adler, John R.; Chang, Steven D.; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate spinal cord dose-volume effects, we present a retrospective review of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatments for spinal cord hemangioblastomas. Methods and Materials: From November 2001 to July 2008, 27 spinal hemangioblastomas were treated in 19 patients with SRS. Seventeen tumors received a single fraction with a median dose of 20 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy). Ten lesions were treated using 18-25 Gy in two to three sessions. Cord volumes receiving 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, and 24 Gy and dose to 10, 100, 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 mm 3 of cord were determined. Multisession treatments were converted to single-fraction biologically effective dose (SFBED). Results: Single-fraction median cord D max was 22.7 Gy (range, 17.8-30.9 Gy). Median V10 was 454 mm 3 (range, 226-3543 mm 3 ). Median dose to 500 mm 3 cord was 9.5 Gy (range, 5.3-22.5 Gy). Fractionated median SFBED 3 cord D max was 14.1 Gy 3 (range, 12.3-19.4 Gy 3 ). Potential toxicities included a Grade 2 unilateral foot drop 5 months after SRS and 2 cases of Grade 1 sensory deficits. The actuarial 3-year local tumor control estimate was 86%. Conclusions: Despite exceeding commonly cited spinal cord dose constraints, SRS for spinal hemangioblastomas is safe and effective. Consistent with animal experiments, these data support a partial-volume tolerance model for the human spinal cord. Because irradiated cord volumes were generally small, application of these data to other clinical scenarios should be made cautiously. Further prospective studies of spinal radiosurgery are needed.

  2. Pilot Evaluation of the Feasibility and Acceptability of StressOFF Strategies: A Single-Session School-Based Stress Management Program for Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Amy J.; Heath, Nancy L.; Carsley, Dana

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the pilot evaluation of the feasibility and acceptability of StressOFF Strategies, a "single-session" (45 min) adolescent-targeted, school-based psychoeducational program, which introduces cognitive behavioral techniques and mindfulness-based techniques. Five hundred and sixty-five Grade 9 students (57% female;…

  3. Using Elite Athletes to Promote Drug Abstinence: Evaluation of a Single-Session School-Based Drug Use Prevention Program Delivered by Junior Hockey Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    School-based substance use prevention programs are a common method to approaching drug use in youths. Project SOS is a single-session drug prevention program developed by police officers and delivered by elite junior hockey players to students in grades 6 and 7. The current study evaluates the effects of Project SOS at achieving its objectives of…

  4. Single session imaging of cerebellum at 7 Tesla: obtaining structure and function of multiple motor subsystems in individual subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Batson

    Full Text Available The recent increase in the use of high field MR systems is accompanied by a demand for acquisition techniques and coil systems that can take advantage of increased power and accuracy without being susceptible to increased noise. Physical location and anatomical complexity of targeted regions must be considered when attempting to image deeper structures with small nuclei and/or complex cytoarchitechtonics (i.e. small microvasculature and deep nuclei, such as the brainstem and the cerebellum (Cb. Once these obstacles are overcome, the concomitant increase in signal strength at higher field strength should allow for faster acquisition of MR images. Here we show that it is technically feasible to quickly and accurately detect blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal changes and obtain anatomical images of Cb at high spatial resolutions in individual subjects at 7 Tesla in a single one-hour session. Images were obtained using two high-density multi-element surface coils (32 channels in total placed beneath the head at the level of Cb, two channel transmission, and three-dimensional sensitivity encoded (3D, SENSE acquisitions to investigate sensorimotor activations in Cb. Two classic sensorimotor tasks were used to detect Cb activations. BOLD signal changes during motor activity resulted in concentrated clusters of activity within the Cb lobules associated with each task, observed consistently and independently in each subject: Oculomotor vermis (VI/VII and CrusI/II for pro- and anti-saccades; ipsilateral hemispheres IV-VI for finger tapping; and topographical separation of eye- and hand- activations in hemispheres VI and VIIb/VIII. Though fast temporal resolution was not attempted here, these functional patches of highly specific BOLD signal changes may reflect small-scale shunting of blood in the microvasculature of Cb. The observed improvements in acquisition time and signal detection are ideal for individualized investigations such as

  5. Impact of a single session of intermittent pneumatic leg compressions on skeletal muscle and isolated artery gene expression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseguini, Bruno T; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Newcomer, Sean C; Laughlin, M H

    2011-12-01

    Intermittent pneumatic leg compressions (IPC) have proven to be an effective noninvasive approach for treatment of patients with claudication, but the mechanisms underlying the clinical benefits remain elusive. In the present study, a rodent model of claudication produced by bilateral ligation of the femoral artery was used to investigate the acute impact of a single session of IPC (150 min) on hemodynamics, skeletal muscle (tibialis anterior), and isolated collateral artery (perforating artery) expression of a subset of genes associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. In addition, the effect of compression frequency (15 vs. 3 compressions/min) on the expression of these factors was studied. In ligated animals, IPC evoked an increase of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 (CXCL1) mRNA (P < 0.01) and immunostaining (P < 0.05), as well as a minor increase in VEGF immunostaining in the muscle endomysium 150 min postintervention. Further, collateral arteries from these animals showed an increased expression of MCP-1 (approximately twofold, P = 0.02). These effects were most evident in the group exposed to the high-frequency protocol (15 compressions/min). In contrast, IPC in sham-operated control animals evoked a modest initial upregulation of VEGF (P = 0.01), MCP-1 (P = 0.02), and CXCL1 (P = 0.03) mRNA in the muscle without concomitant changes in protein levels. No changes in gene expression were observed in arteries isolated from sham animals. In conclusion, IPC acutely up-regulates the expression of important factors involved in vascular remodeling in the compressed muscle and collateral arteries in a model of hindlimb ischemia. These effects appear to be dependent on the compression frequency, such that a high compression frequency (15 compressions/min) evokes more consistent and robust effects compared with the frequency commonly employed clinically to treat patients with claudication (3

  6. A single-session growth mindset intervention for adolescent anxiety and depression: 9-month outcomes of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleider, Jessica; Weisz, John

    2018-02-01

    Single-session interventions (SSIs) show promise in the prevention and treatment of youth psychopathology, carrying potential to improve the scalability and accessibility of youth psychological services. However, existing SSIs have conferred greater benefits for youths with anxiety, compared to depression or comorbid problems, and their effects have generally waned over time - particularly for follow-ups exceeding 3 months. To help address these discrepancies, we tested whether a novel SSI teaching growth mindset of personality (the belief that personality is malleable) could reduce depression and anxiety and strengthen perceived control in high-risk adolescents (N = 96, ages 12-15). At baseline, youths were randomized to receive a 30-min, computer-guided growth mindset intervention or a supportive-therapy control. Youths and parents reported youth anxiety and depressive symptoms, and youths reported their levels of perceived control, at baseline and across a 9-month follow-up period. Compared to the control program, the mindset intervention led to significantly greater improvements in parent-reported youth depression (d = .60) and anxiety (d = .28), youth-reported youth depression (d = .32), and youth-reported perceived behavioral control (d = .29) by 9-month follow-up. Intervention effects were nonsignificant for youth-reported anxiety, although 9-month effect sizes reached the small-to-medium range (d = .33). Intervention group youths also experienced more rapid improvements in parent-reported depression, youth-reported depression, and perceived behavioral control across the follow-up period, compared to control group youths. Findings suggest a promising, scalable SSI for reducing internalizing distress in high-risk adolescents. NCT03132298. © 2017 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  7. Stereotactic radiosurgery: incision less surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Victor M.; Palma, Raul B.

    1997-01-01

    Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) involves the application of focused high dose, high energy radiation to precisely (stereotactically) localized targets in the head without opening the skull for the purpose of destroying pathologic tissues like tumors, and also for producing discrete lesions for the relief of certain functional disorders. This procedure was pioneered by Lars Leksel in the 1950s and has progressively been refined with the development of more powerful computer technology and more precise and safer radiation delivery systems. The used of the Linear Accelerator (LINAC)- based radiosurgery system would be the most cost-effective and appropriate system for this treatment

  8. Comparison of the effect of multiple short-duration with single long-duration exercise sessions on glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, L; Dahl-Petersen, I; Haugaard, Steen B

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated and compared the effects on glycaemic control of two different exercise protocols in elderly men with type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: Eighteen patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus carried out home-based bicycle training for 5 weeks. Patients were randomly assigned...... glucose OGTT (p = 0.04) and plasma glucose concentration areas under the curve at 120 min (p exercise groups...... increased similarly in both exercise groups. A possible explanation is that the energy expenditure associated with multiple short daily sessions may be greater than that in a single daily session. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Nov...

  9. Does Gender Influence Electroconvulsive Therapy Sessions Required across Psychiatric Diagnoses? A 5-Year Experience from a Single Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Harshini; Subramanian, Karthick; Menon, Vikas; Kattimani, Shivanand

    2017-01-01

    Context: There is a paucity of systematic data reflecting the practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) from developing countries. Aim: We aimed to identify the number of ECT sessions required to yield response and gender diffeferences in the number of sessions across various diagnostic categories. Setting and Design: A record-based study from a teaching cum tertiary care hospital in South India. Subjects and Methods: Case records of patients who received modified ECT from January 2011 to January 2016 were reviewed. The sociodemographic details and ECT-related data were collected. Psychiatric diagnoses were ascertained as per the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision criteria. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal–Wallis test and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: Among 148 patients, 82 (55.4%) had mood disorder (bipolar disorder and recurrent depressive disorder), 43 (29.1%) had schizophrenia, and 22 (14.9%) had other acute and transient psychotic disorders (ATPDs). Patients with mood disorders, schizophrenia, and other ATPD received 7.3 (± 3.8), 9.7 (± 6.1), and 5.4 (± 2.0) ECT sessions, respectively, to achieve response. There was no gender difference in the number of sessions received. Conclusion: Our findings show that number of ECT sessions required to yield response may be disorder-specific. Gender does not influence the ECT dose requirement. Variations in ECT parameters across settings may limit the generalizability of results. PMID:28694625

  10. Effect of a single-session meditation training to reduce stress and improve quality of life among health care professionals: a "dose-ranging" feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kavita; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Cha, Stephen S; Sood, Amit

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to assess the feasibility of incorporating a single-session meditation-training program into the daily activities of healthy employees of a tertiary-care academic medical center. The study also assessed the most preferred duration of meditation and the effect of the meditation program on perceived stress, anxiety, and overall quality of life (QOL). Seventeen healthy clinic employees were recruited for this study. After an initial group instruction session covering basic information about meditation, Paced Breathing Meditation (PBM) was taught to the participants. Participants were instructed to self-practice meditation with the help of a DVD daily for a total of 4 weeks. The DVD had three different programs of 5, 15, and 30 minutes with a menu option to choose one of the programs. (1) Patient diary, (2) Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), (3) Linear Analogue Self-Assessment (LASA), (4) Smith Anxiety Scale (SAS). Primary outcome measures were compared using the paired t-test. All participants were female; median age was 48 years (range 33-60 y). The 5-minute meditation session was practiced by 14 participants a total of 137 times during the 4-week trial period, the 15-minute session by 16 participants a total of 223 times, and the 30-minute session by 13 participants 71 times. The median number of days practiced was 25 (range 10-28 d); the average total time practiced was 394 minutes (range 55-850 min). After 4 weeks of practice, the scores of the following instruments improved significantly from baseline: PSS (P meditation in a single training session to health care employees. The study shows that 15 minutes once or twice a day is the most feasible duration of meditation practice. The study also provides promising preliminary efficacy data of this program for improving stress, anxiety, and QOL.

  11. The number of prior lines of systemic therapy as a prognostic factor for patients with brain metastases treated with stereotactic radiosurgery: Results of a large single institution retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Claire M; McTyre, Emory; LeCompte, Michael; Cramer, Christina K; Hughes, Ryan; Watabe, Kounosuke; Lo, Hui-Wen; O'Neill, Stacey; Munley, Michael T; Laxton, Adrian W; Tatter, Stephen B; Ruiz, Jimmy; Chan, Michael D

    2018-02-01

    It is presently unknown whether patients with brain metastases from heavily pre-treated cancers have a significantly different prognosis than those with less pre-treatment. In this study we sought to identify whether the number of prior lines of systemic therapy are associated with clinical outcomes in patients with brain metastases who received stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Between July 2000 and July 2017, 377 patients with brain metastases were treated with upfront SRS. We performed a large, single institution retrospective analysis of these patients. Kaplan Meier analysis was used to estimate survival times. Competing risk analysis was used to estimate times to local failure (LF) and distant brain failure (DBF). Multivariate analysis was performed to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) for overall survival (OS), neurologic and non-neurologic death for patients with 1, 2 and 3+ lines of prior systemic therapy. Of the 1077 patients with brain metastases treated with SRS, 377 received prior systemic therapy with a median of 1 (range: 1-9) lines of prior therapy. Median OS was 8.70 months (95% CI, 7.9-9.5). Median OS for patients with 1 prior line of therapy, 2 prior lines of therapy and 3 or greater lines of therapy were 9.93-, 9.05-, and 6.18-months, respectively (log rank p = .04). Lines of therapy as a continuous variable was not associated with LF or DBF on competing risk analysis. The percentage of patients that died of neurological death was 36%. Greater prior lines of therapy (1 vs. 2 vs. 3 and greater) was associated with a greater likelihood of dying of non-neurologic death (gray's p = .01), but was not associated with likelihood of dying of neurologic death (p = .57). Lines of therapy are associated with OS and non-neurologic death but are not associated with neurologic death, LF or DBF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Safety of ferric carboxymaltose immediately after infliximab administration, in a single session, in inflammatory bowel disease patients with iron deficiency: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Cortes

    Full Text Available To obtain preliminary safety and efficacy data on intravenous (IV administration of infliximab (IFX and ferric carboxymaltose (FCM to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients in a single treatment session.A two-phase non-interventional, observational, prospective pilot study was performed to evaluate safety and efficacy of FCM given immediately after IFX. IBD patients were recruited consecutively in the outpatient clinic in two groups. Control group patients (n = 12 received FCM on a separate day from IFX. Subsequently, single-session group patients (n = 33 received FCM after IFX on the same day. All patients received 5mg/kg IFX and 1000mg FCM for iron-restricted anemia (IRA or 500mg FCM for iron deficiency without anemia. Safety assessment was performed by recording adverse events (AEs during and immediately after infusion, 30 minutes afterwards, and via follow-up at 7 days and 8 weeks. For efficacy assessment, hematological parameters were assessed prior to FCM infusion (pre-FCM and after 8 weeks. Economic impact of FCM given immediately after IFX was assessed.All 45 patients (35 Crohn´s disease, 10 ulcerative colitis received IFX 5mg/kg. 21 patients received 500mg FCM and 24 received 1000mg. FCM administration immediately after IFX corrected iron deficiency or IRA as shown by increases in hematological parameters. No AEs were reported during the safety evaluation at the end of FCM or IFX administration, 30 minutes, 7 days and 8 weeks afterwards, in either control or single-session groups. Total cost per patient for single-session administration was 354.63€; for patients receiving IFX and FCM on separate days, it was 531.94€, giving a 177.31€ per-patient cost saving.Single-session administration of FCM after IFX was safe and effective in IBD patients and can offer a good cost-benefit ratio and improve treatment adherence. To our knowledge, this study is the first to evaluate FCM and IFX administration in a single treatment session.

  13. Adaptive hypofractionated gamma knife radiosurgery for a large brainstem metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinclair, Georges; Bartek, Jiri; Martin, Heather

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To demonstrate how adaptive hypofractionated radiosurgery by gamma knife (GK) can be successfully utilized to treat a large brainstem metastasis - a novel approach to a challenging clinical situation. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 42-year-old woman, diagnosed with metastatic nonsmall cell lung...... in October 2013 revealed a growing brainstem lesion of 26 mm. Linear accelerator-based radiotherapy and microsurgery were judged contraindicated, why the decision was made to treat the patient with three separate radiosurgical sessions during the course of 1 week, with an 18% tumor volume reduction...

  14. Xanthine Oxidase Activity Is Associated with Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Inflammatory and Oxidative Status Markers in Metabolic Syndrome: Effects of a Single Exercise Session

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Pandolfo Feoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the xanthine oxidase (XO activity in metabolic syndrome in subjects submitted to a single exercise session. We also investigated parameters of oxidative and inflammatory status. Materials/Methods. A case-control study (9 healthy and 8 MS volunteers was performed to measure XO, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase activities, lipid peroxidation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP content, glucose levels, and lipid profile. Body mass indices, abdominal circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and TG levels were also determined. The exercise session consisted of 3 minutes of stretching, 3 minutes of warm-up, 30 minutes at a constant dynamic workload at a moderate intensity, and 3 minutes at a low speed. The blood samples were collected before and 15 minutes after the exercise session. Results. Serum XO activity was higher in MS group compared to control group. SOD activity was lower in MS subjects. XO activity was correlated with SOD, abdominal circumference, body mass indices, and hsCRP. The single exercise session reduced the SOD activity in the control group. Conclusions. Our data support the association between oxidative stress and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and suggest XO is present in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome.

  15. Percutaneous Treatment of Simple Hepatic Cysts: The Long-Term Results of PAIR and Catheterization Techniques as Single-Session Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhan, Okan, E-mail: akhano@tr.net [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Islim, Filiz, E-mail: fislim@yahoo.com [Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Balci, Sinan, E-mail: snnbalci@gmail.com [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Erbahceci, Aysun, E-mail: aysunerbahceci@yahoo.com [Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Akpınar, Burcu, E-mail: burcu-akpinar@yahoo.com; Ciftci, Turkmen, E-mail: turkmenciftci@yahoo.com; Akinci, Devrim, E-mail: akincid@hotmail.com [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

    2016-06-15

    PurposeThe purpose of our study is to evaluate results of percutaneous aspiration with alcohol sclerotherapy in symptomatic patients with simple hepatic cysts by employing single-session techniques either by a needle or a catheter.Materials and MethodsWe retrospectively included 39 simple hepatic cysts in 35 patients treated via percutaneous aspiration and single-session alcohol sclerotherapy between years 1993 and 2012. Indications were pain (n = 28) or ruling out cystic echinococcus (CE) disease (n = 7). 29 cysts in 26 patients were treated by needle technique (Group A) and ten cysts in nine patients were treated by single-session catheter technique (Group B). Patients were followed for 4–173 months (median: 38 months).ResultsAll patients were successfully treated. Before procedure, cyst volumes were 21–676 cc (median: 94 cc). Post-procedure cyst volumes at last follow-up were 0-40 cc (median: 1 cc). The mean decrease in cyst volume was 95.92 ± 2.86 % in all patients (95.96 ± 3.26 % in Group A and 95.80 ± 6.20 % in Group B). There was no statistically significant difference between the volume reduction rates of Group A and Group B. Only one patient, in Group B, developed a major complication, an abscess. Hospitalization period was 1 day for all patients.ConclusionsFor patients with symptomatic simple hepatic cysts smaller than 500 cc in volume by using puncture, aspiration, injection, and reaspiration (PAIR) technique with only needle, single-session alcohol sclerotherapy of 10 min is a safe and effective procedure with high success rate.

  16. Does a single session of electroconvulsive therapy alter the neural response to emotional faces in depression? A randomised sham-controlled functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Kessing, Lars V; Ott, Caroline V; Macoveanu, Julian; Harmer, Catherine J; Jørgensen, Anders; Revsbech, Rasmus; Jensen, Hans M; Paulson, Olaf B; Siebner, Hartwig R; Jørgensen, Martin B

    2017-09-01

    Negative neurocognitive bias is a core feature of major depressive disorder that is reversed by pharmacological and psychological treatments. This double-blind functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigated for the first time whether electroconvulsive therapy modulates negative neurocognitive bias in major depressive disorder. Patients with major depressive disorder were randomised to one active ( n=15) or sham electroconvulsive therapy ( n=12). The following day they underwent whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T while viewing emotional faces and performed facial expression recognition and dot-probe tasks. A single electroconvulsive therapy session had no effect on amygdala response to emotional faces. Whole-brain analysis revealed no effects of electroconvulsive therapy versus sham therapy after family-wise error correction at the cluster level, using a cluster-forming threshold of Z>3.1 ( p2.3; pelectroconvulsive therapy-induced changes in parahippocampal and superior frontal responses to fearful versus happy faces as well as in fear-specific functional connectivity between amygdala and occipito-temporal regions. Across all patients, greater fear-specific amygdala - occipital coupling correlated with lower fear vigilance. Despite no statistically significant shift in neural response to faces after a single electroconvulsive therapy session, the observed trend changes after a single electroconvulsive therapy session point to an early shift in emotional processing that may contribute to antidepressant effects of electroconvulsive therapy.

  17. In vivo biological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery: A primate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunsford, L.D.; Altschuler, E.M.; Flickinger, J.C.; Wu, A.; Martinez, A.J. (Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Single-fraction, closed skull, small-volume irradiation (radiosurgery) of intact intracranial structures requires accurate knowledge of radiation tolerance. We have developed a baboon model to assess the in vivo destructive radiobiological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery. Three baboons received a single-fraction, 150-Gy lesion of the caudate nucleus, the thalamus, or the pons using the 8-mm diameter collimator of the gamma unit. Serial standard neurodiagnostic tests (neurological examination, computed tomographic scan, magnetic resonance imaging, stable xenon-enhanced computed tomographic scan of cerebral blood flow, somatosensory and brain stem evoked potentials, and myelin basic protein levels of cerebrospinal fluid) were compared with preoperative studies. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the development of a lesion at the target site between 45 and 60 days after irradiation. Deterioration of the brain stem evoked potentials preceded imaging changes when the lesion encroached on auditory pathways. Myelin basic protein levels increased subsequent to imaging changes. Postmortem neuropathological examination confirmed a well-demarcated radionecrosis of the target volume. The baboon model appears to be an excellent method to study the in vivo biological effects of radiosurgery.

  18. Acute Effects of Different Stretching Techniques on the Number of Repetitions in A Single Lower Body Resistance Training Session

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sá Marcos A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of passive static and ballistic stretching on maximal repetition performance during a resistance training session (RTS. Nine male subjects underwent three experimental conditions: ballistic stretching (BS; passive static stretching (PSS; and a specific warm-up (SW. The RTS was composed of three sets of 12RM for the following exercises: leg press 45 (LP, leg extension (LE, leg curl (LC, and plantar flexors (PF. Performance of six sessions was assessed 48 hours apart. The first visit consisted of a familiarization session including stretching methods and exercises used in the RTS. On the second and third visit, a strength test and retest were performed. During the fourth to the sixth visit, the volunteers randomly performed the following protocols: BS+RTS; PSS+RTS; or SW+RTS. For the sum of the RM number of each three-set exercise, significant differences were found between PSS vs. SW for the LP (p = 0.001; LE (p = 0.005; MF (p = 0.001; and PF (p = 0.038. For the comparison between the methods of stretching PSS vs. BS, significant differences were found only for the FP (p = 0.019. When analyzing the method of stretching BS vs. SW, significant differences were found for the LP (p = 0.014 and MF (p = 0.002. For the total sum of the RM number of three sets of the four exercises that composed the RTS, significant differences were observed (p < 0.05 in the following comparisons: PPS vs. SW (p = 0.001, PPS vs. BS (p = 0.008, and BS vs. SW (p = 0.002. Accordingly, the methods of passive static and ballistic stretching should not be recommended before a RTS.

  19. Single-Session Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Temporarily Improves Symptoms, Mood, and Self-Regulatory Control in Bulimia Nervosa: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kekic

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that pathological eating behaviours in bulimia nervosa (BN are underpinned by alterations in reward processing and self-regulatory control, and by functional changes in neurocircuitry encompassing the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. Manipulation of this region with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS may therefore alleviate symptoms of the disorder.This double-blind sham-controlled proof-of-principle trial investigated the effects of bilateral tDCS over the DLPFC in adults with BN.Thirty-nine participants (two males received three sessions of tDCS in a randomised and counterbalanced order: anode right/cathode left (AR/CL, anode left/cathode right (AL/CR, and sham. A battery of psychological/neurocognitive measures was completed before and after each session and the frequency of bulimic behaviours during the following 24-hours was recorded.AR/CL tDCS reduced eating disorder cognitions (indexed by the Mizes Eating Disorder Cognitions Questionnaire-Revised when compared to AL/CR and sham tDCS. Both active conditions suppressed the self-reported urge to binge-eat and increased self-regulatory control during a temporal discounting task. Compared to sham stimulation, mood (assessed with the Profile of Mood States improved after AR/CL but not AL/CR tDCS. Lastly, the three tDCS sessions had comparable effects on the wanting/liking of food and on bulimic behaviours during the 24 hours post-stimulation.These data suggest that single-session tDCS transiently improves symptoms of BN. They also help to elucidate possible mechanisms of action and highlight the importance of selecting the optimal electrode montage. Multi-session trials are needed to determine whether tDCS has potential for development as a treatment for adult BN.

  20. Single-Session Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Temporarily Improves Symptoms, Mood, and Self-Regulatory Control in Bulimia Nervosa: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekic, Maria; McClelland, Jessica; Bartholdy, Savani; Boysen, Elena; Musiat, Peter; Dalton, Bethan; Tiza, Meyzi; David, Anthony S; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that pathological eating behaviours in bulimia nervosa (BN) are underpinned by alterations in reward processing and self-regulatory control, and by functional changes in neurocircuitry encompassing the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Manipulation of this region with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may therefore alleviate symptoms of the disorder. This double-blind sham-controlled proof-of-principle trial investigated the effects of bilateral tDCS over the DLPFC in adults with BN. Thirty-nine participants (two males) received three sessions of tDCS in a randomised and counterbalanced order: anode right/cathode left (AR/CL), anode left/cathode right (AL/CR), and sham. A battery of psychological/neurocognitive measures was completed before and after each session and the frequency of bulimic behaviours during the following 24-hours was recorded. AR/CL tDCS reduced eating disorder cognitions (indexed by the Mizes Eating Disorder Cognitions Questionnaire-Revised) when compared to AL/CR and sham tDCS. Both active conditions suppressed the self-reported urge to binge-eat and increased self-regulatory control during a temporal discounting task. Compared to sham stimulation, mood (assessed with the Profile of Mood States) improved after AR/CL but not AL/CR tDCS. Lastly, the three tDCS sessions had comparable effects on the wanting/liking of food and on bulimic behaviours during the 24 hours post-stimulation. These data suggest that single-session tDCS transiently improves symptoms of BN. They also help to elucidate possible mechanisms of action and highlight the importance of selecting the optimal electrode montage. Multi-session trials are needed to determine whether tDCS has potential for development as a treatment for adult BN.

  1. Can a Single Session of a Community-Based Group Exercise Program Combining Step Aerobics and Bodyweight Resistance Exercise Acutely Reduce Blood Pressure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendes Romeu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the acute effects of a single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise on blood pressure in healthy young adult women. Twentythree healthy young adult women (aged 31.57 ± 7.87 years participated in two experimental sessions (exercise and control in a crossover study design. Blood pressure was monitored before, immediately after and at 10, 20 and 30 min of recovery. The exercise session consisted of four phases: 1 a warm-up (5 min of dance aerobics; 2 aerobic exercise training (30 min of step aerobics; 3 resistance exercise training (six sets of 12 repetitions of three bodyweight exercises in a circuit mode, 10 min; and 4 a cool-down (5 min of breathing and flexibility exercises; totaling 50 min of duration. Systolic blood pressure after exercise was significantly lower compared to control at the 10th min (-10.83 ± 2.13 vs. -2.6 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009, 20th min (-11.26 ± 2.13 vs. -3.04 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009 and 30th min of recovery (-10.87 ± 2.39 vs. -0.48 ± 2.39 mmHg; p = 0.004. A single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise was effective in inducing significant post-exercise hypotension in healthy young adult women. This type of low-cost exercise interventions may have an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and in community health promotion.

  2. SU-F-T-629: Effect of Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) Width On Plan Quality of Single-Isocenter VMAT Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Multiple Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, J; Thomas, E; Wu, X; Fiveash, J; Popple, R [University Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Single-isocenter VMAT has been shown able to create high quality plans for complex intracranial multiple metastasis SRS cases. Linacs capable of the technique are typically outfitted with an MLC that consists of a combination of 5 mm and 10 mm leaves (standard) or 2.5 mm and 5 mm leaves (high-definition). In this study, we test the hypothesis that thinner collimator leaves are associated with improved plan quality. Methods: Ten multiple metastasis cases were identified and planned for VMAT SRS using a 10 MV flattening filter free beam. Plans were created for a standard (std) and a high-definition (HD) MLC. Published values for leaf transmission factor and dosimetric leaf gap were utilized. All other parameters were invariant. Conformity (plan and individual target), moderate isodose spill (V50%), and low isodose spill (mean brain dose) were selected for analysis. Results: Compared to standard MLC, HD-MLC improved overall plan conformity (median: Paddick CI-HD = 0.83, Paddick CI-std = 0.79; p = 0.004 and median: RTOG CI-HD =1.18, RTOG CI-std =1.24; p = 0.01 ), improved individual lesion conformity (median: Paddick CI-HD,i =0.77, Paddick CI-std,i =0.72; p < 0.001 and median: RTOG CI-HD,i = 1.28, RTOG CI-std,i =1.35; p < 0.001), improved moderate isodose spill (median: V50%-HD = 37.0 cc, V50%-std = 45.7 cc; p = 0.002), and improved low dose spill (median: dmean-HD = 2.90 Gy, dmean-std = 3.19 Gy; p = 0.002). Conclusion: For the single-isocenter VMAT SRS of multiple metastasis plans examined, use of HD-MLC modestly improved conformity, moderate isodose, and low isodose spill compared to standard MLC. However, in all cases we were able to generate clinically acceptable plans with the standard MLC. More work is need to further quantify the difference in cases with higher numbers of small targets and to better understand any potential clinical significance. This research was supported in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  3. SU-F-T-629: Effect of Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) Width On Plan Quality of Single-Isocenter VMAT Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Multiple Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, J; Thomas, E; Wu, X; Fiveash, J; Popple, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Single-isocenter VMAT has been shown able to create high quality plans for complex intracranial multiple metastasis SRS cases. Linacs capable of the technique are typically outfitted with an MLC that consists of a combination of 5 mm and 10 mm leaves (standard) or 2.5 mm and 5 mm leaves (high-definition). In this study, we test the hypothesis that thinner collimator leaves are associated with improved plan quality. Methods: Ten multiple metastasis cases were identified and planned for VMAT SRS using a 10 MV flattening filter free beam. Plans were created for a standard (std) and a high-definition (HD) MLC. Published values for leaf transmission factor and dosimetric leaf gap were utilized. All other parameters were invariant. Conformity (plan and individual target), moderate isodose spill (V50%), and low isodose spill (mean brain dose) were selected for analysis. Results: Compared to standard MLC, HD-MLC improved overall plan conformity (median: Paddick CI_HD = 0.83, Paddick CI_std = 0.79; p = 0.004 and median: RTOG CI_HD =1.18, RTOG CI_std =1.24; p = 0.01 ), improved individual lesion conformity (median: Paddick CI_HD,i =0.77, Paddick CI_std,i =0.72; p < 0.001 and median: RTOG CI_HD,i = 1.28, RTOG CI_std,i =1.35; p < 0.001), improved moderate isodose spill (median: V50%_HD = 37.0 cc, V50%_std = 45.7 cc; p = 0.002), and improved low dose spill (median: dmean_HD = 2.90 Gy, dmean_std = 3.19 Gy; p = 0.002). Conclusion: For the single-isocenter VMAT SRS of multiple metastasis plans examined, use of HD-MLC modestly improved conformity, moderate isodose, and low isodose spill compared to standard MLC. However, in all cases we were able to generate clinically acceptable plans with the standard MLC. More work is need to further quantify the difference in cases with higher numbers of small targets and to better understand any potential clinical significance. This research was supported in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  4. Panel Session

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege

    2004-01-01

    In this panel session, four researchers will discuss the role of a theoretical foundation, in particular AT, in the design of information technology based artefacts. The general discussion will take of from a specific examination of the ActAD approach.......In this panel session, four researchers will discuss the role of a theoretical foundation, in particular AT, in the design of information technology based artefacts. The general discussion will take of from a specific examination of the ActAD approach....

  5. Stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society (ISRS) Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, May N; Sahgal, Arjun; Xu, Wei; De Salles, Antonio; Hayashi, Motohiro; Levivier, Marc; Ma, Lijun; Martinez, Roberto; Régis, Jean; Ryu, Sam; Slotman, Ben J; Paddick, Ian

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to develop International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society (ISRS) consensus guideline statements for vestibular schwannoma. A systematic review of the literature was performed up to April 2015. A total of 55 full-text articles were included in the analysis. All studies were retrospective, except for 2 prospective quality of life studies. Five-year tumour control rates with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (RS), single fraction linac RS, or fractionated (either hypofractionated or conventional fractionation) stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) were similar at 81-100%. The single fraction RS series (linac or Gamma Knife) with tumour marginal doses between 12 and 14 Gy revealed 5-year tumour control rates of 90-99%, hearing preservation rates of 41-79%, facial nerve preservation rates of 95-100% and trigeminal preservation rates of 79-99%.There were 6 non-randomized studies comparing single fraction RS versus FSRT. There was no statistically significant difference in tumour control; HR=1.66 (95% CI 0.81, 3.42), p =0.17, facial nerve function; HR = 0.67 (95% CI 0.30, 1.49), p =0.33, trigeminal nerve function; HR = 0.80 (95% CI 0.41, 1.56), p =0.51, and hearing preservation; HR = 1.10 (95% CI 0.72, 1.68), p =0.65 comparing single fraction RS with FSRT.Nine quality of life reports yielded conflicting results as to which modality (surgery, observation, or radiation) was associated with better quality of life outcomes. There are no randomized trials to help guide management of patients with vestibular schwannoma. Within the limitations of the retrospective series, a number of consensus statements were made.

  6. A Single Session of rTMS Enhances Small-Worldness in Writer’s Cramp: Evidence from Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Multi-Modal Brain Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose D. Bharath

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS induces widespread changes in brain connectivity. As the network topology differences induced by a single session of rTMS are less known we undertook this study to ascertain whether the network alterations had a small-world morphology using multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI.Method: Simultaneous EEG-fMRI was acquired in duplicate before (R1 and after (R2 a single session of rTMS in 14 patients with Writer’s Cramp (WC. Whole brain neuronal and hemodynamic network connectivity were explored using the graph theory measures and clustering coefficient, path length and small-world index were calculated for EEG and resting state fMRI (rsfMRI. Multi-modal graph theory analysis was used to evaluate the correlation of EEG and fMRI clustering coefficients.Result: A single session of rTMS was found to increase the clustering coefficient and small-worldness significantly in both EEG and fMRI (p < 0.05. Multi-modal graph theory analysis revealed significant modulations in the fronto-parietal regions immediately after rTMS. The rsfMRI revealed additional modulations in several deep brain regions including cerebellum, insula and medial frontal lobe.Conclusion: Multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI can supplement motor physiology methods in understanding the neurobiology of rTMS in vivo. Coinciding evidence from EEG and rsfMRI reports small-world morphology for the acute phase network hyper-connectivity indicating changes ensuing low-frequency rTMS is probably not “noise”.

  7. Technical and anatomical aspects of novalis stereotactic radiosurgery sphenopalatine ganglionectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Salles, Antonio A.F.; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Golish, S. Raymond Ph.D.; Medin, Paul M.; Malkasian, Dennis; Solberg, Timothy D.; Selch, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Several techniques have been applied for destruction of the sphenopalatine ganglion to control cluster headache and ocular pain with sympathetic component. Cluster headache has responded to radiofrequency ablation or phenol destruction. Radiosurgery of the sphenopalatine ganglion is promising due to the excellent visualization of the target on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and skull X-rays. Material and Methods: Six patients and one cadaver head were analyzed in this study. The cadaver-head dissection confirmed the location of the sphenopalatine ganglion on X-rays and CT imaging. One patient undergoing radiofrequency sphenopalatine ablation participated for confirmation of the location of the ganglion on plain X-rays. Five patients received radiosurgery of the sphenopalatine ganglion. One patient had classic unilateral cluster headache. Two patients had neuropathic pain and 1 had bilateral migrainous neuralgia. The fifth patient had bilateral atypical facial pain. All received a single maximal dose of 90 Gy with a 5- or 7.5-mm circular collimator. MRI, CT, and skull X-rays identified and confirmed the target. Results: The sphenopalatine fossa is seen in the skull X-ray as an inverse tear drop just caudal to the sphenoid sinus. This location is readily correlated to the CT target by the stereotactic coordinates and confirmed with the presence of the ganglion visualized in the MRI scan. Only the patient with cluster headache experienced lasting pain relief. Conclusion: Multiple imaging modalities confirmed the location of the sphenopalatine ganglion for radiosurgery. The procedure was performed safely with CT and MRI fusion. Radiosurgery was significantly beneficial only on classic cluster headache

  8. The acute effects of a single session of expiratory muscle strength training on blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen saturation in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laciuga, Helena; Davenport, Paul; Sapienza, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) is a rehabilitative program that has been tested for outcomes related to respiratory muscle strength, cough, swallow, and voice function in healthy young adult, elderly individuals, and in patients with progressive neurodegenerative disease. Because EMST has been used in patient care, the associated cardiovascular responses during EMST are of importance. This study investigated the changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), and oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) during one session of EMST in healthy, young adults as a preliminary study of device safety. Thirty-one participants completed a single session of 25 trials with the EMST device. Valsalva maneuvers were performed at the beginning and at the end of the EMST trials for task comparison. The SBP, DBP, HR, and SpO(2) were recorded at the baseline and after completing the following tasks: a Valsalva maneuver, 12 trials using the EMST device, 13 trials using the EMST device, and 5 min of rest following the EMST session. A mixed linear model tested for changes across the six time points. The results indicated no significant change of SBP, DBP, HR, or SpO(2) during or following the EMST trials or after performing the Valsalva maneuver. The results suggest that EMST does not elicit significant fluctuations of blood pressure, HR, and SpO(2) in healthy young adults even when considering the effects of covariates on the outcomes measures.

  9. Sleep quality improved following a single session of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise in older women: Results from a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Youngstedt, Shawn D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor sleep quality is associated with adverse effects on health outcomes. It is not clear whether exercise can improve sleep quality and whether intensity of exercise affects any of the effects. Methods Fifteen healthy, non-obese (body mass index = 24.4 ± 2.1 kg/m2, mean ± SD), sedentary (exercise on no more than 3 times/week) older women (66.1 ± 3.9 years) volunteered for the study. Peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) was evaluated using a graded exercise test on a treadmill with a metabolic cart. Following a 7-day baseline period, each participant completed two exercise sessions (separated by 1 week) with equal caloric expenditure, but at different intensities (60% and 45% VO2peak, sequence randomized) between 9:00 and 11:00 am. A wrist ActiGraph monitor was used to assess sleep at baseline and two nights following each exercise session. Results The average duration of the exercise was 54 and 72 min, respectively at 60% (moderate-intensity) and 45% VO2peak (light-intensity). Wake time after sleep onset was significantly shorter (p = 0.016), the number of awakenings was less (p = 0.046), and total activity counts were lower (p = 0.05) after the moderate-intensity exercise compared to baseline no-exercise condition. Conclusion Our data showed that a single moderate-intensity aerobic exercise session improved sleep quality in older women. PMID:25685605

  10. Sleep quality improved following a single session of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise in older women: Results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Youngstedt, Shawn D

    2014-12-01

    Poor sleep quality is associated with adverse effects on health outcomes. It is not clear whether exercise can improve sleep quality and whether intensity of exercise affects any of the effects. Fifteen healthy, non-obese (body mass index = 24.4 ± 2.1 kg/m 2 , mean ± SD), sedentary (exercise on no more than 3 times/week) older women (66.1 ± 3.9 years) volunteered for the study. Peak oxygen consumption (VO 2peak ) was evaluated using a graded exercise test on a treadmill with a metabolic cart. Following a 7-day baseline period, each participant completed two exercise sessions (separated by 1 week) with equal caloric expenditure, but at different intensities (60% and 45% VO 2peak , sequence randomized) between 9:00 and 11:00 am. A wrist ActiGraph monitor was used to assess sleep at baseline and two nights following each exercise session. The average duration of the exercise was 54 and 72 min, respectively at 60% (moderate-intensity) and 45% VO 2peak (light-intensity). Wake time after sleep onset was significantly shorter ( p = 0.016), the number of awakenings was less ( p = 0.046), and total activity counts were lower ( p = 0.05) after the moderate-intensity exercise compared to baseline no-exercise condition. Our data showed that a single moderate-intensity aerobic exercise session improved sleep quality in older women.

  11. An Excellent Clinical Outcome with Stereotactic Radiosurgery in a Geriatric Patient with Multiple and Recurrent Brain Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Bicky; Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; M Mohammadi, Alireza; Ahluwalia, Manmeet

    2017-12-22

    The incidence of brain metastases range from 10 to 20% of all adult patients with cancer and lung cancer is associated with one of the highest incidences of brain metastases. In geriatric patients, who already have limited cognitive function, whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) can be a problem. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a one day, outpatient treatment with minimal effect to normal brain and could particularly be useful in elderly patients. We report the case of a geriatric patient with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma who had multiple brain metastases and recurrences, who responded well to the stereotactic radiosurgery (six sessions) with acceptable tumor control.

  12. Effectiveness of a brief school-based body image intervention 'Dove Confident Me: Single Session' when delivered by teachers and researchers: Results from a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Atkinson, Melissa J; Steer, Rebecca J; Garbett, Kirsty M; Rumsey, Nichola; Halliwell, Emma

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated a 90-min single session school-based body image intervention (Dove Confident Me: Single Session), and investigated if delivery could be task-shifted to teachers. British adolescents (N = 1707; 11-13 years; 50.83% girls) participated in a cluster randomised controlled trial [lessons as usual control; intervention teacher-led (TL); intervention researcher-led (RL)]. Body image, risk factors, and psychosocial and disordered eating outcomes were assessed 1-week pre-intervention, immediate post-intervention, and 4-9.5 weeks follow-up. Multilevel mixed-models showed post-intervention improvements for intervention students relative to control in body esteem (TL; girls only), negative affect (TL), dietary restraint (TL; girls only), eating disorder symptoms (TL), and life engagement (TL; RL). Awareness of sociocultural pressures increased at post-intervention (TL). Effects were small-medium in size (ds 0.19-0.76) and were not maintained at follow-up. There were no significant differences between conditions at post or follow-up on body satisfaction, appearance comparisons, teasing, appearance conversations and self-esteem. The intervention had short-term benefits for girls' body image and dietary restraint, and for eating disorder symptoms and some psychosocial outcomes among girls and boys. A multi-session version of the intervention is likely to be necessary for sustained improvements. Teachers can deliver this intervention effectively with minimal training, indicating broader scale dissemination is feasible. ISRCTN16782819. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of a single session of transcranial direct-current stimulation on balance and spatiotemporal gait variables in children with cerebral palsy: A randomized sham-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luanda A. C. Grecco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS has been widely studied with the aim of enhancing local synaptic efficacy and modulating the electrical activity of the cortex in patients with neurological disorders. Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of a single session of tDCS regarding immediate changes in spatiotemporal gait and oscillations of the center of pressure (30 seconds in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Method: A randomized controlled trial with a blinded evaluator was conducted involving 20 children with CP between six and ten years of age. Gait and balance were evaluated three times: Evaluation 1 (before the stimulation, Evaluation 2 (immediately after stimulation, and Evaluation 3 (20 minutes after the stimulation. The protocol consisted of a 20-minute session of tDCS applied to the primary motor cortex at an intensity of 1 mA. The participants were randomly allocated to two groups: experimental group - anodal stimulation of the primary motor cortex; and control group - placebo transcranial stimulation. Results: Significant reductions were found in the experimental group regarding oscillations during standing in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions with eyes open and eyes closed in comparison with the control group (p<0.05. In the intra-group analysis, the experimental group exhibited significant improvements in gait velocity, cadence, and oscillation in the center of pressure during standing (p<0.05. No significant differences were found in the control group among the different evaluations. Conclusion: A single session of tDCS applied to the primary motor cortex promotes positive changes in static balance and gait velocity in children with cerebral palsy.

  14. Intracranial osteosarcoma after radiosurgery. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanno, Naoko; Hayashi, Shinkichi; Shimura, Toshiro; Maeda, Shotaro; Teramoto, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with an intracranial osteosarcoma at the site of previous radiosurgery, manifesting as sudden onset of headache and left hemiparesis with aphasia. She had a previous history of stereotactic radiosurgery for an intracranial tumor under a diagnosis of falx meningioma. Computed tomography showed intratumoral and peritumoral hemorrhage at the right parietofrontal region. Gross total resection of the tumor with hematoma was performed. The histological diagnosis was osteosarcoma. Sarcomatous change is a rare complication of radiotherapy. This case illustrates that osteosarcoma may develop years after radiosurgery for benign brain neoplasm. (author)

  15. The Effect of a Single Session of Whole-Body Vibration Training in Recreationally Active Men on the Excitability of the Central and Peripheral Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmielewska Daria

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vibration training has become a popular method used in professional sports and recreation. In this study, we examined the effect of whole-body vibration training on the central nervous system and muscle excitability in a group of 28 active men. Subjects were assigned randomly to one of two experimental groups with different variables of vibrations. The chronaximetry method was used to evaluate the effect of a single session of whole-body vibration training on the excitability of the rectus femoris and brachioradialis muscles. The examination of the fusing and flickering frequencies of the light stimulus was performed. An increase in the excitability of the quadriceps femoris muscle due to low intensity vibrations (20 Hz frequency, 2 mm amplitude was noted, and a return to the initial values was observed 30 min after the application of vibration. High intensity vibrations (60 Hz frequency, 4 mm amplitude caused elongations of the chronaxy time; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Neither a low intensity vibration amplitude of 2 mm (frequency of 20 Hz nor a high intensity vibration amplitude of 4 mm (frequency of 60 Hz caused a change in the excitability of the central nervous system, as revealed by the average frequency of the fusing and flickering of the light stimulus. A single session of high intensity whole-body vibration did not significantly decrease the excitability of the peripheral nervous system while the central nervous system did not seem to be affected.

  16. Whole body oxygen uptake and evoked torque during subtetanic isometric electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscles in a single 30-minute session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, Conor M; Caulfield, Brian M; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the time course of fatigue in torque output and oxygen uptake during isometric subtetanic neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) to facilitate the design of NMES-based rehabilitation protocols that can accumulate a defined aerobic exercise volume within a given time period. Single-arm intervention study with within-subject comparisons. University research laboratory. Volunteer sample of healthy men (N=11; mean age, 34.2 ± 11.5 y; range, 19-53 y; body mass, 79.1 ± 11.7 kg; range, 58-100 kg). A single 30-minute session of continuous bilateral isometric quadriceps NMES at 4 Hz evoking a mean twitch amplitude of 12% of the maximum voluntary contraction. Whole body oxygen consumption rate (V˙o2), and evoked torque were measured simultaneously throughout. Mean increment in V˙o2 was 596 ± 238 mL/min, and average exercise intensity during the session was 3 ±.47 metabolic equivalents. The V˙o2 and torque declined slowly at a rate of -.54%±.31% and -.47%±.57% per minute, respectively. Despite having a higher incremental V˙o2, the observed fatigue rate was considerably less than that previously reported during intermittent isometric tetanic stimulation, suggesting that subtetanic isometric NMES is more sustainable for exercise interventions aimed at accumulating a therapeutic aerobic exercise volume. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Does a single session of theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation of inferior temporal cortex affect tinnitus perception?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moser Tobias

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cortical excitability changes as well as imbalances in excitatory and inhibitory circuits play a distinct pathophysiological role in chronic tinnitus. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the temporoparietal cortex was recently introduced to modulate tinnitus perception. In the current study, the effect of theta-burst stimulation (TBS, a novel rTMS paradigm was investigated in chronic tinnitus. Twenty patients with chronic tinnitus completed the study. Tinnitus severity and loudness were monitored using a tinnitus questionnaire (TQ and a visual analogue scale (VAS before each session. Patients received 600 pulses of continuous TBS (cTBS, intermittent TBS (iTBS and intermediate TBS (imTBS over left inferior temporal cortex with an intensity of 80% of the individual active or resting motor threshold. Changes in subjective tinnitus perception were measured with a numerical rating scale (NRS. Results TBS applied to inferior temporal cortex appeared to be safe. Although half of the patients reported a slight attenuation of tinnitus perception, group analysis resulted in no significant difference when comparing the three specific types of TBS. Converting the NRS into the VAS allowed us to compare the time-course of aftereffects. Only cTBS resulted in a significant short-lasting improvement of the symptoms. In addition there was no significant difference when comparing the responder and non-responder groups regarding their anamnestic and audiological data. The TQ score correlated significantly with the VAS, lower loudness indicating less tinnitus distress. Conclusion TBS does not offer a promising outcome for patients with tinnitus in the presented study.

  18. Breakout Sessions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    Participants are split into small groups for detailed discussion on their chosen topic. To register please click on 'See details' link from the agenda and then on the link to send an email to the session for which you would like to book. Please don't change the subject line of the email.

  19. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or robotic radiosurgery (RRS) for salvage treatment of colorectal liver metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stintzing, Sebastian; Hendrich, Saskia; Heinemann, Volker [Dept. of Medical Oncology and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Klinikum Grosshadern, LMU, Munich (Germany)], E-mail: sebastian.stintzing@med.uni-muenchen.de; Grothe, Alexander; Trumm, Christoph G. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. Hospital Grosshadern, LMU Munich, Munich (Germany); Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten [Dept. and Policlinics of Diagnostic Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus Dresden (Germany); Rentsch, Markus [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Hospital Grosshadern, LMU Munich, Munich (Germany); Fuerweger, Christoph; Muacevic, Alexander [European Cyberknife Center Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Background. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an evolving modality to treat otherwise unresectable liver metastases. In this analysis, two local therapies: 1) single session robotic radiosurgery (RRS) and 2) percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) were compared in a total of 60 heavily pretreated colorectal cancer patients. Methods. Thirty patients with a total of 35 colorectal liver metastases not qualifying for surgery that were treated in curative intent with RRS were prospectively followed. To compare efficacy of both treatment modalities, patients treated with RFA during the same period of time were matched according to number and size of the treated lesions. Local tumor control, local disease free survival (DFS), and freedom from distant recurrence (FFDR) were analyzed for effi cacy. Treatment-related side effects were recorded for comparison. Results. The median diameter of the treated lesions was 33 mm (7-53 mm). Baseline characteristics did not differ significantly between the groups. One- and two-year local control rates showed no signifi cant difference but favored RRS (85% vs. 65% and 80% vs. 61%, respectively). A signifi cantly longer local DFS of patients treated with RRS compared to RFA (34.4 months vs. 6.0 months; p 0.001) was found. Both, median FFDR (11.4 months for RRS vs. 7.1 months for RFA p=0.25) and the recurrence rate (67% for RRS and 63% for RFA, p>0.99) were comparable. Conclusion. Single session RRS is a safe and effective method to treat colorectal liver metastases. In this analysis, a trend towards longer DFS was seen in patients treated with RRS when compared to RFA.

  20. Three year results of stereotactic radiosurgery of large choroidal melanomas with the gamma-knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiel, M.J.; Mueller, A.J.; Schaller, U.; Talies, S.; Kampik, A.; Horstmann, G.A.; Wowra, B.

    2003-01-01

    Eye preserving surgery in patients with large choroidal melanomas includes local resection or radiosurgery. Brachytherapy can only be applied to small tumors in adequate localisation while radiosurgery (charged particles or gamma-knife) can be applied to all other tumors. We report 3-year results of 100 patients treated with gamma-knife radiosurgery. All patients received a single fraction gamma-knife treatment with a retrobulbar block. The radiation dose was 50 Gy and all tumors were within the 50 % isodosis range. Tumors were inaccessible for Ru 106 Brachy-therapy as they were either too large (max. height > 6.0 mm, basis diameter > 19 mm) or contact to optic disc exceeded 90 o or infiltration into the ciliary body was present. Of the 100 patients, 73 were followed for 1 year, 33 for 2 years and 17 for 3 years. Local tumor control was 98 % (2 recurrences). Complications following radiosurgery were rubeosis iridis (12 % of patients after l year, 15 % after 2 years and 6 % after 3 years) and secondary glaucoma (14 % of patients after 1 year, 9 % after 2 years, 6 % after 3 years). Total enucleation rate was 6.3 % per year. The tumors were found at the posterior pole (61 %), middle periphery (21 %) or ciliary body (18 %). Functional results depended on tumor localisation in the eye: after a mean of 1.9 years follow-up visual acuity was stable (± 3 lines) in 71 % of patients with a tumor in the middle periphery while 19 % of tumors with infiltration into the ciliary body and 0 % of tumors at the posterior pole showed stable visual acuity. Gamma-knife-radiosurgery offers a well tolerated, eye preserving treatment for patients with large choroidal melanoma in the middle periphery. Comparing our method to other radiosurgery therapies we can offer a fast technique which only requires a single visit. (author)

  1. Neural Response After a Single ECT Session During Retrieval of Emotional Self-Referent Words in Depression: A Randomized, Sham-Controlled fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Macoveanu, Julian; Jørgensen, Martin B; Støttrup, Mette M; Ott, Caroline V; Jensen, Hans M; Jørgensen, Anders; Harmer, J; Paulson, Olaf B; Kessing, Lars V; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Negative neurocognitive bias is a core feature of depression that is reversed by antidepressant drug treatment. However, it is unclear whether modulation of neurocognitive bias is a common mechanism of distinct biological treatments. This randomized controlled functional magnetic resonance imaging study explored the effects of a single electroconvulsive therapy session on self-referent emotional processing. Methods Twenty-nine patients with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder were randomized to one active or sham electroconvulsive therapy session at the beginning of their electroconvulsive therapy course in a double-blind, between-groups design. The following day, patients were given a self-referential emotional word categorization test and a free recall test. This was followed by an incidental word recognition task during whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T. Mood was assessed at baseline, on the functional magnetic resonance imaging day, and after 6 electroconvulsive therapy sessions. Data were complete and analyzed for 25 patients (electroconvulsive therapy: n = 14, sham: n = 11). The functional magnetic resonance imaging data were analyzed using the FMRIB Software Library randomize algorithm, and the Threshold-Free Cluster Enhancement method was used to identify significant clusters (corrected at P words. However, electroconvulsive therapy reduced the retrieval-specific neural response for positive words in the left frontopolar cortex. This effect occurred in the absence of differences between groups in behavioral performance or mood symptoms. Conclusions The observed effect of electroconvulsive therapy on prefrontal response may reflect early facilitation of memory for positive self-referent information, which could contribute to improvements in depressive symptoms including feelings of self-worth with repeated treatments. PMID:29718333

  2. A Single Session of an Integrated Yoga Program as a Stress Management Tool for School Employees: Comparison of Daily Practice and Nondaily Practice of a Yoga Therapy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosaka, Michiyo; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the daily practice of a yoga therapy program learnt during a single session of an integrated yoga intervention that was developed by us as a stress management tool for school employees. Ninety school employees. Case-control study. Three months after the intervention, the subjects were assigned to a daily practice group (case: n=43) and a nonconsecutive daily practice group (control: n=47) according to their daily practice level of the yoga therapy program. The subjects participated in a stress management education program based on an integrated yoga therapy session. The program included psychological education and counseling about stress management and yoga theories, as well as the practices of asanas, pranayama, relaxation, and cognitive structure based on Indian philosophy. Assessments were performed before and after the program using the Subjective Units of Distress for mind and body and the Two-Dimensional Mood Scale. The General Health Questionnaire 28 (GHQ28) was used to assess the mental health state before the intervention and at 3 months after the program. The subjects showed significant increases in their levels of calmness, comfort, and cheerfulness (pstress (pstress and that the mental health of school employees was promoted by the daily practice of the yoga therapy program.

  3. Treatment of acoustic neuroma: stereotactic radiosurgery vs. microsurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpinos, Marianna; Teh, Bin S.; Zeck, Otto; Carpenter, L. Steven; Phan, Chris; Mai, W.-Y.; Lu, Hsin H.; Chiu, J. Kam; Butler, E. Brian; Gormley, William B.; Woo, Shiao Y.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Two major treatment options are available for patients with acoustic neuroma, microsurgery and radiosurgery. Our objective was to compare these two treatment modalities with respect to tumor growth control, hearing preservation, development of cranial neuropathies, complications, functional outcome, and patient satisfaction. Methods and Materials: To compare radiosurgery with microsurgery, we analyzed 96 patients with unilateral acoustic neuromas treated with Leksell Gamma Knife or microsurgery at Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, Texas, between 1993 and 2000. Radiosurgery technique involved multiple isocenter (1-30 single fraction fixed-frame magnetic resonance imaging) image-based treatment with a mean dose prescription of 14.5 Gy. Microsurgery included translabyrinthine, suboccipital, and middle fossa approaches with intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring. Preoperative patient characteristics were similar except for tumor size and age. Patients undergoing microsurgery were younger with larger tumors compared to the radiosurgical group. The tumors were divided into small 4.0 cm. Median follow-up of the radiosurgical group was longer than the microsurgical group, 48 months (3-84 months) vs. 24 months (3-72 months). Results: There was no statistical significance in tumor growth control between the two groups, 100% in the microsurgery group vs. 91% in the radiosurgery group (p>0.05). Radiosurgery was more effective than microsurgery in measurable hearing preservation, 57.5% vs. 14.4% (p=0.01). There was no difference in serviceable hearing preservation between the two groups. Microsurgery was associated with a greater rate of facial and trigeminal neuropathy in the immediate postoperative period and at long-term follow-up. The rate of development of facial neuropathy was significantly higher in the microsurgical group than in the radiosurgical group (35% vs. 0%, p<0.01 in the immediate postsurgical period and 35.3% vs. 6.1%, p=0.008, at long

  4. Quantitative Review Finds No Evidence of Cognitive Effects in Healthy Populations From Single-session Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Jared Cooney; Forte, Jason D; Carter, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 15-years, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a relatively novel form of neuromodulation, has seen a surge of popularity in both clinical and academic settings. Despite numerous claims suggesting that a single session of tDCS can modulate cognition in healthy adult populations (especially working memory and language production), the paradigms utilized and results reported in the literature are extremely variable. To address this, we conduct the largest quantitative review of the cognitive data to date. Single-session tDCS data in healthy adults (18-50) from every cognitive outcome measure reported by at least two different research groups in the literature was collected. Outcome measures were divided into 4 broad categories: executive function, language, memory, and miscellaneous. To account for the paradigmatic variability in the literature, we undertook a three-tier analysis system; each with less-stringent inclusion criteria than the prior. Standard mean difference values with 95% CIs were generated for included studies and pooled for each analysis. Of the 59 analyses conducted, tDCS was found to not have a significant effect on any - regardless of inclusion laxity. This includes no effect on any working memory outcome or language production task. Our quantitative review does not support the idea that tDCS generates a reliable effect on cognition in healthy adults. Reasons for and limitations of this finding are discussed. This work raises important questions regarding the efficacy of tDCS, state-dependency effects, and future directions for this tool in cognitive research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Matter over mind: a randomised-controlled trial of single-session biofeedback training on performance anxiety and heart rate variability in musicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Wells

    Full Text Available Musical performance is a skilled activity performed under intense pressure, thus is often a profound source of anxiety. In other contexts, anxiety and its concomitant symptoms of sympathetic nervous system arousal have been successfully ameliorated with HRV biofeedback (HRV BF, a technique involving slow breathing which augments autonomic and emotional regulatory capacity.This randomised-controlled study explored the impact of a single 30-minute session of HRV BF on anxiety in response to a highly stressful music performance.A total of 46 trained musicians participated in this study and were randomly allocated to a slow breathing with or without biofeedback or no-treatment control group. A 3 Group×2 Time mixed experimental design was employed to compare the effect of group before and after intervention on performance anxiety (STAI-S and frequency domain measures of HRV.Slow breathing groups (n=30 showed significantly greater improvements in high frequency (HF and LF/HF ratio measures of HRV relative to control (n=15 during 5 minute recordings of performance anticipation following the intervention (effect size: η(2 =0.122 and η(2 =0.116, respectively. The addition of biofeedback to a slow breathing protocol did not produce differential results. While intervention groups did not exhibit an overall reduction in self-reported anxiety, participants with high baseline anxiety who received the intervention (n=15 displayed greater reductions in self-reported state anxiety relative to those in the control condition (n=7 (r=0.379.These findings indicate that a single session of slow breathing, regardless of biofeedback, is sufficient for controlling physiological arousal in anticipation of psychosocial stress associated with music performance and that slow breathing is particularly helpful for musicians with high levels of anxiety. Future research is needed to further examine the effects of HRV BF as a low-cost, non-pharmacological treatment for

  6. Five Fraction Image-Guided Radiosurgery for Primary and Recurrent Meningiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Karl Oermann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Benign tumors that arise from the meninges can be difficult to treat due to their potentially large size and proximity to critical structures such as cranial nerves and sinuses. Single fraction radiosurgery may increase the risk of symptomatic peritumoral edema. In this study, we report our results on the efficacy and safety of five fraction image-guided radiosurgery for benign meningiomas. Materials/Methods: Clinical and radiographic data from 38 patients treated with five fraction radiosurgery were reviewed retrospectively. Mean tumor volume was 3.83mm3 (range, 1.08-20.79 mm3. Radiation was delivered using the CyberKnife, a frameless robotic image-guided radiosurgery system with a median total dose of 25 Gy (range, 25 Gy-35 Gy. Results: The median follow-up was 20 months. Acute toxicity was minimal with eight patients (21% requiring a short course of steroids for headache at the end of treatment. Pre-treatment neurological symptoms were present in 24 patients (63.2%. Post treatment, neurological symptoms resolved completely in 14 patients (58.3%, and were persistent in eight patients (33.3%. There were no local failures, 24 tumors remained stable (64% and 14 regressed (36%. Pre-treatment peritumoral edema was observed in five patients (13.2%. Post-treatment asymptomatic peritumoral edema developed in five additional patients (13.2%. On multivariate analysis, pre-treatment peritumoral edema and location adjacent to a large vein were significant risk factors for radiographic post-treatment edema (p = 0.001 and p = 0.026 respectively. Conclusions: These results suggest that five fraction image-guided radiosurgery is well tolerated with a response rate for neurologic symptoms that is similar to other standard treatment options. Rates of peritumoral edema and new cranial nerve deficits following five fraction radiosurgery were low. Longer follow-up is required to validate the safety and long-term effectiveness of this treatment approach.

  7. A single robotic session that guides or increases movement error in survivors post-chronic stroke: which intervention is best to boost the learning of a timing task?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Amy E; Corriveau, Hélène; Milot, Marie-Hélène

    2017-08-01

    Timing deficits can have a negative impact on the lives of survivors post-chronic stroke. Studies evaluating ways to improve timing post stroke are scarce. The goal of the study was to evaluate the impact of a single session of haptic guidance (HG) and error amplification (EA) robotic training interventions on the improvement of post-stroke timing accuracy. Thirty-four survivors post-chronic stroke were randomly assigned to HG or EA. Participants played a computerized pinball-like game with their affected hand positioned in a robot that either helped them perform better (HG) or worse (EA) during the task. A baseline and retention phase preceded and followed HG and EA, respectively, in order to assess their efficiency at improving absolute timing errors. The impact of the side of the stroke lesion on the participants' performance during the timing task was also explored for each training group. An improvement in timing performance was only noted following HG (8.9 ± 4.9 ms versus 7.8 ± 5.3 ms, p = 0.032). Moreover, for the EA group only, participants with a left-sided stroke lesion showed a worsening in performance as compared to those with a right-sided stroke lesion (p = 0.001). Helping survivors post-chronic stroke perform a timing-based task is beneficial to learning. Future studies should explore longer and more frequent HG training sessions in order to further promote post stroke motor recovery. Implications for Rehabilitation Timing is crucial for the accomplishment of daily tasks. The number of studies dedicated to improving timing is scarce in the literature, even though timing deficits are common post stroke. This innovative study evaluated the impact of a single session of haptic guidance-HG and error amplification-EA robotic training interventions on improvements in timing accuracy among survivors post chronic stroke. HG robotic training improves timing accuracy more than EA among survivors post chronic stroke.

  8. Session summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Y.

    2002-01-01

    In the summary session, possible international activities in the field of basic studies on high-temperature engineering were discussed within the framework of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). It was recommended to include topics relevant to fission-product behaviour and safety issues of HTGR in next meeting, in addition to the topics discussed in this meeting. The chairperson of the last session summarised the recommendations to be presented to the NSC into the following five topics as possible international activities: - Basic studies on behaviour of irradiated graphite/carbon and ceramic materials including their composites under both operation and storage conditions. - Development of in-core material characterisation and instrumentation methods. - Improvement in material properties through high-temperature irradiation. - Basic studies on HTGR fuel fabrication and performance including fission-product release. - Basic studies on safety issues of HTGR. It was also recommended that a further information exchange meeting focused on the organisation of the interactive collaboration activity with regard to the above topics be planned in 2003, tentatively in Oarai, Japan. (author)

  9. It IS worth the effort: Patient knowledge of reproductive aspects of inflammatory bowel disease improves dramatically after a single group education session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountifield, Réme; Andrews, Jane M; Bampton, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Individuals with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) have poor knowledge regarding the implications of disease for fertility and pregnancy. Previous studies suggest that this poor knowledge adversely influences reproductive decision making. To examine the effect of a single group education session on IBD-specific reproductive knowledge in subjects with IBD. People with IBD attending an educational event were invited to complete the CCPKnow questionnaire, testing reproductive knowledge in IBD, before and after an evidenced based presentation on this topic delivered by a Gastroenterologist. Of 248 attendees, 155 participated; 69% female, mean age 40.3years. CCPKnow scores (maximum 17) were low at baseline and increased significantly post education (mean 5.4 pre vs. 14.5 post education; p<0.0001). A large majority (65.1%) of subjects had "poor" (score <8) knowledge at baseline, compared with only 1.9% after education (p<0.0001). Whilst all subareas of knowledge improved after education, the most important improvement was in attitudes toward medication use in pregnancy: 33.5% of subjects indicated at baseline that women should avoid all drugs in pregnancy compared with only 1.2% post education (p<0.0001). A single group-delivered education event focussed on reproductive issues in IBD can dramatically improve patient knowledge. This has the potential to change reproductive behaviour and may reduce voluntary childlessness resulting from misperceptions amongst individuals with IBD. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiosurgery to the Postoperative Surgical Cavity: Who Needs Evidence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberge, David; Parney, Ian; Brown, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing interest in adjuvant radiosurgery after resection of hematogenous brain metastases. This is exemplified by the approximately 1000 cases reported in mainly retrospective series. These cases fall into four paradigms: adjuvant radiosurgery as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), radiosurgery neoadjuvant to the surgical resection, radiosurgery as an intensification of adjuvant WBRT, and adjuvant radiosurgery for patients having failed prior WBRT. These procedures seem well tolerated, with an approximate 5% risk of radiation necrosis. Although crude local control rates for each strategy seem improved over surgery alone, multiple biases make comparisons with standard WBRT difficult without prospective data. Because evidence lags behind clinical practice, an upcoming intergroup trial will aim to clarify the value of the most common tumor bed radiosurgery strategy by randomizing oligometastatic patients between adjuvant WBRT and adjuvant radiosurgery.

  11. Radiosurgery to the Postoperative Surgical Cavity: Who Needs Evidence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberge, David, E-mail: david.roberge@mcgill.ca [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Parney, Ian [Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-06-01

    There is a growing interest in adjuvant radiosurgery after resection of hematogenous brain metastases. This is exemplified by the approximately 1000 cases reported in mainly retrospective series. These cases fall into four paradigms: adjuvant radiosurgery as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), radiosurgery neoadjuvant to the surgical resection, radiosurgery as an intensification of adjuvant WBRT, and adjuvant radiosurgery for patients having failed prior WBRT. These procedures seem well tolerated, with an approximate 5% risk of radiation necrosis. Although crude local control rates for each strategy seem improved over surgery alone, multiple biases make comparisons with standard WBRT difficult without prospective data. Because evidence lags behind clinical practice, an upcoming intergroup trial will aim to clarify the value of the most common tumor bed radiosurgery strategy by randomizing oligometastatic patients between adjuvant WBRT and adjuvant radiosurgery.

  12. WE-AB-207B-10: On Spinal Nerve Toxicity from Single-Session SAbR in Pigs and the Translation of Small Animal NTCP Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrycushko, B; Medin, P [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The incidence of peripheral neuropathy has risen with increased utilization of SAbR. There is no consensus regarding the dose-tolerance of the peripheral nervous system. In 2015, we commenced an investigation to test the hypotheses that single-session irradiation to the pig spinal nerves exhibit a similar dose-tolerance as that of the spinal cord and that a dose-length effect exists. This work evaluates the direct application of small animal NTCP models to both large animal spinal cord and preliminary peripheral nerve data. Methods: To date, 16 of 25 Yucatan minipigs have received single-session SAbR to a 1.5cm length and 4 of 25 have received irradiation to a 0.5cm length of left-sided C6-C8 spinal nerves. Toxicity related gait change has been observed in 13 animals (9 from the long length group and 4 from the short). This preliminary data is overlaid on several dose-response models which have been fit to rodent spinal cord tolerance experiments. Model parameters define a toxicity profile between a completely serial or parallel behaving organ. Adequacy of model application, including how length effects are handled, to published minipig spinal cord dose-response data and to preliminary peripheral nerve response data was evaluated through residual analysis. Results: No rodent-derived dose-response models were directly applicable to all pig data for the different lengths irradiated. Several models fit the long-length irradiated spinal cord data well, with the more serial-like models fitting best. Preliminary data on the short-length irradiation suggests no length effect exists, disproving our hypothesis. Conclusion: Direct application of small-animal NTCP models to pig data suggests dose-length effect predictions from small animal data may not translate clinically. However, the small animal models used have not considered dose heterogeneity and it is expected that including the low-to-mid dose levels in the penumbral region will improve this match. This work

  13. WE-AB-207B-10: On Spinal Nerve Toxicity from Single-Session SAbR in Pigs and the Translation of Small Animal NTCP Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrycushko, B; Medin, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The incidence of peripheral neuropathy has risen with increased utilization of SAbR. There is no consensus regarding the dose-tolerance of the peripheral nervous system. In 2015, we commenced an investigation to test the hypotheses that single-session irradiation to the pig spinal nerves exhibit a similar dose-tolerance as that of the spinal cord and that a dose-length effect exists. This work evaluates the direct application of small animal NTCP models to both large animal spinal cord and preliminary peripheral nerve data. Methods: To date, 16 of 25 Yucatan minipigs have received single-session SAbR to a 1.5cm length and 4 of 25 have received irradiation to a 0.5cm length of left-sided C6-C8 spinal nerves. Toxicity related gait change has been observed in 13 animals (9 from the long length group and 4 from the short). This preliminary data is overlaid on several dose-response models which have been fit to rodent spinal cord tolerance experiments. Model parameters define a toxicity profile between a completely serial or parallel behaving organ. Adequacy of model application, including how length effects are handled, to published minipig spinal cord dose-response data and to preliminary peripheral nerve response data was evaluated through residual analysis. Results: No rodent-derived dose-response models were directly applicable to all pig data for the different lengths irradiated. Several models fit the long-length irradiated spinal cord data well, with the more serial-like models fitting best. Preliminary data on the short-length irradiation suggests no length effect exists, disproving our hypothesis. Conclusion: Direct application of small-animal NTCP models to pig data suggests dose-length effect predictions from small animal data may not translate clinically. However, the small animal models used have not considered dose heterogeneity and it is expected that including the low-to-mid dose levels in the penumbral region will improve this match. This work

  14. The role of computer technology in radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikler, David; Coussaert, Olivier; Schoovaerts, Frédéric; Joly, Anthony; Levivier, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery treatment principles and irradiation techniques have shown little evolution since its introduction in 1968. Conversely, technology progress linked to computers has produced a major impact on the methods used for treatment planning and dose delivery. In order to fully comprehend modern radiosurgery approaches, one has to acquire good insight of the underlying technology, specifically computer software. In this chapter, we describe the evolution from X-ray films to high-resolution digital imaging, the shift from simple trigonometric calculation to highly complex algorithms and new perspectives in patient follow-up. If these changes open new prospects, they also add complexity, which leads to new pitfalls and limits of the stereotactic radiosurgery method.

  15. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Kodrat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia is a debilitating pain syndrome with a distinct symptom mainly excruciating facial pain that tends to come and go unpredictably in sudden shock-like attacks. Medical management remains the primary treatment for classical trigeminal neuralgia. When medical therapy failed, surgery with microvascular decompression can be performed. Radiosurgery can be offered for classical trigeminal neuralgia patients who are not surgical candidate or surgery refusal and they should not in acute pain condition. Radiosurgery is widely used because of good therapeutic result and low complication rate. Weakness of this technique is a latency period, which is time required for pain relief. It usually ranges from 1 to 2 months. This review enlightens the important role of radiosurgery in the treatment of classical trigeminal neuralgia.

  16. Radiosurgery and the double logistic product formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, J.C.; Steiner, L.

    1990-01-01

    The double logistic product formula is proposed as a method for predicting the probability of developing brain necrosis after high dose irradiation of small target volumes as used in stereotactic radiosurgery. Dose-response data observed for the production of localized radiation necreosis for treating intractable pain with the original Leksell gamma unit were used to choose the best fitting parameters for the double logistic product formula. This model can be used with either exponential or linear quadratic formulas to account for the effects of dose, fractionation and time in addition to volume. Dose-response predictions for stereotactic radiosurgery with different sized collimators are presented. (author). 41 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  17. A single session of perturbation-based gait training with the A-TPAD improves dynamic stability in healthy young subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Dario; Kang, Jiyeon; Agrawal, Sunil K

    2017-07-01

    Gait and balance disorders are among the most common causes of falls in older adults. Most falls occur as a result of unexpected hazards while walking. In order to improve the effectiveness of current fall-prevention programs, new balance training paradigms aim to strengthen the control of the compensatory responses required after external perturbations. The aim of this study was to analyze the adaptions of reactive and proactive strategies to control stability after repeated exposures to waist-pull perturbations delivered while walking. Eight healthy young subjects participated in a single training session with the Active Tethered Pelvic assisted Device (A-TPAD). Participants were exposed to repeated multi-directional perturbations of increasing intensity. The Antero-Posterior (AP) and Medio-Lateral (ML) Base of Support (BoS) and Margin of Stability (MoS) during the response to diagonal perturbations were compared before and after the training. Results showed that participants adapted both the reactive and proactive strategies to control walking balance by significantly increasing their pre- and post-perturbation stability. The changes were principally accounted for by an increment of the AP BoS and MoS and a reduction of ML BoS. This improved their ability to react to a diagonal perturbation. We envision that this system can be used to develop a perturbation-based gait training aimed at improving balance and control of stability during walking, thus reducing fall risk.

  18. A case of effective single-session treatment for attention deficit and learning problems in a routine clinical practice: the value of a transdiagnostic approach to case formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitefield-Alexander, Victoria; Edwards, David

    2009-06-01

    This article reports a systematic clinical case study of the psychological assessment and treatment of Daniel (9), a coloured South African boy with a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (inattentive type). The case is of scientific interest because: (1) there was only a single treatment session, in which contingency management training was delivered to Daniel's parents and teacher; (2) there was evidence for the effectiveness of the intervention immediately and at two-year follow-up; (3) it documents the transportability to a South African context of an intervention developed by overseas research; (4) it documents the central role of case formulation in the delivery of effective psychological interventions; and (5) although Daniel met the criteria for ADHD, he also displayed symptoms of depression and social anxiety and the case supports the use of a transdiagnostic approach to case formulation. The conscientiousness with which his parents and teachers applied the programme was a major factor in the effectiveness of the intervention, and such rapid impact would not be possible where parents and teachers are unavailable or not co-operative. The publication of systematic case studies such as this one is important for the development of a local evidence-based practice in South Africa.

  19. Single session, intrauser repeatability of anterior chamber biometric and corneal pachy-volumetric parameters using a new Scheimpflug+Placido device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Gaurav; Srivastava, Dhruv

    2016-01-01

    To analyze single session, intrauser reliability of a Scheimpflug device for anterior chamber (AC) and corneal parameters. In this observational study, 100 normal candidates underwent Scheimpflug analysis with Sirius 3D Rotating Scheimpflug Camera and Topography System (Costruzione Strumenti Oftalmici, Italy). Two scans in dark room conditions were performed by the same experienced user. The candidates were asked to keep both eyes closed for 5min before the scans. Exclusion criteria were previous ocular surgery, corneal scarring and anterior segment/posterior segment anomalies. Only the right eyes were used for the analysis. Both corneal (central, minimum, and apical thickness, volume, horizontal visible iris diameter, and apical curvature) and anterior chamber (volume, depth, angle, horizontal diameter) measurements were evaluated. There was no difference in the means of repeated measurements (p>0.05, ANOVA). Intraclass correlations between the measures were high and ranged from 0.995-0.997 for corneal to 0.964-0.997 for anterior chamber (AC) parameters. The precision of repeatability measures (1.96×Sw) was approximately 5μ for the central and minimum corneal thickness, 8μ for the apical corneal thickness, 0.06mm for AC (anterior chamber) depth and less than 2° for the AC angle. Sirius Scheimpflug system has high repeatability for both corneal and AC parameters in normal eyes. Copyright © 2015 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. An integrated logistic formula for prediction of complications from radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated logistic model for predicting the probability of complications when small volumes of tissue receive an inhomogeneous radiation dose is described. This model can be used with either an exponential or linear quadratic correction for dose per fraction and time. Both the exponential and linear quadratic versions of this integrated logistic formula provide reasonable estimates of the tolerance of brain to radiosurgical dose distributions where there are small volumes of brain receiving high radiation doses and larger volumes receiving lower doses. This makes it possible to predict the probability of complications from stereotactic radiosurgery, as well as combinations of fractionated large volume irradiation with a radiosurgical boost. Complication probabilities predicted for single fraction radiosurgery with the Leksell Gamma Unit using 4, 8, 14, and 18 mm diameter collimators as well as for whole brain irradiation combined with a radiosurgical boost are presented. The exponential and linear quadratic versions of the integrated logistic formula provide useful methods of calculating the probability of complications from radiosurgical treatment

  1. WE-A-304-02: Strategies and Technologies for Cranial Radiosurgery Planning: Gamma Knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, D.

    2015-01-01

    The high fractional doses, stringent requirements for accuracy and precision, and surgical perspective characteristic of intracranial radiosurgery create considerations for treatment planning which are distinct from most other radiotherapy procedures. This session will introduce treatment planning techniques specific to two popular intracranial SRS modalities: Gamma Knife and MLC-based Linac. The basic treatment delivery characteristics of each device will be reviewed with a focus on how those characteristics determine the paradigm used for treatment planning. Basic techniques for treatment planning will be discussed, including considerations such as isodose selection, target and organ-at-risk definition, quality indices, and protection of critical structures. Future directions for SRS treatment planning will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: Introduce the basic physical principles of intracranial radiosurgery and how they are realized in the treatment planning paradigms for Gamma Knife and Linac radiosurgery. Demonstrate basic treatment planning techniques. Discuss metrics for evaluating SRS treatment plan quality. Discuss recent and future advances in SRS treatment planning. D. Schlesinger receives research support from Elekta, AB

  2. Fractionated radiosurgery for painful spinal metastases: DOSIS - a phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guckenberger Matthias

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One third of all cancer patients will develop bone metastases and the vertebral column is involved in approximately 70% of these patients. Conventional radiotherapy with of 1–10 fractions and total doses of 8-30 Gy is the current standard for painful vertebral metastases; however, the median pain response is short with 3–6 months and local tumor control is limited with these rather low irradiation doses. Recent advances in radiotherapy technology – intensity modulated radiotherapy for generation of highly conformal dose distributions and image-guidance for precise treatment delivery – have made dose-escalated radiosurgery of spinal metastases possible and early results of pain and local tumor control are promising. The current study will investigate efficacy and safety of radiosurgery for painful vertebral metastases and three characteristics will distinguish this study. 1 A prognostic score for overall survival will be used for selection of patients with longer life expectancy to allow for analysis of long-term efficacy and safety. 2 Fractionated radiosurgery will be performed with the number of treatment fractions adjusted to either good (10 fractions or intermediate (5 fractions life expectancy. Fractionation will allow inclusion of tumors immediately abutting the spinal cord due to higher biological effective doses at the tumor - spinal cord interface compared to single fraction treatment. 3 Dose intensification will be performed in the involved parts of the vertebrae only, while uninvolved parts are treated with conventional doses using the simultaneous integrated boost concept. Methods / Design It is the study hypothesis that hypo-fractionated image-guided radiosurgery significantly improves pain relief compared to historic data of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. Primary endpoint is pain response 3 months after radiosurgery, which is defined as pain reduction of ≥ 2 points at the treated

  3. Dose-Escalation Study for Cardiac Radiosurgery in a Porcine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanck, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.blanck@uksh.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); CyberKnife Center Northern Germany, Guestrow (Germany); Bode, Frank [Medical Department II, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Gebhard, Maximilian [Institute of Pathology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Hunold, Peter [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Brandt, Sebastian [Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Bruder, Ralf [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Grossherr, Martin [Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Vonthein, Reinhard [Institute of Medical Biometry and Statistics, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); University Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To perform a proof-of-principle dose-escalation study to radiosurgically induce scarring in cardiac muscle tissue to block veno-atrial electrical connections at the pulmonary vein antrum, similar to catheter ablation. Methods and Materials: Nine mini-pigs underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of heart function and electrophysiology assessment by catheter measurements in the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV). Immediately after examination, radiosurgery with randomized single-fraction doses of 0 and 17.5-35 Gy in 2.5-Gy steps were delivered to the RSPV antrum (target volume 5-8 cm{sup 3}). MRI and electrophysiology were repeated 6 months after therapy, followed by histopathologic examination. Results: Transmural scarring of cardiac muscle tissue was noted with doses ≥32.5 Gy. However, complete circumferential scarring of the RSPV was not achieved. Logistic regressions showed that extent and intensity of fibrosis significantly increased with dose. The 50% effective dose for intense fibrosis was 31.3 Gy (odds ratio 2.47/Gy, P<.01). Heart function was not affected, as verified by MRI and electrocardiogram evaluation. Adjacent critical structures were not damaged, as verified by pathology, demonstrating the short-term safety of small-volume cardiac radiosurgery with doses up to 35 Gy. Conclusions: Radiosurgery with doses >32.5 Gy in the healthy pig heart can induce circumscribed scars at the RSPV antrum noninvasively, mimicking the effect of catheter ablation. In our study we established a significant dose-response relationship for cardiac radiosurgery. The long-term effects and toxicity of such high radiation doses need further investigation in the pursuit of cardiac radiosurgery for noninvasive treatment of atrial fibrillation.

  4. Radiosurgery in gliomas (middle-line tumors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betti, O.O.; Rosler, R.

    1989-01-01

    The clinical experience is presented obtained from treatment with high-energy linac radiosurgery of 22 patients with stereotactically biopsed gliomas located in middle-line, from thalamus to brain stem and from infundibulum to pineo-tectal regions, during the period 1982-1987. (H.W.). 10 refs

  5. Linac based radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, T.R.

    2008-01-01

    The following topics were discussed: Definition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT); Stereo market; Indications for SRS/SRT; History of linac-based SRS/SRT; Variety of systems; QA for SRS; Localization; and Imaging. (P.A.)

  6. Treatment of trigeminal neuralgia with radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latorzeff, I.; Redon, A.; Debono, B.; Sol, J.C.; Menegalli, D.; Mertens, P.; Muracciole, X.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia is defined as brief paroxysms of pain limited to the facial distribution of the trigeminal nerve. Drug therapy is considered to be the first-line of treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. Unfortunately, medical treatment does not always provide satisfactory pain relief for 25% of the patients. Moreover, the relief provided by drug therapy generally decreases over time, and increased dosages of these medications are limited because of side effects. In this case, patients can be offered several surgical approaches, such as percutaneous techniques (thermo-coagulation, micro-compression, glycerol injection) or microvascular decompression in the cerebello-pontine angle (Gardner-Jannetta's technique). In this indication, stereotactic radiosurgery, driven by teams using Gamma Knife R , has shown promising efficacy and tolerance to allow this treatment being truly part of trigeminal neuralgia treatment. Technological progresses now allow performing radiosurgery with ballistic and dosimetric processes optimized with stereotactic radiosurgery dedicated linear accelerators. This procedure supports frame implantation to guarantee targeting accuracy in accordance of elevated dose distribution. This article on trigeminal neuralgia treatment will review the different medical and surgical therapeutic options and specify the contemporary place of stereotactic radiosurgery in the light of its clinical results and tolerance aspects. (authors)

  7. Effect of a single session of ear acupuncture on pain intensity and postural control in individuals with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ushinohama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Ear Acupuncture (EA is a form of acupuncture in which needles are applied to the external ear and has been used in multiple painful conditions. Low back pain (LBP is highly prevalent in active individuals and causes high economic burden to health systems worldwide. LBP affects the person’s ability to keep balance, especially in challenging conditions. Objective The aim of the study was to examine the effects of a single session of EA on pain intensity and body sway during postural tasks. Method Eighty adults with LBP and pain intensity equal to or greater than 4 (0-10 scale were randomly allocated (1:1 to EA group (EAG or placebo group (PG. Initially, the level of pain intensity was assessed. Next, participants stood still on a force plate either with feet in parallel or in semi-tandem and with eyes open or closed. Then, the EAG was treated with EA for 20 min and the PG was treated with detuned ultrasound. After the treatment, pain intensity was assessed again and the postural test was repeated. Pain intensity was the primary outcome and center of pressure sway area and speed were the secondary outcomes measured. Results Results revealed that pain intensity decreased in both groups after treatment, but decreased more in the EAG. For postural control, no effect of treatment and no interaction between treatment and postural condition on body sway were found. Conclusion Those findings indicate that EA is better than placebo to reduce pain, but neither treatment has any effect on postural control.

  8. Effects of a Single-Session Cognitive Enhancement Fitness Program on Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels and Cognitive Function in Middle-Aged Women

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    Hyun Jun Kim, Sang Yeoup Lee, Hwa Gyeong Lee, Yang Hee Cho, Eun Mi Ko

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have been undertaken to develop cognitive functional improvement-focused exercise programs and determine their effect. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of a cognitive enhancement fitness program (CEFP on short-term memory and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels according to the cognitive state in middle-aged women. A total of 30 healthy volunteers aged 40–59 years were divided into two groups, that is, a mild cognitive impairment (MCI group and a non-MCI group based on results from the Korean Dementia Screening Questionnaire. A single-session CEFP was conducted over 50 min and consisted of four parts: warm-up, low intensity interval circulation dance exercises, moderate intensity resistance exercises using elastic bands, and cool-down. Serum BDNF levels were measured by ELISA and short-term memory determined by forward digit/word span test was assessed before and after CEFP. After CEFP, forward digit/word span test scores and BDNF levels increased to median 119.2%/115.1% and 118.7%, respectively. After CEFP, the MCI and non-MCI groups produced higher forward digit span test scores (from 6.7 ± 1.5 to 7.5 ± 1.4 points, p = 0.023 and from 6.2 ± 2.0 to 7.0 ± 2.1 points, P=0.011, respectively. After CEFP, forward word span scores and BDNF levels increased (from 3.5 ± 1.7 to 4.6 ± 1.8 points, p = 0.029 and from 610.8 ± 221.1 to 757.9 ± 267.9 pg/ml, p = 0.017, respectively in non-MCI group only. No group differences were observed between change in short-term memory and change in BDNF. Short-term memory and BDNF levels after CEFP were found to be negatively correlated with age, but pre- to post-intervention changes in short-term memory and BDNF were not. The present study shows that a single, 50-minute CEFP improved short-term memory and increased serum BDNF levels in healthy middle-aged women, especially those without MCI.

  9. A randomized, placebo-controlled double-blinded comparative clinical study of five over-the-counter non-pharmacological topical analgesics for myofascial pain: single session findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avrahami Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To investigate the effects of topical agents for the treatment of Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS and Myofascial Trigger Point (MTRP. Methods Subjects with an identifiable trigger point in the trapezius muscle, age 18-80 were recruited for a single-session randomized, placebo-blinded clinical study. Baseline measurements of trapezius muscle pressure pain threshold (PPT: by pressure algometer along with right and left cervical lateral flexion (rangiometer were obtained by a blinded examiner. An assessor blinded to the outcomes assessments applied one of 6 topical formulations which had been placed in identical plastic containers. Five of these topicals were proposed active formulations; the control group was given a non-active formulation (PLA. Five minutes after the application of the formula the outcome measures were re-tested. Data were analyzed with a 5-way ANOVA and Holms-adjusted t-tests with an alpha level of 0.05. Results 120 subjects were entered into the study (63 females; ages 16-82; 20 subjects randomly allocated into each group. The pre- and post-treatment results for pressure threshold did show significant intra-group increases for the Ben-Gay Ultra Strength Muscle Pain Ointment (BG, the Professional Therapy MuscleCare Roll-on (PTMC roll-on and Motion Medicine Cream (MM with an increased threshold of 0.5 kg/cm2 (+/-0.15, 0.72 kg/cm2 (+/-0.17 and 0.47 Kg/cm2 (+/-0.19 respectively. With respect to the inter-group comparisons, PTMC roll-on showed significant increases in pressure threshold compared with Placebo (PLA (p = 0.002 and Icy Hot Extra Strength Cream (IH (p = 0.006. In addition, BG demonstrated significant increases in pressure threshold compared with PLA (p = 0.0003. Conclusions With regards to pressure threshold, PTMC roll-on, BG and MM showed significant increases in pain threshold tolerance after a short-term application on a trigger points located in the trapezius muscle. PTMC roll-on and BG were both

  10. Treat high cervical spinal arteriovenous malformation with Cyberknife radiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fen Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of CyberKnife radiosurgery in the treatment of accidentally found cervical spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM. We present the case of a patient with cervical spinal AVM, who developed progressive neck pain, gait disturbance, urine and stool incontinence 2 weeks after the fell down accident. The patient underwent CyberKnife radiosurgery. After CyberKnife radiosurgery for 2 years, the patient′s neck pain diminished and was able to keep the walk without any assistance. The management of cervical spinal AVM varies. This patient demonstrated a successful treatment of cervical spinal AVM with CyberKnife radiosurgery.

  11. Brain tumor radiosurgery. Current status and strategies to enhance the effect of radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niranjan, A.; Lunsford, L.D.; Gobbel, G.T.; Kondziolka, D.; Maitz, A.; Flickinger, J.C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    First, the current status of brain tumor radiosurgery is reviewed, and radiosurgery for brain tumors, including benign tumors, malignant tumors, primary glial tumors, and metastatic tumors, is described. Rapid developments in neuroimaging, stereotactic techniques, and robotic technology in the last decade have contributed to improved results and wider applications of radiosurgery. Radiosurgery has become the preferred management modality for many intracranial tumors, including schwannomas, meningiomas, and metastatic tumors. Although radiosurgery provides survival benefits in patients with diffuse malignant brain tumors, cure is still not possible. Microscopic tumor infiltration into surrounding normal tissue is the main cause of recurrence. Additional strategies are needed to specifically target tumor cells. Next, strategies to enhance the effect of radiosurgery are reviewed. Whereas the long-term clinical results of radiosurgery have established its role in the treatment of benign tumors, additional strategies are needed to improve cell killing in malignant brain tumors and to protect normal surrounding brain. The first strategy included the use of various agents to protect normal brain while delivering a high dose to the tumor cells, but finding an effective radioprotective agent has been problematic. Pentobarbital and 21-aminosteroid (21-AS) are presented as examples. The second strategy for radiation protection aimed at the repair of radiation-induced damage to the normal brain. The cause of radiation-induced breakdown of normal tissue is unclear. The white matter and the cerebral vasculature appear to be particularly susceptible to radiation. Oligodendrocytes and endothelial cells may be critical targets of radiation. The authors hypothesize that radiation-induced damage to these cell types can be repaired by neural stem cells. They also describe the use of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and neural stem cells as a means of enhancing the effect of

  12. Does a single session of high-intensity interval training provoke a transient elevated risk of falling in seniors and adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donath, Lars; Kurz, Eduard; Roth, Ralf; Hanssen, Henner; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Zahner, Lukas; Faude, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Balance and strength training can reduce seniors' fall risk up to 50%. Available evidence suggests that acute bouts of neuromuscular and endurance exercise deteriorate postural control. High-intensity endurance training has been successfully applied in different populations. Thus, it seemed valuable to examine the acute effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on neuromuscular performance in seniors and young adults. The acute impact of a HIIT session on balance performance and muscle activity after exercise cessation and during post-exercise recovery was examined in young and old adults. We intended to investigate whether a transient exercise-induced fall-risk may occur in both groups. 20 healthy seniors (age 70 (SD 4) years) and young adults (age 27 (SD 3) years) were examined on 3 days. After exhaustive ramp-like treadmill testing in order to determine maximal heart rate (HRmax) on the first day, either a 4 × 4 min HIIT at 90% of HRmax or a control condition (CON) was randomly performed on the second and third day, respectively. Balance performance (postural sway) was assessed during single limb stance with open eyes (SLEO) and double limb stance with closed eyes (DLEC). EMG was recorded for the soleus (SOL), anterior tibialis (TIB), gastrocnemius (GM) and peroneus longus (PL) muscles at the dominant leg. All measures were collected before, immediately as well as 10, 30 and 45 min after HIIT and CON, respectively. Compared to CON, HIIT induced significant increases of postural sway immediately after exercise cessation during SLEO in both groups (adults: p HIIT (post: p = 0.003, Δ = +14% sway, 10 min post: p = 0.004, Δ = +18% sway). Muscle activity was increased during SLEO for TIB until 10 min post in seniors (0.008 HIIT in adults (p HIIT training may cause an acute 'open-fall-window' with a transient impairment of balance performance for at least 10 min after exercise cessation in both groups. Occluded vision in seniors seems to prolong this period

  13. Stereotactic radiosurgery with an upper partial denture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayama, Shusaku; Kunieda, Etsuo; Takeda, Atsushi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Oku, Yohei

    2009-01-01

    A 54-year-old male with partial denture underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with an infrared camera-guided system for a metastatic brain tumor arising from lung cancer. Although this method utilizes a biteplate mounted on the upper jaw to detect head movement, the patient only had four teeth in his upper jaw. In order to stabilize the biteplate, the maxillary denture was fixed to the biteplate with an autopolymerizing resin. In addition, the rest-occlusal position of the lower jaw was impressed on the inferior surface of the biteplate with an autopolymerizing resin. To assess reproducibility and stability, the distance between the left and right incus and left and right markers was measured during pre-planning, as well as before and after stereotactic irradiation. Wearing the biteplate ensures the accuracy of radiotherapy planning for the implementation of radiosurgery in patients who have many maxillary teeth missing. However, a large degree of error was observed when the biteplate was removed. (author)

  14. [Inter-session-processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeck, Almut; Hartmann, Armin; Orlinsky, David

    2004-06-01

    We do not know much about how patients internalize, remember or use psychotherapeutic experiences between psychotherapy sessions and how they use them for change. What happens with in-session-experiences after a session ("inter-session-process") is of main importance for outcome. The inter-session-process describes the work on psychotherapy between sessions. Although inter-session-processes are a central element connecting psychotherapy process and outcome, they remain a neglected area of research. Previous studies examined individual outpatient settings only. This paper gives an overview over theory, instruments for measurement, previous studies and relevance of inter-session-processes for the field of psychotherapy research.

  15. Laser and radiosurgery in veterinary dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Lasers and radiosurgery frequently used in human dentistry are rapidly entering veterinary dental use. The carbon dioxide, diode, and low-level therapy lasers have features including hemostasis control, access to difficult to reach areas, and decreased pain, that make them useful for oral surgery. Periodontal pocket surgery, gingivectomy, gingivoplasty, gingival hyperplasia, operculectomy, tongue surgery, oropharyngeal inflammation therapy, oral mass surgery, crown, and frenectomy laser surgeries are described, including images. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Interstitial photonic radiosurgery for brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Osami; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Iseki, Hiroshi; Hori, Tomokatsu; Takakura, Kintomo [Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan). Neurological Inst.

    1999-12-01

    The photon radiosurgery system (PRS) is a developed of the Photo-electron Corp. of Walham, Mass. The heart of this system is a thin needle, 3 mm in diameter and 100 mm long, from whose tip low-energy X-ray photon are isotropically emitted. This apparatus is a compact radiosurgery system that irradiates soft X ray from the tip of its small probe (weight of the machine=1.9 Kg). The PRS can be used either with a stereotactic frame or during a craniotomy as interstitial radiotherapy. The PRS is able to irradiate 15 Gy at the portion of 1.5 cm from the center for about 20 minutes and avoid severe damage to surrounding normal brain because of steep dose distribution curve. Because this system emits low-energy photons, almost the x-rays are attenuated in the patient. For a treatment of this system, dose rates outside the patient are close to background radiation levels. No special shielding of the patient or health care personnel is required. Basic examination of this system was done. C 6 cell line of Glioma was irradiated by PRS in vitro. A majority of tumor cells were died after 24 hrs. This time we estimated the effect of the PRS for brain tumors. We underwent the PRS to 72 patients from June 1995 to May 1999. Sixty-eight patients underwent intraoperative irradiation after removal and 4 patients had interstitial irradiation after stereotactic biopsy. All 16 cases of primary anaplastic astrocytomas survived and demonstrated good Karnofski performance scale. Median survival tomes of 17 primary cases of glioblastoma is 14 month. Two cases of malignant lymphoma showed complete remission in CT scan 24 hours after intraoperative radiosurgery using PRS and 2 cases of germ cell tumor demonstrated dramatic decrease of tumor size in a short period. There was no definite newly neurological deficit. The intraoperative radiosurgery using PRS is useful adjuvant therapy for brain tumors. (author)

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obedian, E.; Lotbiniere, A.C.J. de; Haffty, B.G.; Piepmeier, J.M.; Fischer, D.B.; Knisely, J.P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the influence of several prognostic factors on overall survival and progression free survival in patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. Materials and Methods: Records of 61 coecutive patients with pathologically confirmed extra-cranial malignancies undergoing SRS at Yale University School of Medicine between 12/18/91 and 7/2/96 were reviewed. All patients underwent head frame localization and CT and/or MRI based treatment planning. Outcome was analyzed with respect to age, number of lesions, size of lesions, location of lesions, site and stage of primary tumor, status of primary tumor at time of SRS, history of whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT), surgery, and/or chemotherapy prior to or after SRS, delay in SRS from diagnosis of brain metastases, dose of radiation delivered, and brain metastasis free interval. Both overall survival and progression free survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Tests for statistical significance were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Median follow-up was 29 months. 3% ((8(61))) of patients displayed evidence of progressive disease at the site of SRS, and 87% ((53(61))) of patients have died. Overall and progression free survival rates for the entire cohort of patients were 43.8% and 89.5% at 1 year and 11.1% and 71.4% at 2 years, respectively. Patients undergoing SRS for a solitary brain metastasis had a significant improvement in overall survival with 1 year survival rates of 52.6% vs. 32.7% for patients undergoing SRS for more than 1 brain metastasis (p=0.002). Patients who presented with progressive systemic disease at the time of SRS had an inferior overall survival with a 1 year survival rate of 15.4% compared to patients with presumed/known stable disease who had a 1 year survival rate of 51.5%/54.2% (p<0.001). Patients treated for cerebral metastases had a higher progression free survival compared to patients undergoing SRS

  18. CyberKnife radiosurgery: Precision without incision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enja Siva Prasad Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery system is an innovative, effective, frameless, non-invasive substitute for conventional surgical treatment of cancer. It works on the principle of stereotaxy. It is used for the treatment of both cancerous and non-cancerous tumors, intracranial lesions, tumors of lung, spine, prostate, and kidney, recurrent cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma, arteriovenous malformation, and trigeminal neuralgia. It has an advantage over other systems like Gamma knife radiosurgery and linear accelerator (LINAC-based systems, as it is frameless, has submillimeter accuracy, does not affect the normal cells adjacent to the lesion, and tracks the lesion in synchronization with the patient′s respiratory rate. The future of CyberKnife encompasses possibilities such as incremental improvements in accuracy and better shaping of the field of radiation and would certainly allow extension of radiosurgery as an effective substitute for chemotherapy. This paper aims to review and highlight the immense potential that CyberKnife holds in the field of dentistry in treating disorders of the head and neck region, thereby ensuring enhanced longevity for the patients.

  19. Geometrically based optimization for extracranial radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ruiguo; Wagner, Thomas H; Buatti, John M; Modrick, Joseph; Dill, John; Meeks, Sanford L

    2004-01-01

    For static beam conformal intracranial radiosurgery, geometry of the beam arrangement dominates overall dose distribution. Maximizing beam separation in three dimensions decreases beam overlap, thus maximizing dose conformality and gradient outside of the target volume. Webb proposed arrangements of isotropically convergent beams that could be used as the starting point for a radiotherapy optimization process. We have developed an extracranial radiosurgery optimization method by extending Webb's isotropic beam arrangements to deliverable beam arrangements. This method uses an arrangement of N maximally separated converging vectors within the space available for beam delivery. Each bouquet of isotropic beam vectors is generated by a random sampling process that iteratively maximizes beam separation. Next, beam arrangement is optimized for critical structure avoidance while maintaining minimal overlap between beam entrance and exit pathways. This geometrically optimized beam set can then be used as a template for either conformal beam or intensity modulated extracranial radiosurgery. Preliminary results suggest that using this technique with conformal beam planning provides high plan conformality, a steep dose gradient outside of the tumour volume and acceptable critical structure avoidance in the majority of clinical cases

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery: basic concepts and current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, Maheep Singh

    2016-01-01

    Term Stereotactic Radiosurgery was coined by Prof Lars Leksell in 1951 as concept. Leksell's experimented together with the radiobiologist Borje Larsson in Uppsala, on trying to develop 'stereotactic radiosurgery', aimed at lesioning in the central brain in functional operations such as thalamotomy and capsulotomy. Clinical experiments using a proton beam were initiated at the Gustav Werner Institute in Uppsala, and a few patients had been treated. Experiences from these led Leksell to design a multi-source 'beam knife', which became ready for use in 1967 as the first 'Gamma Knife' and installed at the private hospital Sophiahammet in Stockholm as a clinical research unit. Moving from functional neurosurgery today Gamma knife is used for a wide range on brain tumors, vascular malformations and functional disorders. Introduction of newer technology in navigation and radiation delivery has made it possible to do whole body Radiosurgery. Various technologies, basic principles, radiobiological aspects and applications will be discussed. (author)

  1. Principles and practice of gamma knife radiosurgery: a review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data sources: A retrospective MEDLINE search was used to find all gamma knife radiosurgery studies published from 1967 to 12th March 2005 and strict inclusion criteria were applied. Study selection: Limited to the review articles in the human study with the key word of gamma knife radiosurgery. Data extraction: In each ...

  2. Potential role for LINAC-based stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of 5 or more radioresistant melanoma brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frakes, Jessica M; Figura, Nicholas B; Ahmed, Kamran A; Juan, Tzu-Hua; Patel, Neha; Latifi, Kujtim; Sarangkasiri, Siriporn; Strom, Tobin J; Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Rao, Nikhil G; Etame, Arnold B

    2015-11-01

    Linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a treatment option for patients with melanoma in whom brain metastases have developed. Very limited data are available on treating patients with ≥5 lesions. The authors sought to determine the effectiveness of SRS in patients with ≥5 melanoma brain metastases. A retrospective analysis of metastatic melanoma treated with SRS in a single treatment session for ≥5 lesions was performed. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were reviewed post-SRS to evaluate local control (LC). Disease progression on imaging was defined using the 2009 Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Survival curves were calculated from the date of brain metastases diagnosis or the date of SRS by using the Kaplan-Meier (KM) method. Univariate and multivariate analysis (UVA and MVA, respectively) were performed using the Cox proportional-hazards model. The authors identified 149 metastatic brain lesions treated in 28 patients. The median patient age was 60.5 years (range 38-83 years), and the majority of patients (24 [85.7%]) had extracranial metastases. Four patients (14.3%) had received previous whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), and 11 (39.3%) had undergone previous SRS. The median planning target volume (PTV) was 0.34 cm3 (range 0.01-12.5 cm3). Median follow-up was 6.3 months (range 1-46 months). At the time of treatment, 7% of patients were categorized as recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class I, 89% as RPA Class II, and 4% as RPA Class III. The rate of local failure was 11.4%. Kaplan-Meier LC estimates at 6 and 12 months were 91.3% and 82.2%, respectively. A PTV volume≥0.34 cm3 was a significant predictor of local failure on UVA (HR 16.1, 95% CI 3.2-292.6, ptreatment. The RPA class was a significant predictor of KM OS estimates from the date of treatment (p=0.02). Patients who did not receive WBRT after SRS treatment had decreased OS on MVA (HR 3.5, 95% CI 1.1-12.0, p=0.03), and patients who did not

  3. Linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery for melanoma brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Melanoma is one of the most common malignancies to metastasize to the brain. Many patients with this disease will succumb to central nervous system (CNS disease, highlighting the importance of effective local treatment of brain metastases for both palliation and survival of the disease. Our objective was to evaluate the outcomes associated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS in the treatment of melanoma brain metastases. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 54 patients with a total of 103 tumors treated with SRS. Twenty patients had prior surgical resection and nine patients underwent prior whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT. 71% of patients had active extracranial disease at the time of SRS. Median number of tumors treated with SRS was 1(range: 1-6 with median radiosurgery tumor volume 2.1 cm 3 (range: 0.05-59.7 cm 3 . The median dose delivered to the 80% isodose line was 24 Gy in a single fraction. Results: The median follow-up from SRS was five months (range:1-30 months. Sixty-five percent of patients had a follow-up MRI available for review. Actuarial local control at six months and 12 months was 87 and 68%, respectively. Eighty-one percent of patients developed new distant brain metastases at a median time of two months. The six-month and 12-month actuarial overall survival rates were 50 and 25%, respectively. The only significant predictor of overall survival was surgical resection prior to SRS. Post-SRS bleeding occurred in 18% of patients and at a median interval of 1.5 months. There was only one episode of radiation necrosis with no other treatment-related toxicity. Conclusion: SRS for brain metastases from melanoma is safe and achieves acceptable local control.

  4. Stereotactic radiosurgery for medically refractory multiple sclerosis-related tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Sudesh S; Niranjan, Ajay; Monaco, Edward A; Flickinger, John C; Lunsford, L Dade

    2017-06-30

    OBJECTIVE Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disease that can lead to severe intention tremor in some patients. In several case reports, conventional radiotherapy has been reported to possibly exacerbate MS. Radiosurgery dramatically limits normal tissue irradiation to potentially avoid such a problem. Gamma Knife thalamotomy (GKT) has been established as a minimally invasive technique that is effective in treating essential tremor and Parkinson's disease-related tremor. The goal in this study was to analyze the outcomes of GKT in patients suffering from medically refractory MS-related tremor. METHODS The authors retrospectively studied the outcomes of 15 patients (mean age 46.5 years) who had undergone GKT over a 15-year period (1998-2012). Fourteen patients underwent GKT at a median maximum dose of 140 Gy (range 130-150 Gy) using a single 4-mm isocenter. One patient underwent GKT at a dose of 140 Gy delivered via two 4-mm isocenters (3 mm apart). The posteroinferior region of the nucleus ventralis intermedius (VIM) was the target for all GKTs. The Fahn-Tolosa-Marin clinical tremor rating scale was used to evaluate tremor, handwriting, drawing, and drinking. The median time to the last follow-up was 39 months. RESULTS After GKT, 13 patients experienced tremor improvement on the side contralateral to surgery. Four patients noted tremor arrest at a median of 4.5 months post-GKT. Seven patients had excellent tremor improvement and 6 had good tremor improvement. Four patients noted excellent functional improvement, 8 noted good functional improvement, and 1 noted satisfactory functional improvement. Three patients experienced diminished tremor relief at a median of 18 months after radiosurgery. Two patients experienced temporary adverse radiation effects. Another patient developed a large thalamic cyst 60 months after GKT, which was successfully managed with Ommaya reservoir placement. CONCLUSIONS Gamma Knife thalamotomy was found to be a minimally

  5. Characterizing and modeling web sessions with applications

    OpenAIRE

    Chiarandini, Luca

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the analysis and modeling of web sessions, groups of requests made by a single user for a single navigation purpose. Understanding how people browse through websites is important, helping us to improve interfaces and provide to better content. After first conducting a statistical analysis of web sessions, we go on to present algorithms to summarize and model web sessions. Finally, we describe applications that use novel browsing methods, in particular parallel...

  6. Balance maintenance as an acquired motor skill: Delayed gains and robust retention after a single session of training in a virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elion, Orit; Sela, Itamar; Bahat, Yotam; Siev-Ner, Itzhak; Weiss, Patrice L Tamar; Karni, Avi

    2015-06-03

    Does the learning of a balance and stability skill exhibit time-course phases and transfer limitations characteristic of the acquisition and consolidation of voluntary movement sequences? Here we followed the performance of young adults trained in maintaining balance while standing on a moving platform synchronized with a virtual reality road travel scene. The training protocol included eight 3 min long iterations of the road scene. Center of Pressure (CoP) displacements were analyzed for each task iteration within the training session, as well as during tests at 24h, 4 weeks and 12 weeks post-training to test for consolidation phase ("offline") gains and assess retention. In addition, CoP displacements in reaction to external perturbations were assessed before and after the training session and in the 3 subsequent post-training assessments (stability tests). There were significant reductions in CoP displacements as experience accumulated within session, with performance stabilizing by the end of the session. However, CoP displacements were further reduced at 24h post-training (delayed "offline" gains) and these gains were robustly retained. There was no transfer of the practice-related gains to performance in the stability tests. The time-course of learning the balance maintenance task, as well as the limitation on generalizing the gains to untrained conditions, are in line with the results of studies of manual movement skill learning. The current results support the conjecture that a similar repertoire of basic neuronal mechanisms of plasticity may underlay skill (procedural, "how to" knowledge) acquisition and skill memory consolidation in voluntary and balance maintenance tasks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Successful single-session endosonography-based endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography without fluoroscopy in pregnant patients with suspected choledocholithiasis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Sheba; Holt, Edward W; Bhat, Yasser M; Kane, Steve; Shah, Janak N; Binmoeller, Kenneth F

    2014-02-01

    Same session endosonography (EUS) immediately prior to scheduled endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) may eliminate the need for ERCP and its associated risks in pregnant patients with no evidence of choledocholithiasis on EUS. In patients with choledocholithiasis, EUS provides information regarding the location, size and number of stones present, which helps guide biliary interventions and confirm stone clearance without the use of fluoroscopy. We retrospectively identified 10 pregnant patients referred to our tertiary endoscopy center for suspected choledocholithiasis between June 2008 and January 2012. All patients underwent same-session EUS-based ERCP. Of 10 pregnant patients managed with EUS-guided ERCP, six were found to have common bile duct stones and went on to ERCP. Four patients with no evidence of choledocholithiasis on EUS did not undergo ERCP. Patients with confirmed choledocholithiasis underwent ERCP without the use of fluoroscopy using the additional information provided by EUS. Same-session EUS immediately prior to scheduled ERCP may eliminate the need for ERCP and its risks in pregnant patients with no evidence of choledocholithiasis on EUS. In patients with confirmed choledocholithiasis, EUS provided additional information regarding the location, number and size of bile duct stones, which enabled the successful clearance of the bile duct without the use of fluoroscopy. © 2013 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  8. Radiosurgery for epilepsy: Systematic review and International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society (ISRS) practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigal, Aileen; Sahgal, Arjun; De Salles, Antonio; Hayashi, Motohiro; Levivier, Marc; Ma, Lijun; Martinez, Roberto; Paddick, Ian; Ryu, Samuel; Slotman, Ben J; Régis, Jean

    2017-11-01

    While there are many reports of radiosurgery for treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy, a literature review is lacking. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize current literature on the use of stereotactic radiosurgery (RS) for treatment of epilepsy. Literature search was performed using various combinations of the search terms "radiosurgery", "stereotactic radiosurgery", "Gamma Knife", "epilepsy" and "seizure", from 1990 until October 2015. Level of evidence was assessed according to the PRISMA guidelines. Fifty-five articles fulfilled inclusion criteria. Level 2 evidence (prospective studies) was available for the clinical indications of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) treated by Gamma Knife (GK) RS. For remaining indications including corpus callosotomy as palliative treatment, epilepsy related to cavernous malformation and extra-temporal epilepsy, only Level 4 data was available (case report, prospective observational study, or retrospective case series). No Level 1 evidence was available. Based on level 2 evidence, RS is an efficacious treatment to control seizures in MTLE, possibly resulting in superior neuropsychological outcomes and quality of life metrics in selected subjects compared to microsurgery. RS has a better risk-benefit ratio for small hypothalamic hamartomas compared to surgical methods Delayed therapeutic effect resulting in ongoing seizures is associated with morbidity and mortality risk. Lack of level 1 evidence precludes the formation of guidelines at present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery for Spinal Metastatic Disease: An Evidence-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Hall

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal metastasis is a problem that afflicts many cancer patients. Traditionally, conventional fractionated radiation therapy and/or surgery have been the most common approaches for managing such patients. Through technical advances in radiotherapy, high dose radiation with extremely steep drop off can now be delivered to a limited target volume along the spine under image-guidance with very high precision. This procedure, known as stereotactic body radiosurgery, provides a technique to rapidly treat selected spinal metastasis patients with single- or limited-fraction treatments that have similar to superior efficacies compared with more established approaches. This review describes current treatment systems in use to deliver stereotactic body radiosurgery as well as results of some of the larger case series from a number of institutions that report outcomes of patients treated for spinal metastatic disease. These series include nearly 1400 patients and report a cumulative local control rate of 90% with myelopathy risk that is significantly less than 1%. Based on this comprehensive review of the literature, we believe that stereotactic body radiosurgery is an established treatment modality for patients with spinal metastatic disease that is both safe and highly effective.

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery may contribute to overall survival for patients with recurrent head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Koji; Sato, Kengo; Horie, Akihisa; Iketani, Susumu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Nakatani, Yasunori; Sato, Junichi; Hamada, Yoshiki

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment of advanced, recurrent lesions for head and neck carcinoma both with and without lymph node involvement. Between April 2006 and July 2007, 22 patients (mean age 67 years) with advanced, recurrent head and neck carcinoma were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. All of the patients except one had biopsy confirmed disease prior to stereotactic radiosurgery. Patients included 3 rT2, 8 rT3, and 9 rT4; 8 of the patients had lymph node metastases. Marginal SRS doses were 20-42 Gy delivered in two to five fractions. Starting one month after SRS, all patients received S-1 oral chemotherapy for one year. At an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 4-39 months), for the 14 locally recurrent patients without lymph node metastases, 9 patients (64.3%) had a complete response (CR), 1 patient (7.1%) had a partial response (PR), 1 patient (7.1%) had stable disease (SD), and 3 patients (21.4%) had progressive disease (PD). For the 8 patients with lymph node metastases, 1 patient with a single retropharyngeal (12.5%) had CR; the remaining 7 patients (87.5%) all progressed. Nine patients have died from their cancer. The overall actuarial 2-year survival for the patients with and without lymph node metastases is 12.5% and 78.6%, respectively. These results show the benefit of stereotactic radiosurgery salvage treatment for advanced, recurrent lesions, without lymph node metastases in previously irradiated head and neck cancer

  11. Implementation of a lung radiosurgery program: technical considerations and quality assurance in an Australian institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Shankar; MacManus, Michael; Ball, David; Chesson, Brent; Aarons, Yolanda; Clements, Natalie; Kron, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    The Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre has established a stereotactic lung radiosurgery program for the treatment of isolated lung metastases. The aim of this study was to critically assess the technical feasibility of performing stereotactic lung radiosurgery in an Australian institution. A single 26-Gy fraction of radiotherapy was delivered to patients with positron emission tomography (PET) staged solitary lung metastases. Motion management was addressed using four-dimensional computed tomographic simulation, and cone beam CT (CBCT) online soft-tissue matching. Treatments were with multiple coplanar and non-coplanar asymmetric beams. Patients were immobilised in a dedicated stereotactic body cradle. Quality assurance (QA) of treatment plans with both ion chamber and film measurements was performed accounting for patient-specific respiratory motion. Between February 2010 and February 2011, nine patients received stereotactic lung radiosurgery. One grade 1 toxicity and one grade 2 toxicity were recorded after treatment. The mean planning target volume was 22.6 cc. A median of eight beams were delivered per treatment plan (range 7–10) with a median of two non-coplanar beams (range 0–6). At treatment plan QA, the difference between planned and delivered dose was ≤1.76% in all static and dynamic ion chamber recordings. A mid-treatment CBCT was performed at a median time of 21 min, with the mean displacement discrepancy from initial set-up being 0.4 mm (range 0–2 mm). Stereotactic radiosurgery to the lung was both feasible and tolerable at our institution. Intrafractional immobilisation within 2 mm was reproducible. Excellent concordance between planned and delivered treatments was achieved in the phantom QA.

  12. Effectiveness of Single Session of Low-Level Laser Therapy with a 940 nm Wavelength Diode Laser on Pain, Swelling, and Trismus After Impacted Third Molar Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Cennet Neslihan; Keskin Tunc, Serap

    2016-09-01

    In low-level laser therapy (LLLT), applications are generally performed in repetitive sessions using wavelengths of around 800 nm, at which the depth of penetration of laser is greater. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of LLLT with a 940 nm diode laser, which was performed extraorally on all the primarily and secondarily affected areas immediately after surgery in a single session, on pain, swelling, and trismus that occurred after impacted tooth extraction. Thirty-five outpatients with similarly impacted lower third molars on both sides were selected. The teeth of patients were removed in two separate operations. Postoperatively, the patients received laser therapy with energy of 4 J/cm(2) on one side and no laser energy was applied to the other side (placebo side). Swelling, trismus, and subjective assessment of pain on a visual analog scale were evaluated and compared between the laser-treated and placebo sides. There was no statistically significant difference in pain, swelling, or trismus between the sides (Mann-Whitney U test p > 0.05). However, according to the clinical outcomes, swelling and trismus were less in the laser-treated side than in the placebo side. A single-session LLLT that would be applied with a diode laser immediately after impacted tooth extraction might help patients to be less affected by postoperative trismus and swelling.

  13. Stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal metastases: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joaquim, Andrei Fernandes; Ghizoni, Enrico; Tedeschi, Helder; Pereira, Eduardo Baldon; Giacomini, Leonardo Abdala

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The spine is the most common location for bone metastases. Since cure is not possible, local control and relief of symptoms is the basis for treatment, which is grounded on the use of conventional radiotherapy. Recently, spinal radiosurgery has been proposed for the local control of spinal metastases, whether as primary or salvage treatment. Consequently, we carried out a literature review in order to analyze the indications, efficacy, and safety of radiosurgery in the treatment of spinal metastases. Methods: We have reviewed the literature using the PubMed gateway with data from the Medline library on studies related to the use of radiosurgery in treatment of bone metastases in spine. The studies were reviewed by all the authors and classified as to level of evidence, using the criterion defined by Wright. Results: The indications found for radiosurgery were primary control of epidural metastases (evidence level II), myeloma (level III), and metastases known to be poor responders to conventional radiotherapy – melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (level III). Spinal radiosurgery was also proposed for salvage treatment after conventional radiotherapy (level II). There is also some evidence as to the safety and efficacy of radiosurgery in cases of extramedullar and intramedullar intradural metastatic tumors (level III) and after spinal decompression and stabilization surgery. Conclusion: Radiosurgery can be used in primary or salvage treatment of spinal metastases, improving local disease control and patient symptoms. It should also be considered as initial treatment for radioresistant tumors, such as melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. (author)

  14. Risk factors for local failure requiring salvage neurosurgery after radiosurgery for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weltman, Eduardo; Hanriot, Rodrigo de Morais; Prisco, Flavio Eduardo; Nadalin, Wladimir; Brandt, Reynaldo Andre; Moreira, Frederico Rafael

    2004-01-01

    Objective: the aim of this study is to select the risk factors for local failure requiring salvage neurosurgery in patients with brain metastases treated with stereotactic radiosurgery in a single institution. Methods: the follow-up of 123 patients, with 255 brain metastases treated with radiosurgery at the Radiation Oncology Department of the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein from July 1993 to August 2001, was retrospectively analyzed. The criteria for salvage neurosurgery were tumor volume enlargement, or tumor persistence leading to severe neurological symptoms, life threatening situation or critical steroid dependence. We considered the case as local failure when the histopathologic evaluation showed morphologically preserved cancer cells (tumor recurrence, persistence or progression). We applied the Fisher's exact test to evaluate the statistical correlation between local failure and primary tumor histology, volume of the brain metastases, prescribed radiosurgery dose, and whole brain radiotherapy. Results: fourteen of 123 patients (11%) underwent salvage neurosurgery. Histology showed preserved cancer cells with necrosis and/or bleeding in 11 cases (9% of the total accrual), and only necrosis with or without bleeding (without preserved cancer cells) in three cases. The primary tumor histology among the 11 patients considered with active neoplasia was malignant melanoma in five cases (21% of the patients with melanoma), breast adenocarcinoma in three (16% of the patients with breast cancer), and other histology in the remaining three. Breast cancer diagnosis, non-elective whole brain irradiation, volume of the brain metastases, and the prescribed radiosurgery dose did not correlate with the risk of local failure. Patients treated with elective whole brain radiotherapy showed fewer local failures, when compared to all patients receiving whole brain radiotherapy, and to the patients not receiving this treatment, with incidence of failure in 4%,7% and 14

  15. Atlas-based functional radiosurgery: Early results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancanello, J.; Romanelli, P.; Pantelis, E.; Sebastiano, F.; Modugno, N. [Politecnico di Milano, Bioengineering Department and NEARlab, Milano, 20133 (Italy) and Siemens AG, Research and Clinical Collaborations, Erlangen, 91052 (Germany); Functional Neurosurgery Deptartment, Neuromed IRCCS, Pozzilli, 86077 (Italy); CyberKnife Center, Iatropolis, Athens, 15231 (Greece); Functional Neurosurgery Deptartment, Neuromed IRCCS, Pozzilli, 86077 (Italy)

    2009-02-15

    Functional disorders of the brain, such as dystonia and neuropathic pain, may respond poorly to medical therapy. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) and the centromedian nucleus of the thalamus (CMN) may alleviate dystonia and neuropathic pain, respectively. A noninvasive alternative to DBS is radiosurgical ablation [internal pallidotomy (IP) and medial thalamotomy (MT)]. The main technical limitation of radiosurgery is that targets are selected only on the basis of MRI anatomy, without electrophysiological confirmation. This means that, to be feasible, image-based targeting must be highly accurate and reproducible. Here, we report on the feasibility of an atlas-based approach to targeting for functional radiosurgery. In this method, masks of the GPi, CMN, and medio-dorsal nucleus were nonrigidly registered to patients' T1-weighted MRI (T1w-MRI) and superimposed on patients' T2-weighted MRI (T2w-MRI). Radiosurgical targets were identified on the T2w-MRI registered to the planning CT by an expert functional neurosurgeon. To assess its feasibility, two patients were treated with the CyberKnife using this method of targeting; a patient with dystonia received an IP (120 Gy prescribed to the 65% isodose) and a patient with neuropathic pain received a MT (120 Gy to the 77% isodose). Six months after treatment, T2w-MRIs and contrast-enhanced T1w-MRIs showed edematous regions around the lesions; target placements were reevaluated by DW-MRIs. At 12 months post-treatment steroids for radiation-induced edema and medications for dystonia and neuropathic pain were suppressed. Both patients experienced significant relief from pain and dystonia-related problems. Fifteen months after treatment edema had disappeared. Thus, this work shows promising feasibility of atlas-based functional radiosurgery to improve patient condition. Further investigations are indicated for optimizing treatment dose.

  16. Atlas-based functional radiosurgery: Early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancanello, J.; Romanelli, P.; Pantelis, E.; Sebastiano, F.; Modugno, N.

    2009-01-01

    Functional disorders of the brain, such as dystonia and neuropathic pain, may respond poorly to medical therapy. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) and the centromedian nucleus of the thalamus (CMN) may alleviate dystonia and neuropathic pain, respectively. A noninvasive alternative to DBS is radiosurgical ablation [internal pallidotomy (IP) and medial thalamotomy (MT)]. The main technical limitation of radiosurgery is that targets are selected only on the basis of MRI anatomy, without electrophysiological confirmation. This means that, to be feasible, image-based targeting must be highly accurate and reproducible. Here, we report on the feasibility of an atlas-based approach to targeting for functional radiosurgery. In this method, masks of the GPi, CMN, and medio-dorsal nucleus were nonrigidly registered to patients' T1-weighted MRI (T1w-MRI) and superimposed on patients' T2-weighted MRI (T2w-MRI). Radiosurgical targets were identified on the T2w-MRI registered to the planning CT by an expert functional neurosurgeon. To assess its feasibility, two patients were treated with the CyberKnife using this method of targeting; a patient with dystonia received an IP (120 Gy prescribed to the 65% isodose) and a patient with neuropathic pain received a MT (120 Gy to the 77% isodose). Six months after treatment, T2w-MRIs and contrast-enhanced T1w-MRIs showed edematous regions around the lesions; target placements were reevaluated by DW-MRIs. At 12 months post-treatment steroids for radiation-induced edema and medications for dystonia and neuropathic pain were suppressed. Both patients experienced significant relief from pain and dystonia-related problems. Fifteen months after treatment edema had disappeared. Thus, this work shows promising feasibility of atlas-based functional radiosurgery to improve patient condition. Further investigations are indicated for optimizing treatment dose.

  17. Monte Carlo dose distributions for radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perucha, M.; Leal, A.; Rincon, M.; Carrasco, E.

    2001-01-01

    The precision of Radiosurgery Treatment planning systems is limited by the approximations of their algorithms and by their dosimetrical input data. This fact is especially important in small fields. However, the Monte Carlo methods is an accurate alternative as it considers every aspect of particle transport. In this work an acoustic neurinoma is studied by comparing the dose distribution of both a planning system and Monte Carlo. Relative shifts have been measured and furthermore, Dose-Volume Histograms have been calculated for target and adjacent organs at risk. (orig.)

  18. The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) evidence-based review of the role of radiosurgery for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Minesh P.; Tsao, May N.; Whelan, Timothy J.; Morris, David E.; Hayman, James A.; Flickinger, John C.; Mills, Michael; Rogers, C. Leland; Souhami, Luis

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the evidence for the use of stereotactic radiosurgery in adult patients with brain metastases. Methods: Key clinical questions to be addressed in this evidence-based review were identified. Outcomes considered were overall survival, quality of life or symptom control, brain tumor control or response and toxicity. MEDLINE (1990-2004 June Week 2), CANCERLIT (1990-2003), CINAHL (1990-2004 June Week 2), EMBASE (1990-2004 Week 25), and the Cochrane library (2004 issue 2) databases were searched using OVID. In addition, the Physician Data Query clinical trials database, the proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) (1997-2004), ASTRO (1997-2004), and the European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) (1997-2003) were searched. Data from the literature search were reviewed and tabulated. This process included an assessment of the level of evidence. Results: For patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases, managed with whole-brain radiotherapy alone vs. whole-brain radiotherapy and radiosurgery boost, there were three randomized controlled trials, zero prospective studies, and seven retrospective series (which satisfied inclusion criteria). For patients with up to three (<4 cm) newly diagnosed brain metastases (and in one study up to four brain metastases), radiosurgery boost with whole-brain radiotherapy significantly improves local brain control rates as compared with whole-brain radiotherapy alone (Level I-III evidence). In one large randomized trial, survival benefit with whole-brain radiotherapy was observed in patients with single brain metastasis. In this trial, an overall increased ability to taper down on steroid dose and an improvement in Karnofsky performance status was seen in patients who were treated with radiosurgery boost as compared with patients treated with whole-brain radiotherapy alone. However, Level I evidence regarding overall quality of life outcomes using a validated

  19. Linear accelerator radiosurgery in treatment of central neurocytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.M.; Katati, M.; Arjona, V.; Lopez, E.; Olivares, G.; Hernandez, V.; Bullejos, J.A.; Arregui, G.; Busquier, H.; Minguez, A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to review our experience with stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of patients with residual neurocytomas after initial surgery. Between October 1996 and December 2001, four patients with central neurocytoma were treated by surgery and subsequently underwent linear accelerator (LINAC) radiosurgery. Two of the patients were cured, one exhibited a significant reduction in tumour size and the fourth remains stable. All four patients are alive and well. In cases of small residual tumours or recurrences radio-surgery allows open surgery to be avoided and is a safe and potentially effective approach. (author)

  20. Early Significant Tumor Volume Reduction After Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Results in Long-Term Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wook Ha; Kim, Dong Gyu; Han, Jung Ho; Paek, Sun Ha; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Chae-Yong; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Jin Wook; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate survival of patients with brain metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Between 1998 and 2010, 46 patients were treated with radiosurgery, and the total number of lesions was 99. The mean age was 58.9 years (range, 33–78 years). Twenty-six patients (56.5%) had a single brain metastasis. The mean tumor volume was 3.0 cm 3 (range, 0.01–35.1 cm 3 ), and the mean marginal dose prescribed was 20.8 Gy (range, 12–25 Gy) at the 50% isodose line. A patient was classified into the good-response group when the sum of the volume of the brain metastases decreased to less than 75% of the original volume at a 1-month follow-up evaluation using MRI. Results: As of December 28, 2010, 39 patients (84.8%) had died, and 7 (15.2%) survived. The overall median survival time was 10.0 ± 0.4 months (95% confidence interval, 9.1–10.8). After treatment, local tumor control was achieved in 72 (84.7%) of the 85 tumors assessed using MRI after radiosurgery. The good-response group survived significantly longer than the poor-response group (median survival times of 18.0 and 9.0 months, respectively; p = 0.025). In a multivariate analysis, classification in the good-response group was the only independent prognostic factor for longer survival (p = 0.037; hazard ratio = 0.447; 95% confidence interval, 0.209–0.953). Conclusions: Radiosurgery seems to be an effective treatment modality for patients with brain metastases from RCC. The early significant tumor volume reduction observed after radiosurgery seems to result in long-term survival in RCC patients with brain metastases.

  1. Acceptance, commissioning and quality control in radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toreti, Dalila Luzia

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic Radiosurgery is a treatment technique that uses narrow beams of radiation focused with great accuracy in a small lesion. The introduction of micro multi leaf collimators (mMLC) allows this technique to reach a higher degree of dose conformation of the target lesion allowing a smaller irradiation of critical structures and normal tissues. This paper presents the results of the acceptance tests and commissioning of a Varian 6EX linear accelerator dedicated to radiosurgery associated with the BrainLab micro multi leaf collimator installed in the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da USP (HC-FMUSP) and establish feasible quality assurance program for the services that employ this special technique. The results of the acceptance tests were satisfactory and are willing with the specifications provided by the manufacturer and the commissioning tests were within the international recommendations. The tests and measures that are part of quality control process should be specific to each treatment unit, and the need, frequency and levels of tolerance

  2. Imaging of arteriovenous malformation following stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranchida, J.V.; Mehall, C.J.; Slovis, T.L.; Lis-Planells, M.

    1997-01-01

    Background. Stereotactic radiosurgery allows for a high dose of focused radiation to be delivered to a small lesion such as an arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The clinical change and brain response over time to this localized high-dose radiation can be quite striking. Objective. The objective of this study to describe and analyse the imaging changes following radiotherapy for AVMs. Materials and methods. The clinical presentation and the imaging changes following radiotherapy in two patients were studied over the course of 1-2 years. Results. The imaging findings include diffuse low attenuation and contrast enhancement on CT. High-signal lesions were apparent on T2-weighted MR images with prominent contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images. Ring enhancement occurred over time. While new changes appeared over 12 months, these changes diminished during the second year. Conclusion. Radiotherapy induces inflammatory changes that are generally reversible but can lead to parenchymal destruction. These imaging changes are often nonspecific and therefore must be interpreted in light of clinical symptomatology and the time course since treatment. These patients should receive routine MR imaging within 3 months after radiosurgery with follow-up imaging at 6, 12, and 18 months. (orig.). With 8 figs

  3. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Theriault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S c,p ) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Results: Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 x 10 cm 2 field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S c,p within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone, respectively

  4. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Thériault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S(c,p)) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 × 10 cm(2) field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S(c,p) within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone, respectively. Furthermore

  5. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Theriault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S{sub c,p}) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Results: Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S{sub c,p} within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone

  6. Both active and sham low-frequency rTMS single sessions over the right DLPFC decrease cue-induced cravings among pathological gamblers seeking treatment: A randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvaget, Anne; Bulteau, Samuel; Guilleux, Alice; Leboucher, Juliette; Pichot, Anne; Valrivière, Pierre; Vanelle, Jean-Marie; Sébille-Rivain, Véronique; Grall-Bronnec, Marie

    2018-02-21

    Background Craving is a core symptom of addictive disorders, such as pathological gambling for example. Over the last decade, several studies have assessed the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the addiction field, which triggers the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to decrease craving. The STIMJEU study investigated whether a single session of low-frequency (LF, i.e., 1 Hz) rTMS applied to the right DLPFC reduced cue-induced gambling craving in a sample of treatment-seeking pathological gamblers. Methods Thirty patients received both active and sham rTMS in random order and were blinded to the condition in a within-subject crossover design. Outcome measures included self-reported gambling craving (Visual Analog Scale and Gambling Craving Scale) and physiological measures (heart rate and blood pressure). Results The rTMS sessions were associated with a significant decrease in the gambling urge, regardless of whether the session was active or sham. When controlling cue-induced craving levels, no effects were observed on craving for active rTMS. Overall, rTMS was well-tolerated, and the credibility of the sham procedure was assessed and appeared to be appropriate. Conclusions We failed to demonstrate the specific efficacy of one session of LF rTMS to decrease cue-induced craving in pathological gamblers. A strong placebo-effect and rTMS parameters may partly explain these results. Yet, we are convinced that rTMS remains a promising therapeutic method. Further studies are required to examine its potential effect.

  7. Markers of biological stress in response to a single session of high-intensity interval training and high-volume training in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Yvonne; Engel, Florian; Wahl, Patrick; Achtzehn, Silvia; Sperlich, Billy; Mester, Joachim

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) vs high-volume training (HVT) on salivary stress markers [cortisol (sC), testosterone (sT), alpha-amylase (sAA)], metabolic and cardiorespiratory response in young athletes. Twelve young male cyclists (14 ± 1 years; 57.9 ± 9.4 mL min -1  kg -1 peak oxygen uptake) performed one session of HIIT (4 × 4 min intervals at 90-95 % peak power output separated by 3 min of active rest) and one session of HVT (90 min constant load at 60 % peak power output). The levels of sC, sT, their ratio (sT/sC) and sAA were determined before and 0, 30, 60, 180 min after each intervention. Metabolic and cardiorespiratory stress was characterized by blood lactate, blood pH, respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]), ventilation (V E ) and ventilatory equivalent (V E /[Formula: see text]). sC increased 30 and 60 min after HIIT. However, 180 min post exercise, sC decreased below baseline levels in both conditions. sT increased 0 and 30 min after HIIT and 0 min after HVT. sAA and sT/sC ratio did not change significantly over time in HIIT nor HVT. Metabolic and cardiorespiratory stress, evidenced by blood lactate, HR, [Formula: see text], V E , and V E /[Formula: see text] was higher during HIIT compared to HVT. The metabolic and cardiorespiratory stress during HIIT was higher compared to HVT, but based on salivary analyses (cortisol, testosterone, alpha-amylase), we conclude no strong acute catabolic effects neither by HIIT nor by HVT.

  8. The development of the international stereotactic radiosurgery society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, L Dade

    2011-01-01

    In this report the origins of the International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society (ISRS) are described from the viewpoint of one of the early organizers and first president. The value of the society, the subsequent leadership, and the Jacob Fabrikant Award winners are also presented. A brief and incomplete timeline for the field of stereotactic radiosurgery is shown. The goals and mission of the ISRS continue to be met via the sponsorship of biennial meetings and publications.

  9. Verification of gamma knife based fractionated radiosurgery with newly developed head-thorax phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisht, Raj Kishor; Kale, Shashank Sharad; Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Singh, Manmohan Jit; Agarwal, Deepak; Garg, Ajay; Rath, Goura Kishore; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Kumar, Pratik; Thulkar, Sanjay; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2016-01-01

    measured dose with ≥90% (max 93%) pixel pass rate at 1 mm of spatial and 1% of dosimetric tolerances. The focal precision test showed the variation of 0.465 mm between radiological and planned iso-centre. Conclusions: The study demonstrated the suitability of newly developed head-thorax phantom for dosimetric verification of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery using Extend™ system of Gamma Knife. - Highlights: • Performance of the Extend™ system of Gamma knife in multi-session radiosurgery. • Extend™ system based treatment verification using a patient simulating phantom. • Designed head-thorax phantom suitable for other dosimetric audit purposes.

  10. Local control after stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases in patients with melanoma with and without BRAF mutation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, David; Bagshaw, Hilary P; Anker, Christopher J; Tward, Jonathan D; Grossmann, Kenneth F; Jensen, Randy L; Shrieve, Dennis C

    2015-08-01

    BRAF inhibitors improve progression-free and overall survival in patients with metastatic melanoma. Brain metastases are common, and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been used, resulting in excellent local control. Because BRAF inhibitors are associated with intracranial responses, the authors hypothesized that BRAF inhibitors would improve local control in patients with melanoma who are receiving SRS for brain metastases. The authors retrospectively identified patients with metastatic melanoma who had been tested for BRAF mutation and treated with SRS for brain metastases. Patients with previous resection, multiple brain metastases, or multiple courses of SRS were eligible. SRS was delivered in a single fraction to a median dose of 2000 cGy. Patients with a BRAF mutation were treated with a BRAF inhibitor on the basis of physician preference. The authors identified 52 patients who were treated in 82 treatment sessions for 185 brain metastases and 13 tumor beds. At a median follow-up of 10.5 months, the 1-year local control rate was 69.2%. At 1 year, the local control rate for brain metastases in patients with BRAF mutation with BRAF treatment was 85.0%, and the local control rate for brain metastases in those without BRAF treatment was 51.5% (p = 0.0077). The rates of distant brain failure, freedom from whole-brain radiation, and overall survival were not different on the basis of BRAF mutation status or inhibitor therapy. The number of new intratumoral hemorrhages after SRS was increased significantly in patients with BRAF treatment. Treatment with BRAF inhibitors was associated with improved local control after SRS in patients with melanoma and brain metastases. An increased number of intratumoral hemorrhages was associated with BRAF inhibitor therapy.

  11. Robotic Radiosurgery. Treating prostata cancer and related genitourinary applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponsky, Lee E. (ed.) [Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States). University Hospitals Case Medical Center

    2012-07-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among North American and European men, but its treatment continues to be problematic owing to serious side-effects, including erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, and potential lower GI complications. Robotic radiosurgery offers a novel, rapid, non-invasive outpatient treatment option for prostate cancer that combines robotics, advanced image-guided motion detection, and automated real-time corrective spatial positioning with submillimeter precision. This book examines all aspects of the treatment of prostate cancer with robotic radiosurgery. After introductory sections on radiosurgery as a multidisciplinary practice and specific issues relating to prostate cancer, the important challenge posed by prostate motion when administering radiation therapy is examined in depth, with detailed discussion as to how image-guided robotic radiosurgery overcomes this problem by continously identifying the precise location of the prostate throughout the course of treatment. A further major section is devoted to a discussion of techniques and potential radiobiological and clinical advantages of hypofractionated radiation delivery by means of robotic radiosurgery systems. The book closes by discussing other emerging genitourinary applications of robotic radiosurgery. All of the authors are experts in their field who present a persuasive case for this fascinating technique. (orig.)

  12. Robotic Radiosurgery. Treating prostata cancer and related genitourinary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponsky, Lee E.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among North American and European men, but its treatment continues to be problematic owing to serious side-effects, including erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, and potential lower GI complications. Robotic radiosurgery offers a novel, rapid, non-invasive outpatient treatment option for prostate cancer that combines robotics, advanced image-guided motion detection, and automated real-time corrective spatial positioning with submillimeter precision. This book examines all aspects of the treatment of prostate cancer with robotic radiosurgery. After introductory sections on radiosurgery as a multidisciplinary practice and specific issues relating to prostate cancer, the important challenge posed by prostate motion when administering radiation therapy is examined in depth, with detailed discussion as to how image-guided robotic radiosurgery overcomes this problem by continously identifying the precise location of the prostate throughout the course of treatment. A further major section is devoted to a discussion of techniques and potential radiobiological and clinical advantages of hypofractionated radiation delivery by means of robotic radiosurgery systems. The book closes by discussing other emerging genitourinary applications of robotic radiosurgery. All of the authors are experts in their field who present a persuasive case for this fascinating technique. (orig.)

  13. Present situation and prospect of gamma knife radiosurgery for functional brain disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongquan; Zhao Xianjun; Liu Wenli

    2002-01-01

    With the evolution of imaging technology in the past two decades, currently anatomic targets including the trigeminal nerve (for trigeminal neuralgia), the thalamus (for tremor or pain), the cingulate gyrus, anterior internal capsule or amygdala (for pain or psychiatric illness), the globus pallidum (for symptoms of Parkinson's disease), and the hippocampus (for epilepsy) can be precisely located with computerized tomography, magnetic resonance image, single photon emission computerized tomography and positron emission tomography; stereotactic radiosurgery gradually tends to perfection. Gamma knife therapy for nervous functional disorders has become the focus of interest in clinical study

  14. WE-G-BRC-01: Risk Assessment for Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G.

    2016-01-01

    Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) originated as an industrial engineering technique used for risk management and safety improvement of complex processes. In the context of radiotherapy, the AAPM Task Group 100 advocates FMEA as the framework of choice for establishing clinical quality management protocols. However, there is concern that widespread adoption of FMEA in radiation oncology will be hampered by the perception that implementation of the tool will have a steep learning curve, be extremely time consuming and labor intensive, and require additional resources. To overcome these preconceptions and facilitate the introduction of the tool into clinical practice, the medical physics community must be educated in the use of this tool and the ease in which it can be implemented. Organizations with experience in FMEA should share their knowledge with others in order to increase the implementation, effectiveness and productivity of the tool. This session will include a brief, general introduction to FMEA followed by a focus on practical aspects of implementing FMEA for specific clinical procedures including HDR brachytherapy, physics plan review and radiosurgery. A description of common equipment and devices used in these procedures and how to characterize new devices for safe use in patient treatments will be presented. This will be followed by a discussion of how to customize FMEA techniques and templates to one’s own clinic. Finally, cases of common failure modes for specific procedures (described previously) will be shown and recommended intervention methodologies and outcomes reviewed. Learning Objectives: Understand the general concept of failure mode and effect analysis Learn how to characterize new equipment for safety Be able to identify potential failure modes for specific procedures and learn mitigation techniques Be able to customize FMEA examples and templates for use in any clinic

  15. A persistent increase in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by both fast-twitch and slow-twitch skeletal muscles after a single exercise session by old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuanyuan; Sharma, Naveen; Arias, Edward B; Castorena, Carlos M; Cartee, Gregory D

    2013-06-01

    Exercise has been demonstrated to enhance subsequent insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (GU) by predominantly type II (fast-twitch) muscle of old rats, but previous research has not evaluated exercise effects on GU by type I (slow-twitch) muscle from old rats. Accordingly, we studied male Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats (24 months old) and determined GU (0, 100, 200, and 5,000 μU/ml insulin) of isolated soleus (predominantly type I) and epitrochlearis (predominantly type II) muscles after one exercise session. Epitrochlearis (100, 200, and 5,000 μU/ml insulin) and soleus (100 and 200 μU/ml insulin) GU were greater at 3-h postexercise vs. age-matched sedentary controls. Insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr1162/1163) was unaltered by exercise in either muscle. Akt phosphorylation (pAkt) was greater for exercised vs. sedentary rats in the epitrochlearis (Ser473 and Thr308 with 100 and 200 μU/ml, respectively) and soleus (Ser473 with 200 μU/ml). AS160 phosphorylation (pAS160) was greater for exercised vs. sedentary rats in the epitrochlearis (Thr642 with 100 μU/ml), but not the soleus. Exercised vs. sedentary rats did not differ for total protein abundance of insulin receptor, Akt, AS160, or GLUT4 in either muscle. These results demonstrate that both predominantly type I and type II muscles from old rats are susceptible to exercise-induced improvement in insulin-mediated GU by mechanisms that are independent of enhanced insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation or altered abundance of important signaling proteins or GLUT4. Exercise-induced elevation in pAkt, and possibly pAS160, may contribute to this effect in the epitrochlearis of old rats, but other mechanisms are likely important for the soleus.

  16. The effectiveness of neuro-music therapy according to the Heidelberg model compared to a single session of educational counseling as treatment for tinnitus: a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argstatter, Heike; Grapp, Miriam; Hutter, Elisabeth; Plinkert, Peter K; Bolay, Hans-Volker

    2015-03-01

    Tinnitus is a very common symptom, yet the quest for an effective treatment is challenging. Results from several clinical trials support the notion that neuro-music therapy is an effective means to reduce tinnitus distress with short duration and long lasting effect. However, until now, the effectiveness has not been tested in a controlled trial against an active comparator. The trial was designed as two-center, parallel intervention group controlled study with two intervention groups: Counseling (50minute individualized personal instruction) or neuro-music therapy (counseling plus eight 50-minute sessions of individualized music therapy). Data of n=290 patients suffering from chronic tinnitus were analyzed. Outcome measure was the change in Tinnitus Questionnaire Total Scores (TQ) from baseline (admission) to end of treatment. Both treatment groups achieved a statistically relevant reduction in TQ scores, though 66% of patients in the music therapy group attained a clinically meaningful improvement compared to 33% in the counseling group. A binary logistic regression revealed two variables significantly influencing therapy outcome: initial tinnitus score and type of therapy with an OR for the music therapy compared to the counseling of 4.34 (CI 2.33-8.09). Counseling is an appropriate treatment option with well above chance of improvement. The neuro-music therapy outperformed the counseling. This treatment targets the tinnitus sound itself, is short in duration, intrinsically motivating and easy to operate and thus presents a possible complement to the therapeutic spectrum in chronic tinnitus. The trial was registered at the ClinicalTrials.gov registry (ID: NCT01845155). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Breast carcinoma in radiosurgery biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Leonard O.; Brito, Pablo E.; Coppolecchia, German L.; Giarmana, Maria J.; Delle Ville, Rodolfo E.; Cortese, Eduardo M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To report our experience on the detection of breast cancer (BC) through guided radiosurgical biopsies (GRSB) in the Gynecology Department of the Hospital Aeronautico Central (SGHAC). Materials and method: We retrospectively analyzed 622 GRSBs performed at the SGHAC between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2004. We took into account single or associated lesions found in mammograms, which we subdivided into four types: 1) Non-palpable mammographic nodules; 2) Microcalcifications; 3) Structural distortions; 4) Mammographic asymmetries. Results: We found 332 non-palpable nodules (53.4%), 214 microcalcifications (34.4%), 40 structural distortions (6.4%), and 36 mammographic asymmetries (5.8%). Out of the 622 GRSBs performed during the above period, 152 BCs were diagnosed, that is, an incidence of 24.4% detected through this method. Out of the 152 BCs, 110 (72.4%) were invasive and 42 (27.6%) were noninvasive. Conclusions: Although 24.4% of BCs were identified through GRSBs, our tea m considers this to be the standard method for early detection of breast cancer. (author) [es

  18. Dosimetric evaluation of proton stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Byung Jun; Shin, Dong Ho; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Se Byeong

    2011-01-01

    Surgical excision, conventional external radiotherapy, and chemotherapy could prolong survival in patients with small intracranial tumors. However, surgical excision for meningiomas located in the region of the base of skull or re-resection is often difficult. Moreover, treatment is needed for patients with recurrent tumors or postoperative residual tumors. Conventional external radiotherapy is popular and has significantly increased for treating brain tumors. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective alternative treatment technique to microsurgical resection such as benign brain tumor or vestibular Schwannomas. In general, the dose to OAR of 3D conformal plan is lower than that of conformal arc and dynamic conformal arc plans. However, any of OARs was not reached to tolerance dose. Although mean dose of the healthy brain tissue for 3D conformal plan was slightly higher than that of arc plans, the doses of the healthy brain tissue at V10 and V20 were significantly low for dynamic conformal arc plan. The dosimetric differences were the greatest at lower doses. In contrast, 3D conformal plan was better spare at higher doses. In this study, a dosimetric evaluation of proton stereotactic radiosurgery for brain lesion tumors was using fixed and arc beams. A brass block fitted to the PTV structure was modeled for dynamic conformal collimator. Although all treatment plans offer a very good coverage of the PTV, we found that proton arc plans had significantly better conformity to the PTV than static 3D conformal plan. The V20 dose of normal brain for dynamic conformal arc therapy is dramatically reduced compare to those for other therapy techniques.

  19. Session-RPE for quantifying the load of different youth basketball training sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lupo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate youth basketball training, verifying the reliability of the session-RPE method in relation to session duration (< and ≥ 80 minutes and workout typology (reduced and high warm-up, conditioning, technical, tactical, game portions within a single session categories. Six male youth basketball players (age, 16.5±0.5 years; height, 195.5±6.75 cm; body mass, 93.9±10.9 kg; and body mass index, 23.6±2.8 kg.m-2 were monitored (HR, type and duration of workouts during 15 (66 individual training sessions (80±26 minutes. Edwards’ HR method was used as a reference measure of internal training load (ITL; the CR-10 RPE scale was administered 30 minutes after the end of each session. The results obtained showed that all comparisons between different session durations and workout portions revealed effects in term of Edwards’ ITLs except for warm-up portions. Moderate to strong relationships between Edwards’ and session- RPE methods emerged for all sessions (r = .85, P < .001, player’s sessions (r range = .79 - .95, P < .001, session durations (< 80 minutes: r = .67, P < .001; ≥ 80 minutes: r = .75, P < .001, and workout portions (r range = .78 - .89, P range = .002 - < .001. The findings indicated that coaches of youth basketball players can successfully use session-RPE to monitor the ITL, regardless of session durations and workout portions.

  20. Metástase cerebral: tratamento paliativo com radiocirurgia Brain metastasis: palliative treatment with radiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio L. Faria

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available O artigo faz avaliação de 52 pacientes com metástase cerebral tratados com radiocirurgia estereotática na Universidade McGill, em Montreal. A radiocirurgia foi realizada com a técnica dinâmica em que, ao mesmo tempo, giram a mesa e a cabeça do acelerador linear de 10 MV. Todos os pacientes (56 tratamentos ao todo foram tratados com um único isocentro e uma dose única mediana de 1800 cGy na periferia da metástase. Em 88% dos casos a radiocirurgia foi usada após falha de tratamento radioterápico fracionado em todo cérebro. Todos os 52 casos tiveram avaliação com CT pós radiocirurgia. O seguimento mediano foi de 6 meses (variou entre 1 e 37 meses e a taxa de resposta, parcial ou completa, foi de 64%. Apenas 4 pacientes (7% tiveram algum tipo de complicação tardia relacionada ao tratamento. Estes achados vão de encontro com dados da literatura. A radiocirurgia é tratamento pouco agressivo, bem tolerado e com alta taxa de resposta para lesões locais e pode ser útil para pacientes selecionados. O seu valor definitivo, como tratamento único ou combinado com radioterapia em todo cérebro, está sendo avaliado de forma prospectiva e randomizada.This is a retrospective review of 52 patients with metastatic brain disease who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery at McGill University in Montreal. The radiosurgical treatment was performed with the dynamic rotation technique in which there is continuous and simultaneous movement of treatment couch and machine gantry of a 10 MV linac. All patients were treated with a single isocenter and a median dose of 1800 cGy was delivered. In 88% of the cases radiosurgery was given after failure from whole brain conventional irradiation. All 52 cases were assessed with brain CT post radiosurgery. The median follow up time was 6 months (range 1 -37 months and the response rate (partial or complete was 64%. Only 4 patientes (7% developed late complications related to the treatment. These findings are

  1. Robotic radiosurgery. Treating tumors that move with respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urschel, Harold C. Jr.; Kresl, John J.; Luketich, James D.; Papiez, Lech; Timmerman, Robert D.; Schulz, Raymond A.

    2007-01-01

    Addresses in detail all aspects of the use of robotic radiosurgery to treat tumors of the lung, liver, and pancreas Includes full consideration of tumor tracking techniques, dosimetry, radiobiology, and fiducial placement strategies Written by leading experts Includes many high quality illustrations Stereotactic radiosurgery continues to evolve in ways that allow this powerful technology to reach and treat more tumors in more patients. This volume in the Robotic Radiosurgery series is devoted to theory and practice in the emerging field of stereotactic radiosurgery (also called stereotactic body radiation therapy) for extracranial tumors, particularly those that move as patients breathe. The book is divided into six sections. The first three sections address tumor motion due to respiration and tumor tracking techniques; dosimetry, radiobiology, and imaging; and fiducial placement systems. The fourth and fifth sections then discuss in depth the use of robotic radiosurgery to treat lung and abdominal tumors, respectively, and a final section explains emerging concepts and techniques. Within this framework, detailed information is provided on the technology and methodology for delivery of high doses of radiation to moving targets, radiobiological and radiological principles, and the challenges faced by clinicians performing extracranial stereotactic radiosurgery. Furthermore, there are thorough reviews of the general clinical literature on stereotactic radiation treatment of tumors of the lungs, liver, and pancreas, and the latest clinical data from clinicians conducting clinical studies using the CyberKnife registered Robotic Radiosurgery System. Special attention is given to the frameless robotic radiosurgery device known as the CyberKnife, the only image-guided radiosurgery system that utilizes intelligent robotics to track, detect, and correct for changes in tumor position during treatments. Tumors that move with respiration are treated with the CyberKnife using a

  2. Robotic radiosurgery. Treating tumors that move with respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urschel, Harold C. Jr. [Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Chair of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgical Research, Education and Clinical Excellence; Kresl, John J. [Arizona Oncology Services at St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Luketich, James D. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center PUH, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). The Heart, Lung and Esophageal Surgery Inst.; Papiez, Lech; Timmerman, Robert D. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schulz, Raymond A. (eds.)

    2007-07-01

    Addresses in detail all aspects of the use of robotic radiosurgery to treat tumors of the lung, liver, and pancreas Includes full consideration of tumor tracking techniques, dosimetry, radiobiology, and fiducial placement strategies Written by leading experts Includes many high quality illustrations Stereotactic radiosurgery continues to evolve in ways that allow this powerful technology to reach and treat more tumors in more patients. This volume in the Robotic Radiosurgery series is devoted to theory and practice in the emerging field of stereotactic radiosurgery (also called stereotactic body radiation therapy) for extracranial tumors, particularly those that move as patients breathe. The book is divided into six sections. The first three sections address tumor motion due to respiration and tumor tracking techniques; dosimetry, radiobiology, and imaging; and fiducial placement systems. The fourth and fifth sections then discuss in depth the use of robotic radiosurgery to treat lung and abdominal tumors, respectively, and a final section explains emerging concepts and techniques. Within this framework, detailed information is provided on the technology and methodology for delivery of high doses of radiation to moving targets, radiobiological and radiological principles, and the challenges faced by clinicians performing extracranial stereotactic radiosurgery. Furthermore, there are thorough reviews of the general clinical literature on stereotactic radiation treatment of tumors of the lungs, liver, and pancreas, and the latest clinical data from clinicians conducting clinical studies using the CyberKnife {sup registered} Robotic Radiosurgery System. Special attention is given to the frameless robotic radiosurgery device known as the CyberKnife, the only image-guided radiosurgery system that utilizes intelligent robotics to track, detect, and correct for changes in tumor position during treatments. Tumors that move with respiration are treated with the Cyber

  3. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R.; Salemi, S.; Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F.; Falaschi, F.; Bartolozzi, C.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T 1 w and T 2 w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T 2 w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T 1 w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  4. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R. [Pisa Univ. Hospital, Second Dept. of Radiology, Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: p.boraschi@do.med.unipi.it; Salemi, S. [Univ. of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F. [Univ. of Pisa, Liver Transplant Unit of the Dept. of Oncology, Transplants and Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Falaschi, F. [Pisa Univ. Hospital, Second Dept. of Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Bartolozzi, C. [Univ. of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T{sub 2}w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T{sub 1}w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  5. Clinical practice of image-guided spine radiosurgery - results from an international research consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guckenberger Matthias

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal radiosurgery is a quickly evolving technique in the radiotherapy and neurosurgical communities. However, the methods of spine radiosurgery have not been standardized. This article describes the results of a survey about the methods of spine radiosurgery at five international institutions. Methods All institutions are members of the Elekta Spine Radiosurgery Research Consortium and have a dedicated research and clinical focus on image-guided radiosurgery. The questionnaire consisted of 75 items covering all major steps of spine radiosurgery. Results Strong agreement in the methods of spine radiosurgery was observed. In particular, similarities were observed with safety and quality assurance playing an important role in the methods of all institutions, cooperation between neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists in case selection, dedicated imaging for target- and organ-at-risk delineation, application of proper safety margins for the target volume and organs-at-risk, conformal planning and precise image-guided treatment delivery, and close clinical and radiological follow-up. In contrast, three major areas of uncertainty and disagreement were identified: 1 Indications and contra-indications for spine radiosurgery; 2 treatment dose and fractionation and 3 tolerance dose of the spinal cord. Conclusions Results of this study reflect the current practice of spine radiosurgery in large academic centers. Despite close agreement was observed in many steps of spine radiosurgery, further research in form of retrospective and especially prospective studies is required to refine the details of spinal radiosurgery in terms of safety and efficacy.

  6. Gamma knife radiosurgery of acoustic neurinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertalanffy, A.; Dietrich, W.; Aichholzer, M.; Kitz, K.; Heimberger, K.; Brix, R.

    2001-01-01

    The authors report on their series of 40 patients with 41 acoustic neurinomas (ACNs), including one patient with bilateral acoustic neurinomas suffering from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF II) who were treated with the gamma knife unit at their institution between August 1992 and October 1995. Of these 41 tumours, 21 ACNs had been operated on before (l to 4 times), 20 ACNs were exclusively treated by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). The maximal axial tumour diameter ranged from 6 to 33 mm (median: 25 mm), the maximal transverse tumour diameter ranged from 7 mm to 36 mm (median: 16 mm). The dose distributed to the tumour margin was 10 to 17 Gy (median: 12 Gy) by enclosing the tumour with the 40 % to 95 % isodose line (median: 50 % isodose line) and using 1 to 12 isocenters (median: 5 isocenters). Central loss of contrast enhancement was observed in 78 % of the patients within six to 12 months after radiosurgery. Thirty-two patients were observed over a minimum follow up period of at least 36 months, 9 patients were lost to follow up as they died of unrelated causes or refused further check-ups. Within the follow up period of up to seven years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) control scans revealed the tumour diameter stable or decreased in 29 cases and increased in three tumours. Of 14 patients with useful hearing before treatment, 9 patients were examined in addition to pure tone audiogramm by measurement of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) one to four years after radiosurgery. None of three patients showed a postoperative loss of the cochlea function. According to slight alterations of the cochlea function (cochlea summating action potential), pure tone audiometry of those patients revealed only slight changes of the hearing level (HL) within a maximum range of ±15 Decibel (dB). The hearing threshold improved in two, was stable in four and deteriorated in three patients, respectively. We observed postradiosurgical aggravation of a pre-existing facial

  7. Radiosurgery scope of practice in Canada: A report of the Canadian association of radiation oncology (CARO) radiosurgery advisory committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberge, David; Menard, Cynthia; Bauman, Glenn; Chan, Alex; Mulroy, Liam; Sahgal, Arjun; Malone, Shawn; McKenzie, Michael; Schroeder, Garry; Fortin, Marie-Andree; Ebacher, Annie; Milosevic, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Radiosurgery has a long history in Canada. Since the treatment of the first patient at the McGill University Health Center in 1985, radiosurgery programs have been developed from coast to coast. These have included multidisciplinary teams of radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons, medical physicists, radiation technologists and other health professionals. In 2008, the CARO Board of Directors requested that a working group be formed to define the role of the radiation oncologist in the practice of radiosurgery. Taking into account evolving technology, changing clinical practice and current scope of practice literature, the working group made recommendations as to the role of the radiation oncologists. These recommendations were endorsed by the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology board of directors in September 2009 and are present herein. It is recognized that patients benefit from a team approach to their care but it is recommended that qualified radiation oncologists be involved in radiosurgery delivery from patient consultation to follow-up. In addition, radiation oncologists should continue to be involved in the administrative aspects of radiosurgery programs, from equipment selection to ongoing quality assurance/quality improvement.

  8. Post-Session Authentication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jensen, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    Entity authentication provides confidence in the claimed identity of a peer entity, but the manner in which this goal is achieved results in different types of authentication. An important factor in this regard is the order between authentication and the execution of the associated session. In th...... as the only setup assumption. We hope post-session authentication can be used to devise new strategies for building trust among strangers....

  9. Report of AAPM TG 135: quality assurance for robotic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Sonja; Cavedon, Carlo; Chuang, Cynthia F; Cohen, Alan B; Garrett, Jeffrey A; Lee, Charles L; Lowenstein, Jessica R; d'Souza, Maximian F; Taylor, David D; Wu, Xiaodong; Yu, Cheng

    2011-06-01

    The task group (TG) for quality assurance for robotic radiosurgery was formed by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine's Science Council under the direction of the Radiation Therapy Committee and the Quality Assurance (QA) Subcommittee. The task group (TG-135) had three main charges: (1) To make recommendations on a code of practice for Robotic Radiosurgery QA; (2) To make recommendations on quality assurance and dosimetric verification techniques, especially in regard to real-time respiratory motion tracking software; (3) To make recommendations on issues which require further research and development. This report provides a general functional overview of the only clinically implemented robotic radiosurgery device, the CyberKnife. This report includes sections on device components and their individual component QA recommendations, followed by a section on the QA requirements for integrated systems. Examples of checklists for daily, monthly, annual, and upgrade QA are given as guidance for medical physicists. Areas in which QA procedures are still under development are discussed.

  10. Compensating for Quasi-periodic Motion in Robotic Radiosurgery

    CERN Document Server

    Ernst, Floris

    2012-01-01

    Compensating for Quasi-periodic Motion in Robotic Radiosurgery outlines the techniques needed to accurately track and compensate for respiratory and pulsatory motion during robotic radiosurgery. The algorithms presented within the book aid in the treatment of tumors that move during respiration. In Chapters 1 and 2,  the book introduces the concept of stereotactic body radiation therapy, motion compensation strategies and the clinical state-of-the-art. In Chapters 3 through 5, the author describes and evaluates new methods for motion prediction, for correlating external motion to internal organ motion, and for the evaluation of these algorithms’ output based on an unprecedented amount of real clinical data. Finally, Chapter 6 provides a brief introduction into currently investigated, open questions and further fields of research. Compensating for Quasi-periodic Motion in Robotic Radiosurgery targets researchers working in the related fields of surgical oncology, artificial intelligence, robotics and more. ...

  11. Sterotactic radiosurgery of the brain using a standard linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, J.S.; Siddon, R.L.; Nedzi, L.A.; Wen, P.Y.; Alexander, Eben III

    1990-01-01

    Between February 1986 and December 1988, 44 patients were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery using a standard linear accelerator. Twenty one patients were treated for cerbrovascular abnormalities and 23 patients were treated for intracranial tumors. Fifteen of the 23 patients treated for intracranial tumors had received previous radiotherapy. The range of doses given by radiosurgery was 1000-2500 cGy. Nausea and vomiting occurred in seven patients within six hours of treatment. The indicence and symptoms were correlated with the dose of radiation to the vomiting center (area postrema) with the median dose to the postrema in symptomatic patients being 618 cGy compared to a range of < 5 to 184 cGy in the remaining 36 asymptomatic patients. Prior radiation therapy has not been associated with increasing risk of complication in patient treated with radiosurgery for recurrent tumors to date. (author). 20 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  12. Peritumoral hemorrhage after radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motozaki, Takahiko; Ban, Sadahiko; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Hamasaki, Masatake.

    1994-01-01

    An unusual case of peritumoral hemorrhage after radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic brain tumor is reported. This 64-year-old woman had a history of breast cancer and underwent right mastectomy in 1989. She remained well until January 1993, when she started to have headache, nausea and speech disturbance, and was hospitalized on February 25, 1993. Neurological examination disclosed right hemiparesis and bilateral papilledema. CT scan and MR imaging showed a solitary round mass lesion in the left basal ganglia region. It was a well-demarcated, highly enhanced mass, 37 mm in diameter. Cerebral angiography confirmed a highly vascular mass lesion in the same location. She was treated with radiosurgery on March 8 (maximum dose was 20 Gy in the center and 10 Gy in the peripheral part of the tumor). After radiosurgery, she had an uneventful course and clinical and radiosurgical improvement could be detected. Her neurological symptoms and signs gradually improved and reduction of the tumor size and perifocal edema could be seen one month after radiosurgery. However, 6 weeks after radiosurgery, she suddenly developed semicoma and right hemiplegia. CT scan disclosed a massive peritumoral hemorrhage. Then, emergency craniotomy, evacuation of the hematoma and total removal of the tumor were performed on April 24. Histopathological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma. It was the same finding as that of the previous breast cancer. Histopathological examination revealed necrosis without tumor cells in the center and residual tumor cells in the peripheral part of the tumor. It is postulated that peritumoral hemorrhage was caused by hemodynamic changes in the vascular-rich tumor after radiosurgery and breakdown of the fragile abnormal vessels in the peripheral part of the tumor. (author)

  13. Tumour response and morphological changes of acoustic neurinomas after radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentino, V.; Raimondi, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-seven of the 1560 patients treated by radiosurgery during the period 1984-1993 had acoustic neurinomas. Four cases were excluded from this study because they had a follow-up of less than 2 years. There were 24 neurinomas treated in 23 patients as one patient had a bilateral tumour. Seven patients underwent radiosurgery for a recurrent tumour (already operated on once or twice), while it was the first treatment for 16 patients. The tumour volume ranged from 1.99 cm 3 to 18.30 cm 3 , and the patient follow-up was from 2 to 8 years. To determine the target on CT/NMR for linear accelerator stereotactic irradiation, the Greitz-Bergstroem non-invasive head fixation device was used. It was again adopted for subsequent serial imaging, and for repeat radiosurgery when necessary. The total peripheral tumour dose ranged from 12 to 45 Gy. In 9 patients there was a reduction in tumour volume varying from 39 to 100% , while 14 of the neurinomas appeared stable after an average follow-up of 3 years. In one patient there was an increase in size of the tumour. Variable morphological changes were present in 66% of the neurinomas treated. Radiosurgery is indicated as an alternative to microsurgery for inoperab1e patients and for those who refuse surgery, for recurrent tumours, and as a post-operative complementary treatment for partially removed tumours. A gradual approach to radiosurgery, depending on tumour response, allows a greater efficacy with minimal risk. In the present series no complications were observed. Hearing was preserved at almost the same level as that prior to radiosurgery in all patients. (author)

  14. Stereotaxic radiosurgery for therapy of arterivenous malformation of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, J.; Feriancic, C.V.; Scaff, L.A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Since march 1983 we are attempting for the first time in Brazil to develop improvements on stereotactic radiosurgery techniques. We have been using the multifocal irradiation method attaching to this purpose the Barcia IV stereotactic frame to a 4 MV linear accelerator. We show details about the centralization technique and the security patterns in our system. From October 1983 to November 1986, 25 patients with arteriovenous malformations of the brain were submitted to a radiosurgery treatment in our service. Good results obtained on the follow-up from one to three years are analysed. (author)

  15. Optimisation of multiple isocentre stereotactic radiosurgery planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roxby, Paul; Ungureanu, Elena; Haworth, Annette; Gavriliouk, Olena

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Finding a good treatment plan for multiple isocentre stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is challenging. Trial and error is too slow even for a computer when more than three isocentres are used. We present a new method which includes an optimization component and works for irregular volumes. The unequal sphere packing problem (USPP) is a well defined mathematical problem with published solutions (algorithms) for filling a convex volume with spheres of variable size. We present an algorithm for non-convex volumes, such as typical SRS targets, using mixed integer programming and linearization of constraints. Available collimator sizes are represented as spheres whose radius equals their 90% isodose. Non-overlapping spheres must lie within the target volume. One formulation maximises the fraction of the target volume covered by the spheres for a given number of isocentres (USPPmax). An alternative formulation minimises the number of isocentres required to achieve a certain packing density (USPPmin). The method was applied retrospectively to 18 recent clinical cases. Results Using USPPmin a solution was achieved in a few seconds in 14 of 18 random clinical cases. Two of the remaining four cases could be computed in under 4 min when a limit of five spheres was introduced. Low values of packing density with the maximum realistic number of isocentres indicated that a multiple isocentre approach was infeasible. Conclusions The algorithm gives the location of each isocentre and the collimator diameter to achieve an optimal multiple isocentre treatment plan. It provides a useful tool for plan design and evaluation.

  16. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Choroidal Hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun Taek; Kang, Se Woong; Lee, Jung-Il

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with choroidal hemangioma (CH), a benign ocular hamartoma, frequently presents with visual disturbance as a result of exudative retinal detachment (RD), which originates in subretinal fluid accumulation. We report our experience using the Leksell Gamma Knife in the management of symptomatic CH. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with symptomatic CH (circumscribed form in 3 patients and diffuse form in 4) were treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife at our institution during a 7-year period. All patients presented with exudative RD involving the macula that resulted in severe visual deterioration. The prescription dose to the target margin was 10 Gy in all cases. The mean tumor volume receiving the prescription dose was 536 mm 3 (range, 151–1,057). The clinical data were analyzed in a retrospective fashion after a mean follow-up of 34.4 months (range, 9–76). Results: The resolution of exudative RD was achieved within 6 months, and the visual acuity of the affected eye had improved at the latest follow-up examination (p = .018) in all patients. No recurrence of exudative RD occurred. Thinning of the CHs was observed in most patients; however, symptomatic radiation toxicity had not developed in any of the patients. Conclusion: Symptomatic CHs can be safely and effectively managed with Gamma Knife radiosurgery using a marginal dose of 10 Gy.

  17. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Choroidal Hemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yun Taek; Kang, Se Woong [Department of Ophthalmology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Il, E-mail: jilee@skku.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Patients with choroidal hemangioma (CH), a benign ocular hamartoma, frequently presents with visual disturbance as a result of exudative retinal detachment (RD), which originates in subretinal fluid accumulation. We report our experience using the Leksell Gamma Knife in the management of symptomatic CH. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with symptomatic CH (circumscribed form in 3 patients and diffuse form in 4) were treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife at our institution during a 7-year period. All patients presented with exudative RD involving the macula that resulted in severe visual deterioration. The prescription dose to the target margin was 10 Gy in all cases. The mean tumor volume receiving the prescription dose was 536 mm{sup 3} (range, 151-1,057). The clinical data were analyzed in a retrospective fashion after a mean follow-up of 34.4 months (range, 9-76). Results: The resolution of exudative RD was achieved within 6 months, and the visual acuity of the affected eye had improved at the latest follow-up examination (p = .018) in all patients. No recurrence of exudative RD occurred. Thinning of the CHs was observed in most patients; however, symptomatic radiation toxicity had not developed in any of the patients. Conclusion: Symptomatic CHs can be safely and effectively managed with Gamma Knife radiosurgery using a marginal dose of 10 Gy.

  18. Summary: Hadron dynamics sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, A.S.; Londergan, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Four sessions on Hadron Dynamics were organized at this Workshop. The first topic, QCD Exclusive Reactions and Color Transparency, featured talks by Ralston, Heppelman and Strikman; the second, QCD and Inclusive Reactions had talks by Garvey, Speth and Kisslinger. The third dynamics session, Medium Modification of Elementary Interactions had contributions from Kopeliovich, Alves and Gyulassy; the fourth session Pre-QCD Dynamics and Scattering, had talks by Harris, Myhrer and Brown. An additional joint Spectroscopy/Dynamics session featured talks by Zumbro, Johnson and McClelland. These contributions are reviewed briefly in this summary. Two additional joint sessions between Dynamics and η physics are reviewed by the organizers of the Eta sessions. In such a brief review there is no way the authors can adequately summarize the details of the physics presented here. As a result, they concentrate only on brief impressionistic sketches of the physics topics discussed and their interrelations. They include no bibliography in this summary, but simply refer to the talks given in more detail in the Workshop proceedings. They focus on topics which were common to several presentations in these sessions. First, nuclear and particle descriptions of phenomena are now clearly converging, in both a qualitative and quantitative sense; they show several examples of this convergence. Second, an important issue in hadron dynamics is the extent to which elementary interactions are modified in nuclei at high energies and/or densities, and they illustrate some of these medium effects. Finally, they focus on those dynamical issues where hadron facilities can make an important, or even a unique, contribution to the knowledge of particle and nuclear physics

  19. Summary: Hadron dynamics sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, A.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Londergan, J.T. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Four sessions on Hadron Dynamics were organized at this Workshop. The first topic, QCD Exclusive Reactions and Color Transparency, featured talks by Ralston, Heppelman and Strikman; the second, QCD and Inclusive Reactions had talks by Garvey, Speth and Kisslinger. The third dynamics session, Medium Modification of Elementary Interactions had contributions from Kopeliovich, Alves and Gyulassy; the fourth session Pre-QCD Dynamics and Scattering, had talks by Harris, Myhrer and Brown. An additional joint Spectroscopy/Dynamics session featured talks by Zumbro, Johnson and McClelland. These contributions are reviewed briefly in this summary. Two additional joint sessions between Dynamics and {eta} physics are reviewed by the organizers of the Eta sessions. In such a brief review there is no way the authors can adequately summarize the details of the physics presented here. As a result, they concentrate only on brief impressionistic sketches of the physics topics discussed and their interrelations. They include no bibliography in this summary, but simply refer to the talks given in more detail in the Workshop proceedings. They focus on topics which were common to several presentations in these sessions. First, nuclear and particle descriptions of phenomena are now clearly converging, in both a qualitative and quantitative sense; they show several examples of this convergence. Second, an important issue in hadron dynamics is the extent to which elementary interactions are modified in nuclei at high energies and/or densities, and they illustrate some of these medium effects. Finally, they focus on those dynamical issues where hadron facilities can make an important, or even a unique, contribution to the knowledge of particle and nuclear physics.

  20. The effectiveness of breath-holding to stabilize lung and pancreas tumors during radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Martin J.; Martin, David; Whyte, Richard; Hai, Jenny; Ozhasoglu, Cihat; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of breath-holding on the short-term reproducibility and long-term variability of tumor position during image-guided radiosurgery. Method: Thirteen patients have undergone single-fraction radiosurgery treatments during which the tumor was repeatedly imaged radiographically to observe its position. The imaging data were used to monitor the efficacy of breath-holding and to periodically readjust the alignment of the treatment beam with the tumor. These measurements have allowed the effects of breathing, heartbeat, patient movement, and instrumental uncertainties to be separately identified in the record of tumor position. Results: During inspiration breath-holding, the lung tumor position was reproducible to within 1 mm, on average, in the direction of maximum displacement during regular breathing, and to within 1.8 mm in three dimensions overall. The pancreas tumor position in three dimensions was reproducible to within 2.5 mm on average. Some patients showed a slow, steady drift of tumor position during the extended sequence of breath-holds, which was compensated by periodic retargeting of the treatment beam. Conclusion: Breath-holding can allow the reduction of tumor motion dosimetry margins to 2 mm or less for lung cancer treatments, provided that the treatment system can detect and adapt to long-term variations in the mean tumor position during a lengthy treatment fraction

  1. Analytic characterization of linear accelerator radiosurgery dose distributions for fast optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeks, S.L.; Buatti, J.M.; Eyster, B.; Kendrick, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    Linear accelerator (linac) radiosurgery utilizes non-coplanar arc therapy delivered through circular collimators. Generally, spherically symmetric arc sets are used, resulting in nominally spherical dose distributions. Various treatment planning parameters may be manipulated to provide dose conformation to irregular lesions. Iterative manipulation of these variables can be a difficult and time-consuming task, because (a) understanding the effect of these parameters is complicated and (b) three-dimensional (3D) dose calculations are computationally expensive. This manipulation can be simplified, however, because the prescription isodose surface for all single isocentre distributions can be approximated by conic sections. In this study, the effects of treatment planning parameter manipulation on the dimensions of the treatment isodose surface were determined empirically. These dimensions were then fitted to analytic functions, assuming that the dose distributions were characterized as conic sections. These analytic functions allowed real-time approximation of the 3D isodose surface. Iterative plan optimization, either manual or automated, is achieved more efficiently using this real time approximation of the dose matrix. Subsequent to iterative plan optimization, the analytic function is related back to the appropriate plan parameters, and the dose distribution is determined using conventional dosimetry calculations. This provides a pseudo-inverse approach to radiosurgery optimization, based solely on geometric considerations. (author)

  2. Radiosurgery for brain metastases: is whole brain radiotherapy necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneed, Penny K.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Forstner, Julie M.; McDermott, Michael W.; Chang, Susan; Park, Elaine; Gutin, Philip H.; Phillips, Theodore L.; Wara, William M.; Larson, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Because whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) may cause dementia in long-term survivors, selected patients with brain metastases may benefit from initial treatment with radiosurgery (RS) alone reserving WBRT for salvage as needed. We reviewed results of RS ± WBRT in patients with newly diagnosed brain metastasis to provide background for a prospective trial. Methods and Materials: Patients with single or multiple brain metastases managed initially with RS alone vs. RS + WBRT (62 vs. 43 patients) from 1991 through February 1997 were retrospectively reviewed. The use of upfront WBRT depended on physician preference and referral patterns. Survival, freedom from progression (FFP) endpoints, and brain control allowing for successful salvage therapy were measured from the date of diagnosis of brain metastases. Actuarial curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Analyses to adjust for known prognostic factors were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model (CPHM) stratified by primary site. Results: Survival and local FFP were the same for RS alone vs. RS + WBRT (median survival 11.3 vs. 11.1 months and 1-year local FFP by patient 71% vs. 79%, respectively). Brain FFP (scoring new metastases and/or local failure) was significantly worse for RS alone vs. RS + WBRT (28% vs. 69% at 1 year; CPHM adjusted p = 0.03 and hazard ratio = 0.476). However, brain control allowing for successful salvage of a first failure was not significantly different for RS alone vs. RS + WBRT (62% vs. 73% at 1 year; CPHM adjusted p = 0.56). Conclusions: The omission of WBRT in the initial management of patients treated with RS for up to 4 brain metastases does not appear to compromise survival or intracranial control allowing for salvage therapy as indicated. A randomized trial of RS vs. RS + WBRT is needed to assess survival, quality of life, and cost in good-prognosis patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases

  3. Radiosurgery in the management of pediatric brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, David C.; Goumnerova, Liliana C.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Dutton, Sharon; Black, Peter McL; Alexander, Eben; Xu Ronghui; Kooy, Hanne; Silver, Barbara; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To describe the outcome of pediatric brain tumor patients following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and factors associated with progression-free survival. Methods: We reviewed the outcome of 90 children treated with SRS for recurrent (n=62) or residual (n=28) brain tumors over a 10-year period. Median follow-up from SRS was 24 months for all patients and 55.5 months for the 34 patients currently alive. Results: The median progression-free survival (PFS) for all patients was 13 months. Median PFS according to tumor histology was medulloblastoma = 11 months, ependymoma 8.5 months, glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytoma = 12 months. Median PFS in patients treated to a single lesion was 15.4 months. No patient undergoing SRS to more than 1 lesion survived disease free beyond 2 years. After adjusting for histology and other clinical factors, SRS for tumor recurrence (RR=2.49) and the presence of > 1 lesion (RR=2.3) were associated with a significantly increased rate of progression (p<0.05). Three-year actuarial local control (LC) was as follows: medulloblastoma = 57%, ependymoma = 29%, anaplastic astrocytoma/glioblastoma = 60%, other histologies = 56%. Nineteen patients with radionecrosis and progressive neurologic symptoms underwent reoperation after an interval of 0.6-62 months following SRS. Pathology revealed necrosis with no evidence of tumor in 9 of these cases. Conclusion: SRS can be given safely to selected children with brain tumors. SRS appears to reduce the proportion of first failures occurring locally and is associated with better outcome when given as a part of initial management. Some patients with unresectable relapsed disease can be salvaged with SRS. SRS to multiple lesions does not appear to be curative. Serious neurologic symptoms requiring reoperation is infrequently caused by radionecrosis alone

  4. Session 2: Machine studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assmann, R.W.; Papotti, G.

    2012-01-01

    This document summarizes the talks and discussion that took place in the second session of the Chamonix 2012 workshop concerning results from machine studies performed in 2011. The session consisted of the following presentations: -) LHC experience with different bunch spacings by G. Rumolo; -) Observations of beam-beam effects in MDs in 2011 by W. Herr; -) Beam-induced heating/ bunch length/RF and lessons for 2012 by E. Metral; -) Lessons in beam diagnostics by R. Jones; -) Quench margins by M. Sapinski; and -) First demonstration with beam of the Achromatic Telescopic Squeeze (ATS) by S. Fartoukh. (authors)

  5. CyberKnife frameless stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal lesions: clinical experience in 125 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerszten, Peter C; Ozhasoglu, Cihat; Burton, Steven A; Vogel, William J; Atkins, Barbara A; Kalnicki, Shalom; Welch, William C

    2004-07-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial lesions is well established. Its use for the treatment of spinal lesions has been limited by the availability of effective target-immobilizing devices. Conventional external beam radiotherapy lacks the precision to allow delivery of large doses of radiation near radiosensitive structures such as the spinal cord. The CyberKnife (Accuray, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) is an image-guided frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system that allows for the radiosurgical treatment of spinal lesions. This study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of the treatment of spinal lesions with a single-fraction radiosurgical technique using the CyberKnife. The CyberKnife system uses the coupling of an orthogonal pair of x-ray cameras to a dynamically manipulated robot-mounted linear accelerator with six degrees of freedom that guides the therapy beam to the intended target without the use of frame-based fixation. Real-time imaging allows the tracking of patient movement. Cervical spine lesions were located and tracked relative to cranial bony landmarks; lower spinal lesions were tracked relative to fiducial bone markers. In this prospective cohort evaluation of a spine radiosurgery technique, 125 spinal lesions in 115 consecutive patients were treated with a single-fraction radiosurgery technique (45 cervical, 30 thoracic, 36 lumbar, and 14 sacral). There were 17 benign tumors and 108 metastatic lesions. All dose plans were calculated on the basis of computed tomographic images acquired from 1.25-mm slices with an inverse treatment planning technique. Radiosurgical circular cones ranging in diameter from 5 to 40 mm were used. Tumor volume ranged from 0.3 to 232 cm(3) (mean, 27.8 cm(3)). Seventy-eight lesions had received external beam irradiation previously. Tumor dose was maintained at 12 to 20 Gy to the 80% isodose line (mean, 14 Gy); canal volume receiving more than 8 Gy ranged from 0.0 to 1.7 cm(3) (mean, 0

  6. Endothelial membrane remodeling is obligate for anti-angiogenic radiosensitization during tumor radiosurgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philip Truman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available While there is significant interest in combining anti-angiogenesis therapy with conventional anti-cancer treatment, clinical trials have as of yet yielded limited therapeutic gain, mainly because mechanisms of anti-angiogenic therapy remain to a large extent unknown. Currently, anti-angiogenic tumor therapy is conceptualized to either "normalize" dysfunctional tumor vasculature, or to prevent recruitment of circulating endothelial precursors into the tumor. An alternative biology, restricted to delivery of anti-angiogenics immediately prior to single dose radiotherapy (radiosurgery, is provided in the present study.Genetic data indicate an acute wave of ceramide-mediated endothelial apoptosis, initiated by acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, regulates tumor stem cell response to single dose radiotherapy, obligatory for tumor cure. Here we show VEGF prevented radiation-induced ASMase activation in cultured endothelium, occurring within minutes after radiation exposure, consequently repressing apoptosis, an event reversible with exogenous C(16-ceramide. Anti-VEGFR2 acts conversely, enhancing ceramide generation and apoptosis. In vivo, MCA/129 fibrosarcoma tumors were implanted in asmase(+/+ mice or asmase(-/- littermates and irradiated in the presence or absence of anti-VEGFR2 DC101 or anti-VEGF G6-31 antibodies. These anti-angiogenic agents, only if delivered immediately prior to single dose radiotherapy, de-repressed radiation-induced ASMase activation, synergistically increasing the endothelial apoptotic component of tumor response and tumor cure. Anti-angiogenic radiosensitization was abrogated in tumors implanted in asmase(-/- mice that provide apoptosis-resistant vasculature, or in wild-type littermates pre-treated with anti-ceramide antibody, indicating that ceramide is necessary for this effect.These studies show that angiogenic factors fail to suppress apoptosis if ceramide remains elevated while anti-angiogenic therapies fail without ceramide

  7. A simulation and training environment for robotic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaefer, Alexander; Gill, Jakub; Schweikard, Achim

    2008-01-01

    To provide a software environment for simulation of robotic radiosurgery, particularly to study the effective robot workspace with respect to the treatment plan quality, and to illustrate the concepts of robotic radiosurgery. A simulation environment for a robotic radiosurgery system was developed using Java and Java3D. The kinematics and the beam characteristics were modeled and linked to a treatment planning module. Simulations of different robot workspace parameters for two example radiosurgical patient cases were performed using the novel software tool. The first case was an intracranial lesion near the left inner ear, the second case was a spinal lesion. The planning parameters for both cases were visualized with the novel simulation environment. An incremental extension of the robot workspace had limited effect for the intracranial case, where the original workspace already covered the left side of the patient. For the spinal case, a larger workspace resulted in a noticeable improvement in plan quality and a large portion of the beams being delivered from the extended workspace. The new software environment is useful to simulate and analyze parameters and configurations for robotic radiosurgery. An enlarged robot workspace may result in improved plan quality depending on the location of the target region. (orig.)

  8. Citation measures in stereotactic radiosurgery: publication across a discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondziolka, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    It is possible to judge the impact of scientific research by the number of citations a publication has received. We identified the most cited works in the field of stereotactic radiosurgery to study the evolution of this field from the perspective of publication. A Web of Science search was performed for articles that included the word 'radiosurgery' in the title. We studied the reports with >100 citations. A total of 5,532 published works were available for study between 1951 and 2010. Eighty-five articles had ≥ 100 citations, and these were published in 19 separate journals. The majority were published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics, the Journal of Neurosurgery and Neurosurgery. The most common topics included brain metastasis management (n = 20), arteriovenous malformations (n = 17), vestibular schwannomas (n = 9), technologies (n = 9), meningiomas (n = 8) and dose response/radiobiology (n = 6). Fifty-seven percent of the articles were published in the last 10 years. The first radiosurgery report by Leksell (1951) initiated the field. The 1980s were a period of new technology development followed in the 1990s by introductory articles on specific indications that consisted mainly of retrospective case series. More sophisticated higher level evidence reports were published in the last decade. The most significant works in radiosurgery include initial technology descriptions, multicenter studies with large numbers of patients, randomized clinical trials and reports that provide dose prescription guidelines. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Intracranial radiosurgery: an effective and disruptive innovation in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, Ajay; Madhavan, Ravindranath; Gerszten, Peter C; Lunsford, L Dade

    2012-01-01

    Physicians are guided by the teachings of their chosen field, standards of accepted practice, peer pressure, prior training, and other sources of bias. When potential bias begins to impact recommendations for care in the field of tumor management, physicians may fail to realize the importance of emerging medical innovations. Some of these ultimately turn out to be 'disruptive innovations.' These innovations are more often than not both low risk and cost effective. But the leaders in the field often initially ignore these newer technologies in favor of more mature existing technologies. However, over time these technologies gradually improve and become mainstream management practices. Intracranial radiosurgery is one such innovation which was not embraced by the neurosurgical community in the beginning. Nowadays, a wide variety of brain and body disorders are treated with radiosurgery. Acoustic neuromas and brain metastases are examples of rapidly growing indications of radiosurgery. In this report, the authors describe the emergence of stereotactic radiosurgery as a disruptive innovation in the field of medicine. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Outcome After Pituitary Radiosurgery for Thalamic Pain Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Motohiro; Chernov, Mikhail F.; Taira, Takaomi; Ochiai, Taku; Nakaya, Kotaro; Tamura, Noriko; Goto, Shinichi; Yomo, Shoji; Kouyama, Nobuo; Katayama, Yoko; Kawakami, Yoriko; Izawa, Masahiro; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes after pituitary radiosurgery in patients with post-stroke thalamic pain syndrome. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2006, 24 patients with thalamic pain syndrome underwent pituitary radiosurgery at Tokyo Women's Medical University and were followed at least 12 months thereafter. The radiosurgical target was defined as the pituitary gland and its connection with the pituitary stalk. The maximum dose varied from 140 to 180 Gy. Mean follow-up after treatment was 35 months (range, 12-48 months). Results: Initial pain reduction, usually within 48 h after radiosurgery, was marked in 17 patients (71%). However, in the majority of cases the pain recurred within 6 months after treatment, and at the time of the last follow-up examination durable pain control was marked in only 5 patients (21%). Ten patients (42%) had treatment-associated side effects. Anterior pituitary abnormalities were marked in 8 cases and required hormonal replacement therapy in 3; transient diabetes insipidus was observed in 2 cases, transient hyponatremia in 1, and clinical deterioration due to increase of the numbness severity despite significant reduction of pain was seen once. Conclusions: Pituitary radiosurgery for thalamic pain results in a high rate of initial efficacy and is accompanied by acceptable morbidity. It can be used as a primary minimally invasive management option for patients with post-stroke thalamic pain resistant to medical therapy. However, in the majority of cases pain recurrence occurs within 1 year after treatment

  11. A simulation and training environment for robotic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaefer, Alexander [University of Luebeck, Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, Luebeck (Germany); Stanford University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford, CA (United States); Gill, Jakub; Schweikard, Achim [University of Luebeck, Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, Luebeck (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    To provide a software environment for simulation of robotic radiosurgery, particularly to study the effective robot workspace with respect to the treatment plan quality, and to illustrate the concepts of robotic radiosurgery. A simulation environment for a robotic radiosurgery system was developed using Java and Java3D. The kinematics and the beam characteristics were modeled and linked to a treatment planning module. Simulations of different robot workspace parameters for two example radiosurgical patient cases were performed using the novel software tool. The first case was an intracranial lesion near the left inner ear, the second case was a spinal lesion. The planning parameters for both cases were visualized with the novel simulation environment. An incremental extension of the robot workspace had limited effect for the intracranial case, where the original workspace already covered the left side of the patient. For the spinal case, a larger workspace resulted in a noticeable improvement in plan quality and a large portion of the beams being delivered from the extended workspace. The new software environment is useful to simulate and analyze parameters and configurations for robotic radiosurgery. An enlarged robot workspace may result in improved plan quality depending on the location of the target region. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery. QUIRO-DEGRO trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabel-du Bois, A.; Milker-Zabel, S.; Debus, J. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology; Henzel, M.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Popp, W. [Prime Networks AG, Basel (Switzerland); Sack, H. [Essen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-09-15

    Background: The German Society of Radiation Oncology ('Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie', DEGRO) initiated a multicenter trial to develop and evaluate adequate modules to assert core processes and subprocesses in radiotherapy. The aim of this prospective evaluation was to methodical assess the required resources (technical equipment and medical staff) for stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery. Material and methods: At two radiotherapy centers of excellence (University Hospitals of Heidelberg and Marburg/Giessen), the manpower and time required for the implementation of intra- and extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy was prospectively collected consistently over a 3-month period. The data were collected using specifically developed process acquisition tools and standard forms and were evaluated using specific process analysis tools. Results: For intracranial (extracranial) fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and radiosurgery (RS), a total of 1,925 (270) and 199 (36) records, respectively, could be evaluated. The approximate time needed to customize the immobilization device was median 37 min (89 min) for FRST and 31 min (26 min) for RS, for the contrast enhanced planning studies 22 and 27 min (25 and 28 min), for physical treatment planning 122 and 59 min (187 and 27 min), for the first and routine radiotherapy sessions for FSRT 40 and 13 min (58 and 31 min), respectively. The median time needed for the RS session was 58 min (45 min). The corresponding minimal manpower needed was 2 technicians for customization of the immobilization device, 2.5 technicians and 1 consultant for the contrast-enhanced planning studies, 1 consultant, 0.5 resident and 0.67 medical physics expert (MPE) for physical treatment planning, as well as 1 consultant, 0.5 resident, and 2.5 technicians for the first radiotherapy treatment and 2.33 technicians for routine radiotherapy sessions. Conclusion: For the first time, the resource requirements for a

  13. Summary of Session III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002

  14. Session 7: Reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, R.; Crockford, G.

    2001-01-01

    The reserve session was devoted to some issues that came up through the workshop, which were grouped into three main areas: The Global Accelerator Network, Problems of stress and how to get organized to minimize them, What should an operations group be responsible for? This paper summarizes the discussions that took place. (author)

  15. Multiparty Asynchronous Session Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honda, Kohei; Yoshida, Nobuko; Carbone, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Communication is a central elements in software development. As a potential typed foundation for structured communication-centered programming, session types have been studied over the past decade for a wide range of process calculi and programming languages, focusing on binary (two-party) sessio...

  16. Poster Session- Extended Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack D. Alexander III; Jean Findley; Brenda K. Kury; Jan L. Beyers; Douglas S. Cram; Terrell T. Baker; Jon C. Boren; Carl Edminster; Sue A. Ferguson; Steven McKay; David Nagel; Trent Piepho; Miriam Rorig; Casey Anderson; Jeanne Hoadley; Paulette L. Ford; Mark C. Andersen; Ed L. Fredrickson; Joe Truett; Gary W. Roemer; Brenda K. Kury; Jennifer Vollmer; Christine L. May; Danny C. Lee; James P. Menakis; Robert E. Keane; Zhi-Liang Zhu; Carol Miller; Brett Davis; Katharine Gray; Ken Mix; William P. Kuvlesky Jr.; D. Lynn Drawe; Marcia G. Narog; Roger D. Ottmar; Robert E. Vihnanek; Clinton S. Wright; Timothy E. Paysen; Burton K. Pendleton; Rosemary L. Pendleton; Carleton S. White; John Rogan; Doug Stow; Janet Franklin; Jennifer Miller; Lisa Levien; Chris Fischer; Emma Underwood; Robert Klinger; Peggy Moore; Clinton S. Wright

    2008-01-01

    Titles found within Poster Session-Extended Abstracts include:Assessment of emergency fire rehabilitation of four fires from the 2000 fire season on the Vale, Oregon, BLM district: review of the density sampling materials and methods: p. 329 Growth of regreen, seeded for erosion control, in the...

  17. The outreach sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trache, Livius [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2015-02-24

    These are moderator’s remarks about the outreach day in the middle of the CSSP14, and in particular about the afternoon outreach session in round table format with the announced theme: “CERN at 60 and the internationalization of science”.

  18. Evaluation of Image-Guided Positioning for Frameless Intracranial Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamba, Michael; Breneman, John C.; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The standard for target alignment and immobilization in intracranial radiosurgery is frame-based alignment and rigid immobilization using a stereotactic head ring. Recent improvements in image-guidance systems have introduced the possibility of image-guided radiosurgery with nonrigid immobilization. We present data on the alignment accuracy and patient stability of a frameless image-guided system. Methods and Materials: Isocenter alignment errors were measured for in vitro studies in an anthropomorphic phantom for both frame-based stereotactic and frameless image-guided alignment. Subsequently, in vivo studies assessed differences between frame-based and image-guided alignment in patients who underwent frame-based intracranial radiosurgery. Finally, intratreatment target stability was determined by image-guided alignment performed before and after image-guided mask immobilized radiosurgery. Results: In vitro hidden target localization errors were comparable for the framed (0.7 ± 0.5 mm) and image-guided (0.6 ± 0.2 mm) techniques. The in vivo differences in alignment were 0.9 ± 0.5 mm (anteroposterior), -0.2 ± 0.4 mm (superoinferior), and 0.3 ± 0.5 mm (lateral). For in vivo stability tests, the mean distance differed between the pre- and post-treatment positions with mask-immobilized radiosurgery by 0.5 ± 0.3 mm. Conclusion: Frame-based and image-guided alignment accuracy in vitro was comparable for the system tested. In vivo tests showed a consistent trend in the difference of alignment in the anteroposterior direction, possibly due to torque to the ring and mounting system with frame-based localization. The mask system as used appeared adequate for patient immobilization.

  19. Scalp Seeding Post Craniotomy and Radiosurgery for Solitary Brain Metastasis: A Case Report and Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sharieff, Waseem; Mulroy, Liam; Weeks, Adrienne; Mansoor, Samina; Pahil, Rajbir; Islam, Muhammad U

    2017-01-01

    Background?? Radiosurgery is being increasingly used post craniotomy for brain metastasis, instead of whole-brain radiation. We report a case of scalp metastasis following craniotomy and radiosurgery, along with a systematic review of the literature. Methods???????? Our patient was a 70-year-old male who presented with a scalp metastasis, two years after craniotomy and radiosurgery, for a solitary brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma. Using Medline? (United States National Library of Me...

  20. Knowledge Modeling for the Outcome of Brain Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Jillian E.

    Purpose: To build a model that will predict the survival time for patients that were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases using support vector machine (SVM) regression. Methods and Materials: This study utilized data from 481 patients, which were equally divided into training and validation datasets randomly. The SVM model used a Gaussian RBF function, along with various parameters, such as the size of the epsilon insensitive region and the cost parameter (C) that are used to control the amount of error tolerated by the model. The predictor variables for the SVM model consisted of the actual survival time of the patient, the number of brain metastases, the graded prognostic assessment (GPA) and Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) scores, prescription dose, and the largest planning target volume (PTV). The response of the model is the survival time of the patient. The resulting survival time predictions were analyzed against the actual survival times by single parameter classification and two-parameter classification. The predicted mean survival times within each classification were compared with the actual values to obtain the confidence interval associated with the model's predictions. In addition to visualizing the data on plots using the means and error bars, the correlation coefficients between the actual and predicted means of the survival times were calculated during each step of the classification. Results: The number of metastases and KPS scores, were consistently shown to be the strongest predictors in the single parameter classification, and were subsequently used as first classifiers in the two-parameter classification. When the survival times were analyzed with the number of metastases as the first classifier, the best correlation was obtained for patients with 3 metastases, while patients with 4 or 5 metastases had significantly worse results. When the KPS score was used as the first classifier, patients with a KPS score of 60 and

  1. LINAC-based stereotactic radiosurgery for meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seong Soo; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Yong Chan

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of LINAC-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of meningiomas, we reviewed clinical response, image response, neurological deficits for patients treated at our institution. Between February 1995 and December 1999, twenty-six patients were treated with SRS. Seven patients had undergone prior resection. Nineteen patients received SRS as the initial treatment. There were 7 male and 19 female patients. The median age was 51 years (range, 14-67 years). At least one clinical symptom presented at the time of SRS in 17 patients and cranial neuropathy was seen in 7 patients. The median tumor volume was 4.7 cm 3 (range, 0.7-16.5 cm 3 ). The mean marginal dose was 15 Gy (range, 10-20 Gy), delivered to the 80% isodose surface (ranger 46-90%). The median clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 27 months (range, 1-71 months) and 25 months (range, 1-52 months), respectively. Of 14 patients who had clinical follow-up of one year or longer, thirteen patients (93%) were improved clinically at follow-up examination. Clinical symptom worsened in one patient at 4 months after SRS as a result of intratumoral edema, who underwent surgical resection at 7 months. Of 14 patients who had radiologic follow-up of one year or longer, tumor volume decreased in 7 patients (50%) at a median of 11 months (range, 6-25 months), remained stable in 6 patients (43%), and increased in one patient (7%), who underwent surgical resection at 44 months. New radiation-induced neurological deficits developed in six patients (23%), Five patients (19%) had transient neurological deficits, completely resolved by conservative treatment including steroid therapy. Radiation-induced brain necrosis developed in one patient (3.8%) at 9 months after SRS who followed by surgical resection of tumor and necrotic tissue. LINAC-based SRS proves to be an effective and safe management strategy for small to moderate sized meningiomas, inoperable, residual, and recurrent, but longterm

  2. Evaluation of the uncertainties in the TLD radiosurgery postal dose system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, L. T.; Leite, S. P.; de Almeida, C. E. V.; Magalhães, L. A. G.

    2018-03-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is a single-fraction radiation therapy procedure for treating intracranial lesions using a stereotactic apparatus and multiple narrow beams delivered through noncoplanar isocentric arcs. To guarantee a high quality standard, a comprehensive Quality Assurance programme is extremely important to ensure that the measured dose is consistent with the tolerance considered to improve treatment quality. The Radiological Science Laboratory operates a postal audit programme in SRT and SRS. The purpose of the programme is to verify the target localization accuracy in known geometry and the dosimetric conditions of the TPS. The programme works in such a way those thermoluminescence dosimeters, consisting of LiF chips, are sent to the centre where they are to be irradiated to a certain dose. The TLD are then returned, where they are evaluated and the absorbed dose is obtained from TLDs readings. The aim of the present work is estimate the uncertainties in the process of dose determination, using experimental data.

  3. Intensity-modulated Radiosurgery for patients with brain metastases: a mature outcomes analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Samuel J; Choi, Mehee; Fuller, Clifton D; Salter, Bill J; Fuss, Martin

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients with brain metastases treated by tomotherapeutic Intensity-modulated Radiosurgery (IMRS). Using retrospective chart review, we analyzed the outcomes of 78 patients (age 33-83 years, median 57 years) who underwent 111 sessions of IMRS (1 to 7 sessions per patient, median 1) for brain metastases (1 to 4 targets per IMRS session, median 1) treated between 2000 and 2005 using a serial tomotherapeutic intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment (IMRT) planning and delivery system (Peacock, Nomos Corp., Cranberry Township, PA). Treatment planning was performed using an inverse treatment planning optimization algorithm that was optimized for IMRS. A median prescription dose of 15 Gy in combination with WBI, and median 20 Gy for IMRS alone was delivered using 2-4 couch angles over 4-24 rotational arcs. Overall survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. To determine the effects of prognostic variables on survival, univariate and multivariate analyses using proportional hazards were performed to assess the effects of age, tumor size, the combination with whole brain irradiation, presence of multiple brain metastases, and presence of extracranial disease. The median overall survival was 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.5-7.9). One- and two-year survival rates were 24% and 10%. In multivariate analyses, age greater than 60 years was the only statistically significant variable that affected survival (hazard rate 1.29, p=0.049). We conclude that tomotherapeutic IMRS is safe and effective to treat patients with brain metastases.

  4. Changes in the biogenic amine content of the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens of rats submitted to single and repeated sessions of the elevated plus-maze test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that exposure to a variety of stressful experiences enhances fearful reactions when behavior is tested in current animal models of anxiety. Until now, no study has examined the neurochemical changes during the test and retest sessions of rats submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM. The present study uses a new approach (HPLC by looking at the changes in dopamine and serotonin levels in the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens in animals upon single or double exposure to the EPM (one-trial tolerance. The study involved two experiments: i saline or midazolam (0.5 mg/kg before the first trial, and ii saline or midazolam before the second trial. For the biochemical analysis a control group injected with saline and not tested in the EPM was included. Stressful stimuli in the EPM were able to elicit one-trial tolerance to midazolam on re-exposure (61.01%. Significant decreases in serotonin contents occurred in the prefrontal cortex (38.74%, amygdala (78.96%, dorsal hippocampus (70.33%, and nucleus accumbens (73.58% of the animals tested in the EPM (P < 0.05 in all cases in relation to controls not exposed to the EPM. A significant decrease in dopamine content was also observed in the amygdala (54.74%, P < 0.05. These changes were maintained across trials. There was no change in the turnover rates of these monoamines. We suggest that exposure to the EPM causes reduced monoaminergic neurotransmission activity in limbic structures, which appears to underlie the "one-trial tolerance" phenomenon.

  5. Comparison of retrograde intrarenal surgery versus a single-session percutaneous nephrolithotomy for lower-pole stones with a diameter of 15 to 30 mm: A propensity score-matching study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gyoo Hwan; Jung, Jae Hyun; Ahn, Tae Sik; Lee, Joong Sub; Cho, Sung Yong; Jeong, Chang Wook; Lee, Seung Bae; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Oh, Seung-June

    2015-07-01

    To investigate surgical outcomes between retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) groups for a main stone sized 15 to 30 mm and located in the lower-pole calyx. Patients who underwent PNL or RIRS for a main stone sized 15 to 30 mm and located in the lower-pole calyx were retrospectively reviewed. Each patient in the RIRS group was matched to one in the PNL group on the basis of calculated propensity scores by use of age, sex, body mass index, previous treatment history, stone site, maximum stone size, and stone volume. We compared perioperative outcomes between the unmatched and matched groups. Patients underwent PNL (n=87, 66.4%) or RIRS (n=44, 33.6%). After matching, 44 patients in each group were included. Mean patient age was 54.4 ± 13.7 years. Perioperative hemoglobin drop was significantly higher and the hospital stay was longer in the PNL group than in the RIRS group. The operative time was significantly longer in the RIRS group than in the PNL group. Stone-free rates were higher and complications rates were lower in the RIRS group than in the PNL group without statistical significance. The presence of a stone located in the lower-anterior minor calyx was a predictor of stone-free status. RIRS and single-session PNL for patients with a main stone of 15 to 30 mm located in the lower-pole calyx showed comparable surgical results. However, RIRS can be performed more safely than PNL with less bleeding. Stones in the lower-anterior minor calyx should be carefully removed during these procedures.

  6. Clinical efficacy and safety of surface imaging guided radiosurgery (SIG-RS) in the treatment of benign skull base tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Steven K M; Patel, Kunal; Kim, Teddy; Knipprath, Erik; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Cerviño, Laura I; Lawson, Joshua D; Murphy, Kevin T; Sanghvi, Parag; Carter, Bob S; Chen, Clark C

    2017-04-01

    Frameless, surface imaging guided radiosurgery (SIG-RS) is a novel platform for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) wherein patient positioning is monitored in real-time through infra-red camera tracking of facial topography. Here we describe our initial clinical experience with SIG-RS for the treatment of benign neoplasms of the skull base. We identified 48 patients with benign skull base tumors consecutively treated with SIG-RS at a single institution between 2009 and 2011. Patients were diagnosed with meningioma (n = 22), vestibular schwannoma (n = 20), or nonfunctional pituitary adenoma (n = 6). Local control and treatment-related toxicity were retrospectively assessed. Median follow-up was 65 months (range 61-72 months). Prescription doses were 12-13 Gy in a single fraction (n = 18), 8 Gy × 3 fractions (n = 6), and 5 Gy × 5 fractions (n = 24). Actuarial tumor control rate at 5 years was 98%. No grade ≥3 treatment-related toxicity was observed. Grade ≤2 toxicity was associated with symptomatic lesions (p = 0.049) and single fraction treatment (p = 0.005). SIG-RS for benign skull base tumors produces clinical outcomes comparable to conventional frame-based SRS techniques while enhancing patient comfort.

  7. ICALEPS 2005 : opening session

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    ICALEPCS 2005, the tenth International Conference on Accelerator and Large Experimental Physics Control Systems, will be held in Geneva, Switzerland, 10-14 Oct. 2005 at the International Conference Center Geneva (CICG). ICALEPCS 2005 thus falls in the year that UNESCO has declared the "World Year of Physics". ICALEPCS covers all aspects of control and operation of Experimental Physics facilities such as particle accelerators, particle detectors, optical telescopes, radio telescopes, nuclear fusion facilities like Tokamaks, nuclear reactors, lasers, etc .... Opening session by . A. Daneels (CERN): Introducting ICALEPCS 2005 . C.Lamprecht (Republic & State of Geneva): Welcome speech . J. Lister (EPFL): Welcome speech . J. Engelen (CERN): The machine and experiment challenges of LHC

  8. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  9. Session: Reservoir Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

  10. Basic life support knowledge, self-reported skills and fears in Danish high school students and effect of a single 45-min training session run by junior doctors; a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaberg, Anne Marie Roust; Larsen, Caroline Emilie Brenner; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2014-01-01

    training session run by junior doctors. METHODS: Six-hundred-fifty-one students were included. They underwent one 45-minute BLS training session including theoretical aspects and hands-on training with mannequins. The students completed a baseline questionnaire before the training session and a follow......-three percent of the students (413/651) had participated in prior BLS training. Only 28% (179/651) knew how to correctly recognize normal breathing. The majority was afraid of exacerbating the condition or causing death by intervening as first responder. The response rate at follow-up was 61% (399...... areas of BLS is poor among high school students. One hands-on training session run by junior doctors seems to be efficient to empower the students to be first responders to OHCA....

  11. 98th LHCC meeting Agenda OPEN Session and CLOSED Session

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    OPEN Session on Wednesday, 8 July at 9h00-11h00 in Main Auditorium, Live webcast, followed by CLOSED Session, Conference room 160-1-009 11h20-17h00. CLOSED Session continued on Thursday, 9 July at 9h00-12h30

  12. Linear accelerator radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Hyong Geun

    2006-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is defined as an episodic electrical shock-like sensation in a dermatomal distribution of the trigeminal nerve. When medications fail to control pain, various procedures are used to attempt to control refractory pain. Of available procedures, stereotactic radiosurgery is the least invasive procedure and has been demonstrated to produce significant pain relief with minimal side effects. Recently, linear accelerators were introduced as a tool for radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia beneath the already accepted gamma unit. Author have experienced one case with trigeminal neuralgia treated with linear accelerator. The patient was treated with 85 Gy by means of 5 mm collimator directed to trigeminal nerve root entry zone. The patient obtained pain free without medication at 20 days after the procedure and remain pain free at 6 months after the procedure. He didn't experience facial numbness or other side effects

  13. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipsen, S.; Blanck, O.; Rades, D.; Oborn, B.; Bode, F.; Liney, G.; Hunold, P.; Schweikard, A.; Keall, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  14. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsen, S. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia and Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Blanck, O.; Rades, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Oborn, B. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Bode, F. [Medical Department II, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Liney, G. [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Hunold, P. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Schweikard, A. [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Keall, P. J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  15. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipsen, S; Blanck, O; Oborn, B; Bode, F; Liney, G; Hunold, P; Rades, D; Schweikard, A; Keall, P J

    2014-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior-inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior-posterior), and 2 mm (left-right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the ideal scenario, compromising

  16. Pain relief by Cyberknife radiosurgery for spinal metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunyoung; Chun, Mison

    2012-01-01

    To report pain relief effect in patients with spinal metastases treated with Cyberknife® and to analyze the factors associated with pain relapse after initial pain relief. We retrospectively analyzed patients with spinal metastasis treated with stereotactic body radiosurgery between April 2007 and June 2009. A total of 57 patients with 73 lesions were available for analysis with a median follow-up of 6.8 months (range, 1-30). Pain was assessed by a verbal/visual analogue scale at each visit: from 0 to 10. Pain relief was defined as a decrease of at least three levels of the pain score without an increase in analgesic use. Complete relief was defined as no analgesics or a score 0 or 1. Pain relief was achieved in 88% of the lesions, with complete relief in 51% within 7 days from the start of radiosurgery. The median duration of pain relief was 3.2 months (range, 1-30). Pain reappeared in 16 patients (27%). Spinal cord compression (P = 0.001) and performance status (P = 0.01) were predictive of pain relapse by multivariate Cox analysis. All 6 patients treated with solitary spinal metastasis experienced pain relief; 5 of them were alive without evidence of disease at a median of 16 months (range, 7-30). As previous studies have shown, our study confirms that pain relief with spinal radiosurgery is around 90%. In particular, long-term pain relief and disease control was observed in patients with solitary spinal metastasis.

  17. Development of a phantom for quality control of radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidegger Soboll, D.; Reuters Schelin, H.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to build a phantom for quality control of stereotactic radiosurgery on linear accelerators. The outward appearance is a translucent human head filled with water and enclosing an insert with test objects of known shapes. The phantom was submitted to computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography exams, in order to perform a radiosurgery planning. Contours of the internal structures on the therapy planning system were drawn over the MRI images. Through the image fusion of CT and MRI, the contour data was transferred to CT images. Stereotactic registration of CT and angiography was made. One isocenter treatment was created, and using the stereotactic coordinates given by the therapy planning system, the phantom was placed on a linac. X-ray images were performed in order to verify the final positioning of the planned isocenter. In the whole process the phantom showed usefulness and adequacy for the positioning quality control of stereotactic radiosurgery with linacs, according to the main documents concerning the issue. (author)

  18. Radiosurgery of Glomus Jugulare Tumors: A Meta-Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guss, Zachary D.; Batra, Sachin; Limb, Charles J.; Li, Gordon; Sughrue, Michael E.; Redmond, Kristin; Rigamonti, Daniele; Parsa, Andrew T.; Chang, Steven; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Lim, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: During the past two decades, radiosurgery has arisen as a promising approach to the management of glomus jugulare. In the present study, we report on a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available published data on the radiosurgical management of glomus jugulare tumors. Methods and Materials: To identify eligible studies, systematic searches of all glomus jugulare tumors treated with radiosurgery were conducted in major scientific publication databases. The data search yielded 19 studies, which were included in the meta-analysis. The data from 335 glomus jugulare patients were extracted. The fixed effects pooled proportions were calculated from the data when Cochrane's statistic was statistically insignificant and the inconsistency among studies was 36 months. In these studies, 95% of patients achieved clinical control and 96% achieved tumor control. The gamma knife, linear accelerator, and CyberKnife technologies all exhibited high rates of tumor and clinical control. Conclusions: The present study reports the results of a meta-analysis for the radiosurgical management of glomus jugulare. Because of its high effectiveness, we suggest considering radiosurgery for the primary management of glomus jugulare tumors.

  19. Measurement of relative dose distributions in stereotactic radiosurgery by the polymer-gel dosimeter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný ml., J.; Spěváček, V.; Hrbáček, J.; Judas, L.; Novotný, J.; Dvořák, P.; Tlacháčová, D.; Schmitt, M.; Tintěra, J.; Vymazal, J.; Čechák, T.; Michálek, Jiří; Přádný, Martin; Liščák, R.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 5, - (2004), s. 225-235 ISSN 1024-2651. [International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Meeting /6./. Kyoto, 22.06.2003-26.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA MZd NC7460 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : stereotactic radiosurgery * polymer-gel dosimeter Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  20. Long-term follow-up of patients with surgical intractable acromegaly after linear accelerator radiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Lin Yan

    2013-07-01

    Conclusion: In comparison to other radiosurgery modalities, LINAC radiosurgery also provides a satisfactory outcome. SRS has maximum effect over the first 2 years and stabilizes after 7.5 years. Moreover, SRS elicits long-term biochemical effects and requires longer follow-up for better biochemical remission.

  1. Validation of the dual-table autoradiographic method to quantify two sequential rCBFs in a single SPET session with N-isopropyl-[123I]p-iodoamphetamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Iida, Hidehiro; Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Ito, Harumi; Konishi, Junji; Yonekura, Yoshiharu

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated an autoradiographic (ARG) method to calculate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) sequentially before and after an acetazolamide (ACZ) challenge in a single session of single-photon emission tomography (SPET) with two injections of N-isopropyl-[ 123 I]p-iodoamphetamine (IMP). The method uses a table look-up method with a fixed distribution volume (Vd) and a standard input function of IMP. To calculate rCBF after an ACZ challenge, two look-up tables (a dual-table) are used to reflect the effect of radioactivity in the brain from the first dose of IMP. We performed simulation studies to evaluate errors attributable to (a) a change in rCBF induced by an ACZ challenge during the scan and (b) a fixed Vd value that might be different from an individual one, along with the effect of (c) scan length. Thirty-three patients were studied by dynamic SPET with two injections of IMP and frequent arterial blood sampling, and the data were analysed using the dual-table ARG method. Twenty-four of the 33 patients received an injection of ACZ 10 min before the second dose of IMP. We generated a standard input function by averaging individual input functions. The optimal method to calibrate a standard input function was determined so that the SD of differences between rCBF calculated by using a calibrated standard input function (F SIF ) and that calculated by using an individual input function (F IIF ) was minimised. Reliability of the method was evaluated by comparing F SIF with gold standard rCBF (F REF ) obtained by two-compartment model analysis of dynamic SPET data and an individual input function with a non-linear least squares fitting method. Errors caused by (a) were less than 4% for a first rCBF ranging between 20 and 60 ml 100 g -1 min -1 and an rCBF change of between -25% and 50%. Errors caused by (b) were relatively large compared with those caused by (a), and were affected by (c) with an increasing error in a longer scan. In the patient study with a proposed

  2. LINAC-radiosurgery for nonsecreting pituitary adenomas. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runge, M.J.R.; Maarouf, M.; Hunsche, S.; Ruge, M.I.; El Majdoub, F.; Treuer, H.; Sturm, V. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery; Kocher, M.; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Voges, J. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    2012-04-15

    Stereotactic linear accelerator-based radiosurgery (LINAC-RS) is increasingly used for microsurgically inaccessible or recurrent pituitary adenomas. This single-center study evaluates the long-term follow-up after LINAC-RS of nonsecreting pituitary adenomas (NSA). Patients and methods: Between 1992 and August 2008, 65 patients with NSA were treated. Patient treatment and follow-up were conducted according to a prospective protocol. Indications for LINAC-RS were (1) tumor recurrence or (2) residual tumor. Three patients were treated primarily. For analysis of prognostic factors, patients were grouped according to epidemiological or treatment-associated characteristics. Results: A total of 61 patients with a follow-up {>=} 12 months (median 83 months, range 15-186 months, longest follow-up of published radiosurgery series) were evaluated with regard to their clinical, radiological, and endocrinological course. The median tumor volume was 3.5 ml ({+-} 4.3 ml, range 0.3-17.3 ml) treated with a median surface and maximum dose of 13.0 Gy and 29.7 Gy, respectively. Local tumor control was achieved in 98%. One patient died of unrelated cause after 36 months and 1 patient developed a radiation-induced seizure disorder. Visual complications did not occur. In 37 of 41 patients (90.2%), pituitary function remained stable. Maximum dose to the pituitary {<=} 16 Gy and female gender were positive prognostic factors for the preservation of pituitary function. Conclusion: LINAC-RS is a minimally invasive, safe, and effective treatment for recurrent NSA or microsurgically inaccessible residual tumor. LINAC-RS yielded a high rate of local long-term tumor control with a small number of radiation-induced side effects. (orig.)

  3. Optimal technique of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for tumors adjacent to brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiou-Shiung; Hwang, Jing-Min; Tai, Po-An; Chang, You-Kang; Wang, Yu-Nong; Shih, Rompin; Chuang, Keh-Shih

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a well-established technique that is replacing whole-brain irradiation in the treatment of intracranial lesions, which leads to better preservation of brain functions, and therefore a better quality of life for the patient. There are several available forms of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SRS, and the goal of the present study is to identify which of these techniques is best (as evaluated by dosimetric outcomes statistically) when the target is located adjacent to brainstem. We collected the records of 17 patients with lesions close to the brainstem who had previously been treated with single-fraction radiosurgery. In all, 5 different lesion catalogs were collected, and the patients were divided into 2 distance groups-1 consisting of 7 patients with a target-to-brainstem distance of less than 0.5cm, and the other of 10 patients with a target-to-brainstem distance of ≥ 0.5 and techniques included multiple noncoplanar beams or arcs with or without intensity-modulated delivery. The volume of gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 0.2cm(3) to 21.9cm(3). Regarding the dose homogeneity index (HIICRU) and conformity index (CIICRU) were without significant difference between techniques statistically. However, the average CIICRU = 1.09 ± 0.56 achieved by VMAT was the best of the 3 techniques. Moreover, notable improvement in gradient index (GI) was observed when VMAT was used (0.74 ± 0.13), and this result was significantly better than those achieved by the 2 other techniques (p techniques required higher MU delivery than DCA, with the averages being twice as high (p technique for delivering treatment to tumors adjacent to brainstem. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. All rights reserved.

  4. Gamma knife radiosurgery for glomus jugulare tumors: therapeutic advantages of minimalism in the skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manish S; Gupta, A; Kale, S S; Agrawal, D; Mahapatra, A K; Sharma, B S

    2008-01-01

    Glomus jugulare (GJ) tumors are paragangliomas found in the region of the jugular foramen. Surgery with/without embolization and conventional radiotherapy has been the traditional management option. To analyze the efficacy of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) as a primary or an adjunctive form of therapy. A retrospective analysis of patients who received GKS at a tertiary neurosurgical center was performed. Of the 1601 patients who underwent GKS from 1997 to 2006, 24 patients with GJ underwent 25 procedures. The average age of the cohort was 46.6 years (range, 22-76 years) and the male to female ratio was 1:2. The most common neurological deficit was IX, X, XI cranial nerve paresis (15/24). Fifteen patients received primary GKS. Mean tumor size was 8.7 cc (range 1.1-17.2 cc). The coverage achieved was 93.1% (range 90-97%) using a mean tumor margin dose of 16.4 Gy (range 12-25 Gy) at a mean isodose of 49.5% (range 45-50%). Thirteen patients (six primary and seven secondary) were available for follow-up at a median interval of 24 months (range seven to 48 months). The average tumor size was 7.9 cc (range 1.1-17.2 cc). Using a mean tumor margin dose of 16.3 Gy (range 12-20 Gy) 93.6% coverage (range 91-97%) was achieved. Six patients improved clinically. A single patient developed transient trigeminal neuralgia. Magnetic resonance imaging follow-up was available for 10 patients; seven recorded a decrease in size. There was no tumor progression. Gamma knife radiosurgery is a safe and effective primary and secondary modality of treatment for GJ.

  5. Static jaw collimation settings to minimize radiation dose to normal brain tissue during stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Young, E-mail: eyhan@uams.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Zhang Xin; Yan Yulong; Sharma, Sunil; Penagaricano, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Moros, Eduardo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Corry, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2012-01-01

    At University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning target volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.

  6. Intersections and Unions of Session Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coşku Acay

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior work has extended the deep, logical connection between the linear sequent calculus and session-typed message-passing concurrent computation with equi-recursive types and a natural notion of subtyping. In this paper, we extend this further by intersection and union types in order to express multiple behavioral properties of processes in a single type. We prove session fidelity and absence of deadlock and illustrate the expressive power of our system with some simple examples. We observe that we can represent internal and external choice by intersection and union, respectively, which was previously suggested by Padovani for a different language of session types motivated by operational rather than logical concerns.

  7. Pathologic effects of gamma-knife radiosurgery on arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, B.F.; Eberhard, D.A.; Steiner, L.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective method for treating many arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Hemodynamic changes and varying degrees of obliteration of an AVM nidus following radiosurgery have been described with angiography, but there have been no detailed reports describing histopathologic changes in AVM after radiation. The purpose of this study was to examine AVM at various times after gamma-knife radiosurgery in order to determine the mechanism of vessel occlusion after this procedure. Methods: Nine AVM specimens were obtained at autopsy or after surgical excision of residual nidus at times ranging from 10 months to more than 5 years after gamma knife radiosurgery. Formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded sections were examined using routine histopathologic stains: hematoxylin and eosin (H and E), Mallory's phosphotungstic acid-hematoxylin (PTAH), Elastic-van Gieson (EVG), and Hematoxylin-van Gieson (HVG). Additionally, immunohistochemical techniques were used to detect: smooth muscle actin (SMA), Factor VIII, and Type IV collagen. Results: Blood vessels within the AVM show progressive occlusion which correlated with the time interval after radiosurgery. The earliest changes after radiation appear to be damage to and loss of endothelial cells. At this early stage of vascular damage fibrin thrombi are sometimes apparent in the lumen of vessels. With time after radiation there is progressive thickening of the intimal layer, due to proliferation of smooth muscle cells. It is clearly demonstrated, immunohistochemically, that this accumulation of cells within the intimal layer reacts positively for smooth muscle actin, and negatively for Factor VIII (an endothelial cell marker). Using immunohistochemistry it is, also, apparent that these smooth muscle cells are surrounded by an extracellular matrix of Type I collagen, which increases in amount and density over time. Ultimately, vessels are completely occluded by an acellular, amorphous hyalin

  8. Session management for web-based healthcare applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, L; Sengupta, S

    1999-01-01

    In health care systems, users may access multiple applications during one session of interaction with the system. However, users must sign on to each application individually, and it is difficult to maintain a common context among these applications. We are developing a session management system for web-based applications using LDAP directory service, which will allow single sign-on to multiple web-based applications, and maintain a common context among those applications for the user. This paper discusses the motivations for building this system, the system architecture, and the challenges of our approach, such as the session objects management for the user, and session security.

  9. Endothelial membrane remodeling is obligate for anti-angiogenic radiosensitization during tumor radiosurgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philip Truman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While there is significant interest in combining anti-angiogenesis therapy with conventional anti-cancer treatment, clinical trials have as of yet yielded limited therapeutic gain, mainly because mechanisms of anti-angiogenic therapy remain to a large extent unknown. Currently, anti-angiogenic tumor therapy is conceptualized to either “normalize” dysfunctional tumor vasculature, or to prevent recruitment of circulating endothelial precursors into the tumor. An alternative biology, restricted to delivery of anti-angiogenics immediately prior to single dose radiotherapy (radiosurgery, is provided in the present study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genetic data indicate an acute wave of ceramide-mediated endothelial apoptosis, initiated by acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, regulates tumor stem cell response to single dose radiotherapy, obligatory for tumor cure. Here we show VEGF prevented radiation-induced ASMase activation in cultured endothelium, occurring within minutes after radiation exposure, consequently repressing apoptosis, an event reversible with exogenous C16-ceramide. Anti-VEGFR2 acts conversely, enhancing ceramide generation and apoptosis. In vivo, MCA/129 fibrosarcoma tumors were implanted in asmase+/+ mice or asmase−/− littermates and irradiated in the presence or absence of anti-VEGFR2 DC101 or anti-VEGF G6-31 antibodies. These anti-angiogenic agents, only if delivered immediately prior to single dose radiotherapy, de-repressed radiation-induced ASMase activation, synergistically increasing the endothelial apoptotic component of tumor response and tumor cure. Anti-angiogenic radiosensitization was abrogated in tumors implanted in asmase−/− mice that provide apoptosis-resistant vasculature, or in wild-type littermates pre-treated with anti-ceramide antibody, indicating that ceramide is necessary for this effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies show that angiogenic factors fail to suppress apoptosis if

  10. MO-A-BRD-08: Radiosurgery Beyond Cancer: Real-Time Target Localization and Treatment Planning for Cardiac Radiosurgery Under MRI Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsen, S [University of Luebeck, Luebeck, SH (Germany); University of Sydney, Camperdown (Australia); Blanck, O [CyberKnife Zentrum Norddeutschland, Guestrow, MV (Germany); Oborn, B [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Bode, F [Medical Clinic II, Section for Electrophysiology, UKSH, Luebeck, SH (Germany); Liney, G [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Keall, P [University of Sydney, Camperdown (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting >2.5M Americans and >4.5M Europeans. AF is usually treated with minimally-invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. Radiosurgery of the pulmonary veins (PV) has been proposed for AF treatment, however is challenging due to the complex respiratory and cardiac motion patterns. We hypothesize that an MRI-linac could solve the difficult real-time targeting and adaptation problem. In this study we quantified target motion ranges on cardiac MRI and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time MRI tracking was applied. Methods: For the motion study, four human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion on coronal and axial cine planes was analyzed using a template matching algorithm. For the planning study, an ablation line at each PV antrum was defined as target on an AF patient scheduled for catheter ablation. Various safety margins ranging from 0mm (perfect tracking) to 8mm (untracked motion) were added to the target defining the PTV. 30Gy single fraction IMRT plans were then generated. Finally, the influence of a 1T magnetic field on treatment beam delivery was calculated using the Geant4 Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance. Results: The motion study showed the mean respiratory motion of the target area on MRI was 8.4mm (SI), 1.7mm (AP) and 0.3mm (LR). Cardiac motion was small (<2mm). The planning study showed that with increasing safety margins to encompass untracked motion, dose tolerances for OARs such as the esophagus and airways were exceeded by >100%. The magnetic field had little impact on the dose distribution. Conclusion: Our results indicate that real-time MRI tracking of the PVs seems feasible. Accurate image guidance for high-dose AF radiosurgery is essential since safety margins covering untracked target motion will result in unacceptable treatment plans.

  11. Formal description of the OSI session layer: session service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sinderen, Marten J.; van Eijk, P.H.J.; Vissers, C.A.; Diaz, M.

    1989-01-01

    The LOTOS formal description of the OSI session service is presented on basis of specification samples from the full description, giving account of how specification styles and session service architectural elements are reflected in the description. Both information (data types) and process

  12. Spinal Cord Tolerance in the Age of Spinal Radiosurgery: Lessons From Preclinical Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, Paul M.; Boike, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical implementation of spinal radiosurgery has increased rapidly in recent years, but little is known regarding human spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction irradiation. In contrast, preclinical studies in single-fraction spinal cord tolerance have been ongoing since the 1970s. The influences of field length, dose rate, inhomogeneous dose distributions, and reirradiation have all been investigated. This review summarizes literature regarding single-fraction spinal cord tolerance in preclinical models with an emphasis on practical clinical significance. The outcomes of studies that incorporate uniform irradiation are surprisingly consistent among multiple small- and large-animal models. Extensive investigation of inhomogeneous dose distributions in the rat has demonstrated a significant dose-volume effect while preliminary results from one pig study are contradictory. Preclinical spinal cord dose-volume studies indicate that dose distribution is more critical than the volume irradiated suggesting that neither dose-volume histogram analysis nor absolute volume constraints are effective in predicting complications. Reirradiation data are sparse, but results from guinea pig, rat, and pig studies are consistent with the hypothesis that the spinal cord possesses a large capacity for repair. The mechanisms behind the phenomena observed in spinal cord studies are not readily explained and the ability of dose response models to predict outcomes is variable underscoring the need for further investigation. Animal studies provide insight into the phenomena and mechanisms of radiosensitivity but the true significance of animal studies can only be discovered through clinical trials.

  13. Relative 11C-PiB Delivery as a Proxy of Relative CBF: Quantitative Evaluation Using Single-Session 15O-Water and 11C-PiB PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin J; Rosario, Bedda L; Mowrey, Wenzhu; Laymon, Charles M; Lu, Xueling; Lopez, Oscar L; Klunk, William E; Lopresti, Brian J; Mathis, Chester A; Price, Julie C

    2015-08-01

    The primary goal of this study was to assess the suitability of (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ((11)C-PiB) blood-brain barrier delivery (K1) and relative delivery (R1) parameters as surrogate indices of cerebral blood flow (CBF), with a secondary goal of directly examining the extent to which simplified uptake measures of (11)C-PiB retention (amyloid-β load) may be influenced by CBF, in a cohort of controls and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD). Nineteen participants (6 controls, 5 AD, 8 MCI) underwent MR imaging, (15)O-water PET, and (11)C-PiB PET in a single session. Fourteen regions of interest (including cerebellar reference region) were defined on MR imaging and applied to dynamic coregistered PET to generate time-activity curves. Multiple analysis approaches provided regional (15)O-water and (11)C-PiB measures of delivery and (11)C-PiB retention that included compartmental modeling distribution volume ratio (DVR), arterial- and reference-based Logan DVR, simplified reference tissue modeling 2 (SRTM2) DVR, and standardized uptake value ratios. Spearman correlation was performed among delivery measures (i.e., (15)O-water K1 and (11)C-PiB K1, relative K1 normalized to cerebellum [Rel-K1-Water and Rel-K1-PiB], and (11)C-PiB SRTM2-R1) and between delivery measures and (11)C-PiB retention, using the Bonferroni method for multiple-comparison correction. Primary analysis showed positive correlations (ρ ≈0.2-0.5) between (15)O-water K1 and (11)C-PiB K1 that did not survive Bonferroni adjustment. Significant positive correlations were found between Rel-K1-Water and Rel-K1-PiB and between Rel-K1-Water and (11)C-PiB SRTM2-R1 (ρ ≈0.5-0.8, P PiB retention and relative (11)C-PiB delivery measures (but not (15)O-water delivery measures) in primary cortical areas that arose only after accounting for cerebrospinal fluid dilution. (11)C-PiB SRTM2-R1 is highly correlated with regional relative CBF, as measured by (15)O-water K1

  14. Gamma knife radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformation in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Tatsuya [Komaki City Hospital, Aichi (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVM) of 38 children were treated by gamma knife radiosurgery. Their clinical courses and the effect of the treatment in 19 patients who had angiographies are described. There were 21 boys and 17 girls with a mean age of 11.2 years. The initial signs and symptoms were: intracranial hemorrhage in 32, seizures in 4, and headache in 2. Prior to the radiosurgery, craniotomy was performed in 10 patients, ventricular drainage, in 8, ventriculoperitoneal shunting in 4, and intravascular embolization in 3. The AVM was in the parietal lobe in 8 patients, in the thalamus in 7, in the occipital lobe in 5, in the temporal lobe in 4, in the basal ganglia in 4, in the corpus callosum in 3, and in other locations in 8. The mean diameter of the nidus was 18.9 mm. According to Spetzler`s classification of AVM, 23 (60.5%) were grade III, 10 were grade II, 3 were grade IV, and 2 were grade VI. The mean maximum dose was 36.3 Gy, and the mean peripheral dose was 20.2 Gy. Follow-up angiography was done in 19 patients during a mean follow-up period of 14.9 months. Complete occlusion of the nidus was obtained within 1 year in 10 of 15 patients (67%). All 6 patients who underwent angiography 2 years after treatment showed complete obliteration of the AVM. Only 1 patient developed hemiparesis due to radiation necrosis. It is considered that occlusion of AVMs by gamma knife radiosurgery is probably more effective and safer in children than in adults. (author).

  15. The 2009 devaluation of radiosurgery and its impact on the neurosurgery-radiation oncology partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbrun, M Peter; Adler, John R

    2010-07-01

    Neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and, increasingly, other surgical specialists recognize that radiosurgery is an important tool for managing selected disorders throughout the body. The partnership between neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists has resulted in collaborative studies that have established the clinical benefits of radiosurgery. Today, however, a range of political and financial issues is straining this relationship and thereby undermining the practice of radiosurgery. Neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists recently restricted the definition of radiosurgery to include only cranial- and spine-focused radiation treatments. Meanwhile, organized radiation oncology decided unilaterally that radiosurgery administered to other parts of the body would be termed stereotactic body radiation therapy. Finally, neurosurgical and radiation oncology coding experts developed new Current Procedural Terminology codes for cranial vault and spine radiosurgery, which were approved for use by the Relative Value Scale Update Committee as of 2009. The authors suggest that the neurosurgery strategy-which included 1) reasserting that all of the tasks of a radiosurgery procedure remain bundled, and 2) agreeing to limit the definition of radiosurgery to cranial vault and spine-has failed neurosurgeons who perform radiosurgery, and it may jeopardize patient access to this procedure in the future. The authors propose that all of the involved medical specialties recognize that the application of image-guided, focused radiation therapy throughout the body requires a partnership between radiation and surgical disciplines. They also urge surgeons to reexamine their coding methods, and they maintain that Current Procedural Terminology codes should be consistent across all of the different specialties involved in these procedures. Finally, surgeons should consider appropriate training in medical physics and radiobiology to perform the tasks involved in these specific procedures

  16. Prediction of complications in Gamma Knife radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lax, I.; Karlsson, B.

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of complications following radiosurgical treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVM) is presented. A simple relationship exists between average dose and risk of complications, and on this basis a model is presented that gives a qualitatively correct description of this relationship. The parameters of the model have been determined using a clinical material of 862 AVM treatments to give a quantitativley correct description of the risk of complications. The dose-response curve is described by a double-exponential function. An accurate description of the dose-response curve at high dose levels is shown to be very important in radiosurgery. (orig.)

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery: a “targeted” therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming; Han, Liang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    The developments of medicine always follow innovations in science and technology. In the past decade, such innovations have made cancer-related targeted therapies possible. In general, the term “targeted therapy” has been used in reference to cellular and molecular level oriented therapies. However, improvements in the delivery and planning of traditional radiation therapy have also provided cancer patients more options for “targeted” treatment, notably stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). In this review, the progress and controversies of SRS and SBRT are discussed to show the role of stereotactic radiation therapy in the ever evolving multidisciplinary care of cancer patients. PMID:22835385

  18. Repeat stereotactic radiosurgery as salvage therapy for locally recurrent brain metastases previously treated with radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Will H; McTyre, Emory R; Okoukoni, Catherine; Alphonse-Sullivan, Natalie K; Ruiz, Jimmy; Munley, Michael T; Qasem, Shadi; Lo, Hui-Wen; Xing, Fei; Laxton, Adrian W; Tatter, Stephen B; Watabe, Kounosuke; Chan, Michael D

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE There are a variety of salvage options available for patients with brain metastases who experience local failure after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). These options include resection, whole-brain radiation therapy, laser thermoablation, and repeat SRS. There is little data on the safety and efficacy of repeat SRS following local failure of a prior radiosurgical procedure. This study evaluates the clinical outcomes and dosimetric characteristics of patients who experienced tumor recurrence and were subsequently treated with repeat SRS. METHODS Between 2002 and 2015, 32 patients were treated with repeat SRS for local recurrence of ≥ 1 brain metastasis following initial SRS treatment. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate time-to-event outcomes including overall survival (OS), local failure, and radiation necrosis. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for predictor variables of interest for each outcome. Composite dose-volume histograms were constructed for each reirradiated lesion, and these were then used to develop a predictive dosimetric model for radiation necrosis. RESULTS Forty-six lesions in 32 patients were re-treated with a second course of SRS after local failure. A median dose of 20 Gy (range 14-22 Gy) was delivered to the tumor margin at the time of repeat SRS. Local control at 1 year was 79% (95% CI 67%-94%). Estimated 1-year OS was 70% (95% CI 55%-88%). Twelve patients had died at the most recent follow-up, with 8/12 patients experiencing neurological death (as described in Patchell et al.). Eleven of 46 (24%) lesions in 11 separate patients treated with repeat SRS were associated with symptomatic radiation necrosis. Freedom from radiation necrosis at 1 year was 71% (95% CI 57%-88%). Analysis of dosimetric data revealed that the volume of a lesion receiving 40 Gy (V 40Gy ) was the most predictive factor for the development of radiation necrosis (p = 0.003). The following V 40Gy thresholds were associated with 10%, 20%, and

  19. Target delineation in radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, W.Y.; Nordell, B.; Karlsson, B.; Soederman, M.; Lindqvist, M.; Ericson, K.; Franck, A.; Lax, I.; Lindquist, C.

    1993-01-01

    A study of 6 selected arteriovenous malformation (AVM) patients was performed to investigate the feasibility of delineating an AVM on MR images and to compare the AVM volume outlined on different images. Conventional stereotaxic angiograms, stereotaxic MR images and MR angiograms using several different pulse sequences were obtained prior to radiosurgery. Treatment plans were made from the conventional stereotaxic angiograms. These plans were then transferred to a separate dose planning computer which displayed the MR images with the superimposed isodose lines. The radiated volumes of AVM and brain tissue were measured from these MR images. Last, an assessment was made of the radiation volume needed for an appropriate treatment of the AVM if the treatment plan was made from the MR images rather than from the conventional stereotaxic angiogram. It was possible to delineate medium and large size AVM nidi on stereotaxic MR images based on an integration of information obtained from various pulse sequences. The estimated volumes of the AVM nidi were found to be larger on the conventional stereotaxic angiograms than on the stereotaxic MR images. Consequently, a dose plan based on a conventional stereotaxic angiogram would result in a higher integral dose to the brain with the same target dose. By using reliable MR information it is expected that the volume of brain exposed to radiation could be decreased and the adverse effects of stereotactic radiosurgery for AVM thereby minimized. (orig.)

  20. Utility and limitation of radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, Kota; Kiya, Katsuzo; Satoh, Hideki; Mizoue, Tatsuya; Matsushige, Toshinori; Araki, Hayato; Akimitsu, Tomohide

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility and limitations of radiosurgery for metastatic brain lesions, and to compare the clinical results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with those of whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in 45 patients with metastatic brain tumors. The patients were divided into two groups: the SRS group (22 patients) and the WBRT group (23 patients). Mean survival was not significantly different between the two groups. However, in patients with 6 or more lesions, both survival time and recurrence-free time in the SRS group were inferior to those in the WBRT group. The main complication in the SRS group was perifocal edema, while dementia was seen in the WBRT group. The bedridden period was longer in the WBRT group than in the SRS group. Death caused by brain lesions was rare in both groups. From these results, SRS preserves high quality of life longer than WBRT, but SRS should be cautiously used in patients with 6 or more lesions. (author)

  1. Gamma-radiosurgery of angiographically occult vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Yoshihisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Takayuki; Oyama, Hirofumi; Iwakoshi, Takayasu

    1995-01-01

    Since the installation of Gamma-knife, we have treated 26 cases of AOVM (angiographically occult vascular malformations), who had enough follow-up period more than 12 months. There were 16 males and 10 females, whose ages ranged from 3 to 58 years with an average of 32.7. Their clinical presentations at the onset were hemorrhage in 17, seizure in 7, and progressive neurological deficits in 2. Three cases had multiple lesions of AOVM. Among 26 symptomatic lesions, 15 were located supratentorially, 7 in brain stem and 4 in cerebellar hemisphere. AOVMs were treated with radiosurgery at the marginal doses between 15 to 20 Gy (mean 17.9 Gy). Follow-up studies revealed a rebleeding in one after the treatment in the mean follow-up period of 17.7 months. Among 7 cases presented with seizure, 5 were improved and the other 2 showed no change. Imaging studies with MRI showed a major shrinkage in 1, minor shrinkage in 7, and no obvious change in 18. Symptomatic perifocal edema occurred in 5 (19.2%), especially those who were treated at the marginal dose more than 18 Gy. In conclusion our preliminary clinical results indicate that the radiosurgery with Gamma-knife has positive effects to prevent the rebleeding and to control the seizures associated with symptomatic AOVMs. (author)

  2. Gamma knife radiosurgery for brainstem arteriovenous malformations: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massager, N; Régis, J; Kondziolka, D; Njee, T; Levivier, M

    2000-12-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) for the treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) located within the brainstem. The results of GKS performed in 87 patients with brainstem AVMs at two centers with experienced physicians are reviewed. The mean patient age was 37 years and the population included 19 children. The male/female ratio was 56:31. The malformation was located in the upper brainstem in 52 patients. Seventy-four percent of the patients had suffered a hemorrhage before GKS. For 70% of the patients no other treatment had been proposed before GKS. The mean AVM volume was 1.3 cm3. The lesions were treated with one to eight isocenters, with a margin dose ranging between 11.5 Gy and 30 Gy. The mean clinical follow-up period was 3.2 years. Ninety-five percent of the patients improved or remained neurologically stable. Rebleeding occurred in three patients at 3, 6, and 16 months, respectively, after GKS. Two patients in whom rebleeding occured recovered, and one died. The AVM obliteration rate was 63% at 2 years and 73% at 3 years after GKS. A second GKS was performed in six patients in whom only partial obliteration was demonstrated on angiography 3 years after the first procedure. Gamma knife radiosurgery may be a valuable first-choice therapy for the treatment of AVMs located within the brainstem.

  3. Impact of learners' role (active participant-observer or observer only) on learning outcomes during high-fidelity simulation sessions in anaesthesia: A single center, prospective and randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanié, Antonia; Gorse, Sophie; Roulleau, Philippe; Figueiredo, Samy; Benhamou, Dan

    2018-01-05

    The increasing use of high-fidelity simulation is limited by the imbalance between the growing number of students and the human resources available in such a way that all residents cannot play a role during scenarios. The learning outcomes of observers need to be studied. This prospective randomised study was approved by the institutional review board. Anaesthesia residents attending a one-day training session were enrolled. In each of the four scenarios, three residents played an active role while others observed in a separate room. All participants attended debriefing sessions. Residents were randomised between active participant-observer group (AP-O group) and observer group (O group). A similar questionnaire was distributed before, immediately after the session and after three months and included self-reported assessment of satisfaction, medical knowledge (noted 0-16), and non-technical skills. A hundred and four questionnaires were analysed. Immediately after the simulation, a significant increase in medical knowledge was recorded but was higher in the AP-O group (6 [5-8] to 10 [8-11]/16) than in the O group (7 [5-8] to 9 [7-10]/16). High scores for non-technical skills were similarly observed in both groups. Satisfaction was high in both groups but was higher in the AP-O group (9 [8-9] versus 8 [8-9]/10, P=0.019). Decay of knowledge was observed for most main outcomes at three months. This study suggests an immediate improvement of learning outcomes for both roles after immersive simulation but some learning outcomes may be better for residents engaged as players in scenarios. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. A comparison of arc-based and static mini-multileaf collimator-based radiosurgery treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Hideo Dale; Pappas, Conrad T.E.; Wilder, Richard B.

    1997-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to compare arc-based and mini-multileaf collimator (mMLC)-based radiosurgery treatment plans using isodose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Methods: Of 11 patients who underwent conventional arc-based radiosurgery for intracranial malignancies, four were treated with one isocenter, four were treated with two isocenters and three were treated with three isocenters. The same cases were re-planned using a test version of mMLC-based radiosurgery software for multiple static non-coplanar fields. Results and conclusion: For non-spherical targets, treatment planning is relatively intuitive with mMLC-based radiosurgery, reducing the amount of time required for planning. Moreover, a lower dose of radiation is delivered to normal tissue with mMLC-based radiosurgery than with arc-based radiosurgery, which theoretically should lead to a reduced risk of complications

  5. Contemporary treatment with radiosurgery for spine metastasis and spinal cord compression in 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sam Uel; Yoon, Han Hah; Stessin, Alexander; Gutman, Fred; Rosiello, Arthur; Davis, Raphael [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook (United States)

    2015-03-15

    With the progress of image-guided localization, body immobilization system, and computerized delivery of intensity-modulated radiation delivery, it became possible to perform spine radiosurgery. The next question is how to translate the high technology treatment to the clinical application. Clinical trials have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of spine radiosurgery and efficacy of the treatment in the setting of spine metastasis, leading to the randomized trials by a cooperative group. Radiosurgery has also demonstrated its efficacy to decompress the spinal cord compression in selected group of patients. The experience indicates that spine radiosurgery has a potential to change the clinical practice in the management of spine metastasis and spinal cord compression.

  6. Supernova hemorrhage: obliterative hemorrhage of brain arteriovenous malformations following γ knife radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Matthew D; Hetts, Steven W; Young, William L; Halbach, Van V; Dowd, Christopher F; Higashida, Randall T; English, Joey D

    2012-09-01

    Hemorrhage represents the most feared complication of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in both untreated patients and those treated with gamma knife radiosurgery. Radiosurgery does not immediately lead to obliteration of the malformation, which often does not occur until years following treatment. Post-obliteration hemorrhage is rare, occurring months to years after radiosurgery, and has been associated with residual or recurrent AVM despite prior apparent nidus elimination. Three cases are reported of delayed intracranial hemorrhage in patients with cerebral AVMs treated with radiosurgery in which no residual AVM was found on catheter angiography at the time of delayed post-treatment hemorrhage. That the pathophysiology of these hemorrhages involves progressive venous outflow occlusion is speculated and the possible mechanistic link to subsequent vascular rupture is discussed.

  7. Efficacy and feasibility of stereotactic radiosurgery in the primary management of unfavorable pediatric ependymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Renu; Yeung, Daniel; Kumar, Parvesh; Muhlbauer, Michael; Kun, Larry E.

    1997-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery was given as a boost in the initial radiation management of five children with localized intracranial ependymoma. Preliminary results in young children with high-risk tumors indicate good local control without excessive neurotoxicity

  8. SU-F-J-160: Clinical Evaluation of Targeting Accuracy in Radiosurgery Using Tractography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juh, R; Han, J; Kim, C; Oh, C [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnamsi, GyeonggiDo (Korea, Republic of); Suh, T [The catholic university of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Focal radiosurgery is a common treatment modality for trigeminal neuralgia (TN), a neuropathic facial pain condition. Assessment of treatment effectiveness is primarily clinical, given the paucity of investigational tools to assess trigeminal nerve changes. The efficiency of radiosurgery is related to its highly precise targeting. We assessed clinically the targeting accuracy of radiosurgery with Gamma knife. We hypothesized that trigeminal tractography provides more information than 2D-MR imaging, allowing detection of unique, focal changes in the target area after radiosurgery. Methods: Sixteen TN patients (2 females, 4 males, average age 65.3 years) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, 40 Gy/50% isodose line underwent 1.5Tesla MR trigeminal nerve. Target accuracy was assessed from deviation of the coordinates of the target compared with the center of enhancement on post MRI. Radiation dose delivered at the borders of contrast enhancement was evaluated. Results: The median deviation of the coordinates between the intended target and the center of contrast enhancement was within 1mm. The radiation doses fitting within the borders of the contrast enhancement the target ranged from 37.5 to 40 Gy. Trigeminal tractography accurately detected the radiosurgical target. Radiosurgery resulted in 47% drop in FA values at the target with no significant change in FA outside the target, suggesting that radiosurgery primarily affects myelin. Tractography was more sensitive, since FA changes were detected regardless of trigeminal nerve enhancement. Conclusion: The median deviation found in clinical assessment of gamma knife treatment for TN Is low and compatible with its high rate of efficiency. DTI parameters accurately detect the effects of focal radiosurgery on the trigeminal nerve, serving as an in vivo imaging tool to study TN. This study is a proof of principle for further assessment of DTI parameters to understand the pathophysiology of TN and treatment

  9. SU-E-T-548: How To Decrease Spine Dose In Patients Who Underwent Sterotactic Spine Radiosurgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acar, H; Altinok, A; Kucukmorkoc, E; Kucuk, N; Caglar, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery for spine metastases involves irradiation using a single high dose fraction. The purpose of this study was to dosimetrically compare stereotactic spine radiosurgery(SRS) plans using a recently new volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) technique against fix-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT). Plans were evaluated for target conformity and spinal cord sparing. Methods: Fifteen previously treated patients were replanned using the Eclipse 10.1 TPS AAA calculation algorithm. IMRT plans with 7 fields were generated. The arc plans used 2 full arc configurations. Arc and IMRT plans were normalized and prescribed to deliver 16.0 Gy in a single fraction to 90% of the planning target volume(PTV). PTVs consisted of the vertebral body expanded by 3mm, excluding the PRV-cord, where the cord was expanded by 2mm.RTOG 0631 recommendations were applied for treatment planning. Partial spinal cord volume was defined as 5mm above and below the radiosurgery target volume. Plans were compared for conformity and gradient index as well as spinal cord sparing. Results: The conformity index values of fifteen patients for two different treatment planning techniques were shown in table 1. Conformity index values for 2 full arc planning (average CI=0.84) were higher than that of IMRT planning (average CI=0.79). The gradient index values of fifteen patients for two different treatment planning techniques were shown in table 2. Gradient index values for 2 full arc planning (average GI=3.58) were higher than that of IMRT planning (average GI=2.82).The spinal cord doses of fifteen patients for two different treatment planning techniques were shown in table 3. D0.35cc, D0.03cc and partial spinal cord D10% values in 2 full arc plannings (average D0.35cc=819.3cGy, D0.03cc=965.4cGy, 10%partial spinal=718.1cGy) were lower than IMRT plannings (average D0.35cc=877.4cGy, D0.03c=1071.4cGy, 10%partial spinal=805.1cGy). Conclusions: The two arc VMAT technique is

  10. Atlas-based identification of targets for functional radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancanello, Joseph; Romanelli, Pantaleo; Modugno, Nicola; Cerveri, Pietro; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Uggeri, Fulvio; Cantore, Giampaolo

    2006-01-01

    Functional disorders of the brain, such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, epilepsy, and neuropathic pain, may exhibit poor response to medical therapy. In such cases, surgical intervention may become necessary. Modern surgical approaches to such disorders include radio-frequency lesioning and deep brain stimulation (DBS). The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is one of the most useful stereotactic targets available: STN DBS is known to induce substantial improvement in patients with end-stage Parkinson's disease. Other targets include the Globus Pallidus pars interna (GPi) for dystonia and Parkinson's disease, and the centromedian nucleus of the thalamus (CMN) for neuropathic pain. Radiosurgery is an attractive noninvasive alternative to treat some functional brain disorders. The main technical limitation to radiosurgery is that the target can be selected only on the basis of magnetic resonance anatomy without electrophysiological confirmation. The aim of this work is to provide a method for the correct atlas-based identification of the target to be used in functional neurosurgery treatment planning. The coordinates of STN, CMN, and GPi were identified in the Talairach and Tournoux atlas and transformed to the corresponding regions of the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) electronic atlas. Binary masks describing the target nuclei were created. The MNI electronic atlas was deformed onto the patient magnetic resonance imaging-T1 scan by applying an affine transformation followed by a local nonrigid registration. The first transformation was based on normalized cross correlation and the second on optimization of a two-part objective function consisting of similarity criteria and weighted regularization. The obtained deformation field was then applied to the target masks. The minimum distance between the surface of an implanted electrode and the surface of the deformed mask was calculated. The validation of the method consisted of comparing the electrode-mask distance to

  11. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife for acoustic neuromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, Robert L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Swanson, Jerry W.; Harner, Stephen G.; Beatty, Charles W.; Kline, Robert W.; Stevens, Lorna N.; Hu, Theresa C.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife for acoustic neuromas. Methods and Materials: Between January 1990 and January 1993, 36 patients with acoustic neuromas were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife. The median maximum tumor diameter was 21 mm (range: 6-32 mm). Tumor volumes encompassed within the prescribed isodose line varied from 266 to 8,667 mm 3 (median: 3,135 mm 3 ). Tumors ≤ 20 mm in maximum diameter received a dose of 20 Gy to the margin, tumors between 21 and 30 mm received 18 Gy, and tumors > 30 mm received 16 Gy. The dose was prescribed to the 50% isodose line in 31 patients and to the 45%, 55%, 60%, 70%, and 80% isodose line in one patient each. The median number of isocenters per tumor was 5 (range: 1-12). Results: At a median follow-up of 16 months (range: 2.5-36 months), all patients were alive. Thirty-five patients had follow-up imaging studies. Nine tumors (26%) were smaller, and 26 tumors (74%) were unchanged. No tumor had progressed. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidences of facial neuropathy were 52.2% and 66.5%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidences of trigeminal neuropathy were 33.7% and 58.9%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidence of facial or trigeminal neuropathy (or both) was 60.8% and 81.7%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the following were associated with the time of onset or worsening of facial weakness or trigeminal neuropathy: (a) patients five isocenters. The 1- and 2-year actuarial rates of preservation of useful hearing (Gardner-Robertson class I or II) were 100% and 41.7% ± 17.3, respectively. Conclusion: Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife provides short-term control of acoustic neuromas when a dose of 16 to 20 Gy to the tumor margin is used. Preservation of useful hearing can be accomplished in a significant proportion of patients

  12. Prolonged treatment time deteriorates positioning accuracy for stereotactic radiosurgery.

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    Chun-Wei Wang

    Full Text Available The accuracy of radiation delivery is increasingly important as radiotherapy technology continues to develop. The goal of this study was to evaluate intrafractional motion during intracranial radiosurgery and the relationship between motion change and treatment time.A total of 50 treatment records with 5988 images, all acquired during treatments with the CyberKnife Radiosurgery System, were retrospectively analyzed in this study. We measured translation and rotation motion including superior-inferior (SI, right-left (RL, anterior-posterior (AP, roll, tilt and yaw. All of the data was obtained during the first 45 minutes of treatment. The records were divided into 3 groups based on 15-min time intervals following the beginning of treatment: group A (0-15 min, group B (16-30 min and group C (31-45 min. The mean deviations, systematic errors, random errors and margin for planning target volume (PTV were calculated for each group.The mean deviations were less than 0.1 mm in all three translation directions in the first 15 minutes. Greater motion occurred with longer treatment times, especially in the SI direction. For the 3D vector, a time-dependent change was observed, from 0.34 mm to 0.77 mm (p=0.01. There was no significant correlation between the treatment time and deviations in the AP, LR and rotation axes. Longer treatment times were associated with increases in systematic error, but not in random error. The estimated PTV margin for groups A, B and C were 0.86 / 1.14 / 1.31 mm, 0.75 / 1.12 / 1.20 mm, and 0.43 / 0.54 / 0.81 mm in the SI, RL, and AP directions, respectively.During intracranial radiosurgery, a consistent increase in the positioning deviation over time was observed, especially in the SI direction. If treatment time is greater than 15 minutes, we recommend increasing the PTV margins to ensure treatment precision.

  13. A concise review of the efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of melanoma and renal cell carcinoma brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanson Peter W

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Melanoma and renal cell carcinoma have a well-documented tendency to develop metastases to the brain. Treating these lesions has traditionally been problematic, because chemotherapy has difficulty crossing the blood brain barrier and whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT is a relatively ineffective treatment against these radioresistant tumor histologies. In recent years, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS has emerged as an effective and minimally-invasive treatment modality for irradiating either single or multiple intracranial structures in one clinical treatment setting. For this reason, we conducted a review of modern literature analyzing the efficacy of SRS in the management of patients with melanoma and renal cell carcinoma brain metastases. In our analysis we found SRS to be a safe, effective and attractive treatment modality for managing radioresistant brain metastases and highlighted the need for randomized trials comparing WBRT alone vs. SRS alone vs. WBRT plus SRS in treating patients with radioresistant brain metastases.

  14. A retrospective analysis of survival and prognostic factors after stereotactic radiosurgery for aggressive meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraro, Daniel J; Zoberi, Imran; Simpson, Joseph R; Jaboin, Jerry J; Funk, Ryan K; Blackett, John William; Ju, Michelle R; DeWees, Todd A; Chicoine, Michael R; Dowling, Joshua L; Rich, Keith M; Drzymala, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    While most meningiomas are benign, aggressive meningiomas are associated with high levels of recurrence and mortality. A single institution’s Gamma Knife radiosurgical experience with atypical and malignant meningiomas is presented, stratified by the most recent WHO classification. Thirty-one patients with atypical and 4 patients with malignant meningiomas treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery between July 2000 and July 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent prior surgical resection. Overall survival was the primary endpoint and rate of disease recurrence in the brain was a secondary endpoint. Patients who had previous radiotherapy or prior surgical resection were included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate survival and identify factors predictive of recurrence and survival. Post-Gamma Knife recurrence was identified in 11 patients (31.4%) with a median overall survival of 36 months and progression-free survival of 25.8 months. Nine patients (25.7%) had died. Three-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 78.0% and 65.0%, respectively. WHO grade II 3-year OS and PFS were 83.4% and 70.1%, while WHO grade III 3-year OS and PFS were 33.3% and 0%. Recurrence rate was significantly higher in patients with a prior history of benign meningioma, nuclear atypia, high mitotic rate, spontaneous necrosis, and WHO grade III diagnosis on univariate analysis; only WHO grade III diagnosis was significant on multivariate analysis. Overall survival was adversely affected in patients with WHO grade III diagnosis, prior history of benign meningioma, prior fractionated radiotherapy, larger tumor volume, and higher isocenter number on univariate analysis; WHO grade III diagnosis and larger treated tumor volume were significant on multivariate analysis. Atypical and anaplastic meningiomas remain difficult tumors to treat. WHO grade III diagnosis and treated tumor volume were significantly

  15. Gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia: the initial experience of the Barrow Neurological Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, C. Leland; Shetter, Andrew G.; Fiedler, Jeffrey A.; Smith, Kris A.; Han, Patrick P.; Speiser, Burton L.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and complications of Gamma Knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: The Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) Gamma Knife facility has been operational since March 17, 1997. A total of 557 patients have been treated, 89 for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). This report includes the first 54 TN patients with follow-up exceeding 3 months. Patients were treated with Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (RS) in uniform fashion according to two sequential protocols. The first 41 patients received 35 Gy prescribed to the 50% isodose via a single 4-mm isocenter targeting the ipsilateral trigeminal nerve adjacent to the pons. The dose was increased to 40 Gy for the remaining 13 patients; however, the other parameters were unvaried. Outcome was evaluated by each patient using a standardized questionnaire. Pain before and after RS was scored as level I-IV per our newly-developed BNI pain intensity scoring criteria (I: no pain; II: occasional pain, not requiring medication; III: some pain, controlled with medication; IV: some pain, not controlled with medication; V: severe pain/no pain relief). Complications, limited to mild facial numbness, were similarly graded by a BNI scoring system. Results: Among our 54 TN patients, 52 experienced pain relief, BNI score I in 19 (35%), II in 3 (6%), III in 26 (48%), and IV in 4 (7%). Two patients (4%) reported no relief (BNI score V). Median follow-up was 12 months (range 3-28). Median time to onset of pain relief was 15 days (range 0-192), and to maximal relief 63 days (range 0-253). Seventeen (31%) noted immediate improvement (≤ 24 h). Prior to RS, all patients were on pharmacologic therapy felt to be optimal or maximal. Twenty-two (41%) were able to stop medications entirely (BNI score I or II). Another 16 (30%), with BNI Score III relief, decreased medication intake by at least 50%. Patients with classical TN pain symptoms were more likely to stop medications than those with

  16. Radical stereotactic radiosurgery with real-time tumor motion tracking in the treatment of small peripheral lung tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments in radiotherapeutic technology have resulted in a new approach to treating patients with localized lung cancer. We report preliminary clinical outcomes using stereotactic radiosurgery with real-time tumor motion tracking to treat small peripheral lung tumors. Methods Eligible patients were treated over a 24-month period and followed for a minimum of 6 months. Fiducials (3–5 were placed in or near tumors under CT-guidance. Non-isocentric treatment plans with 5-mm margins were generated. Patients received 45–60 Gy in 3 equal fractions delivered in less than 2 weeks. CT imaging and routine pulmonary function tests were completed at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 30 months. Results Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated, 15 with stage I lung cancer and 9 with single lung metastases. Pneumothorax was a complication of fiducial placement in 7 patients, requiring tube thoracostomy in 4. All patients completed radiation treatment with minimal discomfort, few acute side effects and no procedure-related mortalities. Following treatment transient chest wall discomfort, typically lasting several weeks, developed in 7 of 11 patients with lesions within 5 mm of the pleura. Grade III pneumonitis was seen in 2 patients, one with prior conventional thoracic irradiation and the other treated with concurrent Gefitinib. A small statistically significant decline in the mean % predicted DLCO was observed at 6 and 12 months. All tumors responded to treatment at 3 months and local failure was seen in only 2 single metastases. There have been no regional lymph node recurrences. At a median follow-up of 12 months, the crude survival rate is 83%, with 3 deaths due to co-morbidities and 1 secondary to metastatic disease. Conclusion Radical stereotactic radiosurgery with real-time tumor motion tracking is a promising well-tolerated treatment option for small peripheral lung tumors.

  17. Radical stereotactic radiosurgery with real-time tumor motion tracking in the treatment of small peripheral lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Brian T; Levy, Elliot; Chang, Thomas; Jamis-Dow, Carlos; Banovac, Filip; Anderson, Eric D; Erickson, Kelly; Reichner, Cristina A; Collins, Sean P; Gagnon, Gregory J; Dieterich, Sonja; McRae, Don A; Zhang, Ying; Yousefi, Shadi

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in radiotherapeutic technology have resulted in a new approach to treating patients with localized lung cancer. We report preliminary clinical outcomes using stereotactic radiosurgery with real-time tumor motion tracking to treat small peripheral lung tumors. Eligible patients were treated over a 24-month period and followed for a minimum of 6 months. Fiducials (3–5) were placed in or near tumors under CT-guidance. Non-isocentric treatment plans with 5-mm margins were generated. Patients received 45–60 Gy in 3 equal fractions delivered in less than 2 weeks. CT imaging and routine pulmonary function tests were completed at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 30 months. Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated, 15 with stage I lung cancer and 9 with single lung metastases. Pneumothorax was a complication of fiducial placement in 7 patients, requiring tube thoracostomy in 4. All patients completed radiation treatment with minimal discomfort, few acute side effects and no procedure-related mortalities. Following treatment transient chest wall discomfort, typically lasting several weeks, developed in 7 of 11 patients with lesions within 5 mm of the pleura. Grade III pneumonitis was seen in 2 patients, one with prior conventional thoracic irradiation and the other treated with concurrent Gefitinib. A small statistically significant decline in the mean % predicted DLCO was observed at 6 and 12 months. All tumors responded to treatment at 3 months and local failure was seen in only 2 single metastases. There have been no regional lymph node recurrences. At a median follow-up of 12 months, the crude survival rate is 83%, with 3 deaths due to co-morbidities and 1 secondary to metastatic disease. Radical stereotactic radiosurgery with real-time tumor motion tracking is a promising well-tolerated treatment option for small peripheral lung tumors

  18. Stereotactic radiosurgery plus whole brain radiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for patients with multiple brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondziolka, Douglas; Patel, Atul; Lunsford, L. Dade; Kassam, Amin; Flickinger, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Multiple brain metastases are a common health problem, frequently diagnosed in patients with cancer. The prognosis, even after treatment with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT), is poor with average expected survivals less than 6 months. Retrospective series of stereotactic radiosurgery have shown local control and survival benefits in case series of patients with solitary brain metastases. We hypothesized that radiosurgery plus WBRT would provide improved local brain tumor control over WBRT alone in patients with two to four brain metastases. Methods: Patients with two to four brain metastases (all ≤25 mm diameter and known primary tumor type) were randomized to initial brain tumor management with WBRT alone (30 Gy in 12 fractions) or WBRT plus radiosurgery. Extent of extracranial cancer, tumor diameters on MRI scan, and functional status were recorded before and after initial care. Results: The study was stopped at an interim evaluation at 60% accrual. Twenty-seven patients were randomized (14 to WBRT alone and 13 to WBRT plus radiosurgery). The groups were well matched to age, sex, tumor type, number of tumors, and extent of extracranial disease. The rate of local failure at 1 year was 100% after WBRT alone but only 8% in patients who had boost radiosurgery. The median time to local failure was 6 months after WBRT alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.5-8.5) in comparison to 36 months (95% CI, 15.6-57) after WBRT plus radiosurgery (p = 0.0005). The median time to any brain failure was improved in the radiosurgery group (p = 0.002). Tumor control did not depend on histology (p = 0.85), number of initial brain metastases (p = 0.25), or extent of extracranial disease (p = 0.26). Patients who received WBRT alone lived a median of 7.5 months, while those who received WBRT plus radiosurgery lived 11 months (p = 0.22). Survival did not depend on histology or number of tumors, but was related to extent of extracranial disease (p = 0.02). There was no

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery for intradural spine tumors using cone-beam CT image guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrate, Andrés; Zussman, Benjamin; Ozpinar, Alp; Niranjan, Ajay; Flickinger, John C; Gerszten, Peter C

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance technology has been widely adopted for spine radiosurgery delivery. There is relatively little experience with spine radiosurgery for intradural tumors using CBCT image guidance. This study prospectively evaluated a series of intradural spine tumors treated with radiosurgery. Patient setup accuracy for spine radiosurgery delivery using CBCT image guidance for intradural spine tumors was determined. METHODS Eighty-two patients with intradural tumors were treated and prospectively evaluated. The positioning deviations of the spine radiosurgery treatments in patients were recorded. Radiosurgery was delivered using a linear accelerator with a beam modulator and CBCT image guidance combined with a robotic couch that allows positioning correction in 3 translational and 3 rotational directions. To measure patient movement, 3 quality assurance CBCTs were performed and recorded in 30 patients: before, halfway, and after the radiosurgery treatment. The positioning data and fused images of planning CT and CBCT from the treatments were analyzed to determine intrafraction patient movements. From each of 3 CBCTs, 3 translational and 3 rotational coordinates were obtained. RESULTS The radiosurgery procedure was successfully completed for all patients. Lesion locations included cervical (22), thoracic (17), lumbar (38), and sacral (5). Tumor histologies included schwannoma (27), neurofibromas (18), meningioma (16), hemangioblastoma (8), and ependymoma (5). The mean prescription dose was 17 Gy (range 12-27 Gy) delivered in 1-3 fractions. At the halfway point of the radiation, the translational variations and standard deviations were 0.4 ± 0.5, 0.5 ± 0.8, and 0.4 ± 0.5 mm in the lateral (x), longitudinal (y), and anteroposterior (z) directions, respectively. Similarly, the variations immediately after treatment were 0.5 ± 0.4, 0.5 ± 0.6, and 0.6 ± 0.5 mm along x, y, and z directions, respectively. The mean rotational angles were 0

  20. Gamma knife radiosurgery for medically refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, J.H.; Yoon, Y.S.; Kang, D.W.; Chung, S.S.; Chang, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) has been generally considered as a viable therapeutic option for the management of medically refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We reviewed our experience with GKS in patients with TN. Between Feb 1996 and May 2006. 77 patients with medical refractory idiopathic TN were treated using GKS. Thirty-six patients who had undergone other previous procedures, previous GKS, or had brain stem lesion, atypical symptoms, were excluded from this study. Pain improvement was achieved in 38 of the patients with TN (pain response rate 92.7 %). Twenty-three patients were pain free and 15 had reduced pain. There were no serious complications. We think that GKS is an effective treatment option for patients with medical refractory idiopathic TN. (author)

  1. Integration of Corticospinal Tractography Reduces Motor Complications After Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Tomoyuki, E-mail: kouga-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shin, Masahiro; Maruyama, Keisuke; Kamada, Kyousuke; Ota, Takahiro [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Itoh, Daisuke [Department of Radiology, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kunii, Naoto [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ino, Kenji; Aoki, Shigeki; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Igaki, Hiroshi; Onoe, Tsuyoshi [Department of Radiology, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Nobuhito [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the use of diffusion-tensor tractography (DTT) of the corticospinal tract could reduce motor complications after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Patients with arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in the deep frontal lobe, deep parietal lobe, basal ganglia, and thalamus who had undergone radiosurgery since 2000 and were followed up for more than 3 years were studied. DTT of the corticospinal tract had been integrated into treatment planning of SRS since 2004, and the maximum dose received by the corticospinal tract was attempted to be less than 20 Gy. Treatment outcomes before (28 patients, Group A) and after (24 patients, Group B) the introduction of this technique were compared. Results: There were no statistical differences between the two groups (Group A vs. Group B) in patients' age (34 years vs. 33 years, p = 0.76), percentage of patients with hemorrhagic events before treatment (50% vs. 29%, p = 0.12), or percentage of AVM involving the basal ganglia and thalamus (36% vs. 46%, p = 0.46). Obliteration rates were 69% and 76% at 4 years in Groups A and B, respectively (p = 0.68), which were not significantly different. Motor complications were observed in 5 patients in Group A (17.9%) but only in 1 patient in Group B (4.2%), which was significantly less frequent (p = 0.021). Conclusion: Integrating DTT of the corticospinal tract into treatment planning contributed to reduction of motor complications without compromising the obliteration rate for AVM adjacent to the corticospinal tract.

  2. Stepwise multi-criteria optimization for robotic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaefer, A.; Schweikard, A.

    2008-01-01

    Achieving good conformality and a steep dose gradient around the target volume remains a key aspect of radiosurgery. Clearly, this involves a trade-off between target coverage, conformality of the dose distribution, and sparing of critical structures. Yet, image guidance and robotic beam placement have extended highly conformal dose delivery to extracranial and moving targets. Therefore, the multi-criteria nature of the optimization problem becomes even more apparent, as multiple conflicting clinical goals need to be considered coordinate to obtain an optimal treatment plan. Typically, planning for robotic radiosurgery is based on constrained optimization, namely linear programming. An extension of that approach is presented, such that each of the clinical goals can be addressed separately and in any sequential order. For a set of common clinical goals the mapping to a mathematical objective and a corresponding constraint is defined. The trade-off among the clinical goals is explored by modifying the constraints and optimizing a simple objective, while retaining feasibility of the solution. Moreover, it becomes immediately obvious whether a desired goal can be achieved and where a trade-off is possible. No importance factors or predefined prioritizations of clinical goals are necessary. The presented framework forms the basis for interactive and automated planning procedures. It is demonstrated for a sample case that the linear programming formulation is suitable to search for a clinically optimal treatment, and that the optimization steps can be performed quickly to establish that a Pareto-efficient solution has been found. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how the stepwise approach is preferable compared to modifying importance factors

  3. Salvage Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Surgically Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, Andrew S.; Shetter, Andrew G.; Shetter, Mary E.; Kakarla, Udaya K.; Rogers, C. Leland

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with surgically refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN) treated with rescue gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Methods and Materials: Seventy-nine patients with typical TN received salvage GKRS between 1997 and 2002 at the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI). All patients had recurrent pain following at least one prior surgical intervention. Prior surgical interventions included percutaneous destructive procedures, microvascular decompression (MVD), or GKRS. Thirty-one (39%) had undergone at least two prior procedures. The most common salvage dose was 80 Gy, although 40-50 Gy was typical in patients who had received prior radiosurgery. Pain outcome was assessed using the BNI Pain Intensity Score, and quality of life was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Results: Median follow-up after salvage GKRS was 5.3 years. Actuarial analysis demonstrated that at 5 years, 20% of patients were pain-free and 50% had pain relief. Pain recurred in patients who had an initial response to GKRS at a median of 1.1 years. Twenty-eight (41%) required a subsequent surgical procedure for recurrence. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model suggested that the strongest predictor of GKRS failure was a history of prior MVD (p=0.029). There were no instances of serious morbidity or mortality. Ten percent of patients developed worsening facial numbness and 8% described their numbness as 'very bothersome.' Conclusions: GKRS salvage for refractory TN is well tolerated and results in long-term pain relief in approximately half the patients treated. Clinicians may reconsider using GKRS to salvage patients who have failed prior MVD.

  4. Monte Carlo evaluation of magnetically focused proton beams for radiosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, Grant A.; Heczko, Sarah L.; Nguyen, Theodore T.; Slater, James M.; Slater, Jerry D.; Wroe, Andrew J.

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the advantages in dose distribution and delivery of proton beams focused by a triplet of quadrupole magnets in the context of potential radiosurgery treatments. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using various configurations of three quadrupole magnets located immediately upstream of a water phantom. Magnet parameters were selected to match what can be commercially manufactured as assemblies of rare-earth permanent magnetic materials. Focused unmodulated proton beams with a range of ~10 cm in water were target matched with passive collimated beams (the current beam delivery method for proton radiosurgery) and properties of transverse dose, depth dose and volumetric dose distributions were compared. Magnetically focused beams delivered beam spots of low eccentricity to Bragg peak depth with full widths at the 90% reference dose contour from ~2.5 to 5 mm. When focused initial beam diameters were larger than matching unfocused beams (10 of 11 cases) the focused beams showed 16%–83% larger peak-to-entrance dose ratios and 1.3 to 3.4-fold increases in dose delivery efficiency. Peak-to-entrance and efficiency benefits tended to increase with larger magnet gradients and larger initial diameter focused beams. Finally, it was observed that focusing tended to shift dose in the water phantom volume from the 80%–20% dose range to below 20% of reference dose, compared to unfocused beams. We conclude that focusing proton beams immediately upstream from tissue entry using permanent magnet assemblies can produce beams with larger peak-to-entrance dose ratios and increased dose delivery efficiencies. Such beams could potentially be used in the clinic to irradiate small-field radiosurgical targets with fewer beams, lower entrance dose and shorter treatment times.

  5. Human Reliability Analysis: session summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The use of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) to identify and resolve human factors issues has significantly increased over the past two years. Today, utilities, research institutions, consulting firms, and the regulatory agency have found a common application of HRA tools and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). The ''1985 IEEE Third Conference on Human Factors and Power Plants'' devoted three sessions to the discussion of these applications and a review of the insights so gained. This paper summarizes the three sessions and presents those common conclusions that were discussed during the meeting. The paper concludes that session participants supported the use of an adequately documented ''living PRA'' to address human factors issues in design and procedural changes, regulatory compliance, and training and that the techniques can produce cost effective qualitative results that are complementary to more classical human factors methods

  6. Analysis of complications based on long-term outcomes after radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Keisuke; Shin, Masahiro; Kirino, Takaaki

    2005-01-01

    Although stereotactic radiosurgery has been recognized as an effective treatment modality for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), its long-term outcome after more than 10 years is still unknown. We retrospectively analyzed the complications arising long after radiosurgery for AVMs. Five-hundred patients with AVMs were treated with radiosurgery and were followed at the University of Tokyo hospital. The mean age was 31 years and the mean close delivered to the AVM margin was 21.0 Gy. The mean diameter of AVMs was 1.9 cm. Radiation-induced neurological complications were observed in 5.2% of patients and could be reduced with recent improvements in imaging technique. Hemorrhage during the interval between radiosurgery and obliteration was observed in 23 out of 500 patients and after confirmation in 6 out of 250 patients. After radiosurgery, the risk of hemorrhage was decreased by 54% during the interval between radiosurgery and angiographic obliteration, and a small risk of hemorrhage remained even after obliteration. Delayed cysts developed in 3 out of 6 patients at the site of previous hemorrhage. The cyst spontaneously decreased in 1 patient and increased in another, requiring surgical resection. Delayed cyst formation unrelated to hemorrhage was also observed in 2 patients, which were closely observed. Angiographic obliteration after radiosurgery for AVM is not necessarily equal to long-term cure because residual degenerated nidus might cause hemorrhage or delayed cyst formation. Radical treatments such as surgical excision of the nidus should be used for respectable lesions and cystoperitoneal shunt or placement of Ommaya reservoir should be selected for unresectable cystic lesions. (author)

  7. Stereotactic Radiosurgery in the Management of Brain Metastases: An Institutional Retrospective Analysis of Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, James L.; Batra, Sachin; Kapor, Sumit; Vellimana, Ananth; Gandhi, Rahul; Carson, Kathryn A.; Shokek, Ori; Lim, Michael; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to report our experience with stereotactic radiosurgery performed with the Gamma Knife (GK) in the treatment of patients with brain metastases and to compare survival for those treated with radiosurgery alone with survival for those treated with radiosurgery and whole-brain radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Prospectively collected demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment and survival data on 237 patients with intracranial metastases who underwent radiosurgery with the GK between 2003 and 2007 were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to compare survival by demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment. Results: The mean age of the patient population was 56 years. The most common tumor histologies were non-small-cell lung carcinoma (34.2%) and breast cancer (13.9%). The median overall survival time was 8.5 months from the time of treatment. The median survival times for patients with one, two/three, and four or more brain metastases were 8.5, 9.4, and 6.7 months, respectively. Patients aged 65 years or greater and those aged less than 65 years had median survival times of 7.8 and 9 months, respectively (p = 0.008). The Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) at the time of treatment was a significant predictor of survival: those patients with a KPS of 70 or less had a median survival of 2.9 months compared with 10.3 months (p = 0.034) for those with a KPS of 80 or greater. There was no statistically significant difference in survival between patients treated with radiosurgery alone and those treated with radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiosurgery with the GK is an efficacious treatment modality for brain metastases. A KPS greater than 70, histology of breast cancer, smaller tumor volume, and age less than 65 years were associated with a longer median survival in our study.

  8. Analysis of neurological sequelae from radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations: how location effects outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, John C.; Kondziolka, Douglas; Maitz, Ann H.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To elucidate how the risks of developing temporary and permanent neurological sequelae from radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations (AVM) relate to AVM location, the addition of stereotactic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to angiographic targeting, and prior hemorrhage or neurological deficits. Materials and Methods: We evaluated follow-up imaging and clinical data in 332 AVM patients who received gamma knife radiosurgery at the University of Pittsburgh between 1987 and 1994. All patients had regular clinical or imaging follow up for a minimum of two years (range: 24-96 mo., median=45 mo.). 83 patients had MR. planning, and 187 previously bled. Results: Symptomatic post-radiosurgery sequelae (any neurological problem including headache) developed in 30/332 patients (9.0%). Symptoms resolved in 58% of patients within 24 mo. with a significantly greater proportion (p=0.006) resolving in patients with Dmin <20 vs. ≥20 Gy (89 vs. 36%). The 7 yr. actuarial rate for developing persistent symptomatic sequelae was 3.8%. We first evaluated the relative risks for different locations to construct a post-radiosurgery injury expression (PIE) score for AVM location (see Table 1). Multivariate logistic regression analysis of symptomatic post-radiosurgery injury identified independent significant correlations with PIE location score (p=0.0007) and 12 Gy volume (p=0.008) but none of the other factors tested (p≥0.3) including the addition of MR targeting, average radiation dose in 20 cc, prior bleed or neurological deficit. We used these results to construct risk prediction models for any symptomatic post-radiosurgery sequelae and for symptomatic necrosis. Conclusion: The risks of complications from AVM radiosurgery can be predicted according to location with the PIE score and by the 12 Gy treatment volume (Table 2)

  9. Sessions and Separability in Security Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Marco; Guttman, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Despite much work on sessions and session types in non- adversarial contexts, session-like behavior given an active adversary has not received an adequate definition and proof methods. We provide a syntactic property that guarantees that a protocol has session-respecting executions. Any uncomprom......Despite much work on sessions and session types in non- adversarial contexts, session-like behavior given an active adversary has not received an adequate definition and proof methods. We provide a syntactic property that guarantees that a protocol has session-respecting executions. Any...

  10. Recent treatment strategies for arteriovenous malformations in children and adolescents. Long-term results of gamma knife radiosurgery and recent noninvasive radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hiroshi K

    2006-01-01

    Although pediatric intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) presenting as intracerebral hematomas are usually treated with microsurgery, radiosurgery is indicated for AVMs in eloquent areas. Long-term results of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) and recent noninvasive treatment are reported. Twenty-four patients aged 10 to 19 years (14 male and 10 female) were treated from 1991 through 1997. The mean follow-up period was 10 years and 3 months. Most patients presented with bleeding and had AVMs in functional areas or deep within the brain. Before GKRS, embolization was performed in 7 patients and microsurgical extirpation was performed in 2 patients. The AVM volume was 0.07 to 22.4 ml at the time of radiosurgery. Complete angiographic obliteration of the AVM was achieved in 88.8% of patients. Two patients underwent GKRS a second time to treat residual nidi. One of 6 patients who did not undergo imaging examinations had bleeding; however, the others patients were healthy and working or attending college. Paralysis due to damage of the internal capsule developed after the first treatment of a grade 5 AVM and after the second treatment of a grade 6 AVM. Late or delayed complications, such as necrosis, cyst formation, bleeding after obliteration, and radiation-induced tumors, did not occur. These results suggest that GKRS is a safe and effective treatment for children with AVMs in eloquent areas. Frameless radiosurgery (CyberKnife) and recent imaging techniques enabled noninvasive treatment of pediatric AVMs. (author)

  11. Summary of Educational Poster Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The educational poster session provided a way of increasing the ordinarily limited time available for discussion of papers, while simultaneously making it easier to communicate visual materials not well suited to oral presentations. Poster presenters were available for 3 hours to discuss their displays. Poster presentations were divided into two categories: minority...

  12. After Smokestack Chasing. Plenary Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appalachia, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Plenary session opening remarks by Appalachian Regional Commission Co-Chairman Winnifred Pizzano inform participants that the Region's future success depends on their ability to meet the challenge of change. Excerpts from four panelists' speeches address rapid social and economic changes in economic development activities at state and local…

  13. SU-F-E-07: Web-Based Training for Radiosurgery: Methods and Metrics for Global Reach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R; Thomas, E; Popple, R; Fiveash, J; Jacobsen, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Webinars have become an evolving tool with greater or lesser success in reaching health care providers (HCPs). This study seeks to assess best practices and metrics for success in webinar deployment for optimal global reach. Methods: Webinars have been developed and launched to reach practicing health care providers in the field of radiation oncology and radiosurgery. One such webinar was launched in early February 2016. “Multiple Brain Metastases & Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiosurgery: Refining the Single-Isocenter Technique to Benefit Surgeons and Patients” presented by Drs. Fiveash and Thomas from UAB was submitted to and accredited by the Institute for Medical Education as qualifying for CME as well as MDCB for educational credit for dosimetrists, in order to encourage participation. MedicalPhysicsWeb was chosen as the platform to inform attendees regarding the webinar. Further IME accredited the activity for 1 AMA PRA Category 1 credit for physicians & medical physicists. The program was qualified by the ABR in meeting the criteria for self-assessment towards fulfilling MOC requirements. Free SAMs credits were underwritten by an educational grant from Varian Medical Systems. Results: The webinar in question attracted 992 pre-registrants from 66 countries. Outside the US and Canada; 11 were from the Americas; 32 were from Europe; 9 from the Middle East and Africa. Australasia and the Indian subcontinent represented the remaining 14 countries. Pre-registrants included 423 Medical Physicists, 225 Medical Dosimetrists, 24 Radiation Therapists, 66 Radiation Oncologists & other. Conclusion: The effectiveness of CME and SAM-CME programs such as this can be gauged by the high rate of respondents who state an intention to change practice habits, a primary goal of continuing medical education and self-assessment. This webinar succeeded in being the most successful webinar on Medical Physics Web as measured by pre-registration, participation and

  14. SU-F-E-07: Web-Based Training for Radiosurgery: Methods and Metrics for Global Reach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, R [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Thomas, E [University of Alabama - Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Popple, R [The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Fiveash, J [University Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Jacobsen, E [Univesity of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Webinars have become an evolving tool with greater or lesser success in reaching health care providers (HCPs). This study seeks to assess best practices and metrics for success in webinar deployment for optimal global reach. Methods: Webinars have been developed and launched to reach practicing health care providers in the field of radiation oncology and radiosurgery. One such webinar was launched in early February 2016. “Multiple Brain Metastases & Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiosurgery: Refining the Single-Isocenter Technique to Benefit Surgeons and Patients” presented by Drs. Fiveash and Thomas from UAB was submitted to and accredited by the Institute for Medical Education as qualifying for CME as well as MDCB for educational credit for dosimetrists, in order to encourage participation. MedicalPhysicsWeb was chosen as the platform to inform attendees regarding the webinar. Further IME accredited the activity for 1 AMA PRA Category 1 credit for physicians & medical physicists. The program was qualified by the ABR in meeting the criteria for self-assessment towards fulfilling MOC requirements. Free SAMs credits were underwritten by an educational grant from Varian Medical Systems. Results: The webinar in question attracted 992 pre-registrants from 66 countries. Outside the US and Canada; 11 were from the Americas; 32 were from Europe; 9 from the Middle East and Africa. Australasia and the Indian subcontinent represented the remaining 14 countries. Pre-registrants included 423 Medical Physicists, 225 Medical Dosimetrists, 24 Radiation Therapists, 66 Radiation Oncologists & other. Conclusion: The effectiveness of CME and SAM-CME programs such as this can be gauged by the high rate of respondents who state an intention to change practice habits, a primary goal of continuing medical education and self-assessment. This webinar succeeded in being the most successful webinar on Medical Physics Web as measured by pre-registration, participation and

  15. Stereotactic radiosurgery of angiographically occult vascular malformations: Indications and preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondziolka, D.; Lunsford, L.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Bissonette, D.J.; Flickinger, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has been shown to treat successfully angiographically demonstrated arteriovenous malformations of the brain. Angiographic obliteration has represented cure and eliminated the risk of future hemorrhage. The role of radiosurgery in the treatment of angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) has been less well defined. In the initial 32 months of operation of the 201-source cobalt-60 gamma knife at the University of Pittsburgh, 24 patients meeting strict criteria for high-risk AOVMs were treated. Radiosurgery was used conservatively; each patient had sustained two or more hemorrhages and had a magnetic resonance imaging-defined AOVM located in a region of the brain where microsurgical removal was judged to pose an excessive risk. Venous angiomas were excluded by performance of high-resolution subtraction angiography in each patient. Fifteen malformations were in the medulla, pons, and/or mesencephalon, and 5 were located in the thalamus or basal ganglia. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 24 months. Nineteen patients either improved or remained clinically stable and did not hemorrhage again during the follow-up interval. One patient suffered another hemorrhage 7 months after radiosurgery. Five patients experienced temporary worsening of pre-existing neurological deficits that suggested delayed radiation injury. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated signal changes and edema surrounding the radiosurgical target. Dose-volume guidelines for avoiding complications were constructed. Our initial experience indicates that stereotactic radiosurgery can be performed safely in patients with small, well-circumscribed AOVMs located in deep, critical, or relatively inaccessible cerebral locations

  16. Role of gamma knife radiosurgery in neurosurgery. Past and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Tomoyuki; Shin, Masahiro; Saito, Nobuhito

    2010-01-01

    The gamma knife was the first radiosurgical device developed at the Karolinska Institute in 1967. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife has been widely accepted in clinical practice and has contributed to the development of neurosurgery. More than 500,000 patients have been treated by gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery so far, and the method is now an indispensable neurosurgical tool. Here we review long-term outcomes and development of stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife and discuss its future perspectives. The primary role of stereotactic radiosurgery is to control small well-demarcated lesions such as metastatic brain tumors, meningiomas, schwannomas, and pituitary adenomas while preserving the function of surrounding brain tissue. The gamma knife has been used as a primary treatment or in combination with surgery, and some applications have been accepted as standard treatment in the field of neurosurgery. Treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations has also been drastically changed after emergence of this technology. Controlling functional disorders is another role of stereotactic radiosurgery. There is a risk of radiation-induced adverse events, which are usually mild and less frequent. However, especially in large or invasive lesions, those risks are not negligible and pose limitations. Advancement of irradiation technology and dose planning software have enabled more sophisticated and safer treatment, and further progress will contribute to better treatment outcomes not only for brain lesions but also for cervical lesions with less invasive treatment. (author)

  17. Less is more: latent learning is maximized by shorter training sessions in auditory perceptual learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Molloy

    Full Text Available The time course and outcome of perceptual learning can be affected by the length and distribution of practice, but the training regimen parameters that govern these effects have received little systematic study in the auditory domain. We asked whether there was a minimum requirement on the number of trials within a training session for learning to occur, whether there was a maximum limit beyond which additional trials became ineffective, and whether multiple training sessions provided benefit over a single session.We investigated the efficacy of different regimens that varied in the distribution of practice across training sessions and in the overall amount of practice received on a frequency discrimination task. While learning was relatively robust to variations in regimen, the group with the shortest training sessions (∼8 min had significantly faster learning in early stages of training than groups with longer sessions. In later stages, the group with the longest training sessions (>1 hr showed slower learning than the other groups, suggesting overtraining. Between-session improvements were inversely correlated with performance; they were largest at the start of training and reduced as training progressed. In a second experiment we found no additional longer-term improvement in performance, retention, or transfer of learning for a group that trained over 4 sessions (∼4 hr in total relative to a group that trained for a single session (∼1 hr. However, the mechanisms of learning differed; the single-session group continued to improve in the days following cessation of training, whereas the multi-session group showed no further improvement once training had ceased.Shorter training sessions were advantageous because they allowed for more latent, between-session and post-training learning to emerge. These findings suggest that efficient regimens should use short training sessions, and optimized spacing between sessions.

  18. Sessions and Separability in Security Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Marco; Guttman, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Despite much work on sessions and session types in non- adversarial contexts, session-like behavior given an active adversary has not received an adequate definition and proof methods. We provide a syntactic property that guarantees that a protocol has session-respecting executions. Any uncomprom...

  19. Indications of Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Seiji; Takanashi, Masami; Hojyo, Atsufumi; Tanaka, Chiharu; Konishi, Masanori; Nakamura, Hirohiko

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the indication of gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas by analyzing tumor control and possible complications using low marginal doses and conformal multiple shots to fit irregular tumor shapes. The authors evaluated 223 patients with followed-up periods ranging from 5 years to 15 years (mean 7.7 years, median 7.4 years). Marginal doses were 9 to 15 Gy (mean 12.5 Gy, median 12 Gy) with corresponding treatment volumes being between 0.1 and 18.7 cm 3 (mean 2.6 cm 3 , median 1.8 cm 3 ). The number of isocenters varied from 2 to 24 shots (mean 9, median 9.2). The actuarial tumor control rates were 95% at 5 years and 94% at 7 years, respectively. Larger tumors (p=0.0068) and those in younger patients (p=0.093) tended to recur significantly. The preservation rates of useful hearing were 84%, 71%, and 64% at 2, 4, and 7 years, respectively. The most deterioration seemed to occur in cases with elderly patients (p=0.0048). Facial and trigeminal functions were preserved at 100%, and 97.8%, respectively. Amongst all patients, 20.6% developed transient dizziness, with persistent dizziness remaining in 1.5% of the total. Fifty-six other patients not in the long-term evaluation consecutively underwent caloric testing and static stabilometry as well as neurological examinations to evaluate vestibular function in detail, both before and after gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). The results showed that 90% of the patients had already developed vestibular dysfunction before the treatment despite reported symptoms of dizziness. GKRS did not significantly affect vestibular function. Hydrocephalus was recognized in 5.5% of all patients, and seemed to occur primarily in cases with larger tumors (p=0.0189). GKRS provides a safe and effective therapy for small to medium sized tumors up to 8 cm 3 . Long-term hearing preservation rate may be affected by presbycusis in elderly patients. (author)

  20. Beam instability Workshop - plenary sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to provide a review of the mechanisms of limiting beam instabilities, their cures, including feedback, and beam measurement for synchrotron radiation light sources. 12 plenary sessions took place whose titles are: 1) challenging brilliance and lifetime issues with increasing currents; 2) limiting instabilities in multibunch; 3) experience from high currents in B factories; 4) longitudinal dynamics in high intensity/bunch; 5) Transverse instabilities for high intensity/bunch; 6) working group introduction from ESRF experience; 7) impedance modelling: simulations, minimization; 8) report on the broadband impedance measurements and modelling workshop; 9) feedback systems for synchrotron light sources; 10) beam instabilities diagnostics; 11) harmonic cavities: the pros and cons; and 12) experimental study of fast beam-ion instabilities at PLS. This document gathers the 12 articles that were presented during these sessions

  1. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of radiogenic changes after radiosurgery of cerebral arteriovenous malformations with implications for the differential diagnosis of radionecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boström, Jan; Hadizadeh, Dariusch R; Block, Wolfgang; Willinek, Winfried; Schild, Hans H; Träber, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of radionecrosis after radiosurgery is 5–20%. That radionecrosis after radiosurgery may be confused with a malignant tumor is a known phenomenon and problem. Three similarly treated patients with cAVM, 1 patient with symptomatic radionecrosis and 2 patients with normal post-radiation MRI changes, were selected and studied in detail with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). 2 cAVM were located in eloquent locations and were classified as Spetzler-Martin grade (SM) III such that interdisciplinary radiosurgery was recommended; a third patient with a left frontal SM II cAVM refused surgery. 1 patient was male, and 2 were female. The patient’s ages ranged from 38 to 62 years (median, 39 years). The nidus volume (= planning target volume = PTV) ranged from 2.75 to 6.89 ccm (median, 6.41 ccm). The single dose was 20 Gy at the isocenter of the PTV encompassing the 80 – 90% isodose. The median follow-up period was 20 months (range, 16 – 84 months). Toxicities were evaluated with the Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) for adverse events version 3.0. No patient suffered a bleeding from cAVM during the study period. A complete nidus occlusion was shown in all patients with time-resolved MRA. All patients showed radiogenic MRI changes, 1 patient showed excessive radionecrosis. This patient was oligosymptomatic and under temporary corticoid therapy symptoms resolved completely. Following patterns associated with radionecrosis in the MRS studies were identified in our collective: • 2D spectroscopic imaging (2D-SI) revealed much lower concentrations of metabolites in the lesion as compared to contralateral healthy tissue in all patients. • Whereas regions with regular post-radiosurgery effects showed almost normal levels of Cho and a Cho/Cr ratio < 2.0, regions with radionecrosis were characterized by increased lipid levels and a Cho/Cr ratio > 2.0 in conjunction with decreased

  2. National Sessions of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sociedad Argentina de Radioproteccion

    2012-01-01

    The Radioprotection Argentine Society (SAR) was organized the National Sessions on Radiation Protection 2012 in order to continue the exchange in the radiation protection community in the country, on work areas that present a challenge to the profession. The new recommendations of the ICRP and the IAEA Safety Standards (2011), among others, includes several topics that are necessary to develop. The SAR wants to encourage different organizations from Argentina, to submit projects that are developing in order to strengthen radiation protection.

  3. The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image Guided Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Initial Clinical Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Winnie; Cho, Young-Bin [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ansell, Steve [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand; Ménard, Cynthia; Millar, Barbara-Ann [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Macfeeters-Hamilton Centre for Neuro-oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kongkham, Paul; Bernstein, Mark [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.chung.md@gmail.com [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The present study used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to measure the inter- and intrafraction uncertainties for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK). Methods and Materials: Using a novel CBCT system adapted to the GK radiosurgery treatment unit, CBCT images were acquired immediately before and after treatment for each treatment session within the context of a research ethics board–approved prospective clinical trial. Patients were immobilized in the Leksell coordinate frame (LCF) for both volumetric CBCT imaging and GK-SRS delivery. The relative displacement of the patient's skull to the stereotactic reference (interfraction motion) was measured for each CBCT scan. Differences between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were used to determine the intrafraction motion. Results: We analyzed 20 pre- and 17 post-treatment CBCT scans in 20 LCF patients treated with SRS. The mean translational pretreatment setup error ± standard deviation in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.19 ± 0.32, 0.06 ± 0.27, and −0.23 ± 0.2 mm, with a maximum of −0.74, −0.53, and −0.68 mm, respectively. After an average time between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans of 82 minutes (range 27-170), the mean intrafraction error ± standard deviation for the LCF was −0.03 ± 0.05, −0.03 ± 0.18, and −0.03 ± 0.12 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudual direction, respectively. Conclusions: Using CBCT on a prototype image guided GK Perfexion unit, we were able to measure the inter- and intrafraction positional changes for GK-SRS using the invasive frame. In the era of image guided radiation therapy, the use of CBCT image guidance for both frame- and non–frame-based immobilization systems could serve as a useful quality assurance tool. Our preliminary measurements can guide the application of achievable thresholds for inter- and intrafraction

  4. Long-term effects of gamma knife radiosurgery for pediatric craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osuka, Koji; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Kida, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kazuo; Hasegawa, Toshinori [Komaki City Hospital, Aichi (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Twenty-one pediatric patients with craniopharyngioma have undergone gamma knife radiosurgery at our facility since May 1991, and we have followed up 10 of these patients for at least 24 months (mean 44.5 months). The patients' ages ranged from 6 to 12 years (mean 8.6 years). Initial presentations were headache in 7 patients, decreased visual acuity in 8, visual field deficit in 5, hypopituitarism in 7, and diabetes insipidus in 3. Prior to radiosurgery, surgical procedures had been performed in 8 patients, conventional radiotherapy in 1, and chemotherapy in 1. Mean tumor diameter was 17.4 mm, and treatment was by gamma knife, with mean maximum and marginal doses of 25.4 Gy and 13.3 Gy, respectively. Follow-up MRI revealed good tumor control (partial response+complete response) in 7 of the 10 patients, with neither further neurological nor endocrinological deterioration. Two patients showed tumor shrinkage for 60 months and 46 months, respectively, after radiosurgery, while, thereafter, tumor gradually recurred at the side of the optic nerve. In one patient, rapid growth of the cyst was observed 6 months after radiosurgery. Gamma knife radiosurgery for pediatric craniopharyngioma is considered to be a safe and effective treatment after microsurgical tumor removal. In cases in which total removal is impossible, it is important to detach the tumor from the optic nerve and to reduce the tumor volume for gamma knife radiosurgery after microsurgery. If the tumor has a cystic component, this should be removed at the time of surgery. (author)

  5. Geometric parameter analysis to predetermine optimal radiosurgery technique for the treatment of arteriovenous malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestrovic, Ante; Clark, Brenda G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method of predicting the values of dose distribution parameters of different radiosurgery techniques for treatment of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) based on internal geometric parameters. Methods and Materials: For each of 18 previously treated AVM patients, four treatment plans were created: circular collimator arcs, dynamic conformal arcs, fixed conformal fields, and intensity-modulated radiosurgery. An algorithm was developed to characterize the target and critical structure shape complexity and the position of the critical structures with respect to the target. Multiple regression was employed to establish the correlation between the internal geometric parameters and the dose distribution for different treatment techniques. The results from the model were applied to predict the dosimetric outcomes of different radiosurgery techniques and select the optimal radiosurgery technique for a number of AVM patients. Results: Several internal geometric parameters showing statistically significant correlation (p < 0.05) with the treatment planning results for each technique were identified. The target volume and the average minimum distance between the target and the critical structures were the most effective predictors for normal tissue dose distribution. The structure overlap volume with the target and the mean distance between the target and the critical structure were the most effective predictors for critical structure dose distribution. The predicted values of dose distribution parameters of different radiosurgery techniques were in close agreement with the original data. Conclusions: A statistical model has been described that successfully predicts the values of dose distribution parameters of different radiosurgery techniques and may be used to predetermine the optimal technique on a patient-to-patient basis

  6. Peritumoral hemorrhage after radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumor; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motozaki, Takahiko (Nishinomiya City General Hospital, Hyogo (Japan)); Ban, Sadahiko; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Hamasaki, Masatake

    1994-08-01

    An unusual case of peritumoral hemorrhage after radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic brain tumor is reported. This 64-year-old woman had a history of breast cancer and underwent right mastectomy in 1989. She remained well until January 1993, when she started to have headache, nausea and speech disturbance, and was hospitalized on February 25, 1993. Neurological examination disclosed right hemiparesis and bilateral papilledema. CT scan and MR imaging showed a solitary round mass lesion in the left basal ganglia region. It was a well-demarcated, highly enhanced mass, 37 mm in diameter. Cerebral angiography confirmed a highly vascular mass lesion in the same location. She was treated with radiosurgery on March 8 (maximum dose was 20 Gy in the center and 10 Gy in the peripheral part of the tumor). After radiosurgery, she had an uneventful course and clinical and radiosurgical improvement could be detected. Her neurological symptoms and signs gradually improved and reduction of the tumor size and perifocal edema could be seen one month after radiosurgery. However, 6 weeks after radiosurgery, she suddenly developed semicoma and right hemiplegia. CT scan disclosed a massive peritumoral hemorrhage. Then, emergency craniotomy, evacuation of the hematoma and total removal of the tumor were performed on April 24. Histopathological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma. It was the same finding as that of the previous breast cancer. Histopathological examination revealed necrosis without tumor cells in the center and residual tumor cells in the peripheral part of the tumor. It is postulated that peritumoral hemorrhage was caused by hemodynamic changes in the vascular-rich tumor after radiosurgery and breakdown of the fragile abnormal vessels in the peripheral part of the tumor. (author).

  7. Comparative analyses of linac and Gamma Knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, L; Kwok, Y; Chin, L S; Yu, C; Regine, W F

    2005-01-01

    Dedicated linac-based radiosurgery has been reported for trigeminal neuralgia treatments. In this study, we investigated the dose fall-off characteristics and setup error tolerance of linac-based radiosurgery as compared with standard Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In order to minimize the errors from different treatment planning calculations, consistent imaging registration, dose calculation and dose volume analysis methods were developed and implemented for both Gamma Knife and linac-based treatments. Intra-arc setup errors were incorporated into the treatment planning process of linac-based deliveries. The effects of intra-arc setup errors with increasing number of arcs were studied and benchmarked against Gamma Knife deliveries with and without plugging patterns. Our studies found equivalent dose fall-off properties between Gamma Knife and linac-based radiosurgery given a sufficient number of arcs (>7) and small intra-arc errors (<0.5 mm) were satisfied for linac-based deliveries. Increasing the number of arcs significantly decreased the variations in the dose fall-off curve at the low isodose region (e.g. from 40% to 10%) and also improved dose uniformity at the high isodose region (e.g. from 70% to 90%). As the number of arcs increased, the effects of intra-arc setup errors on the dose fall-off curves decreased. Increasing the number of arcs also reduced the integral dose to the distal normal brain tissues. In conclusion, linac-based radiosurgery produces equivalent dose fall-off characteristics to Gamma Knife radiosurgery with a high number of arcs. However, one must note the increased treatment time for a large number of arcs and isocentre accuracies

  8. Development of a Prototype Robotic System for Radiosurgery with Upper Hemispherical Workspace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Young Noh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a specialized robotic system under development for radiosurgery using a small-sized linear accelerator. The robotic system is a 5-DOF manipulator that can be installed above a patient to make an upper hemispherical workspace centered in a target point. In order to determine the optimal lengths of the link, we consider the requirements for the workspace of a linear accelerator for radiosurgery. A more suitable kinematic structure than conventional industrial manipulators is proposed, and the kinematic analysis is also provided. A graphic simulator is implemented and used for dynamic analysis. Based on those results, a prototype manipulator and its control system are under development.

  9. Development of stereotactic radiosurgery using carbon beams (carbon-knife)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keawsamur, Mintra; Matsumura, Akihiko; Souda, Hikaru; Kano, Yosuke; Torikoshi, Masami; Nakano, Takashi; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this research is to develop a stereotactic-radiosurgery (SRS) technique using carbon beams to treat small intracranial lesions; we call this device the carbon knife. A 2D-scanning method is adapted to broaden a pencil beam to an appropriate size for an irradiation field. A Mitsubishi slow extraction using third order resonance through a rf acceleration system stabilized by a feed-forward scanning beam using steering magnets with a 290 MeV/u initial beam energy was used for this purpose. Ridge filters for spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) with widths of 5 mm, 7.5 mm, and 10 mm were designed to include fluence-attenuation effects. The collimator, which defines field shape, was used to reduce the lateral penumbra. The lateral-penumbra width at the SOBP region was less than 2 mm for the carbon knife. The penumbras behaved almost the same when changing the air gap, but on the other hand, increasing the range-shifter thickness mostly broadened the lateral penumbra. The physical-dose rates were approximate 6 Gy s‑1 and 4.5 Gy s‑1 for the 10  ×  10 mm2 and 5  ×  5 mm2 collimators, respectively.

  10. Gamma knife radiosurgery under general anesthesia in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Yoshinori; Serizawa, Toru; Nagano, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) is an important treatment option for pediatric intracranial diseases, such as arteriovenous malformations and brain tumors. To perform GKS in children, general anesthesia is required for placing a stereotactic frame around the head of the patient, who must remain supine for the entire procedure. This report describes the anesthetic management of children who have undergone GKS at our institution. Fifty-one GKS procedures were performed in 43 patients (age range, 2-15 years). Twenty-one patients had arteriovenous malformations, and 14 patients had brain tumors. Twenty-nine patients (67.4%) received general anesthesia. All children 10 years or younger were treated under general anesthesia. General anesthesia for GKS is performed outside of the operating room and involves unique conditions. First, the patients must be transported to multiple sites in the hospital (the neuroangiography suite, the department of radiology for magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, and the gamma knife unit). Second, general anesthesia must be maintained in a high magnetic field. Third, medical staff, including anesthesiologists, must remain outside the room during irradiation. Safe and efficient general anesthesia is essential for performing GKS in children. (author)

  11. A Virtual Frame System for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Eric; Purger, David; Tryggestad, Erik; McNutt, Todd; Christodouleas, John; Rigamonti, Daniele; Shokek, Ori; Won Sang; Zhou, Jessica; Lim, Michael; Wong, John; Kleinberg, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We describe a computerized (or virtual) model of a stereotactic head frame to enable planning prior to the day of radiosurgery. The location of the virtual frame acts as a guide to frame placement on the day of the procedure. Methods and Materials: The software consists of a triangular mesh representation of the essential frame hardware that can be overlaid with any MR scan of the patient and manipulated in three dimensions. The software calculates regions of the head that will actually be accessible for treatment, subject to the geometric constraints of the Leksell Gamma Knife hardware. DICOM-compliant MR images with virtual fiducial markers overlaid onto the image can then be generated for recognition by the treatment planning system. Results: Retrospective evaluation of the software on 24 previously treated patients shows a mean deviation of the position of the virtual frame from the actual frame position of 1.6 ± 1.3 mm. Initial clinical use on five patients indicates an average discrepancy of the virtual frame location and the actual frame location of <1 mm. MR images with virtual fiducial markers can be imported into radiosurgical treatment planning software and used to generate an initial treatment plan. Conclusions: The virtual frame provides a tool for prospective determination of lesion accessibility, optimization of the frame placement, and treatment planning before the day of the procedure. This promises to shorten overall treatment times, improve patient comfort, and reduce the need for repeat treatments due to suboptimally placed frames

  12. A dental solution to the reproducible frameless stereotactic problem in fractionated radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, Richard M.; Andres, Eric; Sibata, Claudio; Acharya, Raj; Shin, K.H.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Stereotactic radiosurgery forms an important component of many brain tumor protocols. Patient treatment may be improved when doses are delivered in a fractionated manner over a series of days. Current radiosurgical practices prevent such treatments due to the inaccuracy associated with repeatedly registering pre-treatment imaging scans with the patient's physical location over a discrete series of sessions. We propose a new system for pseudo-frameless stereotactic radio-surgery in which the traditional halo frame system is replaced by a series of dental brackets attached to the upper teeth of each patient. Each bracket may then be fit with sets of fiducial markers which can be localized in the imaging and physical spaces. Patient immobilization will be performed via a custom fit face mask. By decoupling head localization and head immobilization tasks, highly accurate and reproducible fractionated treatment plans may be delivered during a series of treatment sessions. Materials and Methods An experimental custom phantom system was developed in order to evaluate the efficacy of our approach. A rigid head phantom which may be displaced with three rotational degrees of freedom was constructed and fitted with prototype dental brackets. A high contrast CT imaging fixture was then attached to each bracket. The true position of the fixed dental brackets was calculated by direct measurement prior to imaging. Angular encoders were employed to measure the rotational degrees of freedom of the phantom. Multiple imaging scans over a series of series of days were obtained at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute. The high contrast imaging fixtures were removed and replaced prior to each scan in order to best simulate clinical conditions. The origin of each bracket was calculated using analysis software developed at our institution. In order to localize the bracket coordinates in physical space, a specialized probe was constructed with a tip that can interlock with

  13. Stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal metastases: a literature review; Radiocirurgia estereotaxica para metastases de coluna vertebral: revisao de literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joaquim, Andrei Fernandes; Ghizoni, Enrico; Tedeschi, Helder; Pereira, Eduardo Baldon; Giacomini, Leonardo Abdala, E-mail: andjoaquim@yahoo.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2013-04-15

    Objective: The spine is the most common location for bone metastases. Since cure is not possible, local control and relief of symptoms is the basis for treatment, which is grounded on the use of conventional radiotherapy. Recently, spinal radiosurgery has been proposed for the local control of spinal metastases, whether as primary or salvage treatment. Consequently, we carried out a literature review in order to analyze the indications, efficacy, and safety of radiosurgery in the treatment of spinal metastases. Methods: We have reviewed the literature using the PubMed gateway with data from the Medline library on studies related to the use of radiosurgery in treatment of bone metastases in spine. The studies were reviewed by all the authors and classified as to level of evidence, using the criterion defined by Wright. Results: The indications found for radiosurgery were primary control of epidural metastases (evidence level II), myeloma (level III), and metastases known to be poor responders to conventional radiotherapy - melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (level III). Spinal radiosurgery was also proposed for salvage treatment after conventional radiotherapy (level II). There is also some evidence as to the safety and efficacy of radiosurgery in cases of extramedullar and intramedullar intradural metastatic tumors (level III) and after spinal decompression and stabilization surgery. Conclusion: Radiosurgery can be used in primary or salvage treatment of spinal metastases, improving local disease control and patient symptoms. It should also be considered as initial treatment for radioresistant tumors, such as melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. (author)

  14. Aggregated Search Interface Preferences in Multi-Session Search Tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, M.; van Gorp, J.; Nack, F.; Baltussen, L.B.; de Rijke, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregated search interfaces provide users with an overview of results from various sources. Two general types of display exist: tabbed, with access to each source in a separate tab, and blended, which combines multiple sources into a single result page. Multi-session search tasks, e.g., a research

  15. Phase II clinical trial of robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery for metastatic gynecologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eKunos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Recurrent gynecologic cancers are often difficult to manage without significant morbidity. We conducted a phase II study to assess the safety and the efficacy of ablative robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT in women with metastatic gynecologic cancers. Methods A total of 50 patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer who had single or multiple (≤4 metastases underwent robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT (24Gy/3 daily doses. Toxicities were graded prospectively by common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0. SBRT target responses were recorded following RECIST criteria (version 1.0. Rates of clinical benefit for SBRT and non-radiosurgical disease relapse were calculated. Disease-free and overall survivals were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used to control for prognostic variables.Findings SBRT was safely delivered, with 49 (98% of 50 patients completing three prescribed fractions. The most frequent grade 2 or higher adverse events attributed to SBRT included fatigue (16%, nausea (8% and diarrhea (4%. One (2% grade 4 hyperbilirubinemia occurred. SBRT target response was 96% (48 of 50 patients. A 6-month clinical benefit was recorded in 34 (68% [95% CI, 53.2, 80.1] patients. No SBRT-targeted disease progressed. Non-radiosurgical disease relapse occurred in 31 (62% patients. Median disease-free survival was 7.8 months (95% CI, 4.0, 11.6. Median overall survival was 20.2 months (95% CI, 10.9, 29.5.Interpretation SBRT safely controlled metastatic gynecologic cancer targets. Given an observed high rate of non-radiosurgical disease relapse, a phase I trial assessing co-administration of SBRT and cytotoxic chemotherapy is underway.Funding Case Comprehensive Cancer Center

  16. Phase II Clinical Trial of Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery for Metastatic Gynecologic Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunos, Charles A.; Brindle, James; Waggoner, Steven; Zanotti, Kristine; Resnick, Kimberly; Fusco, Nancy; Adams, Ramon; Debernardo, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recurrent gynecologic cancers are often difficult to manage without significant morbidity. We conducted a phase II study to assess the safety and the efficacy of ablative robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) in women with metastatic gynecologic cancers. Methods: A total of 50 patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer who had single or multiple (≤4) metastases underwent robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT (24Gy/3 daily doses). Toxicities were graded prospectively by common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0). SBRT target responses were recorded following RECIST criteria (version 1.0). Rates of clinical benefit for SBRT and non-radiosurgical disease relapse were calculated. Disease-free and overall survivals were estimated by the Kaplan–Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used to control for prognostic variables. Findings: SBRT was safely delivered, with 49 (98%) of 50 patients completing three prescribed fractions. The most frequent grade 2 or higher adverse events attributed to SBRT included fatigue (16%), nausea (8%), and diarrhea (4%). One (2%) grade four hyperbilirubinemia occurred. SBRT target response was 96% (48 of 50 patients). A 6-month clinical benefit was recorded in 34 [68% (95% CI, 53.2, 80.1)] patients. No SBRT targeted disease progressed. Non-radiosurgical disease relapse occurred in 31 (62%) patients. Median disease-free survival was 7.8 months (95% CI, 4.0, 11.6). Median overall survival was 20.2 months (95% CI, 10.9, 29.5). Interpretation: SBRT safely controlled metastatic gynecologic cancer targets. Given an observed high rate of non-radiosurgical disease relapse, a phase I trial assessing co-administration of SBRT and cytotoxic chemotherapy is underway. Funding: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center.

  17. Hematological Toxicity After Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery for Treatment of Metastatic Gynecologic Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunos, Charles A.; Debernardo, Robert; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Fabien, Jeffrey; Dobbins, Donald C.; Zhang Yuxia; Brindle, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate hematological toxicity after robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) for treatment of women with metastatic abdominopelvic gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 women with stage IV gynecologic malignancies treated with abdominopelvic SBRT were analyzed after ablative radiation (2400 cGy/3 divided consecutive daily doses) delivered by a robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT system. Abdominopelvic bone marrow was identified using computed tomography-guided contouring. Fatigue and hematologic toxicities were graded by retrospective assignment of common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0). Bone marrow volume receiving 1000 cGy (V10) was tested for association with post-therapy (median 32 days [25%-75% quartile, 28-45 days]) white- or red-cell counts, hemoglobin levels, and platelet counts as marrow toxicity surrogates. Results: In all, 61 women undergoing abdominopelvic SBRT had a median bone marrow V10 of 2% (25%-75% quartile: 0%-8%). Fifty-seven (93%) of 61 women had received at least 1 pre-SBRT marrow-taxing chemotherapy regimen for metastatic disease. Bone marrow V10 did not associate with hematological adverse events. In all, 15 grade 2 (25%) and 2 grade 3 (3%) fatigue symptoms were self-reported among the 61 women within the first 10 days post-therapy, with fatigue resolved spontaneously in all 17 women by 30 days post-therapy. Neutropenia was not observed. Three (5%) women had a grade 1 drop in hemoglobin level to <10.0 g/dL. Single grade 1, 2, and 3 thrombocytopenias were documented in 3 women. Conclusions: Abdominopelvic SBRT provided ablative radiation dose to cancer targets without increased bone marrow toxicity. Abdominopelvic SBRT for metastatic gynecologic malignancies warrants further study.

  18. Association Between Radiation Necrosis and Tumor Biology After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Jacob A.; Bennett, Elizabeth E.; Xiao, Roy; Kotecha, Rupesh; Chao, Samuel T.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Barnett, Gene H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Murphy, Erin S.; Yu, Jennifer S.; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The primary dose-limiting toxicity of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is radiation necrosis (RN), which occurs after approximately 5% to 10% of treatments. This adverse event may worsen neurologic deficits, increase the frequency and cost of imaging, and necessitate prolonged treatment with steroids or antiangiogenic agents. Previous investigations have primarily identified lesion size and dosimetric constraints as risk factors for RN in small populations. We hypothesized that disease histology, receptor status, and mutational status are associated with RN. Methods and Materials: All patients presenting with brain metastasis between 1997 and 2015 who underwent SRS and subsequent radiographic follow-up at a single tertiary-care institution were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome was the cumulative incidence of radiographic RN. Multivariate competing risks regression was used to identify biological risk factors for RN. Results: 1939 patients (5747 lesions) were eligible for inclusion; 285 patients (15%) experienced radiographic RN after the treatment of 427 (7%) lesions. After SRS, the median time to RN was 7.6 months. After multivariate analysis, graded prognostic assessment, renal pathology, lesion diameter, and the heterogeneity index remained independently predictive of RN in the pooled cohort. In subset analyses of individual pathologies, HER2-amplified status (hazard ratio [HR] 2.05, P=.02), BRAF V600+ mutational status (HR 0.33, P=.04), lung adenocarcinoma histology (HR 1.89, P=.04), and ALK rearrangement (HR 6.36, P<.01) were also associated with RN. Conclusions: In the present investigation constituting the largest series of RN, several novel risk factors were identified, including renal histology, lung adenocarcinoma histology, HER2 amplification, and ALK/BRAF mutational status. These risk factors may be used to guide clinical trial design incorporating biological risk stratification or dose escalation. Future studies determining the

  19. Right Brodmann area 18 predicts tremor arrest after Vim radiosurgery: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleasca, Constantin; Witjas, Tatiana; Van de Ville, Dimitri; Najdenovska, Elena; Verger, Antoine; Girard, Nadine; Champoudry, Jerome; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Levivier, Marc; Guedj, Eric; Régis, Jean

    2018-03-01

    Drug-resistant essential tremor (ET) can benefit from open standard stereotactic procedures, such as deep-brain stimulation or radiofrequency thalamotomy. Non-surgical candidates can be offered either high-focused ultrasound (HIFU) or radiosurgery (RS). All procedures aim to target the same thalamic site, the ventro-intermediate nucleus (e.g., Vim). The mechanisms by which tremor stops after Vim RS or HIFU remain unknown. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) on pretherapeutic neuroimaging data and assessed which anatomical site would best correlate with tremor arrest 1 year after Vim RS. Fifty-two patients (30 male, 22 female; mean age 71.6 years, range 49-82) with right-sided ET benefited from left unilateral Vim RS in Marseille, France. Targeting was performed in a uniform manner, using 130 Gy and a single 4-mm collimator. Neurological (pretherapeutic and 1 year after) and neuroimaging (baseline) assessments were completed. Tremor score on the treated hand (TSTH) at 1 year after Vim RS was included in a statistical parametric mapping analysis of variance (ANOVA) model as a continuous variable with pretherapeutic neuroimaging data. Pretherapeutic gray matter density (GMD) was further correlated with TSTH improvement. No a priori hypothesis was used in the statistical model. The only statistically significant region was right Brodmann area (BA) 18 (visual association area V2, p = 0.05, cluster size K c  = 71). Higher baseline GMD correlated with better TSTH improvement at 1 year after Vim RS (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient = 0.002). Routine baseline structural neuroimaging predicts TSTH improvement 1 year after Vim RS. The relevant anatomical area is the right visual association cortex (BA 18, V2). The question whether visual areas should be included in the targeting remains open.

  20. Concurrent Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Bevacizumab in Recurrent Malignant Gliomas: A Prospective Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, Alvin R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cuneo, Kyle C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Desjardins, Annick [Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Sampson, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Peters, Katherine B. [Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Allen, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Hoang, Jenny K. [Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chang, Zheng; Craciunescu, Oana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Vredenburgh, James J.; Friedman, Henry S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirkpatrick, John P., E-mail: john.kirkpatrick@dm.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Virtually all patients with malignant glioma (MG) eventually recur. This study evaluates the safety of concurrent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and bevacizumab (BVZ), an antiangiogenic agent, in treatment of recurrent MG. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with recurrent MG, treated at initial diagnosis with surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy/temozolomide and then at least 1 salvage chemotherapy regimen, were enrolled in this prospective trial. Lesions <3 cm in diameter were treated in a single fraction, whereas those 3 to 5 cm in diameter received 5 5-Gy fractions. BVZ was administered immediately before SRS and 2 weeks later. Neurocognitive testing (Mini-Mental Status Exam, Trail Making Test A/B), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain (FACT-Br) quality-of-life assessment, physical exam, and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) were performed immediately before SRS and 1 week and 2 months following completion of SRS. The primary endpoint was central nervous system (CNS) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included survival, quality of life, microvascular properties as measured by DCE-MRI, steroid usage, and performance status. Results: One grade 3 (severe headache) and 2 grade 2 CNS toxicities were observed. No patients experienced grade 4 to 5 toxicity or intracranial hemorrhage. Neurocognition, quality of life, and Karnofsky performance status did not change significantly with treatment. DCE-MRI results suggest a significant decline in tumor perfusion and permeability 1 week after SRS and further decline by 2 months. Conclusions: Treatment of recurrent MG with concurrent SRS and BVZ was not associated with excessive toxicity in this prospective trial. A randomized trial of concurrent SRS/BVZ versus conventional salvage therapy is needed to establish the efficacy of this approach.

  1. Association Between Radiation Necrosis and Tumor Biology After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Jacob A. [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bennett, Elizabeth E. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Xiao, Roy [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Kotecha, Rupesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Chao, Samuel T. [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Barnett, Gene H.; Angelov, Lilyana [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Murphy, Erin S.; Yu, Jennifer S. [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ahluwalia, Manmeet S. [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); and others

    2016-12-01

    Background: The primary dose-limiting toxicity of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is radiation necrosis (RN), which occurs after approximately 5% to 10% of treatments. This adverse event may worsen neurologic deficits, increase the frequency and cost of imaging, and necessitate prolonged treatment with steroids or antiangiogenic agents. Previous investigations have primarily identified lesion size and dosimetric constraints as risk factors for RN in small populations. We hypothesized that disease histology, receptor status, and mutational status are associated with RN. Methods and Materials: All patients presenting with brain metastasis between 1997 and 2015 who underwent SRS and subsequent radiographic follow-up at a single tertiary-care institution were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome was the cumulative incidence of radiographic RN. Multivariate competing risks regression was used to identify biological risk factors for RN. Results: 1939 patients (5747 lesions) were eligible for inclusion; 285 patients (15%) experienced radiographic RN after the treatment of 427 (7%) lesions. After SRS, the median time to RN was 7.6 months. After multivariate analysis, graded prognostic assessment, renal pathology, lesion diameter, and the heterogeneity index remained independently predictive of RN in the pooled cohort. In subset analyses of individual pathologies, HER2-amplified status (hazard ratio [HR] 2.05, P=.02), BRAF V600+ mutational status (HR 0.33, P=.04), lung adenocarcinoma histology (HR 1.89, P=.04), and ALK rearrangement (HR 6.36, P<.01) were also associated with RN. Conclusions: In the present investigation constituting the largest series of RN, several novel risk factors were identified, including renal histology, lung adenocarcinoma histology, HER2 amplification, and ALK/BRAF mutational status. These risk factors may be used to guide clinical trial design incorporating biological risk stratification or dose escalation. Future studies determining the

  2. SU-F-T-212: A Comparison of Treatment Strategies for Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberton, T; Slater, J; Wroe, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective and noninvasive treatment for intracranial lesions that uses highly focused radiation beams in a single treatment fraction. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric differences between the treatment brain metastasis with a proton beam vs. intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: Ten separate brain metastasis targets where chosen and treatment plans were created for each, using three different strategies: custom proton beam shaping devices, standardized proton beam shaping devices, and IMRT. Each plan was required to satisfy set parameters for providing adequate coverage and minimizing risk to adjacent tissues. The effectiveness of each plan was calculated by comparing the homogeneity index, conformity index, and V12 for each target using a paired one tailed T-test (α=0.05). Specific comparison of the conformity indices was also made using a subcategory containing targets with volume>1cc. Results: There was no significant difference between the homogeneity indices of the three plans (p>0.05), showing that each plan has the capability of adequately covering the targets. There was a statistically significant difference (p<0.01) between the conformity indices of the custom and the standard proton plan, as with the custom proton and IMRT (p<0.01), with custom proton showing stronger conformity to the target in both cases. There was also a statistical difference between the V12 of all three plans (Custom v. Standardized: p=0.02, Custom v. IMRT: p<0.01, Standardized v. IMRT: p<0.01) with custom proton supplying the lowest dose to surrounding tissues. For large targets (volume>1cc) there was no statistical difference between the proton plans and the IMRT treatment for the conformity index. Conclusion: A custom proton plan is the recommended treatment explored in this study as it is the most reliable way of effectively treating the target while sparing the maximum amount of normal tissue.

  3. Dosimetry of cone-defined stereotactic radiosurgery fields with a commercial synthetic diamond detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Johnny E; Crowe, Scott B; Hill, Robin; Freeman, Nigel; Trapp, J V

    2014-11-01

    Small field x-ray beam dosimetry is difficult due to lack of lateral electronic equilibrium, source occlusion, high dose gradients, and detector volume averaging. Currently, there is no single definitive detector recommended for small field dosimetry. The objective of this work was to evaluate the performance of a new commercial synthetic diamond detector, namely, the PTW 60019 microDiamond, for the dosimetry of small x-ray fields as used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Small field sizes were defined by BrainLAB circular cones (4-30 mm diameter) on a Novalis Trilogy linear accelerator and using the 6 MV SRS x-ray beam mode for all measurements. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured and compared to an IBA SFD and a PTW 60012 E diode. Cross profiles were measured and compared to an IBA SFD diode. Field factors, ΩQclin,Qmsr (fclin,fmsr) , were calculated by Monte Carlo methods using BEAMnrc and correction factors, kQclin,Qmsr (fclin,fmsr) , were derived for the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector. For the small fields of 4-30 mm diameter, there were dose differences in the PDDs of up to 1.5% when compared to an IBA SFD and PTW 60012 E diode detector. For the cross profile measurements the penumbra values varied, depending upon the orientation of the detector. The field factors, ΩQclin,Qmsr (fclin,fmsr) , were calculated for these field diameters at a depth of 1.4 cm in water and they were within 2.7% of published values for a similar linear accelerator. The corrections factors, kQclin,Qmsr (fclin,fmsr) , were derived for the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector. The authors conclude that the new PTW 60019 microDiamond detector is generally suitable for relative dosimetry in small 6 MV SRS beams for a Novalis Trilogy linear equipped with circular cones.

  4. Characteristics of a dedicated linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery-radiotherapy unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Downes, M. Beverly; Corn, Benjamin W.; Curran, Walter J.; Werner-Wasik, M.; Andrews, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) system on a dedicated Varian Clinac-600SR linear accelerator with Brown-Roberts-Wells and Gill-Thomas-Cosman relocatable frames along with the Radionics (RSA) planning system is evaluated. The Clinac-600SR has a single 6-MV beam with the same beam characteristics as that of the mother unit, the Clinac-600C. The primary collimator is a fixed cone projecting to a 10-cm diameter at isocenter. The secondary collimator is a heavily shielded cylindrical collimator attached to the face plate of the primary collimator. The tertiary collimation consists of the actual treatment cones. The cone sizes vary from 12.5 to 40.0 mm diameter. The mechanical stability of the entire system was verified. The variations in isocenter position with table, gantry, and collimator rotation were found to be <0.5 mm with a compounded accuracy of ≤ 1.0 mm. The radiation leakage under the cones was < 1% measured at a depth of 5 cm in a phantom. The beam profiles of all cones in the x and y directions were within ±0.5 mm and match with the physical size of the cone. The dosimetric data such as tissue maximum ratio, off-axis ratio, and cone factor were taken using film, diamond detector, and ion chambers. The mechanical and dosimetric characteristics including dose linearity of this unit are presented and found to be suitable for SRS/SRT. The difficulty in absolute dose measurement for small cone is discussed

  5. The risk of radiation necrosis following stereotactic radiosurgery with concurrent systemic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joseph M; Miller, Jacob A; Kotecha, Rupesh; Xiao, Roy; Juloori, Aditya; Ward, Matthew C; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Mohammadi, Alireza M; Peereboom, David M; Murphy, Erin S; Suh, John H; Barnett, Gene H; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Angelov, Lilyana; Stevens, Glen H; Chao, Samuel T

    2017-06-01

    To investigate late toxicity among patients with newly-diagnosed brain metastases undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with concurrent systemic therapies with or without whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Patients with newly-diagnosed brain metastasis who underwent SRS at a single tertiary-care institution from 1997 to 2015 were eligible for inclusion. The class and timing of all systemic therapies were collected for each patient. The primary outcome was the cumulative incidence of radiographic radiation necrosis (RN). Multivariable competing risks regression was used to adjust for confounding. During the study period, 1650 patients presented with 2843 intracranial metastases. Among these, 445 patients (27%) were treated with SRS and concurrent systemic therapy. Radiographic RN developed following treatment of 222 (8%) lesions, 120 (54%) of which were symptomatic. The 12-month cumulative incidences of RN among lesions treated with and without concurrent therapies were 6.6 and 5.3%, respectively (p = 0.14). Concurrent systemic therapy was associated with a significantly increased rate of RN among lesions treated with upfront SRS and WBRT (8.7 vs. 3.7%, p = 0.04). In particular, concurrent targeted therapies significantly increased the 12-month cumulative incidence of RN (8.8 vs. 5.3%, p therapies, significantly increased rates of RN were observed with VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) (14.3 vs. 6.6%, p = 0.04) and EGFR TKIs (15.6 vs. 6.0%, p = 0.04). Most classes of systemic therapies may be safely delivered concurrently with SRS in the management of newly-diagnosed brain metastases. However, the rate of radiographic RN is significantly increased with the addition of concurrent systemic therapies to SRS and WBRT.

  6. Pediatric cerebral arteriovenous malformations: The role of stereotactic linac-based radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabel-du Bois, Angelika; Milker-Zabel, Stefanie; Huber, Peter; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively clinical outcome and obliteration rates after linac-based radiosurgery (RS) in children with cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2002, 22 children with cerebral AVM were treated at our institution. Mean age at treatment was 11.8 years (range, 4.4-16.4 years). Classification according to Spetzler-Martin was 1 child grade I (4%), 7 grade II (32%), 12 grade III (56%), 1 grade IV (4%), and 1 grade V (4%). Median single dose was 18 Gy/80%-isodose. Median AVM volume was 4.2 mL (range, 0.4-26.5 mL). Median RS-based AVM-score was 1.07 (range, 0.61-3.55). Fifty-nine percent of children experienced intracranial hemorrhage before RS. Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 1.7-7.3 years). Results: Actuarial complete obliteration rate (CO) was 54% after 3 years and 65% after 4 years, respectively. Median time interval to CO was 27.1 months. Intracranial hemorrhage after RS was seen in five children after median 13.9 months. Annual bleeding risk was 9.1% after 1 year and 13.6% after 2 years. Maximum diameter ≥3 cm and AVM-volume ≥6 mL were significant predictors for intracranial hemorrhage. Neurologic deficits were improved/completely dissolved in 58% of children and remained stable in 42%. No new onset of neurologic dysfunction was seen after RS. Conclusions: RS is safe and effective in pediatric cerebral AVM with high obliteration rates. Size and volume of AVM are significant predictors for intracranial bleeding. The same treatment guidelines as in adults should be applied. Careful long-term follow-up observation is required after RS from long life expectation

  7. Reducing monitor units for robotic radiosurgery by optimized use of multiple collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poell, Johan J.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Prevost, Jean-Briac; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in image guidance and dose delivery techniques, and increased use of hypofractionation, have led to prolonged radiotherapy fraction duration. This is also the case with robotic radiosurgery, as extensive on-line image guidance procedures, many beams, and usually high fraction doses are used for tumor irradiation. At this institution, early stage non-small-cell lung cancer patients are treated with image guided tumor tracking for respiratory motion compensation. Approximately 130 circular beams and up to ∼39 000 monitor units (MUs) are used for delivery of a total treatment dose of 60 Gy. The large number of MUs leads to long treatment times and the radiation leakage increases with the number of MUs. Generally, per patient, a single (small) cone is used. To substantially reduce the number of MUs, the authors have developed a new planning strategy for combined use of a small and a large cone. The large cone aims at dose delivery around the PTV center, while the small cone shapes the dose around the (irregular) PTV edges. The authors systematically investigated relationships between the number of MUs, the plan quality, the selected cone diameters, and the beam-direction setup. Plan quality was assessed with the conformity index, mean lung dose (MLD), V20 of the lungs, and by visual inspection. The reduction in MUs was determined by comparing two-cone plans with corresponding one-cone plans that yielded equal MLD, i.e., equal predicted lung toxicity. With the proposed two-cone approach, the required number of MUs reduced by on average 31% (range 4%-56%). The beam-on time per treatment fraction reduced by on average 8 min (range 1-15.2 min). All plans obeyed the clinically applied constraints and were considered clinically acceptable by an involved physician

  8. A new strategy of CyberKnife treatment system based radiosurgery followed by early use of adjuvant bevacizumab treatment for brain metastasis with extensive cerebral edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Enmin; Pan, Li; Dai, Jiazhong; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Xin; Liu, Xiaoxia; Mei, Guanghai; Sheng, Xiaofang

    2014-09-01

    Bevacizumab blocks the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor in leakage-prone capillaries and has been suggested as a new treatment for cerebral radiation edema and necrosis. CyberKnife is a new, frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system. This work investigated the safety and efficacy of CyberKnife followed by early bevacizumab treatment for brain metastasis with extensive cerebral edema. The eligibility criteria of the patients selected for radiosurgery followed by early use of adjuvant bevacizumab treatment were: (1) brain tumors from metastasis with one solitary brain lesion and symptomatic extensive cerebral edema; (2) >18 years of age; (3) the patient refused surgery due to the physical conditions and the risk of surgery; (4) no contraindications for bevacizumab. (5) bevacizumab was applied for a minimum of 2 injections and a maximum of 6 injections with a 2-week interval between treatments, beginning within 2 weeks of the CyberKnife therapy; (6) Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥30. Tumor size and edema were monitored by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Dexamethasone dosage, KPS, adverse event occurrence and associated clinical outcomes were also recorded. Eight patients were accrued for this new treatment. Radiation dose ranged from 20 to 33 Gy in one to five sessions, prescribed to the 61-71 % isodose line. Bevacizumab therapy was administered 3-10 days after completion of CyberKnife treatment for a minimum of two cycles (5 mg/kg, at 2-week intervals). MRI revealed average reductions of 55.8 % (post-gadolinium) and 63.4 % (T2/FLAIR). Seven patients showed significant clinical neurological improvements. Dexamethasone was reduced in all patients, with five successfully discontinuing dexamethasone treatment 4 weeks after bevacizumab initiation. Hypertension, a bevacizumab-related adverse event, occurred in one patient. After 3-8 months, all patients studied were alive and primary brain metastases were under control, 2 developed new brain

  9. Contribution to the planning and dosimetry of photon beams applied to radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy; Contribuicao ao planejamento e a dosimetria de feixes de fotons aplicados a radiocirurgia e a radioterapia estereotaxica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Walter Menezes

    2003-08-15

    Radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy are irradiation techniques that use small diameter photon beams for treating intracranial lesions such as pituitary adenomas, acoustic tumors and arterio-venous malformations which are inaccessible for surgery. These treatment techniques are characterized by the use of very small radiation beams which deliver a precisely measured dose to the target volume, while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Treatment can be performed by using multiple {sup 60}Co gamma-ray sources (in the so-called 'Gamma Knife'), charged particles or X-ray beams produced by linear accelerators. The prescribed dose can be given in a single session or in multiple fractions, as in conventional radiotherapy. The success of the treatment depends, among other factors, of the accurate determination of the parameters that characterize the radiation beam produced by the equipment, as well as, of a well designed quality assurance program. In this study, the dosimetric parameters of a set of collimating cones of a Radionics{sup TM} treatment system applied to two 6 MV- photon beams (Clinac 600C - Varian{sup TM}, and Mevatron MD2 - Siemens{sup TM}) were evaluated by using a water filled PMMA simulator. Measurements were carried out for photon beam diameters ranging from 12.5 to 40.0 mm for the Clinac-600C and from 5.0 to 50.0 mm for the Mevatron MD2. The parameters were evaluated by using a parallel plate ionization chamber (Markus), Kodak X-Omat V dosimetric films, thermoluminescent dosemeters (Harschaw, TLD-100) and photodiodes. The maximum tissue-ratio, the off-axis profile and the output factors were determined and the results were compared to those reported elsewhere. A study of the dosimetric characteristics of some commercially available phototransistors was also carried out. The results showed that these electronic components can be successfully used for measuring the dosimetric parameters of small diameter photon beans used in

  10. CIME Session on Pluripotential Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Patrizio, Giorgio; Berteloot, Francois; Demailly, Jean Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotential theory is a very powerful tool in geometry, complex analysis and dynamics. This volume brings together the lectures held at the 2011 CIME session on "pluripotential theory" in Cetraro, Italy. This CIME course focused on complex Monge-Ampére equations, applications of pluripotential theory to Kahler geometry and algebraic geometry and to holomorphic dynamics. The contributions provide an extensive description of the theory and its very recent developments, starting from basic introductory materials and concluding with open questions in current research.

  11. Working session 3: Tubing integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, C.; Strosnider, J.

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-three individuals representing nine countries (Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, France, Japan, the Slovak Republic, Spain, the UK, and the US) participated in the session on tube integrity. These individuals represented utilities, vendors, consultants and regulatory authorities. The major subjects discussed by the group included overall objectives of managing steam generator tube degradation, necessary elements of a steam generator degradation management program, the concept of degradation specific management, structural integrity evaluations, leakage evaluations, and specific degradation mechanisms. The group's discussions on these subjects, including conclusions and recommendations, are summarized in this article

  12. [Possibility of 3D Printing in Ophthalmology - First Experiences by Stereotactic Radiosurgery Planning Scheme of Intraocular Tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furdová, A; Furdová, Ad; Thurzo, A; Šramka, M; Chorvát, M; Králik, G

    Nowadays 3D printing allows us to create physical objects on the basis of digital data. Thanks to its rapid development the use enormously increased in medicine too. Its creations facilitate surgical planning processes, education and research in context of organ transplantation, individualization prostheses, breast forms, and others.Our article describes the wide range of applied 3D printing technology possibilities in ophthalmology. It is focusing on innovative implementation of eye tumors treatment planning in stereotactic radiosurgery irradiation.We analyze our first experience with 3D printing model of the eye in intraocular tumor planning stereotactic radiosurgery. 3D printing, model, Fused Deposition Modelling, stereotactic radiosurgery, prostheses, intraocular tumor.

  13. Working session 1: Tubing degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharshafdjian, G.; Turluer, G.

    1997-01-01

    A general introductory overview of the purpose of the group and the general subject area of SG tubing degradation was given by the facilitator. The purpose of the session was described as to open-quotes develop conclusions and proposals on regulatory and technical needs required to deal with the issues of SG tubing degradation.close quotes Types, locations and characteristics of tubing degradation in steam generators were briefly reviewed. The well-known synergistic effects of materials, environment, and stress and strain/strain rate, subsequently referred to by the acronym open-quotes MESSclose quotes by some of the group members, were noted. The element of time (i.e., evolution of these variables with time) was emphasized. It was also suggested that the group might want to consider the related topics of inspection capabilities, operational variables, degradation remedies, and validity of test data, and some background information in these areas was provided. The presentation given by Peter Millet during the Plenary Session was reviewed; Specifically, the chemical aspects and the degradation from the secondary side of the steam generator were noted. The main issues discussed during the October 1995 EPRI meeting on secondary side corrosion were reported, and a listing of the potential SG tube degradations was provided and discussed

  14. Development of 3-D Radiosurgery Planning System Using IBM Personal Computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Tae Suk; Park, Charn Il; Ha, Sung Whan; Kang, Wee Saing; Suh, Doug Young; Park, Sung Hun

    1993-01-01

    Recently, stereotactic radiosurgery plan is required with the information of 3-D image and dose distribution. A project has been doing if developing LINAC based stereotactic radiosurgery since April 1991. The purpose of this research is to develop 3-D radiosurgery planning system using personal computer. The procedure of this research is based on two steps. The first step is to develop 3-D localization system, which input the image information of the patient, coordinate transformation, the position and shape of target, and patient contour into computer system using CT image and stereotactic frame. The second step is to develop 3-D dose planning system, which compute dose distribution on image plane, display on high resolution monitor both isodose distribution and patient image simultaneously and develop menu-driven planning system. This prototype of radiosurgery planning system was applied recently for several clinical cases. It was shown that our planning system is fast, accurate and efficient while making it possible to handle various kinds of image modalities such as angiography, CT and MRI. It makes it possible to develop general 3-D planning system using beam eye view or CT simulation in radiation therapy in future

  15. Role of Adjuvant Radiosurgery after Thoracoscopic Microsurgical Resection of a Spinal Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toba N. Niazi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic radiosurgery to benign tumors of the spine has not been advocated as a primary treatment modality because of the favorable prognosis for these lesions after gross-total resection. There is even less evidence regarding its use as an adjuvant to neurosurgical resection of benign recurrent spinal disease. We describe the case of a 30-year-old man with a thoracic spinal schwannoma who had an interval increase of his lesion five months after thoracoscopic microsurgical resection. The patient opted for noninvasive stereotactic radiosurgery in lieu of additional surgical excision and has had stable disease 15 months after radiosurgical treatment with the linear accelerator (LINAC system. In this setting, stereotactic radiosurgery provided a useful adjunct to thoracoscopic microsurgical resection. Future Class I and II evidence should be sought to evaluate the utility of stereotactic radiosurgery as a primary treatment modality or as an adjuvant for microneurosurgical resection of benign spinal lesions in patients who want noninvasive treatment after disease recurrence or who harbor medical comorbidities that would preclude them from being safe surgical candidates.

  16. Dosimetry and narrow X-ray beams, produced by particle linear accelerator for use in radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, J.C.F.; Vizeu, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The principal characteristics of dosimetry and narrow X-ray beams(4Mv) monitoring are investigated for use in estereotatic radiosurgery. An additional collimator system and a estereotatic system (Leksell type) are presented. Dosimetric parameters like tissue-air ratio, peak scatter factor, isodose curves are studied. (M.A.C.) [pt

  17. Morphological and functional MRI, MRS, perfusion and diffusion changes after radiosurgery of brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Sung Tae; Byun, Hong Sik; Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Keonha; Kim, Hyungjin; Lee, Jung II

    2009-01-01

    Radiosurgery is a noninvasive procedure where spatially accurate and highly conformal doses of radiation are targeted at brain lesions with an ablative intent. Recently, radiosurgery has been established as an effective technique for local treatment of brain metastasis. After radiosurgery, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the assessment of the therapeutic response and of any complications. The therapeutic approach depends on the imaging findings obtained after radiosurgery, which have a role in the decision making to perform additional invasive modalities (repeat resection, biopsy) to obtain a definite diagnosis and to improve the survival of patients. Conventional MR imaging findings are mainly based on morphological alterations of tumors. However, there are variable imaging findings of radiation-induced changes including radiation necrosis in the brain. Radiologists are sometimes confused by radiation-induced injuries, including radiation necrosis, that are seen on conventional MR imaging. The pattern of abnormal enhancement on follow-up conventional MR imaging closely mimics that of a recurrent brain metastasis. So, classifying newly developed abnormal enhancing lesions in follow-up of treated brain metastasis with correct diagnosis is one of the key goals in neuro-oncologic imaging. To overcome limitations of the use of morphology-based conventional MR imaging, several physiological-based functional MR imaging methods have been used, namely diffusion-weighted imaging, perfusion MR imaging, and proton MR spectroscopy, for the detection of hemodynamic, metabolic, and cellular alterations. These imaging modalities provide additional information to allow clinicians to make proper decisions regarding patient treatment.

  18. Enhanced intrinsic radiosensitivity after treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery for an acoustic neuroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Gerard; Martin, Olga A.; Roos, Daniel E.; Lobachevsky, Pavel N.; Potter, Andrew E.; Zacest, Andrew C.; Bezak, Eva; Bonner, William M.; Martin, Roger F.; Leong, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced radiosensitivity is an uncommon phenomenon attributable to deficient DNA repair after radiotherapy which can be assessed with the γ-H2AX assay. Reports of radiosensitivity after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) are uncommon. We describe a case where the clinical, radiological and laboratory findings suggest enhanced radiosensitivity after SRS for an acoustic neuroma.

  19. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.635 Section 35.635 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT... decay; (ii) Following replacement of the sources or following reinstallation of the gamma stereotactic...

  20. 10 CFR 35.655 - Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.655 Section 35.655 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF... and serviced during source replacement or at intervals not to exceed 5 years, whichever comes first...

  1. A multi-institutional analysis of complication outcomes after arteriovenous malformation radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, John C.; Kondziolka, Douglas; Lunsford, L. Dade; Pollock, Bruce E.; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Gorman, Deborah A.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Sneed, Patricia; Larson, David; Smith, Vernon; McDermott, Michael W.; Miyawaki, Lloyd; Chilton, Jonathan; Morantz, Robert A.; Young, Byron; Jokura, Hidefumi; Liscak, Roman

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To better understand radiation complications of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) radiosurgery and factors affecting their resolution. Methods and Materials: AVM patients (102/1255) who developed neurological sequelae after radiosurgery were studied. The median AVM marginal dose (D min ) was 19 Gy (range: 10-35). The median volume was 5.7 cc (range: 0.26-143). Median follow-up was 34 months (range: 9-140). Results: Complications consisted of 80/102 patients with evidence of radiation injury to the brain parenchyma (7 also with cranial nerve deficits, 12 also with seizures, 5 with cyst formation), 12/102 patients with isolated cranial neuropathies, and 10/102 patients with only new or worsened seizures. Severity was classified as minimal in 39 patients, mild in 40, disabling in 21, and fatal in 2 patients. Symptoms resolved completely in 42 patients for an actuarial resolution rate of 54% ± 7% at 3 years post-onset. Multivariate analysis identified significantly greater symptom resolution in patients with no prior history of hemorrhage (p = 0.01, 66% vs. 41%), and in patients with symptoms of minimal severity: headache or seizure as the only sequelae of radiosurgery (p < 0.0001, 88% vs. 34%). Conclusion: Late sequelae of radiosurgery manifest in varied ways. Further long-term studies of these problems are needed that take into account symptom severity and prior hemorrhage history

  2. Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) / Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Benefit to Irish patients and Irish Healthcare Economy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cagney, DN

    2017-01-01

    Cancer incidence across Europe is projected to rise rapidly over the next decade. This rising cancer incidence is mirrored by increasing use of and indications for stereotactic radiation. This paper seeks to summarize the exponential increase in indications for stereotactic radiotherapy as well as the evolving economic advantages of stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy

  3. Quality control of radiosurgery: dosimetry with micro camera in spherical mannequin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casado Villalon, F. J.; Navarro Guirado, F.; Garci Pareja, S.; Benitez Villegas, E. M.; Galan Montenegro, P.; Moreno Saiz, C.

    2013-01-01

    The dosimetry of small field is part of quality control in the treatment of cranial radiosurgery. In this work the results of absorbed dose in the isocenter, Planner, with those obtained from are compared experimentally with a micro-camera into an spherical mannequin. (Author)

  4. Stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiyama, Hirofumi; Arai, Koji; Izawa, Masahiro; Takakura, Kintomo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan). Neurological Inst.

    1996-02-01

    The treatment outcome of the metastatic brain tumor in Tokyo Women`s Medical College was reported, and it was described on present state and problem of radiosurgery (RS). One hundred five lesions of 50 patients (male 36, female 12, age 27-85 years) undertaken RS by gamma knife were studied. The primary lesions were the lungs in 23 patients, digestive tract in 12, mammary gland in 4, kidney in 3, thyroid gland in 13, prostate gland in 2 and the other in 3. Thirty nine patients had primary tumor, and 11 patients had recurrent tumor. The volume of 105 lesions was 0.03-56 ml (mean 6.4 ml), and the treatment was carried out for these tumors at average maximum dose 47Gy, average limbic dosage 23Gy. In the image findings, elimination of 46 lesions (44%), reduction of 39 lesions (37%), unchangeable 7 lesions (7%), increase of 13 lesions (13%) were recognized, and tumor reduction rate 81%, local control rate 88% were obtained. The local control rate was around 90% of the tumor, which seize was 15 ml or less. After the treatment, radionecrosis were suspected in 2 lesions of 1 patient. Appearance or aggravation of the edema by the radiation were observed 1-2 month after the treatment in 6 lesions of 5 patients. By the treatment, the following were improved: the hemiplegia in 9 patients, the aphasia in 2, the vertigo in 3. On prognosis, 21 of 46 patients except for the uncertain 4 were alive and 25 died. Through RS is the therapy which is very effective for the metastatic brain tumor, it also exists on some problems to be reached. (A.N.).

  5. Telemedicina: a multimedia broadband teleradiology and radiosurgery project

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blas-Garcia, Pedro; Lopez-Viver, Rodolfo; Martinez, Demetrio; Ruiz, Ignacio; Barriuso, Daniel; Janez-Escalada, Luis; Gomez, Jose L.; Luyando, Luis

    1996-05-01

    Telemedicina is a Spanish project that covers teleradiology and radiosurgery areas. This project is under the frame of the Spanish Broadband National Plan (PLANBA). The final technical tests are being ended over Ethernet and ATM and it is planned to get their first clinical results on February-96. Two pilots will be installed: one in Madrid linking two sites through a ATM network (provided by Telefonica, Spanish PTT) and a second one in Asturias (north of Spain) using ISDN primary access (2 Mbps). The system handles still images, voice and video records, scanned documents, text and slides allowing doctors to interchange this data using cooperative tools. The system is based on a multimedia Unix platform with voice, video and videoconference devices and boards. The platform will be used in several ways: as desktop videoconferencing, primary diagnosis and review. Communications are based on ATM (over AAL5) at 155 Mbps and ISDN (primary access). The protocol used in both networks is TCP/IP. The application is written in C++ (object oriented design and programming) and C. GUI is built under X-Windows and Motif. The codification of video is MJPEG done through dedicated hardware. The system is integrated in a small PACS (previously installed); the images are captured from the modalities such as CT using the DICOM standard and it is connected with the Radiological Information System. The application allows collaborative work: telepointer, shared windows, editors and actions. Main news of the Telemedicina project will be the incorporation of broadband networks (ATM at 155 Mbps) and the integration of collaborative work. This two aspects allow the doctors to improve their work speeding up the transmission and retrieval of medical records. Also this platform can be used to achieve several goals: such as primary diagnosis, videoconference, review.

  6. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Cystic Cerebral Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebinu, Julius O.; Lwu, Shelly; Monsalves, Eric; Arayee, Mandana [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline; Laperriere, Normand J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Goetz, Pablo [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh, E-mail: gelareh.zadeh@uhn.on.ca [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in the treatment of nonsurgical cystic brain metastasis, and to determine predictors of response to GKRS. Methods: We reviewed a prospectively maintained database of brain metastases patients treated at our institution between 2006 and 2010. All lesions with a cystic component were identified, and volumetric analysis was done to measure percentage of cystic volume on day of treatment and consecutive follow-up MRI scans. Clinical, radiologic, and dosimetry parameters were reviewed to establish the overall response of cystic metastases to GKRS as well as identify potential predictive factors of response. Results: A total of 111 lesions in 73 patients were analyzed; 57% of lesions received prior whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Lung carcinoma was the primary cancer in 51% of patients, 10% breast, 10% colorectal, 4% melanoma, and 26% other. Fifty-seven percent of the patients were recursive partitioning analysis class 1, the remainder class 2. Mean target volume was 3.3 mL (range, 0.1-23 mL). Median prescription dose was 21 Gy (range, 15-24 Gy). Local control rates were 91%, 63%, and 37% at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Local control was improved in lung primary and worse in patients with prior WBRT (univariate). Only lung primary predicted local control in multivariate analysis, whereas age and tumor volume did not. Lesions with a large cystic component did not show a poorer response compared with those with a small cystic component. Conclusions: This study supports the use of GKRS in the management of nonsurgical cystic metastases, despite a traditionally perceived poorer response. Our local control rates are comparable to a matched cohort of noncystic brain metastases, and therefore the presence of a large cystic component should not deter the use of GKRS. Predictors of response included tumor subtype. Prior WBRT decreased effectiveness of SRS for local control rates.

  7. Proton Stereotactic Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Benign Meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halasz, Lia M., E-mail: lhalasz@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bussiere, Marc R.; Dennis, Elizabeth R.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chapman, Paul H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Given the excellent prognosis for patients with benign meningiomas, treatment strategies to minimize late effects are important. One strategy is proton radiation therapy (RT), which allows less integral dose to normal tissue and greater homogeneity than photon RT. Here, we report the first series of proton stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) used for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: We identified 50 patients with 51 histologically proven or image- defined, presumed-benign meningiomas treated at our institution between 1996 and 2007. Tumors of <4 cm in diameter and located {>=}2 mm from the optic apparatus were eligible for treatment. Indications included primary treatment (n = 32), residual tumor following surgery (n = 8), and recurrent tumor following surgery (n = 10). The median dose delivered was 13 Gray radiobiologic equivalent (Gy[RBE]) (range, 10.0-15.5 Gy[RBE]) prescribed to the 90% isodose line. Results: Median follow-up was 32 months (range, 6-133 months). Magnetic resonance imaging at the most recent follow-up or time of progression revealed 33 meningiomas with stable sizes, 13 meningiomas with decreased size, and 5 meningiomas with increased size. The 3-year actuarial tumor control rate was 94% (95% confidence interval, 77%-98%). Symptoms were improved in 47% (16/ 34) of patients, unchanged in 44% (15/34) of patients, and worse in 9% (3/34) of patients. The rate of potential permanent adverse effects after SRS was 5.9% (3/51 patients). Conclusions: Proton SRS is an effective therapy for small benign meningiomas, with a potentially lower rate of long-term treatment-related morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess durability of tumor control and late effects.

  8. Spine Radiosurgery: A Dosimetric Analysis in 124 Patients Who Received 18 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schipani, Stefano; Wen, Winston; Jin, Jain-Yue; Kim, Jin Koo; Ryu, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To define the safely tolerated doses to organs at risk (OARs) adjacent to the target volume (TV) of spine radiosurgery (SRS) with 18-Gy in a single fraction. Methods and Materials: A total of 124 patient cases with 165 spine metastases were reviewed. An 18-Gy single-fraction regimen was prescribed to the 90% isodose line encompassing the TV. A constraint of 10 Gy to 10% of the spinal cord outlined 6 mm above and below the TV was used. Dosimetric data to OARs were analyzed. Results: A total of 124 patients (100%) were followed-up, and median follow-up time was 7 months (1-50 months). Symptoms and local control were achieved in 114 patients (92%). Acute Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade 1 oral mucositis occurred in 11 of 11 (100%) patients at risk for oropharyngeal toxicity after cervical spine treatment. There were no RTOG grade 2-4 acute or late complications. Median TV was 43.2 cc (5.3-175.4 cc) and 90% of the TV received median dose of 19 Gy (17-19.8 Gy). Median (range) of spinal cord maximum dose (Dmax), dose to spinal cord 0.35 cc (Dsc0.35), and cord volume receiving 10 Gy (Vsc10) were 13.8 Gy (5.4-21 Gy), 8.9 Gy (2.6-11.4 Gy) and 0.33 cc (0-1.6 cc), respectively. Other OARs were evaluated when in proximity to the TV. Esophagus (n=58), trachea (n=28), oropharynx (n=11), and kidneys (n=34) received median (range) V10 and V15 of 3.1 cc (0-5.8 cc) and 1.2 cc (0-2.9 cc), 2.8 cc (0-4.9 cc), and 0.8 cc (0-2.1 cc), 3.4 cc (0-6.2 cc) and 1.6 cc (0-3.2 cc), 0.3 cc (0-0.8 cc) and 0.08 cc (0-0.1 cc), respectively. Conclusions: Cord Dmax of 14 Gy and D0.35 of 10 Gy are safe dose constraints for 18-Gy single-fraction SRS. Esophagus V10 of 3 cc and V15 of 1 cc, trachea V10 of 3 cc, and V15 of 1 cc, oropharynx V10 of 3.5 cc and V15 of 1.5 cc, kidney V10 of 0.3 cc, and V15 of 0.1 cc are planning guidelines when these OARs are in proximity to the TV.

  9. Dosimetric consequences of translational and rotational errors in frame-less image-guided radiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guckenberger Matthias

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate geometric and dosimetric accuracy of frame-less image-guided radiosurgery (IG-RS for brain metastases. Methods and materials Single fraction IG-RS was practiced in 72 patients with 98 brain metastases. Patient positioning and immobilization used either double- (n = 71 or single-layer (n = 27 thermoplastic masks. Pre-treatment set-up errors (n = 98 were evaluated with cone-beam CT (CBCT based image-guidance (IG and were corrected in six degrees of freedom without an action level. CBCT imaging after treatment measured intra-fractional errors (n = 64. Pre- and post-treatment errors were simulated in the treatment planning system and target coverage and dose conformity were evaluated. Three scenarios of 0 mm, 1 mm and 2 mm GTV-to-PTV (gross tumor volume, planning target volume safety margins (SM were simulated. Results Errors prior to IG were 3.9 mm ± 1.7 mm (3D vector and the maximum rotational error was 1.7° ± 0.8° on average. The post-treatment 3D error was 0.9 mm ± 0.6 mm. No differences between double- and single-layer masks were observed. Intra-fractional errors were significantly correlated with the total treatment time with 0.7mm±0.5mm and 1.2mm±0.7mm for treatment times ≤23 minutes and >23 minutes (p5% in 14% of the patients. A 1 mm safety margin fully compensated intra-fractional patient motion. Conclusions IG-RS with online correction of translational errors achieves high geometric and dosimetric accuracy. Intra-fractional errors decrease target coverage and conformity unless compensated with appropriate safety margins.

  10. Working session 2: Tubing inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, J.; Tapping, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    This session was attended by delegates from 10 countries, and four papers were presented. A wide range of issues was tabled for discussion. Realizing that there was limited time available for more detailed discussion, three topics were chosen for the more detailed discussion: circumferential cracking, performance demonstration (to focus on POD and sizing), and limits of methods. Two other subsessions were organized: one dealt with some challenges related to the robustness of current inspection methods, especially with respect to leaving cracked tubes in service, and the other with developing a chart of current NDE technology with recommendations for future development. These three areas are summarized in turn, along with conclusions and/or recommendations. During the discussions there were four presentations. There were two (Canada, Japan) on eddy current probe developments, both of which addressed multiarray probes that would detect a range of flaws, one (Spain) on circumferential crack detection, and one (JRC, Petten) on the recent PISC III results

  11. DWPF recycle minimization: Brainstorming session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, R.A.; Poirier, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The recycle stream from the DWPF constitutes a major source of water addition to the High Level Waste evaporator system. As now designed, the entire flow of 3.5 to 6.5 gal/min (at sign 25% and 75% attainment, respectively), or 2 gal/min during idling, flow to the 2H evaporator system (Tank 43). Substantial improvement in the HLW water balance and tank volume management is expected if the DWPF recycle to the HLW evaporator system can be significantly reduced. A task team has been appointed to study alternatives for reducing the flow to the HLW evaporator system and make recommendations for implementation and/or further study and evaluation. The brainstorming session detailed in this report was designed to produce the first cut options for the task team to further evaluate

  12. Cinema Sessions in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ignacio MORETA-VELAYOS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For a long time films have been used in teaching and at various levels of professional training  and more specifically in the medical area. In this case, through the description of a project developed in a Primary Care Health Center, we intend to justify the use of movies as a tool that could ease, the sometimes difficult task of continued education among Primary Care professionals. We propose different aspects of everyday practice in which cinema can be potentially useful, as well as the way to include it in the Plan of Continued Education of the Centre and its accreditation.Films and issues discussed in each session, and the project evaluation, are detailed.

  13. WE-G-BRA-08: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y; Bhatnagar, J; Bednarz, G; Flickinger, J; Arai, Y; Huq, M Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Vacsulka, J; Monaco, E; Niranjan, A; Lunsford, L Dade [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Feng, W [Dept of Radiation Oncology, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia Univ Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To perform a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) study for Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery processes at our institution based on our experience with the treatment of more than 13,000 patients. Methods: A team consisting of medical physicists, nurses, radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and an external physicist expert was formed for the FMEA study. A process tree and a failure mode table were created for the GK procedures using the Leksell GK Perfexion and 4C units. Three scores for the probability of occurrence (O), the severity (S), and the probability of no detection (D) for failure modes were assigned to each failure mode by each professional on a scale from 1 to 10. The risk priority number (RPN) for each failure mode was then calculated (RPN = OxSxD) as the average scores from all data sets collected. Results: The established process tree for GK radiosurgery consists of 10 sub-processes and 53 steps, including a sub-process for frame placement and 11 steps that are directly related to the frame-based nature of the GK radiosurgery. Out of the 86 failure modes identified, 40 failure modes are GK specific, caused by the potential for inappropriate use of the radiosurgery head frame, the imaging fiducial boxes, the GK helmets and plugs, and the GammaPlan treatment planning system. The other 46 failure modes are associated with the registration, imaging, image transfer, contouring processes that are common for all radiation therapy techniques. The failure modes with the highest hazard scores are related to imperfect frame adaptor attachment, bad fiducial box assembly, overlooked target areas, inaccurate previous treatment information and excessive patient movement during MRI scan. Conclusion: The implementation of the FMEA approach for Gamma Knife radiosurgery enabled deeper understanding of the overall process among all professionals involved in the care of the patient and helped identify potential

  14. Assessment of neuropsychological changes in patients with arteriovenous malformation (AVM) after radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, Frederik; Steinvorth, Sarah; Wildermuth, Susanne; Lohr, Frank; Fuss, Martin; Debus, Juergen; Essig, Marco; Hacke, Werner; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate neuropsychological effects of radiosurgery in patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM), with special focus on attention and memory. This report describes the study setup and presents the first results during a follow-up of up to 1 year. Materials and Methods: Seventy-nine patients were studied before, acutely after radiosurgery, and during the regular follow-up (subacute phase: Weeks 6-12, chronic phase: Months 6-12). Radiosurgery was performed using a modified linear accelerator (minimum doses to the target volume: 15-22 Gy, median 20 Gy). Estimated whole brain dose was 0.5 to 2 Gy. Neuropsychological testing included assessment of general intelligence (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), attention (modified Trail-Making Test A, Digit Symbol Test, D2 Test, Wiener Determination Machine) and memory (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Benton Visual Retention Test). During follow-up, alternate test versions were used. Neuropsychological deficits were defined as a test score of at least one standard deviation (SD) below the mean of the normal distribution. Results: The pretherapeutic evaluation revealed marked deviations from the normal population; 24% had deficits in intelligence (range 23-31% in different subtests), attention (35%, 23-59%) and memory (48%, 31-61%). The overall percentage of aberrant results was reduced by 12% (memory) to 14% (attention) in the chronic phase up to 12 months after therapy. The improvement in test scores was significant (p < 0.05) in 3 of 4 subtests of attention functions. Conclusions: The acute tolerance of radiosurgery seems to be very good in these patients, showing no relevant increase in number of patients with neuropsychological deficits. Although the long-term follow-up needs to be further increased, our data indicate a tendency to slight improvement in the overall neuropsychological performance of AVM patients in the chronic phase after radiosurgery

  15. WE-G-BRA-08: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y; Bhatnagar, J; Bednarz, G; Flickinger, J; Arai, Y; Huq, M Saiful; Vacsulka, J; Monaco, E; Niranjan, A; Lunsford, L Dade; Feng, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) study for Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery processes at our institution based on our experience with the treatment of more than 13,000 patients. Methods: A team consisting of medical physicists, nurses, radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and an external physicist expert was formed for the FMEA study. A process tree and a failure mode table were created for the GK procedures using the Leksell GK Perfexion and 4C units. Three scores for the probability of occurrence (O), the severity (S), and the probability of no detection (D) for failure modes were assigned to each failure mode by each professional on a scale from 1 to 10. The risk priority number (RPN) for each failure mode was then calculated (RPN = OxSxD) as the average scores from all data sets collected. Results: The established process tree for GK radiosurgery consists of 10 sub-processes and 53 steps, including a sub-process for frame placement and 11 steps that are directl