WorldWideScience

Sample records for single rigid body

  1. Rigid body dynamics of mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Hubert

    2003-01-01

    The second volume of Rigid Body Dynamics of Mechanisms covers applications via a systematic method for deriving model equations of planar and spatial mechanisms. The necessary theoretical foundations have been laid in the first volume that introduces the theoretical mechanical aspects of mechatronic systems. Here the focus is on the application of the modeling methodology to various examples of rigid-body mechanisms, simple planar ones as well as more challenging spatial problems. A rich variety of joint models, active constraints, plus active and passive force elements is treated. The book is intended for self-study by working engineers and students concerned with the control of mechanical systems, i.e. robotics, mechatronics, vehicles, and machine tools. The examples included are a likely source from which to choose models for university lectures.

  2. An Explicit Formulation of Singularity-Free Dynamic Equations of Mechanical Systems in Lagrangian Form---Part one: Single Rigid Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pål Johan From

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the explicit dynamic equations of a mechanical system. The equations are presented so that they can easily be implemented in a simulation software or controller environment and are also well suited for system and controller analysis. The dynamics of a general mechanical system consisting of one or more rigid bodies can be derived from the Lagrangian. We can then use several well known properties of Lie groups to guarantee that these equations are well defined. This will, however, often lead to rather abstract formulation of the dynamic equations that cannot be implemented in a simulation software directly. In this paper we close this gap and show what the explicit dynamic equations look like. These equations can then be implemented directly in a simulation software and no background knowledge on Lie theory and differential geometry on the practitioner's side is required. This is the first of two papers on this topic. In this paper we derive the dynamics for single rigid bodies, while in the second part we study multibody systems. In addition to making the equations more accessible to practitioners, a motivation behind the papers is to correct a few errors commonly found in literature. For the first time, we show the detailed derivations and how to arrive at the correct set of equations. We also show through some simple examples that these correspond with the classical formulations found from Lagrange's equations. The dynamics is derived from the Boltzmann--Hamel equations of motion in terms of local position and velocity variables and the mapping to the corresponding quasi-velocities. Finally we present a new theorem which states that the Boltzmann--Hamel formulation of the dynamics is valid for all transformations with a Lie group topology. This has previously only been indicated through examples, but here we also present the formal proof. The main motivation of these papers is to allow practitioners not familiar with

  3. The theory of pseudo-rigid bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Harley

    1988-01-01

    This monograph concerns the development, analysis, and application of the theory of pseudo-rigid bodies. It collects together our work on that subject over the last five years. While some results have appeared else­ where, much of the work is new. Our objective in writing this mono­ graph has been to present a new theory of the deformation of bodies, one that has not only a firm theoretical basis, but also the simplicity to serve as an effective tool in practical problems. Consequently, the main body of the treatise is a multifaceted development of the theory, from foundations to explicit solutions to linearizations to methods of approximation. The fact that this variety of aspects, each examined in considerable detail, can be collected together in a single, unified treat­ ment gives this theory an elegance that we feel sets it apart from many others. While our goal has always been to give a complete treatment of the theory as it now stands, the work here is not meant to be definitive. Theories are not ent...

  4. Quantum mechanics of a generalised rigid body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gripaios, Ben; Sutherland, Dave

    2016-01-01

    We consider the quantum version of Arnold’s generalisation of a rigid body in classical mechanics. Thus, we quantise the motion on an arbitrary Lie group manifold of a particle whose classical trajectories correspond to the geodesics of any one-sided-invariant metric. We show how the derivation of the spectrum of energy eigenstates can be simplified by making use of automorphisms of the Lie algebra and (for groups of type I) by methods of harmonic analysis. We show how the method can be extended to cosets, generalising the linear rigid rotor. As examples, we consider all connected and simply connected Lie groups up to dimension 3. This includes the universal cover of the archetypical rigid body, along with a number of new exactly solvable models. We also discuss a possible application to the topical problem of quantising a perfect fluid. (paper)

  5. Geometric integrators for stochastic rigid body dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Tretyakov, Mikhail

    2016-01-05

    Geometric integrators play an important role in simulating dynamical systems on long time intervals with high accuracy. We will illustrate geometric integration ideas within the stochastic context, mostly on examples of stochastic thermostats for rigid body dynamics. The talk will be mainly based on joint recent work with Rusland Davidchak and Tom Ouldridge.

  6. The two-body problem of a pseudo-rigid body and a rigid sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall; Vereshchagin, M.; Gózdziewski, K.

    2012-01-01

    n this paper we consider the two-body problem of a spherical pseudo-rigid body and a rigid sphere. Due to the rotational and "re-labelling" symmetries, the system is shown to possess conservation of angular momentum and circulation. We follow a reduction procedure similar to that undertaken...... in the study of the two-body problem of a rigid body and a sphere so that the computed reduced non-canonical Hamiltonian takes a similar form. We then consider relative equilibria and show that the notions of locally central and planar equilibria coincide. Finally, we show that Riemann's theorem on pseudo......-rigid bodies has an extension to this system for planar relative equilibria....

  7. Rigid body formulation in a finite element context with contact interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refachinho de Campos, Paulo R.; Gay Neto, Alfredo

    2018-03-01

    The present work proposes a formulation to employ rigid bodies together with flexible bodies in the context of a nonlinear finite element solver, with contact interactions. Inertial contributions due to distribution of mass of a rigid body are fully developed, considering a general pole position associated with a single node, representing a rigid body element. Additionally, a mechanical constraint is proposed to connect a rigid region composed by several nodes, which is useful for linking rigid/flexible bodies in a finite element environment. Rodrigues rotation parameters are used to describe finite rotations, by an updated Lagrangian description. In addition, the contact formulation entitled master-surface to master-surface is employed in conjunction with the rigid body element and flexible bodies, aiming to consider their interaction in a rigid-flexible multibody environment. New surface parameterizations are presented to establish contact pairs, permitting pointwise interaction in a frictional scenario. Numerical examples are provided to show robustness and applicability of the methods.

  8. Brownian dynamics of confined rigid bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delong, Steven; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Donev, Aleksandar, E-mail: donev@courant.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    We introduce numerical methods for simulating the diffusive motion of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape immersed in a viscous fluid. We parameterize the orientation of the bodies using normalized quaternions, which are numerically robust, space efficient, and easy to accumulate. We construct a system of overdamped Langevin equations in the quaternion representation that accounts for hydrodynamic effects, preserves the unit-norm constraint on the quaternion, and is time reversible with respect to the Gibbs-Boltzmann distribution at equilibrium. We introduce two schemes for temporal integration of the overdamped Langevin equations of motion, one based on the Fixman midpoint method and the other based on a random finite difference approach, both of which ensure that the correct stochastic drift term is captured in a computationally efficient way. We study several examples of rigid colloidal particles diffusing near a no-slip boundary and demonstrate the importance of the choice of tracking point on the measured translational mean square displacement (MSD). We examine the average short-time as well as the long-time quasi-two-dimensional diffusion coefficient of a rigid particle sedimented near a bottom wall due to gravity. For several particle shapes, we find a choice of tracking point that makes the MSD essentially linear with time, allowing us to estimate the long-time diffusion coefficient efficiently using a Monte Carlo method. However, in general, such a special choice of tracking point does not exist, and numerical techniques for simulating long trajectories, such as the ones we introduce here, are necessary to study diffusion on long time scales.

  9. A method for measuring the inertia properties of rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, M.; Mastinu, G.; Previati, G.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the inertia properties of rigid bodies is presented. Given a rigid body and its mass, the method allows to measure (identify) the centre of gravity location and the inertia tensor during a single test. The proposed technique is based on the analysis of the free motion of a multi-cable pendulum to which the body under consideration is connected. The motion of the pendulum and the forces acting on the system are recorded and the inertia properties are identified by means of a proper mathematical procedure based on a least square estimation. After the body is positioned on the test rig, the full identification procedure takes less than 10 min. The natural frequencies of the pendulum and the accelerations involved are quite low, making this method suitable for many practical applications. In this paper, the proposed method is described and two test rigs are presented: the first is developed for bodies up to 3500 kg and the second for bodies up to 400 kg. A validation of the measurement method is performed with satisfactory results. The test rig holds a third part quality certificate according to an ISO 9001 standard and could be scaled up to measure the inertia properties of huge bodies, such as trucks, airplanes or even ships.

  10. Almost Poisson integration of rigid body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, M.A.; Krishnaprasad, P.S.; Li-Sheng Wang

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the numerical integration of Lie-Poisson systems using the mid-point rule. Since such systems result from the reduction of hamiltonian systems with symmetry by lie group actions, we also present examples of reconstruction rules for the full dynamics. A primary motivation is to preserve in the integration process, various conserved quantities of the original dynamics. A main result of this paper is an O(h 3 ) error estimate for the Lie-Poisson structure, where h is the integration step-size. We note that Lie-Poisson systems appear naturally in many areas of physical science and engineering, including theoretical mechanics of fluids and plasmas, satellite dynamics, and polarization dynamics. In the present paper we consider a series of progressively complicated examples related to rigid body systems. We also consider a dissipative example associated to a Lie-Poisson system. The behavior of the mid-point rule and an associated reconstruction rule is numerically explored. 24 refs., 9 figs

  11. Rigid Body Sampling and Individual Time Stepping for Rigid-Fluid Coupling of Fluid Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokun Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an efficient and simple rigid-fluid coupling scheme with scientific programming algorithms for particle-based fluid simulation and three-dimensional visualization. Our approach samples the surface of rigid bodies with boundary particles that interact with fluids. It contains two procedures, that is, surface sampling and sampling relaxation, which insures uniform distribution of particles with less iterations. Furthermore, we present a rigid-fluid coupling scheme integrating individual time stepping to rigid-fluid coupling, which gains an obvious speedup compared to previous method. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  12. A Concise Introduction to Mechanics of Rigid Bodies Multidisciplinary Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, L

    2012-01-01

    A Concise Introduction to Mechanics of Rigid Bodies: Multidisciplinary Engineering presents concise, key concepts of kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies. This compact volume bridges the steep gap between  introductory texts on engineering mechanics, which focus on one and two dimensional motions of particles and rigid bodies, and advanced texts on multi-body dynamics in high dimension spaces  found in multidisciplinary areas like mechatronics, robotics and biomechanics. In the book, rigid body motions in the spaces with different dimensions are described in addition to studies in a uniform framework supported by vector and matrix operations. Rigorous mathematic tools and explanations are provided to clarify the most complex concepts. This book also: Provides practical examples from different engineering areas, offering a link between theoretical fundamentals and everyday applications Offers simplified mathematical equations to clearly present essential theories in robotics and mechanics Presents statics...

  13. Rigid body motion in stereo 3D simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the difficulties experienced by first-grade students studying rigid body motion at Sofia University. Most quantities describing the rigid body are in relations that the students find hard to visualize and understand. They also lose the notion of cause-result relations between vector quantities, such as the relation between torque and angular momentum. Consequently, the understanding of physical laws and conservation principles in free rigid body motion is hampered. This paper presents the capabilities of a 3D simulation, which aims to clarify these questions to the students, who are taught mechanics in the general physics course. The rigid body motion simulations may be observed at http://ialms.net/sim/, and are intended to complement traditional learning practices, not replace them, as the author shares the opinion that no simulation may fully resemble reality.

  14. Stabilization of Rigid Body Dynamics by Internal and External Torques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bloch, A. M; Krishnaprasad, P. S; Marsden, J. E; Sanchez de Alvarez, G

    1990-01-01

    ...] with quadratic feedback torques for internal rotors. We show that with such torques, the equations for the rigid body with momentum wheels are Hamiltonian with respect to a Lie-Poisson bracket structure. Further...

  15. A concise introduction to mechanics of rigid bodies multidisciplinary engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, L

    2017-01-01

    This updated second edition broadens the explanation of rotational kinematics and dynamics — the most important aspect of rigid body motion in three-dimensional space and a topic of much greater complexity than linear motion. It expands treatment of vector and matrix, and includes quaternion operations to describe and analyze rigid body motion which are found in robot control, trajectory planning, 3D vision system calibration, and hand-eye coordination of robots in assembly work, etc. It features updated treatments of concepts in all chapters and case studies. The textbook retains its comprehensiveness in coverage and compactness in size, which make it easily accessible to the readers from multidisciplinary areas who want to grasp the key concepts of rigid body mechanics which are usually scattered in multiple volumes of traditional textbooks. Theoretical concepts are explained through examples taken from across engineering disciplines and links to applications and more advanced courses (e.g. industrial rob...

  16. Anti-synchronization of the rigid body exhibiting chaotic dynamics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on a method derived from nonlinear control theory, we present a novel technical approach for synchronizing the dynamics of a rigid body exhibiting chaotic motion. In this framework, the active control technique is modified and employed to design control functions based on Lyapunov stability theory and ...

  17. Knowledge-In-Action: An Example with Rigid Body Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Sayonara Salvador Cabral; Moreira, Marco Antonio

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the analysis of the resolution of a paper-and-pencil problem, by eight undergraduate students majoring in engineering (six) and physics (two) at the Pontifcia Universidade Catlica do Rio Grande do Sul, in Porto Alegre, Brazil. The problem concerns kinetics of a rigid body, and the analysis was done in the light of Johnson-Lairds…

  18. Nonlinear vibration of an axially loaded beam carrying rigid bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Barry

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the nonlinear vibration due to mid-plane stretching of an axially loaded simply supported beam carrying multiple rigid masses. Explicit expressions and closed form solutions of both linear and nonlinear analysis of the present vibration problem are presented for the first time. The validity of the analytical model is demonstrated using finite element analysis and via comparison with the result in the literature. Parametric studies are conducted to examine how the nonlinear frequency and frequency response curve are affected by tension, rotational inertia, and number of intermediate rigid bodies.

  19. Rotating and rolling rigid bodies and the "hairy ball" theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Kazachkov, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Rotating and rolling rigid bodies exemplify a fascinating theorem of topology, jokingly called the "hairy ball" theorem, which demands that any continuous tangent vector field on the sphere has at least one point where the field is zero. We demonstrate via a gedanken experiment how drilling through a rotating ball, thereby converting it into a torus, leads to the elimination of zero-velocity points on the ball surface. Using the same reasoning, zero-velocity points can be removed from the surface of a drilled spinning top. We discuss the location of zero-velocity points on the surfaces of rigid bodies rolling with no slip and with slip. Observations made from different reference frames identify various zero-velocity points. Illustrative experiments visualizing zero-velocity points are presented.

  20. On regular solutions in the problem of two rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboshin, G. N.

    1982-07-01

    The problem of the movement of two rigid bodies whose elementary particles are attracted to each other according to Newton's law is addressed. It is shown that for bodies possessing axial symmetry with respect to the equatorial plane, the problem admits of several exact particular solutions corresponding to movements, termed 'regular'. In these movements, the center of mass of a body describes a circular orbit with constant angular velocity about the center of mass of the other, which is equivalent to a rectilinear trajectory. The orientation of each body with respect to this orbit is invariable and each body rotates uniformly on its own axis of symmetry. It is possible to distinguish the different types of these regular movements according to the various possible mutual orientations of two bodies. Each type of movement is given and appropriate name, and all the results are based on developmental properties of the problem's force function and may be generalized.

  1. Steady fall of a rigid body in viscous fluid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečasová, Šárka

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 63, Sp. Is. (2005), s. 2113-2119 ISSN 0362-546X. [Invited Talks from the Fourth World Congress of Nonlinear Analysts (WCNA 2004). Orlando , 30.7.2004-7.8.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/02/0684 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : steady fall * rigid body * viscous fluid Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2005

  2. Nonlinear dynamics mathematical models for rigid bodies with a liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Lukovsky, Ivan A

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to analytically approximate methods in the nonlinear dynamics of a rigid body with cavities partly filled by liquid. It combines several methods and compares the results with experimental data. It is useful for experienced and early-stage readers interested in analytical approaches to fluid-structure interaction problems, the fundamental mathematical background and modeling the dynamics of such complex mechanical systems.

  3. Rigid Body Energy Minimization on Manifolds for Molecular Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Hanieh; Beglov, Dmitri; Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch; Vajda, Sandor; Vakili, Pirooz; Kozakov, Dima

    2012-11-13

    Virtually all docking methods include some local continuous minimization of an energy/scoring function in order to remove steric clashes and obtain more reliable energy values. In this paper, we describe an efficient rigid-body optimization algorithm that, compared to the most widely used algorithms, converges approximately an order of magnitude faster to conformations with equal or slightly lower energy. The space of rigid body transformations is a nonlinear manifold, namely, a space which locally resembles a Euclidean space. We use a canonical parametrization of the manifold, called the exponential parametrization, to map the Euclidean tangent space of the manifold onto the manifold itself. Thus, we locally transform the rigid body optimization to an optimization over a Euclidean space where basic optimization algorithms are applicable. Compared to commonly used methods, this formulation substantially reduces the dimension of the search space. As a result, it requires far fewer costly function and gradient evaluations and leads to a more efficient algorithm. We have selected the LBFGS quasi-Newton method for local optimization since it uses only gradient information to obtain second order information about the energy function and avoids the far more costly direct Hessian evaluations. Two applications, one in protein-protein docking, and the other in protein-small molecular interactions, as part of macromolecular docking protocols are presented. The code is available to the community under open source license, and with minimal effort can be incorporated into any molecular modeling package.

  4. Integrable Problems of the Dynamics of Coupled Rigid Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoyavlenskiĭ, O. I.

    1993-06-01

    Several classical problems of dynamics are shown to be integrable for the special systems of coupled rigid bodies introduced in this paper and called Ck-central configurations. It is proved that the dynamics of an arbitrary Ck-central configuration in the Newtonian gravitational field with an arbitrary quadratic potential is integrable in the Liouville sense and in theta-functions of Riemann surfaces. A hidden symmetry of the inertial dynamics of these configurations is found, and reductions of the corresponding Lagrange equations to the Euler equations on the direct sums of Lie coalgebras SO(3) are obtained. Reductions and integrable cases of the equations for the rotation of a heavy Ck-central configuration about a fixed point are indicated. Separation of rotations of a space station type orbiting system, which is a Ck-central configuration of rigid bodies, is proved. This result leads to the possibility of independent stabilization of rotations of the rigid bodies in such orbiting configurations. Integrability of the inertial dynamics of CRn-central configurations of coupled gyrostats is proved.

  5. Symmetry and Reduction for Coordinated Rigid Body Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hanszligmann, H; Smith, T R

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by interest in the collective behavior of autonomous agents, we study networks of rigid bodies and the problem of coordinated orientation and position across the group. Our main result is the reduction of the networked system in the case that individuals are coupled by control inputs that depend only on relative configuration. We use reduction theory based on semi-direct products; this yields flat Poisson spaces which enable efficient formulation of control laws. In the second part of the paper, we apply the reduction results to particular choices of kinetic energy and prove stability of coordinated behaviors.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Demonstration of Rigid Bodies in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarena, Ernesto; Vu, Bruce T.

    2011-01-01

    The Design Analysis Branch (NE-Ml) at the Kennedy Space Center has not had the ability to accurately couple Rigid Body Dynamics (RBD) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). OVERFLOW-D is a flow solver that has been developed by NASA to have the capability to analyze and simulate dynamic motions with up to six Degrees of Freedom (6-DOF). Two simulations were prepared over the course of the internship to demonstrate 6DOF motion of rigid bodies under aerodynamic loading. The geometries in the simulations were based on a conceptual Space Launch System (SLS). The first simulation that was prepared and computed was the motion of a Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) as it separates from its core stage. To reduce computational time during the development of the simulation, only half of the physical domain with respect to the symmetry plane was simulated. Then a full solution was prepared and computed. The second simulation was a model of the SLS as it departs from a launch pad under a 20 knot crosswind. This simulation was reduced to Two Dimensions (2D) to reduce both preparation and computation time. By allowing 2-DOF for translations and 1-DOF for rotation, the simulation predicted unrealistic rotation. The simulation was then constrained to only allow translations.

  7. Collisions of Constrained Rigid Body Systems with Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Shen

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach is developed for the general collision problem of two rigid body systems with constraints (e.g., articulated systems, such as massy linkages in which the relative tangential velocity at the point of contact and the associated friction force can change direction during the collision. This is beyond the framework of conventional methods, which can give significant and very obvious errors for this problem, and both extends and consolidates recent work. A new parameterization and theory characterize if, when and how the relative tangential velocity changes direction during contact. Elastic and dissipative phenomena and different values for static and kinetic friction coefficients are included. The method is based on the explicitly physical analysis of events at the point of contact. Using this method, Example 1 resolves (and corrects a paradox (in the literature of the collision of a double pendulum with the ground. The method fundamentally subsumes other recent models and the collision of rigid bodies; it yields the same results as conventional methods when they would apply (Example 2. The new method reformulates and extends recent approaches in a completely physical context.

  8. About ideal relative motions of rigid heavy body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae MARCOV

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Consider an origin which is fixed at the Earth’s surface, and a rectangular celestial coordinates axes with this origin. The gravity acceleration is the approximate sum of the centrifugal acceleration of the origin relatively to the Earth’s center and the Newton’s gravitational acceleration due to the Earth’s attraction. Thus the selected reference frame is formally an inertial frame. The origin is also a point of a rigid heavy body. The dynamical differential system of absolute motion of the three degrees-of- freedom body is given. Some notable solutions of this system are calculated relatively to a moving laboratory frame with the angular velocity of the Earth.

  9. Dynamics of parallel robots from rigid bodies to flexible elements

    CERN Document Server

    Briot, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    This book starts with a short recapitulation on basic concepts, common to any types of robots (serial, tree structure, parallel, etc.), that are also necessary for computation of the dynamic models of parallel robots. Then, as dynamics requires the use of geometry and kinematics, the general equations of geometric and kinematic models of parallel robots are given. After, it is explained that parallel robot dynamic models can be obtained by decomposing the real robot into two virtual systems: a tree-structure robot (equivalent to the robot legs for which all joints would be actuated) plus a free body corresponding to the platform. Thus, the dynamics of rigid tree-structure robots is analyzed and algorithms to obtain their dynamic models in the most compact form are given. The dynamic model of the real rigid parallel robot is obtained by closing the loops through the use of the Lagrange multipliers. The problem of the dynamic model degeneracy near singularities is treated and optimal trajectory planning for cro...

  10. Unifying Rigid and Soft Bodies Representation: The Sulfur Physics Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Maggiorini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Video games are (also real-time interactive graphic simulations: hence, providing a convincing physics simulation for each specific game environment is of paramount importance in the process of achieving a satisfying player experience. While the existing game engines appropriately address many aspects of physics simulation, some others are still in need of improvements. In particular, several specific physics properties of bodies not usually involved in the main game mechanics (e.g., properties useful to represent systems composed by soft bodies, are often poorly rendered by general-purpose engines. This issue may limit game designers when imagining innovative and compelling video games and game mechanics. For this reason, we dug into the problem of appropriately representing soft bodies. Subsequently, we have extended the approach developed for soft bodies to rigid ones, proposing and developing a unified approach in a game engine: Sulfur. To test the engine, we have also designed and developed “Escape from Quaoar,” a prototypal video game whose main game mechanic exploits an elastic rope, and a level editor for the game.

  11. Leonhard Euler and the mechanics of rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquina, J. E.; Marquina, M. L.; Marquina, V.; Hernández-Gómez, J. J.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present the original ideas and the construction of the rigid bodies theory realised by Leonhard Euler between 1738 and 1775. The number of treatises written by Euler on this subject is enormous, including the most notorious Scientia Navalis (1749), Decouverte d’un noveau principe de mecanique (1752), Du mouvement de rotation des corps solides autour d’un axe variable (1765), Theoria motus corporum solidorum seu rigidorum (1765) and Nova methodus motu corporum rigidorum determinandi (1776), in which he developed the ideas of the instantaneous rotation axis, the so-called Euler equations and angles, the components of what is now known as the inertia tensor, the principal axes of inertia, and, finally, the generalisation of the translation and rotation movement equations for any system. Euler, the man who ‘put most of mechanics into its modern form’ (Truesdell 1968 Essays in the History of Mechanics (Berlin: Springer) p 106).

  12. Global dynamics and stabilization of rigid body attitude systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Nalin Arvind

    Attitude control is fundamental to the design and operation of many large engineering systems that consist in whole or in part of rotational components, with system performance defined in terms of global attitude control objectives. The 3D pendulum is a rigid body, freely rotating about a pivot point that is not the center-of-mass. It is acted upon by gravitational and control moments. New results are obtained for the problem of feedback stabilization of a 3D pendulum; these results exemplify attitude stabilization for a 3-DOF rigid body with potential forces. New results are first obtained for the global dynamics of the 3D pendulum. We identify integrals of its motion, and it is shown that the 3D pendulum has two disjoint equilibrium manifolds, namely the hanging equilibrium manifold and the inverted equilibrium manifold. New nonlinear controllers are shown to provide almost global stabilization of these equilibrium manifolds or almost global stabilization of any desired equilibrium in these manifolds. We identify a performance constraint, namely that there are closed-loop trajectories that can take arbitrarily long to converge to the equilibrium. We then study the problem of stabilization under input saturation effects. We show that as long as the saturation limit is greater than a certain lower bound, the inverted equilibrium manifold or any desired equilibrium in these manifolds, can be almost globally asymptotically stabilized. A new non-smooth controller is proposed that stabilizes the inverted equilibrium manifold such that the domain of attraction is almost global and is geometrically simple, and the closed-loop does not exhibit a performance constraint. We then present experimental results on stabilization of the inverted equilibrium manifold illustrating the closed-loop performance. Next, new stabilization results for an axially symmetric 3D pendulum are presented that generalize stabilization results in the literature for the planar pendulum, the

  13. Collapsed fat navigators for brain 3D rigid body motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Mathias; Mårtensson, Magnus; Avventi, Enrico; Norbeck, Ola; Skare, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    To acquire high-resolution 3D multi-slab echo planar imaging data without motion artifacts, using collapsed fat navigators. A fat navigator module (collapsed FatNav) was added to a diffusion-weighted 3D multi-slab echo planar imaging (DW 3D-MS EPI) sequence, comprising three orthogonal echo planar imaging readouts to track rigid body head motion in the image domain and performing prospective motion correction. The stability, resolution and accuracy of the navigator were investigated on phantoms and healthy volunteers. The experiments on phantoms and volunteers show that the navigator, depicting projections of the subcutaneous fat in of the head, is capable of correcting for head motion with insignificant bias compared to motion estimates derived from the water-signaling DWI images. Despite that this projection technique implies a non-sparse image appearance, collapsed FatNav data could be highly accelerated with parallel imaging, allowing three orthogonal 2D EPI readouts in about 6ms. By utilizing signal from the leading fat saturation RF pulse of the diffusion sequence, only the readout portion of the navigator needs to be added, resulting in a scan time penalty of only about 5%. Motion can be detected and corrected for with a 5-10Hz update frequency when combined with a sequence like the DW 3D-MS EPI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic Multi-Rigid-Body Systems with Concurrent Distributed Contacts: Theory and Examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRINKLE, JEFFREY C.; TZITZOURIS, J.A.; PANG, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Consider a system of rigid bodies with multiple concurrent contacts. The multi-rigid-body contact problem is to predict the accelerations of the bodies and the normal friction loads acting at the contacts. This paper presents theoretical results for the multi-rigid-body contact problem under the assumptions that one or more contacts occur over locally planar, finite regions and that friction forces are consistent with the maximum work inequality. Existence and uniqueness results are presented for this problem under mild assumptions on the system inputs. In addition, the performance of two different time-stepping methods for integrating the dynamics are compared on two simple multi-body systems

  15. Chrono: A Parallel Physics Library for Rigid-Body, Flexible-Body, and Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    of power trains , ChLinkLockRevolute that is a joint between rigid bodies, and so on. A set of more than thirty mechanical constraints are part of this...code ADAMS [29], and the nonlinear finite element analysis code ABAQUS [30]. Chrono::Fluid The Chrono::Fluid component aims at leveraging GPU...University of Wisconsin–Madison. [29] MSC.Software, 2012. “Adams: Automatic dynamic analy- sis of mechanical systems”. Ann Arbor, Michigan. [30] ABAQUS

  16. FICTITIOUS DOMAIN METHOD FOR NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE VISCOUS FLOW AROUND RIGID BODIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Beno

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the method of efficient simulation of the flow around potentially many rigid obstacles. The finite element implementation is based on the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using structured, regular, two dimensional triangular mesh. The fictitious domain method is introduced to account for the presence of rigid particles, representing obstacles to the flow. To enforce rigid body constraints in parts corresponding to rigid obstacles, Lagrange multipliers are used. For time discretization, an operator splitting technique is used. The model is validated using 2D channel flow simulations with circular obstacles. Different possibilities of enforcing rigid body constraints are compared to the fully resolved simulations and optimal strategy is recommended.

  17. Effort Flow Analysis: A Methodology for Directed Product Evolution Using Rigid Body and Compliant Mechanisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greer, James

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation presents a systematic design methodology for directed product evolution that uses both rigid body and compliant mechanisms to facilitate component combination in the domain of mechanical products...

  18. The general problem of the motion of coupled rigid bodies about a fixed point

    CERN Document Server

    Leimanis, Eugene

    1965-01-01

    In the theory of motion of several coupled rigid bodies about a fixed point one can distinguish three basic ramifications. 1. The first, the so-called classical direction of investigations, is concerned with particular cases of integrability ot the equations of motion of a single rigid body about a fixed point,1 and with their geo­ metrical interpretation. This path of thought was predominant until the beginning of the 20th century and its most illustrious represen­ tatives are L. EULER (1707-1783), J L. LAGRANGE (1736-1813), L. POINSOT (1777-1859), S. V. KOVALEVSKAYA (1850-1891), and others. Chapter I of the present monograph intends to reflect this branch of investigations. For collateral reading on the general questions dealt with in this chapter the reader is referred to the following textbooks and reports: A. DOMOGAROV [1J, F. KLEIN and A. SOMMERFELD [11, 1 , 1 J, A. G. 2 3 GREENHILL [10J, A. GRAY [1J, R. GRAMMEL [4 J, E. J. ROUTH [21' 2 , 1 2 31' 32J, J. B. SCARBOROUGH [1J, and V. V. GOLUBEV [1, 2J.

  19. Contact point generation for convex polytopes in interactive rigid body dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silcowitz-Hansen, Morten; Abel, Sarah Maria Niebe; Erleben, Kenny

    When computing contact forces in rigid body dynamics systems, most state-of-the-art solutions use iterative methods such as the projected Gauss–Seidel (PGS) method. Methods such as the PGS method are preferred for their robustness. However, the time-critical nature of interactive applications...... for convex polytopes. A novel contact point generation method is presented, which is based on growth distances and Gauss maps. We demonstrate improvements when using our method in the context of interactive rigid body simulation...

  20. Almost-global tracking for a rigid body with internal rotors

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Aradhana; Banavar, Ravi N.

    2017-01-01

    Almost-global orientation trajectory tracking for a rigid body with external actuation has been well studied in the literature, and in the geometric setting as well. The tracking control law relies on the fact that a rigid body is a simple mechanical system (SMS) on the $3-$dimensional group of special orthogonal matrices. However, the problem of designing feedback control laws for tracking using internal actuation mechanisms, like rotors or control moment gyros, has received lesser attention...

  1. Evolution of motions of a rigid body about its center of mass

    CERN Document Server

    Chernousko, Felix L; Leshchenko, Dmytro D

    2017-01-01

    The book presents a unified and well-developed approach to the dynamics of angular motions of rigid bodies subjected to perturbation torques of different physical nature. It contains both the basic foundations of the rigid body dynamics and of the asymptotic method of averaging. The rigorous approach based on the averaging procedure is applicable to bodies with arbitrary ellopsoids of inertia. Action of various perturbation torques, both external (gravitational, aerodynamical, solar pressure) and internal (due to viscous fluid in tanks, elastic and visco-elastic properties of a body) is considered in detail. The book can be used by researchers, engineers and students working in attitude dynamics of spacecraft.

  2. A generic detailed rigid-body lumbar spine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Zee, Mark; Hansen, Lone; Wong, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present a musculo-skeletal model of the lumbar spine, which can be shared and lends itself to investigation in many locations by different researchers. This has the potential for greater reproducibility and subsequent improvement of its quality from the combined e...... is relatively easy to share and modify due to the use of a well-defined and self-contained scripting language. Validation is though still necessary for specific cases....... the literature. The work resulted in a detailed lumbar spine model with seven rigid segments with 18 degrees-of-freedom and 154 muscles. The model is able to produce a maximum extension moment of 238 Nm around L5/S1. Moreover, a comparison was made with in vivo intradiscal pressure measurements of the L4-5 disc...

  3. Projected Gauss-Seidel subspace minimization method for interactive rigid body dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silcowitz-Hansen, Morten; Abel, Sarah Maria Niebe; Erleben, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    In interactive physical simulation, contact forces are applied to prevent rigid bodies from penetrating and to control slipping between bodies. Accurate contact force determination is a computationally hard problem. Thus, in practice one trades accuracy for performance. This results in visual...

  4. A constrained generalised-? method for coupling rigid parallel chain kinematics and elastic bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gransden, D.I.; Burkhard Bornemann, P.; Rose, M.; Nitzsche, F.

    2015-01-01

    A problem arises from combining flexible rotorcraft blades with stiffer mechanical links, which form a parallel kinematic chain. This paper introduces a method for solving index-3 differential algebraic equations for coupled stiff and elastic body systems with closed-loop kinematics. Rigid body

  5. Projected Gauss-Seidel subspace minimization method for interactive rigid body dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silcowitz-Hansen, Morten; Abel, Sarah Maria Niebe; Erleben, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    In interactive physical simulation, contact forces are applied to prevent rigid bodies from penetrating and to control slipping between bodies. Accurate contact force determination is a computationally hard problem. Thus, in practice one trades accuracy for performance. This results in visual art...

  6. Simulation Methods in the Contact with Impact of Rigid Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Basarabă-Opritescu

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of impacts of elastic bodies is topical and it has many applications, practical and theoretical, too. The elastic character of collision is put in evidence, especially by the velocities of some parts of a particular body, named “ring”. In the presented paper, the situation of elastic collisions is put in evidence by the simulation with the help of the program ANSYS and it refers to the particular case of the ring, with the mechanical characteristics, given in the paper

  7. Student understanding of the application of Newton's second law to rotating rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Hunter G.; Gomez, Luanna S.; Heron, Paula R. L.

    2013-06-01

    We report on an investigation of student understanding of rigid body dynamics in which we asked students in introductory calculus-based physics to compare the translational motions of identical rigid bodies subject to forces that differed only in the point of contact at which they were applied. There was a widespread tendency to claim that forces that cause rotational motion have a diminished effect on translational motion. A series of related problems was developed to examine whether similar errors would be made in other contexts, and interviews were conducted to probe student thinking in greater depth. In this paper, we describe the results of our investigation and also describe a series of different interventions that culminated in the development of a tutorial that improves student ability to apply Newton's second law to rotating rigid bodies.

  8. Formulation and Simulations of the Conserving Algorithm for Feedback Stabilization on Rigid Body Rotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Ren Pu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of stabilization of rigid bodies has received a great deal of attention for many years. People have developed a variety of feedback control laws to meet their design requirements and have formulated various but mostly open loop numerical algorithms for the dynamics of the corresponding closed loop systems. Since the conserved quantities such as energy, momentum, and symmetry play an important role in the dynamics, we investigate the conserved quantities for the closed loop control systems which formally or asymptotically stabilize rigid body rotation and modify the open loop numerical algorithms so that they preserve these important properties. Using several examples, the authors first use the open loop algorithm to simulate the tumbling rigid body actions and then use the resulting closed loop one to stabilize them.

  9. Estimating the orientation of a rigid body moving in space using inertial sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Peng, E-mail: peng.he.1@ulaval.ca; Cardou, Philippe, E-mail: pcardou@gmc.ulaval.ca [Université Laval, Robotics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Canada); Desbiens, André, E-mail: andre.desbiens@gel.ulaval.ca [Université Laval, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (Canada); Gagnon, Eric, E-mail: Eric.Gagnon@drdc-rddc.gc.ca [RDDC Valcartier (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents a novel method of estimating the orientation of a rigid body moving in space from inertial sensors, by discerning the gravitational and inertial components of the accelerations. In this method, both a rigid-body kinematics model and a stochastic model of the human-hand motion are formulated and combined in a nonlinear state-space system. The state equation represents the rigid body kinematics and stochastic model, and the output equation represents the inertial sensor measurements. It is necessary to mention that, since the output equation is a nonlinear function of the state, the extended Kalman filter (EKF) is applied. The absolute value of the error from the proposed method is shown to be less than 5 deg in simulation and in experiments. It is apparently stable, unlike the time-integration of gyroscope measurements, which is subjected to drift, and remains accurate under large accelerations, unlike the tilt-sensor method.

  10. Conservative rigid body dynamics by convected base vectors with implicit constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Nielsen, Martin Bjerre

    2014-01-01

    A conservative time integration formulation is developed for rigid bodies based on a convected set of orthonormal base vectors. The base vectors are represented in terms of their absolute coordinates, and thus the formulation makes use of three translation components, plus nine components...... of the base vectors. Orthogonality and unit length of the base vectors are imposed by constraining the equivalent Green strain components, and the kinetic energy is represented corresponding to rigid body motion. The equations of motion are obtained via Hamilton’s equations including the zero...... are eliminated explicitly within each integration interval leaving a projection operator expressed in terms of displacement component mean values. Hereby the number of variables is reduced by six for each rigid body in the problem, and the difference equations lead to conservation of the orthonormality...

  11. Estimating the orientation of a rigid body moving in space using inertial sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Peng; Cardou, Philippe; Desbiens, André; Gagnon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method of estimating the orientation of a rigid body moving in space from inertial sensors, by discerning the gravitational and inertial components of the accelerations. In this method, both a rigid-body kinematics model and a stochastic model of the human-hand motion are formulated and combined in a nonlinear state-space system. The state equation represents the rigid body kinematics and stochastic model, and the output equation represents the inertial sensor measurements. It is necessary to mention that, since the output equation is a nonlinear function of the state, the extended Kalman filter (EKF) is applied. The absolute value of the error from the proposed method is shown to be less than 5 deg in simulation and in experiments. It is apparently stable, unlike the time-integration of gyroscope measurements, which is subjected to drift, and remains accurate under large accelerations, unlike the tilt-sensor method

  12. Computing the Free Energy along a Reaction Coordinate Using Rigid Body Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Peng; Sodt, Alexander J; Shao, Yihan; König, Gerhard; Brooks, Bernard R

    2014-10-14

    The calculations of potential of mean force along complex chemical reactions or rare events pathways are of great interest because of their importance for many areas in chemistry, molecular biology, and material science. The major difficulty for free energy calculations comes from the great computational cost for adequate sampling of the system in high-energy regions, especially close to the reaction transition state. Here, we present a method, called FEG-RBD, in which the free energy gradients were obtained from rigid body dynamics simulations. Then the free energy gradients were integrated along a reference reaction pathway to calculate free energy profiles. In a given system, the reaction coordinates defining a subset of atoms (e.g., a solute, or the quantum mechanics (QM) region of a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation) are selected to form a rigid body during the simulation. The first-order derivatives (gradients) of the free energy with respect to the reaction coordinates are obtained through the integration of constraint forces within the rigid body. Each structure along the reference reaction path is separately subjected to such a rigid body simulation. The individual free energy gradients are integrated along the reference pathway to obtain the free energy profile. Test cases provided demonstrate both the strengths and weaknesses of the FEG-RBD method. The most significant benefit of this method comes from the fast convergence rate of the free energy gradient using rigid-body constraints instead of restraints. A correction to the free energy due to approximate relaxation of the rigid-body constraint is estimated and discussed. A comparison with umbrella sampling using a simple test case revealed the improved sampling efficiency of FEG-RBD by a factor of 4 on average. The enhanced efficiency makes this method effective for calculating the free energy of complex chemical reactions when the reaction coordinate can be unambiguously defined by a

  13. Motion control of rigid bodies in SE(3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roza, Ashton

    This thesis investigates the control of motion for a general class of vehicles that rotate and translate in three-space, and are propelled by a thrust vector which has fixed direction in body frame. The thesis addresses the problems of path following and position control. For path following, a feedback linearization controller is presented that makes the vehicle follow an arbitrary closed curve while simultaneously allowing the designer to specify the velocity profile of the vehicle on the path and its heading. For position control, a two-stage approach is presented that decouples position control from attitude control, allowing for a modular design and yielding almost global asymptotic stability of any desired hovering equilibrium. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified both in simulation and experimentally by means of a hardware-in-the-loop setup emulating a co-axial helicopter.

  14. Compliant mechanism road bicycle brake: a rigid-body replacement case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Howell, Larry L [NON LANL; Magleby, Spencer P [NON LANL

    2011-01-19

    The design of high-performance bicycle brakes is complicated by the competing design objectives of increased performance and low weight. But this challenge also provides a good case study to demonstrate the design of compliant mechanisms to replace current rigid-link mechanisms. This paper briefly reviews current road brake designs, demonstrates the use of rigid-body replacement synthesis to design a compliant mechanism, and illustrates the combination of compliant mechanism design tools. The resulting concept was generated from the modified dual-pivot brake design and is a partially compliant mechanism where one pin has the dual role of a joint and a mounting pin. The pseudo-rigid-body model, finite element analysis, and optimization algorithms are used to generate design dimensions, and designs are considered for both titanium and E-glass flexures. The resulting design has the potential of reducing the part count and overall weight while maintaining a performance similar to the benchmark.

  15. Explaining rigid dieting in normal-weight women: the key role of body image inflexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cláudia; Trindade, Inês A; Martinho, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Restrictive dieting is an increasing behavior presented by women in modern societies, independently of their weight. There are several known factors that motivate diet, namely a sense of dissatisfaction with one's body and unfavorable social comparisons based on physical appearance. However, dieting seems to have a paradoxical effect and has been considered a risk factor for weight gain and obesity in women and for maladaptive eating. Nevertheless, the study of the emotional regulation processes that explain the adoption of inflexible and rigid eating behaviors still remains little explored. In this line, the present study aims to explore why normal-weight women engage in highly rigid and inflexible diets. We hypothesize that body and weight dissatisfaction and unfavorable social comparisons based on physical appearance explain the adoption of inflexible eating rules, through the mechanisms of body image inflexibility. The current study comprised 508 normal-weight female college students. Path analyses were conducted to explore the study's hypotheses. Results revealed that the model explained 43 % of inflexible eating and revealed excellent fit indices. Furthermore, the unwillingness to experience unwanted events related to body image (body image inflexibility) mediated the impact of body dissatisfaction and unfavorable social comparisons on the adoption of inflexible eating rules. This study highlights the relevance of body image inflexibility to explain rigid eating attitudes, and it seems to be an important avenue for the development of interventions focusing on the promotion of adaptive attitudes towards body image and eating in young women.

  16. Matrix rigidity-modulated cardiovascular organoid formation from embryoid bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem Shkumatov

    Full Text Available Stem cell clusters, such as embryoid bodies (EBs derived from embryonic stem cells, are extensively studied for creation of multicellular clusters and complex functional tissues. It is common to control phenotypes of ES cells with varying molecular compounds; however, there is still a need to improve the controllability of cell differentiation, and thus, the quality of created tissue. This study demonstrates a simple but effective strategy to promote formation of vascularized cardiac muscle-like tissue in EBs and form contracting cardiovascular organoids by modulating the stiffness of a cell adherent hydrogel. Using collagen-conjugated polyacrylamide hydrogels with controlled elastic moduli, we discovered that cellular organization in a form of vascularized cardiac muscle sheet was maximal on the gel with the stiffness similar to cardiac muscle. We envisage that the results of this study will greatly contribute to better understanding of emergent behavior of stem cells in developmental and regeneration process and will also expedite translation of EB studies to drug-screening device assembly and clinical treatments.

  17. Reorientation of Asymmetric Rigid Body Using Two Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghoon Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most spacecrafts are designed to be maneuvered to achieve pointing goals. This is accomplished usually by designing a three-axis control system, which can achieve arbitrary maneuvers, where the goal is to repoint the spacecraft and match a desired angular velocity at the end of the maneuver. New control laws are required, however, if one of the three-axis control actuators fails. This paper explores suboptimal maneuver strategies when only two control torque inputs are available. To handle this underactuated system control problem, the three-axis maneuver strategy is transformed to two successive independent submaneuver strategies. The first maneuver is conducted on one of the available torque axes. Next, the second maneuver is conducted on the torque available plane using two available control torques. However, the resulting control law is more complicated than the general three-axis control law. This is because an optimal switch time needs to be found for determining the end time for the single-axis maneuver or the start time for the second maneuver. Numerical simulation results are presented that compare optimal maneuver strategies for both nominal and failed actuator cases.

  18. Comparison of Point and Line Features and Their Combination for Rigid Body Motion Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilz, Florian; Pugeault, Nicolas; Krüger, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the usage of dierent image features and their combination in the context of estimating the motion of rigid bodies (RBM estimation). From stereo image sequences, we extract line features at local edges (coded in so called multi-modal primitives) as well as point features (by...

  19. Rigid Body Time Integration by Convected Base Vectors with Implicit Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Nielsen, Martin Bjerre

    2013-01-01

    of the kinetic energy used in the present formulation is deliberately chosen to correspond to a rigid body rotation, and the orthonormality constraints are introduced via the equivalent Green strain components of the base vectors. The particular form of the extended inertia tensor used here implies a set...

  20. A conservative quaternion-based time integration algorithm for rigid body rotations with implicit constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin Bjerre; Krenk, Steen

    2012-01-01

    A conservative time integration algorithm for rigid body rotations is presented in a purely algebraic form in terms of the four quaternions components and the four conjugate momentum variables via Hamilton’s equations. The introduction of an extended mass matrix leads to a symmetric set of eight...

  1. Conservative integration of rigid body motion by quaternion parameters with implicit constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin Bjerre; Krenk, Steen

    2012-01-01

    An angular momentum and energy‐conserving time integration algorithm for rigid body rotation is formulated in terms of the quaternion parameters and the corresponding four‐component conjugate momentum vector via Hamilton's equations. The introduction of an extended mass matrix leads to a symmetric...

  2. A rigid-body least-squares program with angular and translation scan facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kutschabsky, L

    1981-01-01

    The described computer program, written in CERN Fortran, is designed to enlarge the convergence radius of the rigid-body least-squares method by allowing a stepwise change of the angular and/or translational parameters within a chosen range. (6 refs).

  3. Lorentz Contraction, Bell's Spaceships and Rigid Body Motion in Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Jerrold

    2010-01-01

    The meaning of Lorentz contraction in special relativity and its connection with Bell's spaceships parable is discussed. The motion of Bell's spaceships is then compared with the accelerated motion of a rigid body. We have tried to write this in a simple form that could be used to correct students' misconceptions due to conflicting earlier…

  4. Dynamic response of sliced rigid bodies subjected to harmonic base excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manos, G.C.; Demosthenous, M.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic response of sliced rigid-block type bodies is investigated by subjecting a number of specimens to a variety of horizontal sinusoidal base motions as they are reproduced by the Earthquake Simulator of Aristotle University. The sliced specimens are either square prisms, cylinders or truncate cones and are assumed to represent models of prototype structures 20 times larger. (author)

  5. On integrability of a heavy rigid body sinking in an ideal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deriabine, Mikhail; Hjorth, Poul G.

    2003-01-01

    We consider a rigid body possessing 3 mutually perpendicular planes of symmetry, sinking in an ideal fluid. We prove that the general solution to the equations of motion branches in the complex time plane, and that the equations consequently are not algebraically integrable. We show...

  6. Reconstructing rotations and rigid body motions from exact point correspondences through reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontijne, D.; Dorst, L.; Dorst, L.; Lasenby, J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new algorithm to reconstruct a rigid body motion from point correspondences. The algorithm works by constructing a series of reflections which align the points with their correspondences one by one. This is naturally and efficiently implemented in the conformal model of geometric

  7. Rigid Body Motion Calculated From Spatial Co-ordinates of Markers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we present a unified method for calculating spatial coordinates of markers for a rigid body motion such as in bones. Kinematical analysis of bone movement in cadaveric specimens or living objects had been developed. Here, we show how spatial co-ordinates of markers in or on bone can be calculated from ...

  8. On the linear problem arising from motion of a fluid around a moving rigid body

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečasová, Šárka; Wolf, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 140, č. 2 (2015), s. 241-259 ISSN 0862-7959 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/11/1304 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : incompressible fluid * rotating rigid body * strong solution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://hdl.handle.net/10338.dmlcz/144329

  9. Lorentz contraction, Bell's spaceships and rigid body motion in special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, Jerrold

    2010-01-01

    The meaning of Lorentz contraction in special relativity and its connection with Bell's spaceships parable is discussed. The motion of Bell's spaceships is then compared with the accelerated motion of a rigid body. We have tried to write this in a simple form that could be used to correct students' misconceptions due to conflicting earlier treatments.

  10. Dynamic forces over the interface between a seated human body and a rigid seat during vertical whole-body vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chi; Qiu, Yi; Griffin, Michael J

    2017-08-16

    Biodynamic responses of the seated human body are usually measured and modelled assuming a single point of vibration excitation. With vertical vibration excitation, this study investigated how forces are distributed over the body-seat interface. Vertical and fore-and-aft forces were measured beneath the ischial tuberosities, middle thighs, and front thighs of 14 subjects sitting on a rigid flat seat in three postures with different thigh contact while exposed to random vertical vibration at three magnitudes. Measures of apparent mass were calculated from transfer functions between the vertical acceleration of the seat and the vertical or fore-and-aft forces measured at the three locations, and the sum of these forces. When sitting normally or sitting with a high footrest, vertical forces at the ischial tuberosities dominated the vertical apparent mass. With feet unsupported to give increased thigh contact, vertical forces at the front thighs were dominant around 8Hz. Around 3-7Hz, fore-and-aft forces at the middle thighs dominated the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass. Around 8-10Hz, fore-and-aft forces were dominant at the ischial tuberosities with feet supported but at the front thighs with feet unsupported. All apparent masses were nonlinear: as the vibration magnitude increased the resonance frequencies decreased. With feet unsupported, the nonlinearity in the apparent mass was greater at the front thighs than at the ischial tuberosities. It is concluded that when the thighs are supported on a seat it is not appropriate to assume the body has a single point of vibration excitation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A non-rigid registration method for mouse whole body skeleton registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Di; Zahra, David; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Berghofer, Paula; Acosta Tamayo, Oscar; Wimberley, Catriona; Gregoire, Marie Claude; Salvado, Olivier

    2010-03-01

    Micro-CT/PET imaging scanner provides a powerful tool to study tumor in small rodents in response to therapy. Accurate image registration is a necessary step to quantify the characteristics of images acquired in longitudinal studies. Small animal registration is challenging because of the very deformable body of the animal often resulting in different postures despite physical restraints. In this paper, we propose a non-rigid registration approach for the automatic registration of mouse whole body skeletons, which is based on our improved 3D shape context non-rigid registration method. The whole body skeleton registration approach has been tested on 21 pairs of mouse CT images with variations of individuals and time-instances. The experimental results demonstrated the stability and accuracy of the proposed method for automatic mouse whole body skeleton registration.

  12. Numerical algorithm for rigid body position estimation using the quaternion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigic, Miodrag; Grahovac, Nenad

    2017-11-01

    This paper deals with rigid body attitude estimation on the basis of the data obtained from an inertial measurement unit mounted on the body. The aim of this work is to present the numerical algorithm, which can be easily applied to the wide class of problems concerning rigid body positioning, arising in aerospace and marine engineering, or in increasingly popular robotic systems and unmanned aerial vehicles. Following the considerations of kinematics of rigid bodies, the relations between accelerations of different points of the body are given. A rotation matrix is formed using the quaternion approach to avoid singularities. We present numerical procedures for determination of the absolute accelerations of the center of mass and of an arbitrary point of the body expressed in the inertial reference frame, as well as its attitude. An application of the algorithm to the example of a heavy symmetrical gyroscope is presented, where input data for the numerical procedure are obtained from the solution of differential equations of motion, instead of using sensor measurements.

  13. Modeling of a light elastic beam by a system of rigid bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šalinić Slaviša

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has shown that a light elastic beam, in the case of small elastic deformations, can be modeled by a kinematic chain without branching composed of rigid bodies which are connected by passive revolute or prismatic joints with corresponding springs in them. Elastic properties of the beam are modeled by the springs introduced. The potential energy of the elastic beam is expressed as a function of components of the vector of elastic displacement and the vector of elastic rotation calculated for the elastic centre of the beam, which results in the diagonal stiffness matrix of the beam. As the potential energy of the introduced system of bodies with springs is expressed in the function of relative joint displacements, the diagonal stiffness matrix is obtained. In addition, these two stiffness matrices are equal. The modeling process has been demonstrated on the example of an elastic beam rotating about a fixed vertical axis, with a rigid body whose mass is considerably larger than the beam mass fixed to its free end. Differential equations of motion have been formed for this mechanical system. The modeling technique described here aims at expanding of usage of well developed methods of dynamics of systems of rigid bodies to the analysis of systems with elastic bodies. .

  14. Diffuse interface immersed boundary method for multi-fluid flows with arbitrarily moving rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jitendra Kumar; Natarajan, Ganesh

    2018-05-01

    We present an interpolation-free diffuse interface immersed boundary method for multiphase flows with moving bodies. A single fluid formalism using the volume-of-fluid approach is adopted to handle multiple immiscible fluids which are distinguished using the volume fractions, while the rigid bodies are tracked using an analogous volume-of-solid approach that solves for the solid fractions. The solution to the fluid flow equations are carried out using a finite volume-immersed boundary method, with the latter based on a diffuse interface philosophy. In the present work, we assume that the solids are filled with a "virtual" fluid with density and viscosity equal to the largest among all fluids in the domain. The solids are assumed to be rigid and their motion is solved using Newton's second law of motion. The immersed boundary methodology constructs a modified momentum equation that reduces to the Navier-Stokes equations in the fully fluid region and recovers the no-slip boundary condition inside the solids. An implicit incremental fractional-step methodology in conjunction with a novel hybrid staggered/non-staggered approach is employed, wherein a single equation for normal momentum at the cell faces is solved everywhere in the domain, independent of the number of spatial dimensions. The scalars are all solved for at the cell centres, with the transport equations for solid and fluid volume fractions solved using a high-resolution scheme. The pressure is determined everywhere in the domain (including inside the solids) using a variable coefficient Poisson equation. The solution to momentum, pressure, solid and fluid volume fraction equations everywhere in the domain circumvents the issue of pressure and velocity interpolation, which is a source of spurious oscillations in sharp interface immersed boundary methods. A well-balanced algorithm with consistent mass/momentum transport ensures robust simulations of high density ratio flows with strong body forces. The

  15. Modelling of transport and collisions between rigid bodies to simulate the jam formation in urban flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Hadji

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the simulation of transport and interaction betweenbodies considered as a rectangular shape particles, in urban flow. We usedan hydrodynamic two-dimensional finite elements model coupled to theparticles model based on Maxey-Riley equations, and taking into accountof contact between bodies. The finite element discretization is based onthe velocity field richer than pressure field, and the particles displacementsare computed by using a rigid body motion method. A collision strategy isalso developed to handle cases in which bodies touch.

  16. Efficient time-symmetric simulation of torqued rigid bodies using Jacobi elliptic functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celledoni, E; Saefstroem, N

    2006-01-01

    If the three moments of inertia are distinct, the solution to the Euler equations for the free rigid body is given in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. Using the arithmetic-geometric mean algorithm (Abramowitz and Stegun 1992 Handbook of Mathematical Functions with Formulas, Graphs, and Mathematical Tables (New York: Dover)), these functions can be calculated efficiently and accurately. Compared to standard numerical ODE and Lie-Poisson solvers, the overall approach yields a faster and more accurate numerical solution to the Euler equations. This approach is designed for mass asymmetric rigid bodies. In the case of symmetric bodies, the exact solution is available in terms of trigonometric functions, see Dullweber et al (1997 J. Chem. Phys. 107 5840-51), Reich (1996 Fields Inst. Commun. 10 181-91) and Benettin et al (2001 SIAM J. Sci. Comp. 23 1189-203) for details. In this paper, we consider the case of asymmetric rigid bodies subject to external forces. We consider a strategy similar to the symplectic splitting method proposed in Reich (1996 Fields Inst. Commun. 10 181-91) and Dullweber et al (1997 J. Chem. Phys. 107 5840-51). The method proposed here is time-symmetric. We decompose the vector field of our problem into a free rigid body (FRB) problem and another completely integrable vector field. The FRB problem consists of the Euler equations and a differential equation for the 3 x 3 orientation matrix. The Euler equations are integrated exactly while the matrix equation is approximated using a truncated Magnus series. In our experiments, we observe that the overall numerical solution benefits greatly from the very accurate solution of the Euler equations. We apply the method to the heavy top and the simulation of artificial satellite attitude dynamics

  17. A stable partitioned FSI algorithm for rigid bodies and incompressible flow. Part I: Model problem analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, J. W.; Henshaw, W. D.; Schwendeman, D. W.; Tang, Qi

    2017-08-01

    A stable partitioned algorithm is developed for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems involving viscous incompressible flow and rigid bodies. This added-mass partitioned (AMP) algorithm remains stable, without sub-iterations, for light and even zero mass rigid bodies when added-mass and viscous added-damping effects are large. The scheme is based on a generalized Robin interface condition for the fluid pressure that includes terms involving the linear acceleration and angular acceleration of the rigid body. Added-mass effects are handled in the Robin condition by inclusion of a boundary integral term that depends on the pressure. Added-damping effects due to the viscous shear forces on the body are treated by inclusion of added-damping tensors that are derived through a linearization of the integrals defining the force and torque. Added-damping effects may be important at low Reynolds number, or, for example, in the case of a rotating cylinder or rotating sphere when the rotational moments of inertia are small. In this first part of a two-part series, the properties of the AMP scheme are motivated and evaluated through the development and analysis of some model problems. The analysis shows when and why the traditional partitioned scheme becomes unstable due to either added-mass or added-damping effects. The analysis also identifies the proper form of the added-damping which depends on the discrete time-step and the grid-spacing normal to the rigid body. The results of the analysis are confirmed with numerical simulations that also demonstrate a second-order accurate implementation of the AMP scheme.

  18. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Könik, Arda; Johnson, Karen L; Dasari, Paul; Pretorius, P H; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A; Connolly, Caitlin M; Segars, Paul W; Lindsay, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  19. New integrable problems in a rigid body dynamics with cubic integral in velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmandouh, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    We introduce a new family of the 2D integrable mechanical system possessing an additional integral of the third degree in velocities. This system contains 20 arbitrary parameters. We also clarify that the majority of the previous systems with a cubic integral can be reconstructed from it as a special version for certain values of those parameters. The applications of this system are extended to include the problem of motion of a particle and rigid body about its fixed point. We announce new integrable problems describing the motion of a particle in the plane, pseudosphere, and surfaces of variable curvature. We also present a new integrable problem in a rigid body dynamics and this problem generalizes some of the previous results for Sokolov-Tsiganov, Yehia, Stretensky, and Goriachev.

  20. Research on Rigid Body Motion Tracing in Space based on NX MCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjie; Dai, Chunxiang; Shi, Karen; Qin, Rongkang

    2018-03-01

    In the use of MCD (Mechatronics Concept Designer) which is a module belong to SIEMENS Ltd industrial design software UG (Unigraphics NX), user can define rigid body and kinematic joint to make objects move according to the existing plan in simulation. At this stage, user may have the desire to see the path of some points in the moving object intuitively. In response to this requirement, this paper will compute the pose through the transformation matrix which can be available from the solver engine, and then fit these sampling points through B-spline curve. Meanwhile, combined with the actual constraints of rigid bodies, the traditional equal interval sampling strategy was optimized. The result shown that this method could satisfy the demand and make up for the deficiency in traditional sampling method. User can still edit and model on this 3D curve. Expected result has been achieved.

  1. Rigid Body Modes Influence On Microvibration Analysis-Application To Swarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laduree, G.; Fransen, S.; Baldesi, G.; Pflieger, I.

    2012-07-01

    Microvibrations are defined as low level mechanical disturbances affecting payload performance, generated by mobile parts or mechanism operating on-board the spacecraft, like momentum or reaction wheels, pointing mechanism, cryo-coolers or thrusters. The disturbances caused by these sources are transmitted through the spacecraft structure and excite modes of that structure or elements of the payload impacting its performance (e.g. Line of sight rotations inducing some image quality degradation). The dynamic interaction between these three elements (noise source, spacecraft structure and sensitive receiver) makes the microvibration prediction a delicate problem. Microvibration sources are generally of concern in the frequency range from a few Hz to 1000 Hz. However, in some specific cases, high stability at lower frequencies might be requested. This is the case of the SWARM mission, whose objectives are to provide the best ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution as well as supplementary information for studying the interaction of the magnetic field with other physical quantities describing the Earth system (e.g. ocean circulation). Among its instruments, SWARM is embarking a very sensitive 6-axis accelerometer in the low frequency range (10-8 m/s2 or rad/s2 between 10-4 and 0.1 Hz) located at its Centre of Gravity and an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer located at the tip of a boom far from the spacecraft body. The ASM performs its measurements by rotating an alternative magnetic field around its main axis thanks to a piezo-electric motor. This repeated disturbance might generate some pollution of the accelerometer science data. The objective of this work is to focus on the interaction of the rigid body mode calculation method with the elastic contribution of the normal modes excited by the noise source frequency content. It has indeed been reported in the past that NASTRAN Lanczos rigid body modes may lead to inaccurate rigid-body accelerations

  2. Stability Analysis of a Rigid Body with a Flexible Attachment Using the Energy-Casimir Method

    OpenAIRE

    Posbergh, T. A.; Krishnaprasad, Perinkulam S.; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    1987-01-01

    We consider a system consisting of a rigid body to which a linear extensible shear beam is attached. For such a system the Energy-Casimir method can be used to investigate the stability of the equilibria. In the case we consider, it can be shown that a test for (formal) stability reduces to checking the positive definiteness of two matrices which depend on the parameters of the system and the particular equilibrium about which the stability is to be ascertained.

  3. Formulation and Simulations of the Conserving Algorithm for Feedback Stabilization on Rigid Body Rotations

    OpenAIRE

    Yong-Ren Pu; Thomas A. Posbergh

    2014-01-01

    The problem of stabilization of rigid bodies has received a great deal of attention for many years. People have developed a variety of feedback control laws to meet their design requirements and have formulated various but mostly open loop numerical algorithms for the dynamics of the corresponding closed loop systems. Since the conserved quantities such as energy, momentum, and symmetry play an important role in the dynamics, we investigate the conserved quantities for the closed loop control...

  4. Stability of coupled rigid body and geometrically exact rods, block diagonalization and the energy, momentum method

    OpenAIRE

    Simo, J. C.; Posbergh, T. A.; Marsden, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper develops and applies the energy-momentum method to the problem of nonlinear stability of relative equilibria. The method is applied in detail to the stability analysis of uniformly rotating states of geometrically exact rod models, and a rigid body with an attached flexible appendage. Here, the flexible appendage is modeled as a geometrically exact rod capable of accommodating arbitrarily large deformations in three dimensions; including extension, shear, flexure and twist. The mod...

  5. Estimation of the ground shaking from the response of rigid bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena de Silva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper illustrates and compares simplified approaches to interpret the mechanisms of damage observed on rigid bodies in the cemetery of Amatrice, after the main shock (August 24, 2016, MW=6.0 of the Central Italy earthquake. The final goal of the work is to link the observed movements of the fallen objects to specific characteristics of the ground motion occurred at the specific site.

  6. Rigid-body displacement perpendicular to a {211} twin boundary in Mo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gemperlová, Juliana; Vystavěl, Tomáš; Gemperle, Antonín; Pénisson, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 11 (2001), s. 1767-1778 ISSN 0141-8637 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010916; GA ČR GA202/99/1665 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : sigma=3 Mo bicrystal * rigid-body displacement * alfa- fringe method Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.238, year: 2001

  7. The motion of the rigid body in viscous fluid including collisions. Global solvability result

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chemetov, N.; Nečasová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 34, April (2017), s. 416-445 ISSN 1468-1218 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-03230S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : rigid body * global weak solution * collisions in finite time Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.659, year: 2016 http://www. sciencedirect .com/science/article/pii/S1468121816301146

  8. The motion of the rigid body in viscous fluid including collisions. Global solvability result

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chemetov, N.; Nečasová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 34, April (2017), s. 416-445 ISSN 1468-1218 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-03230S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : rigid body * global weak solution * collisions in finite time Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.659, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1468121816301146

  9. Explaining rigid dieting in normal-weight women: The key role of body image inflexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, C.; Trindade, Inês A.; Martinho, A.

    2016-01-01

    Ferreira, C., Trindade, I.A., & Martinho, A. (2016). Explaining rigid dieting in normal-weight women: the key role of body image inflexibility. Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity, 21(1), 49–56. doi: 10.1007/s40519-015-0188-x. Restrictive dieting is an increasing behavior presented by women in Western societies, independently of their weight. There are several known factors that motivate diet, namely a sense of dissatisfaction with one’s body and unfavora...

  10. On Classical Dynamics of Affinely-Rigid Bodies Subject to the Kirchhoff-Love Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl Kovalchuk

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article we consider the affinely-rigid body moving in the three-dimensional physical space and subject to the Kirchhoff-Love constraints, i.e., while it deforms homogeneously in the two-dimensional central plane of the body it simultaneously performs one-dimensional oscillations orthogonal to this central plane. For the polar decomposition we obtain the stationary ellipsoids as special solutions of the general, strongly nonlinear equations of motion. It is also shown that these solutions are conceptually different from those obtained earlier for the two-polar (singular value decomposition.

  11. A Hele-Shaw study of brachistochrones in potential flow past rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Ashwin; Camassa, Roberto; McLaughlin, Richard; Moore, Mathew; Spronk, Derrek; Skewrer, David; Skewrer, Sean

    2008-11-01

    The potential flow of an unbounded, viscous, incompressible fluid past a rigid body in two and three dimensions has been theoretically shown to possess a brachistochrone path which is absent in the case of Stokes flow past the same object. In this talk, we present some experimental verification of the brachistochrone by means of a Hele-Shaw experiment which simulates the two dimensional potential flow past an obstacle in the presence of walls. The experiments are also compared with some numerical studies comparing Stokes and potential flow past symmetric bodies in bounded and undounded domains.

  12. On the dynamical symmetry points and the orientations of the principal axes of inertia of a rigid body

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amel'kin, N. I.

    For an arbitrary rigid body, all dynamical symmetry points are found, and the directions of the axes of dynamical symmetry are determined for these points. We obtain conditions on the principal central moments of inertia under which the Lagrange and Kovalevskaya cases can be realized for the rigid

  13. A stable partitioned FSI algorithm for rigid bodies and incompressible flow. Part II: General formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, J. W.; Henshaw, W. D.; Schwendeman, D. W.; Tang, Qi

    2017-08-01

    A stable partitioned algorithm is developed for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems involving viscous incompressible flow and rigid bodies. This added-mass partitioned (AMP) algorithm remains stable, without sub-iterations, for light and even zero mass rigid bodies when added-mass and viscous added-damping effects are large. The scheme is based on a generalized Robin interface condition for the fluid pressure that includes terms involving the linear acceleration and angular acceleration of the rigid body. Added mass effects are handled in the Robin condition by inclusion of a boundary integral term that depends on the pressure. Added-damping effects due to the viscous shear forces on the body are treated by inclusion of added-damping tensors that are derived through a linearization of the integrals defining the force and torque. Added-damping effects may be important at low Reynolds number, or, for example, in the case of a rotating cylinder or rotating sphere when the rotational moments of inertia are small. In this second part of a two-part series, the general formulation of the AMP scheme is presented including the form of the AMP interface conditions and added-damping tensors for general geometries. A fully second-order accurate implementation of the AMP scheme is developed in two dimensions based on a fractional-step method for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using finite difference methods and overlapping grids to handle the moving geometry. The numerical scheme is verified on a number of difficult benchmark problems.

  14. Diagnostic-Photographic Determination of Drag/Lift/Torque Coefficients of High Speed Rigid Body in Water Column

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chu, Peter C; Fan, Chenwu; Gefken, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of rigid body falling through water column with a high speed (such as Mk-84 bomb) needs formulas for drag/lift and torque coefficients, which depend on various physical processes such as supercavitation and bubbles...

  15. Camera based monitoring of the rigid body displacement of a mandrel in superconducting cable production

    CERN Document Server

    Hack, E

    2005-01-01

    We describe a machine vision measurement head that is used to monitor the mandrel in cable production. Two cameras are orthogonally aligned, viewing different sections of the cylindric mandrel surface. The use of telecentric lenses obviates the need for re-calibration after changing the mandrel. All parameters of rigid body motion are obtained in linear theory by using a multi-variate least squares fit procedure on dynamically corresponded sets of target points that vary due to obstruction by rotating wires. A rigorous analysis of measurement uncertainty is given.

  16. A Compliant Bistable Mechanism Design Incorporating Elastica Buckling Beam Theory and Pseudo-Rigid-Body Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sönmez, Ümit; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a new compliant bistable mechanism design is introduced. The combined use of pseudo-rigid-body model (PRBM) and the Elastica buckling theory is presented for the first time to analyze the new design. This mechanism consists of the large deflecting straight beams, buckling beams......, and a slider. The kinematic analysis of this new mechanism is studied, using nonlinear Elastica buckling beam theory, the PRBM of a large deflecting cantilever beam, the vector loop closure equations, and numerically solving nonlinear algebraic equations. A design method of the bistable mechanism...

  17. Coupling characteristics of rigid body motion and elastic deformation of a 3-PRR parallel manipulator with flexible links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xuping; Mills, James K.; Cleghorn, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Modeling of multibody dynamics with flexible links is a challenging task, which not only involves the effect of rigid body motion on elastic deformations, but also includes the influence of elastic deformations on rigid body motion. This paper presents coupling characteristics of rigid body motions and elastic motions of a 3-PRR parallel manipulator with three flexible intermediate links. The intermediate links are modeled as Euler-Bernoulli beams with pinned-pinned boundary conditions based on the assumed mode method (AMM). Using Lagrange multipliers, the fully coupled equations of motions of the flexible parallel manipulator are developed by incorporating the rigid body motions with elastic motions. The mutual dependence of elastic deformations and rigid body motions are investigated from the analysis of the derived equations of motion. Open-loop simulation without joint motion controls and closed-loop simulation with joint motion controls are performed to illustrate the effect of elastic motion on rigid body motions and the coupling effect amongst flexible links. These analyses and results provide valuable insight to the design and control of the parallel manipulator with flexible intermediate links

  18. Simulating Dynamics of the System of Articulated Rigid Bodies with Joint Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Michaylyuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the work is to simulate dynamics of the system of articulated rigid bodies in the virtual environment complexes. The work aim is to develop algorithms and methods to simulate the multi-body system dynamics with joint friction to ensure all calculations in real time in line with visual realistic behavior of objects in a scene.The paper describes the multibody system based on a maximal set of coordinates, and to simulate the joint friction is used a Coulomb's law of dry friction. Joints are described using the holonomic constraints and their derivatives that specify the constraints on velocities of joined bodies. Based on The Coulomb’s law a correlation for the friction impulse values has been derived as an inequality. If the friction impulse performs a constraint that is a lack of relative motion of two joint-joined bodies, there is a static friction in the joint. Otherwise, there is a dynamic friction in the joint. Using a semi-implicit Euler method allows us to describe dynamics of articulated rigid bodies with joint friction as a system of linear algebraic equations and inequalities for the unknown velocities and impulse values.To solve the obtained system of equations and inequalities is used an iterative method of sequential impulses, which sequentially processes constraints for each joint with impulse calculation and its application to the joined bodies rather than considers the entire system. To improve the method convergence, at each iteration the calculated impulses are accumulated for their further using as an initial approximation at the next step of simulation.The proposed algorithms and methods have been implemented in the training complex dynamics subsystem, developed in SRISA RAS. Evaluation of these methods and algorithms has demonstrated their full adequacy to requirements for virtual environment systems and training complexes.

  19. Interactive effects between flexible and rigid control of eating behavior on body weight: a moderated serial multiple mediation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Meule

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Cognitive restraint of eating can be subdivided into rigid control and flexible control of eating behavior. Flexible control appears to be a more favorable dieting strategy as it relates to lower disinhibited eating and body mass index (BMI, while the opposite is found for rigid control. Yet, previous findings also suggest interactive effects between the two such that rigid control is particularly related to higher BMI when flexible control is low. Participants and procedure Data from a previously reported study (Meule, Westenhöfer, & Kübler, 2011 were reanalyzed to examine such interactive effects (N = 615, 76% female. Results Higher rigid control was particularly associated with more frequent and intense food cravings, lower perceived self-regulatory success in weight regulation, and higher BMI at low levels of flexible control. A moderated serial multiple mediation model revealed that rigid control had an indirect effect on BMI through food cravings and perceived self-regulatory success, particularly when flexible control was low. These interactive effects could largely be replicated in a second study with female participants (n = 70. Conclusions The current findings replicate and extend previous reports in that high flexible control may “compensate” for high rigid control, that is, attenuate the effect of rigid control on eating behaviors and body weight. They also provide insights into the mediating mechanisms that link rigid and flexible control of eating behavior with BMI.

  20. Rigid Body Inertia Estimation Using Extended Kalman and Savitzky-Golay Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghoon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inertia properties of rigid body such as ground, aerial, and space vehicles may be changed by several occasions, and this variation of the properties influences the control accuracy of the rigid body. For this reason, accurate inertia properties need to be obtained for precise control. An estimation process is required for both noisy gyro measurements and the time derivative of the gyro measurements. In this paper, an estimation method is proposed for having reliable estimates of inertia properties. First, the Euler equations of motion are reformulated to obtain a regressor matrix. Next, the extended Kalman filter is adopted to reduce the noise effects in gyro angular velocity measurements. Last, the inertia properties are estimated using linear least squares. To achieve reliable and accurate angular accelerations, a Savitzky-Golay filter based on an even number sampled data is utilized. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm for the case of a space vehicle. The numerical simulation results show that the proposed algorithm provides accurate inertia property estimates in the presence of noisy measurements.

  1. Stability of Stationary Viscous Incompressible Flow Around a Rigid Body Performing a Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuring, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Suppose a rigid body moves steadily and without rotation in a viscous incompressible fluid, and the flow around the body is steady, too. Such a flow is usually described by the stationary Navier-Stokes system with Oseen term, in an exterior domain. An Oseen term arises because the velocity field is scaled in such a way that it vanishes at infinity. In the work at hand, such a velocity field, denoted by U, is considered as given. We study a solution of the incompressible evolutionary Navier-Stokes system with the same right-hand side and the same Dirichlet boundary conditions as the stationary problem, and with U+u_0 as initial data, where u_0 is a H^1 -function. Under the assumption that the H^1 -norm of u_0 is small (u_0 a "perturbation of U") and that the eigenvalues of a certain linear operator have negative real part, we show that \\Vert \

  2. Dynamic Non-Rigid Objects Reconstruction with a Single RGB-D Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the 3D reconstruction problem for dynamic non-rigid objects with a single RGB-D sensor. It is a challenging task as we consider the almost inevitable accumulation error issue in some previous sequential fusion methods and also the possible failure of surface tracking in a long sequence. Therefore, we propose a global non-rigid registration framework and tackle the drifting problem via an explicit loop closure. Our novel scheme starts with a fusion step to get multiple partial scans from the input sequence, followed by a pairwise non-rigid registration and loop detection step to obtain correspondences between neighboring partial pieces and those pieces that form a loop. Then, we perform a global registration procedure to align all those pieces together into a consistent canonical space as guided by those matches that we have established. Finally, our proposed model-update step helps fixing potential misalignments that still exist after the global registration. Both geometric and appearance constraints are enforced during our alignment; therefore, we are able to get the recovered model with accurate geometry as well as high fidelity color maps for the mesh. Experiments on both synthetic and various real datasets have demonstrated the capability of our approach to reconstruct complete and watertight deformable objects.

  3. Constrained non-rigid registration for whole body image registration: method and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Peterson, Todd E.; Gore, John C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2007-03-01

    3D intra- and inter-subject registration of image volumes is important for tasks that include measurements and quantification of temporal/longitudinal changes, atlas-based segmentation, deriving population averages, or voxel and tensor-based morphometry. A number of methods have been proposed to tackle this problem but few of them have focused on the problem of registering whole body image volumes acquired either from humans or small animals. These image volumes typically contain a large number of articulated structures, which makes registration more difficult than the registration of head images, to which the vast majority of registration algorithms have been applied. To solve this problem, we have previously proposed an approach, which initializes an intensity-based non-rigid registration algorithm with a point based registration technique [1, 2]. In this paper, we introduce new constraints into our non-rigid registration algorithm to prevent the bones from being deformed inaccurately. Results we have obtained show that the new constrained algorithm leads to better registration results than the previous one.

  4. Dynamic Analysis of a Rigid Body Mounting System with Flexible Foundation Subject to Fluid Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S. Tao

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation of the force transmission from a rigid body mounting system to a flexible foundation with light and heavy fluid loading under the force and moment excitation. The analytical expression has been derived in which the flexible foundation effects are incorporated into a revised system stiffness matrix that is derived from the receptance matrix at mounting points. A typical case with a thin infinite plate as the foundation has been studied with the point and transfer receptances theoretically and numerically analysed in the case of light and heavy fluid loading. The results show that, compared with the rigid foundation, the force transmission is reduced and system natural frequencies are shifted. The detailed analysis demonstrates that the force reduction and frequency shifting are more obvious at low frequencies where the receptance value is significant. The study is also carried out to compare the transfer receptances from different waves in plate as it couples with water with the objective to simplify the calculation of receptance. It is found that, in the low frequency and after a short distance from driving point, the transfer receptance calculation for the heavy fluid loading can be simplified by only accounting the contribution from free wave which may easily be evaluated from the point receptance in air. It implies the plate response under heavy fluid loading could be directly derived from that with light fluid loading.

  5. On the rotational equations of motion in rigid body dynamics when using Euler parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Karim; Nachbagauer, Karin; Steiner, Wolfgang

    Many models of three-dimensional rigid body dynamics employ Euler parameters as rotational coordinates. Since the four Euler parameters are not independent, one has to consider the quaternion constraint in the equations of motion. This is usually done by the Lagrange multiplier technique. In the present paper, various forms of the rotational equations of motion will be derived, and it will be shown that they can be transformed into each other. Special attention is hereby given to the value of the Lagrange multiplier and the complexity of terms representing the inertia forces. Particular attention is also paid to the rotational generalized external force vector, which is not unique when using Euler parameters as rotational coordinates.

  6. Higher order coupling between rigid-body and elastic motion in flexible mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esat, I.I.; Ianakiev, A.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an investigation of the influence of the higher order coupling terms between the rigid-body and elastic motion into flexible mechanism dynamics. The configuration of the mechanical system is obtained by using the so called hybrid coordinates. The kinematic description of the mechanism was obtained using the D-H 4 x 4 transformation matrices. The elastic deformation of each point of the mechanism is described by the finite element modeling (FEM) type interpolation scheme. The dynamic model of the flexible mechanism consists due to the hybrid coordinates of two groups of differential equations. The first group describes the manipulator transport motion and the second group describes the vibration. In this paper the authors evaluated the contribution of the coupling terms between the two groups of differential equations and selected only those with high contribution

  7. On some approximations of the resultant contact forces and their applications in rigid body dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudra, Grzegorz; Szewc, Michał; Wojtunik, Igor; Awrejcewicz, Jan

    2016-10-01

    The work presents the possible applications and effectiveness of certain class of models of the resultant friction force and rolling resistance. The friction models are based on the integral model constructed under assumption of fully developed sliding on the plane contact area of general shape and any pressure distribution. Then the integral model of friction force and moment are approximated based on Padé approximants and their generalizations. These models are expected to be computationally effective in numerical simulations of rigid bodies with frictional contacts, such like billiard balls, Thompson top, the wobble stone and many others. In the present work two different examples of application of the developed contact models are presented and tested: a) a billiard ball rolling and sliding on the plane horizontal table; b) a full ellipsoid of revolution in contact with plane and horizontal base.

  8. Rigid-body-spring model numerical analysis of joint performance of engineered cementitious composites and concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmurovska, Y.; Štemberk, P.; Křístek, V.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of effectiveness of using engineered cementitious composites with polyvinyl alcohol fibers for concrete cover layer repair. A numerical model of a monolithic concaved L-shaped concrete structural detail which is strengthened with an engineered cementitious composite layer with polyvinyl alcohol fibers is created and loaded with bending moment. The numerical analysis employs nonlinear 3-D Rigid-Body-Spring Model. The proposed material model shows reliable results and can be used in further studies. The engineered cementitious composite shows extremely good performance in tension due to the strain-hardening effect. Since durability of the bond can be decreased significantly by its degradation due to the thermal loading, this effect should be also taken into account in the future work, as well as the experimental investigation, which should be performed for validation of the proposed numerical model.

  9. Nonsmooth Newton method for Fischer function reformulation of contact force problems for interactive rigid body simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silcowitz, Morten; Niebe, Sarah Maria; Erleben, Kenny

    2009-01-01

    contact response. In this paper, we present a new approach to contact force determination. We reformulate the contact force problem as a nonlinear root search problem, using a Fischer function. We solve this problem using a generalized Newton method. Our new Fischer - Newton method shows improved......n interactive physical simulation, contact forces are applied to prevent rigid bodies from penetrating each other. Accurate contact force determination is a computationally hard problem. Thus, in practice one trades accuracy for performance. The result is visual artifacts such as viscous or damped...... qualities for specific configurations where the most widespread alternative, the Projected Gauss-Seidel method, fails. Experiments show superior convergence properties of the exact Fischer - Newton method....

  10. Free Energy Landscapes of Alanine Oligopeptides in Rigid-Body and Hybrid Water Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Divya; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2015-08-27

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics is used to study the effect of different rigid-body (mTIP3P, TIP4P, SPC/E) and hybrid (H1.56, H3.00) water models on the conformational free energy landscape of the alanine oligopeptides (acAnme and acA5nme), in conjunction with the CHARMM22 force field. The free energy landscape is mapped out as a function of the Ramachandran angles. In addition, various secondary structure metrics, solvation shell properties, and the number of peptide-solvent hydrogen bonds are monitored. Alanine dipeptide is found to have similar free energy landscapes in different solvent models, an insensitivity which may be due to the absence of possibilities for forming i-(i + 4) or i-(i + 3) intrapeptide hydrogen bonds. The pentapeptide, acA5nme, where there are three intrapeptide backbone hydrogen bonds, shows a conformational free energy landscape with a much greater degree of sensitivity to the choice of solvent model, though the three rigid-body water models differ only quantitatively. The pentapeptide prefers nonhelical, non-native PPII and β-sheet populations as the solvent is changed from SPC/E to the less tetrahedral liquid (H1.56) to an LJ-like liquid (H3.00). The pentapeptide conformational order metrics indicate a preference for open, solvent-exposed, non-native structures in hybrid solvent models at all temperatures of study. The possible correlations between the properties of solvent models and secondary structure preferences of alanine oligopeptides are discussed, and the competition between intrapeptide, peptide-solvent, and solvent-solvent hydrogen bonding is shown to be crucial in the relative free energies of different conformers.

  11. On docking, scoring and assessing protein-DNA complexes in a rigid-body framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Parisien

    Full Text Available We consider the identification of interacting protein-nucleic acid partners using the rigid body docking method FTdock, which is systematic and exhaustive in the exploration of docking conformations. The accuracy of rigid body docking methods is tested using known protein-DNA complexes for which the docked and undocked structures are both available. Additional tests with large decoy sets probe the efficacy of two published statistically derived scoring functions that contain a huge number of parameters. In contrast, we demonstrate that state-of-the-art machine learning techniques can enormously reduce the number of parameters required, thereby identifying the relevant docking features using a miniscule fraction of the number of parameters in the prior works. The present machine learning study considers a 300 dimensional vector (dependent on only 15 parameters, termed the Chemical Context Profile (CCP, where each dimension reflects a specific type of protein amino acid-nucleic acid base interaction. The CCP is designed to capture the chemical complementarities of the interface and is well suited for machine learning techniques. Our objective function is the Chemical Context Discrepancy (CCD, which is defined as the angle between the native system's CCP vector and the decoy's vector and which serves as a substitute for the more commonly used root mean squared deviation (RMSD. We demonstrate that the CCP provides a useful scoring function when certain dimensions are properly weighted. Finally, we explore how the amino acids on a protein's surface can help guide DNA binding, first through long-range interactions, followed by direct contacts, according to specific preferences for either the major or minor grooves of the DNA.

  12. Dynamic Human Body Modeling Using a Single RGB Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiyu; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we present a novel automatic pipeline to build personalized parametric models of dynamic people using a single RGB camera. Compared to previous approaches that use monocular RGB images, our system can model a 3D human body automatically and incrementally, taking advantage of human motion. Based on coarse 2D and 3D poses estimated from image sequences, we first perform a kinematic classification of human body parts to refine the poses and obtain reconstructed body parts. Next, a personalized parametric human model is generated by driving a general template to fit the body parts and calculating the non-rigid deformation. Experimental results show that our shape estimation method achieves comparable accuracy with reconstructed models using depth cameras, yet requires neither user interaction nor any dedicated devices, leading to the feasibility of using this method on widely available smart phones.

  13. Rigid motion correction of dual opposed planar projections in single photon imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, G. I.; Ryder, W. J.; Gillam, J. E.; Boisson, F.; Kyme, A. Z.; Fulton, R. R.; Meikle, S. R.; Kench, P. L.

    2017-05-01

    Awake and/or freely moving small animal single photon emission imaging allows the continuous study of molecules exhibiting slow kinetics without the need to restrain or anaesthetise the animals. Estimating motion free projections in freely moving small animal planar imaging can be considered as a limited angle tomography problem, except that we wish to estimate the 2D planar projections rather than the 3D volume, where the angular sampling in all three axes depends on the rotational motion of the animal. In this study, we hypothesise that the motion corrected planar projections estimated by reconstructing an estimate of the 3D volume using an iterative motion compensating reconstruction algorithm and integrating it along the projection path, will closely match the true, motion-less, planar distribution regardless of the object motion. We tested this hypothesis for the case of rigid motion using Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental phantom data based on a dual opposed detector system, where object motion was modelled with 6 degrees of freedom. In addition, we investigated the quantitative accuracy of the regional activity extracted from the geometric mean of opposing motion corrected planar projections. Results showed that it is feasible to estimate qualitatively accurate motion-corrected projections for a wide range of motions around all 3 axes. Errors in the geometric mean estimates of regional activity were relatively small and within 10% of expected true values. In addition, quantitative regional errors were dependent on the observed motion, as well as on the surrounding activity of overlapping organs. We conclude that both qualitatively and quantitatively accurate motion-free projections of the tracer distribution in a rigidly moving object can be estimated from dual opposed detectors using a correction approach within an iterative reconstruction framework and we expect this approach can be extended to the case of non-rigid motion.

  14. Influence of Rigid Body Motions on Rotor Induced Velocities and Aerodynamic Loads of a Floating Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vaal, Jacobus B.; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Moan, Torgeir

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence of rigid body motions on rotor induced velocities and aerodynamic loads of a floating horizontal axis wind turbine. Analyses are performed with a simplified free wake vortex model specifically aimed at capturing the unsteady and non-uniform inflow typically......, and captures the essential influences of rigid body motions on the rotor loads, induced velocities and wake influence....... experienced by a floating wind turbine. After discussing the simplified model in detail, comparisons are made to a state of the art free wake vortex code, using test cases with prescribed platform motion. It is found that the simplified model compares favourably with a more advanced numerical model...

  15. Development of Swimming Human Simulation Model Considering Rigid Body Dynamics and Unsteady Fluid Force for Whole Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Motomu; Satou, Ken; Miura, Yasufumi

    The purpose of this study is to develop a swimming human simulation model considering rigid body dynamics and unsteady fluid force for the whole body, which will be utilized to analyze various dynamical problems in human swimming. First, the modeling methods and their formulations for the human body and the fluid force are respectively described. Second, experiments to identify the coefficients of the normal drag and the added mass are conducted by use of an experimental setup, in which a limb model rotates in the water, and its rotating angle and the bending moment at the root are measured. As the result of the identification, the present model for the fluid force was found to have satisfactory performance in order to represent the unsteady fluctuations of the experimental data, although it has 10% error. Third, a simulation for the gliding position is conducted in order to identify the tangential drag coefficient. Finally, a simulation example of standard six beat front crawl swimming is shown. The swimming speed of the simulation became a reasonable value, indicating the validity of the present simulation model, although it is 7.5% lower than the actual swimming.

  16. iCub Whole-body Control through Force Regulation on Rigid Noncoplanar Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eNori

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper details the implementation on the humanoid robot iCub of state-of-the-art algorithms for whole-body control. We regulate the forces between the robot and its surrounding environment to stabilize a desired robot posture. We assume that the forces and torques are exerted on rigid contacts. The validity of this assumption is guaranteed by constraining the contact forces and torques, e.g. the contact forces must belong to the associated friction cones. The implementation of this control strategy requires to estimate the external forces acting on the robot, and the internal joint torques. We then detail algorithms to obtain these estimations when using a robot with an iCub-like sensor set, i.e. distributed six-axis force-torque sensors and whole-body tactile sensors. A general theory for identifying the robot inertial parameters is also presented. From an actuation standpoint, we show how to implement a joint torque control in the case of DC brushless motors. In addition, the coupling mechanism of the iCub torso is investigated. The soundness of the entire control architecture is validated in a real scenario involving the robot iCub balancing and making contacts at both arms.

  17. On the motion of rigid bodies in an incompressible or compressible viscous fluid under the action of gravitational forces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ducomet, B.; Nečasová, Šárka

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 5 (2013), s. 1193-1213 ISSN 1937-1632 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/11/1304 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : motion of rigid bodies * incompressible fluid * compressible fluid Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics https://www.aimsciences.org/journals/displayArticlesnew.jsp?paperID=8331

  18. On the motion of several rigid bodies in an incompressible non-Newtonian and heat-conducting fluid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečasová, Šárka

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, - (2009), s. 325-352 ISSN 0430-3202 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Non-Newtonian fluid * heat conductivity * several rigid bodies * global weak solutions * no collisions in finite time Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  19. Analysis of nonlinear dynamics of a cantilever beam-rigid-body MEMS gyroscope using a continuation method

    OpenAIRE

    Lajimi, Seyed Amir Mousavi

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a microbeam-rigid body gyroscope are investigated by using a continuation method. To study the nonlinear dynamics of the system, the Lagrangian of the system is discretized and the reduced-order model is obtained. By using the continuation method, the frequency-response curves are computed and the stability of response is determined.

  20. Case report: Inhaled foreign body mismanaged as TB, finally removed using a rigid bronchoscopy after 6 years of impaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Rubena Lumaya

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body aspiration is an important cause of mortality in children aged less than three years. Foreign body (FB inhalation can pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, especially in longstanding cases and complications such as recurrent pneumonia, lung collapse and lung abscess may develop. We report a case of an 11-year old boy with foreign body impacted in his bronchus for six years, which was mistakenly managed as pulmonary tuberculosis. Radiological evidence confirmed the diagnosis and a rigid bronchoscopy was used to remove the metallic foreign body. The standard of care for the management of a FB in a bronchus is a rigid bronchoscopy; however flexible bronchoscopy can be used, especially in adults. A thorough history with radiological evidence are essential and sometimes, followed by a diagnostic bronchoscopy.

  1. A navigator-based rigid body motion correction for magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullisch, Marcus Goerge

    2012-01-01

    A novel three-dimensional navigator k-space trajectory for rigid body motion detection for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - the Lissajous navigator - was developed and quantitatively compared to the existing spherical navigator trajectory [1]. The spherical navigator cannot sample the complete spherical surface due to slew rate limitations of the scanner hardware. By utilizing a two dimensional Lissajous figure which is projected onto the spherical surface, the Lissajous navigator overcomes this limitation. The complete sampling of the sphere consequently leads to rotation estimates with higher and more isotropic accuracy. Simulations and phantom measurements were performed for both navigators. Both simulations and measurements show a significantly higher overall accuracy of the Lissajous navigator and a higher isotropy of the rotation estimates. Measured under identical conditions with identical postprocessing, the measured mean absolute error of the rotation estimates for the Lissajous navigator was 38% lower (0.3 ) than for the spherical navigator (0.5 ). The maximum error of the Lissajous navigator was reduced by 48% relative to the spherical navigator. The Lissajous navigator delivers higher accuracy of rotation estimation and a higher degree of isotropy than the spherical navigator with no evident drawbacks; these are two decisive advantages, especially for high-resolution anatomical imaging.

  2. A navigator-based rigid body motion correction for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullisch, Marcus Goerge

    2012-01-24

    A novel three-dimensional navigator k-space trajectory for rigid body motion detection for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - the Lissajous navigator - was developed and quantitatively compared to the existing spherical navigator trajectory [1]. The spherical navigator cannot sample the complete spherical surface due to slew rate limitations of the scanner hardware. By utilizing a two dimensional Lissajous figure which is projected onto the spherical surface, the Lissajous navigator overcomes this limitation. The complete sampling of the sphere consequently leads to rotation estimates with higher and more isotropic accuracy. Simulations and phantom measurements were performed for both navigators. Both simulations and measurements show a significantly higher overall accuracy of the Lissajous navigator and a higher isotropy of the rotation estimates. Measured under identical conditions with identical postprocessing, the measured mean absolute error of the rotation estimates for the Lissajous navigator was 38% lower (0.3 ) than for the spherical navigator (0.5 ). The maximum error of the Lissajous navigator was reduced by 48% relative to the spherical navigator. The Lissajous navigator delivers higher accuracy of rotation estimation and a higher degree of isotropy than the spherical navigator with no evident drawbacks; these are two decisive advantages, especially for high-resolution anatomical imaging.

  3. Vector Rotators of Rigid Body Dynamics with Coupled Rotations around Axes without Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katica R. (Stevanović Hedrih

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vector method based on mass moment vectors and vector rotators coupled for pole and oriented axes is used for obtaining vector expressions for kinetic pressures on the shaft bearings of a rigid body dynamics with coupled rotations around axes without intersection. Mass inertia moment vectors and corresponding deviational vector components for pole and oriented axis are defined by K. Hedrih in 1991. These kinematical vectors rotators are defined for a system with two degrees of freedom as well as for rheonomic system with two degrees of mobility and one degree of freedom and coupled rotations around two coupled axes without intersection as well as their angular velocities and intensity. As an example of defined dynamics, we take into consideration a heavy gyrorotor disk with one degree of freedom and coupled rotations when one component of rotation is programmed by constant angular velocity. For this system with nonlinear dynamics, a series of tree parametric transformations of system nonlinear dynamics are presented. Some graphical visualization of vector rotators properties are presented too.

  4. Generalized Predictive Control of Dynamic Systems with Rigid-Body Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations to assess the effectiveness of Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) for active control of dynamic systems having rigid-body modes are presented. GPC is a linear, time-invariant, multi-input/multi-output predictive control method that uses an ARX model to characterize the system and to design the controller. Although the method can accommodate both embedded (implicit) and explicit feedforward paths for incorporation of disturbance effects, only the case of embedded feedforward in which the disturbances are assumed to be unknown is considered here. Results from numerical simulations using mathematical models of both a free-free three-degree-of-freedom mass-spring-dashpot system and the XV-15 tiltrotor research aircraft are presented. In regulation mode operation, which calls for zero system response in the presence of disturbances, the simulations showed reductions of nearly 100%. In tracking mode operations, where the system is commanded to follow a specified path, the GPC controllers produced the desired responses, even in the presence of disturbances.

  5. Fullrmc, a rigid body Reverse Monte Carlo modeling package enabled with machine learning and artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Bachir

    2016-05-05

    A new Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) package "fullrmc" for atomic or rigid body and molecular, amorphous, or crystalline materials is presented. fullrmc main purpose is to provide a fully modular, fast and flexible software, thoroughly documented, complex molecules enabled, written in a modern programming language (python, cython, C and C++ when performance is needed) and complying to modern programming practices. fullrmc approach in solving an atomic or molecular structure is different from existing RMC algorithms and software. In a nutshell, traditional RMC methods and software randomly adjust atom positions until the whole system has the greatest consistency with a set of experimental data. In contrast, fullrmc applies smart moves endorsed with reinforcement machine learning to groups of atoms. While fullrmc allows running traditional RMC modeling, the uniqueness of this approach resides in its ability to customize grouping atoms in any convenient way with no additional programming efforts and to apply smart and more physically meaningful moves to the defined groups of atoms. In addition, fullrmc provides a unique way with almost no additional computational cost to recur a group's selection, allowing the system to go out of local minimas by refining a group's position or exploring through and beyond not allowed positions and energy barriers the unrestricted three dimensional space around a group. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Rigid body dynamics modeling, experimental characterization, and performance analysis of a howitzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachiketa Tiwari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A large caliber howitzer is a complex and cumbersome assembly. Understanding its dynamics and performance attributes' sensitivity to changes in its design parameters can be a very time-consuming and expensive exercise, as such an effort requires highly sophisticated test rigs and platforms. However, the need of such an understanding is crucially important for system designers, users, and evaluators. Some of the key performance attributes of such a system are its vertical jump, forward motion, recoil displacement, and force transmitted to ground through tires and trail after the gun has been fired. In this work, we have developed a rigid body dynamics model for a representative howitzer system, and used relatively simple experimental procedures to estimate its principal design parameters. Such procedures can help in obviating the need of expensive experimental rigs, especially in early stages of the design cycle. These parameters were subsequently incorporated into our simulation model, which was then used to predict gun performance. Finally, we conducted several sensitivity studies to understand the influence of changes in various design parameters on system performance. Their results provide useful insights in our understanding of the functioning of the overall system.

  7. Modeling meniscus rise in capillary tubes using fluid in rigid-body motion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Mohammad O.; Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, a new term representing net flux rate of linear momentum is introduced to Lucas-Washburn equation. Following a fluid in rigid-body motion in modeling the meniscus rise in vertical capillary tubes transforms the nonlinear Lucas-Washburn equation to a linear mass-spring-damper system. The linear nature of mass-spring-damper system with constant coefficients offers a nondimensional analytical solution where meniscus dynamics are dictated by two parameters, namely the system damping ratio and its natural frequency. This connects the numerous fluid-surface interaction physical and geometrical properties to rather two nondimensional parameters, which capture the underlying physics of meniscus dynamics in three distinct cases, namely overdamped, critically damped, and underdamped systems. Based on experimental data available in the literature and the understanding meniscus dynamics, the proposed model brings a new approach of understanding the system initial conditions. Accordingly, a closed form relation is produced for the imbibition velocity, which equals half of the Bosanquet velocity divided by the damping ratio. The proposed general analytical model is ideal for overdamped and critically damped systems. While for underdamped systems, the solution shows fair agreement with experimental measurements once the effective viscosity is determined. Moreover, the presented model shows meniscus oscillations around equilibrium height occur if the damping ratio is less than one.

  8. A six degree-of-freedom god-object method for haptic display of rigid bodies with surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Michael; Redon, Stephane; Coquillart, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a generalization of the god-object method for haptic interaction between rigid bodies. Our approach separates the computation of the motion of the six degree-of-freedom god-object from the computation of the force applied to the user. The motion of the god-object is computed using continuous collision detection and constraint-based quasi-statics, which enables high-quality haptic interaction between contacting rigid bodies. The force applied to the user is computed using a novel constraint-based quasi-static approach, which allows us to suppress force artifacts typically found in previous methods. The constraint-based force applied to the user, which handles any number of simultaneous contact points, is computed within a few microseconds, while the update of the configuration of the rigid god-object is performed within a few milliseconds for rigid bodies containing up to tens of thousands of triangles. Our approach has been successfully tested on complex benchmarks. Our results show that the separation into asynchronous processes allows us to satisfy the different update rates required by the haptic and visual displays. Force shading and textures can be added and enlarge the range of haptic perception of a virtual environment. This paper is an extension of [1].

  9. Stiffness-generated rigid-body mode shapes for Lanczos eigensolution with SUPORT DOF by way of a MSC/NASTRAN DMAP alter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Ayman A.; Barnett, Alan R.; Widrick, Timothy W.; Manella, Richard T.; Miller, Robert P.

    1994-01-01

    When using all MSC/NASTRAN eigensolution methods except Lanczos, the analyst can replace the coupled system rigid-body modes calculated within DMAP module READ with mass orthogonalized and normalized rigid-body modes generated from the system stiffness. This option is invoked by defining MSC/NASTRAN r-set degrees of freedom via the SUPORT bulk data card. The newly calculated modes are required if the rigid-body modes calculated by the eigensolver are not 'clean' due to numerical roundoffs in the solution. When performing transient structural dynamic load analysis, the numerical roundoffs can result in inaccurate rigid-body accelerations which affect steady-state responses. Unfortunately, when using the Lanczos method and defining r-set degrees of freedom, the rigid-body modes calculated within DMAP module REIGL are retained. To overcome this limitation and to allow MSC/NASTRAN to handle SUPORT degrees of freedom identically for all eigensolvers, a DMAP Alter has been written which replaces Lanczos-calculated rigid-body modes with stiffness-generated rigid-body modes. The newly generated rigid-body modes are normalized with respect to the system mass and orthogonalized using the Gram-Schmidt technique. This algorithm has been implemented as an enhancement to an existing coupled loads methodology.

  10. Stiffness-generated rigid-body mode shapes for Lanczos eigensolution with SUPORT DOF by way of a MSC/NASTRAN DMAP alter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Ayman A.; Barnett, Alan R.; Widrick, Timothy W.; Manella, Richard T.; Miller, Robert P.

    1994-03-01

    When using all MSC/NASTRAN eigensolution methods except Lanczos, the analyst can replace the coupled system rigid-body modes calculated within DMAP module READ with mass orthogonalized and normalized rigid-body modes generated from the system stiffness. This option is invoked by defining MSC/NASTRAN r-set degrees of freedom via the SUPORT bulk data card. The newly calculated modes are required if the rigid-body modes calculated by the eigensolver are not 'clean' due to numerical roundoffs in the solution. When performing transient structural dynamic load analysis, the numerical roundoffs can result in inaccurate rigid-body accelerations which affect steady-state responses. Unfortunately, when using the Lanczos method and defining r-set degrees of freedom, the rigid-body modes calculated within DMAP module REIGL are retained. To overcome this limitation and to allow MSC/NASTRAN to handle SUPORT degrees of freedom identically for all eigensolvers, a DMAP Alter has been written which replaces Lanczos-calculated rigid-body modes with stiffness-generated rigid-body modes. The newly generated rigid-body modes are normalized with respect to the system mass and orthogonalized using the Gram-Schmidt technique. This algorithm has been implemented as an enhancement to an existing coupled loads methodology.

  11. The Serret-Andoyer Formalism in Rigid-Body Dynamics: 1. Symmetries and Perturbations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gurfil, P; Elipe, A; Tangren, W; Efroimsky, M

    2007-01-01

    .... As is well known, the problem of unsupported and unperturbed rigid rotator can be reduced. The availability of this reduction is offered by the underlying symmetry, that stems from conservation of the angular momentum and rotational kinetic energy...

  12. Geometric Collocation Method on SO(3 with Application to Optimal Attitude Control of a 3D Rotating Rigid Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojia Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The collocation method is extended to the special orthogonal group SO(3 with application to optimal attitude control (OAC of a rigid body. A left-invariant rigid-body attitude dynamical model on SO(3 is established. For the left invariance of the attitude configuration equation in body-fixed frame, a geometrically exact numerical method on SO(3, referred to as the geometric collocation method, is proposed by deriving the equivalent Lie algebra equation in so(3 of the left-invariant configuration equation. When compared with the general Gauss pseudo-spectral method, the explicit RKMK, and Lie group variational integrator having the same order and stepsize in numerical tests for evolving a free-floating rigid-body attitude dynamics, the proposed method is higher in accuracy, time performance, and structural conservativeness. In addition, the numerical method is applied to solve a constrained OAC problem on SO(3. The optimal control problem is transcribed into a nonlinear programming problem, in which the equivalent Lie algebra equation is being considered as the defect constraints instead of the configuration equation. The transcription method is coordinate-free and does not need chart switching or special handling of singularities. More importantly, with the numerical advantage of the geometric collocation method, the proposed OAC method may generate satisfying convergence rate.

  13. Deformable registration for image-guided spine surgery: preserving rigid body vertebral morphology in free-form transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Wang, A. S.; Uneri, A.; Otake, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Deformable registration of preoperative and intraoperative images facilitates accurate localization of target and critical anatomy in image-guided spine surgery. However, conventional deformable registration fails to preserve the morphology of rigid bone anatomy and can impart distortions that confound high-precision intervention. We propose a constrained registration method that preserves rigid morphology while allowing deformation of surrounding soft tissues. Method: The registration method aligns preoperative 3D CT to intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) using free-form deformation (FFD) with penalties on rigid body motion imposed according to a simple intensity threshold. The penalties enforced 3 properties of a rigid transformation - namely, constraints on affinity (AC), orthogonality (OC), and properness (PC). The method also incorporated an injectivity constraint (IC) to preserve topology. Physical experiments (involving phantoms, an ovine spine, and a human cadaver) as well as digital simulations were performed to evaluate the sensitivity to registration parameters, preservation of rigid body morphology, and overall registration accuracy of constrained FFD in comparison to conventional unconstrained FFD (denoted uFFD) and Demons registration. Result: FFD with orthogonality and injectivity constraints (denoted FFD+OC+IC) demonstrated improved performance compared to uFFD and Demons. Affinity and properness constraints offered little or no additional improvement. The FFD+OC+IC method preserved rigid body morphology at near-ideal values of zero dilatation (D = 0.05, compared to 0.39 and 0.56 for uFFD and Demons, respectively) and shear (S = 0.08, compared to 0.36 and 0.44 for uFFD and Demons, respectively). Target registration error (TRE) was similarly improved for FFD+OC+IC (0.7 mm), compared to 1.4 and 1.8 mm for uFFD and Demons. Results were validated in human cadaver studies using CT and CBCT images, with FFD+OC+IC providing excellent preservation

  14. Stability Analysis of a Rigid Body with Attached Geometrically Nonlinear Rod by the Energy-Momentum Method

    OpenAIRE

    Posbergh, T. A.; Simo, J. C.; Marsden, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper applies the energy-momentum method to the problem of nonlinear stability of relative equilibria of a rigid body with attached flexible appendage in a uniformly rotating state. The appendage is modeled as a geometrically exact rod which allows for finite bending, shearing and twist in three dimensions. Application of the energy-momentum method to this example depends crucially on a special choice of variables in terms of which the second variation block diagonalizes into blocks a...

  15. Biomimetic-Based Output Feedback for Attitude Stabilization of Rigid Bodies: Real-Time Experimentation on a Quadrotor

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero-Castellanos, José; Rifaï, Hala; Marchand, Nicolas; Cruz-José, Rafael; Mohammed, Samer; Guerrero-Sánchez, W.; Mino-Aguilar, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The present paper deals with the development of bounded feedback control laws mimicking the strategy adopted by flapping flyers to stabilize the attitude of systems falling within the framework of rigid bodies. Flapping flyers are able to orient their trajectory without any knowledge of their current attitude and without any attitude computation. They rely on the measurements of some sensitive organs: halteres, leg sensilla and magnetic sense, which give information ab...

  16. Stability of coupled rigid body and geometrically exact rods: Block diagonalization and the energy-momentum method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo, J. C.; Posbergh, T. A.; Marsden, J. E.

    1990-10-01

    This paper develops and applies the energy-momentum method to the problem of nonlinear stability of relative equilibria. The method is applied in detail to the stability of uniformily rotating states of geometrically exact rod models, and a rigid body with an attached flexible appendage. Here, the flexible appendage is modeled as a geometrically exact rod capable of accomodating arbitrarily large deformations in three dimensions; including extension, shear, flexure and twist. The model is said to be ‘geometrically exact’ because of the lack of restrictions of the allowable deformations, and the full invariance properties of the model under superposed rigid body motions. We show that a (sharp) necessary condition for nonlinear stability is that the whole assemblage be in uniform (stationary) rotation about the shortest axis of a precisely defined ‘locked’ inertia dyadic. Sufficient conditions are obtained by appending the restriction that the angular velocity of the stationary motion be bounded from above by the square root of the minimum eigenvalue of an associated linear operator. Specific examples are worked out, including the case of a rod attached to a rigid body in uniform rotation. Our technique depends crucially on a special choice of variables, introduced in this paper and referred to as the block diagonalization procedure, in which the second variation of the energu augmented with the linear and angular momentum block diagonalizes, separating the rotational from the internal vibration modes.

  17. The equations of Lagrange for a continuous deformable body with rigid body degrees of freedom, written in a momentum based formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irschik, H.; Krommer, M.; Nader, M.; Vetyukov, Y.; von Garssen, H.-G.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with Lagrange's Equations, applied to a deformable body in the presence of rigid body degrees of freedom. The Lagrange description of Continuum Mechanics is used. An exact version of the Equations is derived first. This version, which represents an identical extension of the Fundamental Law of Dynamics, does involve the idea of virtual motions. The virtual motion is described in the framework of the Ritz-Ansatz, but our derivation does not make use of D'Alemberts principle, the principle of virtual work, or variational principles. From the exact version, by involving arguments related to the Galerkin approximation technique, we derive an approximate Ritz type version of Lagrange's Equations. This approximate version coincides with the traditional one, which is based on the notion of kinetic energy. However, since our derivation stems from the Fundamental Law of Dynamics, we have at our disposal an alternative formulation, which is based on the notion of local momentum. This momentum based version, which is the main topic of the present contribution, can be used for the purpose of performing independent checks of the energy based version of Lagrange's Equations. The momentum based version also clarifies that and how certain terms in the energy based version do cancel out. The momentum based version is worked out in the framework of the Floating Frame of Reference Formulation of Multibody Dynamics. Explicit formulas for the single terms of Lagrange's Equations are derived for the translational, rotational and flexible degrees of freedom of the deformable body, respectively. Corresponding Lagrange's Equations are explained in the light of the relations of Balance of Total Momentum, Balance of Total Moment of Momentum, of the Mean Stress Theorem and the notion of Virial of Forces. An embedding into the literature is given.

  18. Efficacy and safety of spontaneous ventilation technique using dexmedetomidine for rigid bronchoscopic airway foreign body removal in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yirong; Li, Wenxian; Chen, Kaizheng

    2013-11-01

    In children, removal of an airway foreign body is usually performed by rigid bronchoscopy under general anesthesia. Debate continues regarding the respiratory mode (spontaneous or controlled ventilation) and appropriate anesthetic drugs. Dexmedetomidine has several desirable pharmacologic properties and appears to be a useful agent for airway surgeries. This study evaluates the efficacy of spontaneous ventilation (SV) technique using dexmedetomidine for bronchoscopic removal of foreign bodies in children. Eighty pediatric patients undergoing rigid bronchoscopy for airway foreign body removal were randomly divided into two groups. In the SV group, dexmedetomidine (4 μg∙kg(-1)) and topical lidocaine (3-5 mg∙kg(-1)) were administered and the patients were breathing spontaneously throughout the procedure. In the manual jet ventilation (MJV) group, anesthesia was induced with fentanyl (2 μg∙kg(-1)), propofol (3-5 mg∙kg(-1)), and succinylcholine (1 mg∙kg(-1)), and MJV was performed. The success rates of foreign body removal, the incidence of body movement and other perioperative adverse events, and hemodynamic changes were similar between the two groups. The SV patients required longer stays in the postanesthesia care unit (P depression or hemodynamic instability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Numerical model (switchable/dual model) of the human head for rigid body and finite elements applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacu, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a methodology for the development and validation of a numerical model of the human head using generic procedures is presented. All steps required, starting with the model generation, model validation and applications will be discussed. The proposed model may be considered as a dual one due to its capabilities to switch from deformable to a rigid body according to the application's requirements. The first step is to generate the numerical model of the human head using geometry files or medical images. The required stiffness and damping for the elastic connection used for the rigid body model are identified by performing a natural frequency analysis. The presented applications for model validation are related to impact analysis. The first case is related to Nahum's (Nahum and Smith 1970) experiments pressure data being evaluated and a pressure map generated using the results from discrete elements. For the second case, the relative displacement between the brain and the skull is evaluated according to Hardy's (Hardy WH, Foster CD, Mason, MJ, Yang KH, King A, Tashman S. 2001.Investigation of head injury mechanisms using neutral density technology and high-speed biplanar X-ray. Stapp Car Crash J. 45:337-368, SAE Paper 2001-22-0016) experiments. The main objective is to validate the rigid model as a quick and versatile tool for acquiring the input data for specific brain analyses.

  20. Continuum mechanics of single-substance bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Eringen, A Cemal

    1975-01-01

    Continuum Physics, Volume II: Continuum Mechanics of Single-Substance Bodies discusses the continuum mechanics of bodies constituted by a single substance, providing a thorough and precise presentation of exact theories that have evolved during the past years. This book consists of three parts-basic principles, constitutive equations for simple materials, and methods of solution. Part I of this publication is devoted to a discussion of basic principles irrespective of material geometry and constitution that are valid for all kinds of substances, including composites. The geometrical notions, k

  1. Basic study on rigid body dynamics under micro-gravity environment; Bisho juryoku kankyoka deno gotai dorikigaku no kiso kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The basic experiment on control of rigid bodies such as space robot and the unfolding behavior of space film structures was carried out under micro-gravity using the falling experiment facility of Underground Gravity-free Experiment Center Co. and its results were compared with simulation ones. On control of space robots under micro- gravity, since a robot body moves by reaction of a moving robot arm, the control experiment of arm movement was carried out with no use of any gas jet. The basic data on a large space system on a relatively low orbit were collected as motion of a multi-body rigid body in the nonlinear gravity field of the earth using a gradient gravity field simulated by magnetic field. Using the model of a solar cell film array as a typical example of unfolding space structures, the inverse folding phenomenon in storage of the space structure was studied experimentally under gravity-free condition. In addition, this paper summarizes some study results under micro-gravity such as motion of a flexible manipulator. 77 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Self-propulsion of a body with rigid surface and variable coefficient of lift in a perfect fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramodanov, Sergey M.; Tenenev, Valentin A.; Treschev, Dmitry V.

    2012-11-01

    We study the system of a 2D rigid body moving in an unbounded volume of incompressible, vortex-free perfect fluid which is at rest at infinity. The body is equipped with a gyrostat and a so-called Flettner rotor. Due to the latter the body is subject to a lifting force (Magnus effect). The rotational velocities of the gyrostat and the rotor are assumed to be known functions of time (control inputs). The equations of motion are presented in the form of the Kirchhoff equations. The integrals of motion are given in the case of piecewise continuous control. Using these integrals we obtain a (reduced) system of first-order differential equations on the configuration space. Then an optimal control problem for several types of the inputs is solved using genetic algorithms.

  3. On stability of uniformly-accelerated motions of an axially-symmetric heavy rigid body in an ideal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deriabine, Mikhail

    2003-01-01

    We consider the problem of heavy rigid body dynamics in an infinite volume of an ideal incompressible fluid performing a potential motion. If the body is axially-symmetric, then the system admits partial solutions, when the axis of symmetry is vertical, and the body sinks and rotates around its...... symmetry axis. These solutions were found by V.A.Steklov already at the end of the 19th century, and he also pointed out that in general these motions are unstable (as they are uniformly accelerated).Here we consider the more delicate question, namely we derive the conditions for stability of the rotation...... axis, direction. The method of constructing the Lyapunov function may be generalized for deriving stability conditions for mechanical systems with nonstationary force-fields....

  4. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (V): Development of rigid-body type harmonic solvation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarumi, Moto; Nakai, Hiromi

    2018-05-01

    This letter proposes an approximate treatment of the harmonic solvation model (HSM) assuming the solute to be a rigid body (RB-HSM). The HSM method can appropriately estimate the Gibbs free energy for condensed phases even where an ideal gas model used by standard quantum chemical programs fails. The RB-HSM method eliminates calculations for intra-molecular vibrations in order to reduce the computational costs. Numerical assessments indicated that the RB-HSM method can evaluate entropies and internal energies with the same accuracy as the HSM method but with lower calculation costs.

  5. The self-referential method for linear rigid bodies: application to hard and Lennard-Jones dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweatman, Martin B; Atamas, Alexander; Leyssale, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-14

    The self-referential (SR) method incorporating thermodynamic integration (TI) [Sweatman et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 064102 (2008)] is extended to treat systems of rigid linear bodies. The method is then applied to obtain the canonical ensemble Helmholtz free energy of the alpha-N(2) and plastic face centered cubic phases of systems of hard and Lennard-Jones dumbbells using Monte Carlo simulations. Generally good agreement with reference literature data is obtained, which indicates that the SR-TI method is potentially very general and robust.

  6. Separation of Target Rigid Body and Micro-Doppler Effects in ISAR/SAR Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Deux techniques ont 6t6 propos~es pour s~parer ces deux types de formes. L’une utilise [a repr6sentation temps -fr6quence (TF) avec fen~tres mobiles...et statistiques d’ordre. Elle permet d’abord de reconnaitre les par- ties rigides dans le plan site/azimut. Dans un deuxibme temps , le spectrogramme et...identifier des types particuliers de v~hicules et A determiner leur mouvement et la vitesse de leurs moteurs . Les vibrations produites par le moteur d’un

  7. A biomechanical testing system to determine micromotion between hip implant and femur accounting for deformation of the hip implant: Assessment of the influence of rigid body assumptions on micromotions measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuridan, Steven; Goossens, Quentin; Roosen, Jorg; Pastrav, Leonard; Denis, Kathleen; Mulier, Michiel; Desmet, Wim; Vander Sloten, Jos

    2017-02-01

    Accurate pre-clinical evaluation of the initial stability of new cementless hip stems using in vitro micromotion measurements is an important step in the design process to assess the new stem's potential. Several measuring systems, linear variable displacement transducer-based and other, require assuming bone or implant to be rigid to obtain micromotion values or to calculate derived quantities such as relative implant tilting. An alternative linear variable displacement transducer-based measuring system not requiring a rigid body assumption was developed in this study. The system combined advantages of local unidirectional and frame-and-bracket micromotion measuring concepts. The influence and possible errors that would be made by adopting a rigid body assumption were quantified. Furthermore, as the system allowed emulating local unidirectional and frame-and-bracket systems, the influence of adopting rigid body assumptions were also analyzed for both concepts. Synthetic and embalmed bone models were tested in combination with primary and revision implants. Single-legged stance phase loading was applied to the implant - bone constructs. Adopting a rigid body assumption resulted in an overestimation of mediolateral micromotion of up to 49.7μm at more distal measuring locations. Maximal average relative rotational motion was overestimated by 0.12° around the anteroposterior axis. Frontal and sagittal tilting calculations based on a unidirectional measuring concept underestimated the true tilting by an order of magnitude. Non-rigid behavior is a factor that should not be dismissed in micromotion stability evaluations of primary and revision femoral implants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamical Behavior of a Rigid Body with One Fixed Point (Gyroscope. Basic Concepts and Results. Open Problems: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav Ganchev Nikolov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of the dynamic behavior of a rigid body with one fixed point (gyroscope has a long history. A number of famous mathematicians and mechanical engineers have devoted enormous time and effort to clarify the role of dynamic effects on its movement (behavior – stable, periodic, quasi-periodic or chaotic. The main objectives of this review are: 1 to outline the characteristic features of the theory of dynamical systems and 2 to reveal the specific properties of the motion of a rigid body with one fixed point (gyroscope.This article consists of six sections. The first section addresses the main concepts of the theory of dynamical systems. Section two presents the main theoretical results (obtained so far concerning the dynamic behavior of a solid with one fixed point (gyroscope. Section three examines the problem of gyroscopic stabilization. Section four deals with the non-linear (chaotic dynamics of the gyroscope. Section five is a brief analysis of the gyroscope applications in engineering. The final section provides conclusions and generalizations on why the theory of dynamical systems should be used in the study of the movement of gyroscopic systems.

  9. A local-optimization refinement algorithm in single particle analysis for macromolecular complex with multiple rigid modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Shan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Single particle analysis, which can be regarded as an average of signals from thousands or even millions of particle projections, is an efficient method to study the three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules. An intrinsic assumption in single particle analysis is that all the analyzed particles must have identical composition and conformation. Thus specimen heterogeneity in either composition or conformation has raised great challenges for high-resolution analysis. For particles with multiple conformations, inaccurate alignments and orientation parameters will yield an averaged map with diminished resolution and smeared density. Besides extensive classification approaches, here based on the assumption that the macromolecular complex is made up of multiple rigid modules whose relative orientations and positions are in slight fluctuation around equilibriums, we propose a new method called as local optimization refinement to address this conformational heterogeneity for an improved resolution. The key idea is to optimize the orientation and shift parameters of each rigid module and then reconstruct their three-dimensional structures individually. Using simulated data of 80S/70S ribosomes with relative fluctuations between the large (60S/50S and the small (40S/30S subunits, we tested this algorithm and found that the resolutions of both subunits are significantly improved. Our method provides a proof-of-principle solution for high-resolution single particle analysis of macromolecular complexes with dynamic conformations.

  10. A local-optimization refinement algorithm in single particle analysis for macromolecular complex with multiple rigid modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hong; Wang, Zihao; Zhang, Fa; Xiong, Yong; Yin, Chang-Cheng; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Single particle analysis, which can be regarded as an average of signals from thousands or even millions of particle projections, is an efficient method to study the three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules. An intrinsic assumption in single particle analysis is that all the analyzed particles must have identical composition and conformation. Thus specimen heterogeneity in either composition or conformation has raised great challenges for high-resolution analysis. For particles with multiple conformations, inaccurate alignments and orientation parameters will yield an averaged map with diminished resolution and smeared density. Besides extensive classification approaches, here based on the assumption that the macromolecular complex is made up of multiple rigid modules whose relative orientations and positions are in slight fluctuation around equilibriums, we propose a new method called as local optimization refinement to address this conformational heterogeneity for an improved resolution. The key idea is to optimize the orientation and shift parameters of each rigid module and then reconstruct their three-dimensional structures individually. Using simulated data of 80S/70S ribosomes with relative fluctuations between the large (60S/50S) and the small (40S/30S) subunits, we tested this algorithm and found that the resolutions of both subunits are significantly improved. Our method provides a proof-of-principle solution for high-resolution single particle analysis of macromolecular complexes with dynamic conformations.

  11. Flutter Analysis of RX-420 Balistic Rocket Fin Involving Rigid Body Modes of Rocket Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novi Andria

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Flutter is a phenomenon that has brought a catastrophic failure to the flight vehicle structure. In this experiment, flutter was analyzed for its symmetric and antisymmetric configuration to understand the effect of rocket rigid modes to the fin flutter characteristic. This research was also expected to find out the safety level of RX-420 structure design. The analysis was performed using half rocket model. Fin structure used in this research was a fin which has semispan 600 mm, thickness 12 mm, chord root 700 mm, chord tip 400 mm, made by Al 6061-T651, double spar configuration with skin thickness of 2 mm. Structural dynamics and flutter stability were analyzed using finite element software implemented on MSC. Nastran. The analysis shows that the antisymmetric flutter mode is more critical than symmetric flutter mode. At sea level altitude, antisymmetric flutter occurs at 6.4 Mach, and symmetric flutter occurs at 10.15 Mach. Compared to maximum speed of RX-420 which is 4.5 Mach at altitude 11 km or equivalent to 2.1 Mach at sea level, it can be concluded that the RX-420 structure design is safe, and flutter will not occur during flight.

  12. Governing equations of multi-component rigid body-spring discrete element models of reinforced concrete columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, P B; Tingatinga, E A; Longalong, R E; Saguid, J

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, the complexity of conventional methods to perform seismic performance assessment of buildings led to the development of more effective approaches. The rigid body spring-discrete element method (RBS-DEM) is one of these approaches and has recently been applied to the study of the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) buildings subjected to strong earthquakes. In this paper, the governing equations of RBS-DEM planar elements subjected to lateral loads and horizontal ground motion are presented and used to replicate the hysteretic behavior of experimental RC columns. The RBS-DEM models of columns are made up of rigid components connected by systems of springs that simulate axial, shear, and bending behavior of an RC section. The parameters of springs were obtained using Response-2000 software and the hysteretic response of the models of select columns from the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) Structural Performance Database were computed numerically. Numerical examples show that one-component models were able to simulate the initial stiffness reasonably, while the displacement capacity of actual columns undergoing large displacements were underestimated. (paper)

  13. A modified pseudo-rigid-body modeling approach for compliant mechanisms with fixed-guided beam flexures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we investigate a modified pseudo-rigid-body (MPRB modeling approach for compliant mechanisms with fixed-guided beam flexures by considering the nonlinear effects of center-shifting and load-stiffening. In particular, a fixed-guided compliant beam is modeled as a pair of fixed-free compliant beams jointed at the inflection point, where each fixed-free beam flexure is further modeled by a rigid link connected with an extension spring by a torsion spring, based on the beam constraint model (BCM. Meanwhile, the characteristic parameters of the proposed MPRB model are no longer constant values, but affected by the applied general tip load, especially the axial force. The developed MPRB modeling method is then applied to the analysis of three common compliant mechanisms (i.e. compound parallelogram mechanisms, bistable mechanisms and 1-DOF translational mechanisms, which is further verified by the finite element analysis (FEA results. The proposed MPRB model provides a more accurate method to predict the performance characteristics such as deformation capability, stiffness variation, as well as error motions of complaint mechanisms with fixed-guided beam flexures, and offers a new look into the design and optimization of beam-based compliant mechanisms.

  14. Knowledge-in-action: a study on the integration of forces and energy in a rigid body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo Escudero

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to go on with the study of problem solving in a compatible way with the theories of conceptual fields (TCC of Vergnaud (1990,1994,1998 and mental models of Johnson-Laird (1983,1990. Together with findings of another study (Escudero & Jaime 2007, some achievements and difficulties of freshmore engineering students when solving problems of the motion of rigid body in terms of the knowledge-in-action are analysed. The research methodology under a qualitative paradigm grouped data into categories which are not provided a priori by the theoretical framework. It can be said that the quality of the conceptual representation has been explicit in the quality of the proposed solution. Some meanings introduced by students in their problem solving activities can be characterized as operational invariants.

  15. Estimating the angular velocity of a rigid body moving in the plane from tangential and centripetal acceleration measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardou, Philippe; Angeles, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Two methods are available for the estimation of the angular velocity of a rigid body from point-acceleration measurements: (i) the time-integration of the angular acceleration and (ii) the square-rooting of the centripetal acceleration. The inaccuracy of the first method is due mainly to the accumulation of the error on the angular acceleration throughout the time-integration process, which does not prevent that it be used successfully in crash tests with dummies, since these experiments never last more than one second. On the other hand, the error resulting from the second method is stable through time, but becomes inaccurate whenever the rigid body angular velocity approaches zero, which occurs in many applications. In order to take advantage of the complementarity of these two methods, a fusion of their estimates is proposed. To this end, the accelerometer measurements are modeled as exact signals contaminated with bias errors and Gaussian white noise. The relations between the variables at stake are written in the form of a nonlinear state-space system in which the angular velocity and the angular acceleration are state variables. Consequently, a minimum-variance-error estimate of the state vector is obtained by means of extended Kalman filtering. The performance of the proposed estimation method is assessed by means of simulation. Apparently, the resulting estimation method is more robust than the existing accelerometer-only methods and competitive with gyroscope measurements. Moreover, it allows the identification and the compensation of any bias error in the accelerometer measurements, which is a significant advantage over gyroscopes

  16. Fast and sensitive rigid-body fitting into cryo-EM density maps with PowerFit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gydo C.P.van Zundert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cryo-EM is a rapidly developing method to investigate the three dimensional structure of large macromolecular complexes. In spite of all the advances in the field, the resolution of most cryo-EM density maps is too low for de novo model building. Therefore, the data are often complemented by fitting high-resolution subunits in the density to allow for an atomic interpretation. Typically, the first step in the modeling process is placing the subunits in the density as a rigid body. An objective method for automatic placement is full-exhaustive six dimensional cross correlation search between the model and the cryo-EM data, where the three translational and three rotational degrees of freedom are systematically sampled. In this article we present PowerFit, a Python package and program for fast and sensitive rigid body fitting. We introduce a novel, more sensitive scoring function, the core-weighted local cross correlation, and show how it can be calculated using FFTs for fast translational cross correlation scans. We further improved the search algorithm by using optimized rotational sets to reduce rotational redundancy and by limiting the cryo-EM data size through resampling and trimming the density. We demonstrate the superior scoring sensitivity of our scoring function on simulated data of the 80S D. melanogaster ribosome and on experimental data for four different cases. Through these advances, a fine-grained rotational search can now be performed within minutes on a CPU and seconds on a GPU. PowerFit is free software and can be downloaded from https://github.com/haddocking/powerfit.

  17. Equilibria of the three-body problem with rigid dumb-bell satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elipe, A.; Palacios, M.; Pretka-Ziomek, H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the orbital-rotational motion of an asymmetric dumb-bell (two masses with fixed distance among them) under the attraction of a central body. For this model, we find some equilibria and give sufficient conditions for their stability

  18. On the axioms of the forces in the mechanics of rigid bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lámer Géza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Newton summarised knowledge related to forces in three axioms. The first and second ones define the mechanical state and motion of the examined body when there is no force or when force is exerted on the body. The third defines the law of action and reaction. Newton did not define it as separate axiom but assumed that forces are completely independent from each other. The statics applies four axioms. The first applies to the balance of two forces while the second one applies of three forces. The third axiom defines the relationships inside an equilibrium force system. The fourth one is the axiom of action and reaction. The two axiom systems are independent from each other. Further the independent axioms are applied in case of constraint forces: frictionless reaction force orthogonal on the forced surface, friction force acts in the direction of the motion, the deformation can be elastic, plastic and viscous.

  19. Motion of a rigid body in an unsteady non-uniform heavy fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Thomasson, P. G.

    1995-01-01

    The Lagrangian formulation of the equations of motion of a body immersed in a steady but heavy perfect fluid is outline in Lamb [1] and a resulting set of equations for the unsteady fluid case, is given in Lewis et al [2] in a form suitable for the flight dynamics of underwater vehicles. These equations have also been used to model the motion of airships in a steady uniform atmosphere, Cook et al [4]. Recently however the author has had some difficulty in applying these equations to the motio...

  20. Pseudo-Rigid-Body Model and Kinematic Analysis of MRI-Actuated Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greigarn, Tipakorn; Çavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a kinematic study of a pseudorigid-body model (PRBM) of MRI-compatible, magnetically actuated, steerable catheters. It includes a derivation of a mathematical model of the PRBM of the catheter, singularity studies of the model, and a new manipulability measure. While the forward kinematics of the model presented here is applicable to PRBMs for other applications, actuation method is unique to the particular design. Hence, a careful study of singularities and manipulability of the model is required. The singularities are studied from the underlying equations of motion with intuitive interpretations. The proposed manipulability measure is a generalization of the inverse condition number manipulability measure of robotic manipulators. While the PRBM is an approximation of the flexible catheter, kinematic studies of the PRBM still provide some insight into feasibility and limitations of the catheter, which is beneficial to the design and motion planning of the catheter.

  1. Rigid dietary control, flexible dietary control, and intuitive eating: Evidence for their differential relationship to disordered eating and body image concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linardon, Jake; Mitchell, Sarah

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to replicate and extend from Tylka, Calogero, and Daníelsdóttir (2015) findings by examining the relationship between rigid control, flexible control, and intuitive eating on various indices of disordered eating (i.e., binge eating, disinhibition) and body image concerns (i.e., shape and weight over-evaluation, body checking, and weight-related exercise motivations). This study also examined whether the relationship between intuitive eating and outcomes was mediated by dichotomous thinking and body appreciation. Analysing data from a sample of 372 men and women recruited through the community, this study found that, in contrast to rigid dietary control, intuitive eating uniquely and consistently predicted lower levels of disordered eating and body image concerns. This intuitive eating-disordered eating relationship was mediated by low levels of dichotomous thinking and the intuitive eating-body image relationship was mediated by high levels of body appreciation. Flexible control predicted higher levels of body image concerns and lower levels of disordered eating only when rigid control was accounted for. Findings suggest that until the adaptive properties of flexible control are further elucidated, it may be beneficial to promote intuitive eating within public health approaches to eating disorder prevention. In addition to this, particular emphasis should also be made toward promoting body acceptance and eradicating a dichotomous thinking style around food and eating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. On the relation of flexible and rigid control of eating to body mass index and overeating in patients with binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masheb, Robin M; Grilo, Carlos M

    2002-01-01

    To examine the relationship of flexible and rigid dimensions of restrained eating to body mass index (BMI) and overeating in outpatients with binge eating disorder (BED). Participants were 148 consecutive outpatients who met criteria for BED. The Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) was administered to assess Cognitive Restraint, Hunger, and Disinhibition. The TFEQ also contains two Cognitive Restraint subscales--Flexible Control and Rigid Control. The Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire version (EDE-Q) was administered to assess frequency of different forms of overeating during the past 28 days and the attitudinal features of eating disorders. Flexible Control and Rigid Control were significantly correlated with each other. They were both negatively correlated with BMI, but neither was significantly correlated with the frequency of binge eating or other forms of overeating. In addition, Flexible Control and Rigid Control predicted almost the same amount of variance in BMI. BED patients exhibit flexible and rigid control of eating that is related to BMI, but not to the frequency of binge eating or other forms of overeating. Results of the present study provide preliminary evidence that flexible and rigid control of eating may not be a useful distinction in BED patients. However, increased restraint, regardless of type, may prove to be of benefit with regard to weight control and may not have adverse effects on binge eating in obese BED patients. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Simulation of the steady-state energy transfer in rigid bodies, with convective-radiative boundary conditions, employing a minimum principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gama, R.M.S. da.

    1992-08-01

    The energy transfer phenomenon in a rigid and opaque body that exchanges energy, with the environment, by convection and by diffuse thermal radiation is studied. The considered phenomenon is described by a partial differential equation, subjected to (nonlinear) boundary conditions. A minimum principle, suitable for a large class of energy transfer problems is presented. Some particular cases are simulated. (author)

  4. On a time domain boundary integral equation formulation for acoustic scattering by rigid bodies in uniform mean flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fang Q; Pizzo, Michelle E; Nark, Douglas M

    2017-12-01

    It has been well-known that under the assumption of a uniform mean flow, the acoustic wave propagation equation can be formulated as a boundary integral equation. However, the constant mean flow assumption, while convenient for formulating the integral equation, does not satisfy the solid wall boundary condition wherever the body surface is not aligned with the assumed uniform flow. A customary boundary condition for rigid surfaces is that the normal acoustic velocity be zero. In this paper, a careful study of the acoustic energy conservation equation is presented that shows such a boundary condition would in fact lead to source or sink points on solid surfaces. An alternative solid wall boundary condition, termed zero energy flux boundary condition, is proposed that conserves the acoustic energy and a time domain boundary integral equation is derived. Furthermore, stabilization of the integral equation by Burton-Miller type reformulation is presented. The stability is studied theoretically as well as numerically by an eigenvalue analysis. Numerical solutions are also presented that demonstrate the stability of the current formulation.

  5. A heterogeneous system based on GPU and multi-core CPU for real-time fluid and rigid body simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Junior, José Ricardo; Gonzalez Clua, Esteban W.; Montenegro, Anselmo; Lage, Marcos; Dreux, Marcelo de Andrade; Joselli, Mark; Pagliosa, Paulo A.; Kuryla, Christine Lucille

    2012-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics in simulation has become an important field not only for physics and engineering areas but also for simulation, computer graphics, virtual reality and even video game development. Many efficient models have been developed over the years, but when many contact interactions must be processed, most models present difficulties or cannot achieve real-time results when executed. The advent of parallel computing has enabled the development of many strategies for accelerating the simulations. Our work proposes a new system which uses some successful algorithms already proposed, as well as a data structure organisation based on a heterogeneous architecture using CPUs and GPUs, in order to process the simulation of the interaction of fluids and rigid bodies. This successfully results in a two-way interaction between them and their surrounding objects. As far as we know, this is the first work that presents a computational collaborative environment which makes use of two different paradigms of hardware architecture for this specific kind of problem. Since our method achieves real-time results, it is suitable for virtual reality, simulation and video game fluid simulation problems.

  6. Vibration Suppression of a Helicopter Fuselage by Pendulum Absorbers : Rigid-Body Blades with Aerodynamic Excitation Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaka, Imao; Ishida, Yukio; Koyama, Takayuki; Fujimatsu, Naoki

    Currently, some kinds of helicopters use pendulum absorbers in order to reduce vibrations. Present pendulum absorbers are designed based on the antiresonance concept used in the linear theory. However, since the vibration amplitudes of the pendulum are not small, it is considered that the nonlinearity has influence on the vibration characteristics. Therefore, the best suppression cannot be attained by using the linear theory. In a helicopter, periodic forces act on the blades due to the influences of the air thrust. These periodic forces act on the blades with the frequency which is the integer multiple of the rotational speed of the rotor. Our previous study proposed a 2-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) model composed of a rotor blade and a pendulum absorber. The blade was considered as a rigid body and it was excited by giving a sinusoidal deflection at its end. The present paper proposes a 3DOF model that is more similar to the real helicopter, since the freedom of the fuselage is added and the periodic forces are applied to the blade by aerodynamic force. The vibration is analyzed considering the nonlinear characteristics. The resonance curves of rotor blades with pendulum absorbers are obtained analytically and experimentally. It is clarified that the most efficient condition is obtained when the natural frequency of the pendulum is a little bit different from the frequency of the external force. Various unique nonlinear characteristics, such as bifurcations, are also shown.

  7. Biomimetic-Based Output Feedback for Attitude Stabilization of Rigid Bodies: Real-Time Experimentation on a Quadrotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fermi Guerrero-Castellanos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the development of bounded feedback control laws mimicking the strategy adopted by flapping flyers to stabilize the attitude of systems falling within the framework of rigid bodies. Flapping flyers are able to orient their trajectory without any knowledge of their current attitude and without any attitude computation. They rely on the measurements of some sensitive organs: halteres, leg sensilla and magnetic sense, which give information about their angular velocity and the orientation of gravity and magnetic field vectors. Therefore, the proposed feedback laws are computed using direct inertial sensors measurements, that is vector observations with/without angular velocity measurements. Hence, the attitude is not explicitly required. This biomimetic approach is very simple, requires little computational power and is suitable for embedded applications on small control units. The boundedness of the control signal is taken into consideration through the design of the control laws by saturation of the actuators’ input. The asymptotic stability of the closed loop system is proven by Lyapunov analysis. Real-time experiments are carried out on a quadrotor using MEMS inertial sensors in order to emphasize the efficiency of this biomimetic strategy by showing the convergence of the body’s states in hovering mode, as well as the robustness with respect to external disturbances.

  8. On the existence of global strong solutions to the equations modeling a motion of a rigid body around a viscous fluid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečasová, Šárka; Wolf, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 3 (2016), s. 1539-1562 ISSN 1078-0947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : incompressible fluid * motion of rigid body * strong solutions Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.099, year: 2016 http://www.aimsciences.org/journals/displayArticlesnew.jsp?paperID=11589

  9. [Reconstruction of Vehicle-human Crash Accident and Injury Analysis Based on 3D Laser Scanning, Multi-rigid-body Reconstruction and Optimized Genetic Algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J; Wang, T; Li, Z D; Shao, Y; Zhang, Z Y; Feng, H; Zou, D H; Chen, Y J

    2017-12-01

    To reconstruct a vehicle-bicycle-cyclist crash accident and analyse the injuries using 3D laser scanning technology, multi-rigid-body dynamics and optimized genetic algorithm, and to provide biomechanical basis for the forensic identification of death cause. The vehicle was measured by 3D laser scanning technology. The multi-rigid-body models of cyclist, bicycle and vehicle were developed based on the measurements. The value range of optimal variables was set. A multi-objective genetic algorithm and the nondominated sorting genetic algorithm were used to find the optimal solutions, which were compared to the record of the surveillance video around the accident scene. The reconstruction result of laser scanning on vehicle was satisfactory. In the optimal solutions found by optimization method of genetic algorithm, the dynamical behaviours of dummy, bicycle and vehicle corresponded to that recorded by the surveillance video. The injury parameters of dummy were consistent with the situation and position of the real injuries on the cyclist in accident. The motion status before accident, damage process by crash and mechanical analysis on the injury of the victim can be reconstructed using 3D laser scanning technology, multi-rigid-body dynamics and optimized genetic algorithm, which have application value in the identification of injury manner and analysis of death cause in traffic accidents.

  10. A review of a method for dynamic load distribution, dynamical modeling, and explicit internal force control when two manipulators mutually lift and transport a rigid body object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unseren, M.A.

    1997-04-20

    The paper reviews a method for modeling and controlling two serial link manipulators which mutually lift and transport a rigid body object in a three dimensional workspace. A new vector variable is introduced which parameterizes the internal contact force controlled degrees of freedom. A technique for dynamically distributing the payload between the manipulators is suggested which yields a family of solutions for the contact forces and torques the manipulators impart to the object. A set of rigid body kinematic constraints which restrict the values of the joint velocities of both manipulators is derived. A rigid body dynamical model for the closed chain system is first developed in the joint space. The model is obtained by generalizing the previous methods for deriving the model. The joint velocity and acceleration variables in the model are expressed in terms of independent pseudovariables. The pseudospace model is transformed to obtain reduced order equations of motion and a separate set of equations governing the internal components of the contact forces and torques. A theoretic control architecture is suggested which explicitly decouples the two sets of equations comprising the model. The controller enables the designer to develop independent, non-interacting control laws for the position control and internal force control of the system.

  11. Homogenized rigid body and spring-mass (HRBSM) model for the pushover analysis of out-of-plane loaded unreinforced and FRP reinforced walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolesi, Elisa; Milani, Gabriele

    2017-07-01

    The present paper is devoted to the discussion of a series of unreinforced and FRP retrofitted panels analyzed adopting the Rigid Body and Spring-Mass (HRBSM) model developed by the authors. To this scope, a total of four out of plane loaded masonry walls tested up to failure are considered. At a structural level, the non-linear analyses are conducted replacing the homogenized orthotropic continuum with a rigid element and non-linear spring assemblage by means of which out of plane mechanisms are allowed. FRP retrofitting is modeled adopting two noded truss elements whose mechanical properties are selected in order to describe possible debonding phenomenon or tensile rupture of the strengthening. The outcome provided numerically are compared to the experimental results showing a satisfactory agreement in terms of global pressure-deflection curves and failure mechanisms.

  12. An accuracy assessment of different rigid body image registration methods and robotic couch positional corrections using a novel phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing Aitang [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Jameson, Michael G. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Holloway, Lois [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images greatly reduces interfractional patient positional uncertainties. An understanding of uncertainties in the IGRT process itself is essential to ensure appropriate use of this technology. The purpose of this study was to develop a phantom capable of assessing the accuracy of IGRT hardware and software including a 6 degrees of freedom patient positioning system and to investigate the accuracy of the Elekta XVI system in combination with the HexaPOD robotic treatment couch top. Methods: The constructed phantom enabled verification of the three automatic rigid body registrations (gray value, bone, seed) available in the Elekta XVI software and includes an adjustable mount that introduces known rotational offsets to the phantom from its reference position. Repeated positioning of the phantom was undertaken to assess phantom rotational accuracy. Using this phantom the accuracy of the XVI registration algorithms was assessed considering CBCT hardware factors and image resolution together with the residual error in the overall image guidance process when positional corrections were performed through the HexaPOD couch system. Results: The phantom positioning was found to be within 0.04 ({sigma}= 0.12) Degree-Sign , 0.02 ({sigma}= 0.13) Degree-Sign , and -0.03 ({sigma}= 0.06) Degree-Sign in X, Y, and Z directions, respectively, enabling assessment of IGRT with a 6 degrees of freedom patient positioning system. The gray value registration algorithm showed the least error in calculated offsets with maximum mean difference of -0.2({sigma}= 0.4) mm in translational and -0.1({sigma}= 0.1) Degree-Sign in rotational directions for all image resolutions. Bone and seed registration were found to be sensitive to CBCT image resolution. Seed registration was found to be most sensitive demonstrating a maximum mean error of -0.3({sigma}= 0.9) mm and -1.4({sigma}= 1.7) Degree-Sign in translational

  13. An accuracy assessment of different rigid body image registration methods and robotic couch positional corrections using a novel phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing Aitang; Jameson, Michael G.; Holloway, Lois

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images greatly reduces interfractional patient positional uncertainties. An understanding of uncertainties in the IGRT process itself is essential to ensure appropriate use of this technology. The purpose of this study was to develop a phantom capable of assessing the accuracy of IGRT hardware and software including a 6 degrees of freedom patient positioning system and to investigate the accuracy of the Elekta XVI system in combination with the HexaPOD robotic treatment couch top. Methods: The constructed phantom enabled verification of the three automatic rigid body registrations (gray value, bone, seed) available in the Elekta XVI software and includes an adjustable mount that introduces known rotational offsets to the phantom from its reference position. Repeated positioning of the phantom was undertaken to assess phantom rotational accuracy. Using this phantom the accuracy of the XVI registration algorithms was assessed considering CBCT hardware factors and image resolution together with the residual error in the overall image guidance process when positional corrections were performed through the HexaPOD couch system. Results: The phantom positioning was found to be within 0.04 (σ= 0.12)°, 0.02 (σ= 0.13)°, and −0.03 (σ= 0.06)° in X, Y, and Z directions, respectively, enabling assessment of IGRT with a 6 degrees of freedom patient positioning system. The gray value registration algorithm showed the least error in calculated offsets with maximum mean difference of −0.2(σ= 0.4) mm in translational and −0.1(σ= 0.1)° in rotational directions for all image resolutions. Bone and seed registration were found to be sensitive to CBCT image resolution. Seed registration was found to be most sensitive demonstrating a maximum mean error of −0.3(σ= 0.9) mm and −1.4(σ= 1.7)° in translational and rotational directions over low resolution images, and this is reduced to

  14. The influence of abrasive body dimensions on single asperity wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldman, M.; van der Heide, Emile; Tinga, Tiedo; Masen, Marc Arthur

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on the relation between the properties of abrasive bodies and the wear they cause. By performing single asperity scratch tests to simulate abrasive wear, the wear process takes place in a controlled environment, allowing the properties of the abrasive body to be isolated and

  15. Poisson equations of rotational motion for a rigid triaxial body with application to a tumbling artificial satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. J. F.; Fitzpatrick, P. M.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for studying the effects of gravity gradient torque on the attitude stability of a tumbling triaxial rigid satellite. Poisson equations are used to investigate the rotation of the satellite (which is in elliptical orbit about an attracting point mass) about its center of mass. An averaging method is employed to obtain an intermediate set of differential equations for the nonresonant, secular behavior of the osculating elements which describe the rotational motions of the satellite, and the averaged equations are then integrated to obtain long-term secular solutions for the osculating elements.

  16. A systematic analysis of scoring functions in rigid-body protein docking: The delicate balance between the predictive rate improvement and the risk of overtraining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradas-Bautista, Didier; Moal, Iain H; Fernández-Recio, Juan

    2017-07-01

    Protein-protein interactions play fundamental roles in biological processes including signaling, metabolism, and trafficking. While the structure of a protein complex reveals crucial details about the interaction, it is often difficult to acquire this information experimentally. As the number of interactions discovered increases faster than they can be characterized, protein-protein docking calculations may be able to reduce this disparity by providing models of the interacting proteins. Rigid-body docking is a widely used docking approach, and is often capable of generating a pool of models within which a near-native structure can be found. These models need to be scored in order to select the acceptable ones from the set of poses. Recently, more than 100 scoring functions from the CCharPPI server were evaluated for this task using decoy structures generated with SwarmDock. Here, we extend this analysis to identify the predictive success rates of the scoring functions on decoys from three rigid-body docking programs, ZDOCK, FTDock, and SDOCK, allowing us to assess the transferability of the functions. We also apply set-theoretic measure to test whether the scoring functions are capable of identifying near-native poses within different subsets of the benchmark. This information can provide guides for the use of the most efficient scoring function for each docking method, as well as instruct future scoring functions development efforts. Proteins 2017; 85:1287-1297. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Analogies between the torque-free motion of a rigid body about a fixed point and light propagation in anisotropic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellver-Cebreros, Consuelo; Rodriguez-Danta, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    An apparently unnoticed analogy between the torque-free motion of a rotating rigid body about a fixed point and the propagation of light in anisotropic media is stated. First, a new plane construction for visualizing this torque-free motion is proposed. This method uses an intrinsic representation alternative to angular momentum and independent of the modulus of angular velocity ω. The equivalence between this plane construction and the well-known Poinsot's three-dimensional graphical procedure is also shown. From this equivalence, analogies have been found between the general plane wave equation (relation of dispersion) in anisotropic media and basic equations of torque-free motion of a rigid body about a fixed point. These analogies allow reciprocal transfer of results between optics and mechanics and, as an example, reinterpretation of the internal conical refraction phenomenon in biaxial media is carried out. This paper is intended as an interdisciplinary application of analogies for students and teachers in the context of intermediate physics courses at university level

  18. Rigid Motion and Adapted Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Stephen N.

    The aim here is to describe the rigid motion of a continuous medium in special and general relativity. Section 7.1 defines a rigid rod in special relativity, and Sect. 7.2 shows the link with the space coordinates of a certain kind of accelerating frame in flat spacetimes. Section 7.3 then sets up a notation for describing the arbitrary smooth motion of a continuous medium in general curved spacetimes, defining the proper metric of such a medium. Section 7.4 singles out rigid motions and shows that the rod in Sect. 7.1 undergoes rigid motion in the more generally defined sense. Section 7.5 defines a rate of strain tensor for a continuous medium in general relativity and reformulates the rigidity criterion. Section 7.6 aims to classify all possible rigid motions in special relativity, reemphasizing the link with semi-Euclidean frames adapted to accelerating observers in special relativity. Then, Sects. 7.7 and 7.8 describe rigid motion without rotation and rigid rotation, respectively. Along the way we introduce the notion of Fermi-Walker transport and discuss its relevance for rigid motions. Section 7.9 brings together all the above themes in an account of a recent generalization of the notion of uniform acceleration, thereby characterizing a wide class of rigid motions.

  19. Mechanical impedance of the sitting human body in single-axis compared to multi-axis whole-body vibration exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmlund, P; Lundström, R

    2001-01-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the mechanical impedance of the sitting human body and to compare data obtained in laboratory single-axis investigations with multi-axis data from in vehicle measurements. The experiments were performed in a laboratory for single-axis measurements. The multi-axis exposure was generated with an eight-seat minibus where the rear seats had been replaced with a rigid one. The subjects in the multi-axis experiment all participated in the single-axis experiments. There are quite a few investigations in the literature describing the human response to single-axis exposure. The response from the human body can be expected to be affected by multi-axis input in a different way than from a single-axis exposure. The present knowledge of the effect of multiple axis exposure is very limited. The measurements were performed using a specially designed force and accelerometer plate. This plate was placed between the subject and the hard seat. Outcome shows a clear difference between mechanical impedance for multi-axis exposure compared to single-axis. This is especially clear in the x-direction where the difference is very large. The conclusion is that it seems unlikely that single-axis mechanical impedance data can be directly transferred to a multi-axis environment. This is due to the force cross-talk between different directions.

  20. Explicit symplectic integrators of molecular dynamics algorithms for rigid-body molecules in the canonical, isobaric-isothermal, and related ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Hisashi; Itoh, Satoru G; Okamoto, Yuko

    2007-02-28

    The authors propose explicit symplectic integrators of molecular dynamics (MD) algorithms for rigid-body molecules in the canonical and isobaric-isothermal ensembles. They also present a symplectic algorithm in the constant normal pressure and lateral surface area ensemble and that combined with the Parrinello-Rahman algorithm. Employing the symplectic integrators for MD algorithms, there is a conserved quantity which is close to Hamiltonian. Therefore, they can perform a MD simulation more stably than by conventional nonsymplectic algorithms. They applied this algorithm to a TIP3P pure water system at 300 K and compared the time evolution of the Hamiltonian with those by the nonsymplectic algorithms. They found that the Hamiltonian was conserved well by the symplectic algorithm even for a time step of 4 fs. This time step is longer than typical values of 0.5-2 fs which are used by the conventional nonsymplectic algorithms.

  1. Estimating temperature-dependent anisotropic hydrogen displacements with the invariom database and a new segmented rigid-body analysis program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübben, Jens; Bourhis, Luc J; Dittrich, Birger

    2015-12-01

    Invariom partitioning and notation are used to estimate anisotropic hydrogen displacements for incorporation in crystallographic refinement models. Optimized structures of the generalized invariom database and their frequency computations provide the information required: frequencies are converted to internal atomic displacements and combined with the results of a TLS (translation-libration-screw) fit of experimental non-hydrogen anisotropic displacement parameters to estimate those of H atoms. Comparison with TLS+ONIOM and neutron diffraction results for four example structures where high-resolution X-ray and neutron data are available show that electron density transferability rules established in the invariom approach are also suitable for streamlining the transfer of atomic vibrations. A new segmented-body TLS analysis program called APD-Toolkit has been coded to overcome technical limitations of the established program THMA . The influence of incorporating hydrogen anisotropic displacement parameters on conventional refinement is assessed.

  2. A parametric study of the behavior of the angular momentum vector during spin rate changes of rigid body spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longuski, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    During a spin-up or spin-down maneuver of a spinning spacecraft, it is usual to have not only a constant body-fixed torque about the desired spin axis, but also small undesired constant torques about the transverse axes. This causes the orientation of the angular momentum vector to change in inertial space. Since an analytic solution is available for the angular momentum vector as a function of time, this behavior can be studied for large variations of the dynamic parameters, such as the initial spin rate, the inertial properties and the torques. As an example, the spin-up and spin-down maneuvers of the Galileo spacecraft was studied and as a result, very simple heuristic solutions were discovered which provide very good approximations to the parametric behavior of the angular momentum vector orientation.

  3. Semi-rigid single hook localization the best method for localizing ground glass opacities during video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery: re-aerated swine lung experimental and primary clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guang; Sun, Long; Geng, Guojun; Liu, Hongming; Li, Ning; Liu, Suhuan; Hao, Bing; Yu, Xiuyi; Jiang, Jie

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of currently available preoperative localization methods, including semi-rigid single hook-wire, double-thorn hook-wire, and microcoil, in localizing the pulmonary nodules, thus to select the best technology to assist video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for small ground glass opacities (GGO). Preoperative CT-guided localizing techniques including semi-rigid single hook-wire, double-thorn hook-wire and microcoil were used in re-aerated fresh swine lung for location experiments. The advantages and drawbacks of the three positioning technologies were compared, and then the most optimal technique was used in patients with GGO. Technical success and post-operative complications were used as primary endpoints. All three localizing techniques were successfully performed in the re-aerated fresh swine lung. The median tractive force of semi-rigid single hook wire, double-thorn hook wire and microcoil were 6.5, 4.85 and 0.2 N, which measured by a spring dynamometer. The wound sizes in the superficial pleura, caused by unplugging the needles, were 2 mm in double-thorn hook wire, 1 mm in semi-rigid single hook and 1 mm in microcoil, respectively. In patients with GGOs, the semi-rigid hook wires localizations were successfully performed, without any complication that need to be intervened. Dislodgement was reported in one patient before VATS. No major complications related to the preoperative hook wire localization and VATS were observed. We found from our localization experiments in the swine lung that, among the commonly used three localization methods, semi-rigid hook wire showed the best operability and practicability than double-thorn hook wire and microcoil. Preoperative localization of small pulmonary nodules with single semi-rigid hook wire system shows a high success rate, acceptable utility and especially low dislodgement in VATS.

  4. Enstatite, Mg2Si2O6: A neutron diffraction refinement of the crystal structure and a rigid-body analysis of the thermal vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghose, S.; Schomaker, V.; McMullan, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    Synthetic enstatite, Mg 2 Si 2 O 6 , is orthorhombic, space group Pbca, with eight formula units per cell and lattice parameters a = 18.235(3), b = 8.818(1), c = 5.179(1) A at 23 0 C. A least-squares structure refinement based on 1790 neutron intensity data converged with an agreement factor R(F 2 ) = 0.032, yielding Mg-O and Si-O bond lengths with standard deviations of 0.0007 and 0.0008 A, respectively. The variations observed in the Si-O bond lengths within the silicate tetrahedra A and B are caused by the differences in primary coordination of the oxygen atoms and the proximity of the magnesium ions to the silicon atoms. The latter effect is most pronounced for the bridging bonds of tetrahedron. A. The smallest O-Si-O angle is the result of edge-sharing by the Mg(2) octahedron and the A tetrahedron. An analysis of rigid-body thermal vibrations of the two crystallographically independent [SiO 4 ] tetrahedra indicates considerable librational motion, leading to a thermal correction of apparent Si-O bond lengths as large as +0.002 A at room temperature. (orig.)

  5. Real-time correction of rigid body motion-induced phase errors for diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Rafael; Aksoy, Murat; Aboussouan, Eric; Peterson, Eric; Van, Anh; Bammer, Roland

    2015-02-01

    Diffusion contrast in diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is generated through the constructive addition of signal from many coherence pathways. Motion-induced phase causes destructive interference which results in loss of signal magnitude and diffusion contrast. In this work, a three-dimensional (3D) navigator-based real-time correction of the rigid body motion-induced phase errors is developed for diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession MRI. The efficacy of the real-time prospective correction method in preserving phase coherence of the steady state is tested in 3D phantom experiments and 3D scans of healthy human subjects. In nearly all experiments, the signal magnitude in images obtained with proposed prospective correction was higher than the signal magnitude in images obtained with no correction. In the human subjects, the mean magnitude signal in the data was up to 30% higher with prospective motion correction than without. Prospective correction never resulted in a decrease in mean signal magnitude in either the data or in the images. The proposed prospective motion correction method is shown to preserve the phase coherence of the steady state in diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession MRI, thus mitigating signal magnitude losses that would confound the desired diffusion contrast. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Whole-body single-cell sequencing reveals transcriptional domains in the annelid larval body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achim, Kaia; Eling, Nils; Vergara, Hernando Martinez; Bertucci, Paola Yanina; Musser, Jacob; Vopalensky, Pavel; Brunet, Thibaut; Collier, Paul; Benes, Vladimir; Marioni, John C; Arendt, Detlev

    2018-01-24

    Animal bodies comprise diverse arrays of cells. To characterise cellular identities across an entire body, we have compared the transcriptomes of single cells randomly picked from dissociated whole larvae of the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii. We identify five transcriptionally distinct groups of differentiated cells, each expressing a unique set of transcription factors and effector genes that implement cellular phenotypes. Spatial mapping of cells into a cellular expression atlas, and wholemount in situ hybridisation of group-specific genes reveals spatially coherent transcriptional domains in the larval body, comprising e.g. apical sensory-neurosecretory cells vs. neural/epidermal surface cells. These domains represent new, basic subdivisions of the annelid body based entirely on differential gene expression, and are composed of multiple, transcriptionally similar cell types. They do not represent clonal domains, as revealed by developmental lineage analysis. We propose that the transcriptional domains that subdivide the annelid larval body represent families of related cell types that have arisen by evolutionary diversification. Their possible evolutionary conservation makes them a promising tool for evo-devo research. (167/250). © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. New aspects in single-body meteor physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecina, P.; Ceplecha, Z.

    1983-03-01

    An exact analytical solution of the atmospheric meteoroid single-body problem is presented expressing the distance along the trajectory as a function of time, which yields a least-square fit of the observed trajectory, and analytical expressions for the velocity at the point of maximum deceleration are derived. These results are used to determine the ablation coefficient from observations. These methods are applied to 17 Prairie Network fireballs observed below the maximum deceleration point and to the Innisfree fireball, and the results are found to be superior to the ones obtained with the usual interpolation formula. A model of luminous efficiencies for small velocities and for masses up to several hundred grams based on data on Innisfree and on artificial rocketry meteors is proposed and applied to separate the shape-density coefficient from the meteoroid mass.

  8. Hematological changes after single large dose half-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, T.; Friedrich, S.; Jochem, I.; Eberhardt, H.J.; Koch, R.; Knorr, A.

    1981-01-01

    The determination of different peripheral blood parameters aimed at the study of side effects on the hematological cellular system following a 5 - 8 Gy single large dose half-body irradiation in 20 patients. Compared to the initial values the leukocytes between the 6. and 14., the thrombocytes between the 14. and 21. postirradiation day as well as the lymphocytes between 3 hours and 4 weeks postirradiation were significantly decreased without exhibiting complications such as hemorrhages or infections. The hemoglobin, hematocrit and reticulocyte values revealed but a slight decrease normalized within a 28 days postirradiation period. Transfusions were necessary when a tumor-caused anemia was present prior to irradiation. Changes in serum activity of aminotransferases and lactate dehydrogenase occured during the first hours after irradiation and were due to enzyme release from destroyed tumor cells

  9. A review of a method for dynamic load distribution, dynamic modeling, and explicit internal force control when two serial link manipulators mutually lift and transport a rigid body object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unseren, M.A.

    1997-09-01

    The report reviews a method for modeling and controlling two serial link manipulators which mutually lift and transport a rigid body object in a three dimensional workspace. A new vector variable is introduced which parameterizes the internal contact force controlled degrees of freedom. A technique for dynamically distributing the payload between the manipulators is suggested which yields a family of solutions for the contact forces and torques the manipulators impart to the object. A set of rigid body kinematic constraints which restricts the values of the joint velocities of both manipulators is derived. A rigid body dynamical model for the closed chain system is first developed in the joint space. The model is obtained by generalizing the previous methods for deriving the model. The joint velocity and acceleration variables in the model are expressed in terms of independent pseudovariables. The pseudospace model is transformed to obtain reduced order equations of motion and a separate set of equations governing the internal components of the contact forces and torques. A theoretic control architecture is suggested which explicitly decouples the two sets of equations comprising the model. The controller enables the designer to develop independent, non-interacting control laws for the position control and internal force control of the system.

  10. Marrow toxicity of fractionated vs. single dose total body irradiation is identical in a canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storb, R.; Raff, R.F.; Graham, T.; Appelbaum, F.R.; Deeg, H.J.; Schuening, F.G.; Shulman, H.; Pepe, M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors explored in dogs the marrow toxicity of single dose total body irradiation delivered from two opposing 60 Co sources at a rate of 10 cGy/min and compared results to those seen with total body irradiation administered in 100 cGy fractions with minimum interfraction intervals of 6 hr. Dogs were not given marrow transplants. They found that 200 cGy single dose total body irradiation was sublethal, with 12 of 13 dogs showing hematopoietic recovery and survival. Seven of 21 dogs given 300 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to 6 of 10 dogs given 300 cGy fractionated total body irradiation. One of 28 dogs given 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to none of six given fractionated radiation. With granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) administered from day 0-21 after 400 cGy total body irradiation, most dogs survived with hematological recovery. Because of the almost uniform success with GCSF after 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation, a study of GCSF after 400 cGy fractionated total body irradiation was deemed not to be informative and, thus, not carried out. Additional comparisons between single dose and fractionated total body irradiation were carried out with GCSF administered after 500 and 600 cGy of total body irradiation. As with lower doses of total body irradiation, no significant survival differences were seen between the two modes of total body irradiation, and only 3 of 26 dogs studied survived with complete hematological recovery. Overall, therefore, survival among dogs given single dose total body irradiation was not different from that of dogs given fractionated total body irradiation (p = .67). Similarly, the slopes of the postirradiation declines of granulocyte and platelet counts and the rates of their recovery in surviving dogs given equal total doses of single versus fractionated total body irradiation were indistinguishable. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Channel characterization for single- and multiple-antenna wearable systems used for indoor body-to-body communications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotton, Simon L.; Scanlon, W.G.

    In this paper, an analysis of radio channel characteristics for single- and multiple-antenna bodyworn systems for use in body-to-body communications is presented. The work was based on an extensive measurement campaign conducted at 2.45 GHz representative of an indoor sweep and search scenario for

  12. Implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin methods and interfacial gauge methods for high-order accurate interface dynamics, with applications to surface tension dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free surface flow: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2017-09-01

    In this two-part paper, a high-order accurate implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin (dG) framework is developed for fluid interface dynamics, facilitating precise computation of interfacial fluid flow in evolving geometries. The framework uses implicitly defined meshes-wherein a reference quadtree or octree grid is combined with an implicit representation of evolving interfaces and moving domain boundaries-and allows physically prescribed interfacial jump conditions to be imposed or captured with high-order accuracy. Part one discusses the design of the framework, including: (i) high-order quadrature for implicitly defined elements and faces; (ii) high-order accurate discretisation of scalar and vector-valued elliptic partial differential equations with interfacial jumps in ellipticity coefficient, leading to optimal-order accuracy in the maximum norm and discrete linear systems that are symmetric positive (semi)definite; (iii) the design of incompressible fluid flow projection operators, which except for the influence of small penalty parameters, are discretely idempotent; and (iv) the design of geometric multigrid methods for elliptic interface problems on implicitly defined meshes and their use as preconditioners for the conjugate gradient method. Also discussed is a variety of aspects relating to moving interfaces, including: (v) dG discretisations of the level set method on implicitly defined meshes; (vi) transferring state between evolving implicit meshes; (vii) preserving mesh topology to accurately compute temporal derivatives; (viii) high-order accurate reinitialisation of level set functions; and (ix) the integration of adaptive mesh refinement. In part two, several applications of the implicit mesh dG framework in two and three dimensions are presented, including examples of single phase flow in nontrivial geometry, surface tension-driven two phase flow with phase-dependent fluid density and viscosity, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free

  13. Implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin methods and interfacial gauge methods for high-order accurate interface dynamics, with applications to surface tension dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free surface flow: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2017-09-01

    In this two-part paper, a high-order accurate implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin (dG) framework is developed for fluid interface dynamics, facilitating precise computation of interfacial fluid flow in evolving geometries. The framework uses implicitly defined meshes-wherein a reference quadtree or octree grid is combined with an implicit representation of evolving interfaces and moving domain boundaries-and allows physically prescribed interfacial jump conditions to be imposed or captured with high-order accuracy. Part one discusses the design of the framework, including: (i) high-order quadrature for implicitly defined elements and faces; (ii) high-order accurate discretisation of scalar and vector-valued elliptic partial differential equations with interfacial jumps in ellipticity coefficient, leading to optimal-order accuracy in the maximum norm and discrete linear systems that are symmetric positive (semi)definite; (iii) the design of incompressible fluid flow projection operators, which except for the influence of small penalty parameters, are discretely idempotent; and (iv) the design of geometric multigrid methods for elliptic interface problems on implicitly defined meshes and their use as preconditioners for the conjugate gradient method. Also discussed is a variety of aspects relating to moving interfaces, including: (v) dG discretisations of the level set method on implicitly defined meshes; (vi) transferring state between evolving implicit meshes; (vii) preserving mesh topology to accurately compute temporal derivatives; (viii) high-order accurate reinitialisation of level set functions; and (ix) the integration of adaptive mesh refinement. In part two, several applications of the implicit mesh dG framework in two and three dimensions are presented, including examples of single phase flow in nontrivial geometry, surface tension-driven two phase flow with phase-dependent fluid density and viscosity, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free

  14. A variable parameter single degree-of-freedom model for predicting the effects of sitting posture and vibration magnitude on the vertical apparent mass of the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toward, Martin G R; Griffin, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Models of the vertical apparent mass of the human body are mostly restricted to a sitting posture unsupported by a backrest and ignore the variations in apparent mass associated with changes in posture and changes in the magnitude of vibration. Using findings from experimental research, this study fitted a single degree-of-freedom lumped parameter model to the measured vertical apparent mass of the body measured with a range of sitting postures and vibration magnitudes. The resulting model reflects the effects of reclining a rigid backrest or reclining a foam backrest (from 0 to 30 degrees), the effects of moving the hands from the lap to a steering wheel, the effects of moving the horizontal position of the feet, and the effects of vibration magnitude (from 0.125 to 1.6 ms(-2) r.m.s.). The error between the modelled and the measured apparent mass was minimised, for both the apparent masses of individual subjects and the median apparent masses of groups of 12 subjects, for each sitting posture and each vibration magnitude. Trends in model parameters, the damping ratios, and the damped natural frequencies were identified as a function of the model variables and show the effects of posture and vibration magnitude on body dynamics. For example, contact with a rigid backrest increased the derived damped natural frequency of the principal resonance as a result of reduced moving mass and increased stiffness. When the rigid backrest was reclined from 0 to 30º, the damping decreased and the resonance frequency increased as a result of reduced moving mass. It is concluded that, by appropriate variations in model parameters, a single degree-of-freedom model can provide a useful fit to the vertical apparent mass of the human body over a wide range of postures and vibration magnitudes. When measuring or modelling seat transmissibility, it may be difficult to justify an apparent mass model with more than a single degree-of-freedom if it does not reflect the large influences of

  15. Rigid-body motion correction of the liver in image reconstruction for golden-angle stack-of-stars DCE MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Adam; Balter, James; Cao, Yue

    2018-03-01

    Respiratory motion can affect pharmacokinetic perfusion parameters quantified from liver dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Image registration can be used to align dynamic images after reconstruction. However, intra-image motion blur remains after alignment and can alter the shape of contrast-agent uptake curves. We introduce a method to correct for inter- and intra-image motion during image reconstruction. Sixteen liver dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI examinations of nine subjects were performed using a golden-angle stack-of-stars sequence. For each examination, an image time series with high temporal resolution but severe streak artifacts was reconstructed. Images were aligned using region-limited rigid image registration within a region of interest covering the liver. The transformations resulting from alignment were used to correct raw data for motion by modulating and rotating acquired lines in k-space. The corrected data were then reconstructed using view sharing. Portal-venous input functions extracted from motion-corrected images had significantly greater peak signal enhancements (mean increase: 16%, t-test, P <  0.001) than those from images aligned using image registration after reconstruction. In addition, portal-venous perfusion maps estimated from motion-corrected images showed fewer artifacts close to the edge of the liver. Motion-corrected image reconstruction restores uptake curves distorted by motion. Motion correction also reduces motion artifacts in estimated perfusion parameter maps. Magn Reson Med 79:1345-1353, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Rigidity and symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Asia; Whiteley, Walter

    2014-01-01

    This book contains recent contributions to the fields of rigidity and symmetry with two primary focuses: to present the mathematically rigorous treatment of rigidity of structures, and to explore the interaction of geometry, algebra, and combinatorics. Overall, the book shows how researchers from diverse backgrounds explore connections among the various discrete structures with symmetry as the unifying theme.  Contributions present recent trends and advances in discrete geometry, particularly in the theory of polytopes. The rapid development of abstract polytope theory has resulted in a rich theory featuring an attractive interplay of methods and tools from discrete geometry, group theory, classical geometry, hyperbolic geometry and topology.  The volume will also be a valuable source as an introduction to the ideas of both combinatorial and geometric rigidity theory and its applications, incorporating the surprising impact of symmetry. It will appeal to students at both the advanced undergraduate and gradu...

  17. Robust embryo identification using first polar body single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treff, Nathan R; Su, Jing; Kasabwala, Natasha; Tao, Xin; Miller, Kathleen A; Scott, Richard T

    2010-05-01

    This study sought to validate a novel, minimally invasive system for embryo tracking by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting of the first polar body. First polar body-based assignments of which embryos implanted and were delivered after multiple ET were 100% consistent with previously validated embryo DNA fingerprinting-based assignments. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Early recognition is important when multiple magnets masquerade as a single chain after foreign body ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auriel August

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ingestions of multiple magnets can lead to serious damage to the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, these foreign bodies can take deceptive shapes such as single chains which may mislead clinicians. We report the case of a ten-year-old boy who swallowed 33 magnets, the most yet reported, which took on the appearance of a single loop in the stomach, while actually being located in the stomach, small bowel, and colon. Early recognition and prompt intervention are necessary to avoid complications of this foreign body misadventure.

  19. On Multifractal Rigidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meson, Alejandro M., E-mail: meson@iflysib.unlp.edu.ar; Vericat, Fernando, E-mail: vericat@iflysib.unlp.edu.ar [CONICET-UNLP, Instituto de Fisica de Liquidos y Sistemas Biologicos (IFLYSIB) (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    We analyze when a multifractal spectrum can be used to recover the potential. This phenomenon is known as multifractal rigidity. We prove that for a certain class of potentials the multifractal spectrum of local entropies uniquely determines their equilibrium states. This leads to a classification which identifies two systems up to a change of variables.

  20. Realtime Reconstruction of an Animating Human Body from a Single Depth Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Cheng, Zhi-Quan; Lai, Chao; Martin, Ralph R; Dang, Gang

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for realtime reconstruction of an animating human body,which produces a sequence of deforming meshes representing a given performance captured by a single commodity depth camera. We achieve realtime single-view mesh completion by enhancing the parameterized SCAPE model.Our method, which we call Realtime SCAPE, performs full-body reconstruction without the use of markers.In Realtime SCAPE, estimations of body shape parameters and pose parameters, needed for reconstruction, are decoupled. Intrinsic body shape is first precomputed for a given subject, by determining shape parameters with the aid of a body shape database. Subsequently, per-frame pose parameter estimation is performed by means of linear blending skinning (LBS); the problem is decomposed into separately finding skinning weights and transformations. The skinning weights are also determined offline from the body shape database,reducing online reconstruction to simply finding the transformations in LBS. Doing so is formulated as a linear variational problem;carefully designed constraints are used to impose temporal coherence and alleviate artifacts. Experiments demonstrate that our method can produce full-body mesh sequences with high fidelity.

  1. Flexible ultrathin-body single-photon avalanche diode sensors and CMOS integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, P.; Ishihara, R.; Charbon, E.

    2016-01-01

    We proposed the world’s first flexible ultrathin-body single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) as photon counting device providing a suitable solution to advanced implantable bio-compatible chronic medical monitoring, diagnostics and other applications. In this paper, we investigate the Geiger-mode

  2. Changes in behaviour and body weight following a single or double social defeat in rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, P.; Overkamp, G.J.F.; Daan, S.; Hoofdakker, R.H. van den; Koolhaas, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    In a series of experiments, the consequences of a single and double social conflict on various behaviours and body weight in rats were studied. Animals were subjected to social defeat by placing them into the territory of an aggressive male conspecific for one hour, either once, or twice at the same

  3. Rigid supersymmetry with boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, D.V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Van Nieuwenhuizen, P. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). C.N. Yang Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2008-01-15

    We construct rigidly supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary actions, both in x-space and in superspace. For each standard supersymmetric bulk action a minimal supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary action follows from an extended F- or D-term formula. Additional separately supersymmetric boundary actions can be systematically constructed using co-dimension one multiplets (boundary superfields). We also discuss the orbit of boundary conditions which follow from the Euler-Lagrange variational principle. (orig.)

  4. Rigid supersymmetry with boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, D.V.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, P.

    2008-01-01

    We construct rigidly supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary actions, both in x-space and in superspace. For each standard supersymmetric bulk action a minimal supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary action follows from an extended F- or D-term formula. Additional separately supersymmetric boundary actions can be systematically constructed using co-dimension one multiplets (boundary superfields). We also discuss the orbit of boundary conditions which follow from the Euler-Lagrange variational principle. (orig.)

  5. Self-Assembly of "Chalcone" Type Push-Pull Dye Molecules into Organic Single Crystalline Microribbons and Rigid Microrods for Vis/NIR Range Photonic Cavity Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattikunta, Radhika; Venkatakrishnarao, Dasari; Mohiddon, Mahamad Ahamad; Chandrasekar, Rajadurai

    2016-11-04

    A novel supramolecular fluorescent donor-acceptor type dye molecule, (2E,4E)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(pyren-1-yl)penta-2,4-dien-1-one (HPPD) self-assembles in a mixture of ethanol/chloroform through intermolecular π-π stacking (distance ca. 3.384 Å) to form J-aggregated single-crystalline microribbons displaying Fabry-Pèrot (F-P) type visible-range optical resonance. The corresponding borondifluoride dye (HPPD-BF), with a reduced HOMO-LUMO gap, self-assembles into crystalline microrods acting as an F-P type resonator in the near-infrared (NIR) range. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Rigid origami vertices: conditions and forcing sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Abel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We develop an intrinsic necessary and sufficient condition for single-vertex origami crease patterns to be able to fold rigidly.  We classify such patterns in the case where the creases are pre-assigned to be mountains and valleys as well as in the unassigned case.  We also illustrate the utility of this result by applying it to the new concept of minimal forcing sets for rigid origami models, which are the smallest collection of creases that, when folded, will force all the other creases to fold in a prescribed way.

  7. Enstatite, Mg/sub 2/Si/sub 2/O/sub 6/: A neutron diffraction refinement of the crystal structure and a rigid-body analysis of the thermal vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, S.; Schomaker, V.; McMullan, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    Synthetic enstatite, Mg/sub 2/Si/sub 2/O/sub 6/, is orthorhombic, space group Pbca, with eight formula units per cell and lattice parameters a = 18.235(3), b = 8.818(1), c = 5.179(1) A at 23/sup 0/C. A least-squares structure refinement based on 1790 neutron intensity data converged with an agreement factor R(F/sup 2/) = 0.032, yielding Mg-O and Si-O bond lengths with standard deviations of 0.0007 and 0.0008 A, respectively. The variations observed in the Si-O bond lengths within the silicate tetrahedra A and B are caused by the differences in primary coordination of the oxygen atoms and the proximity of the magnesium ions to the silicon atoms. The latter effect is most pronounced for the bridging bonds of tetrahedron. A. The smallest O-Si-O angle is the result of edge-sharing by the Mg(2) octahedron and the A tetrahedron. An analysis of rigid-body thermal vibrations of the two crystallographically independent (SiO/sub 4/) tetrahedra indicates considerable librational motion, leading to a thermal correction of apparent Si-O bond lengths as large as +0.002 A at room temperature.

  8. Left ventricular rigid body rotation in a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patient with cardiac involvement: A case from the three-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiographic MAGYAR-Path Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Földeák, Dóra; Kalapos, Anita; Domsik, Péter; Sinkó, Mária; Szeleczki, Nóra; Bagdi, Enikő; Krenács, László; Forster, Tamás; Borbényi, Zita; Nemes, Attila

    2017-02-01

    Secondary myocardial involvement by diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is a rare occurrence. Left ventricular (LV) twist is considered an essential part of LV function. In normal circumstances LV twist results from the movement of two orthogonally oriented muscular bands of a helical myocardial structure with consequent clockwise rotation of the base and counterclockwise rotation of the apex. Three-dimensional (3D) speckle-tracking echocardiography (3DSTE) has been found to be feasible for non-invasive 3D quantification of LV wall motion and rotational mechanics. The present report aimed to assess LV twisting motion in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with positron emission tomography/computer tomography-proven cardiac involvement by 3DSTE. During 3DSTE, reduction in some segmental radial, longitudinal, circumferential, area and 3D LV strains were found. Apical and basal LV rotations were found to be in the same counterclockwise direction, confirming near absence of LV twist - so-called rigid body rotation. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Two-body tunnel transitions in a Mn 4 single-molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Bhaduri, S.; Tiron, R.; Hendrickson, D. N.; Christou, G.

    2004-05-01

    The one-body tunnel picture of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) is not always sufficient to explain the measured tunnel transitions. An improvement to the picture is proposed by including also two-body tunnel transitions such as spin-spin cross-relaxation (SSCR) which are mediated by dipolar and weak superexchange interactions between molecules. A Mn 4 SMM is used as a model system. At certain external fields, SSCRs lead to additional quantum resonances which show up in hysteresis loop measurements as well-defined steps.

  10. Single Whole-Body Cryostimulation Procedure versus Single Dry Sauna Bath: Comparison of Oxidative Impact on Healthy Male Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Sutkowy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to extreme heat and cold is one of the environmental factors whose action is precisely based on the mechanisms involving free radicals. Fluctuations in ambient temperature are among the agents that toughen the human organism. The goal of the study was to evaluate the impact of extremely high (dry sauna, DS and low (whole-body cryostimulation, WBC environmental temperatures on the oxidant-antioxidant equilibrium in the blood of healthy male subjects. The subjects performed a single DS bath (n=10; 26.2 ± 4.6 years and a single WBC procedure (n=15; 27.5 ± 3.1 years. In the subjects’ blood taken immediately before and 20 min after the interventions, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in erythrocytes (TBARSer and blood plasma (TBARSpl were determined. Single WBC and DS procedures induced an increase in the activity of SOD and GPx, as well as SOD and CAT, respectively. The SOD activity was higher after WBC than after DS. Extremely high and low temperatures probably induce the formation of reactive oxygen species in the organisms of healthy men and, therefore, disturb the oxidant-antioxidant balance.

  11. Rigidity loss in disordered network materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbroek, Wouter G.; Hagh, Varda F.; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, M. F.; van Hecke, Martin

    Weakly jammed sphere packings show a very peculiar elasticity, with a ratio of compression modulus to shear modulus that diverges as the number of contacts approaches the minimum required for rigidity. Creating artificial isotropic network materials with this property is a challenge: so far, the least elaborate way to generate them is to actually simulate weakly compressed repulsive spheres. The next steps in designing such networks hinge upon a solid understanding of what properties of the sphere-packing derived network are essential for its elasticity. We elucidate the topological aspects of this question by comparing the rigidity transition in these networks to that in other random spring network models, including the common bond-diluted triangular net and a self-stress-free variant of that. We use the pebble game algorithm for identifying rigid clusters in mechanical networks to demonstrate that the marginally rigid state in sphere packings is perfectly isostatic everywhere, and the addition or removal of a single bond creates a globally stressed or globally floppy network, respectively. By contrast, the other classes of random network random networks show a more localized response to addition and removal of bonds, and, correspondingly, a more gradual rigidity transition.

  12. Parasympathetic activity and blood catecholamine responses following a single partial-body cryostimulation and a whole-body cryostimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Hausswirth

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a single whole-body cryostimulation (WBC and a partial-body cryostimulation (PBC (i.e., not exposing the head to cold on indices of parasympathetic activity and blood catecholamines. Two groups of 15 participants were assigned either to a 3-min WBC or PBC session, while 10 participants constituted a control group (CON not receiving any cryostimulation. Changes in thermal, physiological and subjective variables were recorded before and during the 20-min after each cryostimulation. According to a qualitative statistical analysis, an almost certain decrease in skin temperature was reported for all body regions immediately after the WBC (mean decrease±90% CL, -13.7±0.7°C and PBC (-8.3±0.3°C, which persisted up to 20-min after the session. The tympanic temperature almost certainly decreased only after the WBC session (-0.32±0.04°C. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were very likely increased after the WBC session, whereas these changes were trivial in the other groups. In addition, heart rate almost certainly decreased after PBC (-10.9% and WBC (-15.2% sessions, in a likely greater proportion for WBC compared to PBC. Resting vagal-related heart rate variability indices (the root-mean square difference of successive normal R-R intervals, RMSSD, and high frequency band, HF were very likely increased after PBC (RMSSD: +54.4%, HF: +138% and WBC (RMSSD: +85.2%, HF: +632% sessions without any marked difference between groups. Plasma norepinephrine concentrations were likely to very likely increased after PBC (+57.4% and WBC (+76.2%, respectively. Finally, cold and comfort sensations were almost certainly altered after WBC and PBC, sensation of discomfort being likely more pronounced after WBC than PBC. Both acute cryostimulation techniques effectively stimulated the autonomic nervous system (ANS, with a predominance of parasympathetic tone activation. The results of this study also suggest

  13. Locomotion in a planar ideal fluid by a singly actuated elastic body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Scott; Abrajan-Guerrero, Rodrigo

    An aquatic vehicle with a single internal degree of freedom can propel itself by exploiting symmetry-breaking phenomena like vortex shedding, but the manipulation of added-mass effects to achieve locomotion in an ideal fluid - essentially exploiting rather than breaking finite- and infinite-dimensional symmetries - requires a swimming body to execute changes over time in at least two independent shape parameters. Such parameters may be under direct control, and prior work has addressed the design of optimal gaits for swimmers in ideal fluids under this assumption, but may also evolve dynamically as a result of partial actuation and body elasticity. This talk will describe the planar locomotion of a singly actuated jointed robot exploiting limit cycles arising in its internal shape as a result of periodic actuation.

  14. Modelling a short-wake meteor as a single or fragmenting body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Brown, M.

    2017-09-01

    An attempt is made to model a meteor observed with the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory tracking system using a single body model. This meteor showed only very faint wake, implying that fragmentation was not important. Previous attempts to model the meteor with models of fragmenting meteors had overpredicted the amount of wake seen. A single-body, non-homogeneous ablation code was developed, but proved unsuccessful at matching the observed light curve of the meteor, even after a thorough search of parameter space. A model of a meteoroid fragmenting in many small bursts of small fragments was developed in an attempt to match both the light curve and the observed wake, and it succeeded in producing a qualitative fit to the light curve and to the high-resolution wake.

  15. The rigid body obliquity history of mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bills, B.G.

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to explore the range of uncertainty in the obliquity history of Mars associated with the present uncertainty in the axial precession rate. The obliquity, or angular separation between the spin axis and the orbit normal, is the most important parameter for determining the seasonal and latitudinal pattern of insolation. Thus significant variations in obliquity are a likely source of major climatic variations on Mars. The present obliquity is well known, and the torques acting to reorient the spin axis of Mars can be readily calculated for time spans of order 10 7 years into the past (or future). The primary limitation to reconstructing the obliquity history is uncertainty in the mean moment of inertial of Mars, which governs its response to the applied torques. The range of axial precession rates corresponding to recent theoretical estimates of the moment of inertial is 8.29-8.77 arc sec/yr, but even the most recent observational limits are still much broader: 8-12 arc sec/yr. Nominal estimates of the axial precession rate suggest that resonant amplification of a number of small terms in the orbital inclination series will lead to significant variations in the obliquity of Mars, a behavior much different from the Earth. The major variations are on a 10 5 year time scale, with significant amplitude modulation on a 10 6 year time scale. Because of this resonant amplification, estimates of the obliquity history depend very sensitively on assumed values for the axial precession rate. Three different analytic techniques are applied to the obliquity problem. Both linear perturbation analysis and direct numerical integration of the governing differential equations can be used to obtain an obliquity time series, once a model value is selected for the moment of inertia

  16. Rigid body essential X-ray crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Esben Jannik; Biggin, Philip C

    2008-01-01

    The ligand-binding domain (LBD) from the ionotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2 (GluR2) has been shown to adopt a range of ligand-dependent conformational states. These states have been described in terms of the rotation required to fit subdomain (lobe) 2 following superposition of subdomain (lo...

  17. A Qualitative Approach to Rigid Body Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    theorems are non-constructive and hence of unclear utility . Even if the object were such that some number touchpoints would do, one needs some method...of determining where these points should be located . A program asked, "Is this object free to translate?" which counted touchpoints up to two and then

  18. Designing rigid carbon foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sora; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Tománek, David

    2010-08-25

    We use ab initio density functional calculations to study the stability, elastic properties and electronic structure of sp(2) carbon minimal surfaces with negative Gaussian curvature, called schwarzites. We focus on two systems with cubic unit cells containing 152 and 200 carbon atoms, which are metallic and very rigid. The porous schwarzite structure allows for efficient and reversible doping by electron donors and acceptors, making it a promising candidate for the next generation of alkali ion batteries. We identify schwarzite structures that act as arrays of interconnected spin quantum dots or become magnetic when doped. We introduce two interpenetrating schwarzite structures that may find their use as the ultimate super-capacitor.

  19. Exercise body surface potential mapping in single and multiple coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montague, T.J.; Witkowski, F.X.; Miller, R.M.; Johnstone, D.E.; MacKenzie, R.B.; Spencer, C.A.; Horacek, B.M.

    1990-01-01

    Body surface ST integral maps were recorded in 36 coronary artery disease (CAD) patients at: rest; peak, angina-limited exercise; and, 1 and 5 min of recovery. They were compared to maps of 15 CAD patients who exercised to fatigue, without angina, and eight normal subjects. Peak exercise heart rates were similar (NS) in all groups. With exercise angina, patients with two and three vessel CAD had significantly (p less than 0.05) greater decrease in the body surface sum of ST integral values than patients with single vessel CAD. CAD patients with exercise fatigue, in the absence of angina, had decreased ST integrals similar (NS) to patients with single vessel CAD who manifested angina and the normal control subjects. There was, however, considerable overlap among individuals; some patients with single vessel CAD had as much exercise ST integral decrease as patients with three vessel CAD. All CAD patients had persistent ST integral decreases at 5 min of recovery and there was a direct correlation of the recovery and peak exercise ST changes. Exercise ST changes correlated, as well, with quantitative CAD angiographic scores, but not with thallium perfusion scores. These data suggest exercise ST integral body surface mapping allows quantitation of myocardium at ischemic risk in patients with CAD, irrespective of the presence or absence of ischemic symptoms during exercise. A major potential application of this technique is selection of CAD therapy guided by quantitative assessment of ischemic myocardial risk

  20. A new single-particle basis for nuclear many-body calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddu, G.

    2017-10-01

    Predominantly, harmonic oscillator single-particle wave functions are the preferred choice for a basis in ab initio nuclear many-body calculations. These wave-functions, although very convenient in order to evaluate the matrix elements of the interaction in the laboratory frame, have too fast a fall-off at large distances. In the past, as an alternative to the harmonic oscillator, other single-particle wave functions have been proposed. In this work, we propose a new single-particle basis, directly linked to nucleon-nucleon interaction. This new basis is orthonormal and complete, has the proper asymptotic behavior at large distances and does not contain the continuum which would pose severe convergence problems in nuclear many body calculations. We consider the newly proposed NNLO-opt nucleon-nucleon interaction, without any renormalization. We show that, unlike other bases, this single-particle representation has a computational cost similar to the harmonic oscillator basis with the same space truncation and it gives lower energies for 6He and 6Li.

  1. Many-body theory of electric and thermal transport in single-molecule heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfield, Justin

    2010-03-01

    Electron transport in single-molecule junctions (SMJ) is a key example of a strongly-correlated system far from equilibrium, with myriad potential applications in nanotechnology. When macroscopic leads are attached to a single molecule, a SMJ is formed, transforming the ``few-body'' molecular problem into a true ``many-body'' problem. Until recently, a theory of transport that properly accounts for both the particle and wave character of the electron has been lacking, so that the Coulomb blockade and coherent transport regimes were considered ``complementary.'' We have developed a nonequilibrium many-body theoryfootnotetextJ. P. Bergfield and C. A. Stafford, Phys. Rev. B 79, 245125 (2009). that reproduces the key features of both the Coulomb blockade and coherent transport regimes simultaneously. Our approach is based on nonequilibrium Green's functions, enabling physically motivated approximations that sum terms to all orders. The junction Green's functions are calculated exactly in the sequential-tunneling limit, and the corrections to the electron self-energy due to finite tunneling width are included via Dyson-Keldysh equations. In this talk, I will present a brief overview of our many-body theory of SMJ and discuss the simulated linear and nonlinear response of a benzenedithiol-gold junction. I will also outline our derivation of an exact expression for the heat current in an interacting nanostructure, highlighting our predictionfootnotetextJ. P. Bergfield and C. A. Stafford, Nano Letters 9, 3072 (2009). of a dramatic quantum-induced enhancement of thermoelectric effects in the vicinity of a transmission node. Finally, I will provide several striking examples where the predictions of our many-body theory differ drastically from those of mean-field (density functional) theory.

  2. Single-Fraction Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Edward W; Jung, David L; Balagamwala, Ehsan H; Angelov, Lilyana; Suh, John H; Djemil, Toufik; Magnelli, Anthony; Chao, Samuel T

    2017-06-01

    Chordoma is a radioresistant tumor that presents a therapeutic challenge with spine involvement, as high doses of radiation are needed for local control while limiting dose to the spinal cord. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy and safety of single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy for the treatment of spine chordoma. A retrospective review of our institutional database from 2006 to 2013 identified 8 patients (12 cases) with chordoma of the spine who were treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Surgical resection was performed in 7 of the 12 cases. The treatment volume was defined by the bony vertebral level of the tumor along with soft tissue extension appreciated on magnetic resonance imaging fusion. Medical records and imaging were assessed for pain relief and local control. Treatment toxicity was evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Median age was 59 years (range, 17-91). Median target volume was 48 cm 3 (1-304), and median prescription dose was 16 Gy (11-16). Median conformality index was 1.44 (1.14-3.21), and homogeneity index was 1.12 (1.05-1.19). With a median follow-up time of 9.7 months (.5-84), local control was achieved in 75% of the cases treated. One patient developed limited grade 2 spinal cord myelopathy that resolved with steroids. There were no other treatment toxicities from spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy can be safely delivered to treat chordoma of the spine with the potential to improve pain symptoms. Although the early data are suggestive, long-term follow-up with more patients is necessary to determine the efficacy of spine stereotactic body radiation therapy in the treatment of chordoma of the spine.

  3. Evaluating Upper-Body Strength and Power From a Single Test: The Ballistic Push-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Hoffman, Jay R; Sadres, Eliahu; Bartolomei, Sandro; Muddle, Tyler W D; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2017-05-01

    Wang, R, Hoffman, JR, Sadres, E, Bartolomei, S, Muddle, TWD, Fukuda, DH, and Stout, JR. Evaluating upper-body strength and power from a single test: the ballistic push-up. J Strength Cond Res 31(5): 1338-1345, 2017-The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability of the ballistic push-up (BPU) exercise and to develop a prediction model for both maximal strength (1 repetition maximum [1RM]) in the bench press exercise and upper-body power. Sixty recreationally active men completed a 1RM bench press and 2 BPU assessments in 3 separate testing sessions. Peak and mean force, peak and mean rate of force development, net impulse, peak velocity, flight time, and peak and mean power were determined. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to examine the reliability of the BPU. Stepwise linear regression was used to develop 1RM bench press and power prediction equations. Intraclass correlation coefficient's ranged from 0.849 to 0.971 for the BPU measurements. Multiple regression analysis provided the following 1RM bench press prediction equation: 1RM = 0.31 × Mean Force - 1.64 × Body Mass + 0.70 (R = 0.837, standard error of the estimate [SEE] = 11 kg); time-based power prediction equation: Peak Power = 11.0 × Body Mass + 2012.3 × Flight Time - 338.0 (R = 0.658, SEE = 150 W), Mean Power = 6.7 × Body Mass + 1004.4 × Flight Time - 224.6 (R = 0.664, SEE = 82 W); and velocity-based power prediction equation: Peak Power = 8.1 × Body Mass + 818.6 × Peak Velocity - 762.0 (R = 0.797, SEE = 115 W); Mean Power = 5.2 × Body Mass + 435.9 × Peak Velocity - 467.7 (R = 0.838, SEE = 57 W). The BPU is a reliable test for both upper-body strength and power. Results indicate that the mean force generated from the BPU can be used to predict 1RM bench press, whereas peak velocity and flight time measured during the BPU can be used to predict upper-body power. These findings support the potential use of the BPU as a valid method to evaluate upper-body strength and power.

  4. Single Fraction Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastasis: Outcomes from 132 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhidasan, S; Ball, D; Kron, T; Bressel, M; Shaw, M; Chu, J; Chander, S; Wheeler, G; Plumridge, N; Chesson, B; David, S; Siva, S

    2018-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is currently used to treat oligometastases, but the optimum dose/fractionation schedule is unknown. In this study, we evaluated outcomes after single fraction SABR in patients with oligometastatic disease. Single institutional retrospective review of patients treated with single fraction SABR for one to three oligometastases between 2010 and 2015. The primary outcome was freedom from widespread disease defined as distant recurrence not amenable to surgery or SABR; or recurrence with four or more metastases. In total, 186 treatments were delivered in 132 patients. The two most common target sites were lung (51%) and bone (40%). The most frequent single fraction prescription dose was 26 Gy (47%). The most common primary malignancy was genitourinary (n = 46 patients). Freedom from widespread disease was 75% at 1 year (95% confidence interval 67-83%) and 52% at 2 years (95% confidence interval 42-63%). Freedom from local progression at 1 year was 90% (95% confidence interval 85-95%) and at 2 years was 84% (95% confidence interval 77-91%). A compression fracture of the lumbar vertebra was the only grade 3+ treatment-related toxicity. Single fraction SABR is associated with a high rate of freedom from widespread disease, favourable local control and low toxicity comparable with historic multi-fraction SABR reports. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. On steady rotations of a rigid body bearing a single-axis powered gyroscope whose precession axis is parallel to a principal plane of inertia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amel'kin, N. I.

    The set of steady motions of the system named in the title is represented parametrically via the gyro gimbal rotation angle for an arbitrary position of the gimbal axis. We study the set of steady motions for a system in which the gyro gimbal axis is parallel to a principal plane of inertia as well

  6. Investment Price Rigidities and Business Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Alban

    2015-01-01

    I incorporate investment price rigidity in a two-sector monetary model of business cycles. Fit to quarterly U.S. time series, the model suggests that price sluggishness in the investment sector is the single most empirically relevant friction to match the data. Sticky investment prices constitute an important propagation mechanism to understand the sources of aggregate fluctuations, the dynamic effects of technology shocks, and the properties of the relative price of investment goods.

  7. The effects of rigid motions on elastic network model force constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezon, Timothy R

    2012-04-01

    Elastic network models provide an efficient way to quickly calculate protein global dynamics from experimentally determined structures. The model's single parameter, its force constant, determines the physical extent of equilibrium fluctuations. The values of force constants can be calculated by fitting to experimental data, but the results depend on the type of experimental data used. Here, we investigate the differences between calculated values of force constants and data from NMR and X-ray structures. We find that X-ray B factors carry the signature of rigid-body motions, to the extent that B factors can be almost entirely accounted for by rigid motions alone. When fitting to more refined anisotropic temperature factors, the contributions of rigid motions are significantly reduced, indicating that the large contribution of rigid motions to B factors is a result of over-fitting. No correlation is found between force constants fit to NMR data and those fit to X-ray data, possibly due to the inability of NMR data to accurately capture protein dynamics. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Torsional Rigidity of Minimal Submanifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen; Palmer, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    We prove explicit upper bounds for the torsional rigidity of extrinsic domains of minimal submanifolds $P^m$ in ambient Riemannian manifolds $N^n$ with a pole $p$. The upper bounds are given in terms of the torsional rigidities of corresponding Schwarz symmetrizations of the domains in warped...

  9. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, Ruben; Molgado, Alberto; Rojas, Efrain

    2011-01-01

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  10. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, Ruben [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del I.P.N., Unidad Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Molgado, Alberto [Unidad Academica de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas Zac. (Mexico); Rojas, Efrain, E-mail: cordero@esfm.ipn.mx, E-mail: amolgado@fisica.uaz.edu.mx, E-mail: efrojas@uv.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000 Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-03-21

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  11. Sintering behavior of porous wall tile bodies during fast single-firing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidnei José Gomes Sousa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In ceramic wall tile processing, fast single-firing cycles have been widely used. In this investigation a fast single-firing porous wall tile mixture was prepared using raw materials from the North Fluminense region.Specimens were obtained by uniaxial pressing and sintered in air at various temperatures (1080 - 1200 °C using a fast-firing cycle (60 minutes. Evolution of the microstructure was followed by XRD and SEM. The results revealed that the main phases formed during the sintering step are anorthite, gehlenite and hematite. It appears that the sintering process is characterized by the presence of a small amount of a liquid phase below 1140 °C. As a result, the microstructure of the ceramic bodies showed a network of small dense zones interconnected with a porous phase. In addition, the strength of the material below 1140 °C appeared to be related to the type and quantity of crystalline phases in the sintered bodies.

  12. Enhanced expression and purification of camelid single domain VHH antibodies from classical inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Maristella; Scotti, Claudia

    2017-08-01

    Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) are small antigen-binding domains derived from naturally occurring, heavy chain-only immunoglobulins isolated from camelid and sharks. They maintain the same binding capability of full-length IgGs but with improved thermal stability and permeability, which justifies their scientific, medical and industrial interest. Several described recombinant forms of sdAbs have been produced in different hosts and with different strategies. Here we present an optimized method for a time-saving, high yield production and extraction of a poly-histidine-tagged sdAb from Escherichia coli classical inclusion bodies. Protein expression and extraction were attempted using 4 different methods (e.g. autoinducing or IPTG-induced soluble expression, non-classical and classical inclusion bodies). The best method resulted to be expression in classical inclusion bodies and urea-mediated protein extraction which yielded 60-70 mg/l bacterial culture. The method we here describe can be of general interest for an enhanced and efficient heterologous expression of sdAbs for research and industrial purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Structure and Reactions of 11Be: Many-Body Basis for Single-Neutron Halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, F.; Potel, G.; Broglia, R. A.; Vigezzi, E.

    2017-08-01

    The exotic nucleus 11Be has been extensively studied and much experimental information is available on the structure of this system. We treat, within the framework of renormalized nuclear field theory in both configuration and 3D space, the mixing of bound and continuum single-particle states through the coupling to collective vibrations of the 10Be core. We also take care of the Pauli principle acting not only between the single valence particle explicitly considered and those participating in the collective states, but also between fermions involved in two-phonon virtual states dressing the single-particle motion. In this way, it is possible to simultaneously and quantitatively account for the energies of the 1 /2+ , 1 /2- low-lying states, the centroid and line shape of the 5 /2+ resonance and the one-nucleon stripping and pickup absolute differential cross sections involving 11Be as either target or residual nucleus. Also for the dipole transition connecting the 1 /2+ and 1 /2- parity inverted levels as well as the isotopic shift of the charge radius. Theory provides a unified and exhaustive nuclear structure and reaction characterization of the many-body effects which are at the basis of this paradigmatic one-neutron halo system.

  14. Single-blind, placebo controlled randomised clinical study of chitosan for body weight reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, V R; Satia, M C; Deschamps, A; Maquet, V; Shah, R B; Zinzuwadia, P H; Trivedi, J V

    2016-01-08

    Chitosan is a dietary fibre which acts by reducing fat absorption and thus used as a means for controlling weight. Weight loss clinical trial outcomes, however, have contradictory results regarding its efficacy. The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a chitosan from fungal origin in treatment of excess weight in the absence of dietary restrictions. A phase IV, randomised, multicentre, single-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical study was conducted by administering chitosan capsules (500 mg, five/day) and indistinguishable placebo capsules as daily supplements to 96 overweight and obese subjects for 90 days. The study participants were divided in 2:1 ratio to receive either chitosan (n = 64) or placebo (n = 32). Efficacy was assessed by measuring body weight, body composition parameters, anthropometric measurements, HbA1C level and lipid profile at day 45 and day 90. Also, short form-36 quality of life (QoL) questionnaire was assessed to evaluate improvement in life-style and dietary habits were recorded for calorie intake. Safety was assessed by evaluating safety parameters and monitoring adverse events. The mean changes in body weight were -1.78 ± 1.37 kg and -3.10 ± 1.95 kg at day 45 and day 90 respectively in chitosan group which were significantly different (p reduction in body composition and anthropometric parameters together with improvement in QoL score. Chitosan was also able to reduce HbA1C levels (below 6 %) in subjects who had initial higher values. The mean caloric intake shows that there was no change in dietary habits of subjects in both groups. Lipid levels were unaffected and all adverse events were mild in nature and unrelated to study treatment. Chitosan from fungal origin was able to reduce the mean body weight up to 3 kg during the 90 day study period. Together with this, there was also improvement in body composition, anthropometric parameters and HbA1C, reflecting overall benefits for the

  15. Singles transmission scans performed post-injection for quantitative whole body FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.J.; Benard, F.; Karp, J.S. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Post-injection singles transmission scanning has been implemented in the septumless PENN PET 240H scanner (prototype of the GE QUEST). The method uses a 6 mCi point transmission source of {sup 137}Cs at the axial center and 37 cm of transaxial center of the camera field of view. Singles transmission scans of 1.8 minutes per bed axial position provide similar scan count densities to 15 minute coincidence transmission scans with 0.5 mCi {sup 68}Ge rod transmission source. Scatter and emission contamination suppression are achieved by applying a narrow 662 keV transmission photopeak energy window. The residual 511 keV emission contamination constitutes a background of uniform spatial distribution. Accurate and low noise attenuation correction is achieved by segmenting the singles transmission images into lung and soft tissue volumes. Established 511 keV gamma ray attenuation coefficients are then applied and these images are forward projected for attenuation correction. Expectation maximisation or OS-EM reconstruction of the transmission and emission images is used to improve image quality. Both the segmentation and OS-EM reconstruction maintain quantitative accuracy in the fully corrected emission images compared to measured coincidence transmission correction. Thus, a clinical protocol involving 40 minutes of emission scans followed by 20 minutes of singles transmission scans allow the 60 cm of the human torso to be fully scanned within 60 minutes. These quantitative whole body FDG PET images may then be used for tumor grading and assessment of tumor response to treatment.

  16. Reference Prices and Nominal Rigidities

    OpenAIRE

    Eichenbaum, Martin; Jaimovich, Nir; Rebelo, Sérgio

    2008-01-01

    We assess the importance of nominal rigidities using a new weekly scanner data set from a major U.S. retailer, that contains information on prices, quantities, and costs for over 1,000 stores. We find that nominal rigidities are important but do not take the form of sticky prices. Instead, nominal rigidities take the form of inertia in reference prices and costs, defined as the most common prices and costs within a given quarter. Weekly prices and costs fluctuate around reference values which...

  17. Pink teeth in a series of bodies recovered from a single shipwreck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campobasso, Carlo P; Di Vella, Giancarlo; De Donno, Antonio; Santoro, Valeria; Favia, Gianfranco; Introna, Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Pink teeth have most often been observed in victims of drowning but have also been reported in subjects who died suddenly and unnaturally. There is general agreement that there is no obvious connection between the occurrence of pink teeth and the cause of death, but the condition of the surroundings (especially humidity) must certainly play an important role in the development of the pink-tooth phenomenon. The frequency and distribution of postmortem pink coloration of the teeth have been studied among a representative sample of 52 cadavers. All the bodies were victims of a single shipwreck that occurred on March 13, 1997, in the middle of the Otranto Canal (Mediterranean Sea). The bodies were recovered from the seawater after approximately 7 months. A distinct pink coloration of the teeth was found in only 18 cadavers (13 females and 5 males) of ages ranging between 13 and 60 years. The phenomenon was more pronounced in younger individuals due to age-related changes of the root canal, less penetrable by the pigment responsible for the postmortem pink staining. By histochemical methods and autofluorescence, hemoglobin and its derivatives have been identified as the most likely pigments responsible for this postmortem process that can be considered analogous to postmortem lividity. These data are consistent with previous reports on pink teeth, indicating that the diffusion of the blood in the pulp into the dentinal tubules causes the red discoloration of the teeth. Based on the results, the pigmentation is more prominent on the teeth with single roots rather than in the posterior teeth with multiple roots.

  18. Evaluation of single and stack membraneless enzymatic fuel cells based on ethanol in simulated body fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-de-la-Rosa, J; Arjona, N; Moreno-Zuria, A; Ortiz-Ortega, E; Guerra-Balcázar, M; Ledesma-García, J; Arriaga, L G

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate single and double-cell membraneless microfluidic fuel cells (MMFCs) that operate in the presence of simulated body fluids SBF, human serum and blood enriched with ethanol as fuels. The study was performed using the alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme immobilised by covalent binding through an array composed of carbon Toray paper as support and a layer of poly(methylene blue)/tetrabutylammonium bromide/Nafion and glutaraldehyde (3D bioanode electrode). The single MMFC was tested in a hybrid microfluidic fuel cell using Pt/C as the cathode. A cell voltage of 1.035V and power density of 3.154mWcm -2 were observed, which is the highest performance reported to date. The stability and durability were tested through chronoamperometry and polarisation/performance curves obtained at different days, which demonstrated a slow decrease in the power density on day 10 (14%) and day 20 (26%). Additionally, the cell was tested for ethanol oxidation in simulated body fluid (SBF) with ionic composition similar to human blood plasma. Those tests resulted in 0.93V of cell voltage and a power density close to 1.237mWcm -2 . The double cell MMFC (Stack) was tested using serum and human blood enriched with ethanol. The stack operated with blood in a serial connection showed an excellent cell performance (0.716mWcm -2 ), demonstrating the feasibility of employing human blood as energy source. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessing the Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics in a Quenched Quantum Many-Body System via Single Projective Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, L.; Pigeon, S.; Apollaro, T. J. G.; Xuereb, A.; Mazzola, L.; Campisi, M.; Ferraro, A.; Paternostro, M.; De Chiara, G.

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the nature of the statistics of the work done on or by a quantum many-body system brought out of equilibrium. We show that, for the sudden quench and for an initial state that commutes with the initial Hamiltonian, it is possible to retrieve the whole nonequilibrium thermodynamics via single projective measurements of observables. We highlight, in a physically clear way, the qualitative implications for the statistics of work coming from considering processes described by operators that either commute or do not commute with the unperturbed Hamiltonian of a given system. We consider a quantum many-body system and derive an expression that allows us to give a physical interpretation, for a thermal initial state, to all of the cumulants of the work in the case of quenched operators commuting with the unperturbed Hamiltonian. In the commuting case, the observables that we need to measure have an intuitive physical meaning. Conversely, in the noncommuting case, we show that, although it is possible to operate fully within the single-measurement framework irrespectively of the size of the quench, some difficulties are faced in providing a clear-cut physical interpretation to the cumulants. This circumstance makes the study of the physics of the system nontrivial and highlights the nonintuitive phenomenology of the emergence of thermodynamics from the fully quantum microscopic description. We illustrate our ideas with the example of the Ising model in a transverse field showing the interesting behavior of the high-order statistical moments of the work distribution for a generic thermal state and linking them to the critical nature of the model itself.

  20. On the difficulties of a single three-body Lippmann-Schwinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tatsuro; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Thushima, Kathuhide.

    1991-01-01

    First, we point out that the often quoted non-uniqueness argument on a single three-body Lippmann-Schwinger equation (the LS equation) is either not valid because the manipulation leading to it is not justifiable, or inconsequential because the non-uniqueness can easily be discerned and eliminated. Next, we discuss the property of the kernel with energy independent absorbing potentials (EIAP) of general forms. We find that the use of EIAP as in the CDCC approach dose not make the kernel compact. It remains non-compact no matter what we use for two-body potentials. Finally, we investigate in what sense the LS equation is solvable in terms of the CDCC approach. When the wave function inside the right-hand side (RHS) of the LS equation is restricted to a small CDCC model space, the difference between the RHS and the ordinary asymptotic form assumed in the approach is found to diverge asymptotically due to contributions from higher partial waves. We conclude that the CDCC solution cannot be claimed to be the solution to the LS equation, not unless it is restricted to a small model space. (author)

  1. On flexible and rigid nouns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2008-01-01

    , Non-Verb, Modifier), there are also flexible word classes within the rigid lexical category Noun (Set Noun, Sort Noun, General Noun). Members of flexible word classes are characterized by their vague semantics, which in the case of nouns means that values for the semantic features Shape...... and Homogeneity are either left undetermined or they are specified in such a way that they do not quite match the properties of the kind of entity denoted by the flexible item in the external world. I will then argue that flexible word classes constitute a proper category (i.e. they are not the result of a merger...... of some rigid word classes) in that members of flexible word categories display the same properties regarding category membership as members of rigid word classes. Finally this article wants to claim that the distinction between rigid and flexible noun categories (a) adds a new dimension to current...

  2. Mitigation of Temperature Induced Single Event Crosstalk Noise by Applying Adaptive Forward Body Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Pankaj

    Soft Errors due to Single Event (SE) Transients is one of the important reliability issues, which is becoming very prominent in advanced technology and in space applications. Increasing coupling effects among interconnects, on the other hand, can cause SE Transients to contaminate electronically unrelated circuit paths, which in turn can increase circuit sensitivity to radiation. Coupling capacitance increases due to reducing distances between interconnect lines making crosstalk noise more important. On the other hand, chips now experience higher temperatures due to environmental factors and high performance of chips. High-performance VLSI circuits consume more power and hence experience higher temperature due to high utilization factor. The increased temperature affects both interconnect resistance and driving strength of interconnect buffers. This work shows that thermal effects increase the amount of crosstalk noise observed on the victim line at nominal supply voltages. With thermally induced crosstalk contribution, total crosstalk noise may exceed the noise margin of the subsequent gate causing a wrong value to be propagated. The crosstalk prevention measures taken such as victim driver sizing may not be sufficient if thermal effects are not properly considered. This work aims to provide a mitigation method for thermally induced crosstalk noise using adaptive forward body bias. At high temperature, drain current reduces, and adaptive body biasing makes the CMOS recover the lost the drain current. A temperature sensor is proposed here to generate a necessary voltage at the CMOS body. A good temperature sensitivity is achieved with the tiny sensors that keep constant driving strength. Interconnect is modeled in using 10-pi modeling and 45nm technology was use for this simulation. Our proposed method mitigates 90% of temperature induced crosstalk contribution.

  3. Mortality following single-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy for central pulmonary oligometastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sung Jun; Mix, Michael; Rivers, Charlotte; Hennon, Mark; Gomez, Jorge; Singh, Anurag K

    2017-01-01

    The case of a 56-year-old male who developed bronchopulmonary hemorrhage after a course of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for centrally located squamous cell lung carcinoma is presented. The patient was previously treated with concurrent chemoradiation for stage IVA squamous cell carcinoma of the base of tongue. He showed no evidence of disease for 4 years until he developed a solitary metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma in the right hilum. He underwent a single fraction of 26 Gy with heterogeneity correction. He showed no evidence of disease for 13 months until he developed a sudden grade 4 bronchopulmonary hemorrhage. He underwent an urgent right pneumonectomy and later died of a post-operative complication. Pathologic analysis of the specimen revealed no evidence of tumor. Single-fraction SBRT of 26 Gy was sufficient to achieve complete response of his large central lung tumor. However, when treating patients with central lung tumors, some risk of mortality may be unavoidable with either SBRT or pneumonectomy.

  4. Resistance exercise dosage in older adults: single- versus multiset effects on physical performance and body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Daniel A; Taaffe, Dennis R

    2005-12-01

    To determine whether variation in resistance exercise volume affects muscle function and physical performance response in older adults. A randomized trial with subjects assigned to a single-set (1-SET) or three-set (3-SET) exercise group. An exercise facility at the University of Queensland. Twenty-eight community-dwelling men and women aged 65 to 78. Progressive resistance training consisting of seven exercises targeting the major muscle groups of the upper and lower body performed on exercise machines twice weekly for 20 weeks at eight-repetition maximum (RM) intensity. Muscle function included isotonic muscle strength (1-RM) of the seven exercises, isokinetic and isometric knee extensor strength, and muscle endurance for the chest press and leg press exercises. Physical performance included timed chair rise, usual and fast 6-m walk, 6-m backwards walk, 400-m walk, floor rise to standing, and stair climbing ability. In addition, body composition was determined using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Isotonic muscle strength increased in both exercise groups for all seven exercises (P<.01), with the gain in the 3-SET group greater (P<.05) for the seated row, triceps extension, and knee extension (analysis of covariance). Similarly, muscle endurance gains were greater for the 3-SET than the 1-SET group (P<.01), with no significant difference between groups for isokinetic and isometric knee extensor strength. Both groups improved (P<.05) in the chair rise (1-SET, 10.1%; 3-SET, 13.6%), 6-m backwards walk (1-SET, 14.3%; 3-SET, 14.8%), 400-m walk (1-SET, 3.8%; 3-SET, 7.4%), and stair climbing test (1-SET, 7.7%; 3-SET, 6.4%), with the only difference between groups for the 400-m walk (P<.05). There was no difference between groups for change in body composition. Resistance training consisting of only single-set exercises is sufficient to significantly enhance muscle function and physical performance, although muscle strength and endurance gains are greater with higher

  5. Probing correlated quantum many-body systems at the single-particle level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The detection of correlation and response functions plays a crucial role in the experimental characterization of quantum many-body systems. In this thesis, we present novel techniques for the measurement of such functions at the single-particle level. Specifically, we show the single-atom- and single-site-resolved detection of an ultracold quantum gas in an optical lattice. The quantum gas is described by the Bose-Hubbard model, which features a zero temperature phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott-insulating state, a paradigm example of a quantum phase transition. We used the aforementioned detection techniques to study correlation and response properties across the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. The single-atom sensitivity of our method is achieved by fluorescence detection of individual atoms with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A high-resolution objective collects the fluorescence light and yields in situ 'snapshots' of the quantum gas that allow for a single-site-resolved reconstruction of the atomic distribution. This allowed us to measure two-site and non-local correlation-functions across the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. Non-local correlation functions are based on the information of an extended region of the system and play an important role for the characterization of low-dimensional quantum phases. While non-local correlation functions were so far only theoretical tools, our results show that they are actually experimentally accessible. Furthermore, we used a new thermometry scheme, based on the counting of individual thermal excitations, to measure the response of the system to lattice modulation. Using this method, we studied the excitation spectrum of the system across the two-dimensional superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. In particular, we detected a 'Higgs' amplitude mode in the strongly-interacting superfluid close to the transition point where the system is described by an effectively Lorentz-invariant low-energy theory

  6. Probing correlated quantum many-body systems at the single-particle level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endres, Manuel

    2013-02-27

    The detection of correlation and response functions plays a crucial role in the experimental characterization of quantum many-body systems. In this thesis, we present novel techniques for the measurement of such functions at the single-particle level. Specifically, we show the single-atom- and single-site-resolved detection of an ultracold quantum gas in an optical lattice. The quantum gas is described by the Bose-Hubbard model, which features a zero temperature phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott-insulating state, a paradigm example of a quantum phase transition. We used the aforementioned detection techniques to study correlation and response properties across the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. The single-atom sensitivity of our method is achieved by fluorescence detection of individual atoms with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A high-resolution objective collects the fluorescence light and yields in situ 'snapshots' of the quantum gas that allow for a single-site-resolved reconstruction of the atomic distribution. This allowed us to measure two-site and non-local correlation-functions across the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. Non-local correlation functions are based on the information of an extended region of the system and play an important role for the characterization of low-dimensional quantum phases. While non-local correlation functions were so far only theoretical tools, our results show that they are actually experimentally accessible. Furthermore, we used a new thermometry scheme, based on the counting of individual thermal excitations, to measure the response of the system to lattice modulation. Using this method, we studied the excitation spectrum of the system across the two-dimensional superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. In particular, we detected a 'Higgs' amplitude mode in the strongly-interacting superfluid close to the transition point where the system is described by an effectively Lorentz

  7. Birth body length, birth body weight and birth head circumference in neonates born in a single centre between 2011 and 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlus, Beata; Wiśniewski, Andrzej; Kubik, Paweł; Milde, Katarzyna; Gmyrek, Leszek; Pęsko, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    Access to updated and accurate standards for local populations is important for the interpretation of body measurements in neonates and may have an impact on the doctor's recommendations for monitoring early childhood development. to present individual mean values for the most prevalent body measurements (i.e. birth body length (BBL), birth body weight (BBW) and birth head circumference (BHC)) in neonates and compare them to the duration of pregnancy. The measurements (BBL, BBW and BHC) were collected and analyzed from over 27,000 neonates born in a single center. All women with single pregnancies with gestation ranging from 33 to 42 weeks were included in the study. Mean values and statistically significant standard deviation values from population standards of BBL, BBW, and BHC were evaluated for neonates that were born between the 33rd and 42nd week of gestation. Analysis was conducted for the lower limit (10th percentile), average (50th percentile) and upper limit (90th percentile). This was the first time in Polish literature when population standards were presented for three body meas-urements of neonates. With the size of the cohort, these standards can be successfully implemented into routine clinical practice, especially for screening children with body size deficits.

  8. Probing protein ensemble rigidity and hydrogen-deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sljoka, Adnan; Wilson, Derek

    2013-10-01

    Protein rigidity and flexibility can be analyzed accurately and efficiently using the program floppy inclusion and rigid substructure topography (FIRST). Previous studies using FIRST were designed to analyze the rigidity and flexibility of proteins using a single static (snapshot) structure. It is however well known that proteins can undergo spontaneous sub-molecular unfolding and refolding, or conformational dynamics, even under conditions that strongly favor a well-defined native structure. These (local) unfolding events result in a large number of conformers that differ from each other very slightly. In this context, proteins are better represented as a thermodynamic ensemble of 'native-like' structures, and not just as a single static low-energy structure. Working with this notion, we introduce a novel FIRST-based approach for predicting rigidity/flexibility of the protein ensemble by (i) averaging the hydrogen bonding strengths from the entire ensemble and (ii) by refining the mathematical model of hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, we combine our FIRST-ensemble rigidity predictions with the ensemble solvent accessibility data of the backbone amides and propose a novel computational method which uses both rigidity and solvent accessibility for predicting hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX). To validate our predictions, we report a novel site specific HDX experiment which characterizes the native structural ensemble of Acylphosphatase from hyperthermophile Sulfolobus solfataricus (Sso AcP). The sub-structural conformational dynamics that is observed by HDX data, is closely matched with the FIRST-ensemble rigidity predictions, which could not be attained using the traditional single 'snapshot' rigidity analysis. Moreover, the computational predictions of regions that are protected from HDX and those that undergo exchange are in very good agreement with the experimental HDX profile of Sso AcP.

  9. Probing protein ensemble rigidity and hydrogen-deuterium exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sljoka, Adnan; Wilson, Derek

    2013-10-01

    Protein rigidity and flexibility can be analyzed accurately and efficiently using the program floppy inclusion and rigid substructure topography (FIRST). Previous studies using FIRST were designed to analyze the rigidity and flexibility of proteins using a single static (snapshot) structure. It is however well known that proteins can undergo spontaneous sub-molecular unfolding and refolding, or conformational dynamics, even under conditions that strongly favor a well-defined native structure. These (local) unfolding events result in a large number of conformers that differ from each other very slightly. In this context, proteins are better represented as a thermodynamic ensemble of ‘native-like’ structures, and not just as a single static low-energy structure. Working with this notion, we introduce a novel FIRST-based approach for predicting rigidity/flexibility of the protein ensemble by (i) averaging the hydrogen bonding strengths from the entire ensemble and (ii) by refining the mathematical model of hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, we combine our FIRST-ensemble rigidity predictions with the ensemble solvent accessibility data of the backbone amides and propose a novel computational method which uses both rigidity and solvent accessibility for predicting hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX). To validate our predictions, we report a novel site specific HDX experiment which characterizes the native structural ensemble of Acylphosphatase from hyperthermophile Sulfolobus solfataricus (Sso AcP). The sub-structural conformational dynamics that is observed by HDX data, is closely matched with the FIRST-ensemble rigidity predictions, which could not be attained using the traditional single ‘snapshot’ rigidity analysis. Moreover, the computational predictions of regions that are protected from HDX and those that undergo exchange are in very good agreement with the experimental HDX profile of Sso AcP.

  10. Therapist guided internet based cognitive behavioural therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: single blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enander, Jesper; Andersson, Erik; Mataix-Cols, David; Lichtenstein, Linn; Alström, Katarina; Andersson, Gerhard; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Rück, Christian

    2016-02-02

    To evaluate the efficacy of therapist guided internet based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) programme for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-NET) compared with online supportive therapy. A 12 week single blind parallel group randomised controlled trial. Academic medical centre. 94 self referred adult outpatients with a diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder and a modified Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale (BDD-YBOCS) score of ≥ 20. Concurrent psychotropic drug treatment was permitted if the dose had been stable for at least two months before enrolment and remained unchanged during the trial. Participants received either BDD-NET (n=47) or supportive therapy (n=47) delivered via the internet for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was the BDD-YBOCS score after treatment and follow-up (three and six months from baseline) as evaluated by a masked assessor. Responder status was defined as a ≥ 30% reduction in symptoms on the scale. Secondary outcomes were measures of depression (MADRS-S), global functioning (GAF), clinical global improvement (CGI-I), and quality of life (EQ5D). The six month follow-up time and all outcomes other than BDD-YBOCS and MADRS-S at 3 months were not pre-specified in the registration at clinicaltrials.gov because of an administrative error but were included in the original trial protocol approved by the regional ethics committee before the start of the trial. BDD-NET was superior to supportive therapy and was associated with significant improvements in severity of symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-YBOCS group difference -7.1 points, 95% confidence interval -9.8 to -4.4), depression (MADRS-S group difference -4.5 points, -7.5 to -1.4), and other secondary measures. At follow-up, 56% of those receiving BDD-NET were classed as responders, compared with 13% receiving supportive therapy. The number needed to treat was 2.34 (1.71 to 4.35). Self reported satisfaction was high. CBT can be delivered safely via the internet to patients with body

  11. Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellenberg, Devin; Goodman, Karyn A.; Lee, Florence; Chang, Stephanie; Kuo, Timothy; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Greco, Ralph; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer achieves only modest local control. This prospective trial evaluated the efficacy of a single fraction of 25 Gy stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered between Cycle 1 and 2 of gemcitabine chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, pancreatic adenocarcinoma received gemcitabine with SBRT delivered 2 weeks after completion of the first cycle. Gemcitabine was resumed 2 weeks after SBRT and was continued until progression or dose-limiting toxicity. The gross tumor volume, with a 2-3-mm margin, was treated in a single 25-Gy fraction by Cyberknife. Patients were evaluated at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All 16 patients completed SBRT. A median of four cycles (range one to nine) of chemotherapy was delivered. Three patients (19%) developed local disease progression at 14, 16, and 21 months after SBRT. The median survival was 11.4 months, with 50% of patients alive at 1 year. Patients with normal carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9 levels either at diagnosis or after Cyberknife SBRT had longer survival (p <0.01). Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was mild, with 2 cases of Grade 2 (13%) and 1 of Grade 3 (6%) toxicity. Late gastrointestinal toxicity was more common, with five ulcers (Grade 2), one duodenal stenosis (Grade 3), and one duodenal perforation (Grade 4). A trend toward increased duodenal volumes radiated was observed in those experiencing late effects (p = 0.13). Conclusion: SBRT with gemcitabine resulted in comparable survival to conventional chemoradiotherapy and good local control. However, the rate of duodenal ulcer development was significant

  12. Potentially curative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for single or oligometastasis to the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dongryul; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Pyo, Hongryull [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], Email: ahnyc@skku.edu; Seo, Jeong Min [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Radiological Science, Daewon Univ. College, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Eun Hyuk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Background. To analyze the treatment outcomes of a potentially curative therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), for patients with single or oligometastasis to the lungs. Material and methods. Sixty-seven metastatic lung lesions in 57 patients were treated with SBRT between September 2001 and November 2010. All patients had single or oligo-metastasis to the lungs following a meticulous clinical work-up, including PET-CT scans. The lungs were the most common primary organ (33 lesions, 49.3%), followed by the head and neck (11 lesions, 16.4%), the liver (nine lesions, 13.5%), the colorectum (seven lesions, 10.4%), and other organs (seven lesions, 10.4%). Three different fractionation schedules were used: 50 Gy/5 fractions to four lesions (6.0%); 60 Gy/5 fractions to 44 lesions (65.7%); and 60 Gy/4 fractions to 19 lesions (28.3%). Results. Local tumor progression occurred in three lesions (4.5%). The three-year actuarial local control rate was 94.5%. Tumors larger than or equal to 2.5 cm showed poorer local control (98.3% vs. 77.8%, p <0.01). Metastatic tumors from the liver and colorectum showed lower local control rates than those from other organs (77.8%, 85.7%, and 100%, p =0.04). The two-year overall survival rate was 57.2%. Patients with tumors smaller than 2.5 cm had more favorable survival rates (64.0% vs. 38.9% at two-year, p =0.032). Patients with extrathoracic disease had poorer survival rates (66.1% vs. 0% at two-year, p =0.003). Patients with disease-free intervals longer than two years showed a trend toward good prognosis (71.1% vs. 51.1% at two-year, p =0.106). Grade 2 lung toxicity occurred in four patients (6.0%). One patient experienced Grade 5 lung toxicity following SBRT. Conclusion. SBRT for single or oligo-metastasis to the lung seems quite effective and safe. Tumor size, disease-free interval, and presence of extrathoracic disease are prognosticators for survival.

  13. Potentially curative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for single or oligometastasis to the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Dongryul; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Pyo, Hongryull; Seo, Jeong Min; Shin, Eun Hyuk

    2012-01-01

    Background. To analyze the treatment outcomes of a potentially curative therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), for patients with single or oligometastasis to the lungs. Material and methods. Sixty-seven metastatic lung lesions in 57 patients were treated with SBRT between September 2001 and November 2010. All patients had single or oligo-metastasis to the lungs following a meticulous clinical work-up, including PET-CT scans. The lungs were the most common primary organ (33 lesions, 49.3%), followed by the head and neck (11 lesions, 16.4%), the liver (nine lesions, 13.5%), the colorectum (seven lesions, 10.4%), and other organs (seven lesions, 10.4%). Three different fractionation schedules were used: 50 Gy/5 fractions to four lesions (6.0%); 60 Gy/5 fractions to 44 lesions (65.7%); and 60 Gy/4 fractions to 19 lesions (28.3%). Results. Local tumor progression occurred in three lesions (4.5%). The three-year actuarial local control rate was 94.5%. Tumors larger than or equal to 2.5 cm showed poorer local control (98.3% vs. 77.8%, p <0.01). Metastatic tumors from the liver and colorectum showed lower local control rates than those from other organs (77.8%, 85.7%, and 100%, p =0.04). The two-year overall survival rate was 57.2%. Patients with tumors smaller than 2.5 cm had more favorable survival rates (64.0% vs. 38.9% at two-year, p =0.032). Patients with extrathoracic disease had poorer survival rates (66.1% vs. 0% at two-year, p =0.003). Patients with disease-free intervals longer than two years showed a trend toward good prognosis (71.1% vs. 51.1% at two-year, p =0.106). Grade 2 lung toxicity occurred in four patients (6.0%). One patient experienced Grade 5 lung toxicity following SBRT. Conclusion. SBRT for single or oligo-metastasis to the lung seems quite effective and safe. Tumor size, disease-free interval, and presence of extrathoracic disease are prognosticators for survival

  14. Potentially curative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for single or oligometastasis to the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dongryul; Ahn, Yong Chan; Seo, Jeong Min; Shin, Eun Hyuk; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Pyo, Hongryull

    2012-05-01

    To analyze the treatment outcomes of a potentially curative therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), for patients with single or oligometastasis to the lungs. Sixty-seven metastatic lung lesions in 57 patients were treated with SBRT between September 2001 and November 2010. All patients had single or oligo-metastasis to the lungs following a meticulous clinical work-up, including PET-CT scans. The lungs were the most common primary organ (33 lesions, 49.3%), followed by the head and neck (11 lesions, 16.4%), the liver (nine lesions, 13.5%), the colorectum (seven lesions, 10.4%), and other organs (seven lesions, 10.4%). Three different fractionation schedules were used: 50 Gy/5 fractions to four lesions (6.0%); 60 Gy/5 fractions to 44 lesions (65.7%); and 60 Gy/4 fractions to 19 lesions (28.3%). Local tumor progression occurred in three lesions (4.5%). The three-year actuarial local control rate was 94.5%. Tumors larger than or equal to 2.5 cm showed poorer local control (98.3% vs. 77.8%, p <0.01). Metastatic tumors from the liver and colorectum showed lower local control rates than those from other organs (77.8%, 85.7%, and 100%, p =0.04). The two-year overall survival rate was 57.2%. Patients with tumors smaller than 2.5 cm had more favorable survival rates (64.0% vs. 38.9% at two-year, p =0.032). Patients with extrathoracic disease had poorer survival rates (66.1% vs. 0% at two-year, p =0.003). Patients with disease-free intervals longer than two years showed a trend toward good prognosis (71.1% vs. 51.1% at two-year, p =0.106). Grade 2 lung toxicity occurred in four patients (6.0%). One patient experienced Grade 5 lung toxicity following SBRT. SBRT for single or oligo-metastasis to the lung seems quite effective and safe. Tumor size, disease-free interval, and presence of extrathoracic disease are prognosticators for survival.

  15. Imagery Rescripting for Body Dysmorphic Disorder: A Multiple-Baseline Single-Case Experimental Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Rob; Veale, David; Freeston, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) often experience negative distorted images of their appearance, and research suggests these may be linked to memories of adverse events such as bullying or teasing. This study evaluates imagery rescripting (ImR) as an intervention for BDD. In this article, we present a multiple-baseline single-case experimental design testing imagery rescripting as a brief, stand-alone intervention, with six individuals with BDD that related to aversive memories. The impact of the intervention was assessed by self-reported daily measures of symptom severity (preoccupation with appearance, appearance-related checking behaviors, appearance-related distress, and strength of belief that their main problem is their appearance) and standardized clinician ratings of BDD severity (Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale modified for BDD). Four out of six of the participants responded positively to the intervention, with clinically meaningful improvement in symptomatology. Overall response was rapid; improvements began within the first week post-ImR intervention. From a small sample it is cautiously concluded that imagery rescripting may show promise as a module in cognitive-behavioral therapy for BDD, and is worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Effects of single- vs. multiple-set resistance training on maximum strength and body composition in trained postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmler, Wolfgang K; Lauber, Dirk; Engelke, Klaus; Weineck, Juergen

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a single- vs. a multiple-set resistance training protocol in well-trained early postmenopausal women. Subjects (N = 71) were randomly assigned to begin either with 12 weeks of the single-set or 12 weeks of the multiple-set protocol. After another 5 weeks of regenerational resistance training, the subgroup performing the single-set protocol during the first 12 weeks crossed over to the 12-week multiple-set protocol and vice versa. Neither exercise type nor exercise intensity, degree of fatigue, rest periods, speed of movement, training sessions per week, compliance and attendance, or periodization strategy differed between exercise protocols. Body mass, body composition, and 1 repetition maximum (1RM) values for leg press, bench press, rowing, and leg adduction were measured at baseline and after each period. Multiple-set training resulted in significant increases (3.5-5.5%) for all 4 strength measurements, whereas single-set training resulted in significant decreases (-1.1 to -2.0%). Body mass and body composition did not change during the study. The results show that, in pretrained subjects, multiple-set protocols are superior to single-set protocols in increasing maximum strength.

  17. Sex and age differences in body-image, self-esteem, and body mass index in adolescents and adults after single-ventricle palliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Nancy A; Evangelista, Lorraine S; Doering, Lynn V; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Lewis, Alan B; Child, John S

    2012-06-01

    Single-ventricle congenital heart disease (SVCHD) requires multiple palliative surgical procedures that leave visible surgical scars and physical deficits, which can alter body-image and self-esteem. This study aimed to compare sex and age differences in body-image, self-esteem, and body mass index (BMI) in adolescents and adults with SVCHD after surgical palliation with those of a healthy control group. Using a comparative, cross-sectional design, 54 adolescent and adult (26 male and 28 female) patients, age 15–50 years, with SVCHD were compared with 66 age-matched healthy controls. Body-image and self-esteem were measured using the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire–Appearance Scale and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Height and weight were collected from retrospective chart review, and BMI was calculated. Female adolescents and adult patients with SVCHD reported lower body image compared with males patients with SVCHD and healthy controls (p = 0.003). Specific areas of concern were face (p = 0.002), upper torso or chest (p = 0.002), and muscle tone (p = 0.001). Patients with SVCHD who were \\21 years of age had lower body image compared with healthy controls (p = 0.006). Self-esteem was comparable for both patients with SVCHD and healthy peers. There were no sex differences in BMI; BMI was higher in subjects[21 years of age (p = 0.01). Despite the similarities observed in self-esteem between the two groups, female patients with SVCHD\\21 years of age reported lower perceived body-image. Our findings support the need to recognize poor psychological adjustment related to low self-esteem in patients with SVCHD; female patients warrant increased scrutiny. Strategies to help patients with SVCHD cope with nonmodifiable aspects of body-image during the difficult adolescent–to–young adult years may potentially enhance self-esteem and decrease psychological distress.

  18. Biomimetic model systems of rigid hair beds: Part I - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Kaitlyn; Jammalamadaka, Mani S. S.; Hosoi, Anette

    2017-11-01

    Crustaceans - such as lobsters, crabs, and stomapods - have hairy appendages that they use to recognize and track odorants in the surrounding fluid. An array of rigid hairs impedes flow at different rates depending on the spacing between hairs and the Reynolds number, Re. At larger Reynolds numbers (Re >1), fluid travels through the hairs rather than around them, a phenomenon called leakiness. Crustaceans flick their appendages at different speeds in order to manipulate the leakiness between the hairs, allowing the hairs to either detect odors in a sample of fluid or collect a new sample. A single hair can be represented as a slender body attached at one end to a wall. Using both slender body theory and numerical methods, we observe that there is a region of flow around the hair that speeds up relative to the unobstructed flow. As the Reynolds number increases, this fast flow region moves closer to the hair. Using this model, we predict that an array of hairs can be engineered to have a desired leakiness profile.

  19. Rigidly foldable origami gadgets and tessellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Thomas A; Lang, Robert J; Magleby, Spencer P; Howell, Larry L

    2015-09-01

    Rigidly foldable origami allows for motion where all deflection occurs at the crease lines and facilitates the application of origami in materials other than paper. In this paper, we use a recently discovered method for determining rigid foldability to identify existing flat-foldable rigidly foldable tessellations, which are also categorized. We introduce rigidly foldable origami gadgets which may be used to modify existing tessellations or to create new tessellations. Several modified and new rigidly foldable tessellations are presented.

  20. Body

    OpenAIRE

    Riggs, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The human body is both the physical form inhabited by an individual “self” and the medium through which an individual engages with society. Hence the body both shapes and is shaped by an individual’s social roles. In contrast to the cognate fields of archaeology, anthropology, and classics, there has been little explicit discussion or theorization of the body in Egyptology. Some recent works, discussed here, constitute an exception to this trend, but there is much more scope for exploring anc...

  1. A Rigid Mid-Lift-to-Drag Ratio Approach to Human Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerimele, Christopher J.; Robertson, Edward A.; Sostaric, Ronald R.; Campbell, Charles H.; Robinson, Phil; Matz, Daniel A.; Johnson, Breanna J.; Stachowiak, Susan J.; Garcia, Joseph A.; Bowles, Jeffrey V.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Current NASA Human Mars architectures require delivery of approximately 20 metric tons of cargo to the surface in a single landing. A proposed vehicle type for performing the entry, descent, and landing at Mars associated with this architecture is a rigid, enclosed, elongated lifting body shape that provides a higher lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) than a typical entry capsule, but lower than a typical winged entry vehicle (such as the Space Shuttle Orbiter). A rigid Mid-L/D shape has advantages for large mass Mars EDL, including loads management, range capability during entry, and human spaceflight heritage. Previous large mass Mars studies have focused more on symmetric and/or circular cross-section Mid-L/D shapes such as the ellipsled. More recent work has shown performance advantages for non-circular cross section shapes. This paper will describe efforts to design a rigid Mid-L/D entry vehicle for Mars which shows mass and performance improvements over previous Mid-L/D studies. The proposed concept, work to date and evolution, forward path, and suggested future strategy are described.

  2. Simultaneous description of conductance and thermopower in single-molecule junctions from many-body ab initio calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun; Markussen, Troels; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the electronic conductance and thermopower of a single-molecule junction consisting of bis-(4-aminophenyl) acetylene (B4APA) connected to gold electrodes. We use nonequilibrium Green's function methods in combination with density-functional theory (DFT) and the many-body GW...

  3. Rigidity-tuning conductive elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Wanliang; Diller, Stuart; Tutcuoglu, Abbas; Majidi, Carmel

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a conductive propylene-based elastomer (cPBE) that rapidly and reversibly changes its mechanical rigidity when powered with electrical current. The elastomer is rigid in its natural state, with an elastic (Young’s) modulus of 175.5 MPa, and softens when electrically activated. By embedding the cPBE in an electrically insulating sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we create a cPBE-PDMS composite that can reversibly change its tensile modulus between 37 and 1.5 MPa. The rigidity change takes ˜6 s and is initiated when a 100 V voltage drop is applied across the two ends of the cPBE film. This magnitude of change in elastic rigidity is similar to that observed in natural skeletal muscle and catch connective tissue. We characterize the tunable load-bearing capability of the cPBE-PDMS composite with a motorized tensile test and deadweight experiment. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to control the routing of internal forces by embedding several cPBE-PDMS ‘active tendons’ into a soft robotic pneumatic bending actuator. Selectively activating the artificial tendons controls the neutral axis and direction of bending during inflation.

  4. Rigidity-tuning conductive elastomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Wanliang; Diller, Stuart; Tutcuoglu, Abbas; Majidi, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a conductive propylene-based elastomer (cPBE) that rapidly and reversibly changes its mechanical rigidity when powered with electrical current. The elastomer is rigid in its natural state, with an elastic (Young’s) modulus of 175.5 MPa, and softens when electrically activated. By embedding the cPBE in an electrically insulating sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we create a cPBE–PDMS composite that can reversibly change its tensile modulus between 37 and 1.5 MPa. The rigidity change takes ∼6 s and is initiated when a 100 V voltage drop is applied across the two ends of the cPBE film. This magnitude of change in elastic rigidity is similar to that observed in natural skeletal muscle and catch connective tissue. We characterize the tunable load-bearing capability of the cPBE–PDMS composite with a motorized tensile test and deadweight experiment. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to control the routing of internal forces by embedding several cPBE–PDMS ‘active tendons’ into a soft robotic pneumatic bending actuator. Selectively activating the artificial tendons controls the neutral axis and direction of bending during inflation. (paper)

  5. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in multiple candidate genes and body weight in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim El-Sabrout

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we examined parts of six growth genes (growth hormone [GH], melanocortin 4 receptor [MC4R], growth hormone receptor [GHR], phosphorglycerate mutase [PGAM], myostatin [MSTN], and fibroblast growth factor [FGF] as specific primers for two rabbit lines (V-line, Alexandria using nucleotide sequence analysis, to investigate association between detecting single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP of these genes and body weight (BW at market. Materials and Methods: Each line kits were grouped into high and low weight rabbits to identify DNA markers useful for association studies with high BW. DNA from blood samples of each group was extracted to amplify the six growth genes. SNP technique was used to study the associate polymorphism in the six growth genes and marketing BW (at 63 days in the two rabbit lines. The purified polymerase chain reaction products were sequenced in those had the highest and lowest BW in each line. Results: Alignment of sequence data from each group revealed the following SNPs: At nucleotide 23 (A-C and nucleotide 35 (T-G in MC4R gene (sense mutation of Alexandria and V-line high BW. Furthermore, we detected the following SNPs variation between the two lines: A SNP (T-C at nucleotide 27 was identified by MC4R gene (sense mutation and another one (A-C at nucleotide 14 was identified by GHR gene (nonsense mutation of Alexandria line. The results of individual BW at market (63 days indicated that Alexandria rabbits had significantly higher BW compared with V-line rabbits. MC4R polymorphism showed significant association with high BW in rabbits. Conclusion: The results of polymorphism demonstrate the possibility to detect an association between BW in rabbits and the efficiency of the used primers to predict through the genetic specificity using the SNP of MC4R.

  6. Evaluation of a single-pass continuous whole-body 16-MDCT protocol for patients with polytrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy; Platon, Alexandra; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Mirvis, Stuart E; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a conventional multiregional MDCT protocol with two continuous single-pass whole-body MDCT protocols in imaging of patients with polytrauma. Ninety patients with polytrauma underwent whole-body 16-MDCT with a conventional (n=30) or one of two single-pass (n=60) protocols. The conventional protocol included unenhanced scans of the head and cervical spine and contrast-enhanced helical scans (140 mL, 4 mL/s, 300 mg I/mL) of the thorax and abdomen. The single-pass protocols consisted of unenhanced scans of the head followed by one-sweep acquisition from the circle of Willis through the pubic symphysis with a biphasic (150 mL, 6 and 4 mL/s, 300 mg I/mL) or monophasic (110 mL, 4 mL/s, 400 mg I/mL) injection. Acquisition times and interval delays between head, chest, and abdominal scans were recorded. Contrast enhancement was measured in the aortic arch, liver, spleen, and kidney. Diagnostic image quality in the same areas was assessed on a 4-point scale. Median acquisition times for the single-pass protocols were significantly shorter (-42.5%) than the acquisition time for the conventional protocol. No significant differences were found in mean enhancement values in the aorta, liver, spleen, and kidney for the three protocols. The image quality with both single-pass protocols was better than that with the conventional protocol in assessment of the mediastinum and cervical spine (p<0.05). There was no significant difference between the single-pass protocols. Use of single-pass continuous whole-body MDCT protocols can significantly decrease examination time for patients with polytrauma and improve image quality compared with a conventional serial scan protocol. Monophasic injection with highly concentrated contrast medium can reduce injection flow rate and should therefore be preferred to a biphasic injection technique.

  7. Search for CP violation in singly Cabibbo suppressed four-body D decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinelli, Maurizio [Univ. of Bari Aldo Moro (Italy)

    2011-02-01

    We search for CP violation in a sample of 4.7 x 104 singly Cabibbo suppressed D0 → K+ K- π+π- decays and 1.8(2.6) x 104 D(s)+ → KS0 K+ π+ π- decays. CP violation is searched for in the difference between the T-odd asymmetries, obtained using triple product correlations, measured for D and D decays. The measured CP violation parameters are AT(D0) = (1.0 ± 5.1(stat) ± 4.4(syst)) x 10-3, AT(D+) = (-11.96 ± 10.04(stat) ± 4.81(syst)) x 10-3 and AT(Ds+) = (-13.57 ± 7.67(stat) ± 4.82(syst)) x 10-3. This search for CP violation showed that the T-odd correlations are a powerful tool to measure the CP violating observable AT. The relative simplicity of an analysis based on T-odd correlations and the high quality results that can be obtained, allow to consider this tool as fundamental to search for CP violation in four-body decays. Even if the CP violation has not been found, excluding any New Physics effect to the sensitivity of about 0.5%, it is still worth to search for CP violation in D decays. The high statistics that can be obtained at the LHC or by the proposed high luminosity B-factories, make this topic to be considered in high consideration by experiments such as LHCb, SuperB or SuperBelle. The results outlined in this thesis strongly suggest to include a similar analysis into the Physics program of these experiments.

  8. On flexible and rigid nouns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that in addition to the major flexible lexical categories in Hengeveld’s classification of parts of speech systems (Contentive, Non-Verb, Modifier), there are also flexible word classes within the rigid lexical category Noun (Set Noun, Sort Noun, General Noun). Members...... of flexible word classes are characterized by their vague semantics, which in the case of nouns means that values for the semantic features Shape and Homogeneity are either left undetermined or they are specified in such a way that they do not quite match the properties of the kind of entity denoted...... classes. Finally this article wants to claim that the distinction between rigid and flexible noun categories (a) adds a new dimension to current classifications of parts of speech systems, (b) correlates with certain grammatical phenomena (e.g. so-called number discord), and (c) helps to explain the parts...

  9. Signature of Thermal Rigidity Percolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huerta, Adrián

    2013-01-01

    To explore the role that temperature and percolation of rigidity play in determining the macroscopic properties, we propose a model that adds translational degrees of freedom to the spins of the well known Ising hamiltonian. In particular, the Ising model illustrate the longstanding idea that the growth of correlations on approach to a critical point could be describable in terms of the percolation of some sort of p hysical cluster . For certain parameters of this model we observe two well defined peaks of C V , that suggest the existence of two kinds of p hysical percolation , namely connectivity and rigidity percolation. Thermal fluctuations give rise to two different kinds of elementary excitations, i.e. droplets and configuron, as suggested by Angell in the framework of a bond lattice model approach. The later is reflected in the fluctuations of redundant constraints that gives stability to the structure and correlate with the order parameter

  10. Vertebral Column Resection for Rigid Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifi, Comron; Laratta, Joseph L; Petridis, Petros; Shillingford, Jamal N; Lehman, Ronald A; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2017-05-01

    Broad narrative review. To review the evolution, operative technique, outcomes, and complications associated with posterior vertebral column resection. A literature review of posterior vertebral column resection was performed. The authors' surgical technique is outlined in detail. The authors' experience and the literature regarding vertebral column resection are discussed at length. Treatment of severe, rigid coronal and/or sagittal malalignment with posterior vertebral column resection results in approximately 50-70% correction depending on the type of deformity. Surgical site infection rates range from 2.9% to 9.7%. Transient and permanent neurologic injury rates range from 0% to 13.8% and 0% to 6.3%, respectively. Although there are significant variations in EBL throughout the literature, it can be minimized by utilizing tranexamic acid intraoperatively. The ability to correct a rigid deformity in the spine relies on osteotomies. Each osteotomy is associated with a particular magnitude of correction at a single level. Posterior vertebral column resection is the most powerful posterior osteotomy method providing a successful correction of fixed complex deformities. Despite meticulous surgical technique and precision, this robust osteotomy technique can be associated with significant morbidity even in the most experienced hands.

  11. Rigid-only versus combined rigid and flexible percutaneous nephrolithotomy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cracco, Cecilia M; Knoll, Thomas; Liatsikos, Evangelos N; Osther, Palle J; Smith, Arthur D; Scarpa, Roberto M; Scoffone, Cesare M

    2017-08-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is usually performed worldwide with a rigid-only antegrade approach. Daily practice suggests that adding flexible nephroscopy and/or ureteroscopy to conventional rigid PNL might improve its efficacy and safety, but available evidence is weak. Appraisal of reliable outcomes of such PNL techniques would better guide intraoperative choices and optimize surgical results. Therefore, our objective was to systematically review relevant literature comparing the outcomes of rigid-only PNL and combined flexible PNLs (adding flexible nephroscopy and/or flexible ureteroscopy) for the treatment of large and/or complex upper urinary tract calculi, with regard to efficacy and safety. Ovid MedLine, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched in August 2016 to identify relevant studies. Article selection was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis criteria. Six articles reporting on 666 patients were included: two randomized controlled trials, two retrospective comparative studies and two case series ≥50 patients (one prospective and one retrospective). A narrative synthesis of minor evidences was also prepared. The adjunct of flexible nephroscopy and/or ureteroscopy provided better stone-free rates (range 86.7-96.97%), through a single percutaneous access most of the times and in any position, reducing the need for second-look procedures. Safety of the combined flexible procedures was improved to a variable degree, with a consensual reduction of the mean hospital stay (range 5.1-7 days). The current evidence suggests that patients with large and/or complex urolithiasis might benefit from the adjunct of flexible nephroscopy and/or ureteroscopy to rigid PNL.

  12. Fruiting Body Formation of Cordyceps militaris from Multi-Ascospore Isolates and Their Single Ascospore Progeny Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bhushan; Han, Sang-Kuk; Sung, Jae-Mo

    2012-01-01

    Interest in commercial cultivation and product development of Cordyceps species has shown a recent increase. Due to its biochemical and pharmacological effects, Cordyceps militaris, commonly known as orange caterpillar fungus, is being investigated with great interest. Cultivation of C. militaris has been practiced on a large scale in order to fulfill a demand for scientific investigation and product development. Isolates of C. militaris can be easily established from both spores and tissue. For isolation of spores, ascospores released from mature stromata are trapped in sterile medium. Multi-ascospore isolates, as well as combinations of single ascospore strains, are used for production of fruiting bodies. Progeny ascospore strains can be isolated from artificial fruiting bodies, thus, the cycle of fruiting body production can be continued for a long period of time. In this study, we examined fruiting body production from multi-ascospore isolates and their progeny strains for three generations. F1 progeny strains generally produced a larger number of fruiting bodies, compared with their mother multi-ascospore isolates; however, F2 and F3 progeny strains produced fewer fruiting bodies. Optimum preservation conditions could help to increase the vitality of the progeny strains. In order to retain the fruiting ability of the strains, further testing of various methods of preservation and different methods for isolation should be performed. PMID:22870051

  13. Chromosome aberrations of the peripheral lymphocytes in rabbits exposed to single and fractionated whole-body x-irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Hiroaki; Sakurai, Masaharu; Sugahara, Tsutomu.

    1978-01-01

    The changes in the frequency of peripheral lymphocytes with chromosome aberrations were observed during or after irradiation of rabbits exposed to fractionated or single whole-body irradiations. In rabbits given daily fractionated whole-body irradiations the incidence of the aberrations showed a linear increase in the first week; however, the incidence decreased thereafter though exposures were repeated. The lymphocyte count tended to decrease as the number of irradiations increased. In rabbits exposed to a single dose of 250 R or 500 R the incidence of aberrations rapidly decreased over a period of 10 days following irradiation, and then showed a little change thereafter. The lymphocyte count in the peripheral blood reached a nadir 2 - 5 days after irradiation, and then started to increase gradually. It was speculated that there are two types of lymphocytes, long-lived and short-lived, in the peripheral blood of rabbits, both of which are PHA-committed. (auth.)

  14. Management of rigid post-traumatic kyphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S S; Hwa, S Y; Lin, L C; Pai, W M; Chen, P Q; Au, M K

    1996-10-01

    Rigid post-traumatic kyphosis after fracture of the thoracolumbar and lumbar spine represents a failure of initial management of the injury. Kyphosis moves the center of gravity anterior. The kyphosis and instability may result in pain, deformity, and increased neurologic deficits. Management for symptomatic post-traumatic kyphosis always has presented a challenge to orthopedic surgeons. To evaluate the surgical results of one stage posterior correction for rigid symptomatic post-traumatic kyphosis of the thoracolumbar and lumbar spine. The management for post-traumatic kyphosis remains controversial. Anterior, posterior, or combined anterior and posterior procedures have been advocated by different authors and show various degrees of success. One vertebra immediately above and below the level of the deformity was instrumented posteriorly by a transpedicular system (internal fixator AO). Posterior decompression was performed by excision of the spinal process and bilateral laminectomy. With the deformed vertebra through the pedicle, the vertebral body carefully is removed around the pedicle level, approximating a wedge shape. The extent to which the deformed vertebral body should be removed is determined by the attempted correction. Correction of the deformity is achieved by manipulation of the operating table and compression of the adjacent Schanz screws above and below the lesion. Thirteen patients with post-traumatic kyphosis with symptoms of fatigue and pain caused by slow progression of kyphotic deformities received posterior decompression, correction, and stabilization as a definitive treatment. The precorrection kyphosis ranged from 30-60 degrees, with a mean of 40 degrees +/- 10.8 degrees. After correction, kyphosis was reduced to an average of 1.5 degrees +/- 3.8 degrees, with a range from -5 degrees to 5 degrees. The average angle of correction was 38.8 degrees +/- 10.4 degrees, with a range from 25 degrees to 60 degrees. Significant difference was found

  15. Applicability of single-camera photogrammetry to determine body dimensions of pinnipeds: Galapagos sea lions as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meise, Kristine; Mueller, Birte; Zein, Beate; Trillmich, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    Morphological features correlate with many life history traits and are therefore of high interest to behavioral and evolutionary biologists. Photogrammetry provides a useful tool to collect morphological data from species for which measurements are otherwise difficult to obtain. This method reduces disturbance and avoids capture stress. Using the Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) as a model system, we tested the applicability of single-camera photogrammetry in combination with laser distance measurement to estimate morphological traits which may vary with an animal's body position. We assessed whether linear morphological traits estimated by photogrammetry can be used to estimate body length and mass. We show that accurate estimates of body length (males: ±2.0%, females: ±2.6%) and reliable estimates of body mass are possible (males: ±6.8%, females: 14.5%). Furthermore, we developed correction factors that allow the use of animal photos that diverge somewhat from a flat-out position. The product of estimated body length and girth produced sufficiently reliable estimates of mass to categorize individuals into 10 kg-classes of body mass. Data of individuals repeatedly photographed within one season suggested relatively low measurement errors (body length: 2.9%, body mass: 8.1%). In order to develop accurate sex- and age-specific correction factors, a sufficient number of individuals from both sexes and from all desired age classes have to be captured for baseline measurements. Given proper validation, this method provides an excellent opportunity to collect morphological data for large numbers of individuals with minimal disturbance.

  16. Applicability of single-camera photogrammetry to determine body dimensions of pinnipeds: Galapagos sea lions as an example.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Meise

    Full Text Available Morphological features correlate with many life history traits and are therefore of high interest to behavioral and evolutionary biologists. Photogrammetry provides a useful tool to collect morphological data from species for which measurements are otherwise difficult to obtain. This method reduces disturbance and avoids capture stress. Using the Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki as a model system, we tested the applicability of single-camera photogrammetry in combination with laser distance measurement to estimate morphological traits which may vary with an animal's body position. We assessed whether linear morphological traits estimated by photogrammetry can be used to estimate body length and mass. We show that accurate estimates of body length (males: ±2.0%, females: ±2.6% and reliable estimates of body mass are possible (males: ±6.8%, females: 14.5%. Furthermore, we developed correction factors that allow the use of animal photos that diverge somewhat from a flat-out position. The product of estimated body length and girth produced sufficiently reliable estimates of mass to categorize individuals into 10 kg-classes of body mass. Data of individuals repeatedly photographed within one season suggested relatively low measurement errors (body length: 2.9%, body mass: 8.1%. In order to develop accurate sex- and age-specific correction factors, a sufficient number of individuals from both sexes and from all desired age classes have to be captured for baseline measurements. Given proper validation, this method provides an excellent opportunity to collect morphological data for large numbers of individuals with minimal disturbance.

  17. Lubrication of rigid ellipsida solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of geometry on the isothermal hydrodynamic film separating two rigid solids was investigated. The minimum film thickness is derived for fully flooded conjunctions by using the Reynolds boundary conditions. It was found that the minimum film thickness had the same speed, viscosity, and load dependence as Kapitza' classical solution. However, the incorporation of Reynolds boundary conditions resulted in an additional geometry effect. Solutions using the parabolic film approximation are compared by using the exact expression for the film in the analysis. Contour plots are known that indicate in detail the pressure developed between the solids.

  18. Rigid inflatable gastrostomy tube malposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy E. Murray, MB, MCh, MRCS, FFR

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rigid inflatable gastrostomy (RIG tubes are widely used in contemporary clinical practice for a variety of indications. Insertion of RIG tubes is associated with a high technical success rate and low incidence of mortality. In this case report, a procedural pitfall associated with intraperitoneal-extragastric malposition is described. Rigorous assessment of abdominal radiographs, as well as awareness of the expected appearance of the RIG tube and gastropexy T-fasteners, allows the abdominal radiologist to detect early RIG position in the early postprocedural period. Abdominal radiography is a widely available and inexpensive technique. The high spatial resolution it provides makes it a valuable tool in determining hardware position.

  19. Geometry, rigidity, and group actions

    CERN Document Server

    Farb, Benson; Zimmer, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    The study of group actions is more than a hundred years old but remains to this day a vibrant and widely studied topic in a variety of mathematic fields. A central development in the last fifty years is the phenomenon of rigidity, whereby one can classify actions of certain groups, such as lattices in semi-simple Lie groups. This provides a way to classify all possible symmetries of important spaces and all spaces admitting given symmetries. Paradigmatic results can be found in the seminal work of George Mostow, Gergory Margulis, and Robert J. Zimmer, among others.The p

  20. Effect of body biasing on single-event induced charge collection in deep N-well technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yi; Hu Jian-Guo; Tan Hong-Zhou; Qin Jun-Rui

    2015-01-01

    As the device size decreases, the soft error induced by space ions is becoming a great concern for the reliability of integrated circuits (ICs). At present, the body biasing technique is widely used in highly scaled technologies. In the paper, using the three-dimensional technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation, we analyze the effect of the body biasing on the single-event charge collection in deep N-well technology. Our simulation results show that the body biasing mainly affects the behavior of the source, and the effect of body biasing on the charge collection for the nMOSFET and pMOSFET is quite different. For the nMOSFET, the RBB will increase the charge collection, while the FBB will reduce the charge collection. For the pMOSFET, the effect of RBB on the SET pulse width is small, while the FBB has an adverse effect. Moreover, the differenceof the effect of body biasing on the charge collection is compared in deep N-well and twin well. (paper)

  1. Different body fluid volumes measured by single- and multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analyzers in overweight/obese renal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusztal, Mariusz; Dzierżek, Przemysław; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Weyde, Wacław; Klinger, Marian

    2015-05-17

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is an affordable, non-invasive and fast alternative method to assess body composition. The purpose of this study was to compare two different tetrapolar BIA devices for estimating body fluid volumes and body cell mass (BCM) in a clinical setting among patients with kidney failure. All double measurements were performed by multi-frequency (MF) and single-frequency (SF) BIA analyzers: a Body Composition Monitor (Fresenius Medical Care, Germany) and BIA-101 (Akern, Italy), respectively. All procedures were conducted according to the manufacturers' instructions (dedicated electrodes, measurement sites, positions, etc). Total body water (TBW), extracellular water (ECW), intracellular water (ICW) and BCM were compared. The study included 39 chronic kidney disease patients (stage III-V) with a mean age of 45.8 ± 8 years (21 men and 18 women) who had a wide range of BMI [17-34 kg/m2 (mean 26.6 ±5)]. A comparison of results from patients with BMI obese renal patients.

  2. Myosin heavy chain composition of single fibres from m. biceps brachii of male body builders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, H; Zhou, M.-Y.; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    expression of MHC isoforms within histochemical type II fibres of human skeletal muscle with body building. Furthermore, in human skeletal muscle differences in expression of MHC isoforms may not always be reflected in the traditional histochemical classification of types I, IIa, IIb and IIc fibres....

  3. General terms and rigidity: another solution to the trivialization problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Orlando

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I am concerned with the problem of applying the notion of rigidity to general terms. In Naming and Necessity, Kripke has clearly suggested that we should include some general terms among the rigid ones, namely, those common nouns semantically correlated with natural substances, species and phenomena, in general, natural kinds -'water', 'tiger', 'heat'- and some adjectives -'red', 'hot', 'loud'. However, the notion of rigidity has been defined for singular terms; after all, the notion that Kripke has provided us with is the notion of a rigid designator. But general terms do not designate single individuals: rather, they apply to many of them. In sum, the original concept of rigidity cannot be straightforwardly applied to general terms: it has to be somehow redefined in order to make it cover them. As is known, two main positions have been put forward to accomplish that task: the identity of designation conception, according to which a rigid general term is one that designates the same property or kind in all possible worlds, and the essentialist conception, which conceives of a rigid general term as an essentialist one, namely, a term that expresses an essential property of an object. My purpose in the present paper is to defend a particular version of the identity of designation conception: on the proposed approach, a rigid general term will be one that expresses the same property in all possible worlds and names the property it expresses. In my opinion, the position can be established on the basis of an inference to the best explanation of our intuitive interpretation and evaluation, relative to counterfactual circumstances, of statements containing different kinds of general terms, which is strictly analogous to our intuitive interpretation and evaluation, relative to such circumstances, of statements containing different kinds of singular ones. I will argue that it is possible to offer a new solution to the trivialization

  4. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms and DNA methylation markers associated with central obesity and regulation of body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goni, Leticia; Milagro, Fermín I; Cuervo, Marta; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2014-11-01

    Visceral fat is strongly associated with the development of specific obesity-related metabolic alterations. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms seem to be involved in the development of obesity and visceral adiposity. The aims of this review are to identify the single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to central obesity and to summarize the main findings on DNA methylation and obesity. A search of the MEDLINE database was conducted to identify genome-wide association studies, meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies, and gene-diet interaction studies related to central obesity, and, in addition, studies that analyzed DNA methylation in relation to body weight regulation. A total of 8 genome-wide association studies and 9 meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies reported numerous single-nucleotide polymorphisms to be associated with central obesity. Ten studies analyzed gene-diet interactions and central obesity, while 2 epigenome-wide association studies analyzed DNA methylation patterns and obesity. Nine studies investigated the relationship between DNA methylation and weight loss, excess body weight, or adiposity outcomes. Given the development of new sequencing and omics technologies, significantly more knowledge on genomics and epigenomics of obesity and body fat distribution will emerge in the near future. © 2014 International Life Sciences Institute.

  5. Geometry and the onset of rigidity in a disordered network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Mathijs F. J.; Bose, Anwesha; Storm, Cornelis; Ellenbroek, Wouter G.

    2017-11-01

    Disordered spring networks that are undercoordinated may abruptly rigidify when sufficient strain is applied. Since the deformation in response to applied strain does not change the generic quantifiers of network architecture, the number of nodes and the number of bonds between them, this rigidity transition must have a geometric origin. Naive, degree-of-freedom-based mechanical analyses such as the Maxwell-Calladine count or the pebble game algorithm overlook such geometric rigidity transitions and offer no means of predicting or characterizing them. We apply tools that were developed for the topological analysis of zero modes and states of self-stress on regular lattices to two-dimensional random spring networks and demonstrate that the onset of rigidity, at a finite simple shear strain γ★, coincides with the appearance of a single state of self-stress, accompanied by a single floppy mode. The process conserves the topologically invariant difference between the number of zero modes and the number of states of self-stress but imparts a finite shear modulus to the spring network. Beyond the critical shear, the network acquires a highly anisotropic elastic modulus, resisting further deformation most strongly in the direction of the rigidifying shear. We confirm previously reported critical scaling of the corresponding differential shear modulus. In the subcritical regime, a singular value decomposition of the network's compatibility matrix foreshadows the onset of rigidity by way of a continuously vanishing singular value corresponding to the nascent state of self-stress.

  6. Rigid spine reinforced polymer microelectrode array probe and method of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabada, Phillipe; Pannu, Satinderpall S

    2014-05-27

    A rigid spine-reinforced microelectrode array probe and fabrication method. The probe includes a flexible elongated probe body with conductive lines enclosed within a polymeric material. The conductive lines connect microelectrodes found near an insertion end of the probe to respective leads at a connector end of the probe. The probe also includes a rigid spine, such as made from titanium, fixedly attached to the probe body to structurally reinforce the probe body and enable the typically flexible probe body to penetrate and be inserted into tissue, such as neural tissue. By attaching or otherwise fabricating the rigid spine to connect to only an insertion section of the probe body, an integrally connected cable section of the probe body may remain flexible.

  7. Single-blind, placebo controlled randomised clinical study of chitosan for body weight reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, VR; Satia, MC; Deschamps, A.; Maquet, V.; Shah, RB; Zinzuwadia, PH; Trivedi, JV

    2016-01-01

    Background Chitosan is a dietary fibre which acts by reducing fat absorption and thus used as a means for controlling weight. Weight loss clinical trial outcomes, however, have contradictory results regarding its efficacy. The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a chitosan from fungal origin in treatment of excess weight in the absence of dietary restrictions. Methods A phase IV, randomised, multicentre, single-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical ...

  8. The influence of single whole body cryostimulation treatment on the dynamics and the level of maximal anaerobic power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Andrzej T; Lubkowska, Anna; Szyguła, Zbigniew; Frączek, Barbara; Chudecka, Monika

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the dynamics of maximal anaerobic power (MAP) of the lower limbs, following a single whole body cryostimulation treatment (WBC), in relation to the temperature of thigh muscles. The subjects included 15 men and 15 women with an average age (± SD) of 21.6 ± 1.2 years. To evaluate the level of anaerobic power, the Wingate test was applied. The subjects were submitted to 6 WBC treatments at -130°C once a day. After each session they performed a single Wingate test in the 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90th min after leaving the cryogenic chamber. The order of the test was randomized. All Wingate tests were preceded by an evaluation of thigh surface temperature with the use of a thermovisual camera. The average thigh surface temperature (T(av)) in both men and women dropped significantly after the whole body cryostimulation treatment, and next increased gradually. In women T(av) remained decreased for 75 min, whereas in men it did not return to the basal level until 90th min. A statistically insignificant decrease in MAP was observed in women after WBC. On the contrary, a non-significant increase in MAP was observed in men. The course of changes in MAP following the treatment was similar in both sexes to the changes in thigh surface temperature, with the exception of the period between 15th and 30th min. The shorter time to obtain MAP was observed in women till 90th min and in men till 45 min after WBC compared to the initial level. A single whole body cryostimulation may have a minor influence on short-term physical performance of supramaximal intensity, but it leads to improvement of velocity during the start as evidenced by shorter time required to obtain MAP.

  9. Development of co-registration techniques for comparison of whole-body PET/CT studies

    OpenAIRE

    Libório, André Filipe Cidra Duarte Rocha

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to develop an algorithm that co-registers, in a single volume, whole-body Human PET/CT Scans taken at different instants in time, to facilitate the comparison of studies in situations where the patient had to multiple PET/CT exams. The idea is to isolate, from the initials CT volumes, the rigid body parts that can be transformed with a rigid transformation – the bone structures. Bone structures were obtained with segmentation (the process of dividing a volume i...

  10. Cracking of open traffic rigid pavement

    OpenAIRE

    Niken Chatarina; Siswanto Yudi; Widodo; Tjahjono Elly

    2017-01-01

    The research is done by observing the growth of real structure cracking in Natar, Lampung, Indonesia compared to C. Niken’s et al research and literature study. The rigid pavement was done with open traffic system. There are two main crack types on Natar rigid pavement: cracks cross the road, and cracks spreads on rigid pavement surface. The observation of cracks was analyzed by analyzing material, casting, curing, loading and shrinkage mechanism. The relationship between these analysis and s...

  11. Mooring and ground handling rigid airships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of mooring and ground handling rigid airships are discussed. A brief history of Mooring and Ground Handling Rigid Airships from July 2, 1900 through September 1, 1939 is included. Also a brief history of ground handling developments with large U. S. Navy nonrigid airships between September 1, 1939 and August 31, 1962 is included wherein developed equipment and techniques appear applicable to future large rigid airships. Finally recommendations are made pertaining to equipment and procedures which appear desirable and feasible for future rigid airship programs.

  12. Rigidizing Inflatable Deployable Dwelling (RIDD), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — By combining thin thermoplastic films, woven Vectran reinforcements, and heat a reliable, deployable, rigidizing space habitat can be created. Although much research...

  13. Correlation of impression removal force with elastomeric impression material rigidity and hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mary P; Alderman, Nick; Petrie, Cynthia S; Melander, Jennifer; McGuire, Jacob

    2013-07-01

    Difficult impression removal has been linked to high rigidity and hardness of elastomeric impression materials. In response to this concern, manufacturers have reformulated their materials to reduce rigidity and hardness to decrease removal difficulty; however, the relationship between impression removal and rigidity or hardness has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a positive correlation between impression removal difficulty and rigidity or hardness of current elastomeric impression materials. Light- and medium-body polyether (PE), vinylpolysiloxane (VPS), and hybrid vinyl polyether siloxane (VPES) impression materials were tested (n = 5 for each material/consistency/test method). Rigidity (elastic modulus) was measured via tensile testing of dumbbell-shaped specimens (Die C, ASTM D412). Shore A hardness was measured using disc specimens according to ASTM D2240-05 test specifications. Impressions were also made of a custom stainless steel model using a custom metal tray that could be attached to a universal tester to measure associated removal force. Within each impression material consistency, one-factor ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc analyses (α = 0.05) were used to compare rigidity, hardness, and removal force of the three types of impression materials. A Pearson's correlation (α = 0.05) was used to evaluate the association between impression removal force and rigidity or hardness. With medium-body materials, VPS exhibited significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) rigidity and hardness than VPES or PE, while PE impressions required significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) removal force than VPS or VPES impressions. With light-body materials, VPS again demonstrated significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) hardness than VPES or PE, while the rigidity of the light-body materials did not significantly differ between materials (p > 0.05); however, just as with the medium-body materials, light-body PE impressions required significantly higher (p

  14. Data on enhanced expression and purification of camelid single domain antibodies from Escherichia coli classical inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Maristella; Scotti, Claudia

    2017-06-01

    Heterologous expression of high amounts of recombinant proteins is a milestone for research and industrial purposes. Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) are heavy-chain only antibody fragments with applications in the biotechnological, medical and industrial fields. The simple nature and small size of sdAbs allows for efficient expression of the soluble molecule in different hosts. However, in some cases, it results in low functional protein yield. To overcome this limitation, expression of a 6xHistag sdAb was attempted in different conditions in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells. Data showed that high amount of sdAb can be expressed in E. coli classical inclusion bodies, efficiently extracted by urea in a short-time, and properly purified by metal ion affinity chromatography. These data originate from the research article "Enhanced expression and purification of camelid single domain VHH antibodies from classical inclusion bodies" Maggi and Scotti (2017) [1] (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pep.2017.02.007).

  15. Comparative study to develop a single method for retrieving wide class of recombinant proteins from classical inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhiar, Arshad Ahmed; Chanda, Warren; Joseph, Thomson Patrick; Guo, Xuefang; Liu, Min; Sha, Li; Batool, Samana; Gao, Yifan; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Min; Zhong, Mintao

    2018-03-01

    The formation of inclusion bodies (IBs) is considered as an Achilles heel of heterologous protein expression in bacterial hosts. Wide array of techniques has been developed to recover biochemically challenging proteins from IBs. However, acquiring the active state even from the same protein family was found to be an independent of single established method. Here, we present a new strategy for the recovery of wide sub-classes of recombinant protein from harsh IBs. We found that numerous methods and their combinations for reducing IB formation and producing soluble proteins were not effective, if the inclusion bodies were harsh in nature. On the other hand, different practices with mild solubilization buffers were able to solubilize IBs completely, yet the recovery of active protein requires large screening of refolding buffers. With the integration of previously reported mild solubilization techniques, we proposed an improved method, which comprised low sarkosyl concentration, ranging from 0.05 to 0.1% coupled with slow freezing (- 1 °C/min) and fast thaw (room temperature), resulting in greater solubility and the integrity of solubilized protein. Dilution method was employed with single buffer to restore activity for every sub-class of recombinant protein. Results showed that the recovered protein's activity was significantly higher compared with traditional solubilization/refolding approach. Solubilization of IBs by the described method was proved milder in nature, which restored native-like conformation of proteins within IBs.

  16. Synthesis of 3D Model of a Magnetic Field-Influenced Body from a Single Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuilan; Newman, Timothy; Gallagher, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A method for recovery of a 3D model of a cloud-like structure that is in motion and deforming but approximately governed by magnetic field properties is described. The method allows recovery of the model from a single intensity image in which the structure's silhouette can be observed. The method exploits envelope theory and a magnetic field model. Given one intensity image and the segmented silhouette in the image, the method proceeds without human intervention to produce the 3D model. In addition to allowing 3D model synthesis, the method's capability to yield a very compact description offers further utility. Application of the method to several real-world images is demonstrated.

  17. Observing the state of balance with a single upper-body sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte ePaiman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of falls is an urgent challenge in our aging society. For wearable devices that actively prevent falls or mitigate their consequences, a critical prerequisite is knowledge on the user's current state of balance. To keep such wearable systems practical and to achieve high acceptance, only very limited sensor instrumentation is possible, often restricted to inertial measurement units at waist level. We propose to augment this limited sensor information by combining it with additional knowledge on human gait, in the form of an observer concept. The observer contains a combination of validated concepts to model human gait: A spring-loaded inverted pendulum model with articulated upper body, where foot placement and stance leg are controlled via the extrapolated center of mass (XCoM and the virtual pivot point (VPP, respectively. State estimation is performed via an Additive Unscented Kalman Filter (Additive UKF. We investigated sensitivity of the proposed concept to model uncertainties, and we evaluated observer performance with real data from human subjects walking on a treadmill. Data was collected from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU placed near the subject's center of mass (CoM, and observer estimates were compared to the ground truth as obtained via infrared motion capture. We found that the root mean squared deviation did not exceed 13cm on position, 22cm/s on velocity (0.56m/s-1.35m/s, 1.2degrees on orientation and 17degrees/s on angular velocity.

  18. Structural rigidity in the capsid assembly of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespenheide, B M [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, PO Box 871504, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Jacobs, D J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330-8268 (United States); Thorpe, M F [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, PO Box 871504, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

    2004-11-10

    The cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) has a protein cage, or capsid, which encloses its genetic material. The structure of the capsid consists of 180 copies of a single protein that self-assemble inside a cell to form a complete capsid with icosahedral symmetry. The icosahedral surface can be naturally divided into pentagonal and hexagonal faces, and the formation of either of these faces has been proposed to be the first step in the capsid assembly process. We have used the software FIRST to analyse the rigidity of pentameric and hexameric substructures of the complete capsid to explore the viability of certain capsid assembly pathways. FIRST uses the 3D pebble game to determine structural rigidity, and a brief description of this algorithm, as applied to body-bar networks, is given here. We find that the pentameric substructure, which corresponds to a pentagonal face on the icosahedral surface, provides the best structural properties for nucleating the capsid assembly process, consistent with experimental observations.

  19. The single-nucleotide resolution transcriptome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown in body temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omri Wurtzel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the hallmarks of opportunistic pathogens is their ability to adjust and respond to a wide range of environmental and host-associated conditions. The human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has an ability to thrive in a variety of hosts and cause a range of acute and chronic infections in individuals with impaired host defenses or cystic fibrosis. Here we report an in-depth transcriptional profiling of this organism when grown at host-related temperatures. Using RNA-seq of samples from P. aeruginosa grown at 28°C and 37°C we detected genes preferentially expressed at the body temperature of mammalian hosts, suggesting that they play a role during infection. These temperature-induced genes included the type III secretion system (T3SS genes and effectors, as well as the genes responsible for phenazines biosynthesis. Using genome-wide transcription start site (TSS mapping by RNA-seq we were able to accurately define the promoters and cis-acting RNA elements of many genes, and uncovered new genes and previously unrecognized non-coding RNAs directly controlled by the LasR quorum sensing regulator. Overall we identified 165 small RNAs and over 380 cis-antisense RNAs, some of which predicted to perform regulatory functions, and found that non-coding RNAs are preferentially localized in pathogenicity islands and horizontally transferred regions. Our work identifies regulatory features of P. aeruginosa genes whose products play a role in environmental adaption during infection and provides a reference transcriptional landscape for this pathogen.

  20. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung metastases as oligo-recurrence: a single institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Miura, Hiroyuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes following stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung metastases as oligo-recurrence. From May 2003 to June 2014, records for 66 patients with 76 oligo-recurrences in the lungs treated with SBRT were retrospectively reviewed. Oligo-recurrence primary sites and patient numbers were as follows: lungs, 31; colorectal, 13; head and neck, 10; esophagus, 3; uterus, 3; and others, 6. The median SBRT dose was 50 Gy (range, 45-60 Gy) administered in a median of 5 (range, 5-9) fractions. All patients received SBRT, with no acute toxicity. Surviving patients had a median follow-up time of 36.5 months. The 3-year rates of local control, overall survival and disease-free survival were 90.6%, 76.0% and 53.7%, respectively. Longer disease-free interval from initial treatment to SBRT, and non-colorectal cancer were both associated with favorable outcomes. Disease progression after SBRT occurred in 31 patients, most with distant metastases (n = 24) [among whom, 87.5% (n = 21) had new lung metastases]. Among these 21 patients, 12 were judged as having a second oligo-recurrence. Additional SBRT was performed for these 12 patients, and all 12 tumors were controlled without disease progression. Three patients (4.5%) developed Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis. No other late adverse events of Grade ≥2 were identified. Thus, SBRT for oligo-recurrence achieved acceptable tumor control, with additional SBRT also effective for selected patients with a second oligo-recurrence after primary SBRT. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  1. Evaluating a method for automated rigid registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Vester-Christensen, Martin; Larsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    We evaluate a novel method for fully automated rigid registration of 2D manifolds in 3D space based on distance maps, the Gibbs sampler and Iterated Conditional Modes (ICM). The method is tested against the ICP considered as the gold standard for automated rigid registration. Furthermore...

  2. Topological orders in rigid states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, X.G.

    1990-01-01

    The authors study a new kind of ordering topological order in rigid states (the states with no local gapless excitations). This paper concentrates on characterization of the different topological orders. As an example the authors discuss in detail chiral spin states of 2+1 dimensional spin systems. Chiral spin states are described by the topological Chern-Simons theories in the continuum limit. The authors show that the topological orders can be characterized by a non-Abelian gauge structure over the moduli space which parametrizes a family of the model Hamiltonians supporting topologically ordered ground states. In 2 + 1 dimensions, the non-Abelian gauge structure determines possible fractional statistics of the quasi-particle excitations over the topologically ordered ground states. The dynamics of the low lying global excitations is shown to be independent of random spatial dependent perturbations. The ground state degeneracy and the non-Abelian gauge structures discussed in this paper are very robust, even against those perturbations that break translation symmetry. The authors also discuss the symmetry properties of the degenerate ground states of chiral spin states. The authors find that some degenerate ground states of chiral spin states on torus carry non-trivial quantum numbers of the 90 degrees rotation

  3. Single leg jumping neuromuscular control is improved following whole body, long-axis rotational training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, John; Burden, Robert; Krupp, Ryan; Caborn, David N M

    2011-04-01

    Improved lower extremity neuromuscular control during sports may decrease injury risk. This prospective study evaluated progressive resistance, whole body, long-axis rotational training on the Ground Force 360 device. Our hypothesis was that device training would improve lower extremity neuromuscular control based on previous reports of kinematic, ground reaction force (GRF) or electromyographic (EMG) evidence of safer or more efficient dynamic knee stability during jumping. Thirty-six healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either training (Group 1) or control (Group 2) groups. Using a pre-test, post-test study design data were collected from three SLVJ trials. Unpaired t-tests with adjustments for multiple comparisons were used to evaluate group mean change differences (P≤0.05/25≤0.002). During propulsion Group 1 standardized EMG amplitude mean change differences for gluteus maximus (-21.8% vs. +17.4%), gluteus medius (-28.6% vs. +15.0%), rectus femoris (-27.1% vs. +11.2%), vastus medialis (-20.2% vs. +9.1%), and medial hamstrings (-38.3% vs. +30.3%) differed from Group 2. During landing Group 1 standardized EMG amplitude mean change differences for gluteus maximus (-32.9% vs. +11.1%) and rectus femoris (-33.3% vs. +29.0%) also differed from Group 2. Group 1 peak propulsion vertical GRF (+0.24N/kg vs. -0.46N/kg) and landing GRF stabilization timing (-0.68 vs. +0.05s) mean change differences differed from Group 2. Group 1 mean hip (-16.3 vs. +7.8°/s) and knee (-21.4 vs. +18.5°/s) flexion velocity mean change differences also differed from Group 2. Improved lower extremity neuromuscular efficiency, increased peak propulsive vertical GRF, decreased mean hip and knee flexion velocities during landing, and earlier landing stabilization timing in the training group suggests improved lower extremity neuromuscular control. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Initial Development of an Electronic Testis Rigidity Tester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Mirilas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to develop our previously presented mechanical device, the Testis Rigidity Tester (TRT, into an electronic system (Electronic Testis Rigidity Tester, ETRT by applying tactile imaging, which has been used successfully with other solid organs. A measuring device, located at the front end of the ETRT incorporates a tactile sensor comprising an array of microsensors. By application of a predetermined deformation of 2 mm, increased pressure alters linearly the resistance of each microsensor, producing changes of voltage. These signals were amplified, filtered, and digitized, and then processed by an electronic collector system, which presented them as a color-filled contour plot of the area of the testis coming into contact with the sensor. Testis models of different rigidity served for initial evaluation of ETRT; their evacuated central spaces contained different, increasing glue masses. An independent method of rigidity measurement, using an electric weight scale and a micrometer, showed that the more the glue injected, the greater the force needed for a 2-mm deformation. In a preliminary test, a single sensor connected to a multimeter showed similar force measurement for the same deformation in these phantoms. For each of the testis models compressed in the same manner, the ETRT system offered a map of pressures, represented by a color scale within the contour plot of the contact area with the sensor. ETRT found certain differences in rigidity between models that had escaped detection by a blind observer. ETRT is easy to use and provides a color-coded “insight“ of the testis internal structure. After experimental testing, it could be valuable in intraoperative evaluation of testes, so that the surgeon can decide about orchectomy or orcheopexy.

  5. Semiclassical Theory of Spectral Rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M. V.

    1985-08-01

    The spectral rigidity Δ(L) of a set of quantal energy levels is the mean square deviation of the spectral staircase from the straight line that best fits it over a range of L mean level spacings. In the semiclassical limit (hslash-> 0), formulae are obtained giving Δ(L) as a sum over classical periodic orbits. When L ~= Lmax, where Lmax ~ hslash-(N-1) for a system of N freedoms, Δ(L) is shown to display the following universal behaviour as a result of properties of very long classical orbits: if the system is classically integrable (all periodic orbits filling tori), Δ(L) = 1/15L (as in an uncorrelated (Poisson) eigenvalue sequence); if the system is classically chaotic (all periodic orbits isolated and unstable) and has no symmetry, Δ(L) = ln L/2π^2 + D if 1 ~= L ~= Lmax (as in the gaussian unitary ensemble of random-matrix theory); if the system is chaotic and has time-reversal symmetry, Δ(L) = ln L/π^2 + E if 1 ~= L ~= Lmax (as in the gaussian orthogonal ensemble). When L >> Lmax, Δ(L) saturates non-universally at a value, determined by short classical orbits, of order hslash-(N-1) for integrable systems and ln (hslash-1) for chaotic systems. These results are obtained by using the periodic-orbit expansion for the spectral density, together with classical sum rules for the intensities of long orbits and a semiclassical sum rule restricting the manner in which their contributions interfere. For two examples Δ(L) is studied in detail: the rectangular billiard (integrable), and the Riemann zeta function (assuming its zeros to be the eigenvalues of an unknown quantum system whose unknown classical limit is chaotic).

  6. The Effect of A Single Sub-Lethal Dose of Whole Body Irradiation on the Small Intestine of Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ramli, M. A.; Kubba, M. A.; Al-Bassam, L. S.; Belhaj, K.; Al-shawish, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of whole body radiation with a single sub-lethal dose at 4 Gy on rat small intestine was studied histologically and quantitatively. Irradiated animals were euthanized at 24 hours, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post- irradiation. Crypts of Leiberkuhn and peyer's patches were especially targeted by irradiation. The crypts showed severe cellular fragmentation in the germinal cellular compartments twenty Four hours after irradiation resulting in partial denudation of villi especially at their Tips. At three days, these cells resumed their proliferative activity with the appearance of unusually large numbers of mitotic figures. Cellular regeneration in the crypts and on the villous surface showed improvement with advancing time till day 28 when the villi had complete epithelial covering and the proliferative activity of the germinal cryptic cells returned to normal. The quantitative study included the measurement of about fifty villi at each time after irradiation. A significant decrease in villous length was noticed at twenty four hours post-irradiation compared to the control values. The length of villi plateaued at about this level till day twenty one when it slightly increased to reach a sub normal mean length on day 28. We concluded that whole body irradiation with a single dose at 4 Gy was enough to induce cryptic cellular necrosis with sloughing of epithelial villous columnar covering. This cellular damage was, however, sub- total since quick regenerative cellular activity was noticed three days post-irradiation. The decrease in the villous length paralleled the cryptic cellular damage whereas full recovery was not achieved despite obvious cellular regeneration.

  7. Gait analysis following treadmill training with body weight support versus conventional physical therapy: a prospective randomized controlled single blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucareli, P R; Lima, M O; Lima, F P S; de Almeida, J G; Brech, G C; D'Andréa Greve, J M

    2011-09-01

    Single-blind randomized, controlled clinical study. To evaluate, using kinematic gait analysis, the results obtained from gait training on a treadmill with body weight support versus those obtained with conventional gait training and physiotherapy. Thirty patients with sequelae from traumatic incomplete spinal cord injuries at least 12 months earlier; patients were able to walk and were classified according to motor function as ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) impairment scale C or D. Patients were divided randomly into two groups of 15 patients by the drawing of opaque envelopes: group A (weight support) and group B (conventional). After an initial assessment, both groups underwent 30 sessions of gait training. Sessions occurred twice a week, lasted for 30 min each and continued for four months. All of the patients were evaluated by a single blinded examiner using movement analysis to measure angular and linear kinematic gait parameters. Six patients (three from group A and three from group B) were excluded because they attended fewer than 85% of the training sessions. There were no statistically significant differences in intra-group comparisons among the spatial-temporal variables in group B. In group A, the following significant differences in the studied spatial-temporal variables were observed: increases in velocity, distance, cadence, step length, swing phase and gait cycle duration, in addition to a reduction in stance phase. There were also no significant differences in intra-group comparisons among the angular variables in group B. However, group A achieved significant improvements in maximum hip extension and plantar flexion during stance. Gait training with body weight support was more effective than conventional physiotherapy for improving the spatial-temporal and kinematic gait parameters among patients with incomplete spinal cord injuries.

  8. Dissipative N-body simulations of the formation of single galaxies in a cold dark-matter cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewell, M.W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The details of an N-body code designed specifically to study the collapse of a single protogalaxy are presented. This code uses a spherical harmonic expansion to model the gravity and a sticky-particle algorithm to model the gas physics. It includes external tides and cosmologically realistic boundary conditions. The results of twelve simulations using this code are given. The initial conditions for these runs use mean-density profiles and r.m.s. quadrupoles and tides taken from the CDM power spectrum. The simulations start when the center of the perturbation first goes nonlinear, and continue until a redshift Z ∼ 1-2. The resulting rotation curves are approximately flat out to 100 kpc, but do show some structure. The circular velocity is 200 km/sec around a 3σ peak. The final systems have λ approx-equal .03. The angular momentum per unit mass of the baryons implies disk scale lengths of 1-3 kpc. The tidal forces are strong enough to profoundly influence the collapse geometry. In particular, the usual assumption, that tidal torques produce a system approximately in solid-body rotation, is shown to be seriously in error

  9. Assessment of body composition in subjects with metabolic syndrome comparing single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and bioelectrical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloetens, Lieselotte; Johansson-Persson, Anna; Helgegren, Hannah; Landin-Olsson, Mona; Uusitupa, Matti; Åkesson, Björn; Önning, Gunilla

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the agreement between body composition measurements made with two methods-single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (SF-BIA) and bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS). The body composition measurements using SF-BIA and BIS were performed seven times during 6 months on 41 patients (13 men and 28 women) with metabolic syndrome who were taking part in a dietary intervention study. The mean [standard deviation (SD)] fat mass (FM) and median [interquartile range (IQR)] FM% measured with SF-BIA were 32.7 (6.7) kg and 36.3 (30.3-39.3)%, respectively, compared with 38.2 (8.7) kg and 40.9 (35.5-45.6)%, respectively, using BIS. The median (IQR) fat-free mass (FFM) was 60.0 (53.3-73.5) kg according to SF-BIA and 55.4 (48.8-66.5) kg according to BIS. These results obtained with the two methods were significantly different (P<0.001). Still highly significant correlations were found between the results obtained with SF-BIA and BIS for FM and FFM (all r≥0.89, P<0.001). Using Bland-Altman analysis, the bias was found to be -5.4 (4.1) kg for FM, -5.5 (3.7)% for FM%, and 5.4 (4.1) kg for FFM. Rather wide limits of agreement were found for FM, FM%, and FFM. Body composition data obtained using SF-BIA and BIS in subjects with metabolic syndrome were highly correlated but not interchangeable. FM was systematically lower when using SF-BIA than when using BIS.

  10. One-DOF Superimposed Rigid Origami with Multiple States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Gattas, Joseph M; Chen, Yan

    2016-11-10

    Origami-inspired engineering design is increasingly used in the development of self-folding structures. The majority of existing self-folding structures either use a bespoke crease pattern to form a single structure, or a universal crease pattern capable of forming numerous structures with multiple folding steps. This paper presents a new approach whereby multiple distinct, rigid-foldable crease patterns are superimposed in the same sheet such that kinematic independence and 1-DOF mobility of each individual pattern is preserved. This is enabled by the cross-crease vertex, a special configuration consisting of two pairs of collinear crease lines, which is proven here by means of a kinematic analysis to contain two independent 1-DOF rigid-foldable states. This enables many new origami-inspired engineering design possibilities, with two explored in depth: the compact folding of non-flat-foldable structures and sequent folding origami that can transform between multiple states without unfolding.

  11. The Concept of Speed Applied to Rigid Bodies in Rotation: Same alternative conceptions, varied interpretations O Conceito de Velocidade Aplicado em Corpos Rígidos em Rotação: mesmas concepções alternativas, variadas interpretações

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Alves Barros

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an investigation where some alternative conceptions are the origin and the processing of varied interpretations. As for that, it was proposed to high school students the resolution of certain problems that involved rigid bodies in constant rotation. These problems should be analysed within the perspective of the speed concept, which was previously known by the students, but abandoned by the explanations generated by the alternative conceptions.Este trabalho apresenta uma investigação em que algumas concepções alternativas são a origem e o desencadeamento de variadas interpretações. Para isso, foram propostos a alunos do ensino médio a resolução de determinados problemas que envolviam corpos rígidos em rotação constante. Estes problemas deveriam ser analisados dentro da perspectiva do conceito de velocidade, previamente conhecido dos alunos, mas abandonado pelas explicações geradas pelas concepções alternativas.

  12. Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Sequential Gemcitabine for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellenberg, Devin; Kim, Jeff; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Chun, Carlene L.; Columbo, Laurie Ann; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Kunz, Pamela L.; Van Dam, Jacques; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Hsu, Annie; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Goodman, Karyn A.; Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase II trial evaluated the toxicity, local control, and overall survival in patients treated with sequential gemcitabine and linear accelerator-based single-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled on this prospective single-institution, institutional review board-approved study. Gemcitabine was administered on Days 1, 8, and 15, and SBRT on Day 29. Gemcitabine was restarted on Day 43 and continued for 3-5 cycles. SBRT of 25 Gy in a single fraction was delivered to the internal target volume with a 2- 3-mm margin using a nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique. Respiratory gating was used to account for breathing motion. Follow-up evaluations occurred at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All patients completed SBRT and a median of five cycles of chemotherapy. Follow-up for the 2 remaining alive patients was 25.1 and 36.4 months. No acute Grade 3 or greater nonhematologic toxicity was observed. Late Grade 3 or greater toxicities occurred in 1 patient (5%) and consisted of a duodenal perforation (G4). Three patients (15%) developed ulcers (G2) that were medically managed. Overall, median survival was 11.8 months, with 1-year survival of 50% and 2-year survival of 20%. Using serial computed tomography, the freedom from local progression was 94% at 1 year. Conclusion: Linear accelerator-delivered SBRT with sequential gemcitabine resulted in excellent local control of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Future studies will address strategies for reducing long-term duodenal toxicity associated with SBRT.

  13. Multi-Axis Identifiability Using Single-Surface Parameter Estimation Maneuvers on the X-48B Blended Wing Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, Nalin A.; Koshimoto, Ed T.; Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of parameter estimation on hybrid-wing-body type aircraft is complicated by the fact that many design candidates for such aircraft involve a large number of aero- dynamic control effectors that act in coplanar motion. This fact adds to the complexity already present in the parameter estimation problem for any aircraft with a closed-loop control system. Decorrelation of system inputs must be performed in order to ascertain individual surface derivatives with any sort of mathematical confidence. Non-standard control surface configurations, such as clamshell surfaces and drag-rudder modes, further complicate the modeling task. In this paper, asymmetric, single-surface maneuvers are used to excite multiple axes of aircraft motion simultaneously. Time history reconstructions of the moment coefficients computed by the solved regression models are then compared to each other in order to assess relative model accuracy. The reduced flight-test time required for inner surface parameter estimation using multi-axis methods was found to come at the cost of slightly reduced accuracy and statistical confidence for linear regression methods. Since the multi-axis maneuvers captured parameter estimates similar to both longitudinal and lateral-directional maneuvers combined, the number of test points required for the inner, aileron-like surfaces could in theory have been reduced by 50%. While trends were similar, however, individual parameters as estimated by a multi-axis model were typically different by an average absolute difference of roughly 15-20%, with decreased statistical significance, than those estimated by a single-axis model. The multi-axis model exhibited an increase in overall fit error of roughly 1-5% for the linear regression estimates with respect to the single-axis model, when applied to flight data designed for each, respectively.

  14. Soft soils reinforced by rigid vertical inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia-Victoria NEAGOE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement of soft soils by rigid vertical inclusions is an increasingly used technique over the last few years. The system consists of rigid or semi-rigid vertical inclusions and a granular platform for the loads transfer from the structure to the inclusions. This technique aims to reduce the differential settlements both at ground level as below the structure. Reinforcement by rigid inclusions is mainly used for foundation works for large commercial and industrial platforms, storage tanks, wastewater treatment plants, wind farms, bridges, roads, railway embankments. The subject is one of interest as it proves the recently concerns at international level in research and design; however, most studies deal more with the static behavior and less with the dynamic one.

  15. Rigid pricing and rationally inattentive consumer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějka, Filip

    158 B, July (2015), s. 656-678 ISSN 0022-0531 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : rational inattention * imperfect information * nominal rigidity Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.097, year: 2015

  16. Rigid pricing and rationally inattentive consumer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějka, Filip

    158 B, July (2015), s. 656-678 ISSN 0022-0531 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : rational inattention * imperfect information * nominal rigidity Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.097, year: 2015

  17. Analysis of Switched-Rigid Floating Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar R. Marur

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In explicit finite element simulations, a technique called deformable-to-rigid (D2R switching is used routinely to reduce the computation time. Using the D2R option, the deformable parts in the model can be switched to rigid and reverted back to deformable when needed during the analysis. The time of activation of D2R however influences the overall dynamics of the system being analyzed. In this paper, a theoretical basis for the selection of time of rigid switching based on system energy is established. A floating oscillator problem is investigated for this purpose and closed-form analytical expressions are derived for different phases in rigid switching. The analytical expressions are validated by comparing the theoretical results with numerical computations.

  18. Modeling Decomposition of Unconfined Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hobbs, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The decomposition of unconfined rigid polyurethane foam has been modeled by a kinetic bond-breaking scheme describing degradation of a primary polymer and formation of a thermally stable secondary polymer...

  19. Crack identification for rigid pavements using unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahaddin Ersoz, Ahmet; Pekcan, Onur; Teke, Turker

    2017-09-01

    Pavement condition assessment is an essential piece of modern pavement management systems as rehabilitation strategies are planned based upon its outcomes. For proper evaluation of existing pavements, they must be continuously and effectively monitored using practical means. Conventionally, truck-based pavement monitoring systems have been in-use in assessing the remaining life of in-service pavements. Although such systems produce accurate results, their use can be expensive and data processing can be time consuming, which make them infeasible considering the demand for quick pavement evaluation. To overcome such problems, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can be used as an alternative as they are relatively cheaper and easier-to-use. In this study, we propose a UAV based pavement crack identification system for monitoring rigid pavements’ existing conditions. The system consists of recently introduced image processing algorithms used together with conventional machine learning techniques, both of which are used to perform detection of cracks on rigid pavements’ surface and their classification. Through image processing, the distinct features of labelled crack bodies are first obtained from the UAV based images and then used for training of a Support Vector Machine (SVM) model. The performance of the developed SVM model was assessed with a field study performed along a rigid pavement exposed to low traffic and serious temperature changes. Available cracks were classified using the UAV based system and obtained results indicate it ensures a good alternative solution for pavement monitoring applications.

  20. Dynamics of Rigid Bodies and Flexible Beam Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin Bjerre

    . It is shown that particular simplifications are obtained when the same interpolation functions are used for both state-space variables, whereby all inertia effects can be represented via the classic constant mass matrix. The hybrid state-space constitutes the basis for developing a conservative time...... of the global components of the position vectors and associated convected base vectors for the element nodes. The kinematics is expressed in a homogeneous quadratic form and the constitutive stiffness is derived from complementary energy of a set of equilibrium modes, each representing a state of constant...... internal force or moment. This approach avoids local interpolation of kinematic variables, which makes the formulation inherently locking-free and frame-invariant. In the final part of the thesis a multi-level optimization procedure for wind turbine blades is presented. Computational procedures similar...

  1. Quaternion Feedback Control for Rigid-body Spacecraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses three-axis attitude control for a Danish spacecraft, Roemer. The algorithm proposed is based on an approximation of the exact feedback linearisation for quaternionic attitude representation. The proposed attitude controller is tested in a simulation study. The environmental d...... disturbances correspond to those expected for the Roemer mission. The pros and cons of the algorithm are discussed. The results of the study show that the controller is a successful candidate for on-board implementation...

  2. Euler-Poincare Reduction of a Rigid Body Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Kulczycki, P.

    2005-01-01

    |If a mechanical system experiences symmetry, the Lagrangian becomes invariant under a certain group action. This property leads to substantial simplification of the description of movement. The standpoint in this article is a mechanical system afected by an external force of a control action....... Assuming that the system possesses symmetry and the configuration manifold corresponds to a Lie group, the Euler-Poincare reduction breaks up the motion into separate equations of dynamics and kinematics. This becomes of particular interest for modeling, estimation and control of mechanical systems....... A control system generates an external force, which may break the symmetry in the dynamics. This paper shows how to model and to control a mechanical sys- tem on the reduced phase space, such that complete state space asymptotic stabilization can be achieved. The paper comprises a specialization of the well...

  3. Euler-Poincare Reduction of Externall Forced Rigid Body Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Kulczycki, P.

    2004-01-01

    If a mechanical system experiences symmetry, the Lagrangian becomes invariant under a certain group action. This property leads to substantial simplification of the description of movement. The standpoint in this article is a mechanical system affected by an external force of a control action....... Assuming that the system possesses symmetry and the configuration manifold corresponds to a Lie group, the Euler-Poincaré reduction breaks up the motion into separate equations of dynamics and kinematics. This becomes of particular interest for modelling, estimation and control of mechanical systems....... A control system generates an external force, which may break the symmetry in the dynamics. This paper shows how to model and to control a mechanical system on the reduced phase space, such that complete state space asymptotic stabilization can be achieved. The paper comprises a specialization of the well...

  4. Euler-Poincaré Reduction of a Rigid Body Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Kulczycki, P.

    2004-01-01

    If a mechanical system experiences symmetry, the Lagrangian becomes invariant under a certain group action. This property leads to substantial simplification of the description of movement. The standpoint in this article is a mechanical system affected by an external force of a control action....... Assuming that the system possesses symmetry and the configuration manifold corresponds to a Lie group, the Euler-Poincaré reduction breaks up the motion into separate equations of dynamics and kinematics. This becomes of particular interest for modelling, estimation and control of mechanical systems....... A control system generates an external force, which may break the symmetry in the dynamics. This paper shows how to model and to control a mechanical system on the reduced phase space, such that complete state space asymptotic stabilization can be achieved. The paper comprises a specialization of the well...

  5. Reduced Order Aeroservoelastic Models with Rigid Body Modes, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Complex aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic phenomena can be modeled on complete aircraft configurations generating models with millions of degrees of freedom. Starting...

  6. A Digital Computer Approach to the Unsymmetric Rigid Body Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    i A (1 2 I )1ii B (1 3 11)/12 C (1~ 1 1 2)/13 1412 I F, G, H Intermediate expression for computations of w 1 9 w 2 9 w3 d1, d 2, ei, e 2 trial...Staude problem. 6. Grammel (1948): Use of approximating functions in a recursive scheme. A brief description of Grammel’s work can be found in Section...HAMILTON’S EQUATIONS Hamilton’s equations are more general than the methods of Euler and Lagrange. The Hamiltonian, H , is related to the Lagrangian, L, by

  7. Unsteady Transonic Flow Past Airfoils in Rigid Body Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    L( .0 0? CM - .:436 Fiqu ~r(- Sa 77 -- -- .- - --. - PiRF~I~JOUKOWSKI ARFOIL RjA- 0. 00 N- _Q C C-EfP . TI mr= 0.,00 AL[FA= 0.00 M FQ= 0.00 CEFA. 0.00...CL .526-4C C 04 CM - .22 C 2-4 Fique 1cL 108 t AL C.A I, " .. mIt oCN o:f : I mt 4 8 il .o . o .. T1 36.65 A 0.00 m ,,o 630.00 OUPA L., OOD. 000 -650C

  8. Quaternion Feedback Control for Rigid-body Spacecraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses three-axis attitude control for a Danish spacecraft, Roemer. The algorithm proposed is based on an approximation of the exact feedback linearisation for quaternionic attitude representation. The proposed attitude controller is tested in a simulation study. The environmental...

  9. GPU-based discrete element rigid body transport

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, Nicolin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available granular flows, is described. The code under development, BLAZE-DEM, is designed for Graphics Processor Units to take advantage of the speed and low cost driven by the virtual environment and animation industry. It uses a spatial hash and GPU parallelism...

  10. Seeing in the Mind's eye: Imagery rescripting for patients with body dysmorphic disorder. A single case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Viktoria; Stangier, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Intrusive images of appearance play an important role in the maintenance of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and are often linked to negative autobiographical experiences. However, to date there is no study examining the use and efficacy of imagery rescripting in BDD. This study investigated imagery rescripting in six patients with BDD, using a single case series A-B design. The intervention consisted of two treatment sessions (T1, T2). BDD and depressive symptoms were evaluated prior to (T1), post (T2) and two weeks after intervention (FU), using the Yale -Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for BDD (BDD-YBOCS), the Body Dysmorphic Symptoms Inventory, and the Beck Depression Inventory. At post-treatment, significant reductions in negative affect, distress, vividness and encapsulated beliefs associated with images and memories as well as an increased control were observed for five of six patients. These were maintained or decreased at two weeks follow-up. Scores on the BDD-YBOCS indicated a significant 26% improvement in BDD severity at follow-up for the whole group. Considering response as a ≥ 30% reduction in BDD-YBOCS score, four of six patients were classified as treatment responders. At follow-up, significant improvements in BDD and depressive symptoms were observed for the whole group. The small sample size and the lack of a control group limit the generalizability of our results. The findings indicate the potential efficacy of imagery rescripting, and highlight the need for further controlled trials. Imagery rescripting should be considered as a treatment technique within the cognitive framework of BDD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Whole body, long-axis rotational training improves lower extremity neuromuscular control during single leg lateral drop landing and stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, John; Burden, Robert; Krupp, Ryan; Caborn, David N M

    2011-05-01

    Poor neuromuscular control during sports activities is associated with non-contact lower extremity injuries. This study evaluated the efficacy of progressive resistance, whole body, long-axis rotational training to improve lower extremity neuromuscular control during a single leg lateral drop landing and stabilization. Thirty-six healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either Training or Control groups. Electromyographic, ground reaction force, and kinematic data were collected from three pre-test, post-test trials. Independent sample t-tests with Bonferroni corrections for multiple comparisons were used to compare group mean change differences (P≤0.05/21≤0.0023). Training group gluteus maximus and gluteus medius neuromuscular efficiency improved 35.7% and 31.7%, respectively. Training group composite vertical-anteroposterior-mediolateral ground reaction force stabilization timing occurred 1.35s earlier. Training group knee flexion angle at landing increased by 3.5°. Training group time period between the initial two peak frontal plane knee displacements following landing increased by 0.17s. Training group peak hip and knee flexion velocity were 21.2°/s and 20.1°/s slower, respectively. Time period between the initial two peak frontal plane knee displacements following landing and peak hip flexion velocity mean change differences displayed a strong relationship in the Training group (r(2)=0.77, P=0.0001) suggesting improved dynamic frontal plane knee control as peak hip flexion velocity decreased. This study identified electromyographic, kinematic, and ground reaction force evidence that device training improved lower extremity neuromuscular control during single leg lateral drop landing and stabilization. Further studies with other populations are indicated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Captopril and Losartan for Mitigation of Renal Injury Caused by Single-Dose Total-Body Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, John E.; Cohen, Eric P.; Fish, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    It is known that angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II type-1 receptor blockers (ARBs) can be used to mitigate radiation-induced renal injury. However, for a variety of reasons, these previous results are not directly applicable to the development of agents for the mitigation of injuries caused by terrorism-related radiation exposure. As part of an effort to develop an animal model that would fit the requirements of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) “Animal Efficacy Rule”, we designed new studies which used an FDA-approved ACEI (captopril) or an FDA-approved ARB (losartan, Cozaar®) started 10 days after a single total-body irradiation (TBI) at drug doses that are equivalent (on a g/m2/day basis) to the doses prescribed to humans. Captopril and losartan were equally effective as mitigators, with DMFs of 1.23 and 1.21, respectively, for delaying renal failure. These studies show that radiation nephropathy in a realistic rodent model can be mitigated with relevant doses of FDA-approved agents. This lays the necessary groundwork for pivotal rodent studies under the FDA Animal Efficacy Rule and provides an outline of how the FDA-required large-animal studies could be designed. PMID:21175344

  13. Effects of bovine cytochrome P450 single-nucleotide polymorphism, forage type and body condition on production traits in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, M A; Larson, M J; Reiter, S T; Brown, A H; Brown, M A; Looper, M L; Coffey, K P; Rosenkrans, C F

    2012-08-01

    Relating single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) to cows with acceptable productivity could benefit cattle breeders in areas where tall fescue is the predominant forage. This study aimed to (i) identify SNPs in bovine cytochrome P450 3A28 (CYP3A28) and (ii) determine the associations between SNP genotype, forage and cow body condition (BC). Genotype (CC, CG or GG) and forage [Kentucky-31 wild-type endophyte-infected tall fescue (KY+) vs. bermudagrass] effects on milk volume and quality were determined in Herd 1 cows (123 cows); in Herd 2 (99 cows), genotype and BC (low vs. moderate) effects on ovarian follicle size, calving date and calving per cent were determined; and in Herd 3 (114 cows), effects of genotype and fescue cultivar [KY+ vs. non-toxic endophyte-infected tall fescue (HiMag4)] were related to calving per cent, calving date and weaning weights of both cow and her calf. A cytosine (C) to guanine (G) transversion at base 994 (C994G) in CYP3A28 was identified. There was a genotype × forage type interaction (p productivity in cows. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in the...

  15. Utility of a single adjusting compartment: a novel methodology for whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Hirotaka; Izawa, Shigeru; Hori, Wataru; Nakagawa, Ippei

    2008-01-01

    Background There are various methods for predicting human pharmacokinetics. Among these, a whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (WBPBPK) model is useful because it gives a mechanistic description. However, WBPBPK models cannot predict human pharmacokinetics with enough precision. This study was conducted to elucidate the primary reason for poor predictions by WBPBPK models, and to enable better predictions to be made without reliance on complex concepts. Methods The primary reasons for poor predictions of human pharmacokinetics were investigated using a generic WBPBPK model that incorporated a single adjusting compartment (SAC), a virtual organ compartment with physiological parameters that can be adjusted arbitrarily. The blood flow rate, organ volume, and the steady state tissue-plasma partition coefficient of a SAC were calculated to fit simulated to observed pharmacokinetics in the rat. The adjusted SAC parameters were fixed and scaled up to the human using a newly developed equation. Using the scaled-up SAC parameters, human pharmacokinetics were simulated and each pharmacokinetic parameter was calculated. These simulated parameters were compared to the observed data. Simulations were performed to confirm the relationship between the precision of prediction and the number of tissue compartments, including a SAC. Results Increasing the number of tissue compartments led to an improvement of the average-fold error (AFE) of total body clearances (CLtot) and half-lives (T1/2) calculated from the simulated human blood concentrations of 14 drugs. The presence of a SAC also improved the AFE values of a ten-organ model from 6.74 to 1.56 in CLtot, and from 4.74 to 1.48 in T1/2. Moreover, the within-2-fold errors were improved in all models; incorporating a SAC gave results from 0 to 79% in CLtot, and from 14 to 93% in T1/2 of the ten-organ model. Conclusion By using a SAC in this study, we were able to show that poor prediction resulted mainly from such

  16. Algorithms for Graph Rigidity and Scene Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Alex Rune; Jordán, Tibor

    2003-01-01

    We investigate algorithmic questions and structural problems concerning graph families defined by `edge-counts'. Motivated by recent developments in the unique realization problem of graphs, we give an efficient algorithm to compute the rigid, redundantly rigid, M-connected, and globally rigid...... components of a graph. Our algorithm is based on (and also extends and simplifies) the idea of Hendrickson and Jacobs, as it uses orientations as the main algorithmic tool. We also consider families of bipartite graphs which occur in parallel drawings and scene analysis. We verify a conjecture of Whiteley...... by showing that 2d-connected bipartite graphs are d-tight. We give a new algorithm for finding a maximal d-sharp subgraph. We also answer a question of Imai and show that finding a maximum size d-sharp subgraph is NP-hard....

  17. Durable bistable auxetics made of rigid solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiao; Liu, Lu; Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Pasini, Damiano

    2018-02-01

    Bistable Auxetic Metamaterials (BAMs) are a class of monolithic perforated periodic structures with negative Poisson's ratio. Under tension, a BAM can expand and reach a second state of equilibrium through a globally large shape transformation that is ensured by the flexibility of its elastomeric base material. However, if made from a rigid polymer, or metal, BAM ceases to function due to the inevitable rupture of its ligaments. The goal of this work is to extend the unique functionality of the original kirigami architecture of BAM to a rigid solid base material. We use experiments and numerical simulations to assess performance, bistability and durability of rigid BAMs at 10,000 cycles. Geometric maps are presented to elucidate the role of the main descriptors of BAM architecture. The proposed design enables the realization of BAM from a large palette of materials, including elastic-perfectly plastic materials and potentially brittle materials.

  18. Torsional rigidity of submanifolds with controlled geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado, Ana; Markvorsen, Steen; Palmer, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    We prove explicit upper and lower bounds for the torsional rigidity of extrinsic domains of submanifolds ^m$ with controlled radial mean curvature in ambient Riemannian manifolds ^n$ with a pole $ and with sectional curvatures bounded from above and from below, respectively. These bounds are given...... in terms of the torsional rigidities of corresponding Schwarz symmetrizations of the domains in warped product model spaces. Our main results are obtained using methods from previously established isoperimetric inequalities, as found in e.g. [MP4] and [MP5]. As in [MP4] we also characterize the geometry...... of those situations in which the bounds for the torsional rigidity are actually attained and study the behavior at infinity of the so-called geometric average of the mean exit time for Brownian motion....

  19. Is the Assessment of 5 Meters of Gait with a Single Body-Fixed-Sensor Enough to Recognize Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease-Associated Gait?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micó-Amigo, M E; Kingma, I; Faber, G S; Kunikoshi, A.; van Uem, J. M T; van Lummel, R C; Maetzler, W.; van Dieën, J H

    Quantitative assessment of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is an important step in addressing motor symptoms and improving clinical management. Based on the assessment of only 5 meters of gait with a single body-fixed-sensor placed on the lower back, this study presents a method for

  20. Can the single-breath helium dilution method predict lung volumes as measured by whole-body plethysmography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Chaves Coertjens

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare TLC and RV values obtained by the single-breath helium dilution (SBHD method with those obtained by whole-body plethysmography (WBP in patients with normal lung function, patients with obstructive lung disease (OLD, and patients with restrictive lung disease (RLD, varying in severity, and to devise equations to estimate the SBHD results.METHODS: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study involving 169 individuals, of whom 93 and 49 presented with OLD and RLD, respectively, the remaining 27 having normal lung function. All patients underwent spirometry and lung volume measurement by both methods.RESULTS: TLC and RV were higher by WBP than by SBHD. The discrepancy between the methods was more pronounced in the OLD group, correlating with the severity of airflow obstruction. In the OLD group, the correlation coefficient of the comparison between the two methods was 0.57 and 0.56 for TLC and RV, respectively (p < 0.001 for both. We used regression equations, adjusted for the groups studied, in order to predict the WBP values of TLC and RV, using the corresponding SBHD values. It was possible to create regression equations to predict differences in TLC and RV between the two methods only for the OLD group. The TLC and RV equations were, respectively, ∆TLCWBP-SBHD in L = 5.264 − 0.060 × FEV1/FVC (r2= 0.33; adjusted r2 = 0.32 and ∆RVWBP-SBHD in L = 4.862 − 0.055 × FEV1/FVC (r2= 0.31; adjusted r2 = 0.30.CONCLUSIONS: The correction of TLC and RV results obtained by SBHD can improve the accuracy of this method for assessing lung volumes in patients with OLD. However, additional studies are needed in order to validate these equations.

  1. A single GABAergic neuron mediates feedback of odor-evoked signals in the mushroom body of larval Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liria Monica Masuda-Nakagawa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition has a central role in defining the selectivity of the responses of higher order neurons to sensory stimuli. However, the circuit mechanisms of regulation of these responses by inhibitory neurons are still unclear. In Drosophila, the mushroom bodies (MBs are necessary for olfactory memory, and by implication for the selectivity of learned responses to specific odors. To understand the circuitry of inhibition in the calyx (the input dendritic region of the MBs, and its relationship with MB excitatory activity, we used the simple anatomy of the Drosophila larval olfactory system to identify any inhibitory inputs that could contribute to the selectivity of MB odor responses. We found that a single neuron accounts for all detectable GABA innervation in the calyx of the MBs, and that this neuron has presynaptic terminals in the calyx and postsynaptic branches in the MB lobes (output axonal area. We call this neuron the larval anterior paired lateral (APL neuron, because of its similarity to the previously described adult APL neuron. Reconstitution of GFP partners (GRASP suggests that the larval APL makes extensive contacts with the MB intrinsic neurons, Kenyon Cells (KCs, but few contacts with incoming projection neurons. Using calcium imaging of neuronal activity in live larvae, we show that the larval APL responds to odors, in a mannner that requires output from KCs. Our data suggest that the larval APL is the sole GABAergic neuron that innervates the MB input region and carries inhibitory feedback from the MB output region, consistent with a role in modulating the olfactory selectivity of MB neurons.

  2. Identification of biomechanical nonlinearity in whole-body vibration using a reverse path multi-input-single-output method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya; Ferguson, Neil S.

    2018-04-01

    The study implements a classic signal analysis technique, typically applied to structural dynamics, to examine the nonlinear characteristics seen in the apparent mass of a recumbent person during whole-body horizontal random vibration. The nonlinearity in the present context refers to the amount of 'output' that is not correlated or coherent to the 'input', usually indicated by values of the coherence function that are less than unity. The analysis is based on the longitudinal horizontal inline and vertical cross-axis apparent mass of twelve human subjects exposed to 0.25-20 Hz random acceleration vibration at 0.125 and 1.0 ms-2 r.m.s. The conditioned reverse path frequency response functions (FRF) reveal that the uncorrelated 'linear' relationship between physical input (acceleration) and outputs (inline and cross-axis forces) has much greater variation around the primary resonance frequency between 0.5 and 5 Hz. By reversing the input and outputs of the physical system, it is possible to assemble additional mathematical inputs from the physical output forces and mathematical constructs (e.g. square root of inline force). Depending on the specific construct, this can improve the summed multiple coherence at frequencies where the response magnitude is low. In the present case this is between 6 and 20 Hz. The statistical measures of the response force time histories of each of the twelve subjects indicate that there are potential anatomical 'end-stops' for the sprung mass in the inline axis. No previous study has applied this reverse path multi-input-single-output approach to human vibration kinematic and kinetic data before. The implementation demonstrated in the present study will allow new and existing data to be examined using this different analytical tool.

  3. Association of body mass index-related single nucleotide polymorphisms with psychiatric disease and memory performance in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya-Baba, Midori; Matsuo, Junko; Sasayama, Daimei; Hori, Hiroaki; Teraishi, Toshiya; Ota, Miho; Hattori, Kotaro; Noda, Takamasa; Ishida, Ikki; Shibata, Shigenobu; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for psychiatric diseases. Recently, a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to be related to body mass index (BMI). In this study, we investigated the association of BMI-related SNPs with psychiatric diseases and one of their endophenotypes, memory performance, in a Japanese population. The subjects were 1624 patients with one of three psychiatric diseases (799 patients with major depressive disorder, 594 with schizophrenia, and 231 with bipolar disorder) and 1189 healthy controls. Memory performance was assessed using the Wechsler Memory Scale - Revised (WMS-R). Genomic DNA was prepared from venous blood and used to genotype 23 BMI-related SNPs using the TaqMan 5'-exonuclease allelic discrimination assay. We then analysed the relationships between the SNPs and psychiatric disease and various subscales of the WMS-R. Three SNPs (rs11142387, rs12597579, and rs6548238) showed significant differences in the genotype or allele frequency between patients with any psychiatric diseases and controls. Furthermore, six SNPs (rs11142387, rs12597579, rs2815752, rs2074356, rs4776970, and rs2287019) showed significant differences in at least one subscale of the WMS-R depending on the genotypes of the healthy controls. Interestingly, rs11142387 near the Kruppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) was significantly associated with psychiatric disease and poor memory function. We identified three and six BMI-related SNPs associated with psychiatric disease and memory performance, respectively. In particular, carrying the A allele of rs11142387 near KLF9 was found to be associated with psychiatric disease and poor memory performance, which warrants further investigations.

  4. Type number and rigidity of fibred surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, P E

    2001-01-01

    Infinitesimal l-th order bendings, 1≤l≤∞, of higher-dimensional surfaces are considered in higher-dimensional flat spaces (for l=∞ an infinitesimal bending is assumed to be an analytic bending). In terms of the Allendoerfer type number, criteria are established for the (r,l)-rigidity (in the terminology of Sabitov) of such surfaces. In particular, an (r,l)-infinitesimal analogue is proved of the classical theorem of Allendoerfer on the unbendability of surfaces with type number ≥3 and the class of (r,l)-rigid fibred surfaces is distinguished

  5. Financial Constraints and Nominal Price Rigidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menno, Dominik Francesco; Balleer, Almut; Hristov, Nikolay

    that these empirical patterns are consistent with a partial equilibrium menu-cost model with a working capital constraint. We then use the model to show how the presence of financial frictions changes profits and the price distribution of firms compared to a model without financial frictions. Our results suggest...... that tighter financial constraints are associated with higher nominal rigidities, higher prices and lower output. Moreover, in response to aggregate shocks, aggregate price rigidity moves substantially, the response of inflation is dampened, while output reacts more in the presence of financial frictions...

  6. Cracking of open traffic rigid pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Chatarina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is done by observing the growth of real structure cracking in Natar, Lampung, Indonesia compared to C. Niken’s et al research and literature study. The rigid pavement was done with open traffic system. There are two main crack types on Natar rigid pavement: cracks cross the road, and cracks spreads on rigid pavement surface. The observation of cracks was analyzed by analyzing material, casting, curing, loading and shrinkage mechanism. The relationship between these analysis and shrinkage mechanism was studied in concrete micro structure. Open traffic make hydration process occur under vibration; therefore, fresh concrete was compressed and tensioned alternately since beginning. High temperature together with compression, cement dissociation, the growth of Ca2+ at very early age leads abnormal swelling. No prevention from outside water movement leads hydration process occur with limited water which caused spreads fine cracks. Limited water improves shrinkage and plastic phase becomes shorter; therefore, rigid pavement can’t accommodate the abnormal swelling and shrinking alternately and creates the spread of cracks. Discontinuing casting the concrete makes both mix under different condition, the first is shrink and the second is swell and creates weak line on the border; so, the cracks appear as cracks across the road.

  7. Rigid pricing and rationally inattentive consumer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějka, Filip

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2010), s. 1-40 ISSN 1211-3298 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : rational inattention * nominal rigidity Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp409.pdf

  8. About deformation and rigidity in relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coll, Bartolome

    2007-01-01

    The notion of deformation involves that of rigidity. In relativity, starting from Born's early definition of rigidity, some other ones have been proposed, offering more or less interesting aspects but also accompanied of undesired or even pathological properties. In order to clarify the origin of these difficulties presented by the notion of rigidity in relativity, we analyze with some detail significant aspects of the unambiguous classical, Newtonian, notion. In particular, the relative character of its kinetic definition is pointed out, allowing to predict and to understand the limitations imposed by Herglotz-Noether theorem. Also, its equivalent dynamic definition is obtained and, in contrast, its absolute character is shown. But in spite of this absolute character, the dynamic definition is shown to be not extensible to relativity. The metric deformation of Minkowski space by the presence of a gravitational field is interpreted as a universal deformation, and it is shown that, under natural conditions, only a simple deformation law is possible, relating locally, but in an one-to-one way, gravitational fields and gauge classes of two-forms. We argue that fields of unit vectors associated to the internal gauge class of two-forms of every space-time (and, in particular, of Minkowski space-time) are the relativistic analogues of the classical accelerated observers, i.e. of the classical rigid motions. Some other consequences of the universal law of gravitational deformation are commented

  9. Mechanical Control of Whole Body Shape by a Single Cuticular Protein Obstructor-E in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko Tajiri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Body shapes are much more variable than body plans. One way to alter body shapes independently of body plans would be to mechanically deform bodies. To what extent body shapes are regulated physically, or molecules involved in physical control of morphogenesis, remain elusive. During fly metamorphosis, the cuticle (exoskeleton covering the larval body contracts longitudinally and expands laterally to become the ellipsoidal pupal case (puparium. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster Obstructor-E (Obst-E is a protein constituent of the larval cuticle that confers the oriented contractility/expandability. In the absence of obst-E function, the larval cuticle fails to undergo metamorphic shape change and finally becomes a twiggy puparium. We present results indicating that Obst-E regulates the arrangement of chitin, a long-chain polysaccharide and a central component of the insect cuticle, and directs the formation of supracellular ridges on the larval cuticle. We further show that Obst-E is locally required for the oriented shape change of the cuticle during metamorphosis, which is associated with changes in the morphology of those ridges. Thus, Obst-E dramatically affects the body shape in a direct, physical manner by controlling the mechanical property of the exoskeleton.

  10. Controlling elastic waves with small phononic crystals containing rigid inclusions

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Pai

    2014-05-01

    We show that a two-dimensional elastic phononic crystal comprising rigid cylinders in a solid matrix possesses a large complete band gap below a cut-off frequency. A mechanical model reveals that the band gap is induced by negative effective mass density, which is affirmed by an effective medium theory based on field averaging. We demonstrate, by two examples, that such elastic phononic crystals can be utilized to design small devices to control low-frequency elastic waves. One example is a waveguide made of a two-layer anisotropic elastic phononic crystal, which can guide and bend elastic waves with wavelengths much larger than the size of the waveguide. The other example is the enhanced elastic transmission of a single-layer elastic phononic crystal loaded with solid inclusions. The effective mass density and reciprocal of the modulus of the single-layer elastic phononic crystal are simultaneously near zero. © CopyrightEPLA, 2014.

  11. Rigid Patient Positioning is Unreliable in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, Michael T; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Meere, Patrick A; Carroll, Kaitlin M; Jerabek, Seth A; Vigdorchik, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    To our knowledge, no study has assessed the ability of rigid patient positioning devices to afford arthroplasty surgeons with ideal acetabular orientation throughout surgery. The purpose of this study is to use robotic arm-assisted computer navigation to assess the reliability of pelvic position in total hip arthroplasty performed on patients positioned with rigid positioning devices. A prospective cohort of 100 hips (94 patients) underwent robotic-guided total hip arthroplasty in the lateral decubitus position from the posterior approach, 77 stabilized by universal lateral positioner, and 23 by peg board. Before reaming, computed tomography-templated computer software generated true values of pelvic anteversion and inclination based on the position of the robot arm registered to the patient's preoperative pelvic computed tomography. Mean alteration in anteversion and inclination values was 1.7° (absolute value, 5.3°; range, -20° to 20°) and 1.6° (absolute value, 2.6°; range, -8° to 10°), respectively. And 22% of anteversion values were altered by >10° and 41% by >5°. There was no difference between hip positioners used (P = .36). Anteversion variability was correlated with body mass index (P = .02). Despite the use of rigid patient positioning devices-a lateral hip positioner or peg board-this study reveals clinically important malposition of the pelvis in many cases, especially with regard to anteversion. These results show a clear need to pay particular attention to anatomic landmarks or computer-assisted techniques to assure accurate acetabular cup positioning. Patient positioning should not be solely trusted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Body image mediates negative family climate and deteriorating glycemic control for single adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Amy C; Seiffge-Krenke, Inge; Laursen, Brett

    2015-12-01

    Glycemic control declines during adolescence, as youth with diabetes struggle with pubertal changes and a changing social world. The present study tests whether body image mediates longitudinal links between family climate and changes in adolescent glycemic control. Mediation was hypothesized for nondating adolescents but not for dating adolescents, because the former are thought to remain more family oriented than the latter. Participants were German adolescents with Type 1 diabetes (51 girls, 58 boys; M = 15.84 years, SD = 1.44). Participants reported body image and family climate. Physicians assayed blood HbA1c levels (M = 8.22%, SD = 1.80%) to measure glycemic control. For nondating adolescents, body image mediated associations between family climate and longitudinal changes in glycemic control. Poorer family climate was associated with poorer body image, which predicted deteriorating glycemic control. For dating adolescents, family climate was unassociated with changes in glycemic control. Nondating adolescents may look to parents for feedback on body image, which affects how they manage the challenges of diabetes. Parents and practitioners alike should be alert to the fact that family climate continues to be an important determinant of adolescent adjustment, particularly for those who have not moved into romantic relationships. We know that body image matters to adolescents, but for some youth, body image may be the difference between health and serious physical problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Prospective randomized comparison of single-dose versus hyperfractionated total-body irradiation in patients with hematologic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girinsky, T.; Benhamou, E.; Bourhis, J.H.; Dhermain, F.; Guillot-Valls, D.; Ganansia, V.; Luboinski, M.; Perez, A.; Cosset, J.M.; Socie, G.; Baume, D.; Bouaouina, N.; Briot, E.; Baudre, A.; Bridier, A.; Pico, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The efficiency of the two irradiation modes are similar, but the hyperfractionated irradiation seems superior in term of global and specific survival. The incidence rates of pneumopathies are not different between the two groups but the incidence rate of the liver vein-occlusive illness is superior in the group treated by non fractionated whole body irradiation. The cost of the hyperfractionated whole body irradiation is superior to this one of the non fractionated whole body irradiation around a thousand dollars. (N.C.)

  14. Does a laparoscopic approach attenuate the body weight loss and lean body mass loss observed in open distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer? a single-institution exploratory analysis of the JCOG 0912 phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Toru; Sato, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Yamada, Takanobu; Cho, Haruhiko; Ogata, Takashi; Oba, Koji; Yoshikawa, Takaki

    2018-03-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) for gastric cancer may prevent the loss of body weight and lean body mass resulting from reduced surgical stress in comparison to open distal gastrectomy (ODG). A multicenter phase III trial conducted by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG0912 trial) was performed to confirm the non-inferiority of LADG to ODG for stage I gastric cancer in terms of relapse-free survival. This study was performed as a single-institution exploratory analysis using the data of the patients from our hospital who were enrolled in the JCOG0912 phase III trial. Body weight and lean body mass were evaluated using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer within 1 week before and at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after surgery. One-hundred six patients were randomized to undergo ODG (54 patients) or LADG (51 patients). Body weight loss at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months was -3.0%, -4.9%, and -5.4%, respectively, in the ODG group and -2.7%, -4.3%, and -5.7%, respectively, in the LADG group; the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.330, 0.166, and 0.656, respectively). Lean body mass loss at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months was -2.8%, -4.1%, and -2.3%, respectively, in the ODG group and -2.7%, -2.9%, and -3.0%, respectively, in the LADG group; the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.610, 0.413, and 0.925, respectively). The laparoscopic approach did not attenuate the loss of body weight and lean body mass in comparison to patients who underwent open distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

  15. Lectures on formal and rigid geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    A first version of this work appeared in 2005 as a Preprint of the Collaborative Research Center "Geometrical Structures in Mathematics" at the University of Münster. Its aim was to offer a concise and self-contained 'lecture-style' introduction to the theory of classical rigid geometry established by John Tate, together with the formal algebraic geometry approach launched by Michel Raynaud. These Lectures are now viewed commonly as an ideal means of learning advanced rigid geometry, regardless of the reader's level of background. Despite its parsimonious style, the presentation illustrates a number of key facts even more extensively than any other previous work. This Lecture Notes Volume is a revised and slightly expanded version of the original preprint and has been published at the suggestion of several experts in the field.

  16. Financial Constraints and Nominal Price Rigidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menno, Dominik Francesco; Balleer, Almut; Hristov, Nikolay

    This paper investigates how financial market imperfections and the frequency of price adjustment interact. Based on new firm-level evidence for Germany, we document that financially constrained firms adjust prices more often than their unconstrained counterparts, both upwards and downwards. We show...... that these empirical patterns are consistent with a partial equilibrium menu-cost model with a working capital constraint. We then use the model to show how the presence of financial frictions changes profits and the price distribution of firms compared to a model without financial frictions. Our results suggest...... that tighter financial constraints are associated with higher nominal rigidities, higher prices and lower output. Moreover, in response to aggregate shocks, aggregate price rigidity moves substantially, the response of inflation is dampened, while output reacts more in the presence of financial frictions...

  17. Rigidity of the magic pentagram game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalev, Amir; Miller, Carl A.

    2018-01-01

    A game is rigid if a near-optimal score guarantees, under the sole assumption of the validity of quantum mechanics, that the players are using an approximately unique quantum strategy. Rigidity has a vital role in quantum cryptography as it permits a strictly classical user to trust behavior in the quantum realm. This property can be traced back as far as 1998 (Mayers and Yao) and has been proved for multiple classes of games. In this paper we prove ridigity for the magic pentagram game, a simple binary constraint satisfaction game involving two players, five clauses and ten variables. We show that all near-optimal strategies for the pentagram game are approximately equivalent to a unique strategy involving real Pauli measurements on three maximally-entangled qubit pairs.

  18. [Abdominal pain in progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguier, J; Serratrice, J; Lachaud, A; Belenotti, P; Benyamine, A; Verschueren, A; Boucraut, J; Attarian, S; Weiller, P-J

    2015-04-01

    Stiff-person syndrome is rare neurological disease, associating trunk rigidity and painful muscular spasms. A clinical variant of stiff person syndrome is the progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), which includes neurological cognitive disturbances. We report a 73-year-old woman initially addressed for abdominal pain, anorexia and severe weight-loss, for whom diagnosis of PERM was made. Because of its various clinical presentations, sometimes without evidence for neurological disease, the diagnosis of PERM is delayed. The presence of antineuropile antibodies associated with muscular spasms at electromyogram are strong evidence for this diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M.R.; Irani, S.R.; Leite, M.I.; Nithi, K.; Vincent, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The syndrome of progressive encephalopathy with limb rigidity has been historically termed progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM) or stiff-person syndrome plus. Methods: The case is presented of a previously healthy 28-year-old man with a rapidly fatal form of PERM developing over 2 months. Results: Serum antibodies to both NMDA receptors (NMDAR) and glycine receptors (GlyR) were detected postmortem, and examination of the brain confirmed an autoimmune encephalomyelitis, with particular involvement of hippocampal pyramidal and cerebellar Purkinje cells and relative sparing of the neocortex. No evidence for an underlying systemic neoplasm was found. Conclusion: This case displayed not only the clinical features of PERM, previously associated with GlyR antibodies, but also some of the features associated with NMDAR antibodies. This unusual combination of antibodies may be responsible for the particularly progressive course and sudden death. PMID:21775733

  20. Progressive Encephalomyelitis With Rigidity: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraba, Ranka; Jušić, Anica; Sruk, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Background/Objective: The most prominent clinical features of progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity (PER) are painful spasms and rigidity accompanied by clinical signs of brainstem and spinal cord involvement. In initial reports, PER had fatal outcome. Later, clinical improvement related to corticosteroid therapy has been described in some cases. The objective of this study was to signify a reputed clinical significance of corticosteroid therapy in PER. Methods: Case report. Results: A 50-year-old man developed progressive syndrome of tonic extensor spasms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed areas of signal changes in cervical spinal cord and lower brainstem, whereas cerebrospinal fluid analysis indicated subacute encephalomyelitis. His condition dramatically improved on oral corticosteroid therapy. Clinical improvement was accompanied by normalization of MRI findings. Conclusion: For this patient with PER, corticosteroid therapy was a dramatically effective and life-saving treatment, although initiated rather late in the course of the disease. PMID:20397447

  1. Effect of supply voltage and body-biasing on single-event transient pulse quenching in bulk fin field-effect-transistor process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jun-Ting; Chen Shu-Ming; Chen Jian-Jun; Huang Peng-Cheng; Song Rui-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Charge sharing is becoming an important topic as the feature size scales down in fin field-effect-transistor (FinFET) technology. However, the studies of charge sharing induced single-event transient (SET) pulse quenching with bulk FinFET are reported seldomly. Using three-dimensional technology computer aided design (3DTCAD) mixed-mode simulations, the effects of supply voltage and body-biasing on SET pulse quenching are investigated for the first time in bulk FinFET process. Research results indicate that due to an enhanced charge sharing effect, the propagating SET pulse width decreases with reducing supply voltage. Moreover, compared with reverse body-biasing (RBB), the circuit with forward body-biasing (FBB) is vulnerable to charge sharing and can effectively mitigate the propagating SET pulse width up to 53% at least. This can provide guidance for radiation-hardened bulk FinFET technology especially in low power and high performance applications. (paper)

  2. On the Dynamics of Rigid Manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdan, H.; Nuseirat, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper , the dynamics of rigid robot manipulators are investigated using Selective Modal Analysis (SMA). The method allows the determination of quantitative measures of the degree of the participation of the state variables in the system modes.Using Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) of appropriate matrices, we get useful information about the controllability and the observability of the manipulator. Numerical examples to illustrate the developed methods are presented. (authors) . 20 refs.,3 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Rigid geometry of curves and their Jacobians

    CERN Document Server

    Lütkebohmert, Werner

    2016-01-01

    This book presents some of the most important aspects of rigid geometry, namely its applications to the study of smooth algebraic curves, of their Jacobians, and of abelian varieties - all of them defined over a complete non-archimedean valued field. The text starts with a survey of the foundation of rigid geometry, and then focuses on a detailed treatment of the applications. In the case of curves with split rational reduction there is a complete analogue to the fascinating theory of Riemann surfaces. In the case of proper smooth group varieties the uniformization and the construction of abelian varieties are treated in detail. Rigid geometry was established by John Tate and was enriched by a formal algebraic approach launched by Michel Raynaud. It has proved as a means to illustrate the geometric ideas behind the abstract methods of formal algebraic geometry as used by Mumford and Faltings. This book should be of great use to students wishing to enter this field, as well as those already working in it.

  4. An evaluation of a body image intervention in adolescent girls delivered in single-sex versus co-educational classroom settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, Candice J; Paxton, Susan J; McLean, Siân A

    2017-04-01

    Body dissatisfaction is now recognized as having considerable negative impact on social, psychological, and physical health, particularly in adolescent girls. Consequently, we have developed a six-session co-educational body image intervention (Happy Being Me Co-educational) designed to reduce body dissatisfaction and its risk factors in Grade 7 girls. In addition to evaluating the program's efficacy, we aimed to identify whether girls would benefit equally when it was delivered as a universal intervention to a whole class including both boys and girls (co-educational delivery), or delivered as a selective intervention to girls only (single-sex delivery). Participants were 200 Grade 7 girls from five schools in Melbourne, Australia. Schools were randomly allocated to receive the intervention in single-sex classes (n=74), co-educational classes (n=73), or participate as a no-intervention control (n=53). Girls completed self-report assessments of body dissatisfaction, psychological (internalization of the thin ideal, appearance comparison, and self-esteem) and peer environment (weight-related teasing and appearance conversations) risk factors for body dissatisfaction, and dietary restraint, at baseline, post-intervention, and at 6-month follow-up. Significant improvements in body dissatisfaction and psychological risk factors were observed in the intervention group at post-intervention and these were maintained at follow-up for psychological risk factors. Importantly, no significant differences between universal and selective delivery were observed, suggesting that the intervention is appropriate for dissemination in both modes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Heat Transfer Modeling for Rigid High-Temperature Fibrous Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Cunnington, George R.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Combined radiation and conduction heat transfer through a high-temperature, high-porosity, rigid multiple-fiber fibrous insulation was modeled using a thermal model previously used to model heat transfer in flexible single-fiber fibrous insulation. The rigid insulation studied was alumina enhanced thermal barrier (AETB) at densities between 130 and 260 kilograms per cubic meter. The model consists of using the diffusion approximation for radiation heat transfer, a semi-empirical solid conduction model, and a standard gas conduction model. The relevant parameters needed for the heat transfer model were estimated from steady-state thermal measurements in nitrogen gas at various temperatures and environmental pressures. The heat transfer modeling methodology was evaluated by comparison with standard thermal conductivity measurements, and steady-state thermal measurements in helium and carbon dioxide gases. The heat transfer model is applicable over the temperature range of 300 to 1360 K, pressure range of 0.133 to 101.3 x 10(exp 3) Pa, and over the insulation density range of 130 to 260 kilograms per cubic meter in various gaseous environments.

  6. Rigid spherical particles in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhuis, Dennis; Verschoof, Ruben A.; Mathai, Varghese; Huisman, Sander G.; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2016-11-01

    Many industrial and maritime processes are subject to enormous frictional losses. Reducing these losses even slightly will already lead to large financial and environmental benefits. The understanding of the underlying physical mechanism of frictional drag reduction is still limited, for example, in bubbly drag reduction there is an ongoing debate whether deformability and bubble size are the key parameters. In this experimental study we report high precision torque measurements using rigid non-deformable spherical particles in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow with Reynolds numbers up to 2 ×106 . The particles are made of polystyrene with an average density of 1.036 g cm-3 and three different diameters: 8mm, 4mm, and 1.5mm. Particle volume fractions of up to 6% were used. By varying the particle diameter, density ratio of the particles and the working fluid, and volume fraction of the particles, the effect on the torque is compared to the single phase case. These systematic measurements show that adding rigid spherical particles only results in very minor drag reduction. This work is financially supported by Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) by VIDI Grant Number 13477.

  7. Asynchronous oscillations of rigid rods drive viscous fluid to swirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Rintaro; Takagi, Daisuke

    2017-12-01

    We present a minimal system for generating flow at low Reynolds number by oscillating a pair of rigid rods in silicone oil. Experiments show that oscillating them in phase produces no net flow, but a phase difference alone can generate rich flow fields. Tracer particles follow complex trajectory patterns consisting of small orbital movements every cycle and then drifting or swirling in larger regions after many cycles. Observations are consistent with simulations performed using the method of regularized Stokeslets, which reveal complex three-dimensional flow structures emerging from simple oscillatory actuation. Our findings reveal the basic underlying flow structure around oscillatory protrusions such as hairs and legs as commonly featured on living and nonliving bodies.

  8. Deformable image registration with local rigidity constraints for cone-beam CT-guided spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Wang, A. S.; Uneri, A.; Otake, Y.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-07-01

    Image-guided spine surgery (IGSS) is associated with reduced co-morbidity and improved surgical outcome. However, precise localization of target anatomy and adjacent nerves and vessels relative to planning information (e.g., device trajectories) can be challenged by anatomical deformation. Rigid registration alone fails to account for deformation associated with changes in spine curvature, and conventional deformable registration fails to account for rigidity of the vertebrae, causing unrealistic distortions in the registered image that can confound high-precision surgery. We developed and evaluated a deformable registration method capable of preserving rigidity of bones while resolving the deformation of surrounding soft tissue. The method aligns preoperative CT to intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) using free-form deformation (FFD) with constraints on rigid body motion imposed according to a simple intensity threshold of bone intensities. The constraints enforced three properties of a rigid transformation—namely, constraints on affinity (AC), orthogonality (OC), and properness (PC). The method also incorporated an injectivity constraint (IC) to preserve topology. Physical experiments involving phantoms, an ovine spine, and a human cadaver as well as digital simulations were performed to evaluate the sensitivity to registration parameters, preservation of rigid body morphology, and overall registration accuracy of constrained FFD in comparison to conventional unconstrained FFD (uFFD) and Demons registration. FFD with orthogonality and injectivity constraints (denoted FFD+OC+IC) demonstrated improved performance compared to uFFD and Demons. Affinity and properness constraints offered little or no additional improvement. The FFD+OC+IC method preserved rigid body morphology at near-ideal values of zero dilatation ({ D} = 0.05, compared to 0.39 and 0.56 for uFFD and Demons, respectively) and shear ({ S} = 0.08, compared to 0.36 and 0.44 for uFFD and Demons

  9. A Cognitive Developmental Model of Rigidity in Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapsley, Daniel K.; Enright, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    The rigidity construct is reinterpreted in terms of the cognitive developmental approach. A review reveals both cognitive and developmental themes, with an emphasis on the structural and operational properties of rigidity. Notes weaknesses of previous approaches to rigidity and discusses implications and predictions from the proposed model.…

  10. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in IGFBP-2 Gene and Their Associations with Body Weight Traits on Jinghai Yellow Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XH Zhao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2 regulates a broad spectrum of biological activities involved in growth, development, and differentiation. This study aimed at comparing polymorphisms in intron2 of the IGFBP-2 gene among four chicken breeds and at analyzing the associations between its genotypes and body weight in Jinghai Yellow chicken by using PCR-SSCP technique. For primer P2, three genotypes (AA, AB and BB were observed in the four chicken breeds. Gene sequencing revealed one insertion/deletion (the inserted/deleted TC after position 552bp in the intron 2 of IGFBP-2 gene. For primer P5, three genotypes were identified in Jinghai Yellow chickens, and named CC, CD and DD. Gene sequencing revealed two SNPs (C1107G, C1130T and one inserted/deleted GCCAGGT after 1115bp in the intron 2 of IGFBP-2 gene. The results of the linear model analysis showed that Jinghai Yellow chickens with AA genotype had significantly heavier body weight, at hatch and 12 weeks of age, than those of the AB genotype (p<0.05. The A allele had a positive effect on body weight. We speculate that mutations in intron 2 could be used as genetic markers for body weight in Jinghai Yellow chicken. This study provides valuable information for the protection of genetic resources and for breeding of Jinghai Yellow chicken.

  11. A single FTO gene variant rs9939609 is associated with body weight evolution in a multiethnic extremely obese population that underwent bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Gisele K; Resende, Cristina M M; Durso, Danielle F; Rodrigues, Lorena A A; Silva, José Luiz P; Reis, Rodrigo C; Pereira, Solange S; Ferreira, Daniela C; Franco, Gloria R; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The rs9939609 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is involved in obesity. Few studies have been conducted on patients who underwent bariatric surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of FTO SNPs on body weight, body composition, and weight regain during a 60-mo follow-up period after bariatric surgery. The rs9939609 was genotyped in 146 individuals using a real-time polymerase chain reaction TaqMan assay. Data for lifestyle, comorbidities, body weight, body mass index (BMI), excess weight loss (EWL), and body composition were obtained before and 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 60 mo after surgery. Data were analyzed by comparing two groups of patients according to rs9939609 FTO gene polymorphism. Mixed-regression models were constructed to evaluate the dynamics of body weight, BMI, and EWL over time in female patients. No differences were observed between the groups during the first 24 mo after surgery. After 36, 48, and 60 mo, body weight, fat mass, and BMI were higher, whereas fat-free mass and EWL were lower in the FTO-SNP patient group. Weight regain was more frequent and occurred sooner in the FTO-SNP group. There is a different evolution of weight loss in obese carriers of the FTO gene variant rs9939609 after bariatric surgery. However, this pattern was evident at only 2 y postbariatric surgery, inducing a lower proportion of surgery success and a greater and earlier weight regain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A learning-based markerless approach for full-body kinematics estimation in-natura from a single image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drory, Ami; Li, Hongdong; Hartley, Richard

    2017-04-11

    We present a supervised machine learning approach for markerless estimation of human full-body kinematics for a cyclist from an unconstrained colour image. This approach is motivated by the limitations of existing marker-based approaches restricted by infrastructure, environmental conditions, and obtrusive markers. By using a discriminatively learned mixture-of-parts model, we construct a probabilistic tree representation to model the configuration and appearance of human body joints. During the learning stage, a Structured Support Vector Machine (SSVM) learns body parts appearance and spatial relations. In the testing stage, the learned models are employed to recover body pose via searching in a test image over a pyramid structure. We focus on the movement modality of cycling to demonstrate the efficacy of our approach. In natura estimation of cycling kinematics using images is challenging because of human interaction with a bicycle causing frequent occlusions. We make no assumptions in relation to the kinematic constraints of the model, nor the appearance of the scene. Our technique finds multiple quality hypotheses for the pose. We evaluate the precision of our method on two new datasets using loss functions. Our method achieves a score of 91.1 and 69.3 on mean Probability of Correct Keypoint (PCK) measure and 88.7 and 66.1 on the Average Precision of Keypoints (APK) measure for the frontal and sagittal datasets respectively. We conclude that our method opens new vistas to robust user-interaction free estimation of full body kinematics, a prerequisite to motion analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effectiveness of a brief school-based body image intervention 'Dove Confident Me: Single Session' when delivered by teachers and researchers: Results from a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Atkinson, Melissa J; Steer, Rebecca J; Garbett, Kirsty M; Rumsey, Nichola; Halliwell, Emma

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated a 90-min single session school-based body image intervention (Dove Confident Me: Single Session), and investigated if delivery could be task-shifted to teachers. British adolescents (N = 1707; 11-13 years; 50.83% girls) participated in a cluster randomised controlled trial [lessons as usual control; intervention teacher-led (TL); intervention researcher-led (RL)]. Body image, risk factors, and psychosocial and disordered eating outcomes were assessed 1-week pre-intervention, immediate post-intervention, and 4-9.5 weeks follow-up. Multilevel mixed-models showed post-intervention improvements for intervention students relative to control in body esteem (TL; girls only), negative affect (TL), dietary restraint (TL; girls only), eating disorder symptoms (TL), and life engagement (TL; RL). Awareness of sociocultural pressures increased at post-intervention (TL). Effects were small-medium in size (ds 0.19-0.76) and were not maintained at follow-up. There were no significant differences between conditions at post or follow-up on body satisfaction, appearance comparisons, teasing, appearance conversations and self-esteem. The intervention had short-term benefits for girls' body image and dietary restraint, and for eating disorder symptoms and some psychosocial outcomes among girls and boys. A multi-session version of the intervention is likely to be necessary for sustained improvements. Teachers can deliver this intervention effectively with minimal training, indicating broader scale dissemination is feasible. ISRCTN16782819. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of flock coating on bending rigidity of woven fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, O.; Kesimci, M. O.

    2017-10-01

    This work presents the preliminary results of our efforts that focused on the effect of the flock coating on the bending rigidity of woven fabrics. For this objective, a laboratory scale flocking unit is designed and flocked samples of controlled flock density are produced. Bending rigidity of the samples with different flock densities are measured on both flocked and unflocked sides. It is shown that the bending rigidity depends on both flock density and whether the side to be measured is flocked or not. Adhesive layer thickness on the bending rigidity is shown to be dramatic. And at higher basis weights, flock density gets less effective on bending rigidity.

  15. Rigid-only versus combined rigid and flexible percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cracco, Cecilia M; Knoll, Thomas; Liatsikos, Evangelos N

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is usually performed worldwide with a rigid-only antegrade approach. Daily practice suggests that adding flexible nephroscopy and/or ureteroscopy to conventional rigid PNL might improve its efficacy and safety, but available evidence is weak....... Appraisal of reliable outcomes of such PNL techniques would better guide intraoperative choices and optimize surgical results. Therefore our objective was to systematically review relevant literature comparing the outcomes of rigid-only PNL and combined flexible PNLs (adding flexible nephroscopy and....../or flexible ureteroscopy) for the treatment of large and/or complex upper urinary tract calculi, with regard to efficacy and safety. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Ovid MedLine (R), PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched in August 2016 to identify relevant studies. Article selection was performed...

  16. Understanding geological processes: Visualization of rigid and non-rigid transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, T. F.; Atit, K.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; Resnick, I.; Tikoff, B.

    2012-12-01

    Visualizations are used in the geological sciences to support reasoning about structures and events. Research in cognitive sciences offers insights into the range of skills of different users, and ultimately how visualizations might support different users. To understand the range of skills needed to reason about earth processes we have developed a program of research that is grounded in the geosciences' careful description of the spatial and spatiotemporal patterns associated with earth processes. In particular, we are pursuing a research program that identifies specific spatial skills and investigates whether and how they are related to each other. For this study, we focus on a specific question: Is there an important distinction in the geosciences between rigid and non-rigid deformation? To study a general spatial thinking skill we employed displays with non-geological objects that had been altered by rigid change (rotation), and two types of non-rigid change ("brittle" (or discontinuous) and "ductile" (or continuous) deformation). Disciplinary scientists (geosciences and chemistry faculty), and novices (non-science faculty and undergraduate psychology students) answered questions that required them to visualize the appearance of the object before the change. In one study, geologists and chemists were found to be superior to non-science faculty in reasoning about rigid rotations (e.g., what an object would look like from a different perspective). Geologists were superior to chemists in reasoning about brittle deformations (e.g., what an object looked like before it was broken - here the object was a word cut into many fragments displaced in different directions). This finding is consistent with two hypotheses: 1) Experts are good at visualizing the types of changes required for their domain; and 2) Visualization of rigid and non-rigid changes are not the same skill. An additional important finding is that there was a broad range of skill in both rigid and non-rigid

  17. Dimensionality controls cytoskeleton assembly and metabolism of fibroblast cells in response to rigidity and shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Ochsner

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Various physical parameters, including substrate rigidity, size of adhesive islands and micro-and nano-topographies, have been shown to differentially regulate cell fate in two-dimensional (2-D cell cultures. Cells anchored in a three-dimensional (3-D microenvironment show significantly altered phenotypes, from altered cell adhesions, to cell migration and differentiation. Yet, no systematic analysis has been performed that studied how the integrated cellular responses to the physical characteristics of the environment are regulated by dimensionality (2-D versus 3-D.Arrays of 5 or 10 microm deep microwells were fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS. The actin cytoskeleton was compared for single primary fibroblasts adhering either to microfabricated adhesive islands (2-D or trapped in microwells (3-D of controlled size, shape, and wall rigidity. On rigid substrates (Young's Modulus = 1 MPa, cytoskeleton assembly within single fibroblast cells occurred in 3-D microwells of circular, rectangular, square, and triangular shapes with 2-D projected surface areas (microwell bottom surface area and total surface areas of adhesion (microwell bottom plus wall surface area that inhibited stress fiber assembly in 2-D. In contrast, cells did not assemble a detectable actin cytoskeleton in soft 3-D microwells (20 kPa, regardless of their shapes, but did so on flat, 2-D substrates. The dependency on environmental dimensionality was also reflected by cell viability and metabolism as probed by mitochondrial activities. Both were upregulated in 3-D cultured cells versus cells on 2-D patterns when surface area of adhesion and rigidity were held constant.These data indicate that cell shape and rigidity are not orthogonal parameters directing cell fate. The sensory toolbox of cells integrates mechanical (rigidity and topographical (shape and dimensionality information differently when cell adhesions are confined to 2-D or occur in a 3-D space.

  18. A randomized clinical trial of treatment for lumbar segmental rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Tom G; Gatchel, Robert J; Keeley, Janice; McGeary, Don; Dersh, Jeffrey; Anagnostis, Christopher

    2004-10-15

    A randomized single-blind clinical trial of facet injections plus exercise, versus exercise alone, in chronic disabling work-related lumbar spinal disorders (CDWRLSD), accompanied by pilot interrater reliability and facet syndrome prevalence studies. To systematically investigate the use of facet injections as an adjunct to supervised lumbar stretching exercises in regaining lumbar range of motion (ROM) following prolonged deconditioning after work-related lumbar injuries. To assess interrater reliability of visual assessment of segmental rigidity (SR), and to evaluate the prevalence of facet syndrome in cases of lumbar SR. Corticosteroid joint injections have often been used to reduce musculoskeletal inflammation to facilitate joint mobilization in the presence of degenerative arthritis. Lumbar segmental rigidity is a recently described entity usually associated with painful chronic spinal disorders and postoperative spine surgery. Previous work has shown that SR and lumbar ROM improves with a brief intervention consisting of facet injections followed by specific stretching exercises. No systematic study has investigated the potential benefits of a combination of facet injections and exercise over supervised exercises alone to treat lumbar SR. Similarly, no study has assessed the association between SR and the facet syndrome. From a group of consecutive patients (n = 421) with CDWRLSD referred for tertiary rehabilitation between November 1999 and January 2001, 70 were noted to have SR on intake physical examination. The first part of this study assessed interrater reliability for detecting SR, and intrarater reliability for 3-segment true lumbar ROM measurements. Patients randomly assigned to participate in supervised stretching exercises with the addition of fluoroscopically guided bilateral facet injections at the involved levels (Group A, n = 36) also underwent facet syndrome prevalence assessment at the time of injection. They were compared to a randomly

  19. Urinary tract infection as a single presenting sign of multiple vaginal foreign bodies: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neulander, Endre Z; Tiktinsky, Alex; Romanowsky, Igor; Kaneti, Jacob

    2010-02-01

    Vaginal foreign bodies in children usually present with foul-smelling discharge and/or vaginal bleeding. Rarely, these basic clinical diagnostic signs are not present. We report on a 5(1/2)-year-old girl with recurrent lower urinary tract infection as the sole presentation of multiple vaginal foreign bodies. Ultrasound of the lower urinary tract was inconclusive, and cystography indicated for recurrent urinary tract infections was declined by the patient in an outpatient setting. Cystography under general anesthesia raised the suspicion of foreign vaginal objects, and the definitive diagnosis was made by vaginoscopy. The relevant literature covering this subject is reviewed. High level of suspicion and strict basic diagnostic protocol are the most important steps for a timely diagnosis of this condition. Copyright 2010 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of a Single Session of Whole-Body Vibration Training in Recreationally Active Men on the Excitability of the Central and Peripheral Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmielewska Daria

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vibration training has become a popular method used in professional sports and recreation. In this study, we examined the effect of whole-body vibration training on the central nervous system and muscle excitability in a group of 28 active men. Subjects were assigned randomly to one of two experimental groups with different variables of vibrations. The chronaximetry method was used to evaluate the effect of a single session of whole-body vibration training on the excitability of the rectus femoris and brachioradialis muscles. The examination of the fusing and flickering frequencies of the light stimulus was performed. An increase in the excitability of the quadriceps femoris muscle due to low intensity vibrations (20 Hz frequency, 2 mm amplitude was noted, and a return to the initial values was observed 30 min after the application of vibration. High intensity vibrations (60 Hz frequency, 4 mm amplitude caused elongations of the chronaxy time; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Neither a low intensity vibration amplitude of 2 mm (frequency of 20 Hz nor a high intensity vibration amplitude of 4 mm (frequency of 60 Hz caused a change in the excitability of the central nervous system, as revealed by the average frequency of the fusing and flickering of the light stimulus. A single session of high intensity whole-body vibration did not significantly decrease the excitability of the peripheral nervous system while the central nervous system did not seem to be affected.

  1. Evaluation of total body water in canine breeds by single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis method: specific equations are needed for accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguiyan-Colliard, Laurence; Daumas, Caroline; Nguyen, Patrick; Grandjean, Dominique; Cardot, Philippe; Priymenko, Nathalie; Roux, Françoise

    2015-08-06

    Equations based on single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis at 50 kHz for determination of total body water content (TBW) have been previously validated in healthy non-sedated beagle dogs. We investigated whether these equations are predictive of TBW in various canine breeds by comparing the results of these equations with TBW values evaluated directly by deuterium oxide (D2O) dilution. Total body water content of 13 healthy adult pet dogs of various breeds was determined directly using D2O dilution and indirectly using previous equations based on values obtained with a portable bioelectric impedance device. Paired Student's t-tests were used to compare TBW obtained by single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and D2O dilution. A p-value of bioelectrical impedance analysis parameters validated at 50 kHz in healthy adult beagles need to be modified including morphological parameters such as body size and shape in a first approach. As in humans, morphological-specific equations have to be developed and validated.

  2. Many-body effect in the partial singles N2,3 photoelectron spectroscopy spectrum of atomic Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    We can extract out the photoelectron kinetic energy (KE) dependent imaginary part of the core-hole self-energy by employing Auger-photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS). The variation with photoelectron KE in the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) spectral peak intensity of a selected decay channel measured in coincidence with photoelectrons of a selected KE is the partial singles (non-coincidence) photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) spectrum, i.e., the product of the singles PES one and the branching ratio of the partial Auger decay width of a selected decay channel to the imaginary part of the core-hole self-energy. When a decay channel the partial Auger decay width of which is photoelectron KE independent is selected, we can extract out spectroscopically the imaginary part of the core-hole self-energy because the variation with photoelectron KE in the relative spectral intensity of the partial singles PES spectrum to the singles one is that in the branching ratio of the partial Auger decay width of a selected decay channel. As an example we discussed the N 2,3 -hole self-energy of atomic Cd

  3. Indirect prediction of total body water content in healthy adult Beagles by single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguiyan-Colliard, Laurence; Daumas, Caroline; Bousbiat, Sana; Jaffrin, Michel; Cardot, Philippe; Grandjean, Dominique; Priymenko, Nathalie; Nguyen, Patrick; Roux, Françoise

    2015-06-01

    To develop equations for prediction of total body water (TBW) content in unsedated dogs by combining impedance (resistance and reactance) and morphological variables and to compare the results of those equations with TBW content determined by deuterium dilution (TBW(d)). 26 healthy adult Beagles. TBW content was determined directly by deuterium dilution and indirectly with equations developed from measurements obtained by use of a portable bioelectric impedance device and morphological variables including body length, height, weight, and thoracic and abdominal circumferences. Impedance and morphological data from 16 of the 26 dogs were used to determine coefficients for the following 2 equations: TBW(1) = -0.019 (BL(2)/R) + -0.199 (RC + AC) + 0.996 W + 0.081 H + 12.31; and TBW(2) = 0.048 (BL(2)/R) + -0.144 (RC + AC) + 0.777 W + 0.066 H + 0.031 X + 7.47, where AC is abdominal circumference, H is height, BL is body length, R is resistance, RC is rib cage circumference, W is body weight, and × is reactance. Results for TBW(1) (R(2)(1) = 0.843) and TBW(2) (R(2)(2) = 0.816) were highly correlated with the TBW(d). When the equations were validated with data from the remaining 10 dogs, the respective mean differences between TBW(d) and TBW(1) and TBW(2) were 0.17 and 0.11 L, which equated to a nonsignificant underestimation of TBW content by 2.4% and 1.6%, respectively. Results indicated that impedance and morphological data can be used to accurately estimate TBW content in adult Beagles. This method of estimating TBW content is less expensive and easier to perform than is measurement of TBW(d), making it appealing for daily use in veterinary practice.

  4. Grasping rigid objects in zero-g

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Greg D.

    1993-12-01

    The extra vehicular activity helper/retriever (EVAHR) is a prototype for an autonomous free- flying robotic astronaut helper. The ability to grasp a moving object is a fundamental skill required for any autonomous free-flyer. This paper discusses an algorithm that couples resolved acceleration control with potential field based obstacle avoidance to enable a manipulator to track and capture a rigid object in (imperfect) zero-g while avoiding joint limits, singular configurations, and unintentional impacts between the manipulator and the environment.

  5. Rigid gas permeable lenses and patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, R; Schnider, C; Holden, B A

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of new rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lens materials provides the practitioner with a number of alternatives for patient management. But whatever the lens materials used, problems related to the lenses, care and maintenance solutions, and patients may arise. This paper examines concerns such as parameter instability, durability of lenses, compatibility of materials and solutions, patient education and compliance, 3 and 9 o'clock staining, corneal distortion, and lid changes. Suggestions are made on ways to avoid or minimize problems related to RGP lens wear.

  6. Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Mechanics of Materials

    2014-12-01

    Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for different densities of foams under various temperatures and loading rates. Crush stress, tensile strength, and elastic modulus were obtained. A newly developed confined compression experiment provided data for investigating the foam flow direction. A biaxial tension experiment was also developed to explore the damage surface of a rigid polyurethane foam.

  7. A rigid porous filter and filtration method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas, Straub L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter comprising a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulate from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulate. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area- to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  8. Development of an embryoid body-based screening strategy for assessing the hepatocyte differentiation potential of human embryonic stem cells following single-cell dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhough, Sebastian; Bradburn, Helen; Gardner, John; Hay, David C

    2013-02-01

    We have devised an embryoid body-based screening method for the selection of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines capable of forming functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) after single-cell dissociation. The screening method highlighted one cell line from a panel of five that produced albumin-positive cells during embryoid body (EB) formation. Cell lines that did not produce albumin-positive cells during EB formation were shown to respond less well to directed differentiation following single-cell replating. Additionally, the seeding density of the pluripotent populations prior to differentiation was shown to exert a significant effect on the hepatic function of the final population of cells. In summary, we have developed a simple procedure that facilitates the identification of human hESC lines that tolerate single-cell replating and are capable of differentiating to HLCs. Although the hepatic function of cells produced by this method is ∼10-fold lower than our current gold standard stem cell-derived models, we believe that these findings represent an incremental step toward producing HLCs at scale.

  9. Comparative effects of artemisia vulgaris and charcoal moxa stimulating Zhongwan (CV 12) on body temperature in healthy participants: a cross-over single-blind randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Ho-Yeon; Lee, Ju Ah; Park, Sunyoung; Park, Sunju; Park, Jeong-Su; Cheon, Chunhoo; Ko, Seong-Gyu; Kong, Kyung-Hwan; Jun, Chan-yong; Park, Jong-hyeong; Shin, Mi-Ran; Lee, Se-Hoon

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy, safety, satisfaction, discomfort and patient preference of moxa cones of artemisia vulgaris and charcoal moxa. This comparative study of moxibustion treatment with Artemisia vulgaris and charcoal moxa cone stimulating Zhongwan (CV 12) is a cross-over single-blinded, randomized clinical trial. A total of 40 healthy subjects (24 males and 16 females) participated in this study. Two subjects dropped out of the trial. Thirty-eight subjects were treated with Artemisia vulgaris and charcoal moxa cones for 30 min in a cross-over design. After treatment, the patients underwent a 30 minute waiting period, and then the temperatures at Tanzhong (CV 17), Zhongwan (CV 12) and Guanyuan (CV 4) were measured using digital infrared thermal imaging. After the use of Artemisia vulgaris moxa, the patients' body temperatures were slightly lowered at Tanzhong (CV 17), Zhongwan (CV 12) and Guanyuan (CV 4), but the changes were not statistically significant. After the use of charcoal moxa, the patients' body temperatures were somewhat increased at Zhongwan (CV 12) and Guanyuan (CV 4), but the changes were not statistically significant. After Artemisia vulgaris moxa use, the body temperature difference between Zhongwan (CV 12) and Guanyuan (CV 4) was significantly increased. After charcoal moxa use, the body temperature difference between Tanzhong (CV 17) and Zhongwan (CV 12) was significantly decreased in males and in the whole group. This change was caused by the difference in the moxibustion type and by gender differences. This pilot study found that moxibustion did not raise the body temperature, but temperature differences between acupoints were affected. Further large-scale randomized controlled trials are needed for the effect of moxibustion on body temperature.

  10. Correction: Utility of a single adjusting compartment: a novel methodology for whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori Wataru

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract After our work was published, we found that some of the terms in the equations were incorrect and that there were some typographical errors in the abbreviations. In the section 'Single adjusting compartment' in Materials and Methods, VS should be VSAC. In the last paragraph of Results, QSAC should be QSAC. The correct equations are included in this article. These corrections will not affect the results of this study.

  11. Objective characterization of daily living transitions in patients with Parkinson's disease using a single body-fixed sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernad-Elazari, Hagar; Herman, Talia; Mirelman, Anat; Gazit, Eran; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    Body-fixed sensors (BFS), e.g., accelerometers worn for several days, can be used to augment the traditional clinical assessment. Long-term recordings obtained with BFS have been applied to study tremor, postural control, freezing of gait, turning abilities, motor response fluctuations and fall risk among older adults and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We aimed to test whether BFS-derived measures of transitions differ between patients with PD and healthy controls, and to evaluate whether there are differences among patients with mild PD, compared to more severe patients, and to controls. We also explored the added value of the metrics extracted from the sensor as compared to traditional testing in the lab. Ninety-nine patients with PD and 38 healthy older adults (HOA) participated in this study and wore a body-fixed sensor for 3 days. Walk-to-sit (n = 3286) and Sit-to-walk (n = 2858) transitions were analyzed and a machine learning algorithm was applied to distinguish between the groups. Significant differences in transitions were observed between PD patients and HOA, between mild and severe PD, and between mild PD and HOA, both in temporal and distribution features. The machine learning algorithm discriminated patients from HOA (accuracy = 92.3 %), mild from severe patients (accuracy = 89.8 %), and mild patients from HOA (accuracy = 85.9 %). These initial results suggest that body-fixed sensor-derived metrics of everyday transitions can characterize disease severity and differentiate mild PD patients from healthy older adults. Perhaps this approach can help with the integration of BFS into clinical care and the tracking of disease progression and the response to therapy.

  12. Genetic Variation in Cytochrome b-Hinf1 and -Alu1 Gene Correlated to Body Size in Soang Gourami (Osphronemus goramy from Single Spawning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Nuryanto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Soang gourami fingerling shows variable body sizes eventhough resulted from single spawning. Differences in body sizes among individuals is assumed to be correlated to their genetic component which can be studied using cytochrome b gene PCR-RFLP marker. This study aimed to determine specific PCR-RFLP marker among different sizes of soang gourami collected from single spawning. Genomic DNA was isolated using Chelex method. Cytochrome b gene were amplified and digested using four restriction enzymes. Specific markers were analyzed descriptivelly based on DNA band pattern appear in agarose gel. The result showed that PCR-RFLP markers of Cytochrome b-HinfI of 315 bp, and 210 bp, and also Cytochrome b-AluI of 334 bp and 189 bp are specific markers for large individuals, whereas small individuals are characterized by having Cytochrome b- HinfI 366 bp, and 159 bp and Cytochrome b-AluI 525 bp fragments. It is observed that genetic variation of Cytochrome b-HinfI and -AluI markers are possitively correlated to body size in soang gourami fingerling. Therefore, both cytochrome b-HinfI and -AluI gene can be reffered as specific markers to differentiate among different sizes of soang gourami strain fingerling from single spawning. This result proved that genetic divergences among individuals can be related with certain quantitative characters, such size related. Therefore our study can contribute on fisheries development, especially by providing new technique for fingerling selection to obtain high quality fingerling and also provide new insight the application of molecular technique in fisheries. 

  13. Social costs of natural gas market rigidities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadman, H.G.; Darmstadter, J.; Montgomery, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    To the extent that there are market imperfections and other constraints limiting consumption of gas to levels significantly below those dictated by underlying economic factors of cost and producibility, society bears the cost resulting from misallocation of resources and avoidable environmental deterioration. Given the regulatory and institutional setting within which the natural gas industry has been forced to operate, there is a strong presumption that such inhibitions on gas use may in fact exist. Some rigidities stem undoubtedly from characteristics unique to gas as a natural-resource commodity. This report presents a framework for reviewing potential sources of constraints, rigidities, and distortions in the functioning of natural gas markets under the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 (NGPA) and other legislation. The organizing principle and primary focus of the paper are the sequence of transactions between wellhead and point of consumption, with major attention to industrial and power plant use. The transactions in question are between: producers and pipelines; pipelines and distributors; distributors and end users; and pipelines and industrial end users (mainline sales). In addition to these vertical transactions, there are horizontal transactions between pipelines (off-system sales) and between distributors. 22 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  14. Optimized imaging using non-rigid registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Binev, Peter; Blom, Douglas A.; Dahmen, Wolfgang; Sharpley, Robert C.; Vogt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The extraordinary improvements of modern imaging devices offer access to data with unprecedented information content. However, widely used image processing methodologies fall far short of exploiting the full breadth of information offered by numerous types of scanning probe, optical, and electron microscopies. In many applications, it is necessary to keep measurement intensities below a desired threshold. We propose a methodology for extracting an increased level of information by processing a series of data sets suffering, in particular, from high degree of spatial uncertainty caused by complex multiscale motion during the acquisition process. An important role is played by a non-rigid pixel-wise registration method that can cope with low signal-to-noise ratios. This is accompanied by formulating objective quality measures which replace human intervention and visual inspection in the processing chain. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of siliceous zeolite material exhibits the above-mentioned obstructions and therefore serves as orientation and a test of our procedures. - Highlights: • Developed a new process for extracting more information from a series of STEM images. • An objective non-rigid registration process copes with distortions. • Images of zeolite Y show retrieval of all information available from the data set. • Quantitative measures of registration quality were implemented. • Applicable to any serially acquired data, e.g. STM, AFM, STXM, etc

  15. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without total body irradiation for pediatric acute leukemia: a single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu YS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yanshun Mu,* Maoquan Qin,* Bin Wang, Sidan Li, Guanghua Zhu, Xuan Zhou, Jun Yang, Kai Wang, Wei Lin, Huyong Zheng Beijing Key Laboratory of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, National Key Discipline of Pediatrics, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Major Diseases in Children, Ministry of Education, Hematology Oncology Center, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a promising method for therapy of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. However, less availability of matched donors limited its wide application. Recently, haploidentical HSCT has become a great resource. Here, we have retrospectively reported our experience of 20 pediatric patients with acute leukemia who underwent haploidentical HSCT without total body irradiation (TBI myeloablative regimen in our center from November 2007 to June 2014. All the patients attained successful HSCT engraftment in terms of myeloid and platelet recovery. Thirteen patients developed grade I–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (a-GVHD. The incidence of grade I–II a-GVHD, grade III–IV a-GVHD, and chronic GVHD (c-GVHD was 45%, 20%, and 25%, respectively. The mean myeloid and platelet recovery time was 13.20±2.41 and 19.10±8.37 days. The median follow-up time was 43.95±29.26 months. During the follow-up, three patients died. The overall survival (OS rate was 85%. The present study indicated that haploidentical HSCT without TBI myeloablative regimen significantly improved the OS rate of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. Keywords: haploidentical, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, myeloablative regimen, total body irradiation, acute leukemia, pediatric

  16. Nutritional analysis of gastric contents and body condition score at a single time point in feral horses in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Brian A; Owens, Elizabeth; Watts, Kathryn A; Mills, Paul C; Pollitt, Christopher C; de Laat, Melody A

    2011-09-01

    To determine the impact of a free-choice diet on nutritional intake and body condition of feral horses. Cadavers of 41 feral horses from 5 Australian locations. Body condition score (BCS) was determined (scale of 1 to 9), and the stomach was removed from horses during postmortem examination. Stomach contents were analyzed for nutritional variables and macroelement and microelement concentrations. Data were compared among the locations and also compared with recommended daily intakes for horses. Mean BCS varied by location; all horses were judged to be moderately thin. The BCS for males was 1 to 3 points higher than that of females. Amount of protein in the stomach contents varied from 4.3% to 14.9% and was significantly associated with BCS. Amounts of water-soluble carbohydrate and ethanol-soluble carbohydrate in stomach contents of feral horses from all 5 locations were higher than those expected for horses eating high-quality forage. Some macroelement and microelement concentrations were grossly excessive, whereas others were grossly deficient. There was no evidence of ill health among the horses. Results suggested that the diet for several populations of feral horses in Australia appeared less than optimal. However, neither low BCS nor trace mineral deficiency appeared to affect survival of the horses. Additional studies on food sources in these regions, including analysis of water-soluble carbohydrate, ethanol-soluble carbohydrate, and mineral concentrations, are warranted to determine the provenance of such rich sources of nutrients. Determination of the optimal diet for horses may need revision.

  17. Method of adhering bone to a rigid substrate using a graphite fiber reinforced bone cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoell, A. C.; Maxwell, H. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for adhering bone to the surface of a rigid substrate such as a metal or resin prosthesis using an improved surgical bone cement. The bone cement has mechanical properties more nearly matched to those of animal bone and thermal curing characteristics which result in less traumatization of body tissues and comprises a dispersion of short high modulus graphite fibers within a bonder composition including polymer dissolved in reactive monomer such as polymethylmethacrylate dissolved in methylmethacrylate monomer.

  18. The Calculation of Single-Nucleon Energies of Nuclei by Considering Two-Body Effective Interaction, n(k,ρ, and a Hartree-Fock Inspired Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mariji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleon single-particle energies (SPEs of the selected nuclei, that is, O16, Ca40, and Ni56, are obtained by using the diagonal matrix elements of two-body effective interaction, which generated through the lowest-order constrained variational (LOCV calculations for the symmetric nuclear matter with the Aυ18 phenomenological nucleon-nucleon potential. The SPEs at the major levels of nuclei are calculated by employing a Hartree-Fock inspired scheme in the spherical harmonic oscillator basis. In the scheme, the correlation influences are taken into account by imposing the nucleon effective mass factor on the radial wave functions of the major levels. Replacing the density-dependent one-body momentum distribution functions of nucleons, n(k,ρ, with the Heaviside functions, the role of n(k,ρ in the nucleon SPEs at the major levels of the selected closed shell nuclei is investigated. The best fit of spin-orbit splitting is taken into account when correcting the major levels of the nuclei by using the parameterized Wood-Saxon potential and the Aυ18 density-dependent mean field potential which is constructed by the LOCV method. Considering the point-like protons in the spherical Coulomb potential well, the single-proton energies are corrected. The results show the importance of including n(k,ρ, instead of the Heaviside functions, in the calculation of nucleon SPEs at the different levels, particularly the valence levels, of the closed shell nuclei.

  19. Whole body oxygen uptake and evoked torque during subtetanic isometric electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscles in a single 30-minute session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, Conor M; Caulfield, Brian M; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the time course of fatigue in torque output and oxygen uptake during isometric subtetanic neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) to facilitate the design of NMES-based rehabilitation protocols that can accumulate a defined aerobic exercise volume within a given time period. Single-arm intervention study with within-subject comparisons. University research laboratory. Volunteer sample of healthy men (N=11; mean age, 34.2 ± 11.5 y; range, 19-53 y; body mass, 79.1 ± 11.7 kg; range, 58-100 kg). A single 30-minute session of continuous bilateral isometric quadriceps NMES at 4 Hz evoking a mean twitch amplitude of 12% of the maximum voluntary contraction. Whole body oxygen consumption rate (V˙o2), and evoked torque were measured simultaneously throughout. Mean increment in V˙o2 was 596 ± 238 mL/min, and average exercise intensity during the session was 3 ±.47 metabolic equivalents. The V˙o2 and torque declined slowly at a rate of -.54%±.31% and -.47%±.57% per minute, respectively. Despite having a higher incremental V˙o2, the observed fatigue rate was considerably less than that previously reported during intermittent isometric tetanic stimulation, suggesting that subtetanic isometric NMES is more sustainable for exercise interventions aimed at accumulating a therapeutic aerobic exercise volume. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Elastic image registration via rigid object motion induced deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaofen; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Hirsch, Bruce E.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we estimate the deformations induced on soft tissues by the rigid independent movements of hard objects and create an admixture of rigid and elastic adaptive image registration transformations. By automatically segmenting and independently estimating the movement of rigid objects in 3D images, we can maintain rigidity in bones and hard tissues while appropriately deforming soft tissues. We tested our algorithms on 20 pairs of 3D MRI datasets pertaining to a kinematic study of the flexibility of the ankle complex of normal feet as well as ankles affected by abnormalities in foot architecture and ligament injuries. The results show that elastic image registration via rigid object-induced deformation outperforms purely rigid and purely nonrigid approaches.

  1. Consumption habits and interest rate rigidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo L. Maldonado

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we provide a micro model of loans which the lender is a monopolistic bank and the borrower is a competitive consumer with consumption habits who may default on part of his debt. In this setting, we prove that the loan demand curve is kinked and therefore it is possible to find interest rate rigidity in equilibrium as well as asymmetric response of loans to interest rate variations. Finally, we show through an example that the credit supply, as a function of the marginal cost of the bank, exhibits a discontinuity on that marginal cost. As a consequence, lowering the basic interest rate of the economy may produce a sudden increase in credit demand/supply and in the default on debts.

  2. Modeling Decomposition of Unconfined Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHU,TZE YAO; ERICKSON,KENNETH L.; HOBBS,MICHAEL L.

    1999-11-01

    The decomposition of unconfined rigid polyurethane foam has been modeled by a kinetic bond-breaking scheme describing degradation of a primary polymer and formation of a thermally stable secondary polymer. The bond-breaking scheme is resolved using percolation theory to describe evolving polymer fragments. The polymer fragments vaporize according to individual vapor pressures. Kinetic parameters for the model were obtained from Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The chemical structure of the foam was determined from the preparation techniques and ingredients used to synthesize the foam. Scale-up effects were investigated by simulating the response of an incident heat flux of 25 W/cm{sup 2} on a partially confined 8.8-cm diameter by 15-cm long right circular cylinder of foam which contained an encapsulated component. Predictions of center, midradial, and component temperatures, as well as regression of the foam surface, were in agreement with measurements using thermocouples and X-ray imaging.

  3. Modeling Decomposition of Unconfined Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOBBS,MICHAEL L.; ERICKSON,KENNETH L.; CHU,TZE YAO

    1999-11-08

    The decomposition of unconfined rigid polyurethane foam has been modeled by a kinetic bond-breaking scheme describing degradation of a primary polymer and formation of a thermally stable secondary polymer. The bond-breaking scheme is resolved using percolation theory to describe evolving polymer fragments. The polymer fragments vaporize according to individual vapor pressures. Kinetic parameters for the model were obtained from Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The chemical structure of the foam was determined from the preparation techniques and ingredients used to synthesize the foam. Scale-up effects were investigated by simulating the response of an incident heat flux of 25 W/cm{sup 2} on a partially confined 8.8-cm diameter by 15-cm long right circular cylinder of foam that contained an encapsulated component. Predictions of center, midradial, and component temperatures, as well as regression of the foam surface, were in agreement with measurements using thermocouples and X-ray imaging.

  4. Field cracking performance of airfield rigid pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Mehta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses cracking in airport pavements as studied in Construction Cycle 6 of testing carried out at the National Airport Pavement Testing Facility by the Federal Aviation Administration. Pavements of three different flexural strengths as well as two different subgrades, a soft bituminous layer and a more rigid layer known as econocrete, were tested. In addition to this, cracking near two types of isolated transition joints, a reinforced edge joint and a thickened edge joint, was considered. The pavement sections were tested using a moving load simulating that of an aircraft. It has been determined that the degree of cracking was reduced as the flexural strength of the pavement was increased and that fewer cracks formed over the econocrete base than over the bituminous base. In addition, the thickened edge transition joint was more effective in preventing cracking at the edges compared to the reinforced edge joint.

  5. Observational properties of rigidly rotating dust configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilyas, Batyr; Malafarina, Daniele [Nazarbayev University, Department of Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan); Yang, Jinye [Fudan University, Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Bambi, Cosimo [Fudan University, Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Eberhard-Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Theoretical Astrophysics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    We study the observational properties of a class of exact solutions of Einstein's field equations describing stationary, axially symmetric, rigidly rotating dust (i.e. non-interacting particles). We ask the question whether such solutions can describe astrophysical rotating dark matter clouds near the center of galaxies and we probe the possibility that they may constitute an alternative to supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies. We show that light emission from accretion disks made of ordinary baryonic matter in this space-time has several differences with respect to the emission of light from similar accretion disks around black holes. The shape of the iron Kα line in the reflection spectrum of accretion disks can potentially distinguish this class of solutions from the Kerr metric, but this may not be possible with current X-ray missions. (orig.)

  6. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Lung Cancer: Prospective, Single-Center Study of 108 Consecutive Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taremi, Mojgan, E-mail: mojgan.taremi@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hope, Andrew [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Dahele, Max [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stronach Regional Cancer Center, Newmarket, ON (Canada); Pearson, Shannon [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Fung, Sharon [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Purdie, Thomas [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Brade, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cho, John; Sun, Alexander; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present the results of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for medically inoperable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and contrast outcomes in patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. Methods and Materials: Between December 2004 and October 2008, 108 patients (114 tumors) underwent treatment according to the prospective research ethics board-approved SBRT protocols at our cancer center. Of the 108 patients, 88 (81.5%) had undergone pretreatment whole-body [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A pathologic diagnosis was unavailable for 33 (28.9%) of the 114 lesions. The SBRT schedules included 48 Gy in 4 fractions or 54-60 Gy in 3 fractions for peripheral lesions and 50-60 Gy in 8-10 fractions for central lesions. Toxicity and radiologic response were assessed at the 3-6-month follow-up visits using conventional criteria. Results: The mean tumor diameter was 2.4-cm (range, 0.9-5.7). The median follow-up was 19.1 months (range, 1-55.7). The estimated local control rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86-97%) and 89% (95% CI, 81-96%). The cause-specific survival rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% CI, 87-98%) and 77% (95% CI, 64-89%), respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in the local, regional, and distant control between patients with and without pathologically confirmed NSCLC. The most common acute toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 fatigue (53 of 108 patients). No toxicities of Grade 4 or greater were identified. Conclusions: Lung SBRT for early-stage NSCLC resulted in excellent local control and cause-specific survival with minimal toxicity. The disease-specific outcomes were comparable for patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. SBRT can be considered an option for selected patients with proven or presumed early-stage NSCLC.

  8. An expandable prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function in a single device for vertebral body replacement: the clinical experience on 14 consecutive cases with vertebral tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, J J; Ramírez, J J; Chiquete, E; Gómez-Limón, E

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to test the hypothesis that an expandable prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function can provide immediate and durable spine stabilization after corpectomy. We designed an expandable vertebral body prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function in a single device (JR-prosthesis). Anatomical studies were performed to design a titanium-made prosthesis. Cadaver assays were done with a stainless steal device to test fixation and adequacy to the human spine anatomy. Then, 14 patients with vertebral tumors (8 metastatic) underwent corpectomy and vertebral body replacement with the JR-prosthesis. All patients had neurological deficit, severe pain and spine instability (mean follow-up: 25.4 months). Mean pain score before surgery in a visual analog scale improved from 7.6 to 3.0 points after operation (P=0.002). All patients achieved at least one grade of improvement in the Frankel score (P=0.003), excepting the 3 patients with Frankel grade A presurgery. Two patients with renal cell carcinoma died during the following 4 days after surgery (renal failure and massive bleeding), the rest attained a painless and stable spine immediately and maintained for long periods. No significant infections or implant failures were registered. A non-fatal case of inferior vena cava surgical injury was observed (repaired during surgery without further complications). The JR-prosthesis stabilizes the spine immediately after surgery and for the rest of the patients' life. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the clinical experience of any expandable vertebral body prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function in a single device. These observations await confirmation in different scenarios.

  9. Long-Term Cognitive Functioning in Single-Dose Total-Body Gamma-Irradiated Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanbury, David B.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Dugan, Greg; Andrews, Rachel N.; Cline, J. Mark

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effects of a potentially lethal radiation exposure on the brain for long-term cognitive sequelae were investigated using Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) adopted from other facilities after analysis of acute radiation response via the Centers for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation (CMCR) network. Fifty-nine animals were given the opportunity to participate in cognitive cage-side testing. The animals that received single-dose gamma irradiation were significantly less likely to engage in cognitive testing than the controls, suggesting that irradiated animals may have differences in cognitive ability. Five irradiated (6.75–8.05 Gy) and three naïve control animals self-selected, were extensively trained and administered a simple visual discrimination with reversal (SVD+R) task 2–3 times per week for 11–18 months. Each session consisted of 30 trials in which the animals were required to choose the correct visual stimulus for a food reward. After the initial presentation, the stimulus that signaled the presence of food was twice reversed once the animal reached criterion (90% accuracy across four consecutive sessions). While the limited sample size precluded definitive statistical analysis, irradiated animals took longer to reach the criterion subsequent to reversal than did control animals, suggesting a relative deficiency in cognitive flexibility. These results provide preliminary data supporting the potential use of a nonhuman primate model to study radiation-induced, late-delayed cognitive deficits. PMID:27740889

  10. Emerging radiotherapy technology in a developing country: A single Brazilian institution assessment of stereotactic body radiotherapy application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Bonifacio, Lorine Arias; Neves-Junior, Wellington Pimenta; Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Arruda, Fernando Freire; Silva, Joao Luis Fernandes; Carvalho, Heloisa Andrade, E-mail: fymoraes@gmail.com [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP(Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    Objective: To provide a quantitative profile of the indications and use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in a developing country oncology-based institution. In addition, to describe the patient and treatment characteristics, and to provide a temporal analysis. Method: SBRT patients treated from 2007 to 2015 were retrospectively evaluated by two independently investigators. Data were stratified and compared in two periods: first experience (FE) (May 2007 to April 2011), and following experience (FollowE) (May 2011 to April 2015). The following parameters were compared between the groups: total number of treated patients and lesions, treatment site, additional image fusion used, formal protocol adoption, and SBRT planning technique. Results: One hundred and seventy-six (176) patients with 191 lesions were treated: 34 (18%) lesions in the FE and 157 (82%) lesions in FollowE. The majority of lesions were metastases (60.3%), and lung (60.2%) was the most common treatment site, followed by spine (31%), and others (8.8%). An average of 1.4 (±0.6) additional imaging exams for delineation was performed. Conformal 3D radiotherapy planning technique was used in 64.4%, and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in the remaining 35.6% (p=0.0001). Higher rates of curative treatments were observed in FE, as well as more lung lesions, patients ≥ 70 years, 3D conformal, number of additional images and ECOG 0, and all presented p<0.05. The global rate of protocol statement was 79%, lung treatment being the most stated. Conclusion: SBRT application is rapidly increasing in our setting. Treatment sites and planning techniques are becoming more diversified and complex. (author)

  11. Diagnostic whole body scan (pre-therapy scan) in differentiated thyroid cancer: A single center community hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, P; Driscoll, H K; Venkatraman, P

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic whole body scan (pre-therapy scan) with either I-123 or I-131 (radioactive isotopes of iodine) is performed to assess the extent of thyroid cancer especially distant metastasis prior to administering the therapeutic dose of I-131. Our aim of the following study was to determine the utility of the diagnostic pre-therapy scan in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer. It was a case-control study carried out by retrospective chart review, of a randomly selected 100 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who had followed in our community hospital over the course of 1 year. We collected data on multiple variables in the subjects - including age, gender, pre-operative size of the nodules, diagnosis, stage of the malignancy, size of the tumor, multifocality, lymphovascular invasion, dose of radioiodine used for remnant ablation, recurrence rates and persistence rates. Continuous variables were compared using the independent sample Mann-Whitney U-test whereas the Chi-square test was used for nominal variables. The mean dose of radioactive iodine administered was 97.56 (±27.98) in the pre-therapy scan group and it was 97.23 (±32.40) in the control group. There was no difference between the two groups (P - 0.45). There was also no difference in the recurrence rates between the groups (P = 1.0). There was a trend toward a higher degree of persistent cancer in the group that had the pre-therapy scans (P - 0.086). Pre-therapy scan may not affect the dose of radio-iodine I-131 used for remnant ablation of differentiated thyroid cancer and does not influence the recurrence rates. This was especially true with respect to I-131 remnant ablation for low risk tumors.

  12. Clinical results of stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I small-cell lung cancer. A single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Asai, Kaori; Terashima, Koutarou; Matsumoto, Keiji; Hirata, Hideki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). From April 2003 to September 2009, a total of eight patients with Stage I SCLC were treated with SBRT in our institution. In all patients, the lung tumors were proven as SCLC pathologically. The patients' ages were 58-84 years (median: 74). The T-stage of the primary tumor was T1a in two, T1b in two and T2a in four patients. Six of the patients were inoperable because of poor cardiac and/or pulmonary function, and two patients refused surgery. SBRT was given using 7-8 non-coplanar beams with 48 Gy in four fractions. Six of the eight patients received 3-4 cycles of chemotherapy using carboplatin (CBDCA) + etoposide (VP-16) or cisplatin (CDDP) + irinotecan (CPT-11). The follow-up period for all patients was 6-60 months (median: 32). Six patients were still alive without any recurrence. One patient died from this disease and one died from another disease. The overall and disease-specific survival rate at three years was 72% and 86%, respectively. There were no patients with local progression of the lesion targeted by SBRT. Only one patient had nodal recurrence in the mediastinum at 12 months after treatment. The progression-free survival rate was 71%. No Grade 2 or higher SBRT-related toxicities were observed. SBRT plus chemotherapy could be an alternative to surgery with chemotherapy for inoperable patients with Stage I small-cell lung cancer. However, further investigation is needed using a large series of patients. (author)

  13. Clinical utility of simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MRI as a single-step imaging modality in the staging of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yeh, Chih-Hua; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Ng, Shu-Hang; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Yu; Yen-Ming, Tsang; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Huang, Bing-Shen; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Chang, Kai-Ping; Wang, Hung-Ming; Liao, Chun-Ta

    2018-03-03

    Both head and neck magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) play a crucial role in the staging of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In this study, we sought to prospectively investigate the clinical utility of simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MRI for primary staging of NPC patients. We examined 113 patients with histologically confirmed NPC who underwent pretreatment, simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI and PET/CT for primary tumor staging. The images obtained with the different imaging modalities were interpreted independently and compared with each other. PET/MRI increased the accuracy of head and neck MRI for assessment of primary tumor extent in four patients via addition of FDG uptake information to increase the conspicuity of morphologically subtle lesions. PET/MR images were more discernible than PET/CT images for mapping tumor extension, especially intracranial invasion. Regarding the N staging assessment, the sensitivity of PET/MRI (99.5%) was higher than that of head and neck MRI (94.2%) and PET/CT (90.9%). PET/MRI was particularly useful for distinguishing retropharyngeal nodal metastasis from adjacent nasopharyngeal tumors. For distant metastasis evaluation, PET/MRI exhibited a similar sensitivity (90% vs. 86.7% vs. 83.3%), but higher positive predictive value (93.1% vs. 78.8% vs. 83.3%) than whole-body MRI and PET/CT, respectively. For tumor staging of NPC, simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI was more accurate than head and neck MRI and PET/CT, and may serve as a single-step staging modality.

  14. Resistance Training with Single vs. Multi-joint Exercises at Equal Total Load Volume: Effects on Body Composition, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and Muscle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Antonio; Gentil, Paulo; Moro, Tatiana; Marcolin, Giuseppe; Bianco, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effects of equal-volume resistance training performed with single-joint (SJ) or multi-joint exercises (MJ) on VO2max, muscle strength and body composition in physically active males. Thirty-six participants were divided in two groups: SJ group (n = 18, 182.1 ± 5.2, 80.03 ± 2.78 kg, 23.5 ± 2.7 years) exercised with only SJ exercises (e.g., dumbbell fly, knee extension, etc.) and MJ group (n = 18, 185.3 ± 3.6 cm, 80.69 ± 2.98 kg, 25.5 ± 3.8 years) with only MJ exercises (e.g., bench press, squat, etc.). The total work volume (repetitions × sets × load) was equated between groups. Training was performed three times a week for 8 weeks. Before and after the training period, participants were tested for VO2max, body composition, 1 RM on the bench press, knee extension and squat. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare post training values between groups, using baseline values as covariates. According to the results, both groups decreased body fat and increased fat free mass with no difference between them. Whilst both groups significantly increased cardiorespiratory fitness and maximal strength, the improvements in MJ group were higher than for SJ in VO2max (5.1 and 12.5% for SJ and MJ), bench press 1 RM (8.1 and 10.9% for SJ and MJ), knee extension 1 RM (12.4 and 18.9% for SJ and MJ) and squat 1 RM (8.3 and 13.8% for SJ and MJ). In conclusion, when total work volume was equated, RT programs involving MJ exercises appear to be more efficient for improving muscle strength and maximal oxygen consumption than programs involving SJ exercises, but no differences were found for body composition. PMID:29312007

  15. Reproducibility of Dynamic Body Balance Measurement by Center of Foot Pressure Analysis Immediately after Single-Leg Hop Landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yukiko; Yonetani, Yasukazu; Takao, Rikio; Ogasawara, Issei; Mae, Tatsuo; Nakata, Ken; Horibe, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic balance was evaluated using the trajectory length of the center of foot pressure (COP) in the early phase from immediately after landing to the time of pastoral maintenance. Ten young volunteers with an average age of 23.8 years were asked to stand on one foot on a horizontal floor, hop forward half a step and land on one foot 10 times on each of 3 non-consecutive days. The peak of the vertical component of the floor reaction force (Fz), and the initiation time of the maximum value (tz) and COP trajectory length were measured by a force plate (AMTI, Ltd.). None of the subjects complained of any feeling of fear or loss of balance during the 3 days.The interclass correlation coefficient values of Fz and tz over the three days were 0.75 or higher. Single-leg hop for half a step as a motor task enabled safe measurement of COP trajectory length with high reproducibility. Fz reached its peak within 200 ms after landing and the COP trajectory length within 200 ms after landing accounted for approximately 50% of the total COP trajectory length at one second. Although the length differed in each subject, the interclass correlation coefficients for COP up to 100 ms and 200 ms were 0.68 and 0.80, respectively.The COP trajectory length within 200 ms after landing was considered to be useful as an objective criteria for the evaluation of dynamic balance in the early phase after landing.

  16. Whole body and local cryotherapy in restless legs syndrome: A randomized, single-blind, controlled parallel group pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happe, Svenja; Evers, Stefan; Thiedemann, Christian; Bunten, Sabine; Siegert, Rudolf

    2016-11-15

    Treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS) is primarily based on drugs. Since many patients report improvement of symptoms due to cooling their legs, we examined the efficacy of cryotherapy in RLS. 35 patients (28 women, 60.9±12.5years) with idiopathic RLS and symptoms starting not later than 6pm were randomized into three groups: cold air chamber at -60°C (n=12); cold air chamber at -10°C (n=12); local cryotherapy at -17°C (n=11). After a two week baseline, the different therapies were applied three minutes daily at 6pm over two weeks, followed by a four week observation period. The patients completed several questionnaires regarding RLS symptoms, sleep, and quality of life on a weekly basis (IRLS, ESS), VAS and sleep/morning protocol were completed daily, MOSS/RLS-QLI were completed once in each period. Additionally, the PLM index was measured by a mobile device at the end of baseline, intervention, and follow-up. The IRLS score was chosen as primary efficacy parameter. At the end of follow-up, significant improvement of RLS symptoms and quality of life could be observed only in the -60°C group as compared to baseline (IRLS: p=0.009; RLS-QLI: p=0.006; ESS: p=0.020). Local cryotherapy led to improvement in quality of life (VAS4: p=0.028; RLS-QLI: p=0.014) and sleep quality (MOSS: p=0.020; MOSS2: p=0.022) but not in IRLS and ESS. In the -10°C group, the only significant effect was shortening of number of wake phases per night. Serious side-effects were not reported. Whole body cryotherapy at -60°C and, to a less extent, local cryotherapy seem to be a treatment option for RLS in addition to conventional pharmacological treatment. However, the exact mode of cryotherapy needs to be established. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. How much protein can the body use in a single meal for muscle-building? Implications for daily protein distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Brad Jon; Aragon, Alan Albert

    2018-01-01

    Controversy exists about the maximum amount of protein that can be utilized for lean tissue-building purposes in a single meal for those involved in regimented resistance training. It has been proposed that muscle protein synthesis is maximized in young adults with an intake of ~ 20-25 g of a high-quality protein; anything above this amount is believed to be oxidized for energy or transaminated to form urea and other organic acids. However, these findings are specific to the provision of fast-digesting proteins without the addition of other macronutrients. Consumption of slower-acting protein sources, particularly when consumed in combination with other macronutrients, would delay absorption and thus conceivably enhance the utilization of the constituent amino acids. The purpose of this paper was twofold: 1) to objectively review the literature in an effort to determine an upper anabolic threshold for per-meal protein intake; 2) draw relevant conclusions based on the current data so as to elucidate guidelines for per-meal daily protein distribution to optimize lean tissue accretion. Both acute and long-term studies on the topic were evaluated and their findings placed into context with respect to per-meal utilization of protein and the associated implications to distribution of protein feedings across the course of a day. The preponderance of data indicate that while consumption of higher protein doses (> 20 g) results in greater AA oxidation, this is not the fate for all the additional ingested AAs as some are utilized for tissue-building purposes. Based on the current evidence, we conclude that to maximize anabolism one should consume protein at a target intake of 0.4 g/kg/meal across a minimum of four meals in order to reach a minimum of 1.6 g/kg/day. Using the upper daily intake of 2.2 g/kg/day reported in the literature spread out over the same four meals would necessitate a maximum of 0.55 g/kg/meal.

  18. Nitric oxide augments single Ca(2+) channel currents via cGMP-dependent protein kinase in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosakai, Kumiko; Tsujiuchi, Yuuki; Yoshino, Masami

    2015-07-01

    Behavioral and pharmacological studies in insects have suggested that the nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic GMP (cGMP) signaling pathway is involved in the formation of long-term memory (LTM) associated with olfactory learning. However, the target molecules of NO and the downstream signaling pathway are still not known. In this study, we investigated the action of NO on single voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in the intrinsic neurons known as Kenyon cells within the mushroom body of the cricket brain, using the cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Application of the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) increased the open probability (NPO) of single Ca(2+) channel currents. This GSNO-induced increase was blocked by ODQ, a soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor, suggesting that the NO generated by GSNO acts via sGC to raise cGMP levels. The membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-Bro-cGMP also increased the NPO of single Ca(2+) channel currents. Pretreatment of cells with KT5823, a protein kinase G blocker, abolished the excitatory effect of GSNO. These results suggest that NO augments the activity of single Ca(2+) channels via the cGMP/PKG signaling pathway. To gain insight into the physiological role of NO, we examined the effect of GSNO on action potentials of Kenyon cells under current-clamp conditions. Application of GSNO increased the frequency of action potentials elicited by depolarizing current injections, indicating that NO acts as a modulator resulting in a stimulatory signal in Kenyon cells. We discuss the increased Ca(2+) influx through these Ca(2+) channels via the NO/cGMP signaling cascade in relation to the formation of olfactory LTM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of multi- and single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for assessment of body composition in post-menopausal women: effects of body mass index and accelerometer-determined physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gába, A; Kapuš, O; Cuberek, R; Botek, M

    2015-08-01

    Bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) is commonly used in research to assess body composition. However, studies that validate the accuracy of BIA exclusively in post-menopausal women are lacking. The main purpose of the present study was to evaluate the agreement of multi-frequency (MF)-BIA and single-frequency (SF)-BIA with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in the estimation of fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) among post-menopausal women with variation in body mass index (BMI) and physical activity (PA). FM and FFM were estimated by BIA and DXA in 146 post-menopausal women with a mean (SD) age of 62.8 (5.2) years. PA was determined by an accelerometer. The mean (SD) difference between MF-BIA and DXA was -1.8 (1.8) kg (P = 0.08) and 1.3 (1.8) kg (P = 0.01) for FM and FFM, respectively. SF-BIA provided a significantly lower estimate of FM [-2.0 (2.2) kg; P = 0.04] and a higher estimate of FFM [1.8 (2.4) kg; P obese and insufficiently active subjects. In other BMI and PA groups, both BIA devices showed a similar deviation from DXA. BIA tends to underestimate FM and overestimate FFM relative to DXA. MF-BIA appears to be a more appropriate method for the assessment of body composition than SF-BIA in post-menopausal woman with BMI >30 kg/m(2) and in those who are insufficiently active. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  20. The rigid Horowitz-Myers conjecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolgar, Eric [Dept. of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences andTheoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta,Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G1 (Canada)

    2017-03-20

    The new positive energy conjecture was first formulated by Horowitz and Myers in the late 1990s to probe for a possible extended, nonsupersymmetric AdS/CFT correspondence. We consider a version formulated for complete, asymptotically Poincaré-Einstein Riemannian metrics (M,g) with bounded scalar curvature R≥−n(n−1) and with no (inner) boundary except possibly a finite union of compact, totally geodesic hypersurfaces (horizons). This version then asserts that any such (M,g) must have mass not less than a certain bound which is realized as the mass m{sub 0} of a metric g{sub 0} induced on a time-symmetric slice of a spacetime called an AdS soliton. This conjecture remains unproved, having so far resisted standard techniques. Little is known other than that the conjecture is true for metrics which are sufficiently small perturbations of g{sub 0}. We pose another test for the conjecture. We assume its validity and attempt to prove as a corollary the corresponding scalar curvature rigidity statement, which is that g{sub 0} is the unique asymptotically Poincaré-Einstein metric with mass m{sub 0} obeying R≥−n(n−1). Were a second such metric g{sub 1} not isometric to g{sub 0} to exist, it then may well admit perturbations of lower mass, contradicting the assumed validity of the conjecture. We find enough rigidity to show that the minimum mass metric must be static Einstein, so the problem is reduced to that of static uniqueness. When n=3 the manifold must be isometric to a time-symmetric slice of an AdS soliton spacetime, or must have a non-compact horizon. En route we study the mass aspect, obtaining and generalizing known results: (i) we relate the mass aspect of static metrics to the holographic energy density, (ii) we obtain the conformal invariance of the mass aspect when the bulk dimension is odd, and (iii) we show the vanishing of the mass aspect for negative Einstein manifolds with Einstein conformal boundary.

  1. Reinforced molecular recognition as an alternative to rigid receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Sijbren

    2006-01-01

    In theory, a perfectly rigid receptor will probably be an unbeatable binder. However, rigidity may not be easy to achieve in practice and it is certainly not Nature’s method to realise high affinity. In many proteins binding affinity is increased through non-covalent interactions within the protein.

  2. Non-rigid image registration using bone growth model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten; Gramkow, Claus; Kreiborg, Sven

    1997-01-01

    Non-rigid registration has traditionally used physical models like elasticity and fluids. These models are very seldom valid models of the difference between the registered images. This paper presents a non-rigid registration algorithm, which uses a model of bone growth as a model of the change b...

  3. Validation of seat-off and seat-on in repeated sit-to-stand movements using a single-body-fixed sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Lummel, R C; Ainsworth, E; Hausdorff, J M; Lindemann, U; Beek, P J; Van Dieën, J H

    2012-01-01

    The identification of chair rise phases is a prerequisite for quantifying sit-to-stand movements. The aim of this study is to validate seat-off and seat-on detection using a single-body-fixed sensor against detection based on chair switches. A single sensor system with three accelerometers and three gyroscopes was fixed around the waist. Synchronized on–off switches were placed under the chair. Thirteen older adults were recruited from a residential care home and fifteen young adults were recruited among college students. Subjects were asked to complete two sets of five trials each. Six features of the trunk movement during seat-off and seat-on were calculated automatically, and a model was developed to predict the moment of seat-off and seat-on transitions. The predictions were validated with leave-one-out cross-validation. Feature extraction failed in two trials (0.7%). For the optimal combination of seat-off predictors, cross-validation yielded a mean error of 0 ms and a mean absolute error of 51 ms. For the best seat-on predictor, cross-validation yielded a mean error of –3 ms and a mean absolute error of 127 ms. The results of this study demonstrate that seat-off and seat-on in repeated sit-to-stand movements can be detected semi-automatically in young and older adults using a one-body-fixed sensor system with an accuracy of 51 and 127 ms, respectively. The use of the ambulatory instrumentation is feasible for non-technically trained personnel. This is an important step in the development of an automated method for the quantification of sit-to-stand movements in clinical practice. (paper)

  4. Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy and iodine-123 ioflupane single photon emission computed tomography in Lewy body diseases: complementary or alternative techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treglia, Giorgio; Cason, Ernesto; Cortelli, Pietro; Gabellini, Anna; Liguori, Rocco; Bagnato, Antonio; Giordano, Alessandro; Fagioli, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    To compare myocardial sympathetic imaging using (123)I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy and striatal dopaminergic imaging using (123)I-Ioflupane (FP-CIT) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with suspected Lewy body diseases (LBD). Ninety-nine patients who performed both methods within 2 months for differential diagnosis between Parkinson's disease (PD) and other parkinsonism (n = 68) or between dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and other dementia (n = 31) were enrolled. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values of both methods were calculated. For (123) I-MIBG scintigraphy, the overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values in LBD were 83%, 79%, 82%, 86%, and 76%, respectively. For (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT, the overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values in LBD were 93%, 41%, 73%, 71%, and 80%, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between these two methods in patients without LBD, but not in patients with LBD. LBD usually present both myocardial sympathetic and striatal dopaminergic impairments. (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT presents high sensitivity in the diagnosis of LBD; (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy may have a complementary role in differential diagnosis between PD and other parkinsonism. These scintigraphic methods showed similar diagnostic accuracy in differential diagnosis between DLB and other dementia. Copyright © 2012 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  5. Optimization of helical acquisition parameters to preserve uniformity of mouse whole body using multipinhole collimator in single-photon emission computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Ukon

    Full Text Available Focusing on whole-body uniformity in small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, we examined the optimal helical acquisition parameters using five-pinhole collimators for mouse imaging. SPECT images of an 80-mm-long cylindrical phantom with 99mTc solution were acquired using an Inveon multimodality imaging platform. The bed travels used in this study were 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 mm, and the numbers of revolutions traversed during the SPECT scan were 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 7.0, respectively. Artifacts that degrade uniformity in reconstructed images were conspicuous when the bed travel was smaller than the object length. Regarding the distal-to-center ratio (DCR of SPECT values in the object’s axial direction, the DCR nearest to the ideal ratio of 1.00 was 1.02 in the optimal uniformity with 4.0 revolutions and a bed travel of 120 mm. Moreover, the helical acquisition using these parameters suppressed the formation of artifacts. We proposed the optimal parameters in whole-body helical SPECT; the bed travel was sufficiently larger than the object length; the 4.0 or more revolutions were required for a pitch of approximately 30 mm/revolution. The optimal acquisition parameters in SPECT to preserve uniformity would contribute to the accurate quantification of whole-body biodistribution. Keywords: Helical acquisition, Multipinhole collimator, Computed tomography, SPECT

  6. Cosmesis and body image after single-port laparoscopic or conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a multicenter double blinded randomised controlled trial (SPOCC-trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vonlanthen René

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emerging attempts have been made to reduce operative trauma and improve cosmetic results of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. There is a trend towards minimizing the number of incisions such as natural transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES and single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SPLC. Many retrospective case series propose excellent cosmesis and reduced pain in SPLC. As the latter has been confirmed in a randomized controlled trial, patient's satisfaction on cosmesis is still controversially debated. Methods/Design The SPOCC trial is a prospective, multi-center, double blinded, randomized controlled study comparing SPLC with 4-port conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (4PLC in elective surgery. The hypothesis and primary objective is that patients undergoing SPLC will have a better outcome in cosmesis and body image 12 weeks after surgery. This primary endpoint is assessed using a validated 8-item multiple choice type questionnaire on cosmesis and body image. The secondary endpoint has three entities: the quality of life 12 weeks after surgery assessed by the validated Short-Form-36 Health Survey questionnaire, postoperative pain assessed by a visual analogue scale and the use of analgesics. Operative time, surgeon's experience with SPLC and 4PLC, use of additional ports, conversion to 4PLC or open cholecystectomy, length of stay, costs, time of work as well as intra- and postoperative complications are further aspects of the secondary endpoint. Patients are randomly assigned either to SPLC or to 4PLC. Patients as well as treating physicians, nurses and assessors are blinded until the 7th postoperative day. Sample size calculation performed by estimating a difference of cosmesis of 20% (alpha = 0.05 and beta = 0.90, drop out rate of 10% resulted in a number of 55 randomized patients per arm. Discussion The SPOCC-trial is a prospective, multi-center, double-blind, randomized controlled study to assess cosmesis and body

  7. Molecular rigidity and enthalpy-entropy compensation in DNA melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Lara, Fernando; Starr, Francis W; Douglas, Jack F

    2017-11-15

    Enthalpy-entropy compensation (EEC) is observed in diverse molecular binding processes of importance to living systems and manufacturing applications, but this widely occurring phenomenon is not sufficiently understood from a molecular physics standpoint. To gain insight into this fundamental problem, we focus on the melting of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) since measurements exhibiting EEC are extensive for nucleic acid complexes and existing coarse-grained models of DNA allow us to explore the influence of changes in molecular parameters on the energetic parameters by using molecular dynamics simulations. Previous experimental and computational studies have indicated a correlation between EEC and changes in molecular rigidity in certain binding-unbinding processes, and, correspondingly, we estimate measures of DNA molecular rigidity under a wide range of conditions, along with resultant changes in the enthalpy and entropy of binding. In particular, we consider variations in dsDNA rigidity that arise from changes of intrinsic molecular rigidity such as varying the associative interaction strength between the DNA bases, the length of the DNA chains, and the bending stiffness of the individual DNA chains. We also consider extrinsic changes of molecular rigidity arising from the addition of polymer additives and geometrical confinement of DNA between parallel plates. All our computations confirm EEC and indicate that this phenomenon is indeed highly correlated with changes in molecular rigidity. However, two distinct patterns relating to how DNA rigidity influences the entropy of association emerge from our analysis. Increasing the intrinsic DNA rigidity increases the entropy of binding, but increases in molecular rigidity from external constraints decreases the entropy of binding. EEC arises in numerous synthetic and biological binding processes and we suggest that changes in molecular rigidity might provide a common origin of this ubiquitous phenomenon in the mutual

  8. Additional double-wall roof in single-wall, closed, convective incubators: Impact on body heat loss from premature infants and optimal adjustment of the incubator air temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanaud, Stéphane; Decima, Pauline; Pelletier, Amandine; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Stephan-Blanchard, Erwan; Bach, Véronique; Tourneux, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Radiant heat loss is high in low-birth-weight (LBW) neonates. Double-wall or single-wall incubators with an additional double-wall roof panel that can be removed during phototherapy are used to reduce Radiant heat loss. There are no data on how the incubators should be used when this second roof panel is removed. The aim of the study was to assess the heat exchanges in LBW neonates in a single-wall incubator with and without an additional roof panel. To determine the optimal thermoneutral incubator air temperature. Influence of the additional double-wall roof was assessed by using a thermal mannequin simulating a LBW neonate. Then, we calculated the optimal incubator air temperature from a cohort of human LBW neonate in the absence of the additional roof panel. Twenty-three LBW neonates (birth weight: 750-1800g; gestational age: 28-32 weeks) were included. With the additional roof panel, R was lower but convective and evaporative skin heat losses were greater. This difference can be overcome by increasing the incubator air temperature by 0.15-0.20°C. The benefit of an additional roof panel was cancelled out by greater body heat losses through other routes. Understanding the heat transfers between the neonate and the environment is essential for optimizing incubators. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A single bivalent efficiently inhibits cyclin B1 degradation and polar body extrusion in mouse oocytes indicating robust SAC during female meiosis I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Hoffmann

    Full Text Available The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC inhibits anaphase until microtubule-to-kinetochore attachments are formed, thus securing correct chromosome separation and preventing aneuploidy. Whereas in mitosis even a single unattached chromosome keeps the SAC active, the high incidence of aneuploidy related to maternal meiotic errors raises a concern about the lower efficiency of SAC in oocytes. Recently it was suggested that in mouse oocytes, contrary to somatic cells, not a single chromosome but a critical mass of chromosomes triggers efficient SAC pointing to the necessity of evaluating the robustness of SAC in oocytes. Two types of errors in chromosome segregation upon meiosis I related to SAC were envisaged: (1 SAC escape, when kinetochores emit SAC-activating signal unable to stop anaphase I; and (2 SAC deceive, when kinetochores do not emit the signal. Using micromanipulations and live imaging of the first polar body extrusion, as well as the dynamics of cyclin B1 degradation, here we show that in mouse oocytes a single bivalent keeps the SAC active. This is the first direct evaluation of SAC efficiency in mouse oocytes, which provides strong evidence that the robustness of SAC in mammalian oocytes is comparable to other cell types. Our data do not contradict the hypothesis of the critical mass of chromosomes necessary for SAC activation, but suggest that the same rule may govern SAC activity also in other cell types. We postulate that the innate susceptibility of oocytes to errors in chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division may not be caused by lower efficiency of SAC itself, but could be linked to high critical chromosome mass necessary to keep SAC active in oocyte of large size.

  10. The interaction of exercise ability and body mass index upon long-term outcomes among patients undergoing stress-rest perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uretsky, Seth; Supariwala, Azhar; Gurram, Srinivasa; Bonda, Sri Lakshmi Kala; Thota, Naganath; Bezwada, Prema; Manchireddy, Seema; Nair, Subu; Cohen, Randy; Rozanski, Alan

    2013-07-01

    The obesity paradox has been reported in several populations of patients with cardiovascular disease. Recent data have shown that physical fitness may attenuate the obesity paradox. Patients who undergo pharmacologic stress testing are known to have a higher risk of mortality than those who can exercise. The purpose of this study is to determine the interaction of obesity and exercise ability on survival among patients with a normal stress-rest single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A total of 5,203 (60 ± 13 years, male 37%) patients without a history of heart disease and a normal stress-rest SPECT between the years 1995 and 2010 were included in this analysis. Body mass index categories were defined according to the World Health Organization classification: normal weight, 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m(2); overweight, 25 to 29.9 kg/m(2); and obese, ≥30 kg/m(2). Patients were divided into 3 groups based on their ability to exercise: those who reached ≥6 METs on exercise, those who attained a level of stress. Patients in each of these fitness groups were further divided into 3 subgroups based on their body mass index. There were 939 (18%) deaths during a mean follow-up of 8.1 ± 4.1 years, for an overall event rate of 2.3%/y. Both exercise to ≥6 METs and being obese were associated with lower mortality. Adjusted multivariate analysis using the obese high-fit patients as the reference showed a wide heterogeneity in annualized mortality rates according to exercise and weight status, with annualized event rates which varied from 0.6%/y in the obese subjects who were physically fit to 5.3%/y among healthy subjects who underwent pharmacologic stress testing (P Stress mode and body weight impacted long-term survival in patients with a normal stress SPECT. The benefit of being physically fit was evident in all weight groups, as was the adverse effect of being unable to exercise. However, with regard to body weight, there was a paradoxical survival advantage for

  11. Resistance Training with Single vs. Multi-joint Exercises at Equal Total Load Volume: Effects on Body Composition, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and Muscle Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Paoli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare the effects of equal-volume resistance training performed with single-joint (SJ or multi-joint exercises (MJ on VO2max, muscle strength and body composition in physically active males. Thirty-six participants were divided in two groups: SJ group (n = 18, 182.1 ± 5.2, 80.03 ± 2.78 kg, 23.5 ± 2.7 years exercised with only SJ exercises (e.g., dumbbell fly, knee extension, etc. and MJ group (n = 18, 185.3 ± 3.6 cm, 80.69 ± 2.98 kg, 25.5 ± 3.8 years with only MJ exercises (e.g., bench press, squat, etc.. The total work volume (repetitions × sets × load was equated between groups. Training was performed three times a week for 8 weeks. Before and after the training period, participants were tested for VO2max, body composition, 1 RM on the bench press, knee extension and squat. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA was used to compare post training values between groups, using baseline values as covariates. According to the results, both groups decreased body fat and increased fat free mass with no difference between them. Whilst both groups significantly increased cardiorespiratory fitness and maximal strength, the improvements in MJ group were higher than for SJ in VO2max (5.1 and 12.5% for SJ and MJ, bench press 1 RM (8.1 and 10.9% for SJ and MJ, knee extension 1 RM (12.4 and 18.9% for SJ and MJ and squat 1 RM (8.3 and 13.8% for SJ and MJ. In conclusion, when total work volume was equated, RT programs involving MJ exercises appear to be more efficient for improving muscle strength and maximal oxygen consumption than programs involving SJ exercises, but no differences were found for body composition.

  12. Friction effects on lateral loading behavior of rigid piles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zania, Varvara; Hededal, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The adequacy of the p -y curves used in the current practice for the design of rigid pile foundations with large diameter, like in the case of monopile foundations of offshore wind turbines, has been widely questioned. The current study aims at analyzing the lateral behavior of rigid piles, while...... the lateral capacity of the pile. The obtained p - y curves demonstrate the importance of the aforementioned parameters in the design of rigid piles, as the reduction of friction along the interface reduces not only the ultimate load but also the stiffness of the soil-pile response. Read More: http...

  13. Observations on the partial breaking of N=2 rigid supersymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Andrianopoli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the partial breaking of N=2 rigid supersymmetry for a generic rigid special geometry of n abelian vector multiplets in the presence of Fayet–Iliopoulos terms induced by the hyper-Kähler momentum map. By exhibiting the symplectic structure of the problem we give invariant conditions for the breaking to occur, which rely on a quartic invariant of the Fayet–Iliopoulos charges as well as on a modification of the N=2 rigid symmetry algebra by a vector central charge.

  14. Observations on the Partial Breaking of $N=2$ Rigid Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Andrianopoli, Laura; Ferrara, Sergio; Trigiante, Mario

    2015-01-01

    We study the partial breaking of $N=2$ rigid supersymmetry for a generic rigid special geometry of $n$ abelian vector multiplets in the presence of Fayet-Iliopoulos terms induced by the Hyper-K\\"ahler momentum map. By exhibiting the symplectic structure of the problem we give invariant conditions for the breaking to occur, which rely on a quartic invariant of the Fayet-Iliopoulos charges as well as on a modification of the $N=2$ rigid symmetry algebra by a vector central charge.

  15. Tidal Evolution of Asteroidal Binaries. Ruled by Viscosity. Ignorant of Rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efroimsky, Michael

    2015-10-01

    This is a pilot paper serving as a launching pad for study of orbital and spin evolution of binary asteroids. The rate of tidal evolution of asteroidal binaries is defined by the dynamical Love numbers kl divided by quality factors Q. Common in the literature is the (oftentimes illegitimate) approximation of the dynamical Love numbers with their static counterparts. Since the static Love numbers are, approximately, proportional to the inverse rigidity, this renders a popular fallacy that the tidal evolution rate is determined by the product of the rigidity by the quality factor: {k}l/Q\\propto 1/(μ Q). In reality, the dynamical Love numbers depend on the tidal frequency and all rheological parameters of the tidally perturbed body (not just rigidity). We demonstrate that in asteroidal binaries the rigidity of their components plays virtually no role in tidal friction and tidal lagging, and thereby has almost no influence on the intensity of tidal interactions (tidal torques, tidal dissipation, tidally induced changes of the orbit). A key quantity that overwhelmingly determines the tidal evolution is a product of the effective viscosity η by the tidal frequency χ . The functional form of the torque’s dependence on this product depends on who wins in the competition between viscosity and self-gravitation. Hence a quantitative criterion, to distinguish between two regimes. For higher values of η χ , we get {k}l/Q\\propto 1/(η χ ), {while} for lower values we obtain {k}l/Q\\propto η χ . Our study rests on an assumption that asteroids can be treated as Maxwell bodies. Applicable to rigid rocks at low frequencies, this approximation is used here also for rubble piles, due to the lack of a better model. In the future, as we learn more about mechanics of granular mixtures in a weak gravity field, we may have to amend the tidal theory with other rheological parameters, ones that do not show up in the description of viscoelastic bodies. This line of study provides

  16. Purification and refolding of anti-T-antigen single chain antibodies (scFvs) expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Noriyuki; Koyama, Tsubasa; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2014-02-01

    T-antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-1-Ser/Thr) is an oncofetal antigen that is commonly expressed as a carbohydrate determinant in many adenocarcinomas. Since it is associated with tumor progression and metastasis, production of recombinant antibodies specific for T-antigen could lead to the development of cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Previously, we isolated and characterized 11 anti-T-antigen phage clones from a phage library displaying human single-chain antibodies (scFvs) and purified one scFv protein, 1G11. More recently, we purified and characterized 1E8 scFv protein using a Drosophila S2 expression system. In the current study, four anti-T-antigen scFv genes belonging to Groups 1-4 were purified from inclusion bodies expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Inclusion bodies isolated from E. coli cells were denatured in 3.5 M Gdn-HCl. Solubilized His-tagged scFv proteins were purified using Ni(2+)-Sepharose column chromatography in the presence of 3.5 M Gdn-HCl. Purified scFv proteins were refolded according to a previously published method of step-wise dialysis. Two anti-T-antigen scFv proteins, 1E6 and 1E8 that belong to Groups 1 and 2, respectively, were produced in sufficient amounts, thus allowing further characterization of their binding activity with T-antigen. Specificity and affinity constants determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), respectively, provided evidence that both 1E8 and 1E6 scFv proteins are T-antigen specific and suggested that 1E8 scFv protein has a higher affinity for T-antigen than 1E6 scFv protein.

  17. jConsequences of two different doses to the lungs during a single dose of total body irradiation: Results of a radomized study on 85 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girinsky, T.; Socie, G.; Ammarguellat, H.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of lung complications and leukemia recurrences after two different doses to the lungs during total body irradiation. Seventy-nine patients with acute leukemia (AML or ALL) in first complete remission or chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic phase, five patients with high grade lymphoma, and one with chronic lymphocytic leukemia were entered in the study. They were given a single dose of total body irradiation (10 Gy over 4 h) with two different doses to the lungs (6 Gy or 8 Gy) prior to bone marrow transplantation. The median dose rate was 0.04 Gy/min. The median follow-up for both groups of patients was 24 months. The actuarial 5-year overall survival rate was similar in both groups, 59% and 43% for patients given 8 Gy and 6 Gy to the lungs, respectively. The lung complication rate was similar in the two groups (28% vs. 22% for the 8 Gy and 6 Gy group, respectively). The actuarial leukemia recurrence rate was significantly higher in the group of patients given 6 Gy to the lungs (25%) vs. 0% in the 8 Gy group. Interestingly, fall recurrences occurred in the group of patients who were given 6 Gy to the lungs, who had acute leukemia, and no chromic graft vs. host disease (GVHD). Although the number of patients was not very large and the follow-up relatively short, these findings suggest that a lower dose to the lungs could lead to an increased incidence of leukemia recurrences due to a lower dose to the thoracic wall or to a lower incidence of chronic GVHD. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. [Arterial rigidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoli, N A; Dolishniaia, G R; Rebrov, A P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this open study was to estimate arterial rigidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It included 105 patients above 40 years of age. Exclusion criteria were clinical signs of CHD, peripheral atherosclerosis, and other severe chronic diseases in the exacerbation phase. The control group was comprised of 27 practically healthy volunteers. The arterial fluid was detected using a Tensioclinic arteriograph (Tensiomed, Hungary). Arterial rigidity was estimated in patients of two age groups (below and above 60 years) with COPD of different severity The results suggest the development of arterial wall lesions in proportion to the patients' age and COPD severity. It was shown that excessive arterial rigidity and accelerated pulse wave reflection (increased speed of pulse wave propagation and augmentation index) exert significant influence on the elevation of central arterial pressure. Enhanced rigidity of the arterial wall being a cardiovascular risk factor further prospective studies are needed.

  19. Resin Infusion Rigidized Inflatable Concept Development and Demonstration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel concept utilizing resin infusion to rigidize inflatable structures was developed at JSC ES. This ICA project intends to complete manufacturing of a prototype...

  20. Resin Infusion Rigidized Inflatable Concept Development and Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Utilizing resin infusion to rigidize an inflatable structure and form fiber-reinforced composites on-orbit is a novel concept that builds on current NASA technology...

  1. Re-analysis of exponential rigid-rotor astron equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovelace, R.V.; Larrabee, D.A.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies of exponential rigid-rotor astron equilibria include particles which are not trapped in the self-field of the configuration. The modification of these studies required to exclude untrapped particles is derived

  2. Genus Ranges of 4-Regular Rigid Vertex Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Dorothy; Dolzhenko, Egor; Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico; Valencia, Karin

    2015-01-01

    A rigid vertex of a graph is one that has a prescribed cyclic order of its incident edges. We study orientable genus ranges of 4-regular rigid vertex graphs. The (orientable) genus range is a set of genera values over all orientable surfaces into which a graph is embedded cellularly, and the embeddings of rigid vertex graphs are required to preserve the prescribed cyclic order of incident edges at every vertex. The genus ranges of 4-regular rigid vertex graphs are sets of consecutive integers, and we address two questions: which intervals of integers appear as genus ranges of such graphs, and what types of graphs realize a given genus range. For graphs with 2 n vertices ( n > 1), we prove that all intervals [ a, b ] for all a genus ranges. For graphs with 2 n - 1 vertices ( n ≥ 1), we prove that all intervals [ a, b ] for all a genus ranges. We also provide constructions of graphs that realize these ranges.

  3. The role of rigidity in controlling material failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Michelle M; Chen, Bryan Gin-Ge; Beuman, Thomas H; Ulrich, Stephan; Nagel, Sidney R; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2016-09-27

    We investigate how material rigidity acts as a key control parameter for the failure of solids under stress. In both experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that material failure can be continuously tuned by varying the underlying rigidity of the material while holding the amount of disorder constant. As the rigidity transition is approached, failure due to the application of uniaxial stress evolves from brittle cracking to system-spanning diffuse breaking. This evolution in failure behavior can be parameterized by the width of the crack. As a system becomes more and more floppy, this crack width increases until it saturates at the system size. Thus, the spatial extent of the failure zone can be used as a direct probe for material rigidity.

  4. Rigidity theorem for Willmore surfaces in a sphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 126; Issue 2. Rigidity ... Center of Mathematical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, People's Republic of China; College of Mathematics and Information Science, Jiangxi Normal University, Nanchang 330022, People's Republic of China ...

  5. “Mind the Trap”: Mindfulness Practice Reduces Cognitive Rigidity

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, Jonathan; Reiner, Keren; Meiran, Nachshon

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments examined the relation between mindfulness practice and cognitive rigidity by using a variation of the Einstellung water jar task. Participants were required to use three hypothetical jars to obtain a specific amount of water. Initial problems were solvable by the same complex formula, but in later problems ("critical" or "trap" problems) solving was possible by an additional much simpler formula. A rigidity score was compiled through perseverance of the complex formula. In Exp...

  6. Genome-wide association mapping including phenotypes from relatives without genotypes in a single-step (ssGWAS for 6-week body weight in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyu eWang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare results obtained from various methodologies for genome-wide association studies, when applied to real data, in terms of number and commonality of regions identified and their genetic variance explained, computational speed, and possible pitfalls in interpretations of results. Methodologies include: two iteratively reweighted single-step genomic BLUP procedures (ssGWAS1 and ssGWAS2, a single-marker model (CGWAS, and BayesB. The ssGWAS methods utilize genomic breeding values (GEBVs based on combined pedigree, genomic and phenotypic information, while CGWAS and BayesB only utilize phenotypes from genotyped animals or pseudo-phenotypes. In this study, ssGWAS was performed by converting GEBVs to SNP marker effects. Unequal variances for markers were incorporated for calculating weights into a new genomic relationship matrix. SNP weights were refined iteratively. The data was body weight at 6 weeks on 274,776 broiler chickens, of which 4553 were genotyped using a 60k SNP chip. Comparison of genomic regions was based on genetic variances explained by local SNP regions (20 SNPs. After 3 iterations, the noise was greatly reduced of ssGWAS1 and results are similar to that of CGWAS, with 4 out of the top 10 regions in common. In contrast, for BayesB, the plot was dominated by a single region explaining 23.1% of the genetic variance. This same region was found by ssGWAS1 with the same rank, but the amount of genetic variation attributed to the region was only 3%. These finding emphasize the need for caution when comparing and interpreting results from various methods, and highlight that detected associations, and strength of association, strongly depends on methodologies and details of implementations. BayesB appears to overly shrink regions to zero, while overestimating the amount of genetic variation attributed to the remaining SNP effects. The real world is most likely a compromise between methods and remains to

  7. Laser cellulite treatment and laser-assisted lipoplasty of the thighs and buttocks: Combined modalities for single stage contouring of the lower body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Christine; Stoneburner, Jacqueline; McLaughlin, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Cellulite and lipodystrophy are often found together, especially in areas of the buttocks and thighs, causing skin surface irregularities. Each of these conditions is currently treated independently as two separate surgical procedures. In our practice, we developed a novel combined approach for the simultaneous treatment of cellulite and lipodystrophy, as a single stage procedure in the same anatomic area. For the treatment of cellulite, we used the Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 1,440-nm, along with an innovative 1,000-micron directional side-firing fiber optic laser system. For the treatment of lipodystrophy, the Nd:YAG laser with a 1,440 nm wavelength, along with a fiber optic laser system was used. The objective of this study is to determine the efficacy and safety of a combined approach for the simultaneous treatment of cellulite and lipodystrophy. In 2012, 16 subjects with noticeable cellulite, Grade II and Grade III, accompanied by mild-to-moderate lipodystrophy of the lower body received single treatments of the Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 1,440-nm along with the 1,000-micron side-firing fiber optic laser system for simultaneous treatments of both cellulite and lipodystrophy. Patients were assessed at baseline and 3-6 months post-treatment by a modified Nurnberger-Muller scale utilized to quantify the cellulite severity. Additionally, patient satisfaction and a global aesthetic improvement scale were used to measure the improvement in lipodystrophy. Blinded reviewers identified the correct baseline photographs 97% of the time when presented with a set of photographs. The median modified Nurnberger-Muller scale score at baseline was 4.75 ± 1.2 and the average improvement was 2.0 ± 1.2. Global aesthetic improvement scores ranged from 1 to 3 with an average of 1.58 indicating a much-improved overall appearance. Satisfaction was high for both physicians and patients with scores corresponding to extremely satisfied/satisfied. Precise, effective

  8. The Effect of Submaximal Exercise Preceded by Single Whole-Body Cryotherapy on the Markers of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Blood of Volleyball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestyna Mila-Kierzenkowska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of single whole-body cryotherapy (WBC session applied prior to submaximal exercise on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, the concentration of lipid peroxidation products, total oxidative status, and the level of cytokines in blood of volleyball players. The study group consisted of 18 male professional volleyball players, who were subjected to extremely cold air (−130∘C prior to exercise performed on cycloergometer. Blood samples were taken five times: before WBC, after WBC procedure, after exercise preceded by cryotherapy (WBC exercise, and before and after exercise without WBC (control exercise. The activity of catalase statistically significantly increased after control exercise. Moreover, the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase was lower after WBC exercise than after control exercise (P<0.001. After WBC exercise, the level of IL-6 and IL-1β was also lower (P<0.001 than after control exercise. The obtained results may suggest that cryotherapy prior to exercise may have some antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The relations between the level of studied oxidative stress and inflammatory markers may testify to the contribution of reactive oxygen species in cytokines release into the blood system in response to exercise and WBC.

  9. Comparison of forward versus backward walking using body weight supported treadmill training in an individual with a spinal cord injury: a single subject design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriello, Gabriele; Pathare, Neeti; Cirone, Cono; Pastore, Danielle; Shears, Dacia; Sulehri, Sahira

    2014-01-01

    Body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) is a task-specific intervention that promotes functional locomotion. There is no research evaluating the effect of backward walking (BW) using BWSTT in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this single subject design was to examine the differences between forward walking (FW) and BW training using BWSTT in an individual with quadriparesis. The participant was a 57-year-old male with incomplete C3-C6 SCI. An ABABAB design (A = BW; B = FW; each phase = 3 weeks of biweekly sessions) was utilized. Outcome measures included: gait parameters; a timed 4-meter walk; the 5-repetition sit-to-stand test (STST); tandem stance time; and 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Data was analyzed with split level method of trend estimation. Improvements in gait parameters, on the timed 4-meter walk, 6MWT, tandem balance and aerobic endurance were similar with FW and BW training. The only difference between FW and BW training was that BW training resulted in greater improvements in the STST. The results of this study suggest that in this individual backward walking training was advantageous, resulting in improved ability to perform the 5-repetition STST. It is suspected that these changes can be attributed to the differences in muscle activation and task difficulty between FW and BW.

  10. The Effect of Submaximal Exercise Preceded by Single Whole-Body Cryotherapy on the Markers of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Blood of Volleyball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Szpinda, Michał; Augustyńska, Beata; Woźniak, Bartosz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of single whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) session applied prior to submaximal exercise on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, the concentration of lipid peroxidation products, total oxidative status, and the level of cytokines in blood of volleyball players. The study group consisted of 18 male professional volleyball players, who were subjected to extremely cold air (−130°C) prior to exercise performed on cycloergometer. Blood samples were taken five times: before WBC, after WBC procedure, after exercise preceded by cryotherapy (WBC exercise), and before and after exercise without WBC (control exercise). The activity of catalase statistically significantly increased after control exercise. Moreover, the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase was lower after WBC exercise than after control exercise (P cryotherapy prior to exercise may have some antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The relations between the level of studied oxidative stress and inflammatory markers may testify to the contribution of reactive oxygen species in cytokines release into the blood system in response to exercise and WBC. PMID:24489985

  11. Reduction of metallic coil artefacts in computed tomography body imaging: effects of a new single-energy metal artefact reduction algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Ikeda, Osamu; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Oda, Seitaro; Yuki, Hideaki; Nakaura, Takeshi; Hirai, Toshinori; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Funama, Yoshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Kawano, Takayuki [Kumamoto University Graduate School, Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Life Sciences Research, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    We evaluated the effect of a single-energy metal artefact reduction (SEMAR) algorithm for metallic coil artefact reduction in body imaging. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) was performed in 30 patients with metallic coils (10 men, 20 women; mean age, 67.9 ± 11 years). Non-SEMAR images were reconstructed with iterative reconstruction alone, and SEMAR images were reconstructed with the iterative reconstruction plus SEMAR algorithms. We compared image noise around metallic coils and the maximum diameters of artefacts from coils between the non-SEMAR and SEMAR images. Two radiologists visually evaluated the metallic coil artefacts utilizing a four-point scale: 1 = extensive; 2 = strong; 3 = mild; 4 = minimal artefacts. The image noise and maximum diameters of the artefacts of the SEMAR images were significantly lower than those of the non-SEMAR images (65.1 ± 33.0 HU vs. 29.7 ± 10.3 HU; 163.9 ± 54.8 mm vs. 10.3 ± 19.0 mm, respectively; P < 0.001). Better visual scores were obtained with the SEMAR technique (3.4 ± 0.6 vs. 1.0 ± 0.0, P < 0.001). The SEMAR algorithm significantly reduced artefacts caused by metallic coils compared with the non-SEMAR algorithm. This technique can potentially increase CT performance for the evaluation of post-coil embolization complications. (orig.)

  12. Thyroxine clearance in rats within the first month after the single whole-body {gamma} - irradiation at a dose of 10Gy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryadko, Kirill A. [Institute of Radiobiology, National Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus)

    2002-07-01

    The effects of acute whole-body {gamma} -irradiation at a dose of 10 Gy on thyroxine (T{sub 4}) plasma clearance rate (PCR) and thyroidal and blood T4 concentration ([T{sub 4}]) were examined within one month after exposure. The PCR values were measured using the bolus injection, single-compartmental approach. To eliminate the influence of radiation-induced anorexia animals were fasting for two days before the pharmacokinetic experiments. Hormone concentrations in blood and in thyroid tissue were measured by RIA. Throughout the observation period, PCR was elevated in irradiated rats with maximum at day 4 after exposure (0.56{+-}0.04 vs. 0.36{+-}0.03 ml/h100 gbw, P<0.001). [T{sub 4}] in blood was not significantly different from that in control animals. Thyroidal [T{sub 4}] was significantly decreased in irradiated animals 4 days after exposure (151.8{+-}21.7 vs. 258.8{+-}29.9 pmol/mg protein, P<0.01) and gradually increased after day 9. 10 Gy {gamma} -irradiation causes the intensification of T{sub 4} metabolism without the pronounced changes in concentration. Presumably, at early terms the rising local demand in O{sub 4} can not be compensated with the existing level of production. Alterations in the intensity of T{sub 4} metabolism are evident at least one month after exposure but they may not be detected without taking into account kinetic data.

  13. Parameter identification problems for thin inclusions in elastic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khludnev, A. M.; Popova, T. S.

    2017-10-01

    The paper concerns an identification of rigidity parameters for thin inclusions located inside elastic bodies. A delamination of the inclusions is assumed thus providing a crack between inclusions and the elastic matrix. Inequality type boundary conditions are imposed at the crack faces to exclude a mutual penetration. We consider elastic as well as rigid inclusions and solve an optimal control problem for finding a rigidity parameter minimizing a suitable cost functional. The cost functional characterizes a displacement of the inclusion, and a rigidity parameter serves as a control function. We prove a solution existence of the problems formulated.

  14. Finite element method for transient flow of homogeneous gas-liquid mixtures in rigid and quasi-rigid pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haj Kacem, Yassine; Hadj-Taieb, Ezzedine

    2017-01-01

    A numerical solution based on the finite element method is presented to describe wave propagations in the transient flow of homogeneous gas-liquid mixtures in rigid and quasi-rigid pipes. The rigid model is deduced by neglecting the liquid compressibility and the pipe wall elasticity against the gas compressibility. But, these two parameters are taken into consideration in the quasi-rigid model. The effect of fluid compressibility on the pressure waves of transient flow is then analyzed and confronted to the pipe wall elasticity. To validate the reliability of the model presented herein, the numerical results are compared with those obtained by the finite difference method and experiment. The results show that the pressure wave propagation is significantly influenced by gas-fluid mass ratio and pipe wall elasticity. (authors)

  15. Extended thermodynamics revisited: renormalized flux variables and second sound in rigid solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebon, Georgy; Ruggieri, Marianna; Valenti, Antonino

    2008-01-01

    Propagation of heat waves in rigid bodies is investigated. The originality of the approach is that it rests on a revisited version of extended irreversible thermodynamics. In comparison with earlier developments, two innovations are proposed. First, we depart from the linear approach, best illustrated by Cattaneo's relation, to explore the non-linear regime. Second, the extra variables are no longer the usual dissipative fluxes, but renormalized expressions of the fluxes, in order to include the specific material properties of the systems under study. The present model is particularly well suited for studying heat transport at low temperatures in dielectric crystals

  16. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Single Fraction of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Compared With Single Fraction of External Beam Radiation Therapy for Palliation of Vertebral Bone Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hayeon, E-mail: kimh2@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Smith, Kenneth J. [Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been proposed for the palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases because higher radiation doses may result in superior and more durable pain control. A phase III clinical trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0631) comparing single fraction SBRT with single fraction external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in palliative treatment of painful vertebral bone metastases is now ongoing. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis to compare these strategies. Methods and Materials: A Markov model, using a 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon, was developed to compare the cost-effectiveness of SBRT (16 or 18 Gy in 1 fraction) with that of 8 Gy in 1 fraction of EBRT. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and EBRT were captured in the model. Costs were based on Medicare reimbursement in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account for uncertainty, 1-way, 2-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: Base case pain relief after the treatment was assumed as 20% higher in SBRT. Base case treatment costs for SBRT and EBRT were $9000 and $1087, respectively. In the base case analysis, SBRT resulted in an ICER of $124,552 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of the utility of unrelieved pain; the utility of relieved pain after initial treatment and median survival were also sensitive to variation. If median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT cost <$100,000 per QALY gained. Conclusion: SBRT for palliation of vertebral bone metastases is not cost-effective compared with EBRT at a $100,000 per QALY gained WTP threshold. However, if median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT costs ≤$100

  17. Expression and purification of a novel therapeutic single-chain variable fragment antibody against BNP from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Dawei; Zhou, Yuwei; Tang, Jian; Jing, Fang; Zhang, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Abnormal brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) secretion is regarded as the dominating mechanism of cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW), which results from a renal loss of sodium and water during intracranial disease leading to hyponatremia. Scale preparation of therapeutic single-chain variable fragment (scFv) that can neutralize elevated circulating BNP may have potential value for clinical use. In this report, we used a recently isolated humanized anti-BNP scFv fragment (3C1) as model antibody (Ab) to evaluate the potential of scale production of this therapeutic protein. The truncated gene encoding for scFv fragment cloned in pET22b (+) was mainly overexpressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli (E. coli) Rosetta (DE3) pLysS cells. The insoluble fragment was solubilized and purified by Ni-NTA agarose resin under denaturation conditions, and recovered via an effective refolding buffer containing 50 mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.0, 0.15 M NaCl, 1 mM EDTA, 0.5 M arginine, 2 mM GSH, 1 mM GSSG, and 5% glycerol. The refolded scFv fragment was concentrated by PEG20000, and dialyzed in PBS (containing 5% glycerol, pH 7.4). The final yield was approximately 10.2 mg active scFv fragment per liter of culture (3.4 g wet weight cells). The scFv fragment was more than 95% pure assessed by SDS-PAGE assay. Recombinant scFv fragment with His tag displayed its immunoreactivity with anti-His tag Ab by western blotting. ELISA showed the scFv fragment specifically bound to BNP, and it displayed similar activity as the traditional anti-BNP monoclonal Ab (mAb). Thus, the current strategy allows convenient small-scale production of this therapeutic protein. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of adding single-joint exercises to a multi-joint exercise resistance training program on upper body muscle strength and size in trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de França, Henrique Silvestre; Branco, Paulo Alexandre Nordeste; Guedes Junior, Dilmar Pinto; Gentil, Paulo; Steele, James; Teixeira, Cauê Vazquez La Scala

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was compare changes in upper body muscle strength and size in trained men performing resistance training (RT) programs involving multi-joint plus single-joint (MJ+SJ) or only multi-joint (MJ) exercises. Twenty young men with at least 2 years of experience in RT were randomized in 2 groups: MJ+SJ (n = 10; age, 27.7 ± 6.6 years) and MJ (n = 10; age, 29.4 ± 4.6 years). Both groups trained for 8 weeks following a linear periodization model. Measures of elbow flexors and extensors 1-repetition maximum (1RM), flexed arm circumference (FAC), and arm muscle circumference (AMC) were taken pre- and post-training period. Both groups significantly increased 1RM for elbow flexion (4.99% and 6.42% for MJ and MJ+SJ, respectively), extension (10.60% vs 9.79%, for MJ and MJ+SJ, respectively), FAC (1.72% vs 1.45%, for MJ and MJ+SJ, respectively), and AMC (1.33% vs 3.17% for MJ and MJ+SJ, respectively). Comparison between groups revealed no significant difference in any variable. In conclusion, 8 weeks of RT involving MJ or MJ+SJ resulted in similar alterations in muscle strength and size in trained participants. Therefore, the addition of SJ exercises to a RT program involving MJ exercises does not seem to promote additional benefits to trained men, suggesting MJ-only RT to be a time-efficient approach.

  19. Diagnostic imaging of dementia with Lewy bodies by susceptibility-weighted imaging of nigrosomes versus striatal dopamine transporter single-photon emission computed tomography: a retrospective observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamagata, Koji; Sato, Kanako; Suzuki, Michimasa; Hori, Masaaki; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Nakatsuka, Tomoya; Inaoka, Tsutomu; Terada, Hitoshi [Toho University Sakura Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Sakura, Sakura (Japan); Sakakibara, Ryuji; Tsuyusaki, Yohei [Toho University Sakura Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Sakura, Sakura (Japan); Takamura, Tomohiro [University of Yamanashi, Department of Radiology, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    The characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI) overlap but require different treatments; therefore, it is important to differentiate these pathologies. Assessment of dopamine uptake in the striatum using dopamine transporter (DaT) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is the gold standard for diagnosing DLB; however, this modality is expensive, time consuming and involves radiation exposure. Degeneration of the substantia nigra nigrosome-1, which occurs in DLB, but not in AD/a-MCI, can be identified by 3T susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Therefore, the aim of this retrospective observational study was to compare SWI with DaT-SPECT for differentiation of DLB from AD/a-MCI. SWI data were acquired for patients with clinically diagnosed DLB (n = 29), AD (n = 18), a-MCI (n = 13) and healthy controls (n = 26). Images were analysed for nigrosome-1 degeneration. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated for DLB, AD and a-MCI compared with striatal dopamine uptake using DaT-SPECT. SWI achieved 90% diagnostic accuracy (93% sensitivity, 87% specificity) for the detection of nigrosome-1 degeneration in DLB and not in AD/a-MCI as compared with 88.3% accuracy (93% sensitivity, 84% specificity) using DaT-SPECT. SWI nigrosome-1 evaluation was useful in differentiating DLB from AD/a-MCI, with high accuracy. This less invasive and less expensive method is a potential alternative to DaT-SPECT for the diagnosis of DLB. (orig.)

  20. A batch Algorithm for Implicit Non-Rigid Shape and Motion Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartoli, Adrien; Olsen, Søren Ingvor

    2005-01-01

    The recovery of 3D shape and camera motion for non-rigid scenes from single-camera video footage is a very important problem in computer vision. The low-rank shape model consists in regarding the deformations as linear combinations of basis shapes. Most algorithms for reconstructing the parameters...... of the subsequence, using a robust estimator incorporating a model selection criterion that detects erroneous image points. Preliminary experimental results on real and simulated data show that our algorithm deals with challenging video sequences....

  1. Soft-matter composites with electrically tunable elastic rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Wanliang; Lu, Tong; Majidi, Carmel

    2013-08-01

    We use a phase-changing metal alloy to reversibly tune the elastic rigidity of an elastomer composite. The elastomer is embedded with a sheet of low-melting-point Field’s metal and an electric Joule heater composed of a serpentine channel of liquid-phase gallium-indium-tin (Galinstan®) alloy. At room temperature, the embedded Field’s metal is solid and the composite remains elastically rigid. Joule heating causes the Field’s metal to melt and allows the surrounding elastomer to freely stretch and bend. Using a tensile testing machine, we measure that the effective elastic modulus of the composite reversibly changes by four orders of magnitude when powered on and off. This dramatic change in rigidity is accurately predicted with a model for an elastic composite. Reversible rigidity control is also accomplished by replacing the Field’s metal with shape memory polymer. In addition to demonstrating electrically tunable rigidity with an elastomer, we also introduce a new technique to rapidly produce soft-matter electronics and multifunctional materials in several minutes with laser-patterned adhesive film and masked deposition of liquid-phase metal alloy.

  2. Evaluation for rigidity of box construction of nuclear reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Tetsuo

    1979-01-01

    A huge box-shaped structure (hereafter, called box construction) of reinforced concrete is presently utilized as the reactor building structure in nuclear power plants. Evaluation of the rigidity of the huge box construction is required for making a vibration analysis model of nuclear reactor buildings. It is necessary to handle the box construction as the plates to which the force in plane is applied. This paper describes that the bending theory in elementary beam theory is equivalent to a peculiar, orthogonally anisotropic plate, the shearing rigidity and film rigidity in y direction of which are put to infinity and the Poisson's ratio is put to zero, viewed from the two-dimensional theory of elasticity. The form factor of 1.2 for shearing deformation in rectangular cross section was calculated from the parabolic distribution of shearing stress intensity, and it is the maximum value. The factor is equal to 1.2 for slender beams, but smaller than 1.2 for short and thick beams, having tendency to converge to 1.0. The non-conformity of boundary conditions regarding the shearing force at the both ends of cantilevers does not affect very seriously the evaluation of shearing rigidity. From the above results, it was found that the application of the theory to the box construction was able to give the rigidity evaluation with sufficient engineering accuracy. The theory can also be applied to the evaluation of tube type ultrahigh buildings. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  3. Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) Model for Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, Michael K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scherzinger, William M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hinnerichs, Terry D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lo, Chi S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Numerous experiments were performed to characterize the mechanical response of several different rigid polyurethane foams (FR3712, PMDI10, PMDI20, and TufFoam35) to large deformation. In these experiments, the effects of load path, loading rate, and temperature were investigated. Results from these experiments indicated that rigid polyurethane foams exhibit significant volumetric and deviatoric plasticity when they are compressed. Rigid polyurethane foams were also found to be very strain-rate and temperature dependent. These foams are also rather brittle and crack when loaded to small strains in tension or to larger strains in compression. Thus, a new Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) model was developed and implemented into SIERRA with the name Foam Damage to describe the mechanical response of these foams to large deformation at a variety of temperatures and strain rates. This report includes a description of recent experiments and experimental findings. Next, development of a UCPD model for rigid, polyurethane foams is described. Selection of material parameters for a variety of rigid polyurethane foams is then discussed and finite element simulations with the new UCPD model are compared with experimental results to show behavior that can be captured with this model.

  4. Packing density of rigid aggregates is independent of scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangmeister, Christopher D; Radney, James G; Dockery, Lance T; Young, Jessica T; Ma, Xiaofei; You, Rian; Zachariah, Michael R

    2014-06-24

    Large planetary seedlings, comets, microscale pharmaceuticals, and nanoscale soot particles are made from rigid, aggregated subunits that are compacted under low compression into larger structures spanning over 10 orders of magnitude in dimensional space. Here, we demonstrate that the packing density (θf) of compacted rigid aggregates is independent of spatial scale for systems under weak compaction. The θf of rigid aggregated structures across six orders of magnitude were measured using nanoscale spherical soot aerosol composed of aggregates with ∼ 17-nm monomeric subunits and aggregates made from uniform monomeric 6-mm spherical subunits at the macroscale. We find θf = 0.36 ± 0.02 at both dimensions. These values are remarkably similar to θf observed for comet nuclei and measured values of other rigid aggregated systems across a wide variety of spatial and formative conditions. We present a packing model that incorporates the aggregate morphology and show that θf is independent of both monomer and aggregate size. These observations suggest that the θf of rigid aggregates subject to weak compaction forces is independent of spatial dimension across varied formative conditions.

  5. Volumetric Single-Beat Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: Relationship of Image Quality, Heart Rate, and Body Mass Index. Initial Patient Experience With a New Computed Tomography Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Muhammad Aamir; Sanchez, Frank W; Sayegh, Karl; Veledar, Emir; Aziz, Muhammad; Malik, Rehan; Haider, Imran; Agatston, Arthur S; Batlle, Juan C; Janowitz, Warren; Peña, Constantino; Ziffer, Jack A; Nasir, Khurram; Cury, Ricardo C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) image quality (IQ) is very important for accurate diagnosis. We propose to evaluate IQ expressed as Likert scale, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from coronary CT angiography images acquired with a new volumetric single-beat CT scanner on consecutive patients and assess the IQ dependence on heart rate (HR) and body mass index (BMI). We retrospectively analyzed the data of the first 439 consecutive patients (mean age, 55.13 [SD, 12.1] years; 51.47% male), who underwent noninvasive coronary CT angiography in a new single-beat volumetric CT scanner (Revolution CT) to evaluate chest pain at West Kendall Baptist Hospital. Based on patient BMI (mean, 29.43 [SD, 5.81] kg/m), the kVp (kilovolt potential) value and tube current were adjusted within a range of 80 to 140 kVp and 122 to 720 mA, respectively. Each scan was performed in a single-beat acquisition within 1 cardiac cycle, regardless of the HR. Motion correction software (SnapShot Freeze) was used for correcting motion artifacts in patients with higher HRs. Autogating was used to automatically acquire systolic and diastolic phases for higher HRs with electrocardiographic milliampere dose modulation. Image quality was assessed qualitatively by Likert scale and quantitatively by SNR and CNR for the 4 major vessels right coronary, left main, left anterior descending, and left circumflex arteries on axial and multiplanar reformatted images. Values for Likert scale were as follows: 1, nondiagnostic; 2, poor; 3, good; 4, very good; and 5, excellent. Signal-to-noise ratio and CNR were calculated from the average 2 CT attenuation values within regions of interest placed in the proximal left main and proximal right coronary artery. For contrast comparison, a region of interest was selected from left ventricular wall at midcavity level using a dedicated workstation. We divided patients in 2 groups related to the HR: less than or equal to 70 beats/min (bpm) and

  6. Comparison of hexaminolevulinate based flexible and rigid fluorescence cystoscopy with rigid white light cystoscopy in bladder cancer: results of a prospective Phase II study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, J.A.; Moonen, P.M.J.; Heijden, A.G. van der

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown that rigid fluorescence cystoscopy (RFC) with hexaminolevulinate (HAL) is superior to standard rigid white light (RWLC) cystoscopy in diagnosing bladder tumours, with a clinically relevant impact on the patient's management. These studies,

  7. Efficient computation of root mean square deviations under rigid transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Anna K; Dietzen, Matthias; Lengauer, Thomas; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Althaus, Ernst; Hildebrandt, Andreas

    2014-04-15

    The computation of root mean square deviations (RMSD) is an important step in many bioinformatics applications. If approached naively, each RMSD computation takes time linear in the number of atoms. In addition, a careful implementation is required to achieve numerical stability, which further increases runtimes. In practice, the structural variations under consideration are often induced by rigid transformations of the protein, or are at least dominated by a rigid component. In this work, we show how RMSD values resulting from rigid transformations can be computed in constant time from the protein's covariance matrix, which can be precomputed in linear time. As a typical application scenario is protein clustering, we will also show how the Ward-distance which is popular in this field can be reduced to RMSD evaluations, yielding a constant time approach for their computation. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Interaction of the rigid journal with Newtonian fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michal, Havlásek; František, Pochylý

    2017-09-01

    This paper deals with the problem of identification of added effects of incompressible Newtonian fluid that impacts on the rigid journal performing translational motion. It considers two degrees of freedom. The axial motion of the rigid journal was neglected. It assumes small oscillations and linear model. The task was solved for two geometrical configurations of the computational domain. In the first variant of geometry, there is no flow between the bases of journal and stator. The second variant of geometry also allows liquid to flow in space between the bases of journal and stator. The introduction describes the mathematical model for the identification of added mass, damping and stiffness matrices. On the basis of the mathematical model and computational modeling of velocity and pressure fields using CFD, the force components are determined. From there, the mentioned matrices are determined depending on the eccentricity of the rigid journal.

  9. Fibroblast motility on substrates with different rigidities: modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracheva, Maria; Dokukina, Irina

    2009-03-01

    We develop a discrete model for cell locomotion on substrates with different rigidities and simulate experiments described in Lo, Wang, Dembo, Wang (2000) ``Cell movement is guided by the rigidity of the substrate'', Biophys. J. 79: 144-152. In these experiments fibroblasts were planted on a substrate with a step rigidity and showed preference for locomotion over stiffer side of the substrate when approaches the boundary between the soft and the stiff sides of the substrate. The model reproduces experimentally observed behavior of fibroblasts. In particular, we are able to show with our model how cell characteristics (such as cell length, shape, area and speed) change during cell crawling through the ``soft-stiff'' substrate boundary. Also, our model suggests the temporary increase of both cell speed and area in that very moment when cell leaves soft side of substrate.

  10. Dynamic Simulation of Rigid Guide Structure Based on ANSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reflect the varying law of the deflection of the rigid guide when the relative motion occur between the rigid guide and the cage roller, transient dynamic simulation is carried out for the commonly used calculation model of rigid guide and bunton by ANSYS. Simulation of the horizontal force through a section of the guide evenly, and the deflection curves of each model are obtained. It is found that the deflection of the simply supported beam model is the largest, and the three-span continuous beam model have similar peak spans in each span with the spatial grid model, but the spatial grid model has obvious fluctuation with the horizontal force.

  11. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review for Rigid Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1994-02-01

    Rigid Foam is a chemical delay foam used to completely encapsulate an object or to block access to an area. Prior studies have indicated that the final foam product is essentially non-toxic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and summarize the current chemical and toxicological data available on the components of Rigid Foam and to update the information available on the toxicity of the final Rigid Foam product. Since the possibility exists for a partial deployment of Rigid Foam where only one of the components is released, this study also examined the toxicity of its chemical constituents. Rigid Foam is composed of an {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} Component. The {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} component is primarily a polymeric isocyanate and the {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} component is a mixture of polyols. In addition to the primary constituents, dichlorodifluoromethane and trichlorofluoromethane are present as blowing agents along with catalysts and silicone surfactants necessary for foaming. The pre-deployed {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} components are stored in separate vessels and are brought together in static mixing nozzles for dispersal. The results of this evaluation indicate that a completely deployed Rigid Foam under normal conditions is essentially non-toxic as determined previously. However, in the event of a partial deployment or deployment of an individual component directly at an unprotected individual, the degree of hazard is increased due to the toxic and corrosive nature of the individual constituents. The health hazard would depend on the properties of the material to which the person was exposed.

  12. Design of small diameter HT/HP sour service reeled rigid pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Daniel; Gouveia, Joao; Tardelli, Luciano [Tecnitas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: daniel.carneiro@br.bureauveritas.com; Parrilha, Rafael [Bureau Veritas Group, London (United Kingdom); Oazen, Eduardo; Cardoso, Carlos [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    The paper presents an overview of the challenges overcome in the engineering design of two 219 mm diameter, 6 km length oil production pipelines, to be installed by reeling at Espirito Santo Basin, offshore Brazilian coast in 1500 m water depth. The high temperature and high pressure (HT/HP) operating conditions and sour content associated with the small diameter required to single well oil production would usually lead to flexible flow line solution in Brazilian fields. The decision of employing small diameter thick-walled rigid C-Mn steel pipelines with thick thermal insulation made necessary extensive engineering work to achieve a safe and robust thermal expansion control arrangement, including the design of walking mitigation and buckle initiation apparatus; a feasible weld acceptance criterion covering both high cycle fatigue due to pipe lay and vortex induced vibration (VIV) at free spans, and high strain low cycle fatigue and fracture growth induced by reeling installation and in-service lateral buckling. Several studies were performed using highly non-linear three-dimensional finite element models considering: pipe-soil interaction with full 3D seabed bathymetry; load history maintained from pipe lay to operational cycles, including temperature transient effects; high plastic strains (including steel properties de-rating due to high temperature) and section ovalization; mechanical contact between pipe and appurtenances during both installation and operational phases. Pipe-soil interaction comprised embedment considering dynamic effects of pipe lay and full non-linear lateral and axial response curves including break-out and residual resistance. Strain concentration factors due to field joints were evaluated using detailed solid models considering non-linear response of both steel and insulation materials. Susceptibility to VIV at free spans was assessed considering post loaded deformed span natural frequencies, including multi-span interaction effects and

  13. Rigid 4D N=2 supersymmetric backgrounds and actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butter, Daniel; Inverso, Gianluca; Lodato, Ivano [Nikhef Theory Group,Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-09-15

    We classify all N=2 rigid supersymmetric backgrounds in four dimensions with both Lorentzian and Euclidean signature that preserve eight real supercharges, up to discrete identifications. Among the backgrounds we find specific warpings of S{sup 3}×ℝ and AdS{sub 3}×ℝ, AdS{sub 2}×S{sup 2} and H{sup 2}×S{sup 2} with generic radii, and some more exotic geometries. We provide the generic two-derivative rigid vector and hypermultiplet actions and analyze the conditions imposed on the special Kähler and hyperkähler target spaces.

  14. Topology-Preserving Rigid Transformation of 2D Digital Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Phuc; Passat, Nicolas; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Talbot, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    We provide conditions under which 2D digital images preserve their topological properties under rigid transformations. We consider the two most common digital topology models, namely dual adjacency and well-composedness. This paper leads to the proposal of optimal preprocessing strategies that ensure the topological invariance of images under arbitrary rigid transformations. These results and methods are proved to be valid for various kinds of images (binary, gray-level, label), thus providing generic and efficient tools, which can be used in particular in the context of image registration and warping.

  15. Extremal surfaces and the rigidity of null geodesic incompleteness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, I P Costa e; Flores, J L

    2015-01-01

    An important, if relatively less well known aspect of the singularity theorems in Lorentzian geometry, is to understand how their conclusions fare upon weakening or suppression of one or more of their hypotheses. Then, theorems with modified conclusion may arise, showing that those conclusions will fail only in special cases, at least some of which may be described. These are the so-called rigidity theorems, and have many important examples in the specialized literature. In this paper, we prove rigidity results for generalized plane waves and certain globally hyperbolic spacetimes in the presence of extremal compact surfaces. (paper)

  16. Predictors of Difficult Intubation with the Bonfils Rigid Fiberscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Michal; Williams, Stephan; Gallant, Jason; Ruel, Monique; Robitaille, Arnaud

    2016-06-01

    Endotracheal intubation is commonly performed via direct laryngoscopy (DL). However, in certain patients, DL may be difficult or impossible. The Bonfils Rigid Fiberscope® (BRF) is an alternative intubation device, the design of which raises the question of whether factors that predict difficult DL also predict difficult BRF. We undertook this study to determine which demographic, morphologic, and morphometric factors predict difficult intubation with the BRF. Four hundred adult patients scheduled for elective surgery were recruited. Patients were excluded if awake intubation, rapid sequence induction, or induction without neuromuscular blocking agents was planned. Data were recorded, including age, sex, weight, height, American Society of Anesthesiologist classification, history of snoring and sleep apnea, Mallampati class, upper lip bite test score, interincisor, thyromental and sternothyroid distances, manubriomental distances in flexion and extension, neck circumference, maximal neck flexion and extension, neck skinfold thickness at the cricoid cartilage, and Cormack and Lehane grade obtained via DL after paralysis was confirmed. Quality of glottic visualization (good or poor), as well as the number of intubation attempts and time to successful intubation with the BRF, was noted. Univariate analyses were performed to evaluate the association between patient characteristics and time required for intubation. Variables that exhibited a significant correlation were included in a multivariate analysis using a standard least squares model. A P 1 attempt; 4 patients could not be intubated by using the BRF alone. These 4 patients were intubated by using a combination of DL and BRF (2 patients), DL and a Frova bougie (1 patient), and DL and an endotracheal tube shaped with a semirigid stylet (1 patient). Mean time for successful intubation was 26 ± 13 seconds. Multivariate analysis showed that decreased mouth opening (P = 0.008), increased body mass index (P = 0

  17. Efficient Constrained Local Model Fitting for Non-Rigid Face Alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Simon; Wang, Yang; Cox, Mark; Sridharan, Sridha; Cohn, Jeffery F

    2009-11-01

    Active appearance models (AAMs) have demonstrated great utility when being employed for non-rigid face alignment/tracking. The "simultaneous" algorithm for fitting an AAM achieves good non-rigid face registration performance, but has poor real time performance (2-3 fps). The "project-out" algorithm for fitting an AAM achieves faster than real time performance (> 200 fps) but suffers from poor generic alignment performance. In this paper we introduce an extension to a discriminative method for non-rigid face registration/tracking referred to as a constrained local model (CLM). Our proposed method is able to achieve superior performance to the "simultaneous" AAM algorithm along with real time fitting speeds (35 fps). We improve upon the canonical CLM formulation, to gain this performance, in a number of ways by employing: (i) linear SVMs as patch-experts, (ii) a simplified optimization criteria, and (iii) a composite rather than additive warp update step. Most notably, our simplified optimization criteria for fitting the CLM divides the problem of finding a single complex registration/warp displacement into that of finding N simple warp displacements. From these N simple warp displacements, a single complex warp displacement is estimated using a weighted least-squares constraint. Another major advantage of this simplified optimization lends from its ability to be parallelized, a step which we also theoretically explore in this paper. We refer to our approach for fitting the CLM as the "exhaustive local search" (ELS) algorithm. Experiments were conducted on the CMU Multi-PIE database.

  18. Total body irradiation (TBI) in pediatric patients. A single-center experience after 30 years of low-dose rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsenmeier, Claudia; Thoennessen, Daniel; Negretti, Laura; Streller, Tino; Luetolf, Urs Martin; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Oertel, Susanne; Heidelberg Univ.

    2010-01-01

    To retrospectively analyze patient characteristics, treatment, and treatment outcome of pediatric patients with hematologic diseases treated with total body irradiation (TBI) between 1978 and 2006. 32 pediatric patients were referred to the Department of Radiation-Oncology at the University of Zurich for TBI. Records of regular follow-up of 28 patients were available for review. Patient characteristics as well as treatment outcome regarding local control and overall survival were assessed. A total of 18 patients suffered from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 5 from acute and 2 from chronic myelogenous leukemia, 1 from non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and 2 from anaplastic anemia. The cohort consisted of 15 patients referred after first remission and 13 patients with relapsed leukemia. Mean follow-up was 34 months (2-196 months) with 15 patients alive at the time of last follow-up. Eight patients died of recurrent disease, 1 of graft vs. host reaction, 2 of sepsis, and 2 patients died of a secondary malignancy. The 5-year overall survival rate (OS) was 60%. Overall survival was significantly inferior in patients treated after relapse compared to those treated for newly diagnosed leukemia (24% versus 74%; p=0.004). At the time of last follow-up, 11 patients survived for more than 36 months following TBI. Late effects (RTOG ≥3) were pneumonitis in 1 patient, chronic bronchitis in 1 patient, cardiomyopathy in 2 patients, severe cataractogenesis in 1 patient (48 months after TBI with 10 Gy in a single dose) and secondary malignancies in 2 patients (36 and 190 months after TBI). Growth disturbances were observed in all patients treated prepubertally. In 2 patients with identical twins treated at ages 2 and 7, a loss of 8% in final height of the treated twin was observed. As severe late sequelae after TBI, we observed 2 secondary malignancies in 11 patients who survived in excess of 36 months. However, long-term morbidity is moderate following treatment with the fractionated

  19. Total body irradiation (TBI) in pediatric patients. A single-center experience after 30 years of low-dose rate irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linsenmeier, Claudia; Thoennessen, Daniel; Negretti, Laura; Streller, Tino; Luetolf, Urs Martin [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation-Oncology; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre [University Children' s Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Hemato-Oncology; Oertel, Susanne [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation-Oncology; Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2010-11-15

    To retrospectively analyze patient characteristics, treatment, and treatment outcome of pediatric patients with hematologic diseases treated with total body irradiation (TBI) between 1978 and 2006. 32 pediatric patients were referred to the Department of Radiation-Oncology at the University of Zurich for TBI. Records of regular follow-up of 28 patients were available for review. Patient characteristics as well as treatment outcome regarding local control and overall survival were assessed. A total of 18 patients suffered from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 5 from acute and 2 from chronic myelogenous leukemia, 1 from non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and 2 from anaplastic anemia. The cohort consisted of 15 patients referred after first remission and 13 patients with relapsed leukemia. Mean follow-up was 34 months (2-196 months) with 15 patients alive at the time of last follow-up. Eight patients died of recurrent disease, 1 of graft vs. host reaction, 2 of sepsis, and 2 patients died of a secondary malignancy. The 5-year overall survival rate (OS) was 60%. Overall survival was significantly inferior in patients treated after relapse compared to those treated for newly diagnosed leukemia (24% versus 74%; p=0.004). At the time of last follow-up, 11 patients survived for more than 36 months following TBI. Late effects (RTOG {>=}3) were pneumonitis in 1 patient, chronic bronchitis in 1 patient, cardiomyopathy in 2 patients, severe cataractogenesis in 1 patient (48 months after TBI with 10 Gy in a single dose) and secondary malignancies in 2 patients (36 and 190 months after TBI). Growth disturbances were observed in all patients treated prepubertally. In 2 patients with identical twins treated at ages 2 and 7, a loss of 8% in final height of the treated twin was observed. As severe late sequelae after TBI, we observed 2 secondary malignancies in 11 patients who survived in excess of 36 months. However, long-term morbidity is moderate following treatment with the fractionated

  20. High Resolution Quantification of Cellular Forces for Rigidity Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuaimin

    This thesis describes a comprehensive study of understanding the mechanism of rigidity sensing by quantitative analysis using submicron pillar array substrates. From mechanobiology perspective, we explore and study molecular pathways involved in rigidity and force sensing at cell-matrix adhesions with regard to cancer, regeneration, and development by quantification methods. In Chapter 2 and 3, we developed fabrication and imaging techniques to enhance the performance of a submicron pillar device in terms of spatial and temporal measurement ability, and we discovered a correlation of rigidity sensing forces and corresponding proteins involved in the early rigidity sensing events. In Chapter 2, we introduced optical effect arising from submicron structure imaging, and we described a technique to identify the correct focal plane of pillar tip by fabricating a substrate with designed-offset pillars. From calibration result, we identified the correct focal plane that was previously overlooked, and verified our findings by other imaging techniques. In Chapter 3, we described several techniques to selectively functionalize elastomeric pillars top and compared these techniques in terms of purposes and fabrication complexity. Techniques introduced in this chapter included direct labeling, such as stamping of fluorescent substances (organic dye, nano-diamond, q-dot) to pillars top, as well as indirect labeling that selectively modify the surface of molds with either metal or fluorescent substances. In Chapter 4, we examined the characteristics of local contractility forces and identified the components formed a sarcomere like contractile unit (CU) that cells use to sense rigidity. CUs were found to be assembled at cell edge, contain myosin II, alpha-actinin, tropomodulin and tropomyosin (Tm), and resemble sarcomeres in size (˜2 mum) and function. Then we performed quantitative analysis of CUs to evaluate rigidity sensing activity over ˜8 hours time course and found that

  1. On the atmosphere of a moving body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johan Rønby; Aref, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    We explore whether a rigid body moving freely with no circulation around it in a two-dimensional ideal fluid can carry a fluid "atmosphere" with it in its motion. Somewhat surprisingly, the answer appears to be "yes." When the body is elongated and the motion is dominated by rotation, we demonstr......We explore whether a rigid body moving freely with no circulation around it in a two-dimensional ideal fluid can carry a fluid "atmosphere" with it in its motion. Somewhat surprisingly, the answer appears to be "yes." When the body is elongated and the motion is dominated by rotation, we...... demonstrate numerically that, indeed, regions of fluid follow the body in its motion. We see this as an example of the stability of Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser tori. These observations of an atmosphere around a moving body with no circulation around it appear to be new. (C) 2010 American Institute of Physics...

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation on the mechanical properties of natural-rubber-graft-rigid-polymer/rigid-polymer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Meng; Xu, Pengxiang; Yuan, Yizhong; Tian, Xiaohui; Sun, Jinyu; Lin, Jiaping

    2018-03-28

    A coarse-grained model-based molecular dynamics simulation was employed to investigate the mechanical properties of NR-graft-rigid-polymer/rigid-polymer systems (N 30 -g-(R 3 ) 6 /R 10 ). An external factor (the strain rate) as well as internal factors such as the nonbonding interaction strength, the proportion of rigid polymers, and architecture parameters (the length and number of graft chains in a molecule) were examined for their effect on the tensional behavior of N 30 -g-(R 3 ) 6 /R 10 systems. Simulation results show that a higher strain rate can promote the enhancement of mechanical performance, such as a higher modulus or yield stress. Moreover, the stress and modulus increase with an increase of the nonbonding interaction strength within rigid polymers or of the rigid polymer proportion in the systems. However, the increasing stress was found to reach a limit with a continuously increasing rigid polymer proportion. On increasing the number of graft chains in a molecule, the stress increases at small strains. However, at large strains, the evident increase in stress was found in systems in which a graft molecule has longer graft chains. In addition, our research shows that N 30 -g-(R 3 ) 6 /R 10 blends exhibit improved mechanical properties and better compatibilities relative to N 30 /R 10 , which is consistent with the experimental results. Lastly, comparisons with experimental observations were also made to ensure the rationality of the simulation results. Overall, bond stretching, bond orientation, and nonbonding interactions were found to be crucial in governing the mechanical properties of the N 30 -g-(R 3 ) 6 /R 10 systems. These findings may provide important information for further experimental and simulation studies of NR hybrid materials.

  3. Comparisons of Rigid Proctoscopy, Flexible Colonoscopy, and Digital Rectal Examination for Determining the Localization of Rectal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akira; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Okada, Kazutake; Saito, Gota

    2018-02-01

    Rigid proctoscopy is considered essential for rectal tumor localization, although the current gold standard for detection of colorectal cancers is colonoscopy. The European Society for Medical Oncology Guidelines indicate that rigid and flexible endoscopies afford essentially identical results, although little evidence is yet available to support this. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of colonoscopy in identifying the location of rectal cancer and to compare the results with those of rigid proctoscopy and digital rectal examination. This was a retrospective analysis of a prospective database. The study was conducted at a single tertiary colorectal surgery referral center. A total of 173 patients scheduled for curative surgery for histologically verified rectal adenocarcinoma between December 2009 and February 2015 were entered into the study, after having given informed consent. The main study measure was the mean difference and limits of agreement in assessment of the height of the distal edge of rectal cancer from the anal verge, using the Bland and Altman method. The mean difference between rigid proctoscopy and flexible colonoscopy was -0.2 cm (95% CI, -2.0 to 1.6 cm). The mean difference between rigid proctoscopy and digital rectal examination was 0.3 cm (95% CI, 1.9 to 2.4 cm). Intermethod variability larger than the 95% CI between rigid and flexible endoscopes was correlated to the tumor height (OR, 4.27 (95% CI, 1.84-3.10); p = 0.021). This study was conducted in a single center. The limits of agreement (-2.0 and 1.6 cm) in identifying the height of rectal cancers from the anal verge are sufficiently small to support the view that flexible colonoscopy provides similar tumor locations to those measured by rigid proctoscopy, although the discrepancy occasionally exceeded 2 cm for tumors >5 cm above the anal verge. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A405.

  4. Rigid rod spaced fullerene as building block for nanoclusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    By using phenylacetylene based rigid-rod linkers (PhA), we have successfully synthesized two fullerene derivatives, C60-PhA and C60-PhA-C60. The absorption spectral features of C60, as well as that of the phenylacetylene moiety are retained in the monomeric forms of these fullerene derivatives, ruling out the possibility ...

  5. Study of rigidity of semiconducting vanadate glasses and its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    to the increase in the molar volume and the role of different modifiers. These parameters along with the coor- dination number of the glasses affect the glass transition ... glass system (Kawamoto et al 1979, 1980; Music et al. 1994). The purpose of this study is to analyse quantitatively the elastic moduli and hence the rigidity ...

  6. Rigid indented cylindrical cathode for X-ray tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgens, Claude R.

    1985-01-01

    A cathode assembly for a vacuum tube includes a wire filament, a straight bular anode parallel to and surrounding the wire filament, and insulating spacers for rigidly fastening the filament with respect to the anode, and with one side of the anode indented or flattened such that only one portion of the anode is heated to emitting temperatures by the filament.

  7. Static quark potential for a rigid string with constant density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiaoan

    1990-01-01

    The static quark potential of a rigid string with constant density is calculated using a saddle point approximation. The 1/R dependence of the potential at large R is -π/6R, which agrees nicely with the analysis of Eichten et al. (-0.52/R). The universality of the coefficient of the 1/R term is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Role of Rigid Endoscopic Detorsion in the Management of Sigmoid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ANNALS of AFRICAN SURGERY. July 2015 Volume 12 Issue 2. 85. ORIGINAL PAPER. Role of Rigid Endoscopic Detorsion in the. Management of Sigmoid Volvulus. Ngeno M, Ooko PB, Seno S, Oloo M, Topazian HM, White RE. Tenwek Hospital. Correspondence to: Dr. Mercy Ngeno, PO Box 39-20400, Bomet, Kenya.

  9. Efficient Electroluminescence from a New Conjugated Rigid-Rod Polyquinoline

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xuejun, Ph.D

    1998-01-01

    A new conjugated rigid-rod polyquinoline, poly (2,2'-p-phenylene)-6,6'-bis(4-(p-tert-butylphenyl)quinoline)), was synthesized and its thin film was used as the emissive layer in light-emitting diodes...

  10. Numerical rigid plastic modelling of shear capacity of keyed joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herfelt, Morten Andersen; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2015-01-01

    Keyed shear joints are currently designed using simple and conservative design formulas, yet these formulas do not take the local mechanisms in the concrete core of the joint into account. To investigate this phenomenon a rigid, perfectly plastic finite element model of keyed joints is used...

  11. Dielectric relaxation phenomena of rigid polar liquid molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. October 2001 physics pp. 775–793. Dielectric relaxation phenomena of rigid polar liquid molecules under giga hertz electric field. K DUTTA, S K SIT and S ... BDH, England, n-hexane and n-heptane from M/s. E Merck ... used in medicine as drug to induce sleep and relieve pain and in the manufacture of D.D.T..

  12. Study of rigidity of semiconducting vanadate glasses and its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These parameters along with the coordination number of the glasses affect the glass transition temperature. The correlation between the elastic moduli and thermal properties of these samples showed that 0.25MoO3–0.25PbO–0.5V2O5 glass is the most rigid and has an applicable glass transition temperature for coating.

  13. Dielectric relaxation phenomena of rigid polar liquid molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The dielectric relaxation phenomena of rigid polar liquid molecules chloral and ethyltrichloroacetate () in benzene, -hexane and -heptane () under 4.2, 9.8 and 24.6 GHz electric fields at 30°C are studied to show the possible existence of double relaxation times 2 and 1 for rotations of the whole and the flexible ...

  14. Flexible (Polyactive®) versus rigid (hydroxyapatite) dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, G.J.; Heethaar, J.; Cune, M.S.; de Putter, C.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    1997-01-01

    In a beagle dog study, the peri-implant bone changes around flexible (Polyactive®) and rigid hydroxyapatite (HA) implants were investigated radiographically by quantitative digital subtraction analysis and by assessment of marginal bone height, with the aid of a computerized method. A loss of

  15. Influence of rigid boundary on the propagation of torsional surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Influence of rigid boundary on the propagation of torsional surface wave in an inhomogeneous layer. Shishir Gupta. ∗. , Rehena Sultana and Santimoy Kundu. Department of Applied Mathematics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad 826 004, India. ∗. Corresponding author. e-mail: shishir ism@yahoo.com. The present work ...

  16. Controlling rigid formations of mobile agents under inconsistent measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia de Marina Peinado, Hector; Cao, Ming; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2015-01-01

    —Despite the great success of using gradient-based controllers to stabilize rigid formations of autonomous agents in the past years, surprising yet intriguing undesirable collective motions have been reported recently, when inconsistent measurements are used in the agents’ local controllers. To make

  17. Rigidity theorem for Willmore surfaces in a sphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (Math. Sci.) Vol. 126, No. 2, May 2016, pp. 253–260. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Rigidity theorem for Willmore surfaces in a sphere. HONGWEI XU1 and DENGYUN YANG2,∗. 1Center of Mathematical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027,. People's Republic of China. 2College of Mathematics and ...

  18. Short Communication: Statistical determination of the rigidity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From the graph of load against displacement, the rigidity in flexion at different moisture levels was determined from which the Young modulus was calculated. Linear regression models were fitted to the data and the results showed significant correlation coefficients between the Young modulus and moisture content for each ...

  19. Impulsive and rigid temperament subtypes and executive functioning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to explore differences between the executive performance profiles in second order temperament trait configurations consisted of levels of harm avoidance (HA) and novelty seeking (NS). These trait configurations yield the impulsive temperament subtype (high NS and low HA) and the rigid ...

  20. A survey on stability and rigidity results for Lie algebras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crainic, Marius; Schätz, Florian; Struchiner, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    We give simple and unified proofs of the known stability and rigidity results for Lie algebras, Lie subalgebras and Lie algebra homomorphisms. Moreover, we investigate when a Lie algebra homomorphism is stable under all automorphisms of the codomain (including outer automorphisms).