WorldWideScience

Sample records for single rapid head

  1. Photogrammetry-Based Head Digitization for Rapid and Accurate Localization of EEG Electrodes and MEG Fiducial Markers Using a Single Digital SLR Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausner, Tommy; Dalal, Sarang S; Crespo-García, Maité

    2017-01-01

    The performance of EEG source reconstruction has benefited from the increasing use of advanced head modeling techniques that take advantage of MRI together with the precise positions of the recording electrodes. The prevailing technique for registering EEG electrode coordinates involves electromagnetic digitization. However, the procedure adds several minutes to experiment preparation and typical digitizers may not be accurate enough for optimal source reconstruction performance (Dalal et al., 2014). Here, we present a rapid, accurate, and cost-effective alternative method to register EEG electrode positions, using a single digital SLR camera, photogrammetry software, and computer vision techniques implemented in our open-source toolbox, janus3D . Our approach uses photogrammetry to construct 3D models from multiple photographs of the participant's head wearing the EEG electrode cap. Electrodes are detected automatically or semi-automatically using a template. The rigid facial features from these photo-based models are then surface-matched to MRI-based head reconstructions to facilitate coregistration to MRI space. This method yields a final electrode coregistration error of 0.8 mm, while a standard technique using an electromagnetic digitizer yielded an error of 6.1 mm. The technique furthermore reduces preparation time, and could be extended to a multi-camera array, which would make the procedure virtually instantaneous. In addition to EEG, the technique could likewise capture the position of the fiducial markers used in magnetoencephalography systems to register head position.

  2. Rapid radiotracer washout from the heart: effect on image quality in SPECT performed with a single-headed gamma camera system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, M K; Cho, D S

    1992-06-01

    Technetium-99m-teboroxime demonstrates high extraction and rapid washout from the myocardium. To evaluate the feasibility of performing SPECT with this agent using a single-headed gamma camera system, a series of phantom studies were performed that simulated varying degrees of washout from normal and "ischemic" regions of the myocardium. In the absence of ischemic regions, short axis profiles were relatively unaffected by washout of less than 50% of activity over the duration of a SPECT acquisition. However, significant corruption of the SPECT data was observed when large (greater than a factor of 2) differences existed in the washout of activity from normal and "ischemic" myocardium. This corruption was observed with 30%-40% washout of activity from normal regions of the heart. Based on published washout rates, these results indicate that clinical studies with 99mTc-teboroxime may need to be completed within 2-4 min to order to prevent degradation of image quality due to differential washout effects.

  3. Evaluate of head loss, sediment value and copper removal in sand media (rapid sand filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneshi Navab

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Along with the technology development and increasing consumption of water resources, we are experiencing low qualities in the mentioned resources. Copper brings about serious environment al pollution, threatening human health and ecosystem. This metal found variously in water resources and industrial activities. Therefore, it needs to treat the water resources from these excessive amounts. Different methods have used for this reason but the most used method during recent years has been the absorption by economic absorbers such as sand. Rapid sand filters usually used in water and wastewater treatment plants for water clarification. In this research, a single layer gravity rapid sand filter has used to reduce different concentrations of copper. sediment value and head loss arising in filter media is simulated by using combination of Carman-Kozeny, Rose and Gregory models in different discharges of rapid sand filter. Results have shown that with increasing in discharge and decreasing in input copper concentration, arriving time to given head loss, is increasing. In addition, results demonstrated that with increasing in copper concentration in influent, removal efficiency is decreasing somewhat. Results of this research can applied in an appropriate design of rapid sand filter to copper removal, a prediction of rapid sand filter ability to copper removal and an estimation of arising head loss during filter work thus evaluating of time interval backwash. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i2.10641 International Journal of the Environment Vol.3(2 2014: 276-286

  4. Plaque removal with triple-headed vs single-headed manual toothbrushesa systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalf-Scholte, S. M.; van der Weijden, G. A.; Bakker, Ewp; Slot, D. E.

    2018-01-01

    ObjectiveThe aim of this systematic review was to establish the effectiveness of brushing with a triple-headed manual toothbrush compared to a single-headed manual toothbrush on plaque removal. Materials and methodsThe MEDLINE-PubMed and Cochrane-CENTRAL databases were searched. The inclusion

  5. Perspectives about family meals from single-headed and dual-headed households: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M; Hoppmann, Caroline; Hanson, Carrie; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2013-12-01

    Cross-sectional and longitudinal research has shown that family meals are protective for adolescent healthful eating behaviors. However, little is known about what parents think of these findings and whether parents from single- vs dual-headed households have differing perspectives about the findings. In addition, parents' perspectives regarding barriers to applying the findings on family meals in their own homes and suggestions for more widespread adoption of the findings are unknown. The current study aimed to identify single- and dual-headed household parents' perspectives regarding the research findings on family meals, barriers to applying the findings in their own homes, and suggestions for helping families have more family meals. The current qualitative study included 59 parents who participated in substudy of two linked multilevel studies-EAT 2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens) and Families and Eating and Activity in Teens (F-EAT). Parents (91.5% female) were racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse. Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Results from the current study suggest that parents from both single- and dual-headed households have similar perspectives regarding why family meals are protective for healthful eating habits for adolescents (eg, provides structure/routine, opportunities for communication, connection), but provide similar and different reasons for barriers to family meals (eg, single-headed=cost vs dual-headed=lack of creativity) and ideas and suggestions for how to increase the frequency of family meals (eg, single-headed=give fewer options vs dual-headed=include children in the meal preparation). Findings can help inform public health intervention researchers and providers who work with adolescents and their families to understand how to approach discussions regarding reasons for having family meals, barriers to carrying out family meals, and ways to increase family meals depending on family structure. Copyright

  6. Validation of an "Intelligent Mouthguard" Single Event Head Impact Dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Adam; Samorezov, Sergey; Benzel, Edward; Miele, Vincent; Brett, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Dating to Colonel John Paul Stapp MD in 1975, scientists have desired to measure live human head impacts with accuracy and precision. But no instrument exists to accurately and precisely quantify single head impact events. Our goal is to develop a practical single event head impact dosimeter known as "Intelligent Mouthguard" and quantify its performance on the benchtop, in vitro and in vivo. In the Intelligent Mouthguard hardware, limited gyroscope bandwidth requires an algorithm-based correction as a function of impact duration. After we apply gyroscope correction algorithm, Intelligent Mouthguard results at time of CG linear acceleration peak correlate to the Reference Hybrid III within our tested range of pulse durations and impact acceleration profiles in American football and Boxing in vitro tests: American football, IMG=1.00REF-1.1g, R2=0.99; maximum time of peak XYZ component imprecision 3.6g and 370 rad/s2; maximum time of peak azimuth and elevation imprecision 4.8° and 2.9°; maximum average XYZ component temporal imprecision 3.3g and 390 rad/s2. Boxing, IMG=1.00REF-0.9 g, R2=0.99, R2=0.98; maximum time of peak XYZ component imprecision 3.9 g and 390 rad/s2, maximum time of peak azimuth and elevation imprecision 2.9° and 2.1°; average XYZ component temporal imprecision 4.0 g and 440 rad/s2. In vivo Intelligent Mouthguard true positive head impacts from American football players and amateur boxers have temporal characteristics (first harmonic frequency from 35 Hz to 79 Hz) within our tested benchtop (first harmonic frequencyIntelligent Mouthguard qualifies as a single event dosimeter in American football and Boxing.

  7. Single-pole recording head design for 100 Gbpsi perpendicular magnetic recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Kiyoshi; Taguchi, Kaori; Ise, Kazuyuki; Honda, Naoki; Ouchi, Kazuhiro

    2001-01-01

    In developing a perpendicular recording head, writability, head induced erasure and head skew problem are major concerns for achieving 100 Gbpsi recording. Sufficient overwrite performance of the single-pole head with a trackwidth down to 0.26 μm and clear MFM images of 0.16 μm recorded signals were obtained. Furthermore, high stray field robustness was realized with a newly designed head accompanied by a high head efficiency

  8. Microwave Hematoma Detector for the Rapid Assessment of Head Injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadded, W.; Chang, J.; Rosenbury, T.; Dallum, G.; Welsch, P.; Scott, D.; Duarte, D.; Acevedo-Bolton, V.

    2000-02-11

    A non-invasive microwave device for the detection of epi/subdural hemorrhaging (hematoma) is under current development. The final device will be highly portable and allow real time assessment of head injuries, thereby satisfying early detection needs of the field technician as well as providing a tool for repetitious monitoring of high-risk individuals. The device will adopt the advanced technology of micropower impulse radar (MIR) which is a state of the art low cost ultra wide band (UWB) microwave radar developed here at LLNL. It will consist of a MIR transmitting and receiving module, a computer based signal processing module, and a device-to-patient signal coupling module--the UWB antenna. The prototype design is being guided by the needs of the patient and the practitioner along with the prerequisites of the technology including issues such as the specificity of the device, efficacy of diagnosis, accuracy, robustness, and patient comfort. The prototype development follows a concurrent approach which .includes experiments designed to evaluate requirements of the radar and antenna design, phantom development to facilitate laboratory investigations, and investigation into the limits of adapting pre-existing non-medical MIR devices to medical applications. This report will present the accomplishments and project highlights to date in the fiscal year 1999. Future project projections will also be discussed.

  9. Assessment of parental tooth-brushing following instruction with single-headed and triple-headed toothbrushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telishevesky, Yoel S; Levin, Liran; Ashkenazi, Malka

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of toothbrush design on the ability of parents to effectively brush their children's teeth. Parents of children (mean age=5.1±0.75 years old) from 4 kindergarten schools were randomly assigned to receive instruction in brushing their children's teeth using a manual single-headed toothbrush (2 schools) or a triple-headed toothbrush (2 schools). The parents' ability to brush their children's teeth was evaluated according to a novel toothbrush performing skill index (Ashkenazi Index), based on 2 criteria: (1) placement of the toothbrush on each tooth segment to be brushed ("reach"); and (2) completion of enough strokes on each segment ("stay"). One month after instruction, tooth-brushing ability was re-evaluated and plaque index of the children's teeth was assessed. One month after instruction, parents using the triple-headed toothbrush received significantly higher scores on the tooth-brushing performance index (~86%), than did those in the single-headed group (~61%; P=.001). The plaque index was significantly higher in the single-headed group (0.97±0.38) vs the triple-headed group (0.72±0.29; Pbrushing performance index correlated negatively with the plaque index (Pbrushing by parents than does a single-headed toothbrush.

  10. Rapid single flux quantum logic in high temperature superconductor technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shunmugavel, K.

    2006-01-01

    A Josephson junction is the basic element of rapid single flux quantum logic (RSFQ) circuits. A high operating speed and low power consumption are the main advantages of RSFQ logic over semiconductor electronic circuits. To realize complex RSFQ circuits in HTS technology one needs a reproducible

  11. Energetics of the single-headed kinesin KIF1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Ryo; Sasaki, Kazuo

    2013-08-01

    KIF1A is a single-headed molecular motor that moves processively and unidirectionally along a microtubule by using the chemical energy released by hydrolyzing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate (P(i)). Although the movement of KIF1A seems to have successfully been explained by a simple Brownian motor model of the flashing ratchet type, this model is not suited to discuss the energetics of KIF1A. We introduce an elaborated model of the ratchet type to investigate how the chemical free energy is converted into mechanical work by taking account of the binding and release of reactant (ATP) and product (ADP and P(i)) molecules to and from the motor. The efficiency of energy transduction, the power output, and other quantities are calculated from the analytically obtained steady-state solution of the Fokker-Planck equations. It turns out that the concentrations of the reactant and product molecules that optimize both the efficiency and the power are close to those in the cell.

  12. Rapid single flux quantum logic in high temperature superconductor technology

    OpenAIRE

    Shunmugavel, K.

    2006-01-01

    A Josephson junction is the basic element of rapid single flux quantum logic (RSFQ) circuits. A high operating speed and low power consumption are the main advantages of RSFQ logic over semiconductor electronic circuits. To realize complex RSFQ circuits in HTS technology one needs a reproducible fabrication of Josephson junctions with low parameter spread. High quality HTS junctions require a fully epitaxial multilayer structure with clean interfaces and a smooth surface morphology. Neodymium...

  13. Rapidly progressive hip disease masquerading as Gorham′s syndrome of the femoral head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Mahajan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly destructive hip disease (RDHD is a rare syndrome of unknown etiology, resulting in rapid deterioration of both the femoral and acetabular aspects of the hip joint with disappearance of the femoral head. Differential diagnosis should include those conditions known to potentially lead to rapid hip destruction, such as septic arthritis, metabolic bone diseases, autoimmune inflammatory arthritis, malignancy, and classical osteonecrosis. Sequential X-rays in patients with fast worsening of hip symptoms and a high degree of clinical suspicion seem mandatory to avoid extensive joint destruction and facilitate better arthroplasty outcomes in these patients. Because of the degree of joint deformity and the patient′s level of disability, the typical treatment of rapidly destructive arthropathy is total hip arthroplasty. In this report, we present a clinical case of left RDHD offering a useful review for the diagnosis and management of this condition.

  14. Rapid Destruction of the Humeral Head Caused by Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Goshima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly destructive arthritis (RDA of the shoulder is a rare disease. Here, we report two cases, with different destruction patterns, which were most probably due to subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIFs. Case 1 involved a 77-year-old woman with right shoulder pain. Rapid destruction of both the humeral head and glenoid was seen within 1 month of the onset of shoulder pain. We diagnosed shoulder RDA and performed a hemiarthroplasty. Case 2 involved a 74-year-old woman with left shoulder pain. Humeral head collapse was seen within 5 months of pain onset, without glenoid destruction. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a bone marrow edema pattern with an associated subchondral low-intensity band, typical of SIF. Total shoulder arthroplasty was performed in this case. Shoulder RDA occurs as a result of SIF in elderly women; the progression of the joint destruction is more rapid in cases with SIFs of both the humeral head and the glenoid. Although shoulder RDA is rare, this disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute onset shoulder pain in elderly female patients with osteoporosis and persistent joint effusion.

  15. How Lovebirds Maneuver Rapidly Using Super-Fast Head Saccades and Image Feature Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Daniel; van Bokhorst, Evelien; Lentink, David

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal flying animals such as birds depend primarily on vision to coordinate their flight path during goal-directed flight tasks. To extract the spatial structure of the surrounding environment, birds are thought to use retinal image motion (optical flow) that is primarily induced by motion of their head. It is unclear what gaze behaviors birds perform to support visuomotor control during rapid maneuvering flight in which they continuously switch between flight modes. To analyze this, we measured the gaze behavior of rapidly turning lovebirds in a goal-directed task: take-off and fly away from a perch, turn on a dime, and fly back and land on the same perch. High-speed flight recordings revealed that rapidly turning lovebirds perform a remarkable stereotypical gaze behavior with peak saccadic head turns up to 2700 degrees per second, as fast as insects, enabled by fast neck muscles. In between saccades, gaze orientation is held constant. By comparing saccade and wingbeat phase, we find that these super-fast saccades are coordinated with the downstroke when the lateral visual field is occluded by the wings. Lovebirds thus maximize visual perception by overlying behaviors that impair vision, which helps coordinate maneuvers. Before the turn, lovebirds keep a high contrast edge in their visual midline. Similarly, before landing, the lovebirds stabilize the center of the perch in their visual midline. The perch on which the birds land swings, like a branch in the wind, and we find that retinal size of the perch is the most parsimonious visual cue to initiate landing. Our observations show that rapidly maneuvering birds use precisely timed stereotypic gaze behaviors consisting of rapid head turns and frontal feature stabilization, which facilitates optical flow based flight control. Similar gaze behaviors have been reported for visually navigating humans. This finding can inspire more effective vision-based autopilots for drones. PMID:26107413

  16. Rapid P300 brain-computer interface communication with a head-mounted display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo eKäthner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Visual ERP (P300 based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs allow for fast and reliable spelling and are intended as a muscle-independent communication channel for people with severe paralysis. However, they require the presentation of visual stimuli in the field of view of the user. A head mounted display could allow convenient presentation of visual stimuli in situations, where mounting a conventional monitor might be difficult or not feasible (e.g. at a patient’s bedside. To explore if similar accuracies can be achieved with a virtual reality (VR headset compared to a conventional flat screen monitor, we conducted an experiment with 18 healthy participants. We also evaluated it with a person in the locked-in state (LIS to verify that usage of the headset is possible for a severely paralyzed person. Healthy participants performed online spelling with three different display methods. In one condition a 5x5 letter matrix was presented on a conventional 22 inch TFT monitor. Two configurations of the VR headset were tested. In the first (glasses A, the same 5x5 matrix filled the field of view of the user. In the second (glasses B, single letters of the matrix filled the field of view of the user. The participant in the LIS tested the VR headset on 3 different occasions (glasses A condition only. For healthy participants, average online spelling accuracies were 94% (15.5 bits/min using three flash sequences for spelling with the monitor and glasses A and 96% (16.2 bits/min with glasses B. In one session, the participant in the LIS reached an online spelling accuracy of 100% (10 bits/min using the glasses A condition. We also demonstrated that spelling with one flash sequence is possible with the VR headset for healthy users (mean: 32.1 bits/min, maximum reached by one user: 71.89 bits/min at 100% accuracy. We conclude that the VR headset allows for rapid P300 BCI communication in healthy users and may be a suitable display option for severely

  17. Effects of rapid maxillary expansion on head posture, postural stability, and fall risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Celebi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of rapid maxillary expansion (RME on head posture, postural stability, and fall risk. Materials and Methods: A sample of 51 adolescent patients was randomly divided into two groups. In the first group, which consisted of 28 patients (15 females and 13 males, RME was performed as a part of routine orthodontic treatment. The remaining 23 individuals (12 females and 11 males served as the control group. Lateral cephalometric radiographs taken in natural head position, postural stability, and fall risk scores were obtained during the first visit. They were repeated on average 3.8 months and 3.5 months later for the study and control groups, respectively. The changes were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, paired samples t-test, Mann–Whitney U-test, and independent samples t-test. Results: As a result of RME, a statistically significant decrease was detected in the fall risk score (P < 0.05 in the study group, while the head position and postural stability remained unchanged. For the control group, no significant changes were observed in all measurements. Conclusions: The result of the present study suggests that RME has a capacity of improving fall risk.

  18. Using the time shift in single pushbroom datatakes to detect ships and their heading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willburger, Katharina A. M.; Schwenk, Kurt

    2017-10-01

    The detection of ships from remote sensing data has become an essential task for maritime security. The variety of application scenarios includes piracy, illegal fishery, ocean dumping and ships carrying refugees. While techniques using data from SAR sensors for ship detection are widely common, there is only few literature discussing algorithms based on imagery of optical camera systems. A ship detection algorithm for optical pushbroom data has been developed. It takes advantage of the special detector assembly of most of those scanners, which allows apart from the detection of a ship also the calculation of its heading out of a single acquisition. The proposed algorithm for the detection of moving ships was developed with RapidEye imagery. It algorithm consists mainly of three steps: the creation of a land-watermask, the object extraction and the deeper examination of each single object. The latter step is built up by several spectral and geometric filters, making heavy use of the inter-channel displacement typical for pushbroom sensors with multiple CCD lines, finally yielding a set of ships and their direction of movement. The working principle of time-shifted pushbroom sensors and the developed algorithm is explained in detail. Furthermore, we present our first results and give an outlook to future improvements.

  19. Poverty Trends for Families Headed by Working Single Mothers, 1993-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Kathryn H.; Dupree, Allen

    This analysis examines poverty in families headed by working single mothers, addressing whether and to what degree their economic situations have improved. It investigates the effect of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, which moved single mothers from welfare to work. Poverty data from the annual Census…

  20. A simple rapid process for semi-automated brain extraction from magnetic resonance images of the whole mouse head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delora, Adam; Gonzales, Aaron; Medina, Christopher S; Mitchell, Adam; Mohed, Abdul Faheem; Jacobs, Russell E; Bearer, Elaine L

    2016-01-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well-developed technique in neuroscience. Limitations in applying MRI to rodent models of neuropsychiatric disorders include the large number of animals required to achieve statistical significance, and the paucity of automation tools for the critical early step in processing, brain extraction, which prepares brain images for alignment and voxel-wise statistics. This novel timesaving automation of template-based brain extraction ("skull-stripping") is capable of quickly and reliably extracting the brain from large numbers of whole head images in a single step. The method is simple to install and requires minimal user interaction. This method is equally applicable to different types of MR images. Results were evaluated with Dice and Jacquard similarity indices and compared in 3D surface projections with other stripping approaches. Statistical comparisons demonstrate that individual variation of brain volumes are preserved. A downloadable software package not otherwise available for extraction of brains from whole head images is included here. This software tool increases speed, can be used with an atlas or a template from within the dataset, and produces masks that need little further refinement. Our new automation can be applied to any MR dataset, since the starting point is a template mask generated specifically for that dataset. The method reliably and rapidly extracts brain images from whole head images, rendering them useable for subsequent analytical processing. This software tool will accelerate the exploitation of mouse models for the investigation of human brain disorders by MRI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rapid chemical shift encoding with single-acquisition single-slab 3D GRASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hahnsung; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Jaeseok

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of chemical shift encoded, single-slab 3D GRASE for rapid fat-water separation within a single acquisition. The proposed method incorporates signal-to-noise-ratio-optimal chemical shift encoding into single-slab 3D GRASE with variable flip angles. Chemical shift induced phase information was encoded in succession to different positions in k-space by inserting phase encoding blips between adjacent lobes of the oscillating readout gradients. To enhance imaging efficiency, signal prescription-based variable flip angles were used in the long refocusing pulse train. After echo-independent phase correction, missing signals in k-echo space were interpolated using convolution kernels that span over all echoes. Fat-water separation in a single acquisition was performed using both multi-echo fast spin echo and GRASE as compared to conventional multiacquisition fast spin echo with echo shifts. The proposed single-slab 3D GRASE shows superior performance in accurately delineating cartilage structures compared to its counterpart, multi-echo 3D fast spin echo. Compared with multiacquisition fast spin echo with three echo shifts (63 min), the proposed method substantially speeds up imaging time (7 min), and achieves 0.6 mm isotropic resolution in knee imaging with reduced artifacts and noise. We successfully demonstrated the feasibility of rapid chemical shift encoding and separation using the proposed, single-acquisition single-slab 3D GRASE for high resolution isotropic imaging within clinically acceptable time. Magn Reson Med 78:1852-1861, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Rapidly re-computable EEG (electroencephalography) forward models for realistic head shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermer, J. J. (John J.); Mosher, J. C. (John C.); Baillet, S. (Sylvain); Leahy, R. M. (Richard M.)

    2001-01-01

    Solution of the EEG source localization (inverse) problem utilizing model-based methods typically requires a significant number of forward model evaluations. For subspace based inverse methods like MUSIC [6], the total number of forward model evaluations can often approach an order of 10{sup 3} or 10{sup 4}. Techniques based on least-squares minimization may require significantly more evaluations. The observed set of measurements over an M-sensor array is often expressed as a linear forward spatio-temporal model of the form: F = GQ + N (1) where the observed forward field F (M-sensors x N-time samples) can be expressed in terms of the forward model G, a set of dipole moment(s) Q (3xP-dipoles x N-time samples) and additive noise N. Because of their simplicity, ease of computation, and relatively good accuracy, multi-layer spherical models [7] (or fast approximations described in [1], [7]) have traditionally been the 'forward model of choice' for approximating the human head. However, approximation of the human head via a spherical model does have several key drawbacks. By its very shape, the use of a spherical model distorts the true distribution of passive currents in the skull cavity. Spherical models also require that the sensor positions be projected onto the fitted sphere (Fig. 1), resulting in a distortion of the true sensor-dipole spatial geometry (and ultimately the computed surface potential). The use of a single 'best-fitted' sphere has the added drawback of incomplete coverage of the inner skull region, often ignoring areas such as the frontal cortex. In practice, this problem is typically countered by fitting additional sphere(s) to those region(s) not covered by the primary sphere. The use of these additional spheres results in added complication to the forward model. Using high-resolution spatial information obtained via X-ray CT or MR imaging, a realistic head model can be formed by tessellating the head into a set of contiguous

  3. Brushing skills and plaque reduction using single- and triple-headed toothbrushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Liran; Marom, Yael; Ashkenazi, Malka

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of toothbrush design on brushing skills and plaque removal among young healthy adults. A population of 200 healthy young adults was approached. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two research groups: one used a manual single-headed toothbrush, while the other used a manual triple-headed toothbrush. At the start of the study, participants were asked to brush their teeth using the provided toothbrush with no prior guidance or instructions. Plaque Index (PI) was measured. Immediately afterward, participants were personally instructed on how to brush their teeth using the provided toothbrush. Toothbrushing performance skill was evaluated and scored using the toothbrushing performance skill index (TB-PS-I/Ashkenazi index) following the first brushing, as well as on a recall visit 1 week later. Following the first, uninstructed brushing, PI values ranged from 0.41 to 1.33, with higher plaque scores for the single-headed toothbrush group. One week after receiving brushing instructions, PI decreased in the both toothbrush groups and ranged between 0.12 and 0.81, with higher PI scores for the single-headed toothbrush group. Following the first, uninstructed brushing, total TB-PS-I scores, as well as component scores ("reaching" and "staying") showed no difference between the two toothbrush groups. One week after receiving brushing instructions, the TB-PS-I in the triple-headed toothbrush group was significantly higher than that in the single-headed toothbrush group. The triple-headed toothbrush was found to promote easier toothbrushing and plaque removal both before and after receiving toothbrushing instructions.

  4. Head impact exposure measured in a single youth football team during practice drills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Mireille E; Kane, Joeline M; Espeland, Mark A; Miller, Logan E; Powers, Alexander K; Stitzel, Joel D; Urban, Jillian E

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE This study evaluated the frequency, magnitude, and location of head impacts in practice drills within a youth football team to determine how head impact exposure varies among different types of drills. METHODS On-field head impact data were collected from athletes participating in a youth football team for a single season. Each athlete wore a helmet instrumented with a Head Impact Telemetry (HIT) System head acceleration measurement device during all preseason, regular season, and playoff practices. Video was recorded for all practices, and video analysis was performed to verify head impacts and assign each head impact to a specific drill. Eleven drills were identified: dummy/sled tackling, install, special teams, Oklahoma, one-on-one, open-field tackling, passing, position skill work, multiplayer tackle, scrimmage, and tackling drill stations. Generalized linear models were fitted to log-transformed data, and Wald tests were used to assess differences in head accelerations and impact rates. RESULTS A total of 2125 impacts were measured during 30 contact practices in 9 athletes (mean age 11.1 ± 0.6 years, mean mass 44.9 ± 4.1 kg). Open-field tackling had the highest median and 95th percentile linear accelerations (24.7 g and 97.8 g, respectively) and resulted in significantly higher mean head accelerations than several other drills. The multiplayer tackle drill resulted in the highest head impact frequency, with an average of 0.59 impacts per minute per athlete, but the lowest 95th percentile linear accelerations of all drills. The front of the head was the most common impact location for all drills except dummy/sled tackling. CONCLUSIONS Head impact exposure varies significantly in youth football practice drills, with several drills exposing athletes to high-magnitude and/or high-frequency head impacts. These data suggest that further study of practice drills is an important step in developing evidence-based recommendations for modifying or eliminating

  5. Rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Clinical results in 178 advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Demange, L.; Froissart, D.; Panis, X.; Loirette, M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors present a series of 178 patients with Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated by rapid irradiation using multiple and small fractions per day. An initial group of 91 patients (G1) received a total dose of 72 Gy in 80 sessions and 10 days, according to the following split course schedule: J1 to J5, 36 Gy in 40 sessions, eight daily fractions of .9 Gy separated by 2 hours; J6 to J20, rest period; J21 to J25, same as in J1 except that the spinal cord was shielded. This protocol was altered for the following 87 patients (G2) by lessening the total dose to 60 to 66 Gy and the number of fractions to 60. The rest period was lengthened to 4 weeks. All patients but five completed the whole program and the minimal follow-up period was 24 months. At the end of irradiation, 121 patients achieved a total remission, but local recurrences occurred in 56%. Moreover, acute intolerance was considered as severe in 34% of G1 patients, and included extensive mucosal necrosis and bleeding. Although this rate was significantly reduced in G2 patients, late complications were observed in 20 of the 25 survivors, and included trismus, cervical sclerosis, and recurrent laryngeal edema. The crude survival rate is 13% at 2 years. Although this study was not randomized, this particular type of accelerated and hyperfractionated combination of irradiation did not really improve the clinical results in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck. Other schedules and probably other tumors, less extended, should be tested

  6. Rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Clinical results in 178 advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Demange, L.; Froissart, D.; Panis, X.; Loirette, M.

    1985-07-01

    The authors present a series of 178 patients with Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated by rapid irradiation using multiple and small fractions per day. An initial group of 91 patients (G1) received a total dose of 72 Gy in 80 sessions and 10 days, according to the following split course schedule: J1 to J5, 36 Gy in 40 sessions, eight daily fractions of .9 Gy separated by 2 hours; J6 to J20, rest period; J21 to J25, same as in J1 except that the spinal cord was shielded. This protocol was altered for the following 87 patients (G2) by lessening the total dose to 60 to 66 Gy and the number of fractions to 60. The rest period was lengthened to 4 weeks. All patients but five completed the whole program and the minimal follow-up period was 24 months. At the end of irradiation, 121 patients achieved a total remission, but local recurrences occurred in 56%. Moreover, acute intolerance was considered as severe in 34% of G1 patients, and included extensive mucosal necrosis and bleeding. Although this rate was significantly reduced in G2 patients, late complications were observed in 20 of the 25 survivors, and included trismus, cervical sclerosis, and recurrent laryngeal edema. The crude survival rate is 13% at 2 years. Although this study was not randomized, this particular type of accelerated and hyperfractionated combination of irradiation did not really improve the clinical results in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck. Other schedules and probably other tumors, less extended, should be tested.

  7. Competition or Collaboration? Head Start Enrollment during the Rapid Expansion of State Pre-Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassok, Daphna

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade states have surpassed the federal Head Start program as the primary public funder of preschool slots. This paper investigates trends in Head Start enrollment in the context of increased state investment in early childhood. Using national, longitudinal data I find no evidence Head Start programs in states with expanding state…

  8. Whisking Kinematics Enables Object Localization in Head-Centered Coordinates Based on Tactile Information from a Single Vibrissa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Anne E T; Hartmann, Mitra J Z

    2016-01-01

    During active tactile exploration with their whiskers (vibrissae), rodents can rapidly orient to an object even though there are very few proprioceptors in the whisker muscles. Thus a long-standing question in the study of the vibrissal system is how the rat can localize an object in head-centered coordinates without muscle-based proprioception. We used a three-dimensional model of whisker bending to simulate whisking motions against a peg to investigate the possibility that the 3D mechanics of contact from a single whisker are sufficient for localization in head-centered coordinates. Results show that for nearly all whiskers in the array, purely tactile signals at the whisker base - as would be measured by mechanoreceptors, in whisker-centered coordinates - could be used to determine the location of a vertical peg in head-centered coordinates. Both the "roll" and the "elevation" components of whisking kinematics contribute to the uniqueness and resolution of the localization. These results offer an explanation for a behavioral study showing that rats can more accurately determine the horizontal angle of an object if one column, rather than one row, of whiskers is spared.

  9. Whisking kinematics enables object localization in head-centered coordinates based on tactile information from a single vibrissa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne En-Tzu Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During active tactile exploration with their whiskers (vibrissae, rodents can rapidly orient to an object even though there are very few proprioceptors in the whisker muscles. Thus a long-standing question in the study of the vibrissal system is how the rat can localize an object in head-centered coordinates without muscle-based proprioception. We used a three-dimensional model of whisker bending to simulate whisking motions against a peg to investigate the possibility that the 3D mechanics of contact from a single whisker are sufficient for localization in head-centered coordinates. Results show that, for nearly all whiskers in the array, purely tactile signals at the whisker base – as would be measured by mechanoreceptors, in whisker-centered coordinates – could be used to determine the location of a vertical peg in head-centered coordinates. Both the roll and the elevation components of whisking kinematics contribute to the uniqueness and resolution of the localization. These results offer an explanation for a behavioral study showing that rats can more accurately determine the horizontal angle of an object if one column, rather than one row, of whiskers is spared.

  10. Single cotton wool spot as a late manifestation of head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohari, Mohsen; Soleimani, Ali Reza; Manaviat, Masoud Reza; Shojaei, Ahmad

    2014-04-01

    To report a patient with a single cotton wool spot (CWS) following head trauma. A 37-year-old male electrician presented with painless paracentral blurred vision in his left eye of one month duration together with three transient episodes of obscuration of vision in the same eye lasting for 10 minutes. He reported blunt head trauma due to a fall 40 days before referral. Fundus examination at presentation was normal but after 4 months, revealed the appearance of a white spot along the superotemporal arcade in the absence of other fundus lesions. A comprehensive systemic workup was performed revealing no specific findings. Ophthalmoscopic examination after 6 weeks disclosed resolution of the CWS with no intervention. The patient's complaint of paracentral visual field defect improved and subsequent optical coherence tomography showed retinal thinning in that area. Herein, we report a patient with a single CWS near the optic disc four months after head trauma along with normal systemic and paraclinical evaluations. Head trauma may thus be considered as a cause of CWS.

  11. Single Cotton Wool Spot as a Late Manifestation of Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Gohari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a patient with a single cotton wool spot (CWS following head trauma. Case Report: A 37-year-old male electrician presented with painless paracentral blurred vision in his left eye of one month duration together with three transient episodes of obscuration of vision in the same eye lasting for 10 minutes. He reported blunt head trauma due to a fall 40 days before referral. Fundus examination at presentation was normal but after 4 months, revealed the appearance of a white spot along the superotemporal arcade in the absence of other fundus lesions. A comprehensive systemic workup was performed revealing no specific findings. Ophthalmoscopic examination after 6 weeks disclosed resolution of the CWS with no intervention. The patient′s complaint of paracentral visual field defect improved and subsequent optical coherence tomography showed retinal thinning in that area. Conclusion: Herein, we report a patient with a single CWS near the optic disc four months after head trauma along with normal systemic and paraclinical evaluations. Head trauma may thus be considered as a cause of CWS.

  12. Rapid identification of single microbes by various Raman spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösch, Petra; Harz, Michaela; Schmitt, Michael; Peschke, Klaus-Dieter; Ronneberger, Olaf; Burkhardt, Hans; Motzkus, Hans-Walter; Lankers, Markus; Hofer, Stefan; Thiele, Hans; Popp, Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    A fast and unambiguous identification of microorganisms is necessary not only for medical purposes but also in technical processes such as the production of pharmaceuticals. Conventional microbiological identification methods are based on the morphology and the ability of microbes to grow under different conditions on various cultivation media depending on their biochemical properties. These methods require pure cultures which need cultivation of at least 6 h but normally much longer. Recently also additional methods to identify bacteria are established e.g. mass spectroscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry or fluorescence spectroscopy. Alternative approaches for the identification of microorganisms are vibrational spectroscopic techniques. With Raman spectroscopy a spectroscopic fingerprint of the microorganisms can be achieved. Using UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) macromolecules like DNA/RNA and proteins are resonantly enhanced. With an excitation wavelength of e.g. 244 nm it is possible to determine the ratio of guanine/cytosine to all DNA bases which allows a genotypic identification of microorganisms. The application of UVRR requires a large amount of microorganisms (> 10 6 cells) e.g. at least a micro colony. For the analysis of single cells micro-Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm can be used. Here, the obtained information is from all type of molecules inside the cells which lead to a chemotaxonomic identification. In this contribution we show how wavelength dependent Raman spectroscopy yields significant molecular information applicable for the identification of microorganisms on a single cell level.

  13. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C. Junn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients.

  14. Rapid Response: To Scan or Not to Scan? The Utility of Noncontrast CT Head for Altered Mental Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Purujit J; Sethi, Mansha; Sternlieb, Jonathan; Schneider, Doron; Naglak, Mary; Patel, Rajeshkumar R

    2018-01-17

    The aims of the study were the following: (1) to determine how often computed tomography (CT) scans of the head are obtained on rapid responses called for altered mental status (AMS), (2) to determine whether CT imaging of the head is required during all rapid responses called for AMS, (3) to determine which patients would benefit from CT scans of the head in this setting, (4) to note whether an adequate neurologic exam was documented, (5) to determine the cost of CT scans that did not change management, and (6) to examine the role of medications leading to AMS. The study was a retrospective chart review at Abington Jefferson Hospital. Data collected included the age, sex, time of rapid response, clinical condition of the patient, whether an arterial blood gas and blood glucose were done, and whether a neurological exam was documented in the resident's rapid response team note. The patient's medications were also reviewed. Computed tomography scan findings as well as changes made in a patient's care as a result of the scan were recorded. Any findings that did not lead to a change in management were considered a "negative" scan. Overall, 610 rapid responses were activated from January to August 2016. One hundred four (17.04%) of the total rapid responses were for AMS and 83 (79.8%) of these patients underwent noncontrast CT scan of the head. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 74.7 (13.6) years. A total of 56.6% were female. The most frequent clinical conditions documented at the time of rapid responses were noted as confused (33.7%, 28/83), either lethargic or unconscious (32.5%, 27/83), and concern for stroke (21.7%, 18/83). A total of 96.4% (80/83) of the CT scans done were negative for any acute changes. The three patients with positive scans (3/83) had a change in management as a result of the scans. If patients with symptoms concerning for stroke and unconscious patients are excluded, the total number of remaining patients is 56. Of these, zero patients had

  15. Rapid Communication. Monitoring the occurrence of bacteria in stored cabbage heads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichmeier Aleš

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-six cabbage heads stored under typical conditions in a storage hall in Moravia, Czech Republic, were tested for the presence of bacteria by the method of isolation from three different parts of the cabbage heads. Isolations were carried out from stalks, inner and superficial leaves. Two samplings were done; in November 2015 and February 2016. Bacterial cultures were sequenced in the part of 16S rRNA region; bacteria were identified according to the sequences obtained. The most prevalent bacteria were of the genus Pseudomonas. Genera: Klebsiella, Erwinia, Pantoea, Bacillus were also identified. The results provided an interesting insight into the bacterial spectrum in stored cabbage heads and their dynamics during storage. The nucleotide sequences which were found were saved in GenBank/NCBI under accession numbers KX160104-KX160145.

  16. Urban Quality vs single travel: the Personal Rapid Transit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Gargiulo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The great increase in the demand for private mobility with the con­sequent macroscopic growth of channels to meet it, together with short-sighted policies of transport and urban development spread above all in Italy, has produced pollution, congestion and unlivability in the last fifty years.The hope of assuring the maximum individual freedom of travel to people living in consolidated urban centres, in addition to those living in the outskirts arisen and developed without any reasonable urban logic, still goes on producing congestion of vehicular traffic, conside­red, by the majority of citizens, the main cause of the deterioration of the quality of life in our cities.Indeed, also the most recent reports on environment in Italian cities show that the pollution levels are increasing in the big cities, although the news are full of very expensive projects, innovative solutions and unexpected goals continuously shown by public administrations. One of the main environmental detractors is car traffic, which has recently gained on public transport. unlike the previous period. Most of mobility policies implemented in our cities aims at reaching the modal balance by means of measures for controlling and managing the demand for mobility, for mitigating traffic and limiting circulation., such as the road pricing and the parking strategies; for developing and increasing public transport and not polluting means of transport, car sharing and car pooling.All of them have showed modest results both in terms of pollution reduction and vehicular traffic reduction. For over fifty years, mostly in the United States, the Personal Rapid Transit has been tested, a system of public transport trying to join two apparently incompatible factors: the possibility of assuring individual travels and the need for decreasing the levels of acoustic and air pol­lution as well as the congestion caused by private vehicular traffic. In Italy this system is still not well known

  17. Urban Quality vs Single Travel: the Personal Rapid Transit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Gargiulo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The great increase in the demand for private mobility with theconsequent macroscopic growth of channels to meet it, togetherwith short-sighted policies of transport and urban developmentspread above all in Italy, has produced pollution, congestion andunlivability in the last fifty years.The hope of assuring the maximum individual freedom of travel topeople living in consolidated urban centres, in addition to thoseliving in the outskirts arisen and developed without any reasonableurban logic, still goes on producing congestion of vehicular traffic,considered, by the majority of citizens, the main cause of thedeterioration of the quality of life in our cities.Indeed, also the most recent reports on environment in Italiancities show that the pollution levels are increasing in the big cities,although the news are full of very expensive projects, innovativesolutions and unexpected goals continuously shown by publicadministrations. One of the main environmental detractors is cartraffic, which has recently gained on public transport. unlike theprevious period.Most of mobility policies implemented in our cities aims at reachingthe modal balance by means of measures for controlling and managingthe demand for mobility, for mitigating traffic and limiting circulation.,such as the road pricing and the parking strategies; for developingand increasing public transport and not polluting means of transport,car sharing and car pooling.All of them have showed modest results both in terms of pollutionreduction and vehicular traffic reduction.For over fifty years, mostly in the United States, the Personal RapidTransit has been tested, a system of public transport trying to jointwo apparently incompatible factors: the possibility of assuringindividual travels and the need for decreasing the levels of acousticand air pollution as well as the congestion caused by privatevehicular traffic.In Italy this system is still not well known despite the versatility ofits fields

  18. Measurement and Finite Element Model Validation of Immature Porcine Brain-Skull Displacement during Rapid Sagittal Head Rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquesi, Stephanie A; Margulies, Susan S

    2018-01-01

    Computational models are valuable tools for studying tissue-level mechanisms of traumatic brain injury, but to produce more accurate estimates of tissue deformation, these models must be validated against experimental data. In this study, we present in situ measurements of brain-skull displacement in the neonatal piglet head ( n  = 3) at the sagittal midline during six rapid non-impact rotations (two rotations per specimen) with peak angular velocities averaging 51.7 ± 1.4 rad/s. Marks on the sagittally cut brain and skull/rigid potting surfaces were tracked, and peak values of relative brain-skull displacement were extracted and found to be significantly less than values extracted from a previous axial plane model. In a finite element model of the sagittally transected neonatal porcine head, the brain-skull boundary condition was matched to the measured physical experiment data. Despite smaller sagittal plane displacements at the brain-skull boundary, the corresponding finite element boundary condition optimized for sagittal plane rotations is far less stiff than its axial counterpart, likely due to the prominent role of the boundary geometry in restricting interface movement. Finally, bridging veins were included in the finite element model. Varying the bridging vein mechanical behavior over a previously reported range had no influence on the brain-skull boundary displacements. This direction-specific sagittal plane boundary condition can be employed in finite element models of rapid sagittal head rotations.

  19. Measurement and Finite Element Model Validation of Immature Porcine Brain–Skull Displacement during Rapid Sagittal Head Rotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Pasquesi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Computational models are valuable tools for studying tissue-level mechanisms of traumatic brain injury, but to produce more accurate estimates of tissue deformation, these models must be validated against experimental data. In this study, we present in situ measurements of brain–skull displacement in the neonatal piglet head (n = 3 at the sagittal midline during six rapid non-impact rotations (two rotations per specimen with peak angular velocities averaging 51.7 ± 1.4 rad/s. Marks on the sagittally cut brain and skull/rigid potting surfaces were tracked, and peak values of relative brain–skull displacement were extracted and found to be significantly less than values extracted from a previous axial plane model. In a finite element model of the sagittally transected neonatal porcine head, the brain–skull boundary condition was matched to the measured physical experiment data. Despite smaller sagittal plane displacements at the brain–skull boundary, the corresponding finite element boundary condition optimized for sagittal plane rotations is far less stiff than its axial counterpart, likely due to the prominent role of the boundary geometry in restricting interface movement. Finally, bridging veins were included in the finite element model. Varying the bridging vein mechanical behavior over a previously reported range had no influence on the brain–skull boundary displacements. This direction-specific sagittal plane boundary condition can be employed in finite element models of rapid sagittal head rotations.

  20. Rapid analysis of malathion in blood using head space-solid phase microextraction and selected ion monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namera, A; Yashiki, M; Nagasawa, N; Iwasaki, Y; Kojima, T

    1997-08-04

    A simple and rapid method for analysis of malathion in blood was developed using head space-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry/ electron impact ionization-selected ion monitoring (GC-MS/EI-SIM). A vial containing a blood sample, ammonium sulphate, sulphuric acid and fenitrothion as an internal standard, was heated at 90 degrees C for 15 min. The extraction fiber of the SPME was exposed for 5 min in the head space of the vial. The compounds absorbed on the fiber were detached by exposing the fibre in the injection port of GC-MS. A straight calibration curve was obtained between malathion concentrations of 2.5 to 50.0 micrograms g-1 in blood. No interfering substances were found, and the time for analysis was 40 min for one sample.

  1. Single photon emission computed tomography scanning: A predictor of outcome in vegetative state of head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pralaya Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurotrauma is one of the most important causes of death and disability. Some of the severely head injured patients, failed to show significant improvement despite aggressive neurosurgical management and ended up in a vegetative state. Aims: To assess the outcome at six months and one year using Glasgow outcome scale (GOS, in this prospective study on patients with severe head injury, who remained vegetative at one month. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out in the department of Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, New Delhi, over a period of a year and a half (March 2002 through July 2003. Materials and Methods: In patients with severe head injury (GCS < 8, post resuscitation, neurological assessment was done with Glasgow coma scale (GCS, pupillary light reflex, doll′s eye movement and cold caloric test in all cases. Fifty patients, who remained vegetative post injury according to the criteria of Jennett and Plum, at one month, were considered for the study. Brain SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed T omography Scanning was carried out in selected cases. Statistical analysis: Data analysis was done by Pearson′s chi-square test on computer software SPSS, Version 10 (California, USA. Results: Patients with preserved brainstem reflex and with no perfusion defect on SPECT scan had statistically significant favorable outcome. More than 40% of vegetative patients regained consciousness by the end of one year, of whom 24% had favorable outcome in the form of moderate disability and good recovery. Conclusion: SPECT is better than computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI as it assesses the cerebral perfusion and functional injury rather than detecting the lesions only. Further study with a control group is necessary to establish the role of SPECT in head injury.

  2. Evaluation of radiotherapy methods for adaptative head and neck treatment with RapidArc®

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazaro, Sarah J.; Vasconcellos, Herminiane L.; Silva, Laura E. da; Bastos, Fernanda M.; Silva, Leonardo P. da; Alvaro S; Migoviski, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is considered a public health problem worldwide. The intensity-modulated techniques have shown benefit in the treatment of these sites, particularly with respect to reduction of deterministic effects of risk, such as parotid. Anatomical variations in cases of head and neck are very frequent and may lead, for example, to an overdose in the parotid. This can be mitigated if making use of adaptive radiation therapy. The work aims to analyze a methodology to redo the planning of treatments, through 02 acquisitions of TC. The results showed that, due to a reduction in the volumes of the parotid, the doses delivered to these organs are underestimated, which is relevant to readapt the treatment, with the addition of only a second scan without the need of the third. (author)

  3. Rapid MRI evaluation of acute intracranial hemorrhage in pediatric head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, Maura E.; Jaju, Alok; Ciolino, Jody D.; Alden, Tord

    2016-01-01

    Rapid MRI with ultrafast T2 sequences can be performed without sedation and is often used in place of computed tomography (CT) to evaluate pediatric patients for indications such as hydrocephalus. This study investigated the sensitivity of rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and follow-up of acute intracranial hemorrhage in comparison to CT, which is commonly the first-line imaging. Patients presenting to a pediatric hospital with acute intracranial hemorrhage on CT and follow-up rapid MRI within 48 h were included. Rapid MRI studies consisted of three plane ultrafast T2 sequences either with or without axial gradient echo (GRE) sequences. Identification of hemorrhage on rapid MRI was assessed by readers both blinded and unblinded to prior CT results. One hundred two acute hemorrhages in 61 patients were identified by CT. Rapid MRI detection of subdural and epidural hemorrhages was modest in the absence of prior CT for comparison (sensitivity 61-74 %), but increased with review of the prior CT (sensitivity 80-86 %). Hemorrhage size was a significant predictor of detection (p < 0.0001). Three plane fast T2 images alone without GRE sequences were poor at detecting subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 10-25 %); rapid MRI with GRE sequences identified the majority of subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 71-93 %). GRE modestly increased detection of other extra-axial hemorrhages. Rapid MRI with GRE sequences is sensitive for most acute intracranial hemorrhages only when a prior CT is available for review. Rapid MRI is not adequate to replace CT in initial evaluation of intracranial hemorrhages but may be helpful in follow-up of known hemorrhages. (orig.)

  4. Rapid MRI evaluation of acute intracranial hemorrhage in pediatric head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Maura E.; Jaju, Alok [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Ciolino, Jody D. [Northwestern University, Biostatistics Collaboration Center, Department of Preventive Medicine Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Alden, Tord [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Neurosurgery, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Rapid MRI with ultrafast T2 sequences can be performed without sedation and is often used in place of computed tomography (CT) to evaluate pediatric patients for indications such as hydrocephalus. This study investigated the sensitivity of rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and follow-up of acute intracranial hemorrhage in comparison to CT, which is commonly the first-line imaging. Patients presenting to a pediatric hospital with acute intracranial hemorrhage on CT and follow-up rapid MRI within 48 h were included. Rapid MRI studies consisted of three plane ultrafast T2 sequences either with or without axial gradient echo (GRE) sequences. Identification of hemorrhage on rapid MRI was assessed by readers both blinded and unblinded to prior CT results. One hundred two acute hemorrhages in 61 patients were identified by CT. Rapid MRI detection of subdural and epidural hemorrhages was modest in the absence of prior CT for comparison (sensitivity 61-74 %), but increased with review of the prior CT (sensitivity 80-86 %). Hemorrhage size was a significant predictor of detection (p < 0.0001). Three plane fast T2 images alone without GRE sequences were poor at detecting subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 10-25 %); rapid MRI with GRE sequences identified the majority of subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 71-93 %). GRE modestly increased detection of other extra-axial hemorrhages. Rapid MRI with GRE sequences is sensitive for most acute intracranial hemorrhages only when a prior CT is available for review. Rapid MRI is not adequate to replace CT in initial evaluation of intracranial hemorrhages but may be helpful in follow-up of known hemorrhages. (orig.)

  5. Comparative study between IMRT planning and RapidArc® sliding window for head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirani, Luiz F.; Silva, Leonardo P.; Lima, Marilia B.; Bittencourt, Guilherme R.; Ferreira, Anne Caroline M.; Batista, Delano V.S.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the RapidArc (RA) technique in the treatment of head and neck tumors and compare the results of treatments with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the National Cancer Institute (INCA). Head and neck carcinomas have a natural history with relative expansion to others regions, especially in advanced levels. Faster treatments, with better coverage of the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and sparing more risks organs (ROs) are necessary and bring a better clinical impact. Ten patients with head and neck cancer, planned with IMRT technique were replanned using the RA technique. Some dosimetric indexes were calculated for both techniques, with the intention of verifying which of them, at the same time, would promote greater coverage of the PTV and preserve more healthy tissue. In terms of coverage, both indexes were similar. The RA technique was more efficient for delivered doses to ROs. The number of monitor units (MU), number of fields and treatments time estimated were lower than IMRT technique. Finally, the results have showed that the RA technique clearly reduces the treatment time, reducing the average and maximum dose to ROs and conforming the target as IMRT technique. (author)

  6. Growth Asymmetry, Head Circumference, and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Infants with Single Ventricles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas A; Zak, Victor; Shrader, Peter; Ravishankar, Chitra; Pemberton, Victoria L; Newburger, Jane W; Shillingford, Amanda J; Dagincourt, Nicholas; Cnota, James F; Lambert, Linda M; Sananes, Renee; Richmond, Marc E; Hsu, Daphne T; Miller, Stephen G; Zyblewski, Sinai C; Williams, Richard V

    2016-01-01

    To assess the variability in asymmetric growth and its association with neurodevelopment in infants with single ventricle (SV). We analyzed weight-for-age z-score minus head circumference-for-age z-score (HCAZ), relative head growth (cm/kg), along with individual growth variables in subjects prospectively enrolled in the Infant Single Ventricle Trial. Associations between growth indices and scores on the Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) and Mental Developmental Index (MDI) of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II (BSID-II) at 14 months were assessed. Of the 230 subjects enrolled in the Infant Single Ventricle trial, complete growth data and BSID-II scores were available in 168 (73%). Across the cohort, indices of asymmetric growth varied widely at enrollment and before superior cavopulmonary connection (SCPC) surgery. BSID-II scores were not associated with these asymmetry indices. In bivariate analyses, greater pre-SCPC HCAZ correlated with higher MDI (r = 0.21; P = .006) and PDI (r = 0.38; P SCPC with higher PDI (r = 0.15; P = .049). In multivariable modeling, pre-SCPC HCAZ was an independent predictor of PDI (P = .03), but not MDI. In infants with SV, growth asymmetry was not associated with neurodevelopment at 14 months, but pre-SCPC HCAZ was associated with PDI. Asymmetric growth, important in other high-risk infants, is not a brain-sparing adaptation in infants with SV. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00113087. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. PEDIATRIC HEAD INJURIES, MECHANISM TO MANAGEMENT: EXPERIENCE OF A SINGLE CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Head injury is very common in modern life. Patients of any age group may have head injury however mechanism of head injury, pathophysiology and outcome of head injury is quite different in adults as compared to children. Road traffic accident is a common mode of head injury in adults while fall from height and household abuse is common mode in children. In Western countries, there is a separate registry system for pediatric head injury but there is no such system exist in india. Our present study is focused on pediatric head injury and evaluation of factors that affect the final outcome in pediatric patients.

  8. Rapid Evaluation of Power Degradation in Series Connection of Single Feeding Microsized Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2014-07-08

    We have developed a sustainable, single feeding, microsized, air-cathode and membrane-free microbial fuel cells with a volume of 40 mu L each, which we have used for rapid evaluation of power generation and viability of a series array of three cells seeking higher voltage levels. Contrary to expectations, the achieved power density was modest (45 mWm(-3)), limited due to non-uniformities in assembly and the single-channel feeding system.

  9. Acute effects of Radiotherapy in patients with Head and Neck Cancer: IMRT vs RapidArcTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is a standard treatment in the multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of head and neck carcinomas (HNC. The description and perception of the effects caused by the treatment in the normal tissues is important for the clinical evaluation of the patient because treatment is interrupted if the patient develops several acute side effects which directly affect their survival. This study involved 46 patients over 6 weeks of treatment and evaluated the observed acute effects of treatment in five different anatomical areas - skin, mucosa, salivary glands, pharynx /esophagus and larynx. This evaluation adopted the classification of the Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG. Data analysis revealed that the acute effects related to the RapidArcTM technique appeared earlier when compared to IMRT techniques. On the other hand, the IMRT technique showed more exacerbated high-grade effects.

  10. Characterizing rapid-onset vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the human leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credeur, Daniel P.; Holwerda, Seth W.; Restaino, Robert M.; King, Phillip M.; Crutcher, Kiera L.; Laughlin, M. Harold; Padilla, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Rapid-onset vasodilation (ROV) following single muscle contractions has been examined in the forearm of humans, but has not yet been characterized in the leg. Given known vascular differences between the arm and leg, we sought to characterize ROV following single muscle contractions in the leg. Sixteen healthy men performed random ordered single contractions at 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) using isometric knee extension made with the leg above and below heart level, and these were compared with single isometric contractions of the forearm (handgrip). Single thigh cuff compressions (300 mmHg) were utilized to estimate the mechanical contribution to leg ROV. Continuous blood flow was determined by duplex-Doppler ultrasound and blood pressure via finger photoplethysmography (Finometer). Single isometric knee extensor contractions produced intensity-dependent increases in peak leg vascular conductance that were significantly greater than the forearm in both the above- and below-heart level positions (e.g., above heart level: leg 20% MVC, +138 ± 28% vs. arm 20% MVC, +89 ± 17%; P leg. Collectively, these data demonstrate the presence of a rapid and robust vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the leg that is largely independent of mechanical factors, thus establishing the leg as a viable model to study ROV in humans. PMID:25539935

  11. Analysis of late complications after rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Panis, X.; Froissart, D.; Legros, M.; Coninx, P.; Loirette, M.

    1988-01-01

    Late effects were analyzed in a series of 39 patients with a 2-year minimal follow-up who were treated by rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The total dose was 66-72 Gy delivered in two series of 33-36 Gy separated by a 2-4 week rest interval. The number of daily fractions ranged from 8 to 6 and the interval between each fraction was 2 hr. Late complications consisted of cervical fibrosis, mucosal necrosis, bone necrosis, trismus, and laryngeal edema. Seventy percent of patients experienced late complications, and in 54% of cases, these reactions were considered severe, causing death in 13% of patients. No relationship was found between field sizes, dosimetric data and type and frequency of late effects. It is therefore suggested that the interval between two daily sessions in any multifractionated protocol may be of critical importance.

  12. Analysis of late complications after rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Panis, X.; Froissart, D.; Legros, M.; Coninx, P.; Loirette, M.

    1988-01-01

    Late effects were analyzed in a series of 39 patients with a 2-year minimal follow-up who were treated by rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The total dose was 66-72 Gy delivered in two series of 33-36 Gy separated by a 2-4 week rest interval. The number of daily fractions ranged from 8 to 6 and the interval between each fraction was 2 hr. Late complications consisted of cervical fibrosis, mucosal necrosis, bone necrosis, trismus, and laryngeal edema. Seventy percent of patients experienced late complications, and in 54% of cases, these reactions were considered severe, causing death in 13% of patients. No relationship was found between field sizes, dosimetric data and type and frequency of late effects. It is therefore suggested that the interval between two daily sessions in any multifractionated protocol may be of critical importance

  13. Male Heads of Family in Single-Parent Households: Men Adaptations to the Needs of Their Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Mauricio Cano Rodas

    2016-01-01

    The experience of the head of a single-parent home has led interviewed parents to modify the exercise of their masculinity regarding communication, relationships, the manner to express affection and the everyday performance with their children, accepting the new family role by associating it with the responsibility of raising and caring for the children

  14. Strengthening the argument for rapid brain MR imaging: estimation of reduction in lifetime attributable risk of developing fatal cancer in children with shunted hydrocephalus by instituting a rapid brain MR imaging protocol in lieu of Head CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koral, K; Blackburn, T; Bailey, A A; Koral, K M; Anderson, J

    2012-11-01

    Children with shunted hydrocephalus have been undergoing surveillance neuroimaging, generally in the form of head CT, for evaluation of ventricular size. As the life expectancy of these children has improved due to better shunt technology and medical care, risks related to the ionizing radiation incurred during multiple head CT examinations that they are expected to undergo throughout their lifetime have become a concern. The purpose of this study is to estimate the LAR of developing fatal cancer due to head CT for ventricular size assessment in children with shunted hydrocephalus and to assess the impact of instituting a rapid brain MR imaging protocol in reducing radiation exposure. Retrospective review of medical records yielded 182 patients who underwent neuroimaging for assessment of ventricular size. Available neuroimaging studies (head CT and rapid brain MR) were counted and annual neuroimaging frequency was calculated. It was assumed that these patients undergo a similar number of neuroimaging studies annually through 20 years of age. A risk estimate was calculated based on the BEIR VII report and effective doses obtained using the International Commission on Radiologic Protection Report 103 organ weighting factors. The mean annual neuroimaging study frequency was 2.1. Based on the average age of 1.89 years, it was assumed neuroimaging surveillance commences in the second year of life. LAR was calculated assuming that a patient undergoes neuroimaging in the form of head CT at this frequency (2/year) through 20 years of age. Assuming 2 scans are performed per year and the low-dose head CT protocol is used, approximately 1 excess lifetime fatal cancer would be generated per 230 patients; with standard head CT, there would be 1 excess lifetime fatal cancer per 97 patients. Children with shunted hydrocephalus are at increased risk of developing fatal cancer if they are to undergo surveillance using head CT. Implementation of a rapid brain MR imaging protocol

  15. A single-question screen for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postuma, Ronald B; Arnulf, Isabelle; Hogl, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia that is an important risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Lewy body dementia. Its prevalence is unknown. One barrier to determining prevalence is that current screening tools are too long for large......-scale epidemiologic surveys. Therefore, we designed the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Single-Question Screen (RBD1Q), a screening question for dream enactment with a simple yes/no response....

  16. Comparison of planar scanning and single photon emission computed tomography in the diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiglin, D.H.I.; Levine, M.; Stulberg, B.; Pflanze, W.; O'Donnell, J.K.; Belhobek, G.H.; Go, R.T.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients were investigated for avascular necrosis of the femoral head. All hips were studied by plain x-ray and MR imaging, 70 hips studied by radionuclide bone scanning, and 38 were studied by single photon emission CT (SPECT). Core biopsies of the femoral heads from 32 hips were examined. No one reference standard for noninvasive diagnosis of this disease is available. The sensitivity and specificity of the radionuclide studies with respect to SPECT were 77% and 100%; of SPECT with respect to pathologic confirmation, 100% and 57%; of MR imaging with respect to pathologic studies, 100% and 66%. Pathologic sampling is subject to error and may give false negative results with spuriously low specificities for imaging modalities. SPECT is recommended as the radionuclide imaging procedure of choice for detecting avascular necrosis of the femoral head

  17. Multiple Small Diameter Drillings Increase Femoral Neck Stability Compared with Single Large Diameter Femoral Head Core Decompression Technique for Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip J; Mannava, Sandeep; Seyler, Thorsten M; Plate, Johannes F; Van Sikes, Charles; Stitzel, Joel D; Lang, Jason E

    2016-10-26

    Femoral head core decompression is an efficacious joint-preserving procedure for treatment of early stage avascular necrosis. However, postoperative fractures have been described which may be related to the decompression technique used. Femoral head decompressions were performed on 12 matched human cadaveric femora comparing large 8mm single bore versus multiple 3mm small drilling techniques. Ultimate failure strength of the femora was tested using a servo-hydraulic material testing system. Ultimate load to failure was compared between the different decompression techniques using two paired ANCOVA linear regression models. Prior to biomechanical testing and after the intervention, volumetric bone mineral density was determined using quantitative computed tomography to account for variation between cadaveric samples and to assess the amount of bone disruption by the core decompression. Core decompression, using the small diameter bore and multiple drilling technique, withstood significantly greater load prior to failure compared with the single large bore technique after adjustment for bone mineral density (pcore decompression techniques. When considering core decompression for the treatment of early stage avascular necrosis, the multiple small bore technique removed less bone volume, thereby potentially leading to higher load to failure.

  18. Spatial-Temporal Feature Analysis on Single-Trial Event Related Potential for Rapid Face Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The event-related potential (ERP is the brain response measured in electroencephalography (EEG, which reflects the process of human cognitive activity. ERP has been introduced into brain computer interfaces (BCIs to communicate the computer with the subject's intention. Due to the low signal-to-noise ratio of EEG, most ERP studies are based on grand-averaging over many trials. Recently single-trial ERP detection attracts more attention, which enables real time processing tasks as rapid face identification. All the targets needed to be retrieved may appear only once, and there is no knowledge of target label for averaging. More interestingly, how the features contribute temporally and spatially to single-trial ERP detection has not been fully investigated. In this paper, we propose to implement a local-learning-based (LLB feature extraction method to investigate the importance of spatial-temporal components of ERP in a task of rapid face identification using single-trial detection. Comparing to previous methods, LLB method preserves the nonlinear structure of EEG signal distribution, and analyze the importance of original spatial-temporal components via optimization in feature space. As a data-driven methods, the weighting of the spatial-temporal component does not depend on the ERP detection method. The importance weights are optimized by making the targets more different from non-targets in feature space, and regularization penalty is introduced in optimization for sparse weights. This spatial-temporal feature extraction method is evaluated on the EEG data of 15 participants in performing a face identification task using rapid serial visual presentation paradigm. Comparing with other methods, the proposed spatial-temporal analysis method uses sparser (only 10% of the total features, and could achieve comparable performance (98% of single-trial ERP detection as the whole features across different detection methods. The interesting finding is

  19. Leiomyosarcoma of the head and neck: A 17-year single institution experience and review of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Alan D; Farquhar, Douglas R; Brody, Robert M; Parasher, Arjun K; Carey, Ryan M; Purkey, Michael T; Nagda, Danish A; Brooks, John S; Hartner, Lee P; Brant, Jason A; Newman, Jason G

    2018-04-01

    Leiomyosarcoma is a rare neoplasm of the head and neck. The purpose of this study was to present our single-institution case series of head and neck leiomyosarcoma and a review of cases in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Patients with head and neck leiomyosarcoma at the University of Pennsylvania and in the NCDB were identified. Demographic characteristics, tumor factors, treatment paradigms, and outcomes were evaluated for prognostic significance. Nine patients with head and neck leiomyosarcoma from the institution were identified; a majority had high-grade disease and cutaneous leiomyosarcoma, with a 5-year survival rate of 50%. Two hundred fifty-nine patients with leiomyosarcoma were found in the NCDB; macroscopic positive margins and high-grade disease were associated with poor prognosis (P < .01), and positive surgical margins were related to adjuvant radiation (P < .001). Head and neck leiomyosarcoma presents at a high grade and is preferentially treated with surgery. Several demographic and tumor-specific factors are associated with outcomes and prognosis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Single-Trial Event-Related Potential Based Rapid Image Triage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Yu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Searching for points of interest (POI in large-volume imagery is a challenging problem with few good solutions. In this work, a neural engineering approach called rapid image triage (RIT which could offer about a ten-fold speed up in POI searching is developed. It is essentially a cortically-coupled computer vision technique, whereby the user is presented bursts of images at a speed of 6–15 images per second and then neural signals called event-related potential (ERP is used as the ‘cue’ for user seeing images of high relevance likelihood. Compared to past efforts, the implemented system has several unique features: (1 it applies overlapping frames in image chip preparation, to ensure rapid image triage performance; (2 a novel common spatial-temporal pattern (CSTP algorithm that makes use of both spatial and temporal patterns of ERP topography is proposed for high-accuracy single-trial ERP detection; (3 a weighted version of probabilistic support-vector-machine (SVM is used to address the inherent unbalanced nature of single-trial ERP detection for RIT. High accuracy, fast learning, and real-time capability of the developed system shown on 20 subjects demonstrate the feasibility of a brainmachine integrated rapid image triage system for fast detection of POI from large-volume imagery.

  1. Rapid Characterization of Bacterial Electrogenicity Using a Single-Sheet Paper-Based Electrofluidic Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Gao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrogenicity, or bacterial electron transfer capacity, is an important application which offers environmentally sustainable advances in the fields of biofuels, wastewater treatment, bioremediation, desalination, and biosensing. Significant boosts in this technology can be achieved with the growth of synthetic biology that manipulates microbial electron transfer pathways, thereby potentially significantly improving their electrogenic potential. There is currently a need for a high-throughput, rapid, and highly sensitive test array to evaluate the electrogenic properties of newly discovered and/or genetically engineered bacterial species. In this work, we report a single-sheet, paper-based electrofluidic (incorporating both electronic and fluidic structure screening platform for rapid, sensitive, and potentially high-throughput characterization of bacterial electrogenicity. This novel screening array uses (i a commercially available wax printer for hydrophobic wax patterning on a single sheet of paper and (ii water-dispersed electrically conducting polymer mixture, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:polystyrene sulfonate, for full integration of electronic and fluidic components into the paper substrate. The engineered 3-D, microporous, hydrophilic, and conductive paper structure provides a large surface area for efficient electron transfer. This results in rapid and sensitive power assessment of electrogenic bacteria from a microliter sample volume. We validated the effectiveness of the sensor array using hypothesis-driven genetically modified Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant strains. Within 20 min, we observed that the sensor platform successfully measured the electricity-generating capacities of five isogenic mutants of P. aeruginosa while distinguishing their differences from genetically unmodified bacteria.

  2. Corneal flap thickness with the Moria M2 single-use head 90 microkeratome in 72 consecutive LASIK procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Karabela,Yunus; Muftuoglu,Orkun; Kaya,Faruk

    2017-01-01

    Yunus Karabela,1 Orkun Muftuoglu,2 Faruk Kaya1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Medipol University, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Vehbi Koç Vakfi Amerikan Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy and consistency of corneal flap thickness in laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with the Moria M2 single-use head 90 microkeratome. Methods: The central corneal thickness of 72 (37 right, 35 left) eyes of 37 patients was measured by ultrasonic...

  3. Structure-based molecular simulations reveal the enhancement of biased Brownian motions in single-headed kinesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Ryo; Kuwata, Takeshi; Kenzaki, Hiroo; Takada, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    Kinesin is a family of molecular motors that move unidirectionally along microtubules (MT) using ATP hydrolysis free energy. In the family, the conventional two-headed kinesin was experimentally characterized to move unidirectionally through "walking" in a hand-over-hand fashion by coordinated motions of the two heads. Interestingly a single-headed kinesin, a truncated KIF1A, still can generate a biased Brownian movement along MT, as observed by in vitro single molecule experiments. Thus, KIF1A must use a different mechanism from the conventional kinesin to achieve the unidirectional motions. Based on the energy landscape view of proteins, for the first time, we conducted a set of molecular simulations of the truncated KIF1A movements over an ATP hydrolysis cycle and found a mechanism exhibiting and enhancing stochastic forward-biased movements in a similar way to those in experiments. First, simulating stand-alone KIF1A, we did not find any biased movements, while we found that KIF1A with a large friction cargo-analog attached to the C-terminus can generate clearly biased Brownian movements upon an ATP hydrolysis cycle. The linked cargo-analog enhanced the detachment of the KIF1A from MT. Once detached, diffusion of the KIF1A head was restricted around the large cargo which was located in front of the head at the time of detachment, thus generating a forward bias of the diffusion. The cargo plays the role of a diffusional anchor, or cane, in KIF1A "walking."

  4. Structure-based molecular simulations reveal the enhancement of biased Brownian motions in single-headed kinesin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Kanada

    Full Text Available Kinesin is a family of molecular motors that move unidirectionally along microtubules (MT using ATP hydrolysis free energy. In the family, the conventional two-headed kinesin was experimentally characterized to move unidirectionally through "walking" in a hand-over-hand fashion by coordinated motions of the two heads. Interestingly a single-headed kinesin, a truncated KIF1A, still can generate a biased Brownian movement along MT, as observed by in vitro single molecule experiments. Thus, KIF1A must use a different mechanism from the conventional kinesin to achieve the unidirectional motions. Based on the energy landscape view of proteins, for the first time, we conducted a set of molecular simulations of the truncated KIF1A movements over an ATP hydrolysis cycle and found a mechanism exhibiting and enhancing stochastic forward-biased movements in a similar way to those in experiments. First, simulating stand-alone KIF1A, we did not find any biased movements, while we found that KIF1A with a large friction cargo-analog attached to the C-terminus can generate clearly biased Brownian movements upon an ATP hydrolysis cycle. The linked cargo-analog enhanced the detachment of the KIF1A from MT. Once detached, diffusion of the KIF1A head was restricted around the large cargo which was located in front of the head at the time of detachment, thus generating a forward bias of the diffusion. The cargo plays the role of a diffusional anchor, or cane, in KIF1A "walking."

  5. Single sample expression-anchored mechanisms predict survival in head and neck cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinan Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression signatures that are predictive of therapeutic response or prognosis are increasingly useful in clinical care; however, mechanistic (and intuitive interpretation of expression arrays remains an unmet challenge. Additionally, there is surprisingly little gene overlap among distinct clinically validated expression signatures. These "causality challenges" hinder the adoption of signatures as compared to functionally well-characterized single gene biomarkers. To increase the utility of multi-gene signatures in survival studies, we developed a novel approach to generate "personal mechanism signatures" of molecular pathways and functions from gene expression arrays. FAIME, the Functional Analysis of Individual Microarray Expression, computes mechanism scores using rank-weighted gene expression of an individual sample. By comparing head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC samples with non-tumor control tissues, the precision and recall of deregulated FAIME-derived mechanisms of pathways and molecular functions are comparable to those produced by conventional cohort-wide methods (e.g. GSEA. The overlap of "Oncogenic FAIME Features of HNSCC" (statistically significant and differentially regulated FAIME-derived genesets representing GO functions or KEGG pathways derived from HNSCC tissue among three distinct HNSCC datasets (pathways:46%, p<0.001 is more significant than the gene overlap (genes:4%. These Oncogenic FAIME Features of HNSCC can accurately discriminate tumors from control tissues in two additional HNSCC datasets (n = 35 and 91, F-accuracy = 100% and 97%, empirical p<0.001, area under the receiver operating characteristic curves = 99% and 92%, and stratify recurrence-free survival in patients from two independent studies (p = 0.0018 and p = 0.032, log-rank. Previous approaches depending on group assignment of individual samples before selecting features or learning a classifier are limited by design to

  6. Rapid, green synthesis and surface-enhanced Raman scattering effect of single-crystal silver nanocubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Aiqin; Jin, Xia; Gu, Xiaolong; Wei, Xiaoqing; Yang, Guojing

    2012-08-01

    Single-crystal silver (Ag) nanocubes have been synthesized by a rapid and green method at room temperature by adding sodium hydroxide solution to the mixed solutions of silver nitrate, glucose and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the phase composition and morphology. The results showed that the as-prepared particles were single-crystal Ag nanocubes with edge lengths of around 77 nm and a growing direction along {1 0 0} facets. As substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) experiment on crystal violet (CV), the SERS enhancement factor of the as-prepared Ag nanocubes were measured to be 5.5 × 104, indicating potential applications in chemical and biological analysis.

  7. 10-bit rapid single flux quantum digital-to-analog converter for ac voltage standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maezawa, M; Hirayama, F

    2008-01-01

    Digital-to-analog (D/A) converters based on rapid single flux quantum (RSFQ) technology are under development for ac voltage standard applications. We present design and test results on a prototype 10-bit version integrated on a single chip. The 10-bit chip includes over 6000 Josephson junctions and consumes a bias current exceeding 1 A. To reduce the effects of the high bias current on circuit operation, a custom design method was employed in part and large circuit blocks were divided into smaller ones. The 10-bit chips were fabricated and tested at low speed. The test results suggested that our design approach could manage large bias currents on the order of 1 A per chip

  8. Running the number line: Rapid shifts of attention in single-digit arithmetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Romain; Gourjon, Audrey; Couderc, Auriane; Thevenot, Catherine; Prado, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that adults might solve single-digit addition and subtraction problems by rapidly moving through an ordered representation of numbers. In the present study, we tested whether these movements manifest themselves by on-line shifts of attention during arithmetic problem-solving. In two experiments, adult participants were presented with single-digit addition, subtraction and multiplication problems. Operands and operator were presented sequentially on the screen. Although both the first operand and the operator were presented at the center of the screen, the second operand was presented either to the left or to the right side of space. We found that addition problems were solved faster when the second operand appeared to the right than to the left side (Experiments 1 & 2). In contrast, subtraction problems were solved faster when the second operand appeared to the left than to the right side (Experiment 1). No operation-dependent spatial bias was observed in the same time window when the second operand was zero (Experiment 1), and no bias was observed when the operation was a multiplication (Experiment 2). Therefore, our results demonstrate that solving single-digit addition and subtraction, but not multiplication, is associated with horizontal shifts of attention. Our findings support the idea that mental movements to the left or right of a sequential representation of numbers are elicited during single-digit arithmetic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Physical scale modeling of single free head piles under lateral loading in cohesive soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Leonardo Salamanca-Medina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the small scale modeling of free head wood piles under horizontal loading in cohesive soils, tested in order to compare the results with analytical models proposed by various authors. Characteristic Load (CLM and P-Y Curves methods were used for the prediction of lateral deflections at the head of the piles and the method proposed by Broms for estimating the ultimate lateral load. These predictions were compared with the results of the physical modeling, obtaining a good approximation between them.

  10. Land subsidence caused by a single water extraction well and rapid water infiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Martinez-Noguez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays several parts of the world suffer from land subsidence. This setting of the earth surface occurs due to different factors such as earth quakes, mining activities, and gas, oil and water withdrawal. This research presents a numerical study of the influence of land subsidence caused by a single water extraction well and rapid water infiltration into structural soil discontinuities. The numerical simulation of the infiltration was based on a two-phase flow-model for porous media, and for the deformation a Mohr–Coulomb model was used. A two-layered system with a fault zone is presented. First a single water extraction well is simulated producing a cone-shaped (conical water level depletion, which can cause land subsidence. Land Subsidence can be further increased if a hydrological barrier as a result of a discontinuity, exists. After water extraction a water column is applied on the top boundary for one hours in order to represent a strong storm which produces rapid water infiltration through the discontinuity as well as soil deformation. Both events are analysed and compared in order to characterize deformation of both elements and to get a better understanding of the land subsidence and new fracture formations.

  11. Preliminary experience with thallous chloride T1 201-labeled single-photon emission computed tomography scanning in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregor, R. T.; Valdés-Olmos, R.; Koops, W.; Balm, A. J.; Hilgers, F. J.; Hoefnagel, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    To test the feasibility of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanning with the use of thallous chloride T1 201 in patients with head and neck cancer and to decide its possible applications to improve the diagnosis and staging of head and neck cancer. Findings from SPECT with the use

  12. Design of a head phantom produced on a 3D rapid prototyping printer and comparison with a RANDO and 3M lucite head phantom in eye dosimetry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, Peter; Figl, Michael; Wartak, Andreas; Glanzer, Mathias; Dünkelmeyer, Martina; Hojreh, Azadeh; Hummel, Johann

    2017-04-21

    An anthropomorphic head phantom including eye inserts allowing placement of TLDs 3 mm below the cornea has been produced on a 3D printer using a photo-cured acrylic resin to best allow tissue equivalence. Thus H p (3) can be determined in radiological and interventional photon radiation fields. Eye doses and doses to the forehead have been compared to an Alderson RANDO head and a 3M Lucite skull phantom in terms of surface dose per incident air kerma for frontal irradiation since the commercial phantoms do not allow placement of TLDs 3 mm below the corneal surface. A comparison of dose reduction factors (DRFs) of a common lead glasses model has also been performed. Eye dose per incident air kerma were comparable between all three phantoms (printed phantom: 1.40, standard error (SE) 0.04; RANDO: 1.36, SE 0.03; 3M: 1.37, SE 0.03). Doses to the forehead were identical to eye surface doses for the printed phantom and the RANDO head (ratio 1.00 SE 0.04, and 0.99 SE 0.03, respectively). In the 3M Lucite skull phantom dose on the forehead was 15% lower than dose to the eyes attributable to phantom properties. DRF of a sport frame style leaded glasses model with 0.75 mm lead equivalence measured were 6.8 SE 0.5, 9.3 SE 0.4 and 10.5 SE 0.5 for the RANDO head, the printed phantom, and the 3M Lucite head phantom, respectively, for frontal irradiation. A comparison of doses measured in 3 mm depth and on the surface of the eyes in the printed phantom revealed no difference larger than standard errors from TLD dosimetry. 3D printing offers an interesting opportunity for phantom design with increasing potential as printers allowing combinations of tissue substitutes will become available. Variations between phantoms may provide a useful indication of uncertainty budgets when using phantom measurements to estimate individual personnel doses.

  13. Dynamic variability of the heading-flowering stages of single rice in China based on field observations and NDVI estimations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhao; Song, Xiao; Chen, Yi; Wang, Pin; Wei, Xing; Tao, Fulu

    2015-05-01

    Although many studies have indicated the consistent impact of warming on the natural ecosystem (e.g., an early flowering and prolonged growing period), our knowledge of the impacts on agricultural systems is still poorly understood. In this study, spatiotemporal variability of the heading-flowering stages of single rice was detected and compared at three different scales using field-based methods (FBMs) and satellite-based methods (SBMs). The heading-flowering stages from 2000 to 2009 with a spatial resolution of 1 km were extracted from the SPOT/VGT NDVI time series data using the Savizky-Golay filtering method in the areas in China dominated by single rice of Northeast China (NE), the middle-lower Yangtze River Valley (YZ), the Sichuan Basin (SC), and the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau (YG). We found that approximately 52.6 and 76.3 % of the estimated heading-flowering stages by a SBM were within ±5 and ±10 days estimation error (a root mean square error (RMSE) of 8.76 days) when compared with those determined by a FBM. Both the FBM data and the SBM data had indicated a similar spatial pattern, with the earliest annual average heading-flowering stages in SC, followed by YG, NE, and YZ, which were inconsistent with the patterns reported in natural ecosystems. Moreover, diverse temporal trends were also detected in the four regions due to different climate conditions and agronomic factors such as cultivar shifts. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) between the FBM and the SBM in both the regional average value of the phenological stages and the trends, implying the consistency and rationality of the SBM at three scales.

  14. Rapid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahla M. Wassim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of Aedes caspius mosquitoes are incriminated to be a potential reservoir of “Rift Valley Fever Virus” (RVF during interepizootic periods in Egypt. Ae. caspius contains two distinct forms which are morphologically indistinguishable but differ in physiology and behavior; Ae. caspius form (a requires a blood meal for each egg batch(anautogeny, is unable to mate in confined spaces(eurygamous. The second form (b lays egg batch without blood meal (autogenous and can mate in confined spaces (stenogamous. In this work, we collected the autogenous and anautogenous forms of Ae. caspius from two different breeding habitats in the Qalyubia Governorate. Analysis of the Drosophila ace-Orthologous acetylecholinesterase gene revealed that a single polymorphic region characterized each species. Based on this region, specific primers were used to amplify the entire section of intron II, sections of Exon 2 and Exon 3 of ace-2 gene for differentiating the complex species of mosquitoes. The amplicons of anautogenous form sized 441 pb and increase 116 bp than autogenous form of Ae. caspius. High rates of point mutations were addressed; deletion/insertion events are 120 bases. The transversion mutations were 44 bases and were relatively close to the transtion mutations 43 base. The genetic distance was 0.01 between the two forms.

  15. Rapid synthesis of single-phase bismuth ferrite by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Wenqian; Chen, Zhi; Gao, Tong; Zhou, Dantong; Leng, Xiaonan; Niu, Feng; Zhu, Yuxiang; Qin, Laishun; Wang, Jiangying; Huang, Yuexiang

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes on the fast synthesis of bismuth ferrite by the simple microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The phase transformation and the preferred growth facets during the synthetic process have been investigated by X-ray diffraction. Bismuth ferrite can be quickly prepared by microwave hydrothermal method by simply controlling the reaction time, which is further confirmed by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and magnetic measurement. - Graphical abstract: Single-phase BiFeO 3 could be realized at a shortest reaction time of 65 min. The reaction time has strong influences on the phase transformation and the preferred growth facets. - Highlights: • Rapid synthesis (65 min) of BiFeO 3 by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. • Reaction time has influence on the purity and preferred growth facets. • FTIR and magnetic measurement further confirm the pure phase.

  16. Metal-induced rapid transformation of diamond into single and multilayer graphene on wafer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Diana; Deshmukh, Sanket A; Narayanan, Badri; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S; Yan, Zhong; Balandin, Alexander A; Zinovev, Alexander; Rosenmann, Daniel; Sumant, Anirudha V

    2016-07-04

    The degradation of intrinsic properties of graphene during the transfer process constitutes a major challenge in graphene device fabrication, stimulating the need for direct growth of graphene on dielectric substrates. Previous attempts of metal-induced transformation of diamond and silicon carbide into graphene suffers from metal contamination and inability to scale graphene growth over large area. Here, we introduce a direct approach to transform polycrystalline diamond into high-quality graphene layers on wafer scale (4 inch in diameter) using a rapid thermal annealing process facilitated by a nickel, Ni thin film catalyst on top. We show that the process can be tuned to grow single or multilayer graphene with good electronic properties. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanism of graphene growth on polycrystalline diamond. In addition, we demonstrate the lateral growth of free-standing graphene over micron-sized pre-fabricated holes, opening exciting opportunities for future graphene/diamond-based electronics.

  17. An asymmetric PCR-based, reliable and rapid single-tube native DNA engineering strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Widely used restriction-dependent cloning methods are labour-intensive and time-consuming, while several types of ligase-independent cloning approaches have inherent limitations. A rapid and reliable method of cloning native DNA sequences into desired plasmids are highly desired. Results This paper introduces ABI-REC, a novel strategy combining asymmetric bridge PCR with intramolecular homologous recombination in bacteria for native DNA cloning. ABI-REC was developed to precisely clone inserts into defined location in a directional manner within recipient plasmids. It featured an asymmetric 3-primer PCR performed in a single tube that could robustly amplify a chimeric insert-plasmid DNA sequence with homologous arms at both ends. Intramolecular homologous recombination occurred to the chimera when it was transformed into E.coli and produced the desired recombinant plasmids with high efficiency and fidelity. It is rapid, and does not involve any operational nucleotides. We proved the reliability of ABI-REC using a double-resistance reporter assay, and investigated the effects of homology and insert length upon its efficiency. We found that 15 bp homology was sufficient to initiate recombination, while 25 bp homology had the highest cloning efficiency. Inserts up to 4 kb in size could be cloned by this method. The utility and advantages of ABI-REC were demonstrated through a series of pig myostatin (MSTN) promoter and terminator reporter plasmids, whose transcriptional activity was assessed in mammalian cells. We finally used ABI-REC to construct a pig MSTN promoter-terminator cassette reporter and showed that it could work coordinately to express EGFP. Conclusions ABI-REC has the following advantages: (i) rapid and highly efficient; (ii) native DNA cloning without introduction of extra bases; (iii) restriction-free; (iv) easy positioning of directional and site-specific recombination owing to formulated primer design. ABI-REC is a novel approach to

  18. An asymmetric PCR-based, reliable and rapid single-tube native DNA engineering strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Yanzhen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widely used restriction-dependent cloning methods are labour-intensive and time-consuming, while several types of ligase-independent cloning approaches have inherent limitations. A rapid and reliable method of cloning native DNA sequences into desired plasmids are highly desired. Results This paper introduces ABI-REC, a novel strategy combining asymmetric bridge PCR with intramolecular homologous recombination in bacteria for native DNA cloning. ABI-REC was developed to precisely clone inserts into defined location in a directional manner within recipient plasmids. It featured an asymmetric 3-primer PCR performed in a single tube that could robustly amplify a chimeric insert-plasmid DNA sequence with homologous arms at both ends. Intramolecular homologous recombination occurred to the chimera when it was transformed into E.coli and produced the desired recombinant plasmids with high efficiency and fidelity. It is rapid, and does not involve any operational nucleotides. We proved the reliability of ABI-REC using a double-resistance reporter assay, and investigated the effects of homology and insert length upon its efficiency. We found that 15 bp homology was sufficient to initiate recombination, while 25 bp homology had the highest cloning efficiency. Inserts up to 4 kb in size could be cloned by this method. The utility and advantages of ABI-REC were demonstrated through a series of pig myostatin (MSTN promoter and terminator reporter plasmids, whose transcriptional activity was assessed in mammalian cells. We finally used ABI-REC to construct a pig MSTN promoter-terminator cassette reporter and showed that it could work coordinately to express EGFP. Conclusions ABI-REC has the following advantages: (i rapid and highly efficient; (ii native DNA cloning without introduction of extra bases; (iii restriction-free; (iv easy positioning of directional and site-specific recombination owing to formulated primer design. ABI

  19. A single-question screen for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: a multicenter validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postuma, Ronald B; Arnulf, Isabelle; Hogl, Birgit; Iranzo, Alex; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Dauvilliers, Yves; Oertel, Wolfgang; Ju, Yo-El; Puligheddu, Monica; Jennum, Poul; Pelletier, Amelie; Wolfson, Christina; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Frauscher, Birgit; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Cochen De Cock, Valerie; Unger, Marcus M; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Fantini, Maria Livia; Montplaisir, Jacques Y

    2012-06-01

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia that is an important risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Lewy body dementia. Its prevalence is unknown. One barrier to determining prevalence is that current screening tools are too long for large-scale epidemiologic surveys. Therefore, we designed the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Single-Question Screen (RBD1Q), a screening question for dream enactment with a simple yes/no response. Four hundred and eighty-four sleep-clinic-based participants (242 idiopathic RBD patients and 242 controls) completed the screen during a multicenter case-control study. All participants underwent a polysomnogram to define gold-standard diagnosis according to standard criteria. We found a sensitivity of 93.8% and a specificity of 87.2%. Sensitivity and specificity were similar in healthy volunteers, compared to controls or patients with other sleep diagnoses. A single-question screen for RBD may reliably detect disease, with psychometric properties favorably comparable to those reported for longer questionnaires. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Single fraction radiosurgery using Rapid Arc for treatment of intracranial targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Hendrik A; Wagner, Daniela M; Christiansen, Hans; Hess, Clemens F; Vorwerk, Hilke

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic-Radio-Surgery (SRS) using Conformal-Arc-Therapy (CAT) is a well established irradiation technique for treatment of intracranial targets. Although small safety margins are required because of very high accuracy of patient positioning and exact online localisation, there are still disadvantages like long treatment time, high number of monitor units (MU) and covering of noncircular targets. This planning study analysed whether Rapid Arc (RA) with stereotactic localisation for single-fraction SRS can solve these problems. Ten consecutive patients were treated with Linac-based SRS. Eight patients had one or more brain metastases. The other patients presented a symptomatic vestibularis schwannoma and an atypic meningeoma. For all patients, two plans (CAT/RA) were calculated and analysed. Conformity was higher for RA with additional larger low-dose areas. Furthermore, RA reduced the number of MU and the treatment time for all patients. Dose to organs at risk were equal or slightly higher using RA in comparison to CAT. RA provides a new alternative for single-fraction SRS irradiation combining advantages of short treatment time with lower number of MU and better conformity in addition to accuracy of stereotactic localisation in selected cases with uncomplicated clinical realization

  1. Rapid combined characterization of microorganism and host genotypes using a single technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjalmarsson, Sandra; Alderborn, Anders; Fock, Caroline; Muldin, Ingrid; Kling, Helene; Uhlén, Mathias; Engstrand, Lars

    2004-04-01

    Genetic information is becoming increasingly important in diagnosis and prognosis of infectious diseases. In this study we investigated the possibility of using a single technology, the Pyrosequencing trade mark technology (Biotage AB, Uppsala, Sweden), to gather several kinds of important genetic information from the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori, as well as from the carrier of the H. pylori infection. DNA from 87 clinical isolates of H. pylori, 50 isolates from H. pylori-infected transgenic mice and nine gastric biopsies from H. pylori-infected patients was analyzed for targets in the 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA and cytotoxin associated gene A (cagA) genes to determine species identity, clarithromycin susceptibility and virulence level, respectively. In addition, three single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human interleukin-1B (IL-1B) gene, reported to affect the risk of developing gastric cancer, were analyzed in the gastric biopsy samples. All DNA targets were processed and analyzed in parallel, enabling convenient genetic characterization of both pathogen and host. All genotypes were easily and accurately assigned. In the 16S rRNA analysis, 99.83% of the bases were correctly called. We conclude that genetic analysis using Pyrosequencing trade mark technology was nonlaborious, and gave highly accurate data for different kinds of target. We therefore believe that this technology has the potential to complement or in the future substitute the time-consuming traditional microbial identification and typing methods, as well as enabling rapid typing of relevant host genetic markers.

  2. Clinical Study of Extrapulmonary Head and Neck Tuberculosis: A Single-Institute 10-year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oishi, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Although the incidence of tuberculosis (TB in Japan has been decreasing yearly, Japan remains ranked as an intermediate-burden country for TB. Objective This study aims to investigate the current situation of head and neck extrapulmonary TB (EPTB diagnosed in our department. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 47 patients diagnosed with EPTB in the head and neck in our department between January 2005 and December 2014. The extracted data included sex and age distribution, development site, chief complaint, presence or absence of concomitant active pulmonary TB (PTB or history of TB, tuberculin skin test (TST results, interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA results, and duration from the first visit to the final diagnosis of EPTB. Results The subjects consisted of 20 men and 27 women, and age ranged from 6 to 84 years. The most common site was the cervical lymph nodes (30 patients, with the supraclavicular nodes being the most commonly affected (60%. Histopathological examination was performed on 28 patients. TST was positive in 9 out of 9 patients and the IGRA was positive in 18 out of 19 patients. We observed concomitant PTB in 15 out of the 47 patients. Mean duration from the first visit to the final diagnosis of EPTB was 56 days. Conclusion The clinical symptoms of TB, especially those in the head and neck region, are varied. Otolaryngologists should be especially aware of the extrapulmonary manifestations of TB to ensure early diagnosis and treatment from the public health viewpoint.

  3. A single and rapid calcium wave at egg activation in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna H. York-Andersen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Activation is an essential process that accompanies fertilisation in all animals and heralds major cellular changes, most notably, resumption of the cell cycle. While activation involves wave-like oscillations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in mammals, ascidians and polychaete worms and a single Ca2+ peak in fish and frogs, in insects, such as Drosophila, to date, it has not been shown what changes in intracellular Ca2+ levels occur. Here, we utilise ratiometric imaging of Ca2+ indicator dyes and genetically encoded Ca2+ indicator proteins to identify and characterise a single, rapid, transient wave of Ca2+ in the Drosophila egg at activation. Using genetic tools, physical manipulation and pharmacological treatments we demonstrate that the propagation of the Ca2+ wave requires an intact actin cytoskeleton and an increase in intracellular Ca2+ can be uncoupled from egg swelling, but not from progression of the cell cycle. We further show that mechanical pressure alone is not sufficient to initiate a Ca2+ wave. We also find that processing bodies, sites of mRNA decay and translational regulation, become dispersed following the Ca2+ transient. Based on this data we propose the following model for egg activation in Drosophila: exposure to lateral oviduct fluid initiates an increase in intracellular Ca2+ at the egg posterior via osmotic swelling, possibly through mechano-sensitive Ca2+ channels; a single Ca2+ wave then propagates in an actin dependent manner; this Ca2+ wave co-ordinates key developmental events including resumption of the cell cycle and initiation of translation of mRNAs such as bicoid.

  4. A survey of a population of anaesthesiologists from South India regarding practices for rapid sequence intubation in patients with head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyen Parida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Evidence and utility of the individual steps of the rapid sequence induction and tracheal intubation protocols have been debated, especially in the setting of traumatic brain injury. The purpose of this survey was to determine preferences in the current approach to rapid sequence intubation ( RSI in head injury patients among a population of anaesthesiologists from South India. Methods: A questionnaire was E-mailed to all the members of the Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists′ South Zone Chapter to ascertain their preferences, experience and comfort level with regard to their use of rapid sequence intubation techniques in adult patients with head injury. Participants were requested to indicate their practices for RSI technique for a head-injured patient upon arrival at the Emergency Medical Services department of their hospital. Results: The total response rate was 56.9% (530/932. Of the total respondents, 35% of the clinicians used cricoid pressure routinely, most respondents (68% stated that they pre-oxygenate the patients for about 3 min prior to RSI, thiopentone (61% and propofol (34% were commonly used prior to intubation. Rocuronium was the muscle relaxant of choice for RSI among the majority (44%, compared to succinylcholine (39%. Statistical analyses were performed after the initial entry onto a spreadsheet. Data were summarised descriptively using frequency distribution. Conclusion: In a rapid sequence intubation situation, the practice differed significantly among anaesthesiologists. Owing to disagreements and paucity of evidence-based data regarding the standards of RSI, it is apparent that RSI practice still has considerable variability in clinical practice.

  5. Incorporating single-side sparing in models for predicting parotid dose sparing in head and neck IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Lulin, E-mail: lulin.yuan@duke.edu; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yoo, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Jiang, Yuliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, China, 100191 (China); Ge, Yaorong [Department of Software and Information Systems, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Sparing of single-side parotid gland is a common practice in head-and-neck (HN) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. It is a special case of dose sparing tradeoff between different organs-at-risk. The authors describe an improved mathematical model for predicting achievable dose sparing in parotid glands in HN IMRT planning that incorporates single-side sparing considerations based on patient anatomy and learning from prior plan data. Methods: Among 68 HN cases analyzed retrospectively, 35 cases had physician prescribed single-side parotid sparing preferences. The single-side sparing model was trained with cases which had single-side sparing preferences, while the standard model was trained with the remainder of cases. A receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the best criterion that separates the two case groups using the physician's single-side sparing prescription as ground truth. The final predictive model (combined model) takes into account the single-side sparing by switching between the standard and single-side sparing models according to the single-side sparing criterion. The models were tested with 20 additional cases. The significance of the improvement of prediction accuracy by the combined model over the standard model was evaluated using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: Using the ROC analysis, the best single-side sparing criterion is (1) the predicted median dose of one parotid is higher than 24 Gy; and (2) that of the other is higher than 7 Gy. This criterion gives a true positive rate of 0.82 and a false positive rate of 0.19, respectively. For the bilateral sparing cases, the combined and the standard models performed equally well, with the median of the prediction errors for parotid median dose being 0.34 Gy by both models (p = 0.81). For the single-side sparing cases, the standard model overestimates the median dose by 7.8 Gy on average, while the predictions by the combined

  6. Improvement of brain single photon emission tomography (SPET) using transmission data acquisition in a four-head SPET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Kenya; Tanada, Shuji; Inoue, Takeshi; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Hamamoto, Ken

    1993-01-01

    Attenuation coefficient maps (μ-maps) are a useful way to compensate for non-uniform attenuation when performing single photon emission tomography (SPET). A new method was developed to record single photon transmission data and a μ-map for the brain was produced using a four-head SPET scanner. Transmission data were acquired by a gamma camera of opposite to a flood radioactive source attached to one of four gamma cameras in the four-head SPET scanner. Attenuation correction was performed using the iterative expectation maximization algorithm and the μ-map. Phantom studies demonstrated that this method could reconstruct the distribution of radioactivity more accurately than conventional methods, even for a severely non-uniform μ-map, and could improve the quality of SPET images. Clinical application to technetium-99m hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime (HMPAO) brain SPET also demonstrated the usefulness of this method. Thus, this method appears to be promising for improvement in the image quality and quantitative accuracy of brain SPET. (orig.)

  7. Single-step blood direct PCR: A robust and rapid method to diagnose triplet repeat disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inder; Swarup, Vishnu; Shakya, Sunil; Goyal, Vinay; Faruq, Mohammed; Srivastava, Achal Kumar

    2017-08-15

    DNA extraction prior to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification in genetic diagnoses of triplet repeat disorders (TRDs) is tedious and labour-intensive and has the limitations of sample contamination with foreign DNA, including that from preceding samples. Therefore, we aimed to develop a rapid, robust, and cost-effective method for expeditious genetic investigation of TRDs from whole blood as a DNA template. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 70 clinically suspected patients of progressive ataxia. The conventional method using genomic DNA and single-step Blood-Direct PCR (BD-PCR) method with just 2μl of whole blood sample were tested to amplify triplet repeat expansion in genes related to spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) types 1, 2, 3, 12 and Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA). Post-PCR, the allele sizes were mapped and repeat numbers were calculated using GeneMapper and macros run in Microsoft Excel programmes. Successful amplification of target regions was achieved in all samples by both methods. The frequency of the normal and mutated allele was concordant between both methods, diagnosing 37% positive for a mutation in either of the candidate genes. The BD-PCR resulted in higher intensities of product peaks of normal and pathogenic alleles. The nearly-accurate sizing of the normal and expanded allele was achieved in a shorter time (4-5h), without DNA extraction and any risk of cross contamination, which suggests the BD-PCR to be a reliable, inexpensive, and rapid method to confirm TRDs. This technique can be introduced in routine diagnostic procedures of other tandem repeat disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid on-site evaluation with dynamic telecytopathology for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of head and neck nonthyroid lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal K Khurana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE at the time of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (USGFNA of head and neck lesion is essential for obtaining adequate samples and providing the preliminary diagnosis. We summarize our experience with ROSE of USGFNA on head and neck nonthyroid lesions using telecytopathology. Materials and Methods: Real-time images of Diff-Quik stained cytology smears were obtained at ultrasound suite with an Olympus DP-70 digital camera attached to an Olympus CX41 microscope, and transmitted via ethernet by a cytotechnologist to a cytopathologist in cytopathology laboratory who rendered a preliminary diagnosis. Live communication was conducted with Vocera voice communication system. The ultrasound suite was located on different floor from the cytopathology laboratory. Accuracy of ROSE via telecytopathology was compared with an equal number of cases that received ROSE, prior to introduction of telecytopathology, via conventional microscopy. Results: Rapid on-site evaluation was performed on a total of 116 USGFNA of head and neck nonthyroid lesions. The telecytopathology system and conventional microscopy was used to evaluate equal number of cases (58 each. Preliminary diagnoses of benign, atypical/suspicious for malignancy, and positive for malignancy were 72.4%, 17.2% and 10.3% for telecytopathology, and 69.0%, 10.3% and 20.7% for conventional microscopy. None of the cases were deemed unsatisfactory. The overall concordance between the preliminary and final diagnoses was 94.8% for telecytopathology and 98.3% for conventional microscopy and was not statistically significant (P = 0.309. The causes of discordant preliminary and final diagnoses were mainly attributed to availability of cell block and Papanicolaou-stained slides for review or flow cytometry results for lymphoma cases at the time of final sign out. Conclusions: Telecytopathology is comparable with conventional microscopy in ROSE of USGFNA of head and

  9. Single-Layer Plication for Repair of Diastasis Recti: The Most Rapid and Efficient Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Luiz José Muaccad; Barbosa, Marcus Vinicius Jardini; Czapkowski, Adriano; Ajzen, Sergio; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Nahas, Fábio Xerfan

    2017-06-01

    Plication of the anterior rectus sheath is the most commonly used technique for repair of diastasis recti, but is also a time-consuming procedure. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and time required to repair diastasis recti using different plication techniques. Thirty women with similar abdominal deformities, who had had at least one pregnancy, were randomized into three groups to undergo abdominoplasty. Plication of the anterior rectus sheath was performed in two layers with 2-0 monofilament nylon suture (control group) or in a single layer with either a continuous 2-0 monofilament nylon suture (group I) or using a continuous barbed suture (group II). Operative time was recorded. All patients underwent ultrasound examination preoperatively and at 3 weeks and 6 months postoperatively to monitor for diastasis recurrence. The force required to bring the anterior rectus sheath to the midline was measured at the supraumbilical and infraumbilical levels. Patient age ranged from 26 to 50 years and body mass index from 20.56 to 29.17 kg/m2. A significant difference in mean operative time was found between the control and study groups (control group, 35 min:22 s; group I, 14 min:22 s; group II, 15 min:23 s; P < 0.001). Three patients in group II had recurrence of diastasis. There were no significant within- and between-group differences in tensile force on the aponeurosis. Plication of the anterior rectus sheath in a single-layer with a continuous suture showed to be an efficient and rapid technique for repair of diastasis recti. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Rapid single-flux quantum control of the energy potential in a double SQUID qubit circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Chiarello, Fabio; Leoni, Roberto; Torrioli, Guido; Carelli, Pasquale; Cosmelli, Carlo; Khabipov, Marat; Zorin, Alexander B; Balashov, Dmitri

    2007-01-01

    We report on the development and test of an integrated system composed of a flux qubit and a rapid single-flux quantum (RSFQ) circuit that allows qubit manipulation. The goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of control electronics integrated on the same chip as the qubit, in view of the application in quantum computation with superconducting devices. RSFQ logic relies on the storage and transmission of magnetic flux quanta and can be profitably used with superconducting qubits because of the speed, scalability, compatibility with the qubit fabrication process and low temperature environment. While standard RSFQ circuitry is well assessed, the application to quantum computing requires a complete rescaling of parameter values, in order to preserve the qubit coherence and reduce the power dissipation. In the system presented in this paper, the qubit role is played by a superconducting loop interrupted by a small dc SQUID, usually called a double SQUID, which behaves as a tunable rf-SQUID. Its energy potential has the shape of a double well, with the barrier between the wells controlled by magnetic flux applied to the inner dc SQUID. Here for the first time we report measurements at a base temperature of 370 mK in which flux control pulses with desired characteristics were supplied by a RSFQ circuit fabricated using non-standard parameters in the same chip as the qubit

  11. Comparison of virtual monochromatic series, iodine overlay maps, and single energy CT equivalent images in head and neck cancer conspicuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Michael; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Spector, Matthew; Forghani, Reza; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2017-09-29

    To compare lesion conspicuity amongst DECT monochromatic series (40, 45, 50keV), and single-energy CT (SECT) equivalent images in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Two readers compared DECT images to 70keV SECT equivalent series in 39 patients with HNSCC on lesion margin, enhancement, and overall conspicuity. The 45keV and 50keV images were significantly better (p-values ≤0.001) than the SECT equivalent in lesion enhancement, margins, and overall conspicuity for both readers. Readers mostly preferred the 50keV monochromatic series. DECT can provide better lesion visualization than SECT in HNSCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acupuncture and clinical hypnosis for facial and head and neck pain: a single crossover comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D P; Lu, G P; Kleinman, L

    2001-10-01

    Despite their long histories, acupuncture and hypnosis have only recently been acknowledged as valuable by the medical establishment in the U.S. Few studies have used rigorous prospective measurement to evaluate the individual or relative merits of hypnosis and acupuncture in specific clinical settings. In this study, 25 patients with various head and neck pain were studied. Each had an initial assessment of their pain, as well as of their attitudes and expectations. All patients received acupuncture, followed by a reassessment of their pain. After a washout period they received another assessment of pain before and after hypnosis therapy. Preferences for therapy were sought following the hypnotic intervention. Both acupuncture and hypnosis were effective at relieving pain under these conditions. The average relief in pain reported was 4.2 units on a ten point scale, with hypnosis reducing pain by a mean of 4.8 units, compared to 3.7 for acupuncture (p = 0.26). Patient characteristics appeared to impact the effectiveness of treatment: patients with acute pain benefited most from acupuncture treatment, whereas patients with psychogenic pain were more likely to benefit from hypnosis. Patients with chronic pain had more variation in their results. Patients who received healing suggestions from a tape during a hypnotic trance benefited more than those who received no such suggestion, and acupuncture patients who were needle phobic benefited less than those who were not fearful of needles. This study demonstrates the benefits of well designed studies of the effectiveness of these alternative modalities. More work is needed to help practitioners identify which patients are most likely to benefit from these complementary therapies.

  13. Comparative study between IMRT planning and RapidArc® sliding window for head and neck tumors; Estudo comparativo de planejamento entre IMRT sliding window e RapidArc® para tumores de cabeca e pescoco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirani, Luiz F.; Silva, Leonardo P.; Lima, Marilia B.; Bittencourt, Guilherme R.; Ferreira, Anne Caroline M.; Batista, Delano V.S., E-mail: nando_lfp@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    This study aims to evaluate the RapidArc (RA) technique in the treatment of head and neck tumors and compare the results of treatments with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the National Cancer Institute (INCA). Head and neck carcinomas have a natural history with relative expansion to others regions, especially in advanced levels. Faster treatments, with better coverage of the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and sparing more risks organs (ROs) are necessary and bring a better clinical impact. Ten patients with head and neck cancer, planned with IMRT technique were replanned using the RA technique. Some dosimetric indexes were calculated for both techniques, with the intention of verifying which of them, at the same time, would promote greater coverage of the PTV and preserve more healthy tissue. In terms of coverage, both indexes were similar. The RA technique was more efficient for delivered doses to ROs. The number of monitor units (MU), number of fields and treatments time estimated were lower than IMRT technique. Finally, the results have showed that the RA technique clearly reduces the treatment time, reducing the average and maximum dose to ROs and conforming the target as IMRT technique. (author)

  14. Peribulbar block in equine isolated heads. Development of a single needle technique and tomographic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vanessa rabbogliatti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Peribulbar block (PPB has been used in humans as a safer alternative to retrobulbar block (RBB. PBB, depends on the diffusion of anaesthetic solution into the muscle across the connective tissue and it is performed introducing the needle within the extraconal space. The advantages are fewer complications and palpebral akinesia. In Veterinary Medicine few studies describe this technique in dogs (Ahn J 2013 and cats (Shilo-Benjamini et al. 2013. Based on literature the aim of the study is to determinate, in equine specimens, feasibility of inferior PBB with single needle injection, by using contrast medium (CM, and to evaluate thought Computed Tomography (CT the distribution around the optic nerve (degrees. PBB was performed in 6 orbits. The mixture injected consisted of 20 ml of physiological solution and iodinated CM at 25%. Each periorbital area underwent three CT scans. A basal acquisition to assess the needle position before the injection, a second and third scan were performed immediately after injection, and after application of pressure on the periorbital surface area to promote CM diffusion. The needle position was measured from the tip to the optic nerve with a mean distance of 2,27 mm ± 0,28. The mean volume distribution before pressure application was 23,56 cm3 ± 2,58 and after pressure application was 27,56 cm3 ± 4,8.  The CM distribution, was defined (Nouvellon et al. 2010 “successful” in 4 orbits (>270° and “inadequate” in 2 orbits (<180°. The present study demonstrates feasibility of inferior PBB by single injection in horses for its simple and practical execution. Inferior PPB is a potential alternative to systemic administration of neuromuscular blocking agents for ophthalmic surgery. However, this approach needs to be evaluate in clinical trials to assess its feasibility and effectiveness in clinical practice for standing procedures.

  15. Occult primary tumors of the head and neck: accuracy of thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, S. A.; Balm, A. J.; Valdés Olmos, R. A.; Hoefnagel, C. A.; Hilgers, F. J.; Tan, I. B.; Pameijer, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography (thallium SPECT) and computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) in the detection of occult primary tumors of the head and neck. Study of diagnostic tests. National Cancer Institute, Amsterdam,

  16. Method for rapid multidiameter single-fiber reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy through a fiber bundle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelink, A.; Hoy, C.L.; Gamm, U.A.; Sterenborg, H.J.C.M.; Robinson, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated a means for quantifying the absorption and scattering properties of biological tissue through multidiameter single-fiber reflectance (MDSFR) spectroscopy. These measurements can be used to correct single-fiber fluorescence (SFF) spectra for the influence of optical

  17. 3D Rapid Prototyping for Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery: Applications in Image-Guidance, Surgical Simulation and Patient-Specific Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Harley H. L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Vescan, Allan; Daly, Michael J.; Prisman, Eitan; Irish, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of advanced fabrication technology across a broad spectrum of head and neck surgical procedures, including applications in endoscopic sinus surgery, skull base surgery, and maxillofacial reconstruction. The initial case studies demonstrated three applications of rapid prototyping technology are in head and neck surgery: i) a mono-material paranasal sinus phantom for endoscopy training ii) a multi-material skull base simulator and iii) 3D patient-specific mandible templates. Digital processing of these phantoms is based on real patient or cadaveric 3D images such as CT or MRI data. Three endoscopic sinus surgeons examined the realism of the endoscopist training phantom. One experienced endoscopic skull base surgeon conducted advanced sinus procedures on the high-fidelity multi-material skull base simulator. Ten patients participated in a prospective clinical study examining patient-specific modeling for mandibular reconstructive surgery. Qualitative feedback to assess the realism of the endoscopy training phantom and high-fidelity multi-material phantom was acquired. Conformance comparisons using assessments from the blinded reconstructive surgeons measured the geometric performance between intra-operative and pre-operative reconstruction mandible plates. Both the endoscopy training phantom and the high-fidelity multi-material phantom received positive feedback on the realistic structure of the phantom models. Results suggested further improvement on the soft tissue structure of the phantom models is necessary. In the patient-specific mandible template study, the pre-operative plates were judged by two blinded surgeons as providing optimal conformance in 7 out of 10 cases. No statistical differences were found in plate fabrication time and conformance, with pre-operative plating providing the advantage of reducing time spent in the operation room. The applicability of common model design and fabrication techniques

  18. 3D Rapid Prototyping for Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery: Applications in Image-Guidance, Surgical Simulation and Patient-Specific Modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harley H L Chan

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of advanced fabrication technology across a broad spectrum of head and neck surgical procedures, including applications in endoscopic sinus surgery, skull base surgery, and maxillofacial reconstruction. The initial case studies demonstrated three applications of rapid prototyping technology are in head and neck surgery: i a mono-material paranasal sinus phantom for endoscopy training ii a multi-material skull base simulator and iii 3D patient-specific mandible templates. Digital processing of these phantoms is based on real patient or cadaveric 3D images such as CT or MRI data. Three endoscopic sinus surgeons examined the realism of the endoscopist training phantom. One experienced endoscopic skull base surgeon conducted advanced sinus procedures on the high-fidelity multi-material skull base simulator. Ten patients participated in a prospective clinical study examining patient-specific modeling for mandibular reconstructive surgery. Qualitative feedback to assess the realism of the endoscopy training phantom and high-fidelity multi-material phantom was acquired. Conformance comparisons using assessments from the blinded reconstructive surgeons measured the geometric performance between intra-operative and pre-operative reconstruction mandible plates. Both the endoscopy training phantom and the high-fidelity multi-material phantom received positive feedback on the realistic structure of the phantom models. Results suggested further improvement on the soft tissue structure of the phantom models is necessary. In the patient-specific mandible template study, the pre-operative plates were judged by two blinded surgeons as providing optimal conformance in 7 out of 10 cases. No statistical differences were found in plate fabrication time and conformance, with pre-operative plating providing the advantage of reducing time spent in the operation room. The applicability of common model design and

  19. Development and evaluation of one step single tube multiplex RT-PCR for rapid detection and typing of dengue viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Parida Manmohan; Shrivastava Ambuj; Santhosh SR; Dash Paban; Saxena Parag; Rao PV

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Dengue is emerging as a major public health concern in many parts of the world. The development of a one-step, single tube, rapid, and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) for simultaneous detection and typing of dengue virus using serotype specific primers during acute phase of illness is reported. Results An optimal assay condition with zero background was established having no cross-reaction with closely related members of flavivirus (Jap...

  20. Evaluation of advanced hydraulic turbomachinery for underground pumped hydroelectric storage. Part 1. Single-stage regulated pump turbines for operating heads of 500 to 1000 m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigo, A.A.; Blomquist, C.A.; Degnan, J.R.

    1979-10-01

    High-head, large-capacity turbomachinery is needed for the concept of underground pumped hydroelectric storage to be technically and economically attractive. Single-stage, reversible, Francis-type pump turbines with adjustable wicket gates appear to offer the most economically attractive option for heads between about 500 and 1000 m. The feasibility of developing these types of machines for capacities up to 500 MW and operating heads up to 1000 m has been evaluated. Preliminary designs have been generated for six single-stage pump turbines. The designs are for capacities of 350 and 500 MW and for operating heads of 500, 750, and 1000 m. The report contains drawings of the machines along with material specifications and hydraulic performance data. Mechanical, hydraulic, and economic analyses indicate that these machines will behave according to the criteria used to design them and that they can be built at a reasonable cost. The stress and deflection responses of the 500-MW, 100-m-head pump turbine, determined by detailed finite element analysis techniques, give solid evidence of the integrity of the conceptual designs of the six units and indicate no unsolvable problems. Results of a life expectancy analysis of the wicket gates indicate that a near infinite life can be expected for these components when they are subjected to normal design loads. Efficiencies of 90.7 and 91.4% in the generating and pumping modes, respectively, can be expected for the 500-MW, 1000-m-head unit. Performances of the other five machines are comparable. The specific costs of the pump turbines in mid-1978 US dollars per kW vary from 19.2 to 11.8 over a head range of from 500 to 1000 m for the 500-MW machines and from 20.0 to 12.3 for the 350-MW machines.

  1. Validation of quantitative brain dopamine D2 receptor imaging with a conventional single-head SPET camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikkinen, P.; Liewendahl, K.; Savolainen, S.; Launes, J.

    1993-01-01

    Phantom measurements were performed with a conventional single-head single-photon emission tomography (SPET) camera in order to validate the relevance of the basal ganglia/frontal cortex iodine-123 iodobenzamide (IBZM) uptake ratios measured in patients. Inside a cylindrical phantom (diameter 22 cm), two cylinders with a diameter of 3.3 cm were inserted. The activity concentrations of the cylinders ranged from 6.0 to 22.6 kBq/ml and the cylinder/background activity ratios varied from 1.4 to 3.8. From reconstructed SPET images the cylinder/background activity ratios were calculated using three different regions of interest (ROIs). A linear relationship between the measured activity ratio and the true activity ratio was obtained. In patient studies, basal ganglia/frontal cortex IBZM uptake ratios determined from the reconstructed slices using attentuation correction prior to reconstruction were 1.30 ±0.03 in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (n = 9), 1,33 ±0.09 in infantile and juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (n = 7) and 1.34 ±0.05 in narcolepsy (n = 8). Patients with Huntington's disease had significantly lower ratios (1.09 ±0.04, n = 5). The corrected basal ganglia/frontal cortex ratios, determined using linear regression, were about 80 % higher. The use of dual-window scatter correction increased the measured ratios by about 10 %. Although comprehensive correction methods can further improve the resolution in SPET images, the resolution of the SPET system used by us (1.5 - 2 cm) will determine what is achievable in basal ganglia D2 receptor imaging. (orig.)

  2. Multicomponent Treatment of Rapid Naming, Reading Rate, and Visual Attention in Single and Double Deficit Dyslexics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kary A.

    2013-01-01

    While the relationship between rapid automatic naming (RAN) deficiencies and dyslexia (reading disability) is well developed and supported in the behavioral and medical research literature to date, direct treatment of the specific RAN deficiency in addition to subsequently poor reading outcomes in the lexical skill of reading rate and the…

  3. A simple and rapid method for high-resolution visualization of single-ion tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Omichi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Prompt determination of spatial points of single-ion tracks plays a key role in high-energy particle induced-cancer therapy and gene/plant mutations. In this study, a simple method for the high-resolution visualization of single-ion tracks without etching was developed through the use of polyacrylic acid (PAA-N, N’-methylene bisacrylamide (MBAAm blend films. One of the steps of the proposed method includes exposure of the irradiated films to water vapor for several minutes. Water vapor was found to promote the cross-linking reaction of PAA and MBAAm to form a bulky cross-linked structure; the ion-track scars were detectable at a nanometer scale by atomic force microscopy. This study demonstrated that each scar is easily distinguishable, and the amount of generated radicals of the ion tracks can be estimated by measuring the height of the scars, even in highly dense ion tracks. This method is suitable for the visualization of the penumbra region in a single-ion track with a high spatial resolution of 50 nm, which is sufficiently small to confirm that a single ion hits a cell nucleus with a size ranging between 5 and 20 μm.

  4. Rapid approach for cloning bacterial single-genes directly from soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obtaining functional genes of bacteria from environmental samples usually depends on library-based approach which is not favored as its large amount of work with small possibility of positive clones. A kind of bacterial single-gene encoding glutamine synthetase (GS) was selected as example to detect the efficiency of ...

  5. Rapid induction of dopamine sensitization in the nucleus accumbens shell induced by a single injection of cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Bryan F; Bryan, Myranda A; Popov, Pavlo; Robinson, Terry E; Aragona, Brandon J

    2017-05-01

    Repeated intermittent exposure to cocaine results in the neurochemical sensitization of dopamine (DA) transmission within the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Indeed, the excitability of DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is enhanced within hours of initial psychostimulant exposure. However, it is not known if this is accompanied by a comparably rapid change in the ability of cocaine to increase extracellular DA concentrations in the ventral striatum. To address this question we used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) in awake-behaving rats to measure DA responses in the NAc shell following an initial intravenous cocaine injection, and then again 2-h later. Both injections quickly elevated DA levels in the NAc shell, but the second cocaine infusion produced a greater effect than the first, indicating sensitization. This suggests that a single injection of cocaine induces sensitization-related plasticity very rapidly within the mesolimbic DA system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid and Quantitative Measurement of Single Quantum Dots in a Sheath Flow Cuvette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Lihong; Jin, Shenghao; Li, Weifeng; Hang, Wei; Yan, Xiaomei

    2017-09-19

    Semiconducting quantum dots (QDs) are finding a wide range of biomedical applications due to their intense fluorescence brightness and long-term photostability. Here, we report precise quantification of the fluorescence intensity of single QDs on a laboratory-built high-sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM). The nearly uniform illumination of the particles at the intense portions of the radiation field resulted in narrowly distributed signals with high signal-to-noise ratios. By analysis of thousands of QDs individually in as little time as 1 min, intrinsic polydispersity was quickly revealed in a statistically robust manner. Applications of this technique in QD quality assessment, study of metal ion influence, and evaluation of aggregation upon biomolecule coupling are presented. Moreover, an accurate measurement of the QD particle concentration was achieved via single-particle enumeration. HSFCM is believed to provide a powerful characterization tool for QD synthesis and application development.

  7. A single-step method for rapid extraction of total lipids from green microalgae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Axelsson

    Full Text Available Microalgae produce a wide range of lipid compounds of potential commercial interest. Total lipid extraction performed by conventional extraction methods, relying on the chloroform-methanol solvent system are too laborious and time consuming for screening large numbers of samples. In this study, three previous extraction methods devised by Folch et al. (1957, Bligh and Dyer (1959 and Selstam and Öquist (1985 were compared and a faster single-step procedure was developed for extraction of total lipids from green microalgae. In the single-step procedure, 8 ml of a 2∶1 chloroform-methanol (v/v mixture was added to fresh or frozen microalgal paste or pulverized dry algal biomass contained in a glass centrifuge tube. The biomass was manually suspended by vigorously shaking the tube for a few seconds and 2 ml of a 0.73% NaCl water solution was added. Phase separation was facilitated by 2 min of centrifugation at 350 g and the lower phase was recovered for analysis. An uncharacterized microalgal polyculture and the green microalgae Scenedesmus dimorphus, Selenastrum minutum, and Chlorella protothecoides were subjected to the different extraction methods and various techniques of biomass homogenization. The less labour intensive single-step procedure presented here allowed simultaneous recovery of total lipid extracts from multiple samples of green microalgae with quantitative yields and fatty acid profiles comparable to those of the previous methods. While the single-step procedure is highly correlated in lipid extractability (r² = 0.985 to the previous method of Folch et al. (1957, it allowed at least five times higher sample throughput.

  8. Rapid detection of single nucleotide mutation in p53 gene based on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of target complementary DNA in the range 0.5 fM to 0.05 nM, with a detection limit of 0.36 ± 0.04 fM. ... reaction between single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and its ... ing more selective and sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensors.12,13. Graphene, a new class of two-dimensional sheet material, which was discovered by Geim ...

  9. Single-strand-conformation polymorphism of ribosomal DNA for rapid species differentiation in genus Phytophthora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; Hong, Chuanxue; Richardson, Patricia A; Gallegly, Mannon E

    2003-08-01

    Single-strand-conformation polymorphism (SSCP) of ribosomal DNA of 29 species (282 isolates) of Phytophthora was characterized in this study. Phytophthora boehmeriae, Phytophthora botryosa, Phytophthora cactorum, Phytophthora cambivora, Phytophthora capsici, Phytophthora cinnamomi, Phytophthora colocasiae, Phytophthora fragariae, Phytophthora heveae, Phytophthora hibernalis, Phytophthora ilicis, Phytophthora infestans, Phytophthora katsurae, Phytophthora lateralis, Phytophthora meadii, Phytophthora medicaginis, Phytophthora megakarya, Phytophthora nicotianae, Phytophthora palmivora, Phytophthora phaseoli, Phytophthora pseudotsugae, Phytophthora sojae, Phytophthora syringae, and Phytophthora tropicalis each showed a unique SSCP pattern. Phytophthora citricola, Phytophthora citrophthora, Phytophthora cryptogea, Phytophthora drechsleri, and Phytophthora megasperma each had more than one distinct pattern. A single-stranded DNA ladder also was developed, which facilitates comparison of SSCP patterns within and between gels. With a single DNA fingerprint, 277 isolates of Phytophthora recovered from irrigation water and plant tissues in Virginia were all correctly identified into eight species at substantially reduced time, labor, and cost. The SSCP analysis presented in this work will aid in studies on taxonomy, genetics, and ecology of the genus Phytophthora.

  10. Comparison of plastic single-use and metal reusable laryngoscope blades for orotracheal intubation during rapid sequence induction of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, Julien; Marmion, Frédéric; Birenbaum, Aurélie; Nicolas-Robin, Armelle; Coriat, Pierre; Riou, Bruno; Langeron, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    Plastic single-use laryngoscope blades are inexpensive and carry a lower risk of infection compared with metal reusable blades, but their efficiency during rapid sequence induction remains a matter of debate. The authors therefore compared plastic and metal blades during rapid sequence induction in a prospective randomized trial. Two hundred eighty-four adult patients undergoing general anesthesia requiring rapid sequence induction were randomly assigned on a weekly basis to either plastic single-use or reusable metal blades (cluster randomization). After induction, a 60-s period was allowed to complete intubation. In the case of failed intubation, a second attempt was performed using metal blade. The primary endpoint of the study was the rate of failed intubations, and the secondary endpoint was the incidence of complications (oxygen desaturation, lung aspiration, and oropharynx trauma). Both groups were similar in their main characteristics, including risk factors for difficult intubation. On the first attempt, the rate of failed intubation was significantly increased in plastic blade group (17 vs. 3%; P < 0.01). In metal blade group, 50% of failed intubations were still difficult after the second attempt. In plastic blade group, all initial failed intubations were successfully intubated using metal blade, with an improvement in Cormack and Lehane grade. There was a significant increase in the complication rate in plastic group (15 vs. 6%; P < 0.05). In rapid sequence induction of anesthesia, the plastic laryngoscope blade is less efficient than a metal blade and thus should not be recommended for use in this clinical setting.

  11. Aspiration in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Centre Experience of Clinical Profile, Bacterial Isolates and Antibiotic Sensitivity Pattern

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmaiah, K. C.; Sirsath, Nagesh T.; Subramanyam, Jayshree R.; Govind, Babu K.; Lokanatha, D.; Shenoy, Ashok M.

    2013-01-01

    Most patients with head and neck cancer have dysphagia and are at increased risk of having aspiration and subsequent pneumonia. It can cause prolonged hospitalization, treatment delay and/or interruption and mortality in cancer patients. The treatment of these infections often relies on empirical antibiotics based on local microbiology and antibiotic sensitivity patterns. The aim of present study is to analyse respiratory tract pathogens isolated by sputum culture in head and neck cancer pati...

  12. Bilinear common spatial pattern for single-trial ERP-based rapid serial visual presentation triage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K; Shen, K; Shao, S; Ng, W C; Li, X

    2012-08-01

    Common spatial pattern (CSP) analysis is a useful tool for the feature extraction of event-related potentials (ERP). However, CSP is essentially time invariant, and thus unable to exploit the temporal information of ERP. This paper proposes a variant of CSP, namely bilinear common spatial pattern (BCSP), which is capable of accommodating both spatial and temporal information. BCSP generalizes CSP through iteratively optimizing bilinear filters. These bilinear filters constitute a spatio-temporal subspace in which the separation between two conditions is maximized. The method is unique in the sense that it is mathematically intuitive and simple, as all the bilinear filters are obtained by maximizing the power ratio as CSP does. The proposed method was evaluated on 20 subjects' ERP data collected in rapid serial visual presentation triage experiments. The results show that BCSP achieved significantly higher average test accuracy (12.3% higher, p < 0.001).

  13. Multi-resonance effects within a single chirp in broadband rotational spectroscopy: The rapid adiabatic passage regime for benzonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, David; Alvin Shubert, V.; Betz, Thomas; Schnell, Melanie

    2012-10-01

    We report here pronounced, stepwise multi-resonance excitations in benzonitrile arising from a single 1 μs broadband 2-8.3 GHz microwave chirp, observed with our new chirped-pulse broadband rotational spectrometer, COMPACT. Such multi-resonance excitations significantly alter the relative intensity patterns and are a strong indication that, for the given experimental conditions and using benzonitrile as a polar test molecule (μA = 4.5152 D), the rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) regime for strong coupling must be applied. This finding is contrary to previous discussions of chirped-pulse rotational spectroscopy, where the linear fast passage regime of weak coupling has been assumed.

  14. Rapid acquisition of mean Raman spectra of eukaryotic cells for a robust single cell classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schie, Iwan W; Kiselev, Roman; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-11-14

    Raman spectroscopy has previously been used to identify eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. While prokaryotic cells are small in size and can be assessed by a single Raman spectrum, the larger size of eukaryotic cells and their complex organization requires the acquisition of multiple Raman spectra to properly characterize them. A Raman spectrum from a diffraction-limited spot at an arbitrary location within a cell results in spectral variations that affect classification approaches. To probe whole cells with Raman imaging at high spatial resolution is time consuming, because a large number of Raman spectra need to be collected, resulting in low cell throughput and impairing statistical analysis due to low cell numbers. Here we propose a method to overcome the effects of cellular heterogeneity by acquiring integrated Raman spectra covering a large portion of a cell. The acquired spectrum represents the mean macromolecular composition of a cell with an exposure time that is comparable to acquisition of a single Raman spectrum. Data sets were collected from T lymphocyte Jurkat cells, and pancreatic cell lines Capan1 and MiaPaca2. Cell classification by support vector machines was compared for single spectra, spectra of images and integrated Raman spectra of cells. The integrated approach provides better and more stable prediction for individual cells, and in the current implementation, the mean macromolecular information of a cell can be acquired faster than with the acquisition of individual spectra from a comparable region. It is expected that this approach will have a major impact on the implementation of Raman based cell classification.

  15. Rapid single step subcloning procedure by combined action of type II and type IIs endonucleases with ligase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingenspor Martin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subcloning of a DNA fragment from an entry vector into a destination vector is a routinely performed task in molecular biology labs. Results We here present a novel benchtop procedure to achieve rapid recombination into any destination vector of choice with the sole requirement of an endonuclease recognition site. The method relies on a specifically designed entry vector and the combined action of type II and type IIs endonucleases with ligase. The formulation leads to accumulation of a single stable cloning product representing the desired insert carrying destination vector. Conclusion The described method provides a fast single step procedure for routine subcloning from an entry vector into a series of destination vectors with the same restriction enzyme recognition site.

  16. Rapid single step subcloning procedure by combined action of type II and type IIs endonucleases with ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Tobias; Klingenspor, Martin

    2007-11-26

    The subcloning of a DNA fragment from an entry vector into a destination vector is a routinely performed task in molecular biology labs. We here present a novel benchtop procedure to achieve rapid recombination into any destination vector of choice with the sole requirement of an endonuclease recognition site. The method relies on a specifically designed entry vector and the combined action of type II and type IIs endonucleases with ligase. The formulation leads to accumulation of a single stable cloning product representing the desired insert carrying destination vector. The described method provides a fast single step procedure for routine subcloning from an entry vector into a series of destination vectors with the same restriction enzyme recognition site.

  17. Scanning, Multibeam, Single Photon Lidars for Rapid, Large Scale, High Resolution, Topographic and Bathymetric Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Degnan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Several scanning, single photon sensitive, 3D imaging lidars are herein described that operate at aircraft above ground levels (AGLs between 1 and 11 km, and speeds in excess of 200 knots. With 100 beamlets and laser fire rates up to 60 kHz, we, at the Sigma Space Corporation (Lanham, MD, USA, have interrogated up to 6 million ground pixels per second, all of which can record multiple returns from volumetric scatterers such as tree canopies. High range resolution has been achieved through the use of subnanosecond laser pulsewidths, detectors and timing receivers. The systems are presently being deployed on a variety of aircraft to demonstrate their utility in multiple applications including large scale surveying, bathymetry, forestry, etc. Efficient noise filters, suitable for near realtime imaging, have been shown to effectively eliminate the solar background during daytime operations. Geolocation elevation errors measured to date are at the subdecimeter level. Key differences between our Single Photon Lidars, and competing Geiger Mode lidars are also discussed.

  18. Trapping, manipulation and rapid rotation of NBD-C8 fluorescent single microcrystals in optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GALAUP, Jean-Pierre; RODRIGUEZ-OTAZO, Mariela; AUGIER-CALDERIN, Angel; LAMERE; Jean-Francois; FERY-FORGUES, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    We have built an optical tweezers experiment based on an inverted microscope to trap and manipulate single crystals of micro or sub-micrometer size made from fluorescent molecules of 4-octylamino-7-nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD-C8). These single crystals have parallelepiped shapes and exhibit birefringence properties evidenced through optical experiments between crossed polarizers in a polarizing microscope. The crystals are uniaxial with their optical axis oriented along their largest dimension. Trapped in the optical trap, the organic micro-crystals are oriented in such a way that their long axis is along the direction of the beam propagation, and their short axis follows the direction of the linear polarization. Therefore, with linearly polarized light, simply rotating the light polarization can orient the crystal. When using circularly or only elliptically polarized light, the crystal can spontaneously rotate and reach rotation speed of several hundreds of turns per second. A surprising result has been observed: when the incident power is growing up, the rotation speed increases to reach a maximum value and then decreases even when the power is still growing up. Moreover, this evolution is irreversible. Different possible explanations can be considered. The development of a 3D control of the crystals by dynamical holography using liquid crystal spatial modulators will be presented and discussed on the basis of the most recent results obtained. (Author)

  19. Rapid high resolution single nucleotide polymorphism-comparative genome hybridization mapping in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flibotte, Stephane; Edgley, Mark L; Maydan, Jason; Taylor, Jon; Zapf, Rick; Waterston, Robert; Moerman, Donald G

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a significantly improved and simplified method for high-resolution mapping of phenotypic traits in Caenorhabditis elegans using a combination of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and oligo array comparative genome hybridization (array CGH). We designed a custom oligonucleotide array using a subset of confirmed SNPs between the canonical wild-type Bristol strain N2 and the Hawaiian isolate CB4856, populated with densely overlapping 50-mer probes corresponding to both N2 and CB4856 SNP sequences. Using this method a mutation can be mapped to a resolution of approximately 200 kb in a single genetic cross. Six mutations representing each of the C. elegans chromosomes were detected unambiguously and at high resolution using genomic DNA from populations derived from as few as 100 homozygous mutant segregants of mutant N2/CB4856 heterozygotes. Our method completely dispenses with the PCR, restriction digest, and gel analysis of standard SNP mapping and should be easy to extend to any organism with interbreeding strains. This method will be particularly powerful when applied to difficult or hard-to-map low-penetrance phenotypes. It should also be possible to map polygenic traits using this method.

  20. Unilateral and bilateral neck SIB for head and neck cancer patients. Intensity-modulated proton therapy, tomotherapy, and RapidArc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stromberger, Carmen; Budach, Volker; Ghadjar, Pirus; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiotherapy, Berlin (Germany); Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella [Humanitas Cancer Center Milan, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Jamil, Basil [Klinikum Frankfurt Oder, Praxis fuer Strahlentherapie, Frankfurt Oder (Germany); Raguse, Jan D. [Clinic for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Boettcher, Arne [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    To compare simultaneous integrated boost plans for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), helical tomotherapy (HT), and RapidArc therapy (RA) for patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 20 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck received definitive chemoradiation with bilateral (n = 14) or unilateral (n = 6) neck irradiation and were planned using IMPT, HT, and RA with 54.4, 60.8, and 70.4 GyE/Gy in 32 fractions. Dose distributions, coverage, conformity, homogeneity to planning target volumes (PTV)s and sparing of organs at risk and normal tissue were compared. All unilateral and bilateral plans showed excellent PTV coverage and acceptable dose conformity. For unilateral treatment, IMPT delivered substantially lower mean doses to contralateral salivary glands (< 0.001-1.1 Gy) than both rotational techniques did (parotid gland: 6-10 Gy; submandibular gland: 15-20 Gy). Regarding the sparing of classical organs at risk for bilateral treatment, IMPT and HT were similarly excellent and RA was satisfactory. For unilateral neck irradiation, IMPT may minimize the dry mouth risk in this subgroup but showed no advantage over HT for bilateral neck treatment regarding classical organ-at-risk sparing. All methods satisfied modern standards regarding toxicity and excellent target coverage for unilateral and bilateral treatment of head and neck cancer at the planning level. (orig.) [German] Planvergleich von intensitaetsmodulierter Protonentherapie (IMPT), Tomotherapie (HT) und RapidArc-Therapie (RA) fuer Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region unter Anwendung des simultan integrierten Boost-Konzepts (SIB). Fuer 20 Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region und bilateraler (n = 14) oder unilateraler (n = 6) zervikaler primaerer Radiochemotherapie erfolgte eine IMPT-, HT- und RA-Planung mit 54,4, 60,8 und 70,4 GyE/Gy in 32 Fraktionen. Die Dosisverteilung, Abdeckung, Konformitaet und Homogenitaet der PTVs sowie die

  1. Robot-assisted duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection with pancreaticogastrostomy for benign or premalignant pancreatic head lesions: a single-centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Jin, Jia-Bin; Zhan, Qian; Deng, Xia-Xing; Peng, Cheng-Hong; Shen, Bai-Yong

    2018-03-02

    The purpose of this study was to compare short- and long-term outcomes of modified robot-assisted duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (RA-DPPHR) versus robot-assisted pancreaticoduodenectomy (RA-PD). Matched for age, sex, ASA classification, tumour size, history of abdominal surgery and pathological type, 34 patients undergoing RA-DPPHR and 34 patients undergoing RA-PD between January 2010 and December 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. The RA-DPPHR group had shorter surgical time (188.2 vs. 386.3 min, p < 0.001) and less blood loss (168.2 vs. 386.3 ml, p = 0.026) but higher complication rate (47.1% vs. 32.4%, p = 0.105) and pancreatic fistula rate (32.4% vs. 17.6%, p = 0.161). Hospital mortality was 2.9%. Exocrine insufficiency was lower in the RA-DPPHR group (3.0% vs. 24.2%, p = 0.027). Endocrine insufficiency was observed in one RA-DPPHR patient and 5 RA-PD patients (p = 0.197). Modified RA-DPPHR benefits in terms of better conservation of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic functions at the expense of a significant morbidity and non-zero mortality. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Development and evaluation of one step single tube multiplex RT-PCR for rapid detection and typing of dengue viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parida Manmohan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue is emerging as a major public health concern in many parts of the world. The development of a one-step, single tube, rapid, and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR for simultaneous detection and typing of dengue virus using serotype specific primers during acute phase of illness is reported. Results An optimal assay condition with zero background was established having no cross-reaction with closely related members of flavivirus (Japanese encephalitis, West Nile, Yellow fever and alphavirus (Chikungunya. The feasibility of M-RT-PCR assay for clinical diagnosis was validated with 620 acute phase dengue patient sera samples of recent epidemics in India. The comparative evaluation vis a vis conventional virus isolation revealed higher sensitivity. None of the forty healthy serum samples screened in the present study revealed any amplification, thereby establishing specificity of the reported assay for dengue virus only. Conclusion These findings clearly suggested that M-RT-PCR assay reported in the present study is the rapid and cost-effective method for simultaneous detection as well as typing of the dengue virus in acute phase patient serum samples. Thus, the M-RT-PCR assay developed in this study will serve as a very useful tool for rapid diagnosis and typing of dengue infections in endemic areas.

  3. Impact of target probability on single-trial EEG target detection in a difficult rapid serial visual presentation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecotti, Hubert; Sato-Reinhold, Joyce; Sy, Jocelyn L; Elliott, James C; Eckstein, Miguel P; Giesbrecht, Barry

    2011-01-01

    In non-invasive brain-computer interface (BCI), the analysis of event-related potentials (ERP) has typically focused on averaged trials, a current trend is to analyze single-trial evoked response individually with new approaches in pattern recognition and signal processing. Such single trial detection requires a robust response that can be detected in a variety task conditions. Here, we investigated the influence of target probability, a key factor known to influence the amplitude of the evoked response, on single trial target classification in a difficult rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task. Our classification approach for detecting target vs. non target responses, considers spatial filters obtained through the maximization of the signal to signal-plus-noise ratio, and then uses the resulting information as inputs to a Bayesian discriminant analysis. The method is evaluated across eight healthy subjects, on four probability conditions (P=0.05, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50). We show that the target probability has a statistically significant effect on both the behavioral performance and the target detection. The best mean area under the ROC curve is achieved with P=0.10, AUC=0.82. These results suggest that optimal performance of ERP detection in RSVP tasks is critically dependent on target probability.

  4. Revisiting an era in Germany from the perspective of adolescents in mother-headed single-parent families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepali; Silbereisen, Rainer K

    2007-02-01

    Much of the documented work on families headed by single mothers is based on empirical evidence from North America and a few Anglo-Saxon countries. Many researchers consider single-mother families to be at a disadvantage because of nonsupportive family policies. This paper uses data from a social context that differed hugely in this respect-the German Democratic Republic (GDR). The GDR provided extensive state support to single-mother families and, thus, was vastly different from other countries. Based on a literature review and using Hill's family stress theory, this paper is based on the hypothesis that adolescents living in mother-headed single-parent families and those living with their biological parents would have near-similar social outcomes (display of psychosomatic symptoms, perception of stress, display of delinquent behaviour, life satisfaction, academic self-efficacy, and academic grades) and family-related outcomes (relationship with parents and perception of family environment). Further, it was hypothesized that adolescents from stepfather families would display more negative social and family-related outcomes when compared with respondents from the other two family types. The sample comprised 1302 adolescents (M  =  13.82 years, SD  =  1.88) who were recruited from the city of Leipzig in the year immediately following German unification, 1991. Respondents reported on measures of psychosomatic symptoms, stress, delinquency, life satisfaction, academic achievement, and family-related variables. ANCOVAs, with a control for income adjusted for household size, indicated adolescents from single-mother families to have very similar experiences to respondents living with their biological parents on all measures except for their assessment of family environment. Adolescents living in stepfather families reported the least favourable experiences. Results are indicative of a social context in Germany that, despite unification and the early hardships for

  5. Aspiration in head and neck cancer patients: a single centre experience of clinical profile, bacterial isolates and antibiotic sensitivity pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmaiah, K C; Sirsath, Nagesh T; Subramanyam, Jayshree R; Govind, Babu K; Lokanatha, D; Shenoy, Ashok M

    2013-07-01

    Most patients with head and neck cancer have dysphagia and are at increased risk of having aspiration and subsequent pneumonia. It can cause prolonged hospitalization, treatment delay and/or interruption and mortality in cancer patients. The treatment of these infections often relies on empirical antibiotics based on local microbiology and antibiotic sensitivity patterns. The aim of present study is to analyse respiratory tract pathogens isolated by sputum culture in head and neck cancer patients undergoing treatment at a tertiary cancer centre in South India who presented with features of aspiration. The study is carried out to establish empirical antibiotic policy for head and neck cancer patients who present with features of aspiration. This was a retrospective study. The study included sputum samples sent for culture and sensitivity from January 2011 to December 2012. Analysis of microbiologic species isolated in sputum specimen and the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of the bacterial isolates was performed. A detailed study of case files of all patients was done to find out which is the most common site prone for producing aspiration. There were 47 (31.54 %) gram positive isolates and 102 (68.45 %) gram negative isolates. The most common bacterial isolates were Klebsiella pneumoniae (25.50 %), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16.77 %) and Haemophilus influenzae (15.43 %). Levofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic with excellent activity against both gram positive and gram negative isolates. Most patients with aspiration had laryngeal cancer (34.89 %). Aspiration pneumonia was present in 14 (9.39 %) patients. Gram negative bacteria are common etiologic agents in head and neck cancer patients presenting with features of aspiration. Levofloxacin should be started as empirical antibiotic in these patients while awaiting sputum culture sensitivity report. As aspiration in head and neck cancer is an underreported event such institutional antibiotic sensitivity

  6. Head-to-head comparison of ranibizumab PRN versus single-dose dexamethasone for branch retinal vein occlusion (COMRADE-B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattenbach, Lars-Olof; Feltgen, Nicolas; Bertelmann, Thomas; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Berk, Hüsnü; Eter, Nicole; Lang, Gabriele E; Rehak, Matus; Taylor, Simon R; Wolf, Armin; Weiss, Claudia; Paulus, Eva-Maria; Pielen, Amelie; Hoerauf, Hans

    2018-02-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of ranibizumab 0.5 mg versus dexamethasone 0.7 mg according to their European labels in macular oedema secondary to branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in a 6-month, phase IIIb, randomized trial. Patients received either monthly ranibizumab for 3 months followed by Pro re nata (PRN) treatment (n = 126) or a sustained-release dexamethasone implant followed by PRN sham injections (n = 118). Main outcomes were mean average change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) from baseline to month 1 through month 6, mean changes in BCVA and foveal centre point thickness (FCPT), and adverse events (AEs). There was no difference in BCVA gains between the treatments prior to month 3. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) gain with dexamethasone declined thereafter. From month 3 to month 6, mean BCVA change from baseline was significantly higher with ranibizumab than with dexamethasone [raw means (standard deviation):+16.2 (±11) letters versus +9.3 (±10.1) letters]. At month 6, the difference in BCVA gains from baseline was +17.3 letters in the ranibizumab versus +9.2 letters in the dexamethasone group. Patients in the ranibizumab group received a mean of 2.94 loading injections and 1.74 PRN retreatment injections, while those in the dexamethasone group received a single loading injection. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and AEs were more frequent with dexamethasone than ranibizumab treatment. Ranibizumab PRN resulted in greater visual acuity (VA) gains in macular oedema following BRVO compared with single-dose dexamethasone over a 6-month study period, observed from month 3, when administered according to their European label. In clinical practice, retreatment with dexamethasone may be required prior to this point. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Rapidly Progressive Seeding of a Community Acquired Pathogen in an Immune-competent Host--End Organ Damage from Head to Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Miranda, Daisy; Al-Saffar, Farah; Ibrahim, Saif; Font-Diaz, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a 64-years-old male patient that presented to our hospital with a chief complaint of acute worsening of his usual chronic lower back pain, progressive weakness in lower extremities and subjective fevers at home. Spine CT failed to demonstrate any infectious foci but showed partially visualized lung cavitary lesion and renal pole abnormalities. Blood cultures grew methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus Aureus (MSSA). Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) showed no signs of infective endocarditis (IE). Later, the patient experienced an acute deterioration on clinical status and examination showed development of a new murmur. He also developed new hemiparesis with up-going babinski reflex. A head MRI showed multiple infarcts. MRI spine displayed osteomyelitis at T12-L1. Cerebro-spinal fluid was positive for meningitis. A transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) was performed demonstrating new severe mitral and mild tricuspid regurgitations with a definitive 1.5 cm mobile vegetation on posterior mitral leaflet. We present is a very interesting case of a rapidly progressive MSSA infection. MSSA meningitis is a rare disease; there are only few reported cases in the literature to date. We describe a case of MSSA bacteremia, of questionable source, that resulted in MSSA endocarditis affecting right and left heart in a patient who did not have a history of intravenous drug use (IVDU) or immunosuppression. The case was complicated by septic emboli to systemic circulation involving the kidneys, vertebral spine (osteomyelitis), lungs and brain with consequent meningitis and stroke. Even when MSSA infections are well known, to our knowledge there are no previous case reports describing such an acute-simultaneous-manifestation of multi-end-organ failure, including meningitis and stroke. These latter are rarely reported, even individually.

  8. A rapid method for optimization of the rocket propulsion system for single-stage-to-orbit vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldred, C. H.; Gordon, S. V.

    1976-01-01

    A rapid analytical method for the optimization of rocket propulsion systems is presented for a vertical take-off, horizontal landing, single-stage-to-orbit launch vehicle. This method utilizes trade-offs between propulsion characteristics affecting flight performance and engine system mass. The performance results from a point-mass trajectory optimization program are combined with a linearized sizing program to establish vehicle sizing trends caused by propulsion system variations. The linearized sizing technique was developed for the class of vehicle systems studied herein. The specific examples treated are the optimization of nozzle expansion ratio and lift-off thrust-to-weight ratio to achieve either minimum gross mass or minimum dry mass. Assumed propulsion system characteristics are high chamber pressure, liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen propellants, conventional bell nozzles, and the same fixed nozzle expansion ratio for all engines on a vehicle.

  9. Characterization of a fabrication process for the integration of superconducting qubits and rapid-single-flux-quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Groenberg, Leif; Carelli, Pasquale; Chiarello, Fabio; Cosmelli, Carlo; Leoni, Roberto; Poletto, Stefano; Torrioli, Guido; Hassel, Juha; Helistoe, Panu

    2006-01-01

    In order to integrate superconducting qubits with rapid-single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) control circuitry, it is necessary to develop a fabrication process that simultaneously fulfils the requirements of both elements: low critical current density, very low operating temperature (tens of millikelvin) and reduced dissipation on the qubit side; high operation frequency, large stability margins, low dissipated power on the RSFQ side. For this purpose, VTT has developed a fabrication process based on Nb trilayer technology, which allows the on-chip integration of superconducting qubits and RSFQ circuits even at very low temperature. Here we present the characterization (at 4.2 K) of the process from the point of view of the Josephson devices and show that they are suitable to build integrated superconducting qubits

  10. Single-shot T1 mapping of the corpus callosum: A rapid characterization of fiber bundle anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eHofer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Using diffusion-tensor MRI and fiber tractography the topographic organization of the corpus callosum (CC has been described to comprise 5 segments with fibers projecting into prefrontal (I, premotor and supplementary motor (II, primary motor (III, and primary sensory areas (IV, as well as into parietal, temporal, and occipital cortical areas (V. In order to more rapidly characterize the underlying anatomy of these segments, this study used a novel single-shot T1 mapping method to quantitatively determine T1 relaxation times in the human CC. A region-of-interest analysis revealed a tendency for the lowest T1 relaxation times in the genu and the highest T1 relaxation times in the somatomotor region of the CC. This observation separates regions dominated by myelinated fibers with large diameters (somatomotor area from densely packed smaller axonal bundles (genu with less myelin. The results indicate that characteristic T1 relaxation times in callosal profiles provide an additional means to monitor differences in fiber anatomy, fiber density, and gray matter in respective neocortical areas. In conclusion, rapid T1 mapping allows for a characterization of the axonal architecture in an individual CC in less than 10 s. The approach emerges as a valuable means for studying neocortical brain anatomy with possible implications for the diagnosis of neurodegenerative processes.

  11. DPS - a rapid method for genome sequencing of DNA-containing bacteriophages directly from a single plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, Witold; Vogensen, Finn K; Sørensen, Søren J; Hansen, Lars H

    2014-02-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) coexist with bacteria in all environments and influence microbial diversity, evolution and industrial production processes. As a result of this major impact of phages on microbes, tools that allow rapid characterization of phages are needed. Today, one of the most powerful methods for characterization of phages is determination of the whole genome using high throughput sequencing approaches. Here a direct plaque sequencing (DPS) is described, which is a rapid method that allows easy full genome sequencing of DNA-containing phages using the Nextera XT™ kit. A combination of host-DNA removal followed by purification and concentration of the viral DNA, allowed the construction of Illumina-compatible sequencing libraries using the Nextera™ XT technology directly from single phage plaques without any whole genome amplification step. This method was tested on three Caudovirales phages; ϕ29 Podoviridae, P113g Siphoviridae and T4 Myovirdae, which are representative of >96% of all known phages, and were sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Successful de novo assembly of the viral genomes was possible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid increase in hospitalizations resulting from fall-related traumatic head injury in older adults in the Netherlands 1986-2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A. Hartholt (Klaas); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); S. Polinder (Suzanne); M.J.M. Panneman (Martien); T.J.M. van der Cammen (Tischa); P. Patka (Peter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractFalls occur frequently in older adults. With ageing populations worldwide, an increase in fall-related traumatic head injuries can be expected. The aim of our study was to determine trends in traumatic head-injury-related hospitalizations among older adults. Therefore, a secular trend

  13. Endovascular Management of Patients with Head and Neck Cancers Presenting with Acute Hemorrhage: A Single-Center Retrospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilas Boas, P. P.; Castro-Afonso, L. H. de; Monsignore, L. M.; Nakiri, G. S. [University of São Paulo, Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School (Brazil); Mello-Filho, F. V. de [University of São Paulo, Department of Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Ribeirão Preto Medical School (Brazil); Abud, D. G., E-mail: dgabud@fmrp.usp.br [University of São Paulo, Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    PurposeAcute hemorrhage associated with cancers of the head and neck is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate action. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of endovascular embolization for acute hemorrhage in patients with head and neck cancers.Materials and MethodsData were retrospectively collected from patients with head and neck cancers who underwent endovascular embolization to treat acute hemorrhage. The primary endpoint was the rate of immediate control of hemorrhage during the first 24 h after embolization. The secondary endpoints were technical or clinical complications, rate of re-hemorrhage 24 h after the procedure, time from embolization to re-hemorrhage, hospitalization time, mortality rate, and time from embolization to death.ResultsFifty-one patients underwent endovascular embolization. The primary endpoint was achieved in 94% of patients. The rate of technical complications was 5.8%, and no clinical complication was observed. Twelve patients (23.5%) had hemorrhage recurrence after an average time of 127.5 days. The average hospitalization time was 7.4 days, the mortality rate during the follow-up period was 66.6%, and the average time from embolization to death was 132.5 days.ConclusionEndovascular embolization to treat acute hemorrhage in patients with head and neck cancers is a safe and effective method for the immediate control of hemorrhage and results in a high rate of hemorrhage control. Larger studies are necessary to determine which treatment strategy is best for improving patient outcomes.

  14. Endovascular Management of Patients with Head and Neck Cancers Presenting with Acute Hemorrhage: A Single-Center Retrospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilas Boas, P. P.; Castro-Afonso, L. H. de; Monsignore, L. M.; Nakiri, G. S.; Mello-Filho, F. V. de; Abud, D. G.

    2017-01-01

    PurposeAcute hemorrhage associated with cancers of the head and neck is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate action. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of endovascular embolization for acute hemorrhage in patients with head and neck cancers.Materials and MethodsData were retrospectively collected from patients with head and neck cancers who underwent endovascular embolization to treat acute hemorrhage. The primary endpoint was the rate of immediate control of hemorrhage during the first 24 h after embolization. The secondary endpoints were technical or clinical complications, rate of re-hemorrhage 24 h after the procedure, time from embolization to re-hemorrhage, hospitalization time, mortality rate, and time from embolization to death.ResultsFifty-one patients underwent endovascular embolization. The primary endpoint was achieved in 94% of patients. The rate of technical complications was 5.8%, and no clinical complication was observed. Twelve patients (23.5%) had hemorrhage recurrence after an average time of 127.5 days. The average hospitalization time was 7.4 days, the mortality rate during the follow-up period was 66.6%, and the average time from embolization to death was 132.5 days.ConclusionEndovascular embolization to treat acute hemorrhage in patients with head and neck cancers is a safe and effective method for the immediate control of hemorrhage and results in a high rate of hemorrhage control. Larger studies are necessary to determine which treatment strategy is best for improving patient outcomes.

  15. HEAD - TO - HEAD COMPARISON OF TOLERABILITY AND ACCEPTABILITY OF SINGLE DOSE OF FOUR TOPICAL NSAIDS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING CATARACT SURGERY : A RANDOMIZED OPEN LABEL PARALLEL GROUP STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Sekhar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Ophthalmic NSAIDs are used to control pain , discomfort and inflammation associated with ocular conditions and also , following ophthalmic cataract surgeries. These drugs can cause ocular discomfort following administration which lasts for a short duration. However , there exist differences in the intensity and duration of burning sensation among the c ommonly used ophthalmic NSAIDs. Hence , we evaluated the tolerability and acceptability of four topical NSAIDS i.e. , 0.3% nepafenac (N , 0.5% ketorolac (K , 0.4% ketorolac (K LS and 0.09% bromfenac (B after instilling a single drop. METHODS: This randomized , open label , parallel group study was conducted in the department of Ophthalmology in Narayana Medical College , Nellore. A total number of 80 patients participated in the study. Randomization list was computer generated in a ratio of 1:1:1:1 of N , K , K L Sand B. Each patient received one drop of the study drug either in right or left eye which was also decidedat random.Patients of either gender above21 years of age , having no ocular surface pathology and eligible for cataract surgery were include d in the study. Outcome variables included ocular burning intensity on VAS (0 - 100 mm at 0 min (immediately , 2 min and 6 min after administration of medications , time to complete pain relief and global medication performance rated by patient as 0 (bad , 1 (fair , 2(good or 3 (severe . RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 52.85±17.46 years. All groups were age matched , however there were more females than males (pN>K LS >K on global medication performance. CONCLUSION: Bromfenac had better tolerability and acceptability as compared to other tested topical NSAIDs , which was in the order of B>N> K LS >K.

  16. Factors associated with acute oral mucosal reaction induced by radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A retrospective single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhenchao; Gao, Jin; Qian, Liting; Huang, Yifan; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Liping; He, Jian; Yang, Jing; Wang, Ru; Zhang, Yangyang

    2017-12-01

    To investigate risk factors for acute oral mucosal reaction during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma radiotherapy.A retrospective study of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who underwent radiotherapy from November 2013 to May 2016 in Anhui Provincial Cancer Hospital was conducted. Data on the occurrence and severity of acute oral mucositis were extracted from clinical records. Based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading of acute radiation mucosal injury, the patients were assigned into acute reaction (grades 2-4) and minimum reaction (grades 0-1) groups. Preradiotherapy characteristics and treatment factors were compared between the 2 groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to detect the independent factors associated with acute oral mucosal reactions.Eighty patients completed radiotherapy during the study period. Oral mucosal reactions were recorded as 25, 31, and 24 cases of grades 1, 2, and 3 injuries, respectively. Significant differences between acute reaction and minimum reaction groups were detected in cancer lymph node (N) staging, smoking and diabetes history, pretreatment platelet count and T-Helper/T-Suppressor lymphocyte (Th/Ts) ratio, concurrent chemotherapy, and total and single irradiation doses.Multivariate analysis showed that N stage, smoking history, single dose parapharyngeal irradiation, and pretreatment platelet count were independent risk factors for acute radiation induced oral mucosal reaction. Smoking history, higher grading of N stage, higher single dose irradiation, and lower preirradiation platelet count may increase the risk and severity of acute radiation oral mucosal reaction in radiotherapy of head and neck cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Trunnion-Head Stresses in THA: Are Big Heads Trouble?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavernia, Carlos J; Iacobelli, David A; Villa, Jesus M; Jones, Kinzy; Gonzalez, Jose L; Jones, William Kinzy

    2015-06-01

    The effects of large heads on stresses at the THA trunnion-head junction and their impact on tribocorrosion/metal ion release remain controversial. A 12/14 3D-model of a stem with different head sizes was investigated. Material properties of titanium were assigned to the trunnion and cobalt-chrome/alumina to the heads. A load simulating walking single-leg stand phase was applied to the head. A total contact head-trunnion interface was assumed. The area underneath the junction underwent significant elevations in stresses as head size increased from 28- to 40-mm. Maximum principal stress doubled between 28 and 40-mm heads, regardless of head material. Stress levels had a direct correlation to head diameter. Stress increases observed using increasingly larger heads will probably contribute to head-trunnion tribocorrosion and ion release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Enteral Feeding During Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience Using a Reactive Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavel, Sebastien; Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe; Donath, David; Soulieres, Denis; Khaouam, Nader; Charpentier, Danielle; Belair, Manon; Guertin, Louis; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal method for providing enteral nutrition to patients with head-and-neck cancer is unclear. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of our reactive policy, which consists of the installation of a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube only when required by the patient's nutritional status. Methods and Materials: The records of all patients with Stage III and IV head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy between January 2003 and December 2006 were reviewed. The overall and disease-free survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: The present study included 253 patients, and the median follow-up was 33 months. At 3 years, the estimated overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 82.8% and 77.8%, respectively, for the whole population. No survival difference was observed when the patients were compared according to the presence and absence of a NG tube or stratified by weight loss quartile. The mean weight loss during treatment for all patients was 10.4%. The proportion of patients requiring a NG tube was 49.8%, and the NG tube remained in place for a median duration of 40 days. No major complications were associated with NG tube installation. Only 3% of the patients were still dependent on enteral feeding at 6 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that the use of a reactive NG tube with an interdisciplinary team approach is a safe and effective method to manage malnutrition in patients treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  19. BENEFITS OF INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY (IMRT IN PATIENTS WITH HEAD AND NECK MALIGNANCIES- A SINGLE INSTITUTION EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry Seasor Abraham

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Radiotherapy and surgery are the principal curative modalities in treatment of head and neck cancer. Conventional twodimensional and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy result in significant side effects and altered quality of life. IntensityModulated Radiotherapy (IMRT can spare the normal tissues, while delivering a curative dose to the tumour-bearing tissues. This study reveals the role of IMRT in head and neck cancer in view of normal tissue sparing with good tumour control. MATERIALS AND METHODS Radical radiotherapy was given using linear accelerator up to a dose of 66 to 70 gray in 30 to 33 fractions (intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost over 6 to 7 weeks to 56 eligible patients. Concurrent cisplatin was given to patients with locally-advanced disease up to a dose of 40 mg/m2 weekly once along with radiation. The patients were monitored weekly once during the treatment for acute skin and mucosal toxicities using the RTOG scoring criteria. After the treatment, locoregional response was assessed and recorded at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months intervals. RESULTS Severe skin toxicity (grade III or more was seen in approximately 7% patients. Severe mucosal toxicity (grade III or more was seen in approximately 80% of patients. IMRT technique showed better skin sparing compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy. Severe mucosal toxicity was slightly higher in this study due to the simultaneous integrated boost technique used for dose intensification to the mucosa, which results in better primary tumour control. At the end of 6 months, 75% patients achieved locoregional control and residual/recurrent disease was seen in 25% of patients. IMRT offered good locoregional control with less skin toxicity and acceptable mucosal toxicity. The results were similar to the previous study reports using IMRT. CONCLUSION IMRT is a better treatment option in locally-advanced head and neck malignancies providing good

  20. [Clinical features of 39 children with head and neck rhabdomysarcoma in a single medical center, and treatment outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Ling; Zhang, Yi; Huang, Dong-Sheng; Guo, Fang; Han, Tao

    2012-11-01

    To study the clinical features and treatment outcomes of head and neck rhabdomysarcoma (RMS) in children. The clinical data and results of follow-up visits for 39 children with head and neck RMS were retrospectively reviewed. The children (23 males and 16 females) with a median age of 6 years old (ranged 3 months to 14 years) were admitted to the Beijing Tongren Hospital between November, 2004 and November, 2010. The 39 children mainly presented with exophthalmos and eyelid swelling (56%, 22/39), rhinostegnosis and nasal bleeding (28%, 11/39) and check mass (15%, 6/39). Common primary sites were the eyelid and orbit (56%, 22/39), followed by the nasopharynx and ethmoid antrum (28%, 11/39). Thirty-seven of the 39 patients showed a definite pathologic type and the embryo type was the most common (89%, 33/37). Follow-up visits were carried out for 35 children, with a median follow-up time of 38 months (10-80 months). Of the 35 children, 4 cases received surgery alone, 1 case received chemotherapy alone, 12 cases received surgery plus chemotherapy, 2 cases received surgery plus radiochemotherapy, 13 cases received surgery, chemotherapy and radiochemotherapy (8 cases received 125I particles implants), 2 cases received surgery, chemotherapy, radiochemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cells transplantation (APBSCT), and 1 case received chemotherapy and APBSCT. Seven cases relapsed and 5 cases died of brain metastasis. The total survival rate was 86% (30/35), the complete remission rate was 66% (23/35), and the partial remission rate was 20%. In the 8 cases receiving 125I particles implants, 6 survived without tumor. Exophthalmos and eyelid swelling are the main presentations in children with head and neck RMS. Common primary sites of this disease are the eye and nasopharynx. The most common pathologic type is embryo type. Comprehensive treatment, including chemotherapy, surgery, 125I particles implants and APBSCT therapy, can improve outcome.

  1. Patterns of Care in Elderly Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Oncology Patients: A Single-Center Cohort Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shaohui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Lockwood, Gina; Bayley, Andrew; Kim, John; Cummings, Bernard; Dawson, Laura A.; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John; Witterick, Ian; Chen, Eric X.; Ringash, Jolie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the patterns of care for elderly head-and-neck cancer patients with those of younger patients. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of all new mucosal head-and-neck cancer referrals to radiation oncology between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2007 at our institution. The clinical characteristics, treatment pattern, tolerance, and outcomes were compared between the elderly (aged ≥75 years) and younger (aged <75 years) cohorts. Results: A total of 2,312 patients, including 452 (20%) elderly and 1,860 (80%) younger patients, were studied. The elderly patients were more likely to be women (36% vs. 27%, p <.01) and to have other malignancies (23% vs. 13%, p <.01), Stage I or II disease (38% vs. 32%, p <.01), and N0 status (56% vs. 42%, p <.01). Treatment was less often curative in intent (79% vs. 93%, p <.01). For the 1,487 patients who received definitive radiotherapy (RT), no differences were found between the elderly (n = 238) and younger (n = 1,249) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. Within the subset of 760 patients who received intensified treatment (concurrent chemoradiotherapy or hyperfractionated accelerated RT), no difference was seen between the elderly (n = 46) and younger (n = 714) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. After a median follow-up of 2.5 years, the 2-year cause-specific survival rate after definitive RT was 72% (range, 65-78%) for the elderly vs. 86% (range, 84-88%) for the younger patients (p <.01). Conclusion: Elderly head-and-neck cancer patients exhibited different clinical characteristics and experienced different patterns of care from younger patients. Although age itself was an adverse predictor of cause-specific survival, its effect was modest. Elderly patients selected for definitive RT or intensified RT showed no evidence of impaired treatment tolerance.

  2. Suicidal single gunshot injury to the head: differences in site of entrance wound and direction of the bullet path between right- and left-handed--an autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Slobodan; Zivković, Vladimir; Babić, Dragan; Juković, Fehim

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the differences in the anatomical site of a gunshot entrance wound and the direction of the bullet path between right- and left-handed subjects who committed a suicide by a single gunshot injury to the head. The retrospective autopsy study was performed for a 10-year period, and it included selected cases of single suicidal gunshot head injury, committed by handguns. We considered only contact or near-contact wounds. The sample included 479 deceased, with average age 47.1 ± 19.1 years (range, 12-89 years): 432 males and 47 females, with 317 right-handed, 25 left-handed, and 137 subjects with unknown dominant hand. In our observed sample, most cases involved the right temple as the site of entrance gunshot wound (about 67%), followed by the mouth (16%), forehead (7%), left temple (6%), submental (2%), and parietal region (1%). The left temple, right temple, and forehead were the sites of the gunshot entrance wounds, which were the best predictors of the handedness of the deceased (Spearman ρ = 0.149, P = 0.006). Our study showed that the direction of the bullet intracranial path in cases of suicide was even a more potent predictor of the handedness of the deceased (Spearman ρ = 0.263, P = 0.000; Wald = 149.503, P = 0.000).

  3. Professional brushing study comparing the effectiveness of sonic brush heads with manual toothbrushes: a single blinded, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelka, Anna-Kristina; Nagler, Tonia; Hopp, Imke; Petschelt, Anselm; Pelka, Matthias Anton

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the plaque removal efficacy of four toothbrushes: the Philips Sonicare Elite with medium and mini brush heads, the Elmex Sensitive, and the American Dental Association (ADA) reference toothbrush. This study was a randomized, controlled, investigator-blinded, four-brush crossover design study, which examined plaque removal following a consecutive repeated use. All brushes were used on each participant in a randomly assigned quadrant of the mouth. A total of 90 subjects participated in the study. Prior to the experiment, they received a professional prophylaxis and were requested to refrain from toothbrushing for 48 h. Teeth were professionally brushed consecutively for 10 to 90 s per quadrant. A Turesky-modified Quigley Hein Index score was assessed at baseline and after each brushing interval by one blinded investigator. Results showed reduction of mean plaque scores for all brushes with time from 10 to 90 s. After 30 s (2-min whole mouth equivalent) of brushing, the Sonicare brushes cleaned 19, the ADA brush 16, and the Elmex Sensitive 10 of in average 28 tooth surfaces. With time, the number of additional cleaned surfaces decreased. Time is an important variable in the evaluation of plaque-removing efficacy since absolute efficacy increases with time and differs per toothbrush. No differences could be found between the two brush heads of the Sonicare.

  4. Rapid detection of single E. coli bacteria using a graphene-based field-effect transistor device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Bhawana; Zhou, Guihua; Chang, Jingbo; Pu, Haihui; Jin, Bing; Sui, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Xiaochen; Yang, Ching-Hong; Magruder, Matthew; Chen, Junhong

    2018-07-01

    Contamination of surface and drinking water due to the presence of Escherichia coli bacteria is a major cause of water-borne disease outbreak. To address unmet challenges for practical pathogen detection in contaminated samples, we report fabrication of thermally reduced graphene oxide-based field-effect transistor (rGO FET) passivated with an ultrathin layer of Al 2 O 3 for real-time detection of E. coli bacteria. The sensor could detect a single E. coli cell within 50 s in a 1 µL sample volume. The ultrathin layer of Al 2 O 3 acted as a barrier between rGO and potential interferents present in the sample. E. coli specific antibodies anchored on gold nanoparticles acted as probes for selective capture of E. coli. The high density of negative charge on the surface of E. coli cells strongly modulates the concentration of majority charge carriers in the rGO monolayer, thereby allowing real-time monitoring of E. coli concentration in a given sample. With a low detection limit of single cell, the FET sensor had a linear range of 1-100 CFU in 1 µL volume of sample (i.e., 10 3 to 10 5 CFU/ mL). The biosensor with good selectivity and rapid detection was further successfully demonstrated for E. coli sensing in river water. The rGO-based FET sensor provides a low cost and label-free approach, and can be mass produced for detection of a broad spectrum of pathogens in water or other liquid media. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High affinity γPNA sandwich hybridization assay for rapid detection of short nucleic acid targets with single mismatch discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Johnathan M; Zhang, Li Ang; Manna, Arunava; Armitage, Bruce A; Ly, Danith H; Schneider, James W

    2013-07-08

    Hybridization analysis of short DNA and RNA targets presents many challenges for detection. The commonly employed sandwich hybridization approach cannot be implemented for these short targets due to insufficient probe-target binding strengths for unmodified DNA probes. Here, we present a method capable of rapid and stable sandwich hybridization detection for 22 nucleotide DNA and RNA targets. Stable hybridization is achieved using an n-alkylated, polyethylene glycol γ-carbon modified peptide nucleic acid (γPNA) amphiphile. The γPNA's exceptionally high affinity enables stable hybridization of a second DNA-based probe to the remaining bases of the short target. Upon hybridization of both probes, an electrophoretic mobility shift is measured via interaction of the n-alkane modification on the γPNA with capillary electrophoresis running buffer containing nonionic surfactant micelles. We find that sandwich hybridization of both probes is stable under multiple binding configurations and demonstrate single base mismatch discrimination. The binding strength of both probes is also stabilized via coaxial stacking on adjacent hybridization to targets. We conclude with a discussion on the implementation of the proposed sandwich hybridization assay as a high-throughput microRNA detection method.

  6. Rapid Response of Long-Standing, Treatment-Resistant Non-Catatonic Mutism in Paranoid Schizophrenia with Single ECT session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Mansoor Ahmad; Rather, Yasir Hassan; Shah, Majid Shafi; Wani, Rayees Ahmad; Hussain, Arshad

    2014-11-01

    Mutism is a common manifestation of catatonia, but mutism due to other forms of psychopathology and neurological disorders have also been described. Although not common, long-standing mutism has also been a feature of non-catatonic schizophrenia and traditionally responds less to conventional therapies. We describe a rare case of paranoid schizophrenia presenting with continuous mutism for about 4 years. This 26-year-old male had symptoms of schizophrenia without catatonia. After failed trial of adequate pharmacotherapy and psychological intervention and considering his level of dysfunction, he was started on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). To our surprise, he improved with a single session of ECT while he was on concurrent pharmacotherapy. We also discuss the possible explanation for this rapid effect of ECT in such clinical presentation. To our knowledge, this is the first case of non-catatonic mutism of schizophrenia of this long duration responding so promptly to ECT, although there are other reports as well in literature, but multiple ECT sessions were applied in those cases. Non-catatonic mutism is perhaps presenting as a cultural variant in this part of the world and whenever encountered, ECT should be an option. Further research should be carried out to validate this idea.

  7. Self-Assemblies of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes through Tunable Tethering of Pyrenes by Dextrin for Rapidly Chiral Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Li Wei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrene-modified dextrin (Py-Dex was synthesized via the Schiff base reaction between reducing end of dextrins and 1-aminopyrene, and then self-assemblies of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs were fabricated through the tunable tethering of pyrene to SWNTs by dextrin chains. The Py-Dex-SWNTs assemblies were found to be significantly water-soluble because of the synergistic effect of dextrin chains and pyrene moieties. Py-Dex and Py-Dex-SWNTs were adequately characterized by NMR, UV-vis, fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The tethering effect of dextrin toward pyrene moieties was clearly revealed and was found to be tunable by adjusting the length of dextrin chains. The fluorescence of pyrene moieties was sufficiently quenched by SWNTs with the support of dextrin chains. Furthermore, the Py-Dex-SWNTs assemblies were used for chiral selective sensing by introducing cyclodextrins as chiral binding sites. The rapid chiral sensing was successfully tested for different enantiomers.

  8. A Military Relevant Model of Closed Concussive Head Injury: Longitudinal Studies Characterizing and Validating Single and Repetitive mTBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    metabolic homeostasis associated with repeated concussion versus a single concussion. More specifically, 3×PCIs resulted in increased levels of glycogen ...carnosine is an endogenous neuroprotector against free radicals. Cell Mol Neurobiol, 17(2), 259-271. 3. Borges, N., Cerejo, A., Santos, A., Sarmento, A

  9. Magnetic Beads-Based Sensor with Tailored Sensitivity for Rapid and Single-Step Amperometric Determination of miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Vargas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a sensitive amperometric magneto-biosensor for single-step and rapid determination of microRNAs (miRNAs. The developed strategy involves the use of direct hybridization of the target miRNA (miRNA-21 with a specific biotinylated DNA probe immobilized on streptavidin-modified magnetic beads (MBs, and labeling of the resulting heteroduplexes with a specific DNA–RNA antibody and the bacterial protein A (ProtA conjugated with an horseradish peroxidase (HRP homopolymer (Poly-HRP40 as an enzymatic label for signal amplification. Amperometric detection is performed upon magnetic capture of the modified MBs onto the working electrode surface of disposable screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs using the H2O2/hydroquinone (HQ system. The magnitude of the cathodic signal obtained at −0.20 V (vs. the Ag pseudo-reference electrode demonstrated linear dependence with the concentration of the synthetic target miRNA over the 1.0 to 100 pM range. The method provided a detection limit (LOD of 10 attomoles (in a 25 μL sample without any target miRNA amplification in just 30 min (once the DNA capture probe-MBs were prepared. This approach shows improved sensitivity compared with that of biosensors constructed with the same anti-DNA–RNA Ab as capture instead of a detector antibody and further labeling with a Strep-HRP conjugate instead of the Poly-HRP40 homopolymer. The developed strategy involves a single step working protocol, as well as the possibility to tailor the sensitivity by enlarging the length of the DNA/miRNA heteroduplexes using additional probes and/or performing the labelling with ProtA conjugated with homopolymers prepared with different numbers of HRP molecules. The practical usefulness was demonstrated by determination of the endogenous levels of the mature target miRNA in 250 ng raw total RNA (RNAt extracted from human mammary epithelial normal (MCF-10A and cancer (MCF-7 cells and tumor tissues.

  10. Band-head spectra of low-energy single-particle excitations in some well-deformed, odd-mass heavy nuclei within a microscopic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Meng-Hock [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR5797, Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR5797, Gradignan (France); Duc, Dao Duy [Ton Duc Thang University, Division of Nuclear Physics, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Ton Duc Thang University, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Nhan Hao, T.V. [Duy Tan University, Center of Research and Development, Danang (Viet Nam); Hue University, Center for Theoretical and Computational Physics, College of Education, Hue City (Viet Nam); Long, Ha Thuy [Hanoi University of Sciences, Vietnam National University, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Quentin, P. [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR5797, Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR5797, Gradignan (France); Ton Duc Thang University, Division of Nuclear Physics, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Bonneau, L. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR5797, Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR5797, Gradignan (France)

    2016-01-15

    In four well-deformed heavy odd nuclei, the energies of low-lying rotational band heads have been determined microscopically within a self-consistent Hartree-Fock-plus-BCS approach with blocking. A Skyrme nucleon-nucleon effective interaction has been used together with a seniority force to describe pairing correlations. Only such states which are phenomenologically deemed to be related to single-particle excitations have been considered. The polarization effects, including those associated with the genuine time-reversal symmetry breaking have been fully taken into account within our model assumptions. The calculated spectra are in reasonably good qualitative agreement with available data for the considered odd-neutron nuclei. This is not so much the case for the odd-proton nuclei. A potential explanation for such a difference in behavior is proposed. (orig.)

  11. Congenital Deficiency of Distal Ulna and Dislocation of the Radial Head Treated by Single Bone Forearm Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paragjyoti Gogoi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital deficiency of part of distal ulna affecting the distal radio-ulnar joint is a rare disorder. It is even rarer to find the association of proximal radio-ulnar joint dislocation along with distal ulnar deficiency. This type of congenital forearm anomaly is difficult to treat. Conversion to a single bone forearm in the expense of pronation-supination movement is a viable option. By doing so the elbow and wrist can be stabilized; however movement is possible in only one plane. We are describing here a girl of 8 years having proximal radio-ulnar joint dislocation along with deficiency of distal ulna treated by converting into a single bone forearm.

  12. The ATPase cross-bridge cycle of the Kar3 motor domain. Implications for single head motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Andrew T; Gilbert, Susan P

    2003-02-07

    Kar3 is a minus-end directed microtubule motor involved in meiosis and mitosis in Saccharomyces cerevisae. Unlike Drosophila Ncd, the other well characterized minus-end directed motor that is a homodimer, Kar3 is a heterodimer with a single motor domain and either the associated polypeptides Cik1 or Vik1. Our mechanistic studies with Ncd showed that both motor domains were required for ATP-dependent motor domain detachment from the microtubule. We have initiated a series of experiments to compare the mechanistic requirements for Kar3 motility in direct comparison to Ncd. The results presented here show that the single motor domain of Kar3 (Met(383)-Lys(729)) exhibits characteristics similar to monomeric Ncd. The microtubule-activated steady-state ATPase cycle of Kar3 (k(cat) = 0.5 s(-1)) is limited by ADP release (0.4 s(-1)). Like monomeric Ncd, Kar3 does not readily detach from the microtubule with the addition of MgATP. These results show that the single motor domain of Kar3 is not sufficient for ATP-dependent microtubule dissociation, suggesting that structural elements outside of the catalytic core are required for the cyclic interactions with the microtubule for force generation.

  13. Head Lice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  14. Rapid dual-injection single-scan 13N-ammonia PET for quantification of rest and stress myocardial blood flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, T C; DiBella, E V R; McGann, C J; Christian, P E; Hoffman, J M; Kadrmas, D J

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of myocardial blood flows at rest and stress using 13 N-ammonia PET is an established method; however, current techniques require a waiting period of about 1 h between scans. The objective of this study was to test a rapid dual-injection single-scan approach, where 13 N-ammonia injections are administered 10 min apart during rest and adenosine stress. Dynamic PET data were acquired in six human subjects using imaging protocols that provided separate single-injection scans as gold standards. Rest and stress data were combined to emulate rapid dual-injection data so that the underlying activity from each injection was known exactly. Regional blood flow estimates were computed from the dual-injection data using two methods: background subtraction and combined modelling. The rapid dual-injection approach provided blood flow estimates very similar to the conventional single-injection standards. Rest blood flow estimates were affected very little by the dual-injection approach, and stress estimates correlated strongly with separate single-injection values (r = 0.998, mean absolute difference = 0.06 ml min -1 g -1 ). An actual rapid dual-injection scan was successfully acquired in one subject and further demonstrates feasibility of the method. This study with a limited dataset demonstrates that blood flow quantification can be obtained in only 20 min by the rapid dual-injection approach with accuracy similar to that of conventional separate rest and stress scans. The rapid dual-injection approach merits further development and additional evaluation for potential clinical use

  15. Rapid near-optimal trajectory generation and guidance law development for single-stage-to-orbit airbreathing vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calise, A. J.; Flandro, G. A.; Corban, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    General problems associated with on-board trajectory optimization, propulsion system cycle selection, and with the synthesis of guidance laws were addressed for an ascent to low-earth-orbit of an air-breathing single-stage-to-orbit vehicle. The NASA Generic Hypersonic Aerodynamic Model Example and the Langley Accelerator aerodynamic sets were acquired and implemented. Work related to the development of purely analytic aerodynamic models was also performed at a low level. A generic model of a multi-mode propulsion system was developed that includes turbojet, ramjet, scramjet, and rocket engine cycles. Provisions were made in the dynamic model for a component of thrust normal to the flight path. Computational results, which characterize the nonlinear sensitivity of scramjet performance to changes in vehicle angle of attack, were obtained and incorporated into the engine model. Additional trajectory constraints were introduced: maximum dynamic pressure; maximum aerodynamic heating rate per unit area; angle of attack and lift limits; and limits on acceleration both along and normal to the flight path. The remainder of the effort focused on required modifications to a previously derived algorithm when the model complexity cited above was added. In particular, analytic switching conditions were derived which, under appropriate assumptions, govern optimal transition from one propulsion mode to another for two cases: the case in which engine cycle operations can overlap, and the case in which engine cycle operations are mutually exclusive. The resulting guidance algorithm was implemented in software and exercised extensively. It was found that the approximations associated with the assumed time scale separation employed in this work are reasonable except over the Mach range from roughly 5 to 8. This phenomenon is due to the very large thrust capability of scramjets in this Mach regime when sized to meet the requirement for ascent to orbit. By accounting for flight path

  16. Evaluation of radiotherapy methods for adaptative head and neck treatment with RapidArc®; Avaliacao de uma metodologia de radioterapia adaptativa para tratamentos de cabeca e pescoco com RapidArc®

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazaro, Sarah J.; Vasconcellos, Herminiane L.; Silva, Laura E. da; Bastos, Fernanda M.; Silva, Leonardo P. da; Alvaro S; Migoviski, Igor, E-mail: sarahmazaro@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Nacional de Cancer Jose de Alencar Gomes da Silva (INCA), Rio de Janeiro,RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    Head and neck cancer is considered a public health problem worldwide. The intensity-modulated techniques have shown benefit in the treatment of these sites, particularly with respect to reduction of deterministic effects of risk, such as parotid. Anatomical variations in cases of head and neck are very frequent and may lead, for example, to an overdose in the parotid. This can be mitigated if making use of adaptive radiation therapy. The work aims to analyze a methodology to redo the planning of treatments, through 02 acquisitions of TC. The results showed that, due to a reduction in the volumes of the parotid, the doses delivered to these organs are underestimated, which is relevant to readapt the treatment, with the addition of only a second scan without the need of the third. (author)

  17. Birth body length, birth body weight and birth head circumference in neonates born in a single centre between 2011 and 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlus, Beata; Wiśniewski, Andrzej; Kubik, Paweł; Milde, Katarzyna; Gmyrek, Leszek; Pęsko, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    Access to updated and accurate standards for local populations is important for the interpretation of body measurements in neonates and may have an impact on the doctor's recommendations for monitoring early childhood development. to present individual mean values for the most prevalent body measurements (i.e. birth body length (BBL), birth body weight (BBW) and birth head circumference (BHC)) in neonates and compare them to the duration of pregnancy. The measurements (BBL, BBW and BHC) were collected and analyzed from over 27,000 neonates born in a single center. All women with single pregnancies with gestation ranging from 33 to 42 weeks were included in the study. Mean values and statistically significant standard deviation values from population standards of BBL, BBW, and BHC were evaluated for neonates that were born between the 33rd and 42nd week of gestation. Analysis was conducted for the lower limit (10th percentile), average (50th percentile) and upper limit (90th percentile). This was the first time in Polish literature when population standards were presented for three body meas-urements of neonates. With the size of the cohort, these standards can be successfully implemented into routine clinical practice, especially for screening children with body size deficits.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms other than factor V Leiden are associated with coagulopathy and osteonecrosis of the femoral head in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kou-Ti; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Huang, Tsan-Wen; Lee, Yun-Shien; Hsu, Wei-Hsiu; Hsu, Robert W W; Ueng, Steve W N; Lee, Mel S

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of factor V Leiden have been associated with osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) in Caucasians but remains controversial in Asians. We used an SNP microarray to screen 55 loci of factor V gene in patients with ONFH of Chinese. Significantly different candidate SNPs at 14 loci were analyzed in 146 patients and 116 healthy controls using MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry and gene sequencing. The factor V Leiden (rs6025) was not found in all participants. Six SNP loci (rs9332595, rs6020, rs9332647, rs3766110, rs10919186, and rs12040141) were confirmed with significant differences in patients but not in controls. The rs6020 G-to-A polymorphism was found in 88.9% of the patients. In addition, a high percentage (87.6%) of the patients had an abnormal coagulation profile that included hyperfibrinogen, elevated fibrinogen degradation products, elevated D-dimer, abnormal protein S, abnormal protein C, or a decrease in anti-thrombin III. Patients with the rs6020 G-to-A polymorphism (mutation) had a higher risk (odds ratio: 4.62; 95% confidence interval: 1.44-14.8) of having coagulation abnormalities than did those without the mutation (wild-type) (χ(2) p  =  0.006). Our findings suggested that the rs6020 polymorphism might be the genetic trait that accounts for the higher prevalence of ONFH in the Chinese population than in Westerners. Exposure to risk factors such as alcohol and steroids in patients with the rs6020 polymorphism causes coagulation abnormalities and, subsequently, thromboembolisms in the femoral head.

  19. Rapid improvement of depressive symptoms and cognition in an elderly patient with a single session of piano playing: a clinical treatment report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalai, Gul; Manalai, Partam; Dutta, Raja; Fegan, Gerald; Scrofani, Philip

    2012-06-01

    Music has been used as a non-pharmacological modality in the treatment of different conditions since ancient times. It has received attention in modern medicine in recent decades, particularly in geriatric population. The effects of music on mood and cognition are well documented. The aim of the current case report is to highlight the benefits of musical activities in the geriatric population. We report a naturalistic treatment outcome in an elderly patient on a geriatric psychiatric unit related to a single session of piano playing. A rapid and sustained improvement in mood and cognition of an elderly patient was observed after a single session of playing piano. Notwithstanding the limitations of a single subject, uncontrolled case study, the effect was dramatic. Our findings support previous claims regarding music therapy including effects of a single session music-based therapeutic interventions, and we conclude that music therapy for geriatric patients with mood and cognitive deficits is worth further systematic investigation.

  20. Comparison of single-use and reusable metal laryngoscope blades for orotracheal intubation during rapid sequence induction of anesthesia: a multicenter cluster randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, Julien; Le Manach, Yannick Le; Borel, Marie; Lenfant, François; Nicolas-Robin, Armelle; Carillion, Aude; Ripart, Jacques; Riou, Bruno; Langeron, Olivier

    2010-02-01

    Single-use metal laryngoscope blades are cheaper and carry a lower risk of infection than reusable metal blades. The authors compared single-use and reusable metal blades during rapid sequence induction of anesthesia in a multicenter cluster randomized trial. One thousand seventy-two adult patients undergoing general anesthesia under emergency conditions and requiring rapid sequence induction were randomly assigned on a weekly basis to either single-use or reusable metal blades (cluster randomization). After induction, a 60-s period was allowed to complete intubation. In the case of failed intubation, a second attempt was performed using the opposite type of blade. The primary endpoint was the rate of failed intubation, and the secondary endpoints were the incidence of complications (oxygen desaturation, lung aspiration, and/or oropharynx trauma) and the Cormack and Lehane score. Both groups were similar in their main characteristics, including the risk factors for difficult intubation. The rate of failed intubation was significantly decreased with single-use metal blades at the first attempt compared with reusable blades (2.8 vs. 5.4%, P < 0.05). In addition, the proportion of grades III and IV in Cormack and Lehane score were also significantly decreased with single-use metal blades (6 vs. 10%, P < 0.05). The global complication rate did not reach statistical significance, although the same trend was noted (6.8% vs. 11.5%, P = not significant). An investigator survey and a measure of illumination pointed that illumination might have been responsible for this result. The single-use metal blade was more efficient than a reusable metal blade in rapid sequence induction of anesthesia.

  1. DPS - a rapid method for genome sequencing of DNA-containing bacteriophages directly from a single plaque

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold Piotr; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) coexist with bacteria in all environments and influence microbial diversity, evolution and industrial production processes. As a result of this major impact of phages on microbes, tools that allow rapid characterization of phages are needed. Today, one of the most powerful...

  2. The effects of A single dose of gamma-rays applied on the head on behavior of rats in Morris's water maze and in the open field test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smajda, B.; Kiskova, J.; Lievajova, K.; Capicikova, M.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of a sublethal dose of gamma-rays applied on the head on selected behavioral parameters were investigated in this study. Adult male Sprague-Dowley rats (n=9) were irradiated with a single dose of 20 Gy of gamma-rays from a 60 Co radiation source. The irradiated animals as well as sham-irradiated controls were tested daily in Morris water maze (MWM) (2 sessions per day) and in the open field test. The ability of spatial learning given by latency time to find the hidden platform was followed in MWM. The horizontal and vertical locomotion, the number of crossings of the center of the field and the washing behavior were recorded during an 8-minute test in the open field. The results obtained show, that radiation didn't altered significantly the dynamic of learning in MWM during the experiment. The level of horizontal and vertical locomotory activity in open field was lower in irradiated group in comparison with controls. The number of the crossings of the field's center, related to the level of anxiozity of animals was non-significantly lower in irradiated animals, whereas no differences in number of washing between both groups were detected. The results point to differences in radiosensitivity in various behavioral parameters in rats, maybe due to different level of their control and coordination in CNS. (authors)

  3. Comparison of the clinical effectiveness of a single and a triple-headed toothbrushes in a population of mentally retarded patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvetre, E; Rozow, A; de Meel, H; Richebe, A; Abi-Khalil, M; Demeure, F

    1995-01-01

    Tooth brushing is a very simple and effective method for removing daily dental deposits and for preventing dental and periodontal diseases. However, it can cause considerable manipulative difficulties among some populations, e.g., young children, physically handicapped and mentally retarded patients. In order to test and compare the efficiency of a newly designed toothbrush (Superbrush), we have performed a pilot study on patients staying at the "Reine Fabiola Village No. 1", an institution for patients who are followed for mental retardation at different levels. 30 patients were included in the study, aged between 18 to 40 years. Among these 30, five had to be eliminated for their incapacity to follow the initial training in how to brush their teeth. The comparison was made with a normal single headed tooth brush, in a double blind trial, based on bleeding and plaque indexes, performed on 6 different teeth on day 0, 7 and 21. The results of this study indicate that there is no significant difference between the two types of toothbrushes with respect to the ability of plaque removing and gingivitis prevention, during the period of time of this study. However, the easiness of manipulating this newly designed toothbrush renders it a useful tool for the dental hygiene for this special part of the dental compromised population.

  4. Heads Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC HEADS UP Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . HEADS UP Brain Injury Basics What Is a Concussion? Concussion ...

  5. Evaluation of Orthodontic and Triple-headed Toothbrushes When Used Alone or in Conjunction with Single-tufted Toothbrush in Patients with Fixed Lingual Orthodontic Appliances. A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Malka; Salem, Nurit Flaisher; Garon, Silvia; Levin, Liran

    2015-04-01

    Brushing with a single-tufted toothbrush in conjunction with a manual toothbrush has been widely recommended, although its effectiveness has not been proven. This study investigated the effectiveness of orthodontic and triple-headed toothbrushes when used alone or in conjunction with the single-tufted toothbrush in patients with fixed lingual orthodontic appliances. In this randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial, orthodontic patients (N = 26, mean age 27.3 years) with lingual fixed appliances were asked to brush with a triple-headed or an orthodontic toothbrush alone for one month, followed by brushing in conjunction with the single-tufted toothbrush for an additional month. Teeth were professionally cleaned at baseline and one month later. A clinician blinded to group assignments examined the patients and evaluated tooth plaque index, bracket plaque index, modified gingival index and bleeding on probing at baseline at one month and two months. After one month of brushing with the orthodontic toothbrush, the mean plaque index for tooth and bracket, bleeding index and gingival index were higher by 74.4% (0.68 vs. 0.39, p = 0.026), 54.2% (0.37 vs. 0.24), 15.4% (0.15 vs. 0.13) and 30% (0.26 vs. 0.20), respectively, than after brushing with the triple-headed toothbrush. After combined brushing with the single-tufted toothbrush, no additional statistical differences were found between groups. When used alone, the triple-headed toothbrush seems to remove plaque more effectively than the orthodontic toothbrush. The addition of the single-tufted toothbrush eliminates differences between groups.

  6. Femoral head avascular necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrysikopoulos, H.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.L.; Ashburn, W.; Pretorius, T.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging has been shown to be more sensitive and specific than planar scintigraphy for avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. However, experience with single photon emission CT (SPECT) is limited. The authors retrospectively compared 1.5-T MR imaging with SPECT in 14 patients with suspected femoral head AVN. Agreement between MR imaging and SPECT was present in 24 femurs, 14 normal and ten with AVN. MR imaging showed changes of AVN in the remaining four femoral heads. Of these, one was normal and the other three inconclusive for AVN by SPECT. The authors conclude that MR imaging is superior to SPECT for the evaluation of AVN of the hip

  7. Effect of rapid modulation of circulating plasma testosterone concentration on begging, aggressive behavior and competition for food in black-headed gull (Larus ridibundus) chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncoraglio, Giuseppe; Groothuis, Ton G G

    2013-08-01

    Sibling competition mediated by begging behavior is extremely common in avian species and recent studies have highlighted the role of endogenous testosterone in regulating such phenomenon. However, current literature depicts an inconsistent pattern in altricial vs. semi-precocial species, with stimulating versus inhibitory effects of the hormone respectively. This is possibly due to a difference in the methodology of hormone treatment (short-term moderate dose versus a long-term stronger elevation, respectively) between the studies performed so far. In this study, we induced short-term moderate peaks in plasma testosterone levels, as applied in altricial bird species, and assessed the effects of our manipulation on begging, competitive and aggressive behavior in black-headed gull (Larus ridibundus) chicks, a semi-precocial species. Our results suggest that, unlike in altricial songbirds, temporary increase of plasma testosterone concentration suppresses begging and enhances aggressiveness towards intruders. However, it also increases aggression and the chances of getting priority while scrambling with nest mates to gain access to food. Thus, the inconsistencies in the hormonal control of begging behavior observed between altricial vs. semi-precocial birds seem real and perhaps related to species differences in complexity of the display and the nature of competition. These may be elucidated by future comparative studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Preliminary evaluation of multifield and single-field optimization for the treatment planning of spot-scanning proton therapy of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Enzhuo M.; Liu, Wei; Wu, Richard; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Li, Yupeng [Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) using multifield optimization (MFO) can generate highly conformal dose distributions, but it is more sensitive to setup and range uncertainties than SSPT using single-field optimization (SFO). The authors compared the two optimization methods for the treatment of head and neck cancer with bilateral targets and determined the superior method on the basis of both the plan quality and the plan robustness in the face of setup and range uncertainties.Methods: Four patients with head and neck cancer with bilateral targets who received SSPT treatment in the authors' institution were studied. The patients had each been treated with a MFO plan using three fields. A three-field SFO plan (3F-SFO) and a two-field SFO plan (2F-SFO) with the use of a range shifter in the beam line were retrospectively generated for each patient. The authors compared the plan quality and robustness to uncertainties of the SFO plans with the MFO plans. Robustness analysis of each plan was performed to generate the two dose distributions consisting of the highest and the lowest possible doses (worst-case doses) from the spatial and range perturbations at every voxel. Dosimetric indices from the nominal and worst-case plans were compared.Results: The 3F-SFO plans generally yielded D95 and D5 values in the targets that were similar to those of the MFO plans. 3F-SFO resulted in a lower dose to the oral cavity than MFO in all four patients by an average of 9.9 Gy, but the dose to the two parotids was on average 6.7 Gy higher for 3F-SFO than for MFO. 3F-SFO plans reduced the variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the targets by 22.8% compared to the MFO plans. Variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the organs at risk (OARs) varied between organs and between patients, although they were on average 9.2% less for the 3F-SFO plans than for the MFO plans. Compared with the MFO plans, the 2F-SFO plans showed a reduced dose to

  9. Preliminary evaluation of multifield and single-field optimization for the treatment planning of spot-scanning proton therapy of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, Enzhuo M.; Liu, Wei; Wu, Richard; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe; Li, Yupeng; Frank, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) using multifield optimization (MFO) can generate highly conformal dose distributions, but it is more sensitive to setup and range uncertainties than SSPT using single-field optimization (SFO). The authors compared the two optimization methods for the treatment of head and neck cancer with bilateral targets and determined the superior method on the basis of both the plan quality and the plan robustness in the face of setup and range uncertainties.Methods: Four patients with head and neck cancer with bilateral targets who received SSPT treatment in the authors' institution were studied. The patients had each been treated with a MFO plan using three fields. A three-field SFO plan (3F-SFO) and a two-field SFO plan (2F-SFO) with the use of a range shifter in the beam line were retrospectively generated for each patient. The authors compared the plan quality and robustness to uncertainties of the SFO plans with the MFO plans. Robustness analysis of each plan was performed to generate the two dose distributions consisting of the highest and the lowest possible doses (worst-case doses) from the spatial and range perturbations at every voxel. Dosimetric indices from the nominal and worst-case plans were compared.Results: The 3F-SFO plans generally yielded D95 and D5 values in the targets that were similar to those of the MFO plans. 3F-SFO resulted in a lower dose to the oral cavity than MFO in all four patients by an average of 9.9 Gy, but the dose to the two parotids was on average 6.7 Gy higher for 3F-SFO than for MFO. 3F-SFO plans reduced the variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the targets by 22.8% compared to the MFO plans. Variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the organs at risk (OARs) varied between organs and between patients, although they were on average 9.2% less for the 3F-SFO plans than for the MFO plans. Compared with the MFO plans, the 2F-SFO plans showed a reduced dose to the

  10. Single Sustained Inflation followed by Ventilation Leads to Rapid Cardiorespiratory Recovery but Causes Cerebral Vascular Leakage in Asphyxiated Near-Term Lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina S Sobotka

    Full Text Available A sustained inflation (SI rapidly restores cardiac function in asphyxic, bradycardic newborns but its effects on cerebral haemodynamics and brain injury are unknown. We determined the effect of different SI strategies on carotid blood flow (CaBF and cerebral vascular integrity in asphyxiated near-term lambs.Lambs were instrumented and delivered at 139 ± 2 d gestation and asphyxia was induced by delaying ventilation onset. Lambs were randomised to receive 5 consecutive 3 s SI (multiple SI; n = 6, a single 30 s SI (single SI; n = 6 or conventional ventilation (no SI; n = 6. Ventilation continued for 30 min in all lambs while CaBF and respiratory function parameters were recorded. Brains were assessed for gross histopathology and vascular leakage.CaBF increased more rapidly and to a greater extent during a single SI (p = 0.01, which then decreased below both other groups by 10 min, due to a higher cerebral oxygen delivery (p = 0.01. Blood brain barrier disruption was increased in single SI lambs as indicated by increased numbers of blood vessel profiles with plasma protein extravasation (p = 0.001 in the cerebral cortex. There were no differences in CaBF or cerebral oxygen delivery between the multiple SI and no SI lambs.Ventilation with an initial single 30 s SI improves circulatory recovery, but is associated with greater disruption of blood brain barrier function, which may exacerbate brain injury suffered by asphyxiated newborns. This injury may occur as a direct result of the initial SI or to the higher tidal volumes delivered during subsequent ventilation.

  11. Rapid Quantitative Analysis of Multiple Explosive-Compound Classes on a Single Instrument via Flow-Injection Analysis Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-20

    on a Single In‐ strument via Flow‐Injection Analysis Tandem Mass  Spectrometry   Alla Ostrinskaya, Roderick R. Kunz, Michelle Clark, Rich P...alla.ostrinskaya@ll.mit.edu    ABSTRACT: A flow injection analysis (FIA) tandem mass spectrometry (MSMS) method was developed for rapid quantita- tive analysis of...and has redundant detection channels for reduced  error   rates necessary  for probative use,  (b)  is more  rapid  than existing methods to allow for

  12. Head injuries in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, R C

    1996-12-01

    Injuries to the head and neck are the most frequent catastrophic sports injury, and head injuries are the most common direct athletic cause of death. Although direct compressive forces may injure the brain, neural tissue is particularly susceptible to injury from shearing stresses, which are most likely to occur when rotational forces are applied to the head. The most common athletic head injury is concussion, which may very widely in severity. Intracranial haemorrhage is the leading cause of head injury death in sports, making rapid initial assessment and appropriate follow up mandatory after a head injury. Diffuse cerebral swelling is another serious condition that may be found in the child or adolescent athlete, and the second impact syndrome is a major concern in adult athletes. Many head injuries in athletes are the result of improper playing techniques and can be reduced by teaching proper skills and enforcing safety promoting rules. Improved conditioning (particularly of the neck), protective headgear, and careful medical supervision of athletes will also minimise this type of injury.

  13. Rapid MR imaging of the liver. Comparison of twelve techniques for single breath-hold whole volume acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Jenner, Goeran; Cooper, T.G.; Potchen, E.J.; Ishigaki, Takeo

    1994-01-01

    Twelve magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences for single breath-hold whole volume acquisition of the liver were evaluated on volunteers. Liver and spleen contrast to noise ratio (C/N), overall image quality, and grade of artifacts were compared. The 12 sequences included T 2 -weighted fast spin echo (FSE) with or without fat suppression (FS), fast multiplanar spoiled gradient recalled imaging (FMPSPGR), fast gradient recalled imaging without preparation pulses (FGR), FGR with inversion recovery preparation pulse nulling the liver or fat (IR-FGR-L and IR-FGR-F), FGR with driven equilibrium preparation pulse (DE-FGR), single shot moderately or heavily T 2 -weighted spin echo echo planar imaging (SE-EPI-mT2 and SE-EPI-hT2), multi-shot moderately T 2 -weighted spin echo echo planar imaging (multi-shot SE-EPI-mT2), inversion recovery EPI, and gradient echo EPI. In the quantitative analysis, FSE + FS showed a significantly higher C/N ratio than the others (p<0.05). In the qualitative evaluation, DE-prepFGR, and single and multi-shot SE-EPI-mT2 had good results, as did FSE and FSE + FS. Further studies should be conducted to determine whether or not these breath-hold sequences can obviate current conventional non-breath-hold sequences. (author)

  14. Rapid, single-step most-probable-number method for enumerating fecal coliforms in effluents from sewage treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, E. F.; Silverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    A single-step most-probable-number method for determining the number of fecal coliform bacteria present in sewage treatment plant effluents is discussed. A single growth medium based on that of Reasoner et al. (1976) and consisting of 5.0 gr. proteose peptone, 3.0 gr. yeast extract, 10.0 gr. lactose, 7.5 gr. NaCl, 0.2 gr. sodium lauryl sulfate, and 0.1 gr. sodium desoxycholate per liter is used. The pH is adjusted to 6.5, and samples are incubated at 44.5 deg C. Bacterial growth is detected either by measuring the increase with time in the electrical impedance ratio between the innoculated sample vial and an uninnoculated reference vial or by visual examination for turbidity. Results obtained by the single-step method for chlorinated and unchlorinated effluent samples are in excellent agreement with those obtained by the standard method. It is suggested that in automated treatment plants impedance ratio data could be automatically matched by computer programs with the appropriate dilution factors and most probable number tables already in the computer memory, with the corresponding result displayed as fecal coliforms per 100 ml of effluent.

  15. Development of a simplified RT-PCR without RNA isolation for rapid detection of RNA viruses in a single small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiufang; Liu, Haoqiu; Yuan, Pingping; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Qingqing; Jiang, Xuanli; Zhou, Yijun

    2017-05-03

    The small brown planthopper (SBPH) is an important pest of cereal crops and acts as a transmission vector for multiple RNA viruses. Rapid diagnosis of virus in the vector is crucial for efficient forecast and control of viral disease. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for virus detection. The traditional RT-PCR contains a RNA isolation step and is widely used for virus detection in insect. However, using the traditional RT-PCR for detecting RNA virus in individual SBPHs becomes challenging because of the expensive reagents and laborious procedure associated with RNA isolation when processing a large number of samples. We established a simplified RT-PCR method without RNA isolation for RNA virus detection in a single SBPH. This method is achieved by grinding a single SBPH in sterile water and using the crude extract directly as the template for RT-PCR. The crude extract containing the virus RNA can be prepared in approximately two minutes. Rice stripe virus (RSV), rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) and Himetobi P virus (HiPV) were successfully detected using this simplified method. The detection results were validated by sequencing and dot immunobinding assay, indicating that this simplified method is reliable for detecting different viruses in insects. The evaluation of the sensitivity of this method showed that both RSV and HiPV can be detected when the cDNA from the crude extract was diluted up to 10 3 fold. Compared to the traditional RT-PCR with RNA isolation, the simplified RT-PCR method greatly reduces the sample processing time, decreases the detection cost, and improves the efficiency by avoiding RNA isolation. A simplified RT-PCR method is developed for rapid detection of RNA virus in a single SBPH without the laborious RNA isolation step. It offers a convenient alternative to the traditional RT-PCR method.

  16. Rapid Rule-Out of Acute Myocardial Injury Using a Single High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin I Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Yader; Smith, Stephen W; Shah, Anoop S V; Anand, Atul; Chapman, Andrew R; Love, Sara A; Schulz, Karen; Cao, Jing; Mills, Nicholas L; Apple, Fred S

    2017-01-01

    Rapid rule-out strategies using high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays are largely supported by studies performed outside the US in selected cohorts of patients with chest pain that are atypical of US practice, and focused exclusively on ruling out acute myocardial infarction (AMI), rather than acute myocardial injury, which is more common and associated with a poor prognosis. Prospective, observational study of consecutive patients presenting to emergency departments [derivation (n = 1647) and validation (n = 2198) cohorts], where high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI) was measured on clinical indication. The negative predictive value (NPV) and diagnostic sensitivity of an hs-cTnI concentration rules out acute myocardial injury, regardless of etiology, with an excellent NPV and diagnostic sensitivity, and identifies patients at minimal risk of AMI or cardiac death at 30 days. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02060760. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  17. Metagenomics and single-cell genomics reveal high abundance of comammox Nitrospira in a rapid gravity sand filter treating groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palomo, Alejandro; Fowler, Jane; Gülay, Arda

    , the ecological relevance of comammox remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the microbial communities from various locations within a groundwater-fed rapid sand filter (RSF), where Nitrospira were at very high relative abundances. Through metagenomics, a highly abundant composite multi-genome of Nitrospira...... genus was recovered harboring metabolic capacity for complete ammonia oxidation. We developed a cell extraction strategy that enables the disruption of Nitrospira cell clusters attached to the mineral coating of the sand. Individual cells were identified via fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH...... taxonomic differences with the recently described comammox Nitrospira genomes. The high abundance of comammox Nitrospira spp. together with the low abundance of canonical ammonia oxidizing prokaryotes in the investigated RSF system suggests the essential role of this novel comammox Nitrospira in the RSFs...

  18. Detecting Intracranial Hemorrhage Using Automatic Tube Current Modulation With Advanced Modeled Iterative Reconstruction in Unenhanced Head Single- and Dual-Energy Dual-Source CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Wichmann, Julian L; Bennett, Dennis W; Leithner, Doris; Bauer, Ralf W; Vogl, Thomas J; Bodelle, Boris

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine diagnostic accuracy, image quality, and radiation dose of low-dose single- and dual-energy unenhanced third-generation dual-source head CT for detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). A total of 123 patients with suspected ICH were examined using a dual-source 192-MDCT scanner. Standard-dose 120-kVp single-energy CT (SECT; n = 36) and 80-kVp and 150-kVp dual-energy CT (DECT; n = 30) images were compared with low-dose SECT (n = 32) and DECT (n = 25) images obtained using automated tube current modulation (ATCM). Advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) was used for all protocols. Detection of ICH was performed by three readers who were blinded to the image acquisition parameters of each image series. Image quality was assessed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Interobserver agreement was calculated using the Fleiss kappa. Radiation dose was measured as dose-length product (DLP). Detection of ICH was excellent (sensitivity, 94.9-100%; specificity, 94.7-100%) in all protocols (p = 1.00) with perfect interobserver agreement (0.83-0.96). Qualitative ratings showed significantly better ratings for both standard-dose protocols regarding gray matter-to-white matter contrast (p ≤ 0.014), whereas highest gray matter-to-white matter contrast-to-noise ratio was observed with low-dose DECT images (p ≥ 0.057). The lowest posterior fossa artifact index was measured for standard-dose DECT, which showed significantly lower values compared with low-dose protocols (p ≤ 0.034). Delineation of ventricular margins and sharpness of subarachnoidal spaces were rated excellent in all protocols (p ≥ 0.096). Low-dose techniques lowered radiation dose by 26% for SECT images (DLP, 575.0 ± 72.3 mGy · cm vs 771.5 ± 146.8 mGy · cm; p dual-source CT while allowing significant radiation dose reduction.

  19. A rapid automated procedure for laboratory and shipboard spectrophotometric measurements of seawater alkalinity: continuously monitored single-step acid additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Byrne, R. H.; Lindemuth, M.; Easley, R. A.; Patsavas, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    An automated system for shipboard and laboratory alkalinity measurements is presented. The simple system, which consists of a Dosimat titrator to deliver acid volumetrically and a USB 4000 spectrophotometer to monitor the titration progress, provides fast, precise and accurate measurements of total alkalinity for oceanographic research. The analytical method is based on single-point HCl titrations of seawater samples of a known volume; bromol cresol purple is used as an indicator to determine the final pH. Field data from an Arctic cruise demonstrates accuracy and precision around 1 micro mol/kg and a sample processing rate of 6 min per sample.

  20. Detection and mapping of Cannabinoids in single hair samples through rapid derivatization- Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Beasley, Emma; Francese, Simona; Bassindale, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The sample preparation method reported in this work has permitted for the first time the application of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Profiling and Imaging (MALDI-MSP and MALDI-MSI) for the detection and mapping of cannabinoids in a single hair sample. MALDI-MSI analysis of hair samples has recently been suggested as an alternative technique to traditional methods of GC-MS and LC-MS due to simpler sample preparation, the ability to detect a narrower time frame ...

  1. Self-Assemblies of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes through Tunable Tethering of Pyrenes by Dextrin for Rapidly Chiral Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Wei-Li; Chen, Qiushui; Li, Haifang; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Pyrene-modified dextrin (Py-Dex) was synthesized via the Schiff base reaction between reducing end of dextrins and 1-aminopyrene, and then self-assemblies of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were fabricated through the tunable tethering of pyrene to SWNTs by dextrin chains. The Py-Dex-SWNTs assemblies were found to be significantly water-soluble because of the synergistic effect of dextrin chains and pyrene moieties. Py-Dex and Py-Dex-SWNTs were adequately characterized by NMR, UV-vis, ...

  2. Comprehensive and rapid assessment of carotid plaques in acute stroke using a new single sweep method for three-dimensional carotid ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashyan, Harapet; Saqqur, Maher; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Romanchuk, Helen; Nanda, Navin C; Becher, Harald

    2013-04-01

    We describe a 68-year-old man with acute stroke in whom the newly developed single sweep method for three-dimensional (3D) carotid ultrasound provided a rapid and comprehensive assessment of atherosclerotic plaque burden in the internal carotid artery. The two-dimensional duplex carotid scan diagnosed 50-69% stenosis, and with the three-dimensional method, the markedly hypoechogenic plaque (total volume 1.42 mL) was shown to occupy 77% of the total arterial volume (1.84 mL), consistent with severe lesion. The ultrasound findings were confirmed by computed tomographic angiography and subsequent carotid endarterectomy. The new single sweep 3D carotid ultrasound has the potential to become a valuable clinical tool in the assessment of stroke patients. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Rapid progressive seeding of a community acquired pathogen in an immune-competent host: end organ damage from head to bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Torres-Miranda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA meningitis is a rare disease when not related to neurosurgery: there are only few reported cases in the literature to date. We describe a case that highlights not only meningeal but also diffuse and rapidly progressive systemic involvement with multi-organ failure. A 64-year-old male presented to our hospital with a chief complaint of acute worsening of his usual chronic lower back pain, progressive weakness in lower extremities and subjective fevers at home. Hospital course demonstrated MSSA bacteremia, of questionable source, that resulted in endocarditis affecting right and left heart in a patient with no history of intravenous drug use. The case was complicated by septic emboli to systemic circulation involving the kidneys, vertebral spine, lungs and brain with consequent meningitis and stroke, even when treated empirically with vancomycin and then switched to nafcillin as indicated. Even though MSSA infections are well known, there are very few case reports describing such an acute-simultaneous-manifestation of multi-end-organ failure, including meningitis and stroke. Our case, also presented with an uncommon manifestation of persistent infection dissemination despite adequate antibiotic treatment.

  4. Rapid Progressive Seeding of a Community Acquired Pathogen in an Immune-Competent Host: End Organ Damage from Head to Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Miranda, Daisy; Al-Saffar, Farah; Ibrahim, Saif; Diaz-Font, Stephanie

    2015-04-15

    Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) meningitis is a rare disease when not related to neurosurgery: there are only few reported cases in the literature to date. We describe a case that highlights not only meningeal but also diffuse and rapidly progressive systemic involvement with multi-organ failure. A 64-year-old male presented to our hospital with a chief complaint of acute worsening of his usual chronic lower back pain, progressive weakness in lower extremities and subjective fevers at home. Hospital course demonstrated MSSA bacteremia, of questionable source, that resulted in endocarditis affecting right and left heart in a patient with no history of intravenous drug use. The case was complicated by septic emboli to systemic circulation involving the kidneys, vertebral spine, lungs and brain with consequent meningitis and stroke, even when treated empirically with vancomycin and then switched to nafcillin as indicated. Even though MSSA infections are well known, there are very few case reports describing such an acute-simultaneous-manifestation of multi-end-organ failure, including meningitis and stroke. Our case, also presented with an uncommon manifestation of persistent infection dissemination despite adequate antibiotic treatment.

  5. Rapid computation of single PET scan rest-stress myocardial blood flow parametric images by table look up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guehl, Nicolas J; Normandin, Marc D; Wooten, Dustin W; Rozen, Guy; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Shoup, Timothy M; Woo, Jonghye; Ptaszek, Leon M; Fakhri, Georges El; Alpert, Nathaniel M

    2017-09-01

    We have recently reported a method for measuring rest-stress myocardial blood flow (MBF) using a single, relatively short, PET scan session. The method requires two IV tracer injections, one to initiate rest imaging and one at peak stress. We previously validated absolute flow quantitation in ml/min/cc for standard bull's eye, segmental analysis. In this work, we extend the method for fast computation of rest-stress MBF parametric images. We provide an analytic solution to the single-scan rest-stress flow model which is then solved using a two-dimensional table lookup method (LM). Simulations were performed to compare the accuracy and precision of the lookup method with the original nonlinear method (NLM). Then the method was applied to 16 single scan rest/stress measurements made in 12 pigs: seven studied after infarction of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) territory, and nine imaged in the native state. Parametric maps of rest and stress MBF as well as maps of left (f LV ) and right (f RV ) ventricular spill-over fractions were generated. Regions of interest (ROIs) for 17 myocardial segments were defined in bull's eye fashion on the parametric maps. The mean of each ROI was then compared to the rest (K 1r ) and stress (K 1s ) MBF estimates obtained from fitting the 17 regional TACs with the NLM. In simulation, the LM performed as well as the NLM in terms of precision and accuracy. The simulation did not show that bias was introduced by the use of a predefined two-dimensional lookup table. In experimental data, parametric maps demonstrated good statistical quality and the LM was computationally much more efficient than the original NLM. Very good agreement was obtained between the mean MBF calculated on the parametric maps for each of the 17 ROIs and the regional MBF values estimated by the NLM (K 1map LM  = 1.019 × K 1 ROI NLM  + 0.019, R 2  = 0.986; mean difference = 0.034 ± 0.036 mL/min/cc). We developed a table lookup method for fast

  6. Single motor unit firing behavior in the right trapezius muscle during rapid movement of right or left index finger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karen; Olsen, Henrik B; Blangsted, Anne K

    2014-01-01

    of a general multi joint motor program, while a generally increased and continuous firing rate would support the attention related muscle activation. METHOD: Twelve healthy female subjects were seated at a computer work place with elbows and forearms supported. Ten double clicks (DC) were performed with right......BACKGROUND: Computer work is associated with low level sustained activity in the trapezius muscle that may cause development of trapezius myalgia. Such a low level activity may be attention related or alternatively, be part of a general multi joint motor program providing stabilization...... of the shoulder joint as a biomechanical prerequisite for precise finger manipulation. This study examines single motor unit (MU) firing pattern in the right trapezius muscle during fast movements of ipsilateral or contralateral index finger. A modulation of the MU firing rate would support the existence...

  7. Detection of zinc oxide and cerium dioxide nanoparticles during drinking water treatment by rapid single particle ICP-MS methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Ariel R; Adams, Craig D; Ma, Yinfa; Stephan, Chady; Eichholz, Todd; Shi, Honglan

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) entering water systems are an emerging concern as NPs are more frequently manufactured and used. Single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) methods were validated to detect Zn- and Ce-containing NPs in surface and drinking water using a short dwell time of 0.1 ms or lower, ensuring precision in single particle detection while eliminating the need for sample preparation. Using this technique, information regarding NP size, size distribution, particle concentration, and dissolved ion concentrations was obtained simultaneously. The fates of Zn- and Ce-NPs, including those found in river water and added engineered NPs, were evaluated by simulating a typical drinking water treatment process. Lime softening, alum coagulation, powdered activated carbon sorption, and disinfection by free chlorine were simulated sequentially using river water. Lime softening removed 38-53 % of Zn-containing and ZnO NPs and >99 % of Ce-containing and CeO2 NPs. Zn-containing and ZnO NP removal increased to 61-74 % and 77-79 % after alum coagulation and disinfection, respectively. Source and drinking water samples were collected from three large drinking water treatment facilities and analyzed for Zn- and Ce-containing NPs. Each facility had these types of NPs present. In all cases, particle concentrations were reduced by a minimum of 60 % and most were reduced by >95 % from source water to finished drinking water. This study concludes that uncoated ZnO and CeO2 NPs may be effectively removed by conventional drinking water treatments including lime softening and alum coagulation.

  8. Rapid and efficient radiosynthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195, a single photon emission computed tomography tracer for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimlott, Sally L. [Department of Clinical Physics, West of Scotland Radionuclide Dispensary, Western Infirmary, G11 6NT Glasgow (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.pimlott@clinmed.gla.ac.uk; Stevenson, Louise [Department of Chemistry, WestCHEM, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom); Wyper, David J. [Institute of Neurological Sciences, Southern General Hospital, G51 4TF Glasgow (United Kingdom); Sutherland, Andrew [Department of Chemistry, WestCHEM, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-15

    Introduction: [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 is a high-affinity single photon emission computed tomography radiotracer for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors that has previously been used to measure activated microglia and to assess neuroinflammation in the living human brain. This study investigates the radiosynthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 in order to develop a rapid and efficient method that obtains [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 with a high specific activity for in vivo animal and human imaging studies. Methods: The synthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 was evaluated using a solid-state interhalogen exchange method and an electrophilic iododestannylation method, where bromine and trimethylstannyl derivatives were used as precursors, respectively. In the electrophilic iododestannylation method, the oxidants peracetic acid and chloramine-T were both investigated. Results: Electrophilic iododestannylation produced [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 with a higher isolated radiochemical yield and a higher specific activity than achievable using the halogen exchange method investigated. Using chloramine-T as oxidant provided a rapid and efficient method of choice for the synthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195. Conclusions: [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 has been successfully synthesized via a rapid and efficient electrophilic iododestannylation method, producing [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 with a higher isolated radiochemical yield and a higher specific activity than previously achieved.

  9. A single phase, red emissive Mg2SiO4:Sm3+ nanophosphor prepared via rapid propellant combustion route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ramachandra; Prashantha, S. C.; Nagabhushana, H.; Sharma, S. C.; Nagaswarupa, H. P.; Anantharaju, K. S.; Nagabhushana, B. M.; Premkumar, H. B.; Girish, K. M.

    2015-04-01

    Mg2SiO4:Sm3+ (1-11 mol%) nanoparticles were prepared by a rapid low temperature solution combustion route. The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns exhibit orthorhombic structure with α-phase. The average crystallite size estimated using Scherer's method, W-H plot and strain-size plots were found to be in the range 25-50 nm and the same was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures show porous structure and crystallites were agglomerated. The effect of Sm3+ cations on luminescence of Mg2SiO4 was well studied. Interestingly the samples could be effectively excited with 315 nm and emitted light in the red region, which was suitable for the demands of high efficiency WLEDs. The emission spectra consists of four main peaks which can be assigned to the intra 4-f orbital transitions of Sm3+ ions 4G5/2 → 6H5/2 (576 nm), 4G5/2 → 6H7/2 (611 nm), 4G5/2 → 6H9/2 (656 nm) and 4G5/2 → 6H11/2 (713 nm). The optimal luminescence intensity was obtained for 5 mol% Sm3+ ions. The CIE (Commission International de I'Eclairage) chromaticity co-ordinates were calculated from emission spectra, the values (0.588, 0.386) were close to the NTSC (National Television Standard Committee) standard value of red emission. Coordinated color temperature (CCT) was found to be 1756 K. Therefore optimized Mg2SiO4:Sm3+ (5 mol%) phosphor was quite useful for solid state lighting.

  10. Common spatio-temporal pattern for single-trial detection of event-related potential in rapid serial visual presentation triage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ke; Shen, Kaiquan; Shao, Shiyun; Ng, Wu Chun; Kwok, Kenneth; Li, Xiaoping

    2011-09-01

    Searching for target images in large volume imagery is a challenging problem and the rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) triage is potentially a promising solution to the problem. RSVP triage is essentially a cortically-coupled computer vision technique that relies on single-trial detection of event-related potentials (ERP). In RSVP triage, images are shown to a subject in a rapid serial sequence. When a target image is seen by the subject, unique ERP characterized by P300 are elicited. Thus, in RSVP triage, accurate detection of such distinct ERP allows for fast searching of target images in large volume imagery. The accuracy of the distinct ERP detection in RSVP triage depends on the feature extraction method, for which the common spatial pattern analysis (CSP) was used with limited success. This paper presents a novel feature extraction method, termed common spatio-temporal pattern (CSTP), which is critical for robust single-trial detection of ERP. Unlike the conventional CSP, whereby only spatial patterns of ERP are considered, the present proposed method exploits spatial and temporal patterns of ERP separately, providing complementary spatial and temporal features for high accurate single-trial ERP detection. Numerical study using data collected from 20 subjects in RSVP triage experiments demonstrates that the proposed method offers significant performance improvement over the conventional CSP method (corrected p-value < 0.05, Pearson r = 0.64) and other competing methods in the literature. This paper further shows that the main idea of CSTP can be easily applied to other methods.

  11. Single motor unit firing behaviour in the right trapezius muscle during rapid movement of right or left index finger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen eSøgaard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Computer work is associated with low level sustained activity in the trapezius muscle that may cause myalgia. The activity may be attention related or part of a general multijoint motor program providing stabilization of the shoulder girdle for precise finger manipulation. This study examines single motor unit (MU firing pattern in the right trapezius muscle during fast movements of ipsi or contralateral index finger. Modulated firing rate would support a general multi joint motor program, while a generally increased and continuous firing rate would support attention related activation. 12 healthy female subjects were seated at a computer work place with elbows and forearms supported. Ten double clicks (DC were performed with right and left index finger on a computer mouse instrumented with a trigger.Surface EMG was recorded from right and left trapezius muscle. Intramuscular EMG was recorded with a quadripolar wire electrode in the right trapezius.Surface EMG was analysed as %MVE. The intramuscular EMG was decomposed into individual MU action potential trains. Instantaneous firing rate (IFR was calculated from inter-spike interval with ISI shorter than 20 ms defined as doublets. IFR was averaged across 10 DC to show IFR modulation.Surface EMG in both right and left trapezius was 1.8-2.5%MVE. During right hand DC a total of 32 MUs were identified. Four subjects showed no activity. Four showed MU activity with weak or no variations related to the timing of DC. Four subjects showed large modulation in IFR with temporal relation to DC. During left hand DC 15 MUs were identified in 4 subjects, for two of the subjects with IFR modulations related to DC. Doublets was found as an integrated part of MU activation in the trapezius muscle and for one subject temporarily related to DC. In conclusion, DC with ipsi- and contralateral fast movements of the index finger was found to evoke biomechanically as well as attention related activity pattern in the

  12. Rapid one-step purification of single-cells encapsulated in alginate microcapsules from oil to aqueous phase using a hydrophobic filter paper: implications for single-cell experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Do-Hyun; Jang, Miran; Park, Je-Kyun

    2014-10-01

    By virtue of the biocompatibility and physical properties of hydrogel, picoliter-sized hydrogel microcapsules have been considered to be a biometric signature containing several features similar to that of encapsulated single cells, including phenotype, viability, and intracellular content. To maximize the experimental potential of encapsulating cells in hydrogel microcapsules, a method that enables efficient hydrogel microcapsule purification from oil is necessary. Current methods based on centrifugation for the conventional stepwise rinsing of oil, are slow and laborious and decrease the monodispersity and yield of the recovered hydrogel microcapsules. To remedy these shortcomings we have developed a simple one-step method to purify alginate microcapsules, containing a single live cell, from oil to aqueous phase. This method employs oil impregnation using a commercially available hydrophobic filter paper without multistep centrifugal purification and complicated microchannel networks. The oil-suspended alginate microcapsules encapsulating single cells from mammalian cancer cell lines (MCF-7, HepG2, and U937) and microorganisms (Chlorella vulgaris) were successfully exchanged to cell culture media by quick (~10 min) depletion of the surrounding oil phase without coalescence of neighboring microcapsules. Cell proliferation and high integrity of the microcapsules were also demonstrated by long-term incubation of microcapsules containing a single live cell. We expect that this method for the simple and rapid purification of encapsulated single-cell microcapsules will attain widespread adoption, assisting cell biologists and clinicians in the development of single-cell experiments. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A rapid, ratiometric, enzyme-free, and sensitive single-step miRNA detection using three-way junction based FRET probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingying; Liu, Lin; Yang, Cai; Yuan, Jing; Feng, Hongtao; Chen, Yan; Zhao, Peng; Yu, Zhiqiang; Jin, Zongwen

    2018-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single stranded endogenous molecules composed of only 18-24 nucleotides which are critical for gene expression regulating the translation of messenger RNAs. Conventional methods based on enzyme-assisted nucleic acid amplification techniques have many problems, such as easy contamination, high cost, susceptibility to false amplification, and tendency to have sequence mismatches. Here we report a rapid, ratiometric, enzyme-free, sensitive, and highly selective single-step miRNA detection using three-way junction assembled (or self-assembled) FRET probes. The developed strategy can be operated within the linear range from subnanomolar to hundred nanomolar concentrations of miRNAs. In comparison with the traditional approaches, our method showed high sensitivity for the miRNA detection and extreme selectivity for the efficient discrimination of single-base mismatches. The results reveal that the strategy paved a new avenue for the design of novel highly specific probes applicable in diagnostics and potentially in microscopic imaging of miRNAs in real biological environments.

  14. Rapid magnetic solid-phase extraction based on monodisperse magnetic single-crystal ferrite nanoparticles for the determination of free fatty acid content in edible oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Zhao, Qin; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Feng, Yu-Qi; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-09

    This study proposes a rapid magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) based on monodisperse magnetic single-crystal ferrite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles (NPs) for determining the quantities of eight free fatty acids (FFAs), including palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), linolenic acid (C18:3), arachidic acid (C20:0), eicosenoic acid (C20:1), and behenic acid (C22:0) in oil. The amine-functionalized mesoporous Fe(3)O(4) magnetic NPs were applied as a sorbent for MSPE of FFAs from oil samples in a process that is based on hydrophilic interaction. The extraction can be completed rapidly in a dispersive mode with the aid of vigorous vortex. Additional tedious processing steps such as centrifugation and evaporation of organic solvent were not necessary with this procedure. Furthermore, esterification of FFAs can be accomplished during the desorption procedure by using methanol/sulfuric acid (99:1, v/v) as the desorption solvent. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated, including the matrix solvent for extraction, the desorption solvent and desorption time, and the amount of sorbent and extraction time. The pretreatment process was rapid under optimal conditions, being accomplished within 15 min. When coupled with gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID), a rapid, simple, and convenient MSPE-GC-FID method for the determination of FFAs in oil samples was established with a total analysis time within 25 min. The limits of detection for the target FFAs were found to be 7.22-26.26 ng/mL. Recoveries in oil samples were in the range of 81.33-117.75%, with RSDs of <6.4% (intraday) and <6.9% (interday). This method was applied successfully to the analysis of dynamic FFA formation in four types of edible oils subjected to an accelerated storage test. The simple, rapid, and cost-effective method developed in the current study offers a potential application for the extraction and

  15. High-level rapid production of full-size monoclonal antibodies in plants by a single-vector DNA replicon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhong; Phoolcharoen, Waranyoo; Lai, Huafang; Piensook, Khanrat; Cardineau, Guy; Zeitlin, Larry; Whaley, Kevin J.; Arntzen, Charles J.

    2010-01-01

    Plant viral vectors have great potential in rapid production of important pharmaceutical proteins. However, high-yield production of heterooligomeric proteins that require the expression and assembly of two or more protein subunits often suffers problems due to the “competing” nature of viral vectors derived from the same virus. Previously we reported that a bean yellow dwarf virus (BeYDV)-derived, three-component DNA replicon system allows rapid production of single recombinant proteins in plants (Huang et al. 2009). In this article, we report further development of this expression system for its application in high-yield production of oligomeric protein complexes including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in plants. We showed that the BeYDV replicon system permits simultaneous efficient replication of two DNA replicons and thus, high-level accumulation of two recombinant proteins in the same plant cell. We also demonstrated that a single vector that contains multiple replicon cassettes was as efficient as the three-component system in driving the expression of two distinct proteins. Using either the non-competing, three-vector system or the multi-replicon single vector, we produced both the heavy and light chain subunits of a protective IgG mAb 6D8 against Ebola virus GP1 (Wilson et al. 2000) at 0.5 mg of mAb per gram leaf fresh weight within 4 days post infiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. We further demonstrated that full-size tetrameric IgG complex containing two heavy and two light chains was efficiently assembled and readily purified, and retained its functionality in specific binding to inactivated Ebola virus. Thus, our single-vector replicon system provides high-yield production capacity for heterooligomeric proteins, yet eliminates the difficult task of identifying non-competing virus and the need for co-infection of multiple expression modules. The multi-replicon vector represents a significant advance in transient expression technology for

  16. Mesh-shape-and-size controlled rapid-melting growth for the formation of single-crystalline (100), (110), and (111) Ge networks on insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizushima, Ichiro; Toko, Kaoru; Ohta, Yasuharu; Sakane, Takashi; Sadoh, Taizoh; Miyao, Masanobu

    2011-01-01

    Single-crystalline-Ge (c-Ge) networks with various crystal orientations on insulators formed on Si substrates are essential for integrating high-speed and multifunctional devices onto the Si platform. c-Ge networks are realized by rapid-melting growth of mesh-patterned amorphous-Ge over large areas (500x250 μm 2 ) on (110) and (111) as well as (100) Si substrates by optimizing the shape and the size of the mesh. It is revealed that latent-heat generated at the growth front can be controlled by selecting mesh-shape-and-size, which suppresses the spontaneous nucleation. In addition, essential role of the growth-direction on preventing the rotational growth is clarified.

  17. Rapid determination of free fatty acid content in waste deodorizer distillates using single bounce-attenuated total reflectance-FTIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Saba; Sherazi, Sayed Tufail Hussain; Talpur, Farah N; Mahesar, Sarfaraz A; Kara, Huseyin

    2012-01-01

    A simple, rapid, economical, and environmentally friendly analytical method was developed for the quantitative assessment of free fatty acids (FFAs) present in deodorizer distillates and crude oils by single bounce-attenuated total reflectance-FTIR spectroscopy. Partial least squares was applied for the calibration model based on the peak region of the carbonyl group (C=O) from 1726 to 1664 cm(-1) associated with the FFAs. The proposed method totally avoided the use of organic solvents or costly standards and could be applied easily in the oil processing industry. The accuracy of the method was checked by comparison to a conventional standard American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS) titrimetric procedure, which provided good correlation (R = 0.99980), with an SD of +/- 0.05%. Therefore, the proposed method could be used as an alternate to the AOCS titrimetric method for the quantitative determination of FFAs especially in deodorizer distillates.

  18. Skull reconstruction after resection of bone tumors in a single surgical time by the association of the techniques of rapid prototyping and surgical navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchieta, M V M; Salles, F A; Cassaro, B D; Quaresma, M M; Santos, B F O

    2016-10-01

    Presentation of a new cranioplasty technique employing a combination of two technologies: rapid prototyping and surgical navigation. This technique allows the reconstruction of the skull cap after the resection of a bone tumor in a single surgical time. The neurosurgeon plans the craniotomy previously on the EximiusMed software, compatible with the Eximius Surgical Navigator, both from the company Artis Tecnologia (Brazil). The navigator imports the planning and guides the surgeon during the craniotomy. The simulation of the bone fault allows the virtual reconstruction of the skull cap and the production of a personalized modelling mold using the Magics-Materialise (Belgium)-software. The mold and a replica of the bone fault are made by rapid prototyping by the company Artis Tecnologia (Brazil) and shipped under sterile conditions to the surgical center. The PMMA prosthesis is produced during the surgical act with the help of a hand press. The total time necessary for the planning and production of the modelling mold is four days. The precision of the mold is submillimetric and accurately reproduces the virtual reconstruction of the prosthesis. The production of the prosthesis during surgery takes until twenty minutes depending on the type of PMMA used. The modelling mold avoids contraction and dissipates the heat generated by the material's exothermic reaction in the polymerization phase. The craniectomy is performed with precision over the drawing made with the help of the Eximius Surgical Navigator, according to the planned measurements. The replica of the bone fault serves to evaluate the adaptation of the prosthesis as a support for the perforations and the placement of screws and fixation plates, as per the surgeon's discretion. This technique allows the adequate oncologic treatment associated with a satisfactory aesthetic result, with precision, in a single surgical time, reducing time and costs.

  19. Myofascial force transmission in dynamic muscle conditions: effects of dynamic shortening of a single head of multi-tendoned rat extensor digitorum longus muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, H.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of myofascial force transmission during dynamic shortening of head III of rat extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL III). The anterior crural compartment was left intact. Force was measured simultaneously at the distal EDL III tendon, the proximal EDL tendon and

  20. Controlled intermittent shortening contractions of a muscle-tendon complex: muscle fibre damage and effects on force transmission from a single head of rat EDL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, H.; Lehti, T.M.; Tiihonen, V.; Komulainen, J.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to examine effects of prolonged (3 h) intermittent shortening (amplitude 2 mm) contractions (muscles were excited maximally) of head III of rat extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL III) on indices of muscle damage and on force transmission within the intact anterior crural

  1. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... numbness in the arms or legs. Loss of consciousness. Seizures. What causes a head injury? There are ... Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight ...

  2. Head Lice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Head lice cannot jump or fly. Only the direct contact with an infested person or their contaminated ... the complex world of health care and making…Sports and Exercise at Every AgeRead Article >>Exercise and ...

  3. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy versus induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy as definitive, first line treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. A retrospective single center analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balermpas, P.; Bauer, C.; Fraunholz, I.; Ottinger, A.; Fokas, E.; Roedel, C.; Weiss, C. [Goethe University Frankfurt, Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wagenblast, J.; Stoever, T. [Goethe University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Seitz, O. [Goethe University, Department of Oral Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Despite the lack of evidence to support its implementation in the clinical practice, induction chemotherapy (IC) before chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is often used in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We retrospectively examined the tolerability, feasibility, and clinical outcome of both concepts in a single center analysis. In all, 83 patients were treated between 2007 and 2010 with IC + CRT (n = 42) or CRT alone (n = 41). IC consisted of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (TPF), or cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (PF). All patients were scheduled to receive 2 cycles of PF during concurrent CRT. Adverse events were assessed according to the common toxicity criteria of adverse events (CTCAE v. 3.0). Associations were tested using the χ{sup 2} test, and survival estimates were calculated according to Kaplan-Meier. The median follow-up was 30.35 months (range 2.66-61.25 months). At 2 years, the overall survival rate was significantly higher for primary CRT compared to IC + CRT group (74.8 % vs. 54 %, respectively; p = 0.041). Significantly more treatment-related overall grade 4 toxicities were documented in the IC + CRT group compared to the CRT group (42.9% vs. 9.8%; p = 0.001). Renal toxicity ≥ grade 2 occurred in 52.4 % vs. 7.3 % (p < 0.001), respectively. In all, 93 % of the patients with primary CRT compared to 71 % with IC + CRT received the planned full radiotherapy dose (p = 0.012). This is, to our knowledge, the largest retrospective study to compare IC + CRT with primary CRT. IC showed high acute toxicity, compromised the feasibility of concurrent CRT, and was associated with reduced overall survival rates compared to primary CRT. The lack of clinical benefit in conjunction with the increased toxicity does not support implementation of IC. (orig.) [German] Trotz fehlender Studienergebnisse, die den Einsatz einer Induktionschemotherapie (IC) vor einer simultanen Radiochemotherapie (RCT) in der klinischen

  4. Rapid Synthesis of a Long Double-Stranded Oligonucleotide from a Single-Stranded Nucleotide Using Magnetic Beads and an Oligo Library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumate Pengpumkiat

    Full Text Available Chemical synthesis of oligonucleotides is a widely used tool in the field of biochemistry. Several methods for gene synthesis have been introduced in the growing area of genomics. In this paper, a novel method of constructing dsDNA is proposed. Short (28-mer oligo fragments from a library were assembled through successive annealing and ligation processes, followed by PCR. First, two oligo fragments annealed to form a dsDNA molecule. The double-stranded oligo was immobilized onto magnetic beads (solid support via streptavidin-biotin binding. Next, single-stranded oligo fragments were added successively through ligation to form the complete DNA molecule. The synthesized DNA was amplified through PCR and gel electrophoresis was used to characterize the product. Sanger sequencing showed that more than 97% of the nucleotides matched the expected sequence. Extending the length of the DNA molecule by adding single-stranded oligonucleotides from a basis set (library via ligation enables a more convenient and rapid mechanism for the design and synthesis of oligonucleotides on the go. Coupled with an automated dispensing system and libraries of short oligo fragments, this novel DNA synthesis method would offer an efficient and cost-effective method for producing dsDNA.

  5. A comparative analysis of costs of single and dual rapid HIV and syphilis diagnostics: results from a randomised controlled trial in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obure, Carol Dayo; Gaitan-Duarte, Hernando; Losada Saenz, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Lina; Angel-Muller, Edith; Laverty, Maura; Perez, Freddy

    2017-11-01

    HIV and congenital syphilis are major public health burdens contributing to substantial perinatal morbidity and mortality globally. Although studies have reported on the costs and cost-effectiveness of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for syphilis screening within antenatal care in a number of resource-constrained settings, empirical evidence on country-specific cost and estimates of single RDTs compared with dual RDTs for HIV and syphilis are limited. A cluster randomised controlled study design was used to compare the incremental costs of two testing algorithms: (1) single RDTs for HIV and syphilis and (2) dual RDTs for HIV and syphilis, in 12 health facilities in Bogota and Cali, Colombia. The costs of single HIV and syphilis RDTs and dual HIV and syphilis RDTs were collected from each of the health facilities. The economic costs per woman tested for HIV and syphilis and costs per woman treated for syphilis defined as the total costs required to test and treat one woman for syphilis were estimated. A total of 2214 women were tested in the study facilities. Cost per pregnant woman tested and cost per woman treated for syphilis were US$10.26 and US$607.99, respectively in the single RDT arm. For the dual RDTs, the cost per pregnant woman tested for HIV and syphilis and cost per woman treated for syphilis were US$15.89 and US$1859.26, respectively. Overall costs per woman tested for HIV and syphilis and cost per woman treated for syphilis were lower in Cali compared with Bogota across both intervention arms. Staff costs accounted for the largest proportion of costs while treatment costs comprised <1% of the preventive programme. Findings show lower average costs for single RDTs compared with dual RDTs with costs sensitive to personnel costs and the scale of output at the health facilities. NCT02454816; results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Bone-preserving prosthesis with a single axis for treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head: midterm results for the thrust plate hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunaga, Yuji; Goto, Toshihiko; Hisatome, Takashi; Tanaka, Ryuji; Yamasaki, Takuma; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    We studied 27 patients (31 joints) who underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) using the thrust plate hip prosthesis (TPP) for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The mean follow-up period was 56 months (range 38-72 months). Clinical evaluation by the Merle d'Aubigne and Postel system showed a significant improvement from a preoperative mean score of 8.1 to a final mean follow-up score of 16.6. Mechanical loosening developed about 1 year postoperatively in one joint with a bone defect. Grade 1 stress shielding was observed in four joints. Although indications for the TPP are restricted to certain cases, unlike the conventional intramedullary stem, much can be expected of TPP. It is an outstanding prosthesis for osteonecrosis of the femoral head of young patients in terms of bone preservation and physiological load transfer.

  7. Inflation threshold: A nonlinear trapping-induced threshold for the rapid onset of stimulated Raman scattering from a single laser speckle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, H. X.; DuBois, D. F.; Bezzerides, B.

    2007-01-01

    The rapid onset, with increasing laser intensity, of levels of backward stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS) exceeding linear convective predictions, from single laser hot spots was predicted by simulations [Vu et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 1745 (2002)], and has been observed [Montgomery et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2311 (2002)] in nonlinear regimes dominated by electron trapping. A theory for this inflation threshold is given here. The threshold is the result of competition between velocity diffusion and trapping, and is exceeded when the convectively amplified SRS Langmuir wave (LW) achieves an amplitude for which the coherent trapping velocity increment of electrons in the LW (the half-width of the trapping separatrix) exceeds the rms diffusion velocity (resulting from background plasma fluctuations), accumulated in one bounce time, for electrons with mean velocities near the phase velocity of the LW. The results of this theory, when the kinetic theory of the one-dimensional (1D) reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) simulation is used, are in good agreement with a series of 1D RPIC simulations. The theory is naturally generalized to three dimensions, and is compatible with macroscopic laser interaction codes such as pF3d [Berger et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 4337 (1998)]. Comparison of the LW trapping-induced inflation threshold to the LW threshold for the Langmuir decay instability provides an estimate for the transition between nonlinear saturation regimes. In an independent hot spot model of many hot spots, statistics suggests that the inflation threshold intensity will control the rapid onset of strong BSRS in laser beams smoothed by random phase plates

  8. The single-isocenter treatment of head and neck cancer: time gain using MLC and automatic set-up; Traitement des cancers ORL: gain de temps avec le collimateur multilames et la mise en place automatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerleer, G.O. de; Vakaet, L.A.M.L.; Bate, M.T.; Wagter, C. de; Naeyer, B. de; Neve, W.J. de [University Hospital, Gent (Belgium). Div. of Radiotherapy (R-UZG)

    1999-05-01

    In this manuscript, we studied the difference in the treatment time required to execute a single-isocenter three-field irradiation of the head and neck, using either tray-mounted cerro-bend blocks or a multi-leaf collimator (MLC) for field shaping and automatic set-up. A total of twenty consecutive, unselected patients (16 males, four females), were eligible for this study because the dose they were to received was 44 Gy (2 Gy/fraction) to the head,neck and supraclavicular regions. Patients were randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups. The first group (n=11) was treated on a Philips SL-75 linear accelerator (SL-75), using 5 MV photons and tray-mounted cerro-bend blocks. The second group (n=9) was treated on a Philips SL-25 linear accelerator (SL-25-MLC), using 6 MV photons and a MLC. Patients of the second group were treated using the automatic set-up of the SL-25-MLC, without entering the treatment room between consecutive fields. Overall treatment time was significantly shorter on the SL-25-MLC than on the SL-75 (P<0.0001). The difference in total treatment-execution time was in the range of 157 s per treatment session. The largest difference was observed in the set-up time. There was an average of a 125 s time gain per treatment day (P<0.0001) in favour of the SL-25-MLC. Compared to tray-mounted cerro-bend blocks, a MLC and automatic set-up results in a significant time advantage when a single isocenter technique is used to treat head and neck cancer. (authors)

  9. Rapid Genome-wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Discovery in Soybean and Rice via Deep Resequencing of Reduced Representation Libraries with the Illumina Genome Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Deschamps

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Massively parallel sequencing platforms have allowed for the rapid discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs among related genotypes within a species. We describe the creation of reduced representation libraries (RRLs using an initial digestion of nuclear genomic DNA with a methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease followed by a secondary digestion with the 4bp-restriction endonuclease This strategy allows for the enrichment of hypomethylated genomic DNA, which has been shown to be rich in genic sequences, and the digestion with serves to increase the number of common loci resequenced between individuals. Deep resequencing of these RRLs performed with the Illumina Genome Analyzer led to the identification of 2618 SNPs in rice and 1682 SNPs in soybean for two representative genotypes in each of the species. A subset of these SNPs was validated via Sanger sequencing, exhibiting validation rates of 96.4 and 97.0%, in rice ( and soybean (, respectively. Comparative analysis of the read distribution relative to annotated genes in the reference genome assemblies indicated that the RRL strategy was primarily sampling within genic regions for both species. The massively parallel sequencing of methylation-sensitive RRLs for genome-wide SNP discovery can be applied across a wide range of plant species having sufficient reference genomic sequence.

  10. Head Tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bones in the neck. Children with Klippel-Feil syndrome may have a short, broad neck, low hairline, and very restricted neck movement. Torticollis ... surgery may be necessary. To treat Klippel-Feil syndrome, a specialist may recommend ... to ease head and neck pain. Your pediatrician can refer you to a ...

  11. Head lice

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, Ian F

    2011-01-01

    Head lice can only be diagnosed by finding live lice, as eggs take 7 days to hatch, and may appear viable for weeks after death of the egg. Infestation may be more likely in school children, with risks increased in children with more siblings, longer hair, or of lower socioeconomic group.

  12. Late effects after treatment of twenty children with soft tissue sarcomas of the head and neck. Experience at a single institution with a review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fromm, M.; Littman, P.; Raney, R.B.; Nelson, L.; Handler, S.; Diamond, G.; Stanley, C.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty children with soft tissue sarcomas of the head and neck, treated at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania from 1972 to 1981, were evaluated for the late deleterious effects of treatment. All patients received radiation therapy and combination chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, and cyclophosphamide; certain patients also received Adriamycin (doxorubicin). All had ophthalmologic, otologic, growth, and cosmetic evaluations; 15 also had dental and maxillofacial examinations. The median age at diagnosis was 6 years (range, 7 months-13 years). Median follow-up from time of diagnosis was 5.5 years with a minimum of 3 years in all but four patients. The major problems encountered were related to the eyes (xerophthalmia and cataracts), ears (hearing loss), teeth (maleruption and caries), glandular structures (xerostomia, hypopituitarism), and development (craniofacial deformity). It is concluded that children treated for soft tissue sarcomas of the head and neck with combined modality therapy, including radiation enhancers, may show a variety of late treatment-related adversities. These children require close multidisciplinary follow-up for detection of late effects in order that appropriate prophylactic or symptomatic treatment can be instituted to minimize their consequences

  13. Is HEADS in our heads?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Hertz, Pernille Grarup; Blix, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outpatient clinic visits are a window of opportunity to address health risk behaviors and promote a healthier lifestyle among young people. The HEADS (Home, Education, Eating, Activities, Drugs [i.e. substance use including tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs], Sexuality [including...... contraception], Safety, Self-harm) interview is a feasible way of exploring health risk behaviors and resilience. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate how often HEADS topics were addressed according to young patients and staff in pediatric and adult outpatient clinics. METHODS: We conducted...

  14. Genomic epidemiology of the Haitian cholera outbreak: a single introduction followed by rapid, extensive, and continued spread characterized the onset of the epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, Mark; Pearson, Talima; Koenig, Sara S K; Pearson, Ofori; Hicks, Nathan; Agrawal, Sonia; Sanjar, Fatemeh; Galens, Kevin; Daugherty, Sean; Crabtree, Jonathan; Hendriksen, Rene S; Price, Lance B; Upadhyay, Bishnu P; Shakya, Geeta; Fraser, Claire M; Ravel, Jacques; Keim, Paul S

    2014-11-04

    For centuries, cholera has been one of the most feared diseases. The causative agent Vibrio cholerae is a waterborne Gram-negative enteric pathogen eliciting a severe watery diarrheal disease. In October 2010, the seventh pandemic reached Haiti, a country that had not experienced cholera for more than a century. By using whole-genome sequence typing and mapping strategies of 116 serotype O1 strains from global sources, including 44 Haitian genomes, we present a detailed reconstructed evolutionary history of the seventh pandemic with a focus on the Haitian outbreak. We catalogued subtle genomic alterations at the nucleotide level in the genome core and architectural rearrangements from whole-genome map comparisons. Isolates closely related to the Haitian isolates caused several recent outbreaks in southern Asia. This study provides evidence for a single-source introduction of cholera from Nepal into Haiti followed by rapid, extensive, and continued clonal expansion. The phylogeographic patterns in both southern Asia and Haiti argue for the rapid dissemination of V. cholerae across the landscape necessitating real-time surveillance efforts to complement the whole-genome epidemiological analysis. As eradication efforts move forward, phylogeographic knowledge will be important for identifying persistent sources and monitoring success at regional levels. The results of molecular and epidemiological analyses of this outbreak suggest that an indigenous Haitian source of V. cholerae is unlikely and that an indigenous source has not contributed to the genomic evolution of this clade. In this genomic epidemiology study, we have applied high-resolution whole-genome-based sequence typing methodologies on a comprehensive set of genome sequences that have become available in the aftermath of the Haitian cholera epidemic. These sequence resources enabled us to reassess the degree of genomic heterogeneity within the Vibrio cholerae O1 serotype and to refine boundaries and

  15. Retrospective analysis of self-reporting pain scores and pain management during head and neck IMRT radiotherapy: A single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, P.; Bisson, J.; Asplin, P.; Gahir, D.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Head and neck carcinomas are relatively rare in the United Kingdom with an estimated 9000 cases diagnosed annually. However, pain associated with disease and treatment side effects such as oral mucositis present a major issue for therapy radiographers in providing effective care and maintaining radiotherapy treatment compliance, all factors that can compromise patient outcome if not managed appropriately. Method: This retrospective analysis of self-reporting pain scores collected during a course of radiotherapy aims to assess the perceived pain intensity scores in 30 patients. Data was collected during radiographer review sessions held weekly to determine if any variables to perceived pain scores occurred during a course of radiotherapy. Results: As treatment progressed, the self-reporting pain scores within the cohort increased, in week one the total cohort pain score was 35, this increased to 114 in week 3 and in the final week had totalled 151. An escalation in pain was observed in week 3 of treatment possibly as a result of radiation induced inflammation alongside cytotoxic chemotherapy. Conclusions: The findings of this study provide further evidence to an individualised approach to patient pain relief and providing regular on treatment reviews, thus maintaining patient comfort and ensuring continued treatment compliance. - Highlights: • Pain is an important but too infrequently analysed symptom in head and neck cancer. • As treatment progressed, the self-reporting pain scores within the cohort increased. • These findings provide the rationale for an individualised approach to pain relief. • Ensuring adequate pain control can positively influence continued treatment compliance.

  16. Rapid effects of single small doses of L-thyroxine and triiodo-L-thyronine on growth hormone, as studied in the rat by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hervas, F.; Morreale de Escobar, G.; Escobar del Rey, F.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormone deprivation and restitution on growth hormone (GH) economy have been studied in the rat by means of a specific radioimmunoassay. The pituitary GH content and the plasma GH levels before and during stimulation with pentobarbital (''PB-test'') were studied in male rats at different intervals after surgical thyroidectomy (T), and in T rats at different time intervals after the ip injection of 0.20, 1.75, and 5.0 μg thyroxine (T 4 ) or 0.05, 0.10, 0.20 and 1.0 μg triiodothyronine (T 3 ), all doses being referred to 100 g body wt. Pituitary GH content decreased very rapidly after T, a difference being shown at the end of the shortest time interval studied (24 h); 24 days after T, pituitary GH content was 0.3 percent or less of the pre-T level, the basal plasma GH was lower than in intact controls and an increase in plasma GH during PB-stimulation was no longer observed. When rats T for 30 days or longer were injected with T 4 or T 3 , pituitary GH content increased; basal plasma GH levels increased also and a positive response to PB was observed. An effect on pituitary GH content could be observed as soon as 2 h after the ip injection of 1.0 μg T 3 , or 6 h after 5.0 μg T 4 . The ''latent period'' was somewhat longer when lower doses of the hormones were used. Effects of a single 0.10 μg T 3 dose could be detected within 12 h. L-T 3 appeared to be at least 9 times more potent in vivo than T 4 , as assessed from the effect on pituitary GH. The measurement by RIA of changes in GH content of the rat pituitary may thus provide the most adequate parameter available at present (other than suppression of TRH-induced TSH release) for a biological effect in vivo of single doses of the thyroid hormones, a measurement clearly related to an important physiological role. (U.S.)

  17. Rapid analysis of Fructus forsythiae essential oil by ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Jiao; Ma, Dan-Hui; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A new ILAMD-HS-SDME method is developed for the microextraction of essential oil. •ILs used as destruction agent of plant cell walls and microwave absorption medium. •Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency are optimized by Box–Behnken design. •Procedure benefits: similar constituents, shorter duration and smaller sample amount. •ILAMD-HS-SDME followed by GC–MS is a promising technique in analytical fields. -- Abstract: A rapid, green and effective miniaturized sample preparation and analytical technique, i.e. ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction (ILAMD-HS-SDME) followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) was developed for the analysis of essential oil (EO) in Fructus forsythiae. In this work, ionic liquids (ILs) were not only used as the absorption medium of microwave irradiation but also as the destruction agent of plant cell walls. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C 2 mim]OAc) was chosen as the optimal ILs. Moreover, n-heptadecane (2.0 μL) was selected as the appropriate suspended solvent for the extraction and concentration of EO. Extraction conditions of the proposed method were optimized using the relative peak area of EO constituents as the index, and the optimal operational parameters were obtained as follows: irradiation power (300 W), sample mass (0.7 g), mass ratio of ILs to sample (2.4), temperature (78 °C) and time (3.4 min). In comparison to previous reports, the proposed method was faster and required smaller sample amount but could equally monitor all EO constituents with no significant differences

  18. Rapid analysis of Fructus forsythiae essential oil by ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Jiao [State Key Laboratory of Tree Genetics and Breeding, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Ma, Dan-Hui [College of Life Sciences, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng [State Engineering Laboratory of Bio-Resource Eco-Utilization, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Fu, Yu-Jie, E-mail: yujie_fu2002@yahoo.com [State Engineering Laboratory of Bio-Resource Eco-Utilization, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Ma, Wei, E-mail: mawei@hljucm.net [State Key Laboratory of Tree Genetics and Breeding, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); School of Pharmaceutical, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, Harbin 150040 (China)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A new ILAMD-HS-SDME method is developed for the microextraction of essential oil. •ILs used as destruction agent of plant cell walls and microwave absorption medium. •Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency are optimized by Box–Behnken design. •Procedure benefits: similar constituents, shorter duration and smaller sample amount. •ILAMD-HS-SDME followed by GC–MS is a promising technique in analytical fields. -- Abstract: A rapid, green and effective miniaturized sample preparation and analytical technique, i.e. ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction (ILAMD-HS-SDME) followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) was developed for the analysis of essential oil (EO) in Fructus forsythiae. In this work, ionic liquids (ILs) were not only used as the absorption medium of microwave irradiation but also as the destruction agent of plant cell walls. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C{sub 2}mim]OAc) was chosen as the optimal ILs. Moreover, n-heptadecane (2.0 μL) was selected as the appropriate suspended solvent for the extraction and concentration of EO. Extraction conditions of the proposed method were optimized using the relative peak area of EO constituents as the index, and the optimal operational parameters were obtained as follows: irradiation power (300 W), sample mass (0.7 g), mass ratio of ILs to sample (2.4), temperature (78 °C) and time (3.4 min). In comparison to previous reports, the proposed method was faster and required smaller sample amount but could equally monitor all EO constituents with no significant differences.

  19. Chronic cervicogenic tinnitus rapidly resolved by intermittent use of cervical collar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl eBechter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Cervicogenic tinnitus is a not generally accepted pathogenetic subtype, which might be subsumed under the concept of somatosensory tinnitus. After the personal experience of therapy resistant tinnitus in context with a cervical pain syndrome (CS and successful add-on treatment with cervical collar (CC, the idea was persued in several individual treatments in patients.Patients and Methods:Reporting one particular case with chronic tinnitus considered untreatable, but rapidly improved with CC use. Thereafter tinnitus was experimentally replicated by head inclination, the respective neck-head angles and cerebral blood flow measured. Results:Chronic subjective tinnitus of a 20 years duration completely disappeared within 4 weeks with an intermittent short time application of CC. Thereafter, tinnitus was liberately again induced by head inclination, set on with anterior tilt of 14°, reaching maximum strength by 23°. Tinnitus stopped with return to neutral head position. Blood flow in the vertebral arteries on both sides was unchanged during head inclination with prevalent tinnitus, however blood flow was physiologically reduced with head rotation though not accompanied by tinnitus.Discussion:In a single case of chronic tinnitus, we found that treatment with CC rapidly led to full remission. Nevertheless, tinnitus could be resumed by constrained head postures. Experimental tinnitus replication by inclination points to an underscored role of upper posterior cervical muscle groups, matching with animal experiments, working in concert with other triggers including psychological factors. Blood flow reduction in vertebral arteries was unrelated to tinnitus.

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special ... the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  1. The value of scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for the diagnosis of ectopic thyroid in the head and neck: A STROBE-compliant retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Shao, Ziyang; Yang, Gongxing; Gu, Aichun; Jiang, Mengda; Pan, Yifan; Ma, Yubo

    2018-03-01

    Because of its rarity, the exact imaging features of ectopic thyroid are poorly known.To analyze the value of scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT in the diagnosis of ectopic thyroid in the head and neck.First, we retrospectively analyzed the scintigraphy, CT, MRI, and SPECT/CT images from 25 masses (22 patients) suspected of head and neck ectopic thyroid from 2006 to 2017 at the Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital. Each mass was imaged by nuclear imaging (scintigraphy with or without SPECT/CT) and radiological exam (CT and/or MRI). Pathological examination was considered as the gold standard. Secondly, thirteen malignant ectopic thyroids in the head and neck reported in the English literature from 2001 to 2017 were retrieved for comparison.The accuracy of scintigraphy was not significantly higher than that of CT (94.7%, vs 89.5%, P > .99) or MRI (92.3%, vs 84.6%, P > .99). Five masses which underwent scintigraphy with SPECT/CT were all true positive, while 1 was false negative on MRI, and 2 were false negative on CT. Compared to the benign ectopic thyroids in our study, the 13 malignant ectopic thyroids retrieved from the literature were grossly the same in shape, margins, and invasion on CT or MRI.The number of patients was limited, but scintigraphy combined with SPECT/CT could be a reliable method for the diagnosis of ectopic thyroid. Benign and malignant ectopic thyroids appear to be similar in shapes, margins, and invasion on CT or MRI.

  2. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck: a single-center analysis of 105 consecutive cases over a 30-year period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, S.; Bloemena, E.; van der Waal, I.; de Bree, R.; Rietveld, D.H.F.; Kuik, D.J.; Leemans, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Adenoid cystic carcinoma is a rare salivary gland malignancy with a poor disease free survival due to frequent distant metastases and late local recurrences. Previous single-center reports on outcome mostly encompass small series. In this report a relative large series of 105 cases is

  3. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy using simultaneous-integrated boost for definitive treatment of locally advanced mucosal head and neck cancer: outcomes from a single-institution series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Meredith; Guo, Linxin; Hanna, Catherine; Back, Michael; Guminski, Alex; Lee, Adrian; Eade, Thomas; Veivers, David; Wignall, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The study aims to report outcomes for patients treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with simultaneous-integrated boost and weekly cisplatin for American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III/IV mucosal head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Records for 67 patients treated definitively with IMRT for HNSCC were reviewed. By including only those treated with weekly cisplatin, 45 patients were eligible for analysis. Treatment outcomes, effect of patient, tumour and treatment characteristics on disease recurrence were analysed. All patients completed IMRT to 7000cGy in 35 fractions, with concurrent weekly cisplatin 40mg/m 2 (median 6 cycles). Median follow-up was 28 months for living patients. Two-year loco-regional recurrence-free, metastasis-free and overall survival were 85.4, 81.0 and 87.4%, respectively. Local recurrence occurred in three patients, and distant recurrence in eight patients. Our results show efficacy of IMRT and weekly cisplatin in the treatment of stage III/IV HNSCC at our institution with respect to loco-regional control.

  4. Bray Head

    OpenAIRE

    Brocas, Samuel Frederick (Irish cityscape painter, watercolorist, and draftsman, 1792-1847)

    2008-01-01

    'A number of Martello towers were built around the coast of Ireland, especially along the east, from Millmount (Drogheda), to Bray, around Dublin Bay but also around Cork Harbour on the south coast. On the east coast, concentrated mainly around Dublin Bay, the towers were in line of sight of each other, providing the ability to communicate with one another, or warn of any incoming attacks.' (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martello_Tower#Ireland) 'Bray Head (Irish: Ceann Bre) is a hill and headland, of...

  5. Goniometer head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, V.; Berger, V.D.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Zarifov, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The goniometer head is an electromechanical instrument that performs the independent transfer of a testing sample on three coordinate axes (X, Y, Z) within limits of ±8 mm and independent rotation relative of these directions. The instrument comprises a sample holder, bellows component and three electrometer drives. The sample holder rotates around the axes X and Y, and is installed on the central arm which rotates around axis Z. One characteristic of this instrument is its independence which allows its use in any camera for researches in the field of radiation physics. 2 figs

  6. Head direction cells in the postsubiculum do not show replay of prior waking sequences during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Mark P; Bogaard, Andrew R; Andrews, Chris M; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2012-03-01

    During slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, hippocampal place cells in the rat show replay of sequences previously observed during waking. We tested the hypothesis from computational modeling that the temporal structure of REM sleep replay could arise from an interplay of place cells with head direction cells in the postsubiculum. Physiological single-unit recording was performed simultaneously from five or more head direction or place by head direction cells in the postsubiculum during running on a circular track allowing sampling of a full range of head directions, and during sleep periods before and after running on the circular track. Data analysis compared the spiking activity during individual REM periods with waking as in previous analysis procedures for REM sleep. We also used a new procedure comparing groups of similar runs during waking with REM sleep periods. There was no consistent evidence for a statistically significant correlation of the temporal structure of spiking during REM sleep with spiking during waking running periods. Thus, the spiking activity of head direction cells during REM sleep does not show replay of head direction cell activity occurring during a previous waking period of running on the task. In addition, we compared the spiking of postsubiculum neurons during hippocampal sharp wave ripple events. We show that head direction cells are not activated during sharp wave ripples, whereas neurons responsive to place in the postsubiculum show reliable spiking at ripple events. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Is there a single spot size and grid for intensity modulated proton therapy? Simulation of head and neck, prostate and mesothelioma cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widesott, Lamberto; Lomax, Antony J.; Schwarz, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the quality of dose distributions in real clinical cases for different dimensions of scanned proton pencil beams. The distance between spots (i.e., the grid of delivery) is optimized for each dimension of the pencil beam. Methods: The authors vary the σ of the initial Gaussian size of the spot, from σ x = σ y = 3 mm to σ x = σ y = 8 mm, to evaluate the impact of the proton beam size on the quality of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans. The distance between spots, Δx and Δy, is optimized on the spot plane, ranging from 4 to 12 mm (i.e., each spot size is coupled with the best spot grid resolution). In our Hyperion treatment planning system (TPS), constrained optimization is applied with respect to the organs at risk (OARs), i.e., the optimization tries to satisfy the dose objectives in the planning target volume (PTV) as long as all planning objectives for the OARs are met. Three-field plans for a nasopharynx case, two-field plans for a prostate case, and two-field plans for a malignant pleural mesothelioma case are considered in our analysis. Results: For the head and neck tumor, the best grids (i.e., distance between spots) are 5, 4, 6, 6, and 8 mm for σ = 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. σ ≤ 5 mm is required for tumor volumes with low dose and σ≤ 4 mm for tumor volumes with high dose. For the prostate patient, the best grid is 4, 4, 5, 5, and 5 mm for σ = 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. Beams with σ > 3 mm did not satisfy our first clinical requirement that 95% of the prescribed dose is delivered to more than 95% of prostate and proximal seminal vesicles PTV. Our second clinical requirement, to cover the distal seminal vesicles PTV, is satisfied for beams as wide as σ = 6 mm. For the mesothelioma case, the low dose PTV prescription is well respected for all values of σ, while there is loss of high dose PTV coverage for σ > 5 mm. The best grids have a spacing of 6, 7, 8, 9, and 12 mm for σ = 3, 4, 5, 6

  8. Is there a single spot size and grid for intensity modulated proton therapy? Simulation of head and neck, prostate and mesothelioma cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widesott, Lamberto; Lomax, Antony J.; Schwarz, Marco [AtreP, Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, 38122 Trento (Italy); Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); AtreP, Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, 38122 Trento (Italy)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the quality of dose distributions in real clinical cases for different dimensions of scanned proton pencil beams. The distance between spots (i.e., the grid of delivery) is optimized for each dimension of the pencil beam. Methods: The authors vary the {sigma} of the initial Gaussian size of the spot, from {sigma}{sub x} = {sigma}{sub y} = 3 mm to {sigma}{sub x} = {sigma}{sub y} = 8 mm, to evaluate the impact of the proton beam size on the quality of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans. The distance between spots, {Delta}x and {Delta}y, is optimized on the spot plane, ranging from 4 to 12 mm (i.e., each spot size is coupled with the best spot grid resolution). In our Hyperion treatment planning system (TPS), constrained optimization is applied with respect to the organs at risk (OARs), i.e., the optimization tries to satisfy the dose objectives in the planning target volume (PTV) as long as all planning objectives for the OARs are met. Three-field plans for a nasopharynx case, two-field plans for a prostate case, and two-field plans for a malignant pleural mesothelioma case are considered in our analysis. Results: For the head and neck tumor, the best grids (i.e., distance between spots) are 5, 4, 6, 6, and 8 mm for {sigma} = 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. {sigma} {<=} 5 mm is required for tumor volumes with low dose and {sigma}{<=} 4 mm for tumor volumes with high dose. For the prostate patient, the best grid is 4, 4, 5, 5, and 5 mm for {sigma} = 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. Beams with {sigma} > 3 mm did not satisfy our first clinical requirement that 95% of the prescribed dose is delivered to more than 95% of prostate and proximal seminal vesicles PTV. Our second clinical requirement, to cover the distal seminal vesicles PTV, is satisfied for beams as wide as {sigma} = 6 mm. For the mesothelioma case, the low dose PTV prescription is well respected for all values of {sigma}, while there is loss of high dose PTV coverage

  9. The Role of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging in Head and Neck Cancer after Radical Chemoradiotherapy: a Single Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelissen, C; Sherriff, J; Jones, T; Guest, P; Colley, S; Sanghera, P; Hartley, A

    2017-11-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is used to restage head and neck cancer 3 months after chemoradiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to determine the negative predictive value (NPV) of a scan reported as having no abnormal uptake and the positive predictive values (PPV) for different maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) thresholds. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oro-/hypopharynx/larynx (n = 206) were included. SUVmax and subsequent locoregional recurrence were documented. The median SUVmax was 11.2 (range 4-33)/4.6 (range 2-30), respectively, in patients with/without definite primary site recurrence (P = 0.004). The median SUVmax was 4.4 (range 2.6-15.6)/3.1 (range 2.1-4.6), respectively, in patients with/without definite nodal recurrence (P = 0.003). The NPV for a scan reported as having no abnormal uptake was 92%. The PPV for the SUVmax thresholds 4, 6 and 8, respectively, were 53, 65 and 92% (primary site) and 93, 100 and 100% (nodes). The NPV of PET/CT after chemoradiation is consistent with the literature and underlines the importance of PET/CT in restaging the primary site if salvage neck dissection is considered. The overall PPV of PET/CT remains low but is high for nodal SUVmax > 4. These data could be used to design risk-stratified follow-up schedules. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Myofascial force transmission in dynamic muscle conditions: effects of dynamic shortening of a single head of multi-tendoned rat extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Huub; Huijing, Peter A

    2005-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of myofascial force transmission during dynamic shortening of head III of rat extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL III). The anterior crural compartment was left intact. Force was measured simultaneously at the distal EDL III tendon, the proximal EDL tendon and the distal tendons of tibialis anterior and extensor hallucis longus muscles (TA + EHL). Two types of distal shortening of EDL III were studied: (1) sinusoidal shortening (2 mm) and (2) isokinetic shortening (8 mm). Sinusoidal shortening of EDL III caused a decrease in force exerted at the distal tendon of EDL III: from 0.58 (0.08) N to 0.26 (0.04) N. In contrast, hardly any changes in proximal EDL force and distal TA+EHL force were found. Maximal concentric force exerted at the distal tendon of EDL III was higher than maximal isometric force expected on the basis of the physiological cross-sectional area of EDL III muscle fibers (Maas et al. 2003). Therefore, a substantial fraction of this force must originate from sources other than muscle fibers of EDL III. Isokinetic shortening of EDL III caused high changes in EDL III force from 0.97 (0.15) N to zero. In contrast, changes in proximal EDL force were much smaller: from 2.44 (0.25) N to 1.99 (0.19) N. No effects on TA + EHL force could be shown. These results are explained in terms of force transmission between the muscle belly of EDL III and adjacent tissues. Thus, also in dynamic muscle conditions, muscle fiber force is transmitted via myofascial pathways.

  11. Indoor air pollution by emissions of fossil fuel single stoves: possibly a hitherto underrated risk factor in the development of carcinomas in the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, A; Senneweld, E; Maier, H

    1995-02-01

    We have carried out three case-control studies on the relative risk of head and neck cancer in association with indoor air pollution. The studies performed at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology of the University of Heidelberg comprised 369 male patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx and 1476 healthy control subjects matched for sex, age, and residential area. The OR of laryngeal cancer related to daily exposure to fossil fuels due to stove-heating with oil, coal, gas, and wood for longer than 40 years was 2.5 (CI = 1.51 to 4.05). After adjustment for tobacco and alcohol, the OR declined slightly to 2.0 (CI = 1.10 to 3.46) but still was significant. Elevated ORs were also found for daily presence in a kitchen with an oil, coal, or wood oven for longer than 40 years (OR = 1.7, CI = 1.01 to 2.71; after tobacco and alcohol adjustment, OR = 1.4, CI = 0.76 to 2.41). The OR of pharyngeal cancer related to daily exposure to fossil fuels due to stove-heating with oil, coal, gas, and wood for longer than 40 years was 3.6 (CI = 2.04 to 6.41). After adjustment for tobacco and alcohol the OR declined slightly to 3.3 (CI = 1.43 to 7.55) but still was significant. Elevated ORs were also found for daily presence in a kitchen with an oil, coal, or wood oven for longer than 40 years (OR = 1.6, CI = 0.89 to 2.77; after tobacco and alcohol adjustment, OR = 2.5, CI = 1.03 to 6.30).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Tridimensional pose estimation of a person head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Berenguer, Elisa; Soria, Carlos; Nasisi, Oscar; Mut, Vicente

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we present a method for estimating 3-D motion parameters; this method provides an alternative way for 3D head pose estimation from image sequence in the current computer vision literature. This method is robust over extended sequences and large head motions and accurately extracts the orientation angles of head from a single view. Experimental results show that this tracking system works well for development a human-computer interface for people that possess severe motor incapacity

  13. Rapid Quantitative Analysis of Multiple Explosive-Compound Classes on a Single Instrument via Flow-Injection Analysis Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    tailoring the ionization method , declustering potentials, and collision energies for each specific analyte. In doing so, a single instrument can be...of both conventional explosives, homemade explosives, and their related compounds, and many of these methods require special instrumentation . A...10%, respectively, compare favorably to existing methods . Use of a single instrument for detection of multiple explosive classes also reduces the

  14. CT perfusion measurements of head and neck carcinoma from single section with largest tumor dimensions or average of multiple sections: Agreement between the two methods and effect on intra- and inter-observer agreement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, Ahmed M., E-mail: ahm_m_tawfik@hotmail.com [Institut für Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Klinikum der J.W.v. Goethe Universität Frankfurt am Main, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7 Frankfurt am Main 60590 (Germany); Diagnostic Radiology Department, Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, 62 Elgomhorya Street, Mansoura 35512 (Egypt); Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A.; Naguib, Nagy N. [Institut für Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Klinikum der J.W.v. Goethe Universität Frankfurt am Main, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7 Frankfurt am Main 60590 (Germany); Razek, Ahmed Abdel [Diagnostic Radiology Department, Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, 62 Elgomhorya Street, Mansoura 35512 (Egypt); Denewer, Adel T. [Surgical Oncology Department, Mansoura Oncology Centre, Mansoura Faculty of medicine (Egypt); Bisdas, Sotirios [Department of Neuroradiology, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J. [Institut für Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Klinikum der J.W.v. Goethe Universität Frankfurt am Main, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7 Frankfurt am Main 60590 (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the agreement between quantitative CT perfusion measurements of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) obtained from single section with maximal tumor dimension and from average values of multiple sections, and to compare intra- and inter-observer agreement of the two methods. Methods: Perfusion was measured for 28 SCC cases using a region of interest (ROI) inserted in the single dynamic CT section showing maximal tumor dimension, then using average values of multiple ROIs inserted in all tumor-containing sections. Agreement between values of blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and permeability surface area product (PS) calculated by the two methods was assessed. Intra-observer agreement was assessed by comparing repeated calculations done by the same radiologist using both methods after 2 months blinding period. Perfusion measurements were done by another radiologist independently to assess inter-observer agreement of both methods. Results: No significant differences were observed between the means of the 4 perfusion parameters calculated by both methods, all p values >0.05 The 95% limits of agreement between the two methods were (−33.9 to 43) ml/min/100 g for BF, (−2.5 to 2.8) ml/100 g for BV, (−4.9 to 3.9) s for MTT and (−17.5 to 18.6) ml/min/100 g for PS. Narrower limits of agreement were obtained using average of multiple sections than with single section denoting improved intra- and inter-observer agreement. Conclusion: Agreement between both methods is acceptable. Taking the average of multiple sections slightly improves intra- and inter-observer agreement.

  15. Head circumference (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head circumference is a measurement of the circumference of the child's head at its largest area, above the eyebrows and ears and around the back of the head. During routine check-ups, the distance is measured ...

  16. Abnormal Head Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Abnormal Head Position En Español Read in Chinese What is an abnormal head posture? An abnormal or compensatory head posture occurs ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  18. Single and Double Infrared Transitions in Rapid Vapor Deposited Parahydrogen Solids: Application to Sample Thickness Determination and Quantitative Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tam, Simon

    2001-01-01

    ...) solid from its infrared (IR) absorption spectrum. Millimeters-thick pH2 solids of exceptional optical clarity can be produced by the rapid vapor deposition method M.E. Fajardo and S. Tam, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 4237 (1998...

  19. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  20. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, and double strand break genes as markers for response to radiotherapy in patients with Stage I to II head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carles, Joan; Monzo, Mariano; Amat, Marta; Jansa, Sonia; Artells, Rosa; Navarro, Alfons; Foro, Palmira; Alameda, Francesc; Gayete, Angel; Gel, Bernat; Miguel, Maribel; Albanell, Joan; Fabregat, Xavier

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes can influence response to radiotherapy. We analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in nine DNA repair genes in 108 patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNSCC) who had received radiotherapy only. Methods and Materials: From May 1993 to December 2004, patients with Stage I and II histopathologically confirmed HNSCC underwent radiotherapy. DNA was obtained from paraffin-embedded tissue, and SNP analysis was performed using a real-time polymerase chain reaction allelic discrimination TaqMan assay with minor modifications. Results: Patients were 101 men (93.5%) and 7 (6.5%) women, with a median age of 64 years (range, 40 to 89 years). Of the patients, 76 (70.4%) patients were Stage I and 32 (29.6%) were Stage II. The XPF/ERCC1 SNP at codon 259 and XPG/ERCC5 at codon 46 emerged as significant predictors of progression (p 0.00005 and 0.049, respectively) and survival (p = 0.0089 and 0.0066, respectively). Similarly, when variant alleles of XPF/ERCC1, XPG/ERCC5 and XPA were examined in combination, a greater number of variant alleles was associated with shorter time to progression (p = 0.0003) and survival (p 0.0002). Conclusions: Genetic polymorphisms in XPF/ERCC1, XPG/ERCC5, and XPA may significantly influence response to radiotherapy; large studies are warranted to confirm their role in HNSCC

  1. Fast gaze reorientations by combined movements of the eye, head, trunk and lower extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasopoulos, Dimitri; Naushahi, J; Sklavos, Sokratis; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2015-05-01

    Large reorientations of the line of sight, involving combined rotations of the eyes, head, trunk and lower extremities, are executed either as fast single-step or as slow multiple-step gaze transfers. In order to obtain more insight into the mechanisms of gaze and multisegmental movement control, we have investigated time-optimal gaze shifts (i.e. with the instruction to move as fast as possible) during voluntary whole-body rotations to remembered targets up to 180° eccentricity performed by standing healthy humans in darkness. Fast, accurate, single-step movement patterns occurred in approximately 70 % of trials, i.e. considerably more frequently than in previous studies with the instruction to turn at freely chosen speed (30 %). Head-in-space velocity in these cases was significantly higher than during multiple-step transfers and displayed a conspicuously regular bell-shaped profile, increasing smoothly to a peak and then decreasing slowly until realignment with the target. Head-in-space acceleration was on average not different during reorientations to the different target eccentricities. In contrast, head-in-space velocity increased with target eccentricity due to the longer duration of the acceleration phase implemented during trials to more distant targets. Eye saccade amplitude approached the eye-in-orbit mechanical limit and was unrelated to eye/head velocity, duration or target eccentricity. Overall, the combined movement was stereotyped such that the first two principal components accounted for data variance almost up to gaze shift end, suggesting that the three mechanical degrees of freedom under consideration (eye-in-orbit, head-on-trunk and trunk-in-space) are on average reduced to two kinematic degrees of freedom (i.e. eye, head-in-space). Synchronous EMG activity in the anterior tibial and gastrocnemius muscles preceded the onset of eye rotation. Since the magnitude and timing of peak head-in-space velocity were scaled with target eccentricity and

  2. Head counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattenberg, B

    1994-08-24

    A fellow at the American Enterprise Institute remarked that population growth slowed from 1.73% to 1.57% during 1990 to 1994. In Eastern Europe alone population declined by 1 million in the past 4 years. Fertility decline is evident even in Africa and a rapid fertility transition has appeared in Iran. The data are based on figures recently generated by the UN and published in "World Population Prospects: 1994 revision." The projected medium fertility variant was 9.8 billion by 2050 and 10 billion in 2054. UN statisticians have reported that the real numbers are likely to be even higher despite their own reports of fertility decline. The UN believes that sustaining 2.1 children per woman at replacement level will not be allowed by countries. The more developed countries are now at or below replacement: Japan at 1.5, Korea at 1.7, Germany at 1.3, and Italians at 1.3. Large population numbers threaten stability and are related to famine, pollution, war, and animal and plant species decimation. The evidence from Rwanda and Bosnia is clear. A more desirable and realistic estimate should be 7-8 billion by 2050. World population in preparation for the International Conference on Population and Development is being publicized as a problem so that the UN and environmentalists can increase their funding and attain a high spot on the global agenda. The author's experience as part of the US delegation to the International Population Conference in Mexico City in 1984 led to the conclusion that these international policy conferences are really public relations events. Gloom and doom predictions are constantly being modified; for instance, what was the "coming ice age" is now "global warming." The world has survived thus far, while the numbers have been increasing. If the world does not prosper in the years ahead, it is unlikely to be due to too many people.

  3. Head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the titles are: Combined Surgical Resection and Irradiation for Head and Neck Cancers; Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Head and Neck Database: Identification of Prognostic Factors and the Re-evaluation of American Joint Committee Stages; Combined Modality Approach to Head and Neck Cancer; Induction Combination Chemotherapy of Regionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer; and Outcome after Complete Remission to Induction Chemotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer

  4. Rapid structure determination of the hydrogen-containing compound Cs2C2O4.H2O by joint single-crystal X-ray and powder neutron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Mark T; Henry, Paul F; Light, Mark E

    2007-06-01

    The structure determination of caesium oxalate monohydrate using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder neutron diffraction data and a combination of both has been undertaken. Results show that even for hydrogen-containing materials data collected rapidly on a high-flux neutron diffractometer improve the refinement such that accurate positional and thermal displacement parameters can be extracted for all atom types. This contrasts with structural models extracted from either data set alone that demonstrate the inherent limitations of the individual diffraction methods. The rapidity with which useful neutron diffraction data has been collected from hydrogen-containing compounds, 10 min in this study, indicates that the technique should be widely applicable allowing the facile and accurate extraction of hydrogen positions for many compounds.

  5. Linear-after-the-exponential polymerase chain reaction and allied technologies. Real-time detection strategies for rapid, reliable diagnosis from single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Kenneth E; Wangh, Lawrence J

    2007-01-01

    Accurate detection of gene sequences in single cells is the ultimate challenge to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sensitivity. Unfortunately, commonly used conventional and real-time PCR techniques are often too unreliable at that level to provide the accuracy needed for clinical diagnosis. Here we provide details of linear-after-the-exponential-PCR (LATE-PCR), a method similar to asymmetric PCR in the use of primers at different concentrations, but with novel design criteria to ensure high efficiency and specificity. Compared with conventional PCR, LATE-PCR increases the signal strength and allele discrimination capability of oligonucleotide probes such as molecular beacons and reduces variability among replicate samples. The analysis of real-time kinetics of LATE-PCR signals provides a means for improving the accuracy of single cell genetic diagnosis.

  6. Development and assessment of multiplex high resolution melting assay as a tool for rapid single-tube identification of five Brucella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Krishna K; Sells, Jessica; Lee, Robin; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Foster, Jeffrey T; Whatmore, Adrian M

    2014-12-11

    The zoonosis brucellosis causes economically significant reproductive problems in livestock and potentially debilitating disease of humans. Although the causative agent, organisms from the genus Brucella, can be differentiated into a number of species based on phenotypic characteristics, there are also significant differences in genotype that are concordant with individual species. This paper describes the development of a five target multiplex assay to identify five terrestrial Brucella species using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequent high resolution melt curve analysis. This technology offers a robust and cost effective alternative to previously described hydrolysis-probe Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP)-based species defining assays. Through the use of Brucella whole genome sequencing five species defining SNPs were identified. Individual HRM assays were developed to these target these changes and, following optimisation of primer concentrations, it was possible to multiplex all five assays in a single tube. In a validation exercise using a panel of 135 Brucella strains of terrestrial and marine origin, it was possible to distinguish the five target species from the other species within this panel. The HRM multiplex offers a number of diagnostic advantages over previously described SNP-based typing approaches. Further, and uniquely for HRM, the successful multiplexing of five assays in a single tube allowing differentiation of five Brucella species in the diagnostic laboratory in a cost-effective and timely manner is described. However there are possible limitations to using this platform on DNA extractions direct from clinical material.

  7. Rapidity Dependence of the Single Inclusive Jet Cross-Section in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at the Center-of-Mass Energy of 18-TeV with the D0 Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babukhadia, Levan R. [Arizona U.

    1999-01-01

    We have made a precise measurement of the rapidity dependence of inclusive single jet production cross section $d^2\\sigma/(dE_T d\\eta)$ in $p\\overline{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.8 TeV. The measurement is based on integrated luminosity of 92 $pb^{-1}$ data collected by the D0 detector at the Tevatron Collider, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The cross sections are reported as a function of jet transverse energy in five pseudorapidity $(\\eta)$ intervals up to $\\eta$ = 3:0. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions from next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  8. Head trauma and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitoshi

    1979-01-01

    In our cases of acute and subacute subdural hematoma, the use of CT was evaluated. In our department of surgery, acute subdural hematoma was found in 46 of 388 patients of head trauma who underwent CT. Acute subdural hematoma, like epidural hematoma was usually visualized as a high-density area along the cranial inner table, and this was easily differenciated from epidural hematoma because of difference in shape from the other. The picture of acute subdural hematoma was occasionally confused with that of intracerebral hematoma or cerebral contusion. Single use of CT does not differenciate subacute subdural hematoma from chronic subdural hematoma. However, CT usually visualized acute hematoma as a high-density area, showing the extent of hematoma. Comparison of the thickness of hematoma with the axis deviation of the median part such as the 3rd cerebral ventricle suggested severity of cerebral edema. CT also revealed bilateral or multiple lesions of cerebral contusion or intracerebral hematoma. (Ueda, J.)

  9. sup(99m)Tc-DTPA gamma-camera renography: Normal values and rapid determination of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehling, M.; Moller, M.L.; Lund, J.O.; Trap-Jensen, J.; Jensen, K.B.; Thamdrup, B.

    1985-01-01

    A method for sup(99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) gamma-camera renography is presented. From each renogram an uptake index (UI) proportional to the single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (SKGFR) is defined. If the proportionality factor between UI and SKGFR is the same in all patients, UI can be used as an accurate measure of SKGFR. In order to test this, sup(99m)Tc-DTPA renography was performed in 101 patients with glomerular filtration rates (GFR) varying between 4 and 172 ml/min. The sum of the right- and left-kidney UIs correlated well with the total GFR calculated from the simultaneously measured plasma clearance of sup(99m)Tc-DTPA after a single injection. The correlation coefficient was 0.97. The method was tested in a prospective study of 57 patients. The total GFR estimated from the renograms was not significantly different from the GFR calculated from the plasma clearance of sup(99m)Tc-DTPA. The coefficient of variation -a combination of inaccuracy and imprecision in the estimates as well as in the reference values - was 11.8% at a GFR of 100 ml/min. It is concluded that, in adults, the SKGFR can be calculated as part of the clinical routine from sup(99m)Tc-DTPA gamma-camera renography without determining the injected dose or collecting urine or blood samples. Normal values for some parameters of the renogram obtained in 25 normal subjects are given. (orig.)

  10. Genotyping Single Nucleotide Polymorphism C4685T in 14. Intron of Bovine CAPN1 Gene by Rapid Tetra-Primer ARMS-PCR Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Gábor

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP C4685T located in 14. intron of bovine CAPN1 gene have shown significant association with a higher lean share in valuable cuts for mutant genotype TT. The work was oriented to developed a sensitive single tube tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (ARMS-PCR method for detection of C4685T polymorphism in CAPNI gene and analysis of genotype structure in population of 130 animals of Slovak Pinzgau cattle. The genomic DNA was isolated from samples of blood and hairs of cattle. Design of primers for ARMS-PCR was realized by using program Tetra-Primer ARMS-PCR. The presence of wild allele C and mutant allele T on agarose gel was detected by one control 439 bp fragment for both alleles and one specific fragment for each allele C - 204 bp and T - 290 bp. For the checking of correct genotyping was used PCR-RFLP method with restriction endonuclease BseGI. In the population of Slovak Pinzgau cattle we detected all genotypes. There were detected homozygote genotype CC with frequency 0.3308, heterozygote genotype CT with frequency 0.4 and homozygote genotype TT with frequency 0.2692. Frequency of alleles C and T for SNP C4685T of gene CAPN1 were 0.5308 and 0.4692.

  11. Effect of maxillary protraction with alternating rapid palatal expansion and constriction vs expansion alone in maxillary retrusive patients: a single-center, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weitao; Zhou, Yanheng; Wang, Xuedong; Liu, Dawei; Zhou, Shaonan

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects of facemask protraction combined with alternating rapid palatal expansion and constriction (RPE/C) vs rapid palatal expansion (RPE) alone in the early treatment of maxillary retrusive patients. Patients with a midface deficiency were recruited and randomly allocated into either the control group (RPE) or the intervention group (RPE/C). Eligibility criteria included the following: age 7 to 13 years old, Class III malocclusion, anterior crossbite, ANB less than 0°, Wits appraisal less than -2 mm, A-Np less than 0 mm, and no cleft of lip or palate. The primary outcome was the degree of maxillary forward movement after treatment. The secondary outcomes were the changes of the other cephalometric variables after treatment and the treatment time. Simple randomization was carried out using a random number table at the beginning of the study. Envelopes containing the grouping information were used to ensure allocation concealment from the researchers. Blinding was applicable for cephalometric analysis only. Hyrax palatal expanders and facemask maxillary protraction were used in all patients. Patients in the RPE group were treated with rapid palatal expansion for 1 week. Patients in the RPE/C group were treated with RPE/C for 7 weeks. The expansion or constriction rate was 1 mm per day. Cephalometric analysis with traditional cephalometric measurements and an x-y coordinate system were used to compare the pretreatment and posttreatment cephalometric radiographs. Independent t tests were used to compare the data between the 2 groups. A total of 44 patients were randomized to either the RPE group or the RPE/C group in a 1:1 ratio. One subject in the RPE group was lost to follow-up during the treatment. Per-protocol analysis was used. All the other 43 patients reached the treatment completion criteria and were analyzed (RPE group: n = 21; RPE/C group: n = 22). The average protraction time was 10

  12. SU-E-T-331: Dosimetric Impact of Multileaf Collimator Leaf Width On Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) RapidArc Treatment Plans for Single and Multiple Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, S; Keeling, V; Ahmad, S; Algan, O

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf width on normal-brain-tissue doses and dose conformity of SRS RapidArc treatment plans for brain tumors. Methods: Ten patients with 24 intracranial tumors (seven with 1–2 and three with 4–6 lesions) were planned using RapidArc for both Varian Millennium 120 MLC (5 mm leaf width) and high definition (HD) MLC (2.5 mm leaf width). Between 2 and 8 arcs were used with two full coplanar arcs and the rest non-coplanar half arcs. 6 MV beams were used and plans were optimized with a high priority to the Normal Tissue Objective (to achieve dose conformity and sharp dose fall-off) and normal brain tissue. Calculation was done using AAA on a 1 mm grid size. The prescription dose ranged from 14–22 Gy. Plans were normalized such that 99% of the target received the prescription dose. Identical beam geometries, optimizations, calculations, and normalizations were used for both plans. Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), V4, V8 and V12 Gy for normal brain tissue and Integral Dose were used for analysis. Results: In all cases, HD MLC plans performed better in sparing normal brain tissue, achieving a higher PCI with a lower Integral Dose. The average PCI for all 24 targets was 0.75±0.23 and 0.70±0.23 (p ≤0.0015) for HD MLC and Millennium MLC plans, respectively. The average ratio of normal brain doses for Millennium MLC to HD MLC plans was 1.30±0.16, 1.27±0.15, and 1.31±0.18 for the V4, V8, and V12, respectively. The differences in normal brain dose for all criteria were statistically significant with p-value < 0.02. On average Millennium MLC plans had a 16% higher integral dose than HD MLC plans. Conclusion: Significantly better dose conformity with reduced volume of normal brain tissue and integral dose was achieved with HD MLC plans compared to Millennium MLC plans

  13. The value of a rapid contrast-enhanced angio-MRI protocol in the detection of head and neck paragangliomas in SDHx mutations carriers: a retrospective study on behalf of the PGL.EVA investigators*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravel, Guillaume; Hernigou, Anne [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Niccoli, Patricia [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire la Timone, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Marseille, Service d' Endocrinologie, Diabete et Maladies Metaboliques, Marseille (France); Rohmer, Vincent [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d' Angers, Service d' Endocrinologie, Diabetologie, Nutrition, Angers (France); LUNAM Universite, INSERM, U1063, Angers (France); Moulin, Guy [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire la Timone, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Marseille, Service de Radiologie, Marseille (France); Borson-Chazot, Francoise [Federation d' Endocrinologie, Hospices civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Est, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Faculte de Medecine Lyon-Est, Lyon (France); Cancer Research Center of Lyon, INSERM UMR1052, UMR CNRS 5286, Lyon (France); Rousset, Pascal [Hospices civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Est, Service de Radiologie, Lyon (France); Pasco-Papon, Anne [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d' Angers, Service de Radiologie, Angers (France); Marcus, Claude [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Reims, Service de Radiologie, Reims (France); Dubrulle, Frederique [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Lille, Service de Radiologie, Lille (France); Gouya, Herve [Hopital Cochin, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Bidault, Francois [Institut Gustave Roussy, Service de Radiologie, Villejuif (France); Dupas, Benoit [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nantes, Service de Radiologie, Nantes (France); Gabrillargues, Jean [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Clermont-Ferrand, Service de Neuroradiologie, Clermont Ferrand (France); Caumont-Prim, Aurore [Unite d' Epidemiologie et de Recherche Clinique, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France); Centre d' investigation Epidemiologique 4, INSERM, Paris (France); Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Genetique, Paris (France); Paris Cardiovascular Research Center, INSERM, UMR970, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Halimi, Philippe [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France)

    2016-06-15

    To assess the performance of a simplified MRI protocol consisting of a contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography (CE-MRA) in association with a post-contrast T1-weighted sequence (T1WIV) for the detection of HNPGLs in SDHx mutation carriers. This retrospective sub-study is based on the multicenter PGL.EVA cohort, which prospectively enrolled SDHx mutation carriers from 2005 to 2009; 157 index cases or relatives were included. CE-MRA and the T1WIV images were read solely with knowledge of the clinical data but blind to the diagnosis. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios for the simplified MRI protocol were compared to the full MRI protocol reading results and to the gold standard status obtained through the consensus of an expert committee. The sensitivity and specificity of the readings of the simplified MRI protocol were, respectively, 88.7 % (95 % CI = 78.1-95.3) and 93.7 % (95 % CI = 86.8-97.7) versus 80.7 % (95 % CI = 68.6-89.6) and 94.7 % (95 % CI = 88.1-98.3) for the readings of the full MRI protocol. The simplified post-contrast MRI with shorter duration (5 to 10 minutes) showed no performance difference compared to the lengthy standard full MRI and can be proposed for the detection of head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) in SDHx mutation carriers. (orig.)

  14. Reliable, rapid and simple method for the analysis of phthalates in sediments by ultrasonic solvent extraction followed by head space-solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, V; Moscoso-Pérez, C; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; López-Mahía, P; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a new reliable, simple and fast method for the determination of six PAEs in sediments, based on ultrasonic solvent extraction (USE) followed by head space solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination (GC-MS), is proposed. The extraction parameters were studied, and the most favourable conditions were selected. The analytical features of the method were calculated: matrix effect, accuracy (ranged from 90% to 111%), repeatability and intermediate precision (RSD <10%), detection and quantification limits of the method (ranged from 0.001µgg -1 (DOP) to 0.142µgg -1 (DEP)), and satisfactory results were obtained. Major advantages of this approach are low consumption of reagents and solvents, no clean-up or evaporation steps were required and minimum sample manipulation. In addition, cross contamination from glassware, solvents and samples is minimized, thus procedural blanks are keeping to a minimum.. The applicability of the proposed method was demonstrated analysing sediment samples from Galician coast (NW Spain). The proposed method allows the application in routine laboratory conditions and its implementation in environmental monitoring studies under the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) and Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The value of a rapid contrast-enhanced angio-MRI protocol in the detection of head and neck paragangliomas in SDHx mutations carriers: a retrospective study on behalf of the PGL.EVA investigators*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravel, Guillaume; Hernigou, Anne; Niccoli, Patricia; Rohmer, Vincent; Moulin, Guy; Borson-Chazot, Francoise; Rousset, Pascal; Pasco-Papon, Anne; Marcus, Claude; Dubrulle, Frederique; Gouya, Herve; Bidault, Francois; Dupas, Benoit; Gabrillargues, Jean; Caumont-Prim, Aurore; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Halimi, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    To assess the performance of a simplified MRI protocol consisting of a contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography (CE-MRA) in association with a post-contrast T1-weighted sequence (T1WIV) for the detection of HNPGLs in SDHx mutation carriers. This retrospective sub-study is based on the multicenter PGL.EVA cohort, which prospectively enrolled SDHx mutation carriers from 2005 to 2009; 157 index cases or relatives were included. CE-MRA and the T1WIV images were read solely with knowledge of the clinical data but blind to the diagnosis. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios for the simplified MRI protocol were compared to the full MRI protocol reading results and to the gold standard status obtained through the consensus of an expert committee. The sensitivity and specificity of the readings of the simplified MRI protocol were, respectively, 88.7 % (95 % CI = 78.1-95.3) and 93.7 % (95 % CI = 86.8-97.7) versus 80.7 % (95 % CI = 68.6-89.6) and 94.7 % (95 % CI = 88.1-98.3) for the readings of the full MRI protocol. The simplified post-contrast MRI with shorter duration (5 to 10 minutes) showed no performance difference compared to the lengthy standard full MRI and can be proposed for the detection of head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) in SDHx mutation carriers. (orig.)

  16. Head and face reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002980.htm Head and face reconstruction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Head and face reconstruction is surgery to repair or ...

  17. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - ... Head CT is done in the hospital or radiology center. You lie on a narrow table that ...

  18. Head Lice: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Lice - Head Lice Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Lice Head Lice General Information Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Treatment ...

  19. Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  1. Head injury - first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000028.htm Head injury - first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... a concussion can range from mild to severe. First Aid Learning to recognize a serious head injury and ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

  3. Ultrasound-assisted single extraction tests for rapid assessment of metal extractability from soils by total reflection X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Calle, I; Cabaleiro, N; Lavilla, I; Bendicho, C

    2013-09-15

    In this work, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) was employed for acceleration of metal extraction from soil samples. After extraction, multielemental analysis (Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb) of EDTA and acetic acid extracts was performed by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF). High-intensity ultrasonic processors, i.e. the ultrasonic probe (50W) and the cup-horn sonoreactor (200W) were applied. Both ultrasonic procedures were compared with a miniaturized version of the single extraction scheme proposed by the Standards, Measurements and Testing program (SM&T). The extraction time with EDTA was reduced from 1h (conventional procedure) to 2 min (ultrasonic probe) or to 10 min (cup-horn sonoreactor). The time required for acetic acid extraction was also reduced from 16 h (conventional procedure) to 6 min (ultrasonic probe) or to 30 min (cup-horn sonoreactor). In addition, the amount of sample and extractants was drastically reduced as a result of the miniaturization implemented in the developed approaches. The combination of UAE and TXRF allows assessing the potential metal mobility and bioavailability in a simple way. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid Identification of Echinococcus granulosus and E. canadensis Using High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis by Focusing on a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safa, Ahmad Hosseini; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; Tajaddini, Mohammadhasan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Mohtashami-Pour, Mehdi; Pestehchian, Nader

    2016-07-22

    High-resolution melting (HRM) is a reliable and sensitive scanning method to detect variation in DNA sequences. We used this method to better understand the epidemiology and transmission of Echinococcus granulosus. We tested the use of HRM to discriminate the genotypes of E. granulosus and E. canadensis. One hundred forty-one hydatid cysts were collected from slaughtered animals in different parts of Isfahan-Iran in 2013. After DNA extraction, the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene was amplified using PCR coupled with the HRM curve. The result of HRM analysis using partial the sequences of cox1 gene revealed that 93, 35, and 2 isolates were identified as G1, G3, and G6 genotypes, respectively. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was found in locus 9867 of the cox1 gene. This is a critical locus for the differentiation between the G6 and G7 genotypes. In the phylogenic tree, the sample with a SNP was located between the G6 and G7 genotypes, which suggest that this isolate has a G6/G7 genotype. The HRM analysis developed in the present study provides a powerful technique for molecular and epidemiological studies on echinococcosis in humans and animals.

  5. Separation of input function for rapid measurement of quantitative CMRO{sub 2} and CBF in a single PET scan with a dual tracer administration method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Watabe, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Takuya; Iida, Hidehiro [Department of Investigative Radiology, Advanced Medical-Engineering Center, National Cardiovascular Center-Research Institute, 5-7-1, Fujishirodai, Suita, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan)

    2007-04-07

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) images can be quantified using positron emission tomography (PET) by administrating {sup 15}O-labelled water (H{sup 15}{sub 2}O) and oxygen ({sup 15}O{sub 2}). Conventionally, those images are measured with separate scans for three tracers C{sup 15}O for CBV, H{sup 15}{sub 2}O for CBF and {sup 15}O{sub 2} for CMRO{sub 2}, and there are additional waiting times between the scans in order to minimize the influence of the radioactivity from the previous tracers, which results in a relatively long study period. We have proposed a dual tracer autoradiographic (DARG) approach (Kudomi et al 2005), which enabled us to measure CBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} rapidly by sequentially administrating H{sup 15}{sub 2}O and {sup 15}O{sub 2} within a short time. Because quantitative CBF and CMRO{sub 2} values are sensitive to arterial input function, it is necessary to obtain accurate input function and a drawback of this approach is to require separation of the measured arterial blood time-activity curve (TAC) into pure water and oxygen input functions under the existence of residual radioactivity from the first injected tracer. For this separation, frequent manual sampling was required. The present paper describes two calculation methods: namely a linear and a model-based method, to separate the measured arterial TAC into its water and oxygen components. In order to validate these methods, we first generated a blood TAC for the DARG approach by combining the water and oxygen input functions obtained in a series of PET studies on normal human subjects. The combined data were then separated into water and oxygen components by the present methods. CBF and CMRO{sub 2} were calculated using those separated input functions and tissue TAC. The quantitative accuracy in the CBF and CMRO{sub 2} values by the DARG approach did not exceed the acceptable range, i.e., errors in those

  6. Suspected Cerebral Edema in Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Is There Still a Role for Head CT in Treatment Decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Rivera, Carmen L; Asaro, Lisa A; Agus, Michael S D; DeCourcey, Danielle D

    2017-03-01

    Neurologic deterioration associated with cerebral edema in diabetic ketoacidosis is typically sudden in onset, progresses rapidly, and requires emergent treatment. The utility of brain imaging by head CT in decisions to treat for cerebral edema has not been previously studied. The objective of this study was to describe the characteristics of pediatric patients with diabetic ketoacidosis who develop altered mental status and evaluate the role of head CT in this cohort. Retrospective analysis of clinical, biochemical, and radiologic data. Tertiary care children's hospital (2004-2010). Six hundred eighty-six admissions of patients (diabetic ketoacidosis. None. Altered mental status was documented during 96 of 686 diabetic ketoacidosis admissions (14%). Compared with alert patients, those with altered mental status were younger (median, 12.0 vs 13.1 yr; p = 0.007) and more acidotic (pH, 7.04 vs 7.19; p diabetic ketoacidosis admissions with altered mental status (63%), 16 (27%) of which had abnormal results. Hyperosmolar therapy for cerebral edema was given during 23 of the 60 admissions (38%), during which 12 (52%) had normal head CT results, eight of these 12 (67%) after cerebral edema treatment and four (33%) before. Of the 11 admissions with abnormal head CT results that received hyperosmolar therapy, four head CT scan (36%) occurred after hyperosmolar treatment and seven (64%) before. For the 11 admissions with head CT before cerebral edema treatment, there was a median 2-hour delay between head CT and hyperosmolar therapy. In this single-center retrospective study, there was no evidence that decisions about treatment of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis and suspected cerebral edema were enhanced by head CT, and head CT may have led to a significant delay in hyperosmolar therapy.

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography ( ...

  8. [Rapidly vanishing hip--a mystery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Yaniv; Sigal, Amit; Greental, Arnan; Vlodavsky, Euvgeni; Soudry, Michael; Militianu, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly destructive hip disease is a rare condition, the cause of which is yet to be clarified, and is described in the literature by scant case reports. The disease was first described by Forestier in 1957, and since then many names have been proposed to describe the rapid vanishing of the femoral head, and occasionally the acetabulum. This condition initially represents as acute hip pain, and rapidly progresses to complete vanishing of the proximal femur, within a few months. We briefly discuss the literature regarding this phenomenon, and describe a case of a female patient who suffered from complete disappearance of the femoral head within 9 weeks.

  9. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ... out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  11. CT Perfusion of the Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Site Index A-Z CT Perfusion of the Head Computed tomography (CT) perfusion of the head uses ... the Head? What is CT Perfusion of the Head? Computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging shows which areas ...

  12. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  13. A Phase 2 Open Label, Single-Arm Trial to Evaluate the Combination of Cetuximab Plus Taxotere, Cisplatin, and 5-Flurouracil as an Induction Regimen in Patients With Unresectable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesía, Ricard, E-mail: rmesia@iconcologia.net [Medical Oncology Department, Institut Català d' Oncologia L' Hospitalet, Barcelona (Spain); Vázquez, Silvia [Medical Oncology Department, Institut Català d' Oncologia L' Hospitalet, Barcelona (Spain); Grau, Juan J. [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Clínic i Provincial, Barcelona (Spain); García-Sáenz, Jose A. [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid (Spain); Lozano, Alicia [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Català d' Oncologia L' Hospitalet, Barcelona (Spain); García, Carlos [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital General Yagüe, Burgos (Spain); Carles, Joan [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital del Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Irigoyen, Antonio [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Granada (Spain); Mañós, Manel [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Hospital de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); García-Paredes, Beatriz [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid (Spain); Barco, Elvira del [Medical Oncology Department, Gregorio Marañón University Hospital, Madrid (Spain); Taberna, Miren [Medical Oncology Department, Institut Català d' Oncologia L' Hospitalet, Barcelona (Spain); Escobar, Yolanda [Medical Oncology Department, Gregorio Marañón University Hospital, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: Despite treatment, prognosis of unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHC) is dismal. Cetuximab therapy has proven to increase the clinical activity of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in patients with locoregional advanced disease with an acceptable toxicity profile. We designed a phase 2 trial to evaluate the efficacy of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) plus cetuximab (C-TPF) as an induction regimen in patients with unresectable SCCHN. Methods and Materials: A single-arm phase 2 trial was conducted. Eligible patients included those with untreated unresectable SCCHC, World Health Organization performance status of 0 to 1, 18 to 70 years of age. Treatment consisted of four 21-day cycles of TPF (docetaxel, 75 mg/m{sup 2} day 1; cisplatin, 75 mg/m{sup 2} day 1; 5-fluorouracil [5-FU], 750 mg/m{sup 2} day 1-5) and cetuximab, 250 mg/m{sup 2} weekly (loading dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2}). Prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and antibiotic support were given. After induction, sequential accelerated radiation therapy with concomitant boost (69.9 Gy) and weekly cetuximab therapy were delivered in the absence of disease progression. The primary endpoint was objective response rate (ORR) to C-TPF. Results: Fifty patients were enrolled across 8 centers. Median age was 54 years; disease was stage IV; oropharynx and hypopharynx were the most common primary sites. Eighty-two percent received 4 cycles of C-TPF, and 86% started sequential treatment based on radiation therapy and cetuximab. ORR after C-TPF was 86% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 73%-94%) and 24% had complete response (CR). With a median follow-up of 40.7 months, median overall survival (OS) was 40.7 months. The 2-year actuarial locoregional control (LRC) rate was 57%. The most common drug-related grade 3 or 4 toxicities during induction were neutropenia (24%), neutropenic fever (24%), and diarrhea (20%). There were 3 treatment-related deaths (6

  14. Cultivo de brócolos de inflorescência única no verão em plantio direto Single head broccoli cultivars production in summer under no-tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Augusto de C e Melo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi conduzido no delineamento de blocos casualizados, em arranjo de parcelas subdivididas com três repetições. As parcelas foram constituídas por plantas de cobertuta [milheto (Pennisetum glaucum, milho (Zea mays, consórcio de milho com mucuna-preta preta (Estilozobium aterrimum, sorgo-sudão (Sorghum bicolor X S. sudanense] além do plantio convencional (PC (solo preparado com aração e gradagem após pousio. As cultivares Avenger, Demoledor, Grandisimo, Green Storm Bonanza, Legacy e o material HECB-01-06, constituiram as sub-parcelas. Não houve diferença significativa entre o plantio direto (PD e o PC quanto à produção de brócolos. Houve diferença significativa entre cultivares para as variáveis avaliadas. Com relação às cultivares, Avenger obteve maior produtividade (13,2 t ha-1, peso médio de inflorescências (458 g, diâmetro (15,3 cm e melhor qualidade das inflorescências (índice de aspecto visual de 4,0. Portanto, considerando-se as vantagens do PD com a manutenção de níveis de produtividade equivalentes às obtidas no PC, deve-se recomendar sua adoção.The objective of this work was to evaluate single head broccoli cultivars production in summer under no-tillage (NT. The experimental design was randomized blocks with a split-plot design and three replicates. The plots were constituted by the cover crops: pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum, corn (Zea mays, a mix of corn and black velvet-bean (Estilozobium aterrimum, sorghum sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor X S. sudanense, besides the conventional tillage (CT - soil after fallow prepared with plow and disk harrow. Cultivars Avenger, Demoledor, Grandisimo, Green Storm Bonanza, Legacy and the material HECB-01-06, represented the sub-plots. No differences were found among NT and CT concerning broccoli yield. There were significant differences between cultivars for the evaluated variables. The cultivar Avenger presented the highest yield (13.2 t ha-1, average

  15. Nivolumab versus standard, single-agent therapy of investigator's choice in recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (CheckMate 141): health-related quality-of-life results from a randomised, phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kevin J; Ferris, Robert L; Blumenschein, George; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Fayette, Jérôme; Licitra, Lisa; Kasper, Stefan; Even, Caroline; Vokes, Everett E; Worden, Francis; Saba, Nabil F; Kiyota, Naomi; Haddad, Robert; Tahara, Makoto; Grünwald, Viktor; Shaw, James W; Monga, Manish; Lynch, Mark; Taylor, Fiona; DeRosa, Michael; Morrissey, Laura; Cocks, Kim; Gillison, Maura L; Guigay, Joël

    2017-08-01

    Patients with platinum-refractory recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck have few treatment options and poor prognosis. Nivolumab significantly improved survival of this patient population when compared with standard single-agent therapy of investigator's choice in Checkmate 141; here we report the effect of nivolumab on patient-reported outcomes (PROs). CheckMate 141 was a randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who progressed within 6 months after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to nivolumab 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks (n=240) or investigator's choice (n=121) of methotrexate (40-60 mg/m 2 of body surface area), docetaxel (30-40 mg/m 2 ), or cetuximab (250 mg/m 2 after a loading dose of 400 mg/m 2 ) until disease progression, intolerable toxicity, or withdrawal of consent. On Jan 26, 2016, the independent data monitoring committee reviewed the data at the planned interim analysis and declared overall survival superiority for nivolumab over investigator's choice therapy (primary endpoint; described previously). The protocol was amended to allow patients in the investigator's choice group to cross over to nivolumab. All patients not on active therapy are being followed for survival. As an exploratory endpoint, PROs were assessed at baseline, week 9, and every 6 weeks thereafter using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (QLQ-C30), the EORTC head and neck cancer-specific module (EORTC QLQ-H&N35), and the three-level European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire. Differences within and between treatment groups in PROs were analysed by ANCOVA among patients with baseline and at least one other assessment. All randomised patients were included in the time to clinically meaningful deterioration analyses. Median time to clinically meaningful

  16. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, M.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Oswestry, SY10 7AG, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Darby, A.J. [Department of Pathology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Oswestry, SY10 7AG, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to increase awareness of, and to show the variable clinical and radiological features of, subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head. The clinical and radiological findings in 7 patients with subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head were reviewed retrospectively. The diagnosis was confirmed histologically in 4 patients. Radiographs were performed in all patients, MRI in 5 and scintigraphy in 4 patients. Radiographs showed varying degrees of femoral head collapse in 4 patients. In the remaining 3 patients radiographs showed a normal femoral head, regional osteoporosis and focal sclerosis, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a low-signal band on T1- and T2-weighted images in the subchondral bone adjacent or parallel to the articular surface associated with bone marrow oedema. Scintigraphy showed increased uptake in the femoral head. Insufficiency fractures of the femoral head are easily overlooked or confused with avascular necrosis and, when there is significant joint destruction, osteoarthritis. Unsuspected insufficiency fracture of the femoral head can lead to significant and rapid loss of bone stock in osteoporotic patients waiting for arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. Increased awareness of this condition will hopefully lead to earlier diagnosis and a successful outcome of conservative treatment. (orig.)

  17. Pharmacokinetic study of five ginsenosides using a sensitive and rapid liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method following single and multiple oral administration of Shexiang Baoxin pills to rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chengcheng; Yang, Yongge; Lv, Chao; Jin, Huizi; Tao, Jianfei; Yuan, Xing; Huang, Huimei; Han, Lin; Chang, Wanlin; Liu, Runhui; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-03-01

    Shexiang Baoxin pills (SBP) are a traditional Chinese medicine that are used for treating coronary heart disease. Ginsenosides are the main effective components of SBP, but a comprehensive and deep pharmacokinetic study of ginsenosides in SBP, including multiple dosing and linear or nonlinear properties, is lacking. This study was designed to investigate and compare the pharmacokinetic characteristics of ginsenosides in SBP at a single dose and in multiple doses. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the ginsenosides Rg1, Re, Rb3, Rc and Rb1 in rat plasma. Rats were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of 4, 8 or 12 g/kg and multiple doses (4 g/kg) of SBP for 8, 15 or 22 consecutive days. The results revealed that ginsenosides, following a single oral dose of 4 or 8 g/kg, were absorbed rapidly, with a Tmax ranging from 0.250 to 1.08 h. The AUC0-t and Cmax of the ppd-type ginsenosides Rb3, Rc and Rb1 were greater than those of the ppt-type ginsenosides Rg1 and Re. Nondose-dependent exposure was observed at doses of 4-12 g/kg for all of the ginsenosides. After multiple dosing, the plasma levels of the ppt-type ginsenosides decreased, whereas those of the ppd-type ginsenosides did not change significantly. In conclusion, the LC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to investigate the pharmacokinetics of ginsenosides after single and multiple oral administrations of SBP. The ginsenosides did not accumulate after multiple dosing. The ppd-type ginsenosides displayed more favorable pharmacokinetic properties compared with the ppt-type ginsenosides. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Rapid single-step methods for detection of two immune defence gene polymorphisms: the myeloperoxidase (MPO) G-129A and the Fc gamma receptor 2A (FCGR2A) H/R131

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølle, Ingolf; Melsvik, Dorte; Østergaard, Mette

    2007-01-01

    . formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens. Here we describe two new single-step methods for rapid and sensitive analysis of: 1. The G-129A myeloperoxidase (MPO) promoter polymorphism, which affects the amount of myeloperoxidase in neutrophils. 2. The Fc gamma receptor 2A (FCGR2A)-H/R131......Polymorphisms of immune defence genes may act as disease modifiers and are studied by many researchers. A conclusive analysis of the impact of genetic variations typically requires a large number of sample specimens, and in retrospective studies this may include samples of reduced quality, e.g...... polymorphism, which is critical to the binding of IgG2 immune complexes to phagocytes. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jul-31...

  19. Procalcitonin for selecting the antibiotic regimen in outpatients with low-risk community-acquired pneumonia using a rapid point-of-care testing: A single-arm clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiá, Mar; Padilla, Sergio; Ortiz de la Tabla, Victoria; González, Matilde; Bas, Cristina; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess the role of procalcitonin (PCT) to guide the initial selection of the antibiotic regimen for low-risk community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods A single-arm clinical trial was conducted including outpatients with CAP and Pneumonia Severity Index risk classes I-II. Antimicrobial selection was based on the results of PCT measured with a rapid point-of-care testing. According to serum PCT levels, patients were assigned to two treatment strategies: oral azithromycin if PCT was Atypical organisms were more common in patients given azithromycin (18.5% vs 8.1%, respectively). The majority (93%) of patients with atypical pneumonia had low PCT levels. Clinical cure rates were 95.8% in the azithromycin group, 94.6% in the levofloxacin group, and 94.4% in the historical control group. No 30-day mortality or recurrences were observed, and the 3-year rates of recurrence and mortality were very low in both groups. Adverse events occurrence was also infrequent. Conclusion A PCT-guided strategy with a rapid point-of-care testing safely allowed selecting empirical narrow-spectrum antibiotics in outpatients with CAP. Trial registration The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02600806 PMID:28426811

  20. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, Karen M

    2016-07-01

    Soccer is currently the most popular and fastest growing sport worldwide, with approximately 265 million registered soccer players existing around the world. The popularity of the sport, coupled with the high incidence of 18.8-21.5 head injuries per 1,000 player hours reported, make it essential that clinicians, coaches, and the athletes, have a solid understanding of head injuries. The successful rehabilitation of athletes with head injuries relies upon early and accurate identification strategies and implementation of appropriate return to play measures across all areas in the continuum of care. Soccer is a frequently played sport, and head injuries are common. Therefore, it is imperative that clinicians, coaches, and the athletes themselves have a solid understanding of head injury prevention, diagnosis, and treatment options. The purpose of this article was to provide rehabilitation nurses with current information regarding frequently occurring head injuries in the widespread sport of soccer. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  1. Rapid analysis of the essential oil components of dried Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim by Fe2O3-magnetic-microsphere-assisted microwave distillation and simultaneous headspace single-drop microextraction followed by GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qing

    2013-06-01

    In this work, microwave distillation assisted by Fe2 O3 magnetic microspheres (FMMS) and headspace single-drop microextraction were combined, and developed for determination of essential oil compounds in dried Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim (ZBM). The FMMS were used as microwave absorption solid medium for dry distillation of dried ZBM. Using the proposed method, isolation, extraction, and concentration of essential oil compounds can be carried out in a single step. The experimental parameters including extraction solvent, solvent volume, microwave power, irradiation time, and the amount of added FMMS, were studied. The optimal analytical conditions were: 2.0 μL decane as the extraction solvent, microwave power of 300 W, irradiation time of 2 min, and the addition of 0.1 g FMMS to ZBM. The method precision was from 4 to 10%. A total of 52 compounds were identified by the proposed method. The conventional steam distillation method was also used for the analysis of essential oil in dried ZBM and only 31 compounds were identified by steam distillation method. It was found that the proposed method is a simple, rapid, reliable, and solvent-free technique for the determination of volatile compounds in Chinese herbs. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Head and Neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Liselotte; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Loft, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography with FDG of the head and neck region is mainly used for the diagnosis of head and neck cancer, for staging, treatment evaluation, relapse, and planning of surgery and radio therapy. This article is a practical guide of imaging techniques......, including a detailed protocol for FDG PET in head and neck imaging, physiologic findings, and pitfalls in selected case stories....

  3. Bottom head assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs

  4. Corticosterone induces rapid spinogenesis via synaptic glucocorticoid receptors and kinase networks in hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimasa Komatsuzaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modulation of dendritic spines under acute stress is attracting much attention. Exposure to acute stress induces corticosterone (CORT secretion from the adrenal cortex, resulting in rapid increase of CORT levels in plasma and the hippocampus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrated the mechanisms of rapid effect (∼1 h of CORT on the density and morphology of spines by imaging neurons in adult male rat hippocampal slices. The application of CORT at 100-1000 nM induced a rapid increase in the density of spines of CA1 pyramidal neurons. The density of small-head spines (0.2-0.4 µm was increased even at low CORT levels (100-200 nM. The density of middle-head spines (0.4-0.5 µm was increased at high CORT levels between 400-1000 nM. The density of large-head spines (0.5-1.0 µm was increased only at 1000 nM CORT. Co-administration of RU486, an antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (GR, abolished the effect of CORT. Blocking a single kinase, such as MAPK, PKA, PKC or PI3K, suppressed CORT-induced enhancement of spinogenesis. Blocking NMDA receptors suppressed the CORT effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results imply that stress levels of CORT (100-1000 nM drive the spinogenesis via synaptic GR and multiple kinase pathways.

  5. Head Injuries in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  7. Procalcitonin for selecting the antibiotic regimen in outpatients with low-risk community-acquired pneumonia using a rapid point-of-care testing: A single-arm clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Masiá

    Full Text Available We aimed to assess the role of procalcitonin (PCT to guide the initial selection of the antibiotic regimen for low-risk community-acquired pneumonia (CAP.A single-arm clinical trial was conducted including outpatients with CAP and Pneumonia Severity Index risk classes I-II. Antimicrobial selection was based on the results of PCT measured with a rapid point-of-care testing. According to serum PCT levels, patients were assigned to two treatment strategies: oral azithromycin if PCT was <0.5 ng/ml, or levofloxacin if levels were ≥0.5 ng/ml. Primary outcome was clinical cure rate. Short-term and long-term outcomes were assessed. Results were compared with those of a historical standard-of-care control-group treated in our centre.Of 253 subjects included, 216 (85.4% were assigned to azithromycin. Pneumococcal infection was diagnosed in 26 (12% and 21 (56.8% patients allocated to azithromycin and levofloxacin groups, respectively. No patients in the azithromycin group developed bacteraemia. Atypical organisms were more common in patients given azithromycin (18.5% vs 8.1%, respectively. The majority (93% of patients with atypical pneumonia had low PCT levels. Clinical cure rates were 95.8% in the azithromycin group, 94.6% in the levofloxacin group, and 94.4% in the historical control group. No 30-day mortality or recurrences were observed, and the 3-year rates of recurrence and mortality were very low in both groups. Adverse events occurrence was also infrequent.A PCT-guided strategy with a rapid point-of-care testing safely allowed selecting empirical narrow-spectrum antibiotics in outpatients with CAP.The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02600806.

  8. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  9. Curative and organ-preserving treatment with intra-arterial carboplatin induction followed by surgery and/or radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer: single-center five-year results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinelli Carmine

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluated the feasibility, toxicity, response rate and survival of neoadjuvant superselective intra-arterial infusion of high dose carboplatin in advanced head and neck cancer. Methods Forty-six patients with primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma received 3 cycles of intra-arterial carboplatin (300 to 350 mg/m2 per cycle every 2 weeks, followed by radiotherapy or surgery plus radiotherapy. Results No complications or severe toxicity occurred. Sixteen patients (35% were complete responders, 20 (43% partial responders while 10 (22% did not respond to treatment. After completion of the multimodality treatment, 38/46 patients (83% were complete responders. After a 5-year follow-up period, 18/46 patients (39% are alive and disease-free, 3 (6,5% have died of a second primary tumor and 25 (54,5% have died of the disease. Conclusion Intra-arterial carboplatin induction chemotherapy is a safe, well-tolerated technique that discriminates between responders and non-responders and so may have prognostic significance in planning further integrated treatments aimed to organ preservation for advanced head and neck carcinomas.

  10. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular ...

  11. American Head and Neck Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Head & Neck Society Mission Statement: Advance Education, Research, and Quality of Care for the head and neck oncology patient. American Head & Neck Society | AHNS The mission of the AHNS is to ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  13. Head and neck cancer imaging. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermans, Robert (ed.) [University Hospital, Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology

    2012-07-01

    Imaging is crucial in the multidisciplinary approach to head and neck cancer management. The rapid technological development of recent years makes it necessary for all members of the multidisciplinary team to understand the potential applications, limitations, and advantages of existing and evolving imaging technologies. It is equally important that the radiologist has sufficient clinical background knowledge to understand the clinical significance of imaging findings. This book provides an overview of the findings obtained using different imaging techniques during the evaluation of head and neck neoplasms, both before and after therapy. All anatomic areas in the head and neck are covered, and the impact of imaging on patient management is discussed in detail. The authors are recognized experts in the field, and numerous high-quality images are included. This second edition provides information on the latest imaging developments in this area, including the application of PET-CT and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. A More Rapid, Rapid Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Justin; Slamon, Nicholas B

    2016-09-01

    Critical care physicians' standard for arrival to a rapid response team activation is 10 minutes or less at this institution. This study proposes that a FaceTime (Apple, Cupertino, CA) video call between the staff at the bedside and the critical care physician will allow the implementation of potentially life-saving therapies earlier than the current average response (4.5 min). Prospective cohort study. Freestanding, tertiary-care children's hospital. Pediatric patients ages 0-17. Six units were chosen as matched pairs. In the telemedicine units, after notification of an rapid response team, the critical care intensivist established a FaceTime video call with the nurse at the bedside and gathered history, visually assessed the patient, and suggested interventions. Simultaneously, the rapid response nurse, respiratory therapist, and fellow were dispatched to respond to the bedside. After the video call, the intensivist also reported to the bedside. The control units followed the standard rapid response team protocol: the intensivist physically responded to the bedside. Differences in response time, number of interventions, Pediatric Early Warning System scores, and disposition were measured, and the PICU course of those transferred was evaluated. The telemedicine group's average time to establish FaceTime interface was 2.6 minutes and arrival at bedside was 3.7 minutes. The control group average arrival time was 3.6 minutes. The difference between FaceTime interface and physical arrival in the control group was statistically significant (p = 0.012). Physical arrival times between the telemedicine and control groups remained consistent. Fifty-eight percent of the telemedicine patients and 73% of the control patients were admitted to the PICU (p = 0.13). Of patients transferred to the PICU, there was no difference in rate of intubation, initiation of bilevel positive airway pressure, central line placement, or vasopressors. The study group averaged 1.4 interventions

  15. Incorporating 3D-printing technology in the design of head-caps and electrode drives for recording neurons in multiple brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, Drew B; DeLucca, Michael V; Haufler, Darrell; Paré, Denis

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in recording and computing hardware have enabled laboratories to record the electrical activity of multiple brain regions simultaneously. Lagging behind these technical advances, however, are the methods needed to rapidly produce microdrives and head-caps that can flexibly accommodate different recording configurations. Indeed, most available designs target single or adjacent brain regions, and, if multiple sites are targeted, specially constructed head-caps are used. Here, we present a novel design style, for both microdrives and head-caps, which takes advantage of three-dimensional printing technology. This design facilitates targeting of multiple brain regions in various configurations. Moreover, the parts are easily fabricated in large quantities, with only minor hand-tooling and finishing required. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Head Impact Biomechanics in Women's College Soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynall, Robert C; Clark, Michael D; Grand, Erin E; Stucker, Jaclyn C; Littleton, Ashley C; Aguilar, Alain J; Petschauer, Meredith A; Teel, Elizabeth F; Mihalik, Jason P

    2016-09-01

    There are limited nonlaboratory soccer head impact biomechanics data. This is surprising given soccer's global popularity. Epidemiological data suggest that female college soccer players are at a greater concussion injury risk than their male counterparts. Therefore, the purposes of our study were to quantify head impact frequency and magnitude during women's soccer practices and games in the National Collegiate Athletic Association and to characterize these data across event type, playing position, year on the team, and segment of game (first and second halves). Head impact biomechanics were collected from female college soccer players (n = 22; mean ± SD age = 19.1 ± 0.1 yr, height = 168.0 ± 3.5 cm, mass = 63.7 ± 6.0 kg). We employed a helmetless head impact measurement device (X2 Biosystems xPatch) before each competition and practice across a single season. Peak linear and rotational accelerations were categorized based on impact magnitude and subsequently analyzed using appropriate nonparametric analyses. Overall, women's college soccer players experience approximately seven impacts per 90 min of game play. The overwhelming majority (~90%) of all head impacts were categorized into our mildest linear acceleration impact classification (10g-20g). Interestingly, a higher percentage of practice impacts in the 20g-40g range compared with games (11% vs 7%) was observed. Head impact biomechanics studies have provided valuable insights into understanding collision sports and for informing evidence-based rule and policy changes. These have included changing the football kickoff, ice hockey body checking ages, and head-to-head hits in both sports. Given soccer's global popularity, and the growing public concern for the potential long-term neurological implications of collision and contact sports, studying soccer has the potential to impact many athletes and the sports medicine professionals caring for them.

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used to detect: bleeding, brain injury and skull fractures in patients with head injuries. bleeding caused by ... be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ...

  18. TCGA head Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... head CT scanning. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  20. Head Start Impact Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nationally representative, longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Head Start or community services as usual;direct...

  1. Early Head Start Evaluation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Early Head Start or community services as usual;direct assessments and...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It ... within the brain shortly after a patient exhibits symptoms of a stroke. a stroke, especially with a ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, ... cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scans in children should always be done with low-dose technique. top of page What are the ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  7. Overview of Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kept in the emergency department or hospital for observation. Children who have had a minor head injury ... penetrating trauma (such as a knife or gunshot wound). Injuries may range from relatively small hematomas (collections ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor ... scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular ...

  10. Rat Cardiovascular Responses to Whole Body Suspension: Head-down and Non-Head-Down Tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, Joseph M.; Dombrowski, Judy

    1992-01-01

    The rat whole body suspension technique mimics responses seen during exposure to microgravity and was evaluated as a model for cardiovascular responses with two series of experiments. In one series, changes were monitored in chronically catheterized rats during 7 days of Head-Down Tilt (HDT) or Non-Head-Down Tilt (N-HDT) and after several hours of recovery. Elevations of mean arterial (MAP), systolic, and diastolic pressures of approx. 20 % (P less than 0.05) in HDT rats began as early as day 1 and were maintained for the duration of suspension. Pulse pressures were relatively unaffected, but heart rates were elevated approx. 10 %. During postsuspension (2-7 h), most cardiovascular parameters returned to presuspension levels. N-HDT rats exhibited elevations chiefly on days 3 and 7. In the second series, blood pressure was monitored in 1- and 3-day HDT and N-HDT rats to evaluate responses to rapid head-up tilt. MAP, systolic and diastolic pressures, and HR were elevated (P less than 0.05) in HDT and N-HDT rats during head-up tilt after 1 day of suspension, while pulse pressures remained un changed. HDT rats exhibited elevated pretilt MAP and failed to respond to rapid head-up tilt with further increase of MAP on day 3, indicating some degree of deconditioning. The whole body suspended rat may be useful as a model to better understand responses of rats exposed to microgravity.

  11. Updates in Head and Neck Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largo, Rene D; Garvey, Patrick B

    2018-02-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Have a basic understanding of virtual planning, rapid prototype modeling, three-dimensional printing, and computer-assisted design and manufacture. 2. Understand the principles of combining virtual planning and vascular mapping. 3. Understand principles of flap choice and design in preoperative planning of free osteocutaneous flaps in mandible and midface reconstruction. 4. Discuss advantages and disadvantages of computer-assisted design and manufacture in reconstruction of advanced oncologic mandible and midface defects. Virtual planning and rapid prototype modeling are increasingly used in head and neck reconstruction with the aim of achieving superior surgical outcomes in functionally and aesthetically critical areas of the head and neck compared with conventional reconstruction. The reconstructive surgeon must be able to understand this rapidly-advancing technology, along with its advantages and disadvantages. There is no limit to the degree to which patient-specific data may be integrated into the virtual planning process. For example, vascular mapping can be incorporated into virtual planning of mandible or midface reconstruction. Representative mandible and midface cases are presented to illustrate the process of virtual planning. Although virtual planning has become helpful in head and neck reconstruction, its routine use may be limited by logistic challenges, increased acquisition costs, and limited flexibility for intraoperative modifications. Nevertheless, the authors believe that the superior functional and aesthetic results realized with virtual planning outweigh the limitations.

  12. Axis of eye rotation changes with head-pitch orientation during head impulses about earth-vertical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Americo A; Schubert, Michael C; Clendaniel, Richard A; Carey, John P; Della Santina, Charles C; Minor, Lloyd B; Zee, David S

    2006-06-01

    The goal of this study was to assess how the axis of head rotation, Listing's law, and eye position influence the axis of eye rotation during brief, rapid head rotations. We specifically asked how the axis of eye rotation during the initial angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) changed when the pitch orientation of the head relative to Earth-vertical was varied, but the initial position of the eye in the orbit and the orientation of Listing's plane with respect to the head were fixed. We measured three-dimensional eye and head rotation axes in eight normal humans using the search coil technique during head-and-trunk (whole-body) and head-on-trunk (head-only) "impulses" about an Earth-vertical axis. The head was initially oriented at one of five pitch angles (30 degrees nose down, 15 degrees nose down, 0 degrees, 15 degrees nose up, 30 degrees nose up). The fixation target was always aligned with the nasooccipital axis. Whole-body impulses were passive, unpredictable, manual, rotations with peak-amplitude of approximately 20 degrees , peak-velocity of approximately 80 degrees /s, and peak-acceleration of approximately 1000 degrees /s2. Head-only impulses were also passive, unpredictable, manual, rotations with peak-amplitude of approximately 20 degrees , peak-velocity of approximately 150 degrees /s, and peak-acceleration of approximately 3000 degrees /s2. During whole-body impulses, the axis of eye rotation tilted in the same direction, and by an amount proportional (0.51 +/- 0.09), to the starting pitch head orientation (P rotation could be predicted from vectorial summation of the gains (eye velocity/head velocity) obtained for rotations about the pure yaw and roll head axes. Thus, even when the orientation of Listing's plane and eye position in the orbit are fixed, the axis of eye rotation during the VOR reflects a compromise between the requirements of Listing's law and a perfectly compensatory VOR.

  13. Hydra multiple head star sensor and its in-flight self-calibration of optical heads alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, L.; Blarre, L.; Perrimon, N.; Kocher, Y.; Martinez, P. E.; Dussy, S.

    2017-11-01

    HYDRA is EADS SODERN new product line of APS-based autonomous star trackers. The baseline is a multiple head sensor made of three separated optical heads and one electronic unit. Actually the concept which was chosen offers more than three single-head star trackers working independently. Since HYDRA merges all fields of view the result is a more accurate, more robust and completely autonomous multiple-head sensor, releasing the AOCS from the need to manage the outputs of independent single-head star trackers. Specific to the multiple head architecture and the underlying data fusion, is the calibration of the relative alignments between the sensor optical heads. The performance of the sensor is related to its estimation of such alignments. HYDRA design is first reminded in this paper along with simplification it can bring at system level (AOCS). Then self-calibration of optical heads alignment is highlighted through descriptions and simulation results, thus demonstrating the performances of a key part of HYDRA multiple-head concept.

  14. [The family. The poorest households with female heads].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta Diaz, F

    1992-01-01

    Data from the household questionnaire of the 1987 Mexican Fertility and Health Survey were the basis for an analysis of the characteristics of households headed by women. 14.1% of households were headed by women in 1987, of which 14% were in rural and 86% in urban areas. 41.9% of the households headed by women contained only a woman and her children. Child care responsibilities are the main determinant of discrimination in the labor market for these women and oblige them to accept jobs that are not adequately paid. The social disadvantage of households headed by women is also related to their age and marital and educational status. Among male and female household heads respectively, 16.3% and 36.5% were over age 60, 16.4% and 27.5% were illiterate, and 92.7% and 8.4% were married or in union. 15.5% of the female heads were single, 24.7% were divorced or separated, and 51.4% were widows. Among employed female household heads, 49.2% were salaried, 36.5% were self-employed, and 10.1% were domestic workers. 63.8% of female and 46.3% of male household heads earned one minimum salary or less per month. The average size of households headed by women was 3.9 members, compared to 5.4 for households headed by men.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  17. JINR rapid communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The present collection of rapid communications from JINR, Dubna, contains six separate reports on Monte Carlo simulation of silicon detectors for the ALICE experiment at LHC, a study of single tagged multihadronic γγ* events at an average Q 2 of 90 GeV 2 , epithermal neutron activation analysis of moss, lichen and pine needles in atmospheric deposition monitoring, the theory of neutrino oscillation, coupled quadrupole and monopole vibrations of large amplitude and test of the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule using parametrization of the measured lepton-proton asymmetry. 21 figs., 18 tabs

  18. Head trauma in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ji-Yao

    2013-11-01

    The Chinese Head Trauma Data Bank (CHTDB) has been established, which includes 7,145 hospitalised cases with acute head trauma patients in 47 hospitals. We explored factors that might affect the outcome of acute traumatic brain injury. There was no statistical difference in the mortality rate between male (7.5%) and female (7.2%) patients (P>0.05). The mortality rate in children (65 years) was 7.3%, 7.2% and 9.0%, respectively (P>0.05). The mortality rate of patients with mild (2.7%), moderate (5.0%) and severe (21.8%) head trauma was significantly different (P40 mm Hg was 6.3%, 21.4% and 93.1%, respectively (Phead trauma data bank in China, has one of the largest numbers of cases of any head trauma data bank in the world. Our major findings on mortality may be helpful to neurosurgeons for predicting the outcome of acute head trauma patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pigeons (C. livia Follow Their Head during Turning Flight: Head Stabilization Underlies the Visual Control of Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo G. Ros

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Similar flight control principles operate across insect and vertebrate fliers. These principles indicate that robust solutions have evolved to meet complex behavioral challenges. Following from studies of visual and cervical feedback control of flight in insects, we investigate the role of head stabilization in providing feedback cues for controlling turning flight in pigeons. Based on previous observations that the eyes of pigeons remain at relatively fixed orientations within the head during flight, we test potential sensory control inputs derived from head and body movements during 90° aerial turns. We observe that periods of angular head stabilization alternate with rapid head repositioning movements (head saccades, and confirm that control of head motion is decoupled from aerodynamic and inertial forces acting on the bird's continuously rotating body during turning flapping flight. Visual cues inferred from head saccades correlate with changes in flight trajectory; whereas the magnitude of neck bending predicts angular changes in body position. The control of head motion to stabilize a pigeon's gaze may therefore facilitate extraction of important motion cues, in addition to offering mechanisms for controlling body and wing movements. Strong similarities between the sensory flight control of birds and insects may also inspire novel designs of robust controllers for human-engineered autonomous aerial vehicles.

  20. A Prospective, Randomized, Single-Blinded, Head-to-Head Long-Term Outcome Study, Comparing Intrathecal (IT) Boluses With Continuous Infusion Trialing Techniques Prior to Implantation of Drug Delivery Systems (DDS) for the Treatment of Severe Intractable Chronic Nonmalignant Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Maged; Doleys, Daniel M; Saleh, Islam A; Medvedovsky, Andrew; Verdolin, Michael H; Hamza, Monalyce

    2015-10-01

    The study aims to compare intrathecal (IT) boluses to continuous infusion trialing techniques prior to implantation of drug delivery systems (DDS) for the treatment of severe intractable chronic nonmalignant pain. This is a prospective, randomized, head-to-head long-term outcome study. Forty patients with comparable patient demographics were randomly assigned to two cohorts. Cohort A trialed with intermittent boluses; Cohort B trialed with continuous infusion. One patient failed trial in each group. Nineteen patients were implanted in each group. Follow-up was for 36 months with intervals at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36 months. The Brief Pain Inventory was used was used for assessment. We used the Brief Pain Inventory to measure pain (worst and average), physical function (walking, normal work, and general activity), behavioral function (mood, sleep, and relations with others), IT dose, and oral opioid use. We observed statistically significant reduction in pain and improvement of function in both cohorts following DDS implantation throughout the observation period. The IT dose remained virtually unchanged throughout as well, with overall limited dose escalation. Oral opioid use was significantly reduced. There was no statistically significant difference in prediction of trial success or long-term outcomes between the two cohorts. Low-dose IT opioids via DDS can provide significant and long-lasting reduction in pain, and improvement in function (physical and behavioral) for patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. The two trialing techniques tested, intermittent boluses, and continuous infusion delivered intrathecally showed no clinical significance difference in terms of predicting trial success or long-term outcomes. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  1. Is wartime mobilisation a suitable policy model for rapid national climate mitigation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delina, Laurence L.; Diesendorf, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Climate science suggests that, to have a high probability of limiting global warming to an average temperature increase of 2 °C, global greenhouse gas emissions must peak by 2020 and be reduced to close to zero by 2040. However, the current trend is heading towards at least 4 °C by 2100 and little effective action is being taken. This paper commences the process of developing contingency plans for a scenario in which a sudden major global climate impact galvanises governments to implement emergency climate mitigation targets and programs. Climate activists assert that rapid mitigation is feasible, invoking the scale and scope of wartime mobilisation strategies. This paper draws upon historical accounts of social, technological and economic restructurings in several countries during World War 2 in order to investigate potential applications of wartime experience to radical, rigorous and rapid climate mitigation strategies. We focus on the energy sector, the biggest single contributor to global climate change, in developed and rapidly developing countries. We find that, while wartime experience suggests some potential strategies for rapid climate mitigation in the areas of finance and labour, it also has severe limitations, resulting from its lack of democratic processes. - Highlights: • The paper explores the strengths and weaknesses of using wartime experience as a model for rapid climate mitigation. • Wartime experience suggests some potential strategies for rapid climate mitigation in the areas of finance and labour. • Wartime experience also has severe limitations, resulting from its lack of democratic processes

  2. Head first Ajax

    CERN Document Server

    Riordan, Rebecca M

    2008-01-01

    Ajax is no longer an experimental approach to website development, but the key to building browser-based applications that form the cornerstone of Web 2.0. Head First Ajax gives you an up-to-date perspective that lets you see exactly what you can do -- and has been done -- with Ajax. With it, you get a highly practical, in-depth, and mature view of what is now a mature development approach. Using the unique and highly effective visual format that has turned Head First titles into runaway bestsellers, this book offers a big picture overview to introduce Ajax, and then explores the use of ind

  3. Head First Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Wouldn't it be great if there were a statistics book that made histograms, probability distributions, and chi square analysis more enjoyable than going to the dentist? Head First Statistics brings this typically dry subject to life, teaching you everything you want and need to know about statistics through engaging, interactive, and thought-provoking material, full of puzzles, stories, quizzes, visual aids, and real-world examples. Whether you're a student, a professional, or just curious about statistical analysis, Head First's brain-friendly formula helps you get a firm grasp of statistics

  4. Effects of rolling on characteristics of single-phase water flow in narrow rectangular ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Dianchuan; Yan Changqi; Sun Licheng; Xu Chao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mass flow rate and friction pressure drop with different pressure head are compared. ► The effect of pressure head on flow fluctuation is considered theoretically. ► Time-mean and real-time friction pressure drop in different rolling motion are studied. ► Rolling motion influences the fluctuation of friction pressure drop in two aspects. ► New correlation for frictional coefficient in rolling motion is achieved. - Abstract: Experimental and theoretical studies of rolling effects on characteristics of single-phase water flow in narrow rectangular ducts are performed under ambient temperature and pressure. Two types of pressure head are supplied by elevate water tank and pump respectively. The results show that the frictional pressure drop under rolling condition fluctuates periodically, with its amplitude decaying as mean Reynolds number increase and the rolling amplitude decrease, while the amplitude is nearly invariable with rolling period. Rolling motion influences the fluctuation amplitude of frictional pressure drop in two aspects, on the one hand, rolling reduced periodical pulsing flow leads to the fluctuation of the frictional pressure drop, on the other hand, additional force acting on fluid near the wall due to the rolling motion makes local frictional resistance oscillate periodically. The mass flow rate oscillates periodically in rolling motion with the pressure head supplied by water tank, while its fluctuation is so weak that could be neglected for the case of the pressure head supplied by pump. An empirical correlation for the frictional coefficient under rolling condition is achieved, and the experimental data is well correlated. A mathematical model is also developed to study the effect of pressure head on mass flow rate fluctuation in rolling motion. The fluctuation amplitude of the mass flow rate decreases rapidly with a higher pressure head. Comparing with the vertical condition, rolling motion nearly has no effects on

  5. Influence of the Gilbert damping constant on the flux rise time of write head fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl, Othmar; Schrefl, Thomas; Suess, Dieter; Schabes, Manfred E.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic recording at fast data rates requires write heads with rapid rise times of the magnetic flux during the write process. We present three-dimensional (3D) micromagnetic finite element calculations of an entire ring head including 3D coil geometry during the writing of magnetic bits in granular media. The simulations demonstrate how input current profiles translate into magnetization processes in the head and which in turn generate the write head field. The flux rise time significantly depends on the Gilbert damping constant of the head material. Low damping causes incoherent magnetization processes, leading to long rise times and low head fields. High damping leads to coherent reversal of the magnetization in the head. As a consequence, the gap region can be quickly saturated which causes high head fields with short rise times

  6. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawabe, James K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ...

  8. Silva as the Head

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2015-01-01

    The head of the performance design programme is substituted by a sister's academy delegate. this performance situation formed part of a week of semesterstart where the students and professors visited Sister's Academy, Malmø. I participated in the Sister's Academy as visiting researcher and here...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your face, sinuses, and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can ...

  10. Overview of Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... falls, motor vehicle crashes, assaults, and mishaps during sports and recreational activities. People with minor head injuries may have a headache ... feel part of the body Inability to recognize people or the ... vision, or blind spots) Drainage of clear fluid (cerebrospinal fluid) from ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page ... to obtain a tissue sample ( biopsy ) from the brain. assess aneurysms or ... or any disorder of the heart, kidneys or thyroid gland , or ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Blood Clots CT Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography ( ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page ...

  14. Rapid thermal processing of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Borisenko, Victor E

    1997-01-01

    Rapid thermal processing has contributed to the development of single wafer cluster processing tools and other innovations in integrated circuit manufacturing environments Borisenko and Hesketh review theoretical and experimental progress in the field, discussing a wide range of materials, processes, and conditions They thoroughly cover the work of international investigators in the field

  15. Head Lice: Information for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Head Lice Information for Parents Language: English Español (Spanish) ... Tweet Share Compartir You should examine your child's head, especially behind the ears and at the nape ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  17. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or ... Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or ...

  18. Childhood Head and Neck Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid Association ® www.thyroid.org Childhood Head & Neck Irradiation What is the thyroid gland? The thyroid gland ... Thyroid Association ® www.thyroid.org Childhood Head & Neck Irradiation Thyroid nodules (see Thyroid Nodule brochure) • Thyroid nodules ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  1. Cardiac autonomic characteristics in infants sleeping with their head covered by bedclothes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Patricia; Lipshut, Willy; Valente, Filomena; Adams, Stephan; Groswasser, José; Kahn, André

    2003-06-01

    The risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome is increased in infants sleeping with their head covered by bedding items. This study was designed to evaluate cardiac autonomic nervous controls in infants sleeping with the head covered by bedclothes. Sixteen healthy infants with a median age of 12 weeks (range 9-13 weeks) were recorded polygraphically for one night. While they slept in their usual supine position, a bedsheet was placed over their head for about 45 min. All infants were challenged with the head covered and with the head free during both rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Sleep, breathing and heart rate (HR) characteristics were recorded simultaneously, together with rectal and pericephalic temperatures. In both head-free and head-covered conditions, autoregressive spectral analysis of HR was evaluated as a function of sleep stages. During the head-covered periods, parasympathetic tonus decreased and sympathetic activity increased in both REM and NREM sleep. Compared with the head-free periods, the head-covered sleep periods were characterized by greater rectal (P = 0.012) and pericephalic temperatures (P = 0.002). Covering the infant's head with a bedsheet was associated with significant changes in autonomic balance. The finding could be related to an elevation in temperatures within the infant's microenvironment.

  2. The Spectrum of Computed Tomographic Findings in Head Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Lee, K. S.; Kim, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    CT has become the single sufficient and necessary radiographic test in the evaluation of patient with cranial trauma. Recognition of the classic patterns and variations of traumatic CT abnormalities is challenging and rewarding aspects in head trauma. In retrospective analysis of CT findings of 532 patients with head trauma, a wide spectrum of traumatic abnormalities were demonstrated: skull fracture, subgaleal hematoma, pneumocephalus, cerebral edema, cerebral contusion, epidural hematoma, subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hematoma, intraventricular hematoma, brain infarction, hydrocephalus and porencephaly.

  3. Where are we heading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noto, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper deals with different aspects connected to the global petroleum industry by discussing the way of heading. The aspects cover themes like new frontiers, new relationships, sanctions, global climate change, new alliances and new technology. New frontiers and relationships concern domestic policy affecting the industry, and sanctions are discussed in connection with trade. The author discusses the industry's participation in the global environmental policy and new alliances to provide greater opportunity for developing new technology

  4. Where are we heading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noto, L.A. [Mobil Corporation, (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The present paper deals with different aspects connected to the global petroleum industry by discussing the way of heading. The aspects cover themes like new frontiers, new relationships, sanctions, global climate change, new alliances and new technology. New frontiers and relationships concern domestic policy affecting the industry, and sanctions are discussed in connection with trade. The author discusses the industry`s participation in the global environmental policy and new alliances to provide greater opportunity for developing new technology

  5. Head segmentation in vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Schilling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Classic theories of vertebrate head segmentation clearly exemplify the idealistic nature of comparative embryology prior to the 20th century. Comparative embryology aimed at recognizing the basic, primary structure that is shared by all vertebrates, either as an archetype or an ancestral developmental pattern. Modern evolutionary developmental (Evo-Devo) studies are also based on comparison, and therefore have a tendency to reduce complex embryonic anatomy into overly simplified patterns. Her...

  6. JINR rapid communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The present collection of rapid communications from JINR, Dubna, contains seven separate reports on investigation of the tensor analyzing power A yy in the reaction A(d polarized, p)X at large transverse momenta of proton, double-differential ionization cross section calculations for fast collisions of ions and atoms, a study of the two-photon interactions tagged at an average 2 > of 90 GeV 2 , cluster and single-particle distributions in nucleus-nucleus interactions, the Coulomb interaction of charged pions in CC-and CTa-collisions at 4.2 A GeV/c, influence of nitrogen and oxygen gas admixtures on the response of the DELPHI HCAL and MUS detectors and an automation of physics research on base of open standards

  7. Head injuries in snowboarders compared with head injuries in skiers. A prospective analysis of 1076 patients from 1994 to 1999 in Niigata, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, O; Takaba, M; Saito, T; Endo, S

    2001-01-01

    We investigated snowboarding-related head injury cases and skiing-related head injury cases during five ski seasons at one resort area. There were 634 snowboarding-related head injuries and 442 skiing-related head injuries. The number of snowboarding head injuries increased rapidly over the study period. More male snowboarders than female snowboarders suffered head injuries. For both snowboarders and skiers, head injuries frequently occurred on the easy and middle slopes. Falls were the most frequent causes of injury in both groups. Jumping was a more frequent cause of injury in the snowboarders (30%) than in the skiers (2.5%). Injury to the occipital region predominated in the snowboarders as compared with the skiers. There were 49 organic lesions in 37 snowboarders and 46 organic lesions in 33 skiers. Subdural hematoma was frequent in the snowboarding head injury group, and fracture was frequent in the skiing head injury group compared with the snowboarding group (not significant). Subdural hematoma was likely to be caused by a fall rather than by a collision, and bone fracture was likely to be caused by a collision rather than by a fall. Four snowboarders and one skier died as a result of their head injuries. Our data suggest that snowboarding head injuries may be prevented by protection of the occipital region and refraining from jumping by beginners.

  8. Cranial nerve injury after minor head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Alejandro Fernández; Canals, Andreu Gabarrós; Gonzalez, Juan Martino; Martín, Juan José Acebes

    2010-09-01

    There are no specific studies about cranial nerve (CN) injury following mild head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) in the literature. The aim of this analysis was to document the incidence of CN injury after mild head trauma and to correlate the initial CT findings with the final outcome 1 year after injury. The authors studied 49 consecutive patients affected by minor head trauma and CN lesions between January 2000 and January 2006. Detailed clinical and neurological examinations as well as CT studies using brain and bone windows were performed in all patients. Based on the CT findings the authors distinguished 3 types of traumatic injury: no lesion, skull base fracture, and other CT abnormalities. Patients were followed up for 1 year after head injury. The authors distinguished 3 grades of clinical recovery from CN palsy: no recovery, partial recovery, and complete recovery. Posttraumatic single nerve palsy was observed in 38 patients (77.6%), and multiple nerve injuries were observed in 11 (22.4%). Cranial nerves were affected in 62 cases. The most affected CN was the olfactory nerve (CN I), followed by the facial nerve (CN VII) and the oculomotor nerves (CNs III, IV, and VI). When more than 1 CN was involved, the most frequent association was between CNs VII and VIII. One year after head trauma, a CN deficit was present in 26 (81.2%) of the 32 cases with a skull base fracture, 12 (60%) of 20 cases with other CT abnormalities, and 3 (30%) of 10 cases without CT abnormalities. Trivial head trauma that causes a minor head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) can result in CN palsies with a similar distribution to moderate or severe head injuries. The CNs associated with the highest incidence of palsy in this study were the olfactory, facial, and oculomotor nerves. The trigeminal and lower CNs were rarely damaged. Oculomotor nerve injury can have a good prognosis, with a greater chance of recovery if no lesion is demonstrated on the initial CT scan.

  9. Head circumference in Iranian infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Esmaeili

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Head circumference (HC measurement is one of the important parameter for diagnosis of neurological, developmental disorders and dysmorphic syndromes. Recognition of different disorders requires an understanding of normal variation for HC size, in particular, in infancy period with most rapid growth of the brain. Because of international and interracial standard chart differences about anthropometric indices, some differences from local to local, generation to generation and changes in ethnic mix of population and socioeconomic factors, periodic revolution of HC size is suggested. The aims of our study were presenting local HC standard for an Iranian infant population and comparison with the American national center of health statistics (NCHS charts accepted by WHO. Methods: 1003 subjects aged from birth to 24 months apparently healthy normal children enrolled randomly in this cross sectional study. HC size were measured and recorded. Tables and graphs were depicted by Excel Microsoft Office 2007. We use two tailed t-student test for statistical analysis. Results: The mean of HC size in boys was larger than girls. The curves were followed a similar pattern to NCHS based on a visual comparison. Overall our subjects in both sexes at birth time had smaller HC size than NCHS. In other ages our children had larger HC size than those of NCHS. Conclusion: Because of international and interracial difference of HC size. We recommend in each area of the world, local anthropometric indices are constructed and used clinically. In addition more extensive and longitudinally design comprehensive studies is suggested.

  10. Head Lice: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spread lice? Can swimming spread lice? What are head lice? The head louse, or Pediculus humanus capitis , ... spread disease. Who is at risk for getting head lice? Head lice are found worldwide. In the ...

  11. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...

  12. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.

    1995-06-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). (orig.)

  13. Head First Web Design

    CERN Document Server

    Watrall, Ethan

    2008-01-01

    Want to know how to make your pages look beautiful, communicate your message effectively, guide visitors through your website with ease, and get everything approved by the accessibility and usability police at the same time? Head First Web Design is your ticket to mastering all of these complex topics, and understanding what's really going on in the world of web design. Whether you're building a personal blog or a corporate website, there's a lot more to web design than div's and CSS selectors, but what do you really need to know? With this book, you'll learn the secrets of designing effecti

  14. Head First Python

    CERN Document Server

    Barry, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Ever wished you could learn Python from a book? Head First Python is a complete learning experience for Python that helps you learn the language through a unique method that goes beyond syntax and how-to manuals, helping you understand how to be a great Python programmer. You'll quickly learn the language's fundamentals, then move onto persistence, exception handling, web development, SQLite, data wrangling, and Google App Engine. You'll also learn how to write mobile apps for Android, all thanks to the power that Python gives you. We think your time is too valuable to waste struggling with

  15. Head First Mobile Web

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, Lyza; Grigsby, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Despite the huge number of mobile devices and apps in use today, your business still needs a website. You just need it to be mobile. Head First Mobile Web walks you through the process of making a conventional website work on a variety smartphones and tablets. Put your JavaScript, CSS media query, and HTML5 skills to work-then optimize your site to perform its best in the demanding mobile market. Along the way, you'll discover how to adapt your business strategy to target specific devices. Navigate the increasingly complex mobile landscapeTake both technical and strategic approaches to mobile

  16. Head first C#

    CERN Document Server

    Stellman, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Head First C# is a complete learning experience for object-oriented programming, C#, and the Visual Studio IDE. Built for your brain, this book covers C# 3.0 and Visual Studio 2008, and teaches everything from language fundamentals to advanced topics including garbage collection, extension methods, and double-buffered animation. You'll also master C#'s hottest and newest syntax, LINQ, for querying SQL databases, .NET collections, and XML documents. By the time you're through, you'll be a proficient C# programmer, designing and coding large-scale applications. Every few chapters you will come

  17. Head first C#

    CERN Document Server

    Stellman, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    You want to learn C# programming, but you're not sure you want to suffer through another tedious technical book. You're in luck: Head First C# introduces this language in a fun, visual way. You'll quickly learn everything from creating your first program to learning sophisticated coding skills with C# 4.0, Visual Studio 2010 and .NET 4, while avoiding common errors that frustrate many students. The second edition offers several hands-on labs along the way to help you build and test programs using skills you've learned up to that point. In the final lab, you'll put everything together. From o

  18. "Stuttering" after minor head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasberg, Stephen; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Parry, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as impairment in brain function as a result of mechanical force. It is classified based on clinical findings using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Mild TBI is defined as GCS 14-15; moderate, 9-13; and severe, 3-8. Patients with the same TBI classification may have very different underlying pathology. In moderate to severe TBI, the primary pathology may include contusions, hemorrhage, diffuse axonal injury, direct cellular damage, "tearing and shearing of the tissues, loss of the blood-brain barrier, disruption of the neurochemical homeostasis and loss of the electrochemical function". Although the primary pathology associated with mild TBI may be milder versions of the same pathology associated with moderate and severe TBI, it is generally a metabolic injury. However, it is reported that 15% of patients with mild TBI and a GCS score of 14 or 15 will have an intracranial lesion; less than 1% of these require neurosurgical intervention. Although patients with mild TBI may have intracranial lesions, it is rare that the presenting and only physical examination finding is an isolated neurologic finding. Here we present a case of isolated head trauma with a single physical examination finding--expressive aphasia.

  19. Eye-based head gestures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardanbegi, Diako; Witzner Hansen, Dan; Pederson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for video-based head gesture recognition using eye information by an eye tracker has been proposed. The method uses a combination of gaze and eye movement to infer head gestures. Compared to other gesture-based methods a major advantage of the method is that the user keeps the gaze...... on the interaction object while interacting. This method has been implemented on a head-mounted eye tracker for detecting a set of predefined head gestures. The accuracy of the gesture classifier is evaluated and verified for gaze-based interaction in applications intended for both large public displays and small...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  2. Actors with Multi-Headed Message Receive Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulzmann, Martin; Lam, Edmund Soon Lee; Van Weert, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The actor model provides high-level concurrency abstractions to coordinate simultaneous computations by message passing. Languages implementing the actor model such as Erlang commonly only support single-headed pattern matching over received messages. We propose and design an extension of Erlang...... style actors with receive clauses containing multi-headed message patterns. Patterns may be non-linear and constrained by guards. We provide a number of examples to show the usefulness of the extension. We also explore the design space for multi-headed message matching semantics, for example first......-match and rule priority-match semantics. The various semantics are inspired by the multi-set constraint matching semantics found in Constraint Handling Rules. This provides us with a formal model to study actors with multi-headed message receive patterns. The system can be implemented efficiently and we have...

  3. Chryse 'Alien Head'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    26 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an impact crater in Chryse Planitia, not too far from the Viking 1 lander site, that to seems to resemble a bug-eyed head. The two odd depressions at the north end of the crater (the 'eyes') may have formed by wind or water erosion. This region has been modified by both processes, with water action occurring in the distant past via floods that poured across western Chryse Planitia from Maja Valles, and wind action common occurrence in more recent history. This crater is located near 22.5oN, 47.9oW. The 150 meter scale bar is about 164 yards long. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/lower left.

  4. Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-03-01

    Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

  5. Repeat Rapid Response Events in Children: Characteristics and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulmester, Kristen M; Jaimon, Nancy; Bavare, Aarti C

    2018-04-01

    We describe the characteristics and outcomes of pediatric repeat rapid response events within a single hospitalization. We hypothesized that triggers for repeat rapid response and initial rapid response events are similar, and repeat rapid response events are associated with high prevalence of medical complexity and worse outcomes. A 3-year retrospective study. High-volume tertiary academic pediatric hospital. All rapid response events were reviewed to identify repeat rapid response events. None. Patient demographics, rapid response triggers, primary clinical diagnoses, illness acuity scores, medical interventions, transfers to ICU, occurrence of critical deterioration, and mortality were reviewed. We reviewed 146 patients with 309 rapid response events (146 initial rapid response and 163 repeat rapid response: 36% 7 d after initial rapid response). Median age was 3 years, and 60% were males. Eighty-five percentage of repeat rapid response occurred in medical complexity patients. The triggers for 71% of all repeat rapid response matched with those of initial rapid response. Transfer to ICU occurred in 69 (47%) of initial rapid response and 124 (76%) of repeat rapid response (p events correlated. Transfer to ICU was more likely after repeat rapid response and among repeat rapid response, events with ICU readmissions had a longer length of ICU and hospital stay. Mortality for the repeat rapid response cohort was higher than that for overall rapid responses in our center and per published reports from other centers.

  6. Rapid fibrosis and significant histologic recurrence of hepatitis C after liver transplant is associated with higher tumor recurrence rates in hepatocellular carcinomas associated with hepatitis C virus-related liver disease: a single center retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasavada, Bhavin B; Chan, Chao Long

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus recurrence after transplant is universal. Histologic recurrence is observed in > 50% hepatitis C virus-infected grafts within the first year. The primary aim of our study was to evaluate factors responsible for hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence and mortality including histologic markers. All patients who had undergone transplant for hepatocellular carcinoma associated with hepatitis C virus from 2002 to 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. There were 109 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma associated with hepatitis C virus that underwent living-donor liver transplant from July 2002 to June 2012. On univariate analysis, preoperative Model for End-Stage Liver Disease Score (P = .026), α-fetoprotein level (P = .020), rapid fibrosis (P = .008), and Hepatitis Activity Index ≥ 6 (P = .008) were associated with recurrence. On multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score (P Hepatitis C virus recurrence on biopsy is a poor prognostic indicator and is associated with a higher risk of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after liver transplant. Rapid fibrosis after liver transplant independently predicts hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence.

  7. Determination of kidney function with 99mTc-DTPA renography using a dual-head camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus J; Møller, Michael L; Zerahn, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Single-head gamma camera renography has been used for decades to estimate kidney function. An estimate of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) can be obtained using Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Tc-DTPA). However, because of differing attenuation, an error is introduced when the kidney...... depth or kidney size is unequal. This error can be reduced using geometric mean data obtained from dual-head renography. The aim of this study was to compare single-head versus dual-head assessment of single kidney function....

  8. Rapid MR assessment of left ventricular systolic function after acute myocardial infarction using single breath-hold cine imaging with the temporal parallel acquisition technique (TPAT) and 4D guide-point modelling analysis of left ventricular function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, Holger C.; Jensen, Christoph J.; Sabin, Georg V.; Naber, Christoph K.; Bruder, Oliver; Nassenstein, Kai; Schlosser, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We compared four-dimensional guide-point modelling left ventricular function analysis (4DVF) results of cine images in four short-axis and two long-axis slices acquired in a single breath-hold, obtained with the temporal parallel acquisition technique (TPAT), with standard left ventricular function (LVF) analysis results determined by the summation of discs method, in patients who had recently suffered myocardial infarction. Despite wall motion abnormalities, 4DVF yields results for left ventricular ejection fractions and end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes that are in excellent agreement with standard LVF analysis results in these patients. A shortened cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) protocol using single breath-hold cine image acquisition could facilitate the assessment of left ventricular function soon after myocardial infarction in critically ill patients who are unable to comply with the multiple breath-holds required for standard LVF analysis. (orig.)

  9. PRECISE HEAD TRACKING IN HEARING APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Helle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview about two research projects, both dealing with optical head tracking in hearing applications. As part of the project “Development of a real-time low-cost tracking system for medical and audiological problems (ELCoT” a cost-effective single camera 3D tracking system has been developed which enables the detection of arm and head movements of human patients. Amongst others, the measuring system is designed for a new hearing test (based on the “Mainzer Kindertisch”, which analyzes the directional hearing capabilities of children in cooperation with the research project ERKI (Evaluation of acoustic sound source localization for children. As part of the research project framework “Hearing in everyday life (HALLO” a stereo tracking system is being used for analyzing the head movement of human patients during complex acoustic events. Together with the consideration of biosignals like skin conductance the speech comprehension and listening effort of persons with reduced hearing ability, especially in situations with background noise, is evaluated. For both projects the system design, accuracy aspects and results of practical tests are discussed.

  10. Precise Head Tracking in Hearing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, A. M.; Pilinski, J.; Luhmann, T.

    2015-05-01

    The paper gives an overview about two research projects, both dealing with optical head tracking in hearing applications. As part of the project "Development of a real-time low-cost tracking system for medical and audiological problems (ELCoT)" a cost-effective single camera 3D tracking system has been developed which enables the detection of arm and head movements of human patients. Amongst others, the measuring system is designed for a new hearing test (based on the "Mainzer Kindertisch"), which analyzes the directional hearing capabilities of children in cooperation with the research project ERKI (Evaluation of acoustic sound source localization for children). As part of the research project framework "Hearing in everyday life (HALLO)" a stereo tracking system is being used for analyzing the head movement of human patients during complex acoustic events. Together with the consideration of biosignals like skin conductance the speech comprehension and listening effort of persons with reduced hearing ability, especially in situations with background noise, is evaluated. For both projects the system design, accuracy aspects and results of practical tests are discussed.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  12. Flat Head Syndrome (Positional Plagiocephaly)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... itself out. Although they're very simple, the exercises must be done correctly. For kids with severe flat head syndrome in which repositioning for 2-3 months doesn't help, doctors may prescribe a custom-molded helmet or head band. While helmets might ...

  13. Analytical modelling of soccer heading

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 11 April 2014; revised 22 September 2014; accepted 14 February 2015. Abstract. Heading occur frequently in soccer games and studies have shown that repetitive heading of the soccer ball could result in degeneration of brain cells and lead to mild traumatic brain injury. This study proposes a two ...

  14. Womanhood in Bessie Head's fiction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rain Cloud~· Gather ( 1969), Maru ( 1972) and A Question of Power ( 1974 ),. Head addresses and deals with ... In A Question of Power, Head deals with these groups through. Kenosi and Elizabeth respectively. ... environment, Mma Millipede soon establishes herself through her hard work and unique individuality which ...

  15. Analytical modelling of soccer heading

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heading occur frequently in soccer games and studies have shown that repetitive heading of the soccer ball could result in degeneration of brain cells and lead to mild traumatic brain injury. This study proposes a two degree-of-freedom linear mathematical model to study the impact of the soccer ball on the brain. The model ...

  16. The head-mounted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Return of the talking heads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinecke Hansen, Kenneth; Bro, Peter; Andersson, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The present article suggests that the brief history of Western television news dramaturgy can be expounded as three major waves: from the early days of the talking heads in the studio, over the narrativization of the field report to a (re-)current studio- and field-based talking heads format...

  18. Evaluation of a laboratory model of human head impact biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Fidel; Shull, Peter B; Camarillo, David B

    2015-09-18

    This work describes methodology for evaluating laboratory models of head impact biomechanics. Using this methodology, we investigated: how closely does twin-wire drop testing model head rotation in American football impacts? Head rotation is believed to cause mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) but helmet safety standards only model head translations believed to cause severe TBI. It is unknown whether laboratory head impact models in safety standards, like twin-wire drop testing, reproduce six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) head impact biomechanics that may cause mTBI. We compared 6DOF measurements of 421 American football head impacts to twin-wire drop tests at impact sites and velocities weighted to represent typical field exposure. The highest rotational velocities produced by drop testing were the 74th percentile of non-injury field impacts. For a given translational acceleration level, drop testing underestimated field rotational acceleration by 46% and rotational velocity by 72%. Primary rotational acceleration frequencies were much larger in drop tests (~100 Hz) than field impacts (~10 Hz). Drop testing was physically unable to produce acceleration directions common in field impacts. Initial conditions of a single field impact were highly resolved in stereo high-speed video and reconstructed in a drop test. Reconstruction results reflected aggregate trends of lower amplitude rotational velocity and higher frequency rotational acceleration in drop testing, apparently due to twin-wire constraints and the absence of a neck. These results suggest twin-wire drop testing is limited in modeling head rotation during impact, and motivate continued evaluation of head impact models to ensure helmets are tested under conditions that may cause mTBI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mapping of QTLs for frost tolerance and heading time using SSR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The progeny of individual F2 plants were used as F2:3 families for the assessment of LT50 and heading time. Single marker analysis revealed that seven markers with total of 27% of phenotypic variance determination linked to LT50 and five markers linked to the heading time. Two markers that were located on 2B and 5A ...

  20. Conformal Light Augmented Single Substrate Head-Mounted Display Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) need for space suit displays and processing cores, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to...

  1. Snowboard head injury: prospective study in Chino, Nagano, for two seasons from 1995 to 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaguchi, H; Fujimaki, T; Ueki, K; Takahashi, M; Yoshida, H; Kirino, T

    1999-06-01

    The popularity of snowboarding has been growing rapidly throughout the world. To date, however, the risk of head injury associated with this relatively new winter sport, especially in comparison with alpine skiing, has not been well analyzed. This study was conducted to assess the risk of head injury in snowboarding and to elucidate its features in comparison with skiing head injury. We prospectively analyzed 301 cases of head injuries related to snowboarding or skiing experienced from December of 1995 to May of 1997 at our institution, which is located close to the most popular skiing areas in Japan. Of those injuries, 143 cases were snowboard related and 158 cases were ski related. In addition to appropriate medical evaluation and medical care, detailed examination was performed on every patient to determine various factors, including sex, age, skill level, cause and mechanism of the accident, and the side of impact to the head. The data are statistically analyzed to elucidate unique features of snowboard head injury. During the study period, 2.2 million snowboarders and 4.2 million skiers visited the five skiing facilities that are covered by our hospital. Thus, the incidence of head injury was 6.5 per 100,000 visits for snowboarders and 3.8 per 100,000 visits for skiers. Beginning snowboarders more frequently sustained head injuries compared with beginning skiers (60 of 142 vs. 48 of 154, p = 0.022). Likewise, frequent causes of snowboarding head injuries were fall during jumping (43 of 139 vs. 2 of 147, pskiing head injuries (1.3%). Of 11 major head injury cases, 10 were caused by occipital impact. These results indicate that snowboarders, particularly beginners, are at higher risk for head injury, frequently involving occipital impact, and could lead to more major head injuries. We propose that measures should be taken to protect the head, especially the occiput, in snowboarding.

  2. Femoral head necrosis; Hueftkopfnekrose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, J.; Scheurecker, G.; Scheurecker, A.; Stoeger, A.; Huber, A. [Roentgeninstitut am Schillerpark, Linz (Austria); Hofmann, S. [Orthopaedisches Landeskrankenhaus Stolzalpe (Austria)

    2009-05-15

    The epidemiology and pathohistogenesis of avascular femoral head necrosis has still not been clarified in detail. Because the course of the disease runs in stages and over a long time period nearly always culminates in the necessity for a total hip prosthesis, an exact radiological evaluation is of paramount importance for the treatment. There is a need for a common staging system to enable comparison of different therapy concepts and especially their long-term results. In this article the ARCO staging system is described in full detail, which includes all radiological modalities as well as histopathological alterations. (orig.) [German] Bei der avaskulaeren Femurkopfnekrose handelt es sich um ein Krankheitsbild, dessen Ursachen noch immer nicht vollstaendig geklaert sind. Da die Erkrankung stadienhaft verlaeuft und ueber einen laengeren Zeitraum betrachtet nahezu immer in einem prothetischen Hueftersatz muendet, ist eine genaue radiologische Abklaerung fuer die Behandlung von enormer Bedeutung. Um Langzeiterfolge verschiedener Therapiekonzepte vergleichen zu koennen, sind eine exakte Beschreibung und darauf basierend die Verwendung einer einheitlichen Stadieneinteilung wuenschenswert. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird die ARCO-Stadieneinteilung im Detail beschrieben, die alle bildgebenden Methoden beruecksichtigt und histopathologische Veraenderungen mit einbezieht. (orig.)

  3. Head trauma and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitoshi

    1979-01-01

    It has been said that chronic subdural hematoma cannot be diagnosed by CT. In our cases, CT was used, and the results were described. According to the density of the picture, CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma could be classified into 3 types, those of higher density than that of the cerebral paranchyma, those of isodensity, and those of lower density than that of the cerebral parenchyma. The difference among them appeared to be due to variation in the fluid in hematoma, especially that in hemoglobin concentration. Chronic subdural hematoma was found in 27 of 388 cases of head trauma in which CT was undertaken in our department of surgery for last 2 years. It is difficult to differenciate this disease from subdural edema or subarachnoideal retention of the cerebrospinal fluid. In many cases, use of contrast medium added no change to the CT picture. Cerebral angiography is necessary for definite diagnosis of the disease. Chronic subdural hematoma gives more varieties of findings than other intracranial hematomas. However, if the film is very carefully read, CT is still useful for diagnosing this disease in spite of initially remarked difficulties. (Ueda, J.)

  4. Ultra-low-head hydroelectric technology: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Daqing; Deng, Zhiqun (Daniel)

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, distributed renewable energy-generation technologies, such as wind and solar, have developed rapidly. Nevertheless, the utilization of ultra-low-head (ULH) water energy (i.e., situations where the hydraulic head is less than 3 m or the water flow is more than 0.5 m/s with zero head) has received little attention. We believe that, through technological innovations and cost reductions, ULH hydropower has the potential to become an attractive, renewable, and sustainable resource. This paper investigates potential sites for ULH energy resources, the selection of relevant turbines and generators, simplification of civil works, and project costs. This review introduces the current achievements on ULH hydroelectric technology to stimulate discussions and participation of stakeholders to develop related technologies for further expanding its utilization as an important form of renewable energy.

  5. The internal representation of head orientation differs for conscious perception and balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Brian H; Rasman, Brandon G; Inglis, J Timothy; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2017-04-15

    We tested perceived head-on-feet orientation and the direction of vestibular-evoked balance responses in passively and actively held head-turned postures. The direction of vestibular-evoked balance responses was not aligned with perceived head-on-feet orientation while maintaining prolonged passively held head-turned postures. Furthermore, static visual cues of head-on-feet orientation did not update the estimate of head posture for the balance controller. A prolonged actively held head-turned posture did not elicit a rotation in the direction of the vestibular-evoked balance response despite a significant rotation in perceived angular head posture. It is proposed that conscious perception of head posture and the transformation of vestibular signals for standing balance relying on this head posture are not dependent on the same internal representation. Rather, the balance system may operate under its own sensorimotor principles, which are partly independent from perception. Vestibular signals used for balance control must be integrated with other sensorimotor cues to allow transformation of descending signals according to an internal representation of body configuration. We explored two alternative models of sensorimotor integration that propose (1) a single internal representation of head-on-feet orientation is responsible for perceived postural orientation and standing balance or (2) conscious perception and balance control are driven by separate internal representations. During three experiments, participants stood quietly while passively or actively maintaining a prolonged head-turned posture (>10 min). Throughout the trials, participants intermittently reported their perceived head angular position, and subsequently electrical vestibular stimuli were delivered to elicit whole-body balance responses. Visual recalibration of head-on-feet posture was used to determine whether static visual cues are used to update the internal representation of body configuration

  6. Efficacy and Safety of a Single-Dose Mebendazole 500 mg Chewable, Rapidly-Disintegrating Tablet forAscaris lumbricoidesandTrichuris trichiuraInfection Treatment in Pediatric Patients: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 3 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Steven A; Diro, Ermias; Workneh, Netsanet; Mekonnen, Zeleke; Levecke, Bruno; Steinmann, Peter; Umulisa, Irenee; Alemu, Hailemaryam; Baeten, Benny; Engelen, Marc; Hu, Peter; Friedman, Andrew; Baseman, Alan; Mrus, Joseph

    2017-12-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new chewable, rapidly-disintegrating mebendazole (MBZ) 500 mg tablet for Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura infection treatment. Pediatric patients (1-15 years; N = 295; from Ethiopia and Rwanda) excreting A. lumbricoides and/or T. trichiura eggs were enrolled. The study had a screening phase (3 days), a double-blind treatment phase (DBP, 19 days), and an open-label phase (OLP, 7 days). Patients received MBZ or placebo on day 1 of DBP and open-label MBZ on day 19 ± 2 after stool sample collection. Cure rates (primary endpoint), defined as species-specific egg count of 0 at the end of DBP, were significantly higher in the MBZ group than placebo for A. lumbricoides (83.7% [72/86; 95% CI: 74.2%; 90.8%] versus 11.1% [9/81; 95% CI: 5.2%; 20.1%], P lumbricoides (97.9% [95% CI: 94.4; 99.9] versus 19.2% [95% CI: -5.9; 41.5]; P lumbricoides and T. trichiura infections in pediatric patients, and no safety concerns were identified.

  7. A promising split-lesion technique for rapid tattoo removal using a novel sequential approach of a single sitting of pulsed CO(2) followed by Q-switched Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardana, Kabir; Garg, Vijay K; Bansal, Shivani; Goel, Khushbu

    2013-12-01

    Laser tattoo removal conventionally uses Q-switched (QS) lasers, but they require multiple sittings, and the end results depend largely on the type of tattoo treated. In pigmented skin, due to the competing epidermal pigment results, laser results in tattoo are slow and inadequate. To evaluate the efficacy of a combined use of ultrapulse CO2 and QS Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser in the treatment of tattoos in Indian skin. A split-lesion trial was carried out in five patients, with the left side of tattoos receiving the QS Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and the right side, a sequential combination of Up CO2 and QS Nd: YAG at 6 weeks interval with a maximum of six sittings. Outcome assessment was carried out by a blinded assessor using standardized photography. An assessment of physician improvement score, side-effects score, and patient satisfaction score was taken during and at the end of the study. There was a statistically significant improvement on the combination side(physician improvement score -3.7 vs. 1.87: P = 0.0019) which occurred earlier with fewer sittings (1.7 vs. 6). There was no statistically significant difference in the side effects. A combination of an Up CO2 laser with QS Nd: YAG laser is a promising tool for rapid and effective removal of blue-black/blue amateur tattoo in pigmented skin. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Navvus FFR to reduce CONTRAst, Cost and radiaTion (CONTRACT); insights from a single-centre clinical and economical evaluation with the RXi Rapid-Exchange FFR device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masdjedi, Kaneshka; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Diletti, Roberto; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; de Jaegere, Peter; Regar, Evelyn; Zijlstra, Felix; van Domburg, Ron T; Daemen, Joost

    2017-04-15

    To assess whether the RXi Navvus system compared to the use of standard Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) wires reduces total contrast volume, radiation and overall study cost in a real world patient population referred for coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention. FFR is the mainstay of functional hemodynamic assessment of coronary artery lesions. The RXi Navvus system (ACIST Medical Systems, Eden Prairie, MN) is a monorail microcatheter with FFR-measurement capability through optical pressure sensor technology. This is an investigator-initiated, prospective, single-center, observational cohort study. A total of 238 patients were enrolled, 97 patients with Navvus and 141 with conventional pressure-wire based FFR (PW-FFR). Final analyses were performed on the cohort in which only 1 device was used (82 Navvus procedures vs. 136 PW-FFR procedures). No significant differences were found in the total amount of contrast used (150±77 vs 147±79ml; p=0.81), radiation use (6200±4601 vs. 5076±4655 centiG∗cm 2 ; p=0.09) or costs (€1994,- vs. €1930,-; p=0.32) in the Navvus vs. PW-FFR groups respectively. No significant differences were found in the amount of contrast used, total procedural costs or radiation when the Navvus system was used as compared to conventional FFR wires. CONTRACT is an investigator-initiated, prospective, single-center, observational cohort study that evaluated whether the RXi Navvus system compared to the use of standard Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) wires reduces total contrast volume, radiation and overall study cost in a real world patient population referred for coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention. Use of the RXi Navvus system was associated with comparable procedural costs, amount of radiation and contrast used as compared to PW-FFR systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Rat cardiovascular responses to whole body suspension - Head-down and non-head-down tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, Joseph M.; Dombrowski, Judy

    1992-01-01

    Two experiments aimed at examining the versatility of the whole body suspension (WBS) system as a ground-based model for cardiovascular effects of microgravity are described. The first experiment studied heart rate and arterial pressure responses in rats during a 7-day period of head-down tilt (HDT) or nonhead-down tilt (NHDT) and after removal from whole body suspension (WBS). Mean arterial (MAP), systolic, and diastolic pressures increased about 20 percent in HDT rats on the fist day, heart rates were elevated about 10 percent. During postsuspension most cardiovascular parameters returned to presuspension levels. The second experiment evaluated responses to rapid head-up tilt in HDT and NHDT rats. It was observed that, while pulse pressures remained unchanged, MAP, systolic and diastolic pressures, and HR were elevated in HDT and NHDT rats during head-up tilt after one day of suspension. The WBS rats are considered to be useful as a model to better understand responses of rats exposed to microgravity.

  10. Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Toshiki; Imanishi, Yorihisa

    2008-01-01

    The limitation of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) in head and neck cancer (HNC) as the primary treatment is described based on recent findings. Limits in the application/indication involve factors of age, performance status (PS) and renal function. The first is that, as deaths in >71 years old patients are derived from other causes (41%) than HNC, CCRT is only useful for younger population; the second, patients with PS 0-1 or Karnofsky performance score >60-70 can be indicated; and third, contraindicated are those with creatinine clearance (CCr) <60 mL/min as the key drug cisplatin in CCRT has a high renal toxicity. It should be recognized that completion rates of chemotherapy and RT are as low as 66-85% and 84-92%, respectively, in CCRT. CCRT has such limiting adverse events as mucitis, dry mouth, dysohagia, weight loss, neutropenia, sepsis, etc., which are most important in CCRT application. CCRT is recommended for the primary cancers of larynx and hypopharynx because they are significantly better conserved than middle pharyngeal, oral and upper jaw cancers. Evidence of CCRT is poor for cancers in paranasal sinuses. Planned neck dissection (PND) is for the cervical metastatic lymph nodes and conducted 6-12 weeks after CCRT regardless to its outcome. In fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) negative cases, PND can be omitted. Necessity of PND is possibly inversely proportional to CCRT intensity performed. For control of remote metastasis, CCRT has obvious limits and inductive chemotherapy before it is currently considered. Salvage surgery post CCRT does not always yield a relief because of complication. Patients with advanced laryngeal cancer can be selected either to surgery or CCRT depending on results of the inductive chemotherapy. To predict the sensitivity to CCRT, some biomarkers like HPV, EGFR and VEGF have been suggested to be useful by retrospective studies. Understanding the limitation is as important as knowing the usefulness in

  11. Association between infantile spasms and nonaccidental head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birca, Ala; D'Anjou, Guy; Carmant, Lionel

    2014-05-01

    Infantile spasms constitute a severe epileptic encephalopathy of infancy with poor long-term developmental outcome. Many diverse etiologies have been associated with infantile spasms, but the pathophysiological process is still not fully understood. We describe 2 cases of previously healthy 1- and 3-month-old infants who suffered a nonaccidental head injury with extensive cerebral lesions. Both presented with acute focal seizures rapidly controlled with phenobarbital. Nevertheless, they developed infantile spasms after a latency period of 3-4 months. Spasms were rapidly controlled with vigabatrin. Both children manifested with developmental delay, either exacerbated (case 1) or elicited (case 2) by infantile spasms. Our report highlights nonaccidental head injury as a risk factor for developing infantile spasms following a seizure-free latency period. A better understanding of the pathophysiology linking accidental brain trauma with infantile spasms could lead to more effective neuroprotective strategies. In the meantime, increased awareness and follow-up are warranted.

  12. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  13. Deviation of eyes and head in acute cerebral stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilg UJ

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a well-known phenomenon that some patients with acute left or right hemisphere stroke show a deviation of the eyes (Prévost's sign and head to one side. Here we investigated whether both right- and left-sided brain lesions may cause this deviation. Moreover, we studied the relationship between this phenomenon and spatial neglect. In contrast to previous studies, we determined not only the discrete presence or absence of eye deviation with the naked eye through clinical inspection, but actually measured the extent of horizontal eye-in-head and head-on-trunk deviation. In further contrast, measurements were performed early after stroke onset (1.5 days on average. Methods Eye-in-head and head-on-trunk positions were measured at the bedside in 33 patients with acute unilateral left or right cerebral stroke consecutively admitted to our stroke unit. Results Each single patient with spatial neglect and right hemisphere lesion showed a marked deviation of the eyes and the head to the ipsilesional, right side. The average spontaneous gaze position in this group was 46° right, while it was close to the saggital body midline (0° in the groups with acute left- or right-sided stroke but no spatial neglect as well as in healthy subjects. Conclusion A marked horizontal eye and head deviation observed ~1.5 days post-stroke is not a symptom associated with acute cerebral lesions per se, nor is a general symptom of right hemisphere lesions, but rather is specific for stroke patients with spatial neglect. The evaluation of the patient's horizontal eye and head position thus could serve as a brief and easy way helping to diagnose spatial neglect, in addition to the traditional paper-and-pencil tests.

  14. Immunization of chickens with an agonistic monoclonal anti-chicken CD40 antibody-hapten complex: rapid and robust IgG response induced by a single subcutaneous injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Hsin; Abi-Ghanem, Daad; Waghela, Suryakant D; Chou, Wen-Ko; Farnell, Morgan B; Mwangi, Waithaka; Berghman, Luc R

    2012-04-30

    Producing diagnostic antibodies in chicken egg yolk represents an alternate animal system that offers many advantages including high productivity at low cost. Despite being an excellent counterpart to mammalian antibodies, chicken IgG from yolk still represents an underused resource. The potential of agonistic monoclonal anti-CD40 antibodies (mAb) as a powerful immunological adjuvant has been demonstrated in mammals, but not in chickens. We recently reported an agonistic anti-chicken CD40 mAb (designated mAb 2C5) and showed that it may have potential as an immunological adjuvant. In this study, we examined the efficacy of targeting a short peptide to chicken CD40 [expressed by the antigen-presenting cells (APCs)] in enhancing an effective IgG response in chickens. For this purpose, an immune complex consisting of one streptavidin molecule, two directionally biotinylated mAb 2C5 molecules, and two biotinylated peptide molecules was produced. Chickens were immunized subcutaneously with doses of this complex ranging from 10 to 90 μg per injection once, and relative quantification of the peptide-specific IgG response showed that the mAb 2C5-based complex was able to elicit a strong IgG response as early as four days post-immunization. This demonstrates that CD40-targeting antigen to chicken APCs can significantly enhance antibody responses and induce immunoglobulin isotype-switching. This immunization strategy holds promise for rapid production of hapten-specific IgG in chickens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or cause problems during an MRI exam. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is currently a recognized, but rare, complication ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be present in your body due to prior accidents. Foreign bodies near and especially lodged in the ... of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  19. Zero torque gear head wrench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdougal, A. R.; Norman, R. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A gear head wrench particularly suited for use in applying torque to bolts without transferring torsional stress to bolt-receiving structures is introduced. The wrench is characterized by a coupling including a socket, for connecting a bolt head with a torque multiplying gear train, provided within a housing having an annulus concentrically related to the socket and adapted to be coupled with a spacer interposed between the bolt head and the juxtaposed surface of the bolt-receiving structure for applying a balancing counter-torque to the spacer as torque is applied to the bolt head whereby the bolt-receiving structure is substantially isolated from torsional stress. As a result of the foregoing, the operator of the wrench is substantially isolated from any forces which may be imposed.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top of page ... and is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society ...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... of the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  4. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should ... a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses ... medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform than other imaging modalities. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary according to the type of body ...

  13. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ ...

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... teeth or become infected. It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out ... and surgically treating cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... gadolinium contrast, it may still be possible to use it after appropriate pre-medication. Patient consent will ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and ... sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and ... most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What ...

  20. Heater head for stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, John A.

    1985-07-09

    A monolithic heater head assembly which augments cast fins with ceramic inserts which narrow the flow of combustion gas and obtains high thermal effectiveness with the assembly including an improved flange design which gives greater durability and reduced conduction loss.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  2. New Russian science head named

    CERN Multimedia

    Levitin, C

    2000-01-01

    Ilya Klebanov, a deputy prime minister, has been appointed the country's new head of industrial and scientific policy. He will control the new Ministry for Industry, Science and Technologies (4 paragraphs).

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ... Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... let the radiologist know about them. Parents or family members who accompany patients into the scanning room ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  8. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disorders are not uncommon. Individuals with a TMJ disorder may experience a variety of symptoms, such as earaches, ... Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ ...

  9. Preventing head injuries in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to keep their children from getting head injuries. Car Safety Your child should wear a seatbelt at ... local sporting goods store, sports facility, or bike shop will be able to help make certain the ...

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to 42,000 Americans will ... cheek out to see its inside surface as well as the back of the gums Pull out ...

  11. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Oral, Head ...

  12. Head injury management guidelines for general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy C Ganz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A complete examination of a head injured patient in the hospital requires a number of instruments. These include a stethoscope, sphygmomanometer, ophthalmoscope, otoscope, cotton wool, safety pin, tuning fork, reflex hammer and a small key to test the plantar response. Few of these are required at the accident scene. This is because, in the hospital, the aim is optimal definitive treatment. At the accident scene, the aim is prevention of secondary injury, rapid recording of the most important findings and safe efficient transport to the hospital. This short paper reviews how the local doctor should undertake a neurosurgical assessment of traumatic brain injury patients. Moreover, the primary management at accident scenes is described and the rationale behind the approach is outlined

  13. Henry Head and the Theatre of Reverie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Watt-Smith

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1903, the neurologist Henry Head (1861-1940 embarked on a painful self-experiment, in which he severed the radial nerve of his left arm, and then charted the gradual and faltering return of sensitivity to the limb over the next four and a half years. To directly experience his own sensations, Head entered into a trance-like state of distraction or reverie he called a ‘negative attitude of attention’. This article explores Head’s peculiar technique for looking within, and argues that while introspection was an established strategy in psychological laboratories, Head’s reverie also resonated with techniques associated with actors and theatrical audiences during this period. Viewing psychological self-experimentation through the lens of theatre, this article makes visible aspects of Head’s embodied, affective laboratory encounters, often obscured in accounts of his experiment. At the same time, it proposes that the broader historical and cultural significance of Head’s experiment lies in his attempt to observe himself by producing states of inattention and reverie at will, mental ‘attitudes’ that were themselves the subject of a rapidly evolving debate in scientific and aesthetic circles at the turn of the twentieth century.

  14. Local head gradient coils: window(s) of opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eric C

    2012-08-15

    At the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW), prior to the 1991 announcement of the discovery of BOLD fMRI, all of the technical pieces that were needed for efficient BOLD fMRI imaging were assembled for other applications, allowing MCW to jump into the fMRI business just days after the announcement. Central among these pieces was single shot EPI, implemented at MCW using a three axis local head gradient coil. This article describes the development of local gradient coil technology at MCW, and a historical perspective on local head gradient coils in general. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. NMR Investigation of Equilibrium Micelle of Two Head Surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Meong Soo; Nam, Ki Dae [School of Chemical Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea); Jeong, Hwan Kyeong [AMLCD Division Semiconductor Samsung Electronics, Chunan (Korea); Lee, Hyang Woo [Department of Cosmetology, Keochang Provincial College, Keochang (Korea)

    2001-06-01

    The two-headed surfactant, disodium 4-n-alkyl-3-sulfonato succinate, has been synthesized by the monoesterification of maleic anhydride and n-alkanol(C{sub 8} {approx} C{sub 12}) and addition of sodium bisulfite to the corresponding monoester. The equilibrium micellar properties formed by these aqueous compounds, and the conformations of the alkyl long chain length that comprised of the interior of micellar, have been investigated using a combination of 1-D NMR and homonuclear/heteronuclear 2-D NMR techniques. The cmc' and the aggregation numbers determined from the NMR experiments were in an agreement with previous results found in the literatures for other types of two-headed surfactant systems. The amphiphiles had high cmc' and low aggregation numbers compared to single-headed surfactants of a comparable chain length. All these results were attributed to the addition a second headgroup to a single-headed, single-tailed surfactant. 27 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Effects of head circumference and metabolic syndrome on cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Soo; Eom, Jin-Sup; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Oh, Byoung Hoon; Hong, Chang Hyung

    2010-01-01

    Brain volume progressively decreases with an increase in atrophy, and the brain becomes more susceptible to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Metabolic syndrome has also been associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline in the elderly. In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of head circumference and metabolic syndrome on cognitive decline. This study was part of a longitudinal study conducted on Koreans aged 60 years or older. We analyzed a final sample of 596 Korean participants with complete baseline and 2-year follow-up data. The cognitive function of the subjects was assessed using the Korean version of the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Head circumference was measured from the glabella to the occipital protuberance using a measuring tape. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the NCEP-ATP III standards. Central obesity was assessed on the basis of waist-circumference values, in accordance with the World Health Organization Western Pacific Region report on Asians. We used a longitudinal factorial design in which the MMSE score was the dependent variable, and head circumference and metabolic syndrome were considered as factors. After adjusting the results for age, gender, education, height, weight, baseline MMSE, and number of follow-up years, we observed that smaller head circumference and the presence of metabolic syndrome were independently associated with rapid cognitive decline. All these findings suggest that smaller head circumference and the presence of metabolic syndrome have additive effects on cognitive decline. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Avaliação cefalométrica radiográfica da posição craniocervical de pacientes orientados em posição natural da cabeça pré e pós-expansão rápida da maxila Cephalometric radiographic evaluation of the craniocervical position of patients oriented in natural head position before and after the rapid maxillary expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belini Augusto Villalba Freire-Maia

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a eventual alteração na posição craniocervical de pacientes orientados na Posição Natural da Cabeça (PNC, após o procedimento de expansão rápida da maxila (ERM. Utilizaram-se telerradiografias em norma lateral, selecionadas do acervo de documentação da Clínica de Ortodontia Preventiva da Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo, de 20 pacientes, com idades entre 5 a 11 anos (média de 9,0 anos, sendo 7 do gênero masculino e 13 do feminino, obtidas no início do tratamento e imediatamente após a fase ativa da expansão da maxila. Os pacientes eram portadores de atresia da maxila e foram tratados com aparelho disjuntor tipo Biederman modificado. A partir dos cefalogramas pré e pós-ERM foram obtidas as grandezas angulares craniovertical (SN.VER, craniocervical (OPT.SN e CVT.SN, cervicohorizontal (OPT.HOR, CVT.HOR e o ângulo da curvatura cervical (OPT.CVT. Após análise estatística e interpretação dos resultados obtidos concluímos que a posição da cabeça não apresentou alteração estatisticamente significativa. Não foram observadas diferenças estatisticamente significativas entre os gêneros quando comparadas as fases pré e pós-ERM para as grandezas estudadas. O método de obtenção de telerradiografias laterais em Orientação Natural da Cabeça mostrou-se confiável e reproduzível na amostra estudada, mesmo na presença de intervenção ortodôntica-ortopédica entre as séries de radiografias.The aim of this study was to evaluate the eventual alteration in the craniocervical position of patients, oriented in the Natural Head Position (NHP, after the rapid maxillary expansion (RME procedure. We have used lateral radiographs, selected from the documentation file of the Preventive Orthodontics Clinic, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo. Our sample consisted of 20 patients (7M:13F, with ages ranging from 5.08 up to 11.08 years (mean of 9,0. The

  18. Microvolume turbidimetry for rapid and sensitive determination of the acid labile sulfide fraction in waters after headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ generation of volatile hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavilla, I; Pena-Pereira, F; Gil, S; Costas, M; Bendicho, C

    2009-08-04

    In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of applying headspace single-drop microextraction with in-drop precipitation for the quantitative determination of the acid labile sulfide fraction (H2S, HS-, and S2- (free sulfide), amorphous FeS and some metal sulfide complexes-clusters as ZnS) in aqueous samples by microvolume turbidimetry. The methodology lies in the in situ hydrogen sulfide generation and subsequent sequestration into an alkaline microdrop containing ZnO(2)(2-) and exposed to the headspace above the stirred aqueous sample. The ZnS formed in the drop was then determined by microvolume turbidimetry. The optimum experimental conditions of the proposed method were: 2 microL of a microdrop containing 750 mg L(-1) Zn(II) in 1 mol L(-1) NaOH exposed to the headspace of a 20-mL aqueous sample stirred at 1600 rpm during 80 s after derivatization with 1 mL of 6 mol L(-1) HCl. An enrichment factor of 1710 was achieved in only 80 s. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 5-100 microg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.5 microg L(-1). The repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation, was 5.8% (N = 9). Finally, the proposed methodology was successfully applied to the determination of the acid labile sulfide fraction in different natural water samples.

  19. Rapid and precise determination of Sr and Nd isotopic ratios in geological samples from the same filament loading by thermal ionization mass spectrometry employing a single-step separation scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao-Feng; Li, Xian-Hua; Li, Qiu-Li; Guo, Jing-Hui; Li, Xiang-Hui; Yang, Yue-Heng

    2012-05-21

    Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) offers the excellent precision and accuracy of the Sr and Nd isotopic ratio analysis for geological samples, but this method is labour intensive, expensive and time-consuming. In this study, a new analytical protocol by TIMS is presented that aims at improving analytical efficiency and cutting down experimental cost. Using the single-step cation exchange resin technique, mixed Sr and rare earth elements (REEs) fractions were separated from matrix and evaporated to dryness. Afterwards, mixed Sr+REEs fractions were dissolved and loaded onto the same Re filament using 1 μL of 2 M HCl. Then, Sr and Nd were sequentially measured without venting using TIMS. In contrast to conventional TIMS methods, the merits of this analytical protocol are its cost- and time-saving adaptations. The applicability of our method is evaluated by replicated measurements of (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (143)Nd/(144)Nd for nine international silicate rock reference materials, spanning a wide range of bulk compositions. The typical internal precision in this study is ca. 0.001% (RSE) for (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (143)Nd/(144)Nd; the analytical results obtained for these standard rocks show a good agreement with reported values, indicating the effectiveness of the proposed method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  1. Increase in Non-Contrast Computerized Tomography Scans of the Head Following Popular Media Stories About Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Pirotte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: On March 18, 2009, actress Natasha Richardson died after a head injury. It is possiblethat the rate of patients presenting with mild head injury and receiving computed tomographies (CTsmay have been influenced by the Richardson event. We hypothesized that there was a statisticallysignificant increase in the rate of census-adjusted head CTs performed for mild trauma after March16, 2009, compared to prior to this date.Methods: We included all with a non-contrast head CT performed from the emergency department(ED between March 1and April 15, 2009, for minor trauma. The primary outcome was the census adjustedrate of head CTs per time (# of head CTs/census. We compared the census adjusted ratefor the 2 weeks prior to 2 weeks after the accident. To document media dissemination we searchedLexis-Nexis for news stories mentioning “Richardson.”Results: In the 2 weeks prior to March 16, 2009, the census-adjusted rate was 0.81% (95% CI0.54–1.16 and there were no stories. The first media reports appeared on March 16, 2009, (n = 19and quickly doubled (n = 40, n = 43 over the subsequent 2 days. The rate of CTs nearly doubledduring the 2 weeks post accident 1.46% (1.10–1.91%. This absolute increase in rate percentagewas statistically significant. (0.65%; 0.17 to 1.14%.Conclusion: The percentage of all ED patients seen with mild trauma tested with head CT almostdoubled when comparing the pre-Richardson accident vs. post time periods. There was an increasein media reports of the accident that occurred rapidly after the event and peaked on day 3.

  2. Generating anatomically accurate finite element meshes for electrical impedance tomography of the human head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Canhua; Dai, Meng; Fu, Feng; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2013-07-01

    For electrical impedance tomography (EIT) of brain, the use of anatomically accurate and patient-specific finite element (FE) mesh has been shown to confer significant improvements in the quality of image reconstruction. But, given the lack of a rapid method to achieve the accurate anatomic geometry of the head, the generation of patient-specifc mesh is time-comsuming. In this paper, a modified fuzzy c-means algorithm based on non-local means method is performed to implement the segmentation of different layers in the head based on head CT images. This algorithm showed a better effect, especially an accurate recognition of the ventricles and a suitable performance dealing with noise. And the FE mesh established according to the segmentation results is validated in computational simulation. So a rapid practicable method can be provided for the generation of patient-specific FE mesh of the human head that is suitable for brain EIT.

  3. Rapid Tooling via Stereolithography

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, composite stereolithography (SL) resins were introduced to the marketplace, offering performance features beyond what traditional SL resins could offer. In particular, the high heat deflection temperatures and high stiffness of these highly filled resins have opened the door to several new rapid prototyping (RP) applications, including wind tunnel test modelling and, more recently, rapid tooling.

  4. Heading for a fall? Management of head injury in infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Williamson, M

    2010-09-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest reasons for infants (< 1 year) to attend the Emergency Department (ED). Clinical management varies considerably and concern about non accidental injury results in a high admission rate in some hospitals. Information was obtained on 103 children under one year of age presenting to the ED with head injury in a prospective study. The average age was 6.7 months and 57% of patients were male. Twenty eight babies had skull x rays with 1 skull fracture diagnosed. None required CT brain scan. Ninety eight (94%) were discharged home from the ED. There were no unplanned returns, readmissions or adverse events. The incidence of traumatic brain injury in children under one year of age presenting with head injury is low and the majority can be safely discharged home.

  5. Magnetic head having a wear-resistant layer, and method of manufacturing such a magnetic head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirne, F.W.A.; Zieren, V.; Broese van Groenou, A.; Oorschot, L.F.M. van; Lasinski, P.; Jongh, M. de; Roozeboom, F.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic head having a head face (5) and comprising a head structure composed of thin layers and provided with a transducing element (E11), in which different materials occurring in different areas are present in the head face. The head face is provided with a first layer (31) of a material which is

  6. Head Impact Exposure and Neurologic Function of Youth Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munce, Thayne A; Dorman, Jason C; Thompson, Paul A; Valentine, Verle D; Bergeron, Michael F

    2015-08-01

    Football players are subjected to repetitive impacts that may lead to brain injury and neurologic dysfunction. Knowledge about head impact exposure (HIE) and consequent neurologic function among youth football players is limited. This study aimed to measure and characterize HIE of youth football players throughout one season and explore associations between HIE and changes in selected clinical measures of neurologic function. Twenty-two youth football players (11-13 yr) wore helmets outfitted with a head impact telemetry (HIT) system to quantify head impact frequency, magnitude, duration, and location. Impact data were collected for each practice (27) and game (9) in a single season. Selected clinical measures of balance, oculomotor performance, reaction time, and self-reported symptoms were assessed before and after the season. The median individual head impacts per practice, per game, and throughout the entire season were 9, 12, and 252, respectively. Approximately 50% of all head impacts (6183) had a linear acceleration between 10g and 20g, but nearly 2% were greater than 80g. Overall, the head impact frequency distributions in this study population were similar in magnitude and location as in high school and collegiate football, but total impact frequency was lower. Individual changes in neurologic function were not associated with cumulative HIE. This study provides a novel examination of HIE and associations with short-term neurologic function in youth football and notably contributes to the limited HIE data currently available for this population. Whereas youth football players can experience remarkably similar head impact forces as high school players, cumulative subconcussive HIE throughout one youth football season may not be detrimental to short-term clinical measures of neurologic function.

  7. Rapid arc in cancer treatment - a therapeutic perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Recently, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has demonstrated the ability to deliver radiation dose precisely and accurately with a shorter delivery time compared to conventional intensity-modulated fixed-field treatment (IMRT). We applied the hypothesis of VMAT technique at our hospital to determine the superior dose coverage for planning target volume (PTV) with adequate sparing of organs-at-risk (OARs). The delivery time and monitor units (MUs) is reduced in comparison with conventional fixed-field IMRT. Rapid Arc (RA) plans had a pre-treatment quality assurance and results were summarised in terms of the Gamma Agreement Index (GAI) scoring criteria of 3% and 3 mm thresholds. A total of 771 patients were treated between July 2011 and August 2013 of which head and neck cancer were 385, prostate cancer 53, brain tumours 112, cervical and endometrial cancer 77, breast cancer 38, rectal and bladder cancer 56, special technique using SBRT 45 (Liver and Lung) and Cranio-spinal irradiation 5 patients using RA single (177 control points) and double arcs (354 control points). The Average treatment time was 4.8 ±0.2 minutes (220 seconds of beam-on). The number of MU per fraction of 2.0 Gy was 522.5 ± 133.62. VMAT can be a valuable clinical tool that can deliver the prescribed dose efficiently in 1.5-3 minutes (single or double arcs) with high target homogeneity and adequate sparing of organs at risk. It would allow to reduce patient lying time on couch and over all beam on time from 4 hours to one hour. The toxicity (Tracheal fistula) observed in two patients of Carcinoma Lung receiving SRT high lights the need for peer review. (author)

  8. Single-Photon Optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnenkamp, A.; Børkje, K.; Girvin, S. M.

    2011-08-01

    Optomechanics experiments are rapidly approaching the regime where the radiation pressure of a single photon displaces the mechanical oscillator by more than its zero-point uncertainty. We show that in this limit the power spectrum has multiple sidebands and that the cavity response has several resonances in the resolved-sideband limit. Using master-equation simulations, we also study the crossover from the weak-coupling many-photon to the single-photon strong-coupling regime. Finally, we find non-Gaussian steady states of the mechanical oscillator when multiphoton transitions are resonant. Our study provides the tools to detect and take advantage of this novel regime of optomechanics.

  9. Wheelchair control by head motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajkanović Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electric wheelchairs are designed to aid paraplegics. Unfortunately, these can not be used by persons with higher degree of impairment, such as quadriplegics, i.e. persons that, due to age or illness, can not move any of the body parts, except of the head. Medical devices designed to help them are very complicated, rare and expensive. In this paper a microcontroller system that enables standard electric wheelchair control by head motion is presented. The system comprises electronic and mechanic components. A novel head motion recognition technique based on accelerometer data processing is designed. The wheelchair joystick is controlled by the system’s mechanical actuator. The system can be used with several different types of standard electric wheelchairs. It is tested and verified through an experiment performed within this paper.

  10. OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS OF HEAD INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanukollu Venkata Madusudana Rao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This prospective study aimed to evaluate the incidence of ocular manifestations in head injury and their correlation with the intracranial lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 108 consecutive cases of closed head injury admitted in the neurosurgical ward of a tertiary teaching hospital underwent a thorough ophthalmic assessment. Clinical examination, radiological imaging and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS were applied to grade the severity of injury. RESULTS Total number of 108 patients of head injury were examined of which 38 patients had ocular manifestations (35.18%. Of these, 85.18% were males, 84% of injuries were due to road traffic accidents and 16% were due to fall from a height. The ocular manifestations were as follows- Orbital complications were seen in 6 patients (15.8%. Anterior segment manifestations included black eyes seen in 10 patients (26.3%, subconjunctival haemorrhage in 10.5% of patients (4 patients, corneal involvement in 21% of patients (8 patients and pupillary involvement in 50% of patients (19 patients. Posterior segment manifestations were seen in 26.3% of patients (10 patients and were as follows- Purtscher’s retinopathy in 2 patients and optic atrophy in 5 patients. Cranial nerve palsies were seen in 15 patients (39.47% and supranuclear movement disorders were seen in 3 patients (8%. CONCLUSION Even though, neurosurgeons perform comprehensive clinical examination including eye examination, the main purpose is limited to aid topical diagnosis of neurological lesions. This study emphasises the importance of a detailed eye examination by an ophthalmologist to prevent irreversible visual loss in addition to aiding in the neurological diagnosis. Pupillary involvement, papilloedema and ocular motor paresis pointed to a more severe head injury. This observational prospective study helped us to correlate the severity of head injuries in association with ocular findings in patients admitted in neurosurgical ward

  11. Integrating Rapid Prototyping into Graphic Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Renmei; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Integrating different science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) areas can help students learn and leverage both the equipment and expertise at a single school. In comparing graphic communications classes with classes that involve rapid prototyping (RP) technologies like 3D printing, there are sufficient similarities between goals,…

  12. Head First 2D Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Fallow), Stray

    2009-01-01

    Having trouble with geometry? Do Pi, The Pythagorean Theorem, and angle calculations just make your head spin? Relax. With Head First 2D Geometry, you'll master everything from triangles, quads and polygons to the time-saving secrets of similar and congruent angles -- and it'll be quick, painless, and fun. Through entertaining stories and practical examples from the world around you, this book takes you beyond boring problems. You'll actually use what you learn to make real-life decisions, like using angles and parallel lines to crack a mysterious CSI case. Put geometry to work for you, and

  13. Local analysis with RAPIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, J.C.; Cliffe, K.A.

    1992-02-01

    Techniques for determining the topological dimension of a manifold and the eigenvalues of a linearized flow near a fixed point are described, together with their implementation in the program RAPIDS. (author)

  14. Human eye-head gaze shifts preserve their accuracy and spatiotemporal trajectory profiles despite long-duration torque perturbations that assist or oppose head motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Mathieu; Galiana, Henrietta L; Guitton, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    Humans routinely use coordinated eye-head gaze saccades to rapidly and accurately redirect the line of sight (Land MF. Vis Neurosci 26: 51-62, 2009). With a fixed body, the gaze control system combines visual, vestibular, and neck proprioceptive sensory information and coordinates two moving platforms, the eyes and head. Classic engineering tools have investigated the structure of motor systems by testing their ability to compensate for perturbations. When a reaching movement of the hand is subjected to an unexpected force field of random direction and strength, the trajectory is deviated and its final position is inaccurate. Here, we found that the gaze control system behaves differently. We perturbed horizontal gaze shifts with long-duration torques applied to the head that unpredictably either assisted or opposed head motion and very significantly altered the intended head trajectory. We found, as others have with brief head perturbations, that gaze accuracy was preserved. Unexpectedly, we found also that the eye compensated well--with saccadic and rollback movements--for long-duration head perturbations such that resulting gaze trajectories remained close to that when the head was not perturbed. However, the ocular compensation was best when torques assisted, compared with opposed, head motion. If the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) is suppressed during gaze shifts, as currently thought, what caused invariant gaze trajectories and accuracy, early eye-direction reversals, and asymmetric compensations? We propose three mechanisms: a gaze feedback loop that generates a gaze-position error signal; a vestibular-to-oculomotor signal that dissociates self-generated from passively imposed head motion; and a saturation element that limits orbital eye excursion.

  15. Comparison of Head and Eye Tracting with and Without a Visual Cue to Head Position

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luthman, Nicholas

    2001-01-01

    .... This has important implications in the design of head-steered machinery. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a visual cue to head position on gaze and head pursuit. Eleven subjects (3 females, 8 males...

  16. Sixteen dot/mm thermal printing head using polyimide heat-resistant layer; Polyimide chikunetsuso wo mochiita 16 dot/mm kannetsu kiroku head kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, T.; Watanabe, M. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-05-25

    A high-efficiency thermal printing head with a resolution of 16 dot/mm has been developed. Print power efficiency was remarkably improved by using polyimide which has low thermal conductivity and high temperature stability, as a heat-resistant layer. The thickness of the polyamide layer was optimized to ensure both high efficiency and rapid cooling by temperature response analysis of the head using the finite-element method. Experiments show that the printing power for thermal paper decreased to half of that of conventional heads with glass glaze, and the pulse durability of the head exceeded 10{sup 8} pulses within an electric resistance change of 10%. 6 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ... Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  2. challenges facing child headed households

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    Now there is a new family set up: the child headed households. (CHH). ..... building fund and uniforms to complement BEAM. For those in primary ... these children. As a result of this SRHBC took it upon itself to keep food for this household and only give them what was enough for a week or so. The issue of food insecurity ...

  3. Blunt Head Trauma and Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B Chelse

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital examined whether having an isolated headache following minor blunt head trauma was suggestive of traumatic brain injury (TBI among a large cohort of children 2-18 years of age.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. top of page What are the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able to ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  6. The head organizer in Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Hans R

    2012-01-01

    Organizers and organizing centers play critical roles in axis formation and patterning during the early stages of embryogenesis in many bilaterians. The presence and activity of an organizer was first described in adult Hydra about 100 years ago, and in the following decades organizer regions were identified in a number of bilaterian embryos. In an adult Hydra, the cells of the body column are constantly in the mitotic cycle resulting in continuous displacement of the tissue to the extremities where it is sloughed. In this context, the head organizer located in the hypostome is continuously active sending out signals to maintain the structure and morphology of the head, body column and foot of the animal. The molecular basis of the head organizer involves the canonical Wnt pathway, which acts in a self-renewing manner to maintain itself in the context of the tissue dynamics of Hydra. During bud formation, Hydra's mode of asexual reproduction, a head organizer based on the canonical Wnt pathway is set up to initiate and control the development of a new Hydra. As this pathway plays a central role in vertebrate embryonic organizers, its presence and activity in Hydra indicate that the molecular basis of the organizer arose early in metazoan evolution.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  8. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to 42,000 Americans ... diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Oral cancer’s mortality is particularly high, not because it is ...

  9. Practical management of head injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wester, K.; Skretting, P.; Syvertsen, A.H.; Aas-Aune, G.

    1987-01-01

    The article offers practical advice for the management and treatment of severe head injuries in a county hospital without a neurosurgical department. Recommendations are based partly on recent, relevant literature and partly on our experience in a Norwegian county hospital and a neurosurgical department

  10. Effect of external viscous load on head movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, M.-H.; Lakshminarayanan, V.; Stark, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of horizontal head rotation were obtained from normal human subjects intending to make 'time optimal' trajectories between targets. By mounting large, lightweight vanes on the head, viscous damping B, up to 15 times normal could be added to the usual mechanical load of the head. With the added viscosity, the head trajectory was slowed and of larger duration (as expected) since fixed and maximal (for that amplitude) muscle forces had to accelerate the added viscous load. This decreased acceleration and velocity and longer duration movement still ensued in spite of adaptive compensation; this provided evidence that quasi-'time optimal' movements do indeed employ maximal muscle forces. The adaptation to this added load was rapid. Then the 'adapted state' subjects produced changed trajectories. The adaptation depended in part on the differing detailed instructions given to the subjects. This differential adaptation provided evidence for the existence of preprogrammed controller signals, sensitive to intended criterion, and neurologically ballistic or open loop rather than modified by feedback from proprioceptors or vision.

  11. Radial head prosthesis: results overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carità, E; Donadelli, A; Cugola, L; Perazzini, P

    2017-12-01

    Radial head replacement is frequently used in treatment of radial head fractures or sequela. Impossibility to restore a correct anatomy, acute elbow traumatic instability and failure of osteosynthesis hardware are the most common indications. The authors describe their case studies and results on the implantation of various radial head prostheses. Between June 2005 and June 2016, 28 radial head prostheses were implanted in the same number of patients with an average follow-up of 49 months (6-104). Indications for implantation were: Mason type III and IV radial head fractures and post-traumatic arthritis due to failure of previous treatments. Monopolar prostheses were used and were press-fit implanted via Kaplan's lateral access and Kocher's anconeus approach to the humeroradial joint. At the follow-up, assessments were made of the pain, according to the visual analogic scale, range of motion (ROM), stability and functionality according to the Mayo Elbow Performance Score, presence of osteolysis and mobilization during radiography tests, personal satisfaction of the patients, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand and Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation outcomes measurements. At the follow-up, we recorded an average level of pain of 1.8 in patients under acute treatments for radial head fractures and a marked reduction in the remaining cases from 6.7 to 2.1. ROM was found on average to be 107° of flexion-extension and 159° of pronosupination. Personal satisfaction was good-excellent in 23 cases. There was no case of infection; removal of the implant was necessary in three cases due to mobilization of the stem and oversized implants. In six cases, bone resorption was seen at the level of the prosthetic collar and it was in all cases asymptomatic. The results of this study suggest that the use of prostheses, if well positioned, is a valid solution in the treatment of secondary arthritis and fractures of the radial head with poor prognosis, with good results in the

  12. Preradiation dental decisions in patients with head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bruins, H.H. (Hubert Herman)

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a series of studies that investigated preradiation dental decision making in patients with head and neck cancer. In Chapter 1, it is ascertained that in view of the risk for oral sequelae resulting from high-dose radiotherapy, special attention to preradiation dental planning appears critical. Each case must be managed individually on the basis of the patient's needs, the status of the tumor, and the risks for dental health in irradiated tissues; a single-formula approach...

  13. Low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography in a realistic geometry head model: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Lei; Lai Yuan; He Bin

    2005-01-01

    It is of importance to localize neural sources from scalp recorded EEG. Low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) has received considerable attention for localizing brain electrical sources. However, most such efforts have used spherical head models in representing the head volume conductor. Investigation of the performance of LORETA in a realistic geometry head model, as compared with the spherical model, will provide useful information guiding interpretation of data obtained by using the spherical head model. The performance of LORETA was evaluated by means of computer simulations. The boundary element method was used to solve the forward problem. A three-shell realistic geometry (RG) head model was constructed from MRI scans of a human subject. Dipole source configurations of a single dipole located at different regions of the brain with varying depth were used to assess the performance of LORETA in different regions of the brain. A three-sphere head model was also used to approximate the RG head model, and similar simulations performed, and results compared with the RG-LORETA with reference to the locations of the simulated sources. Multi-source localizations were discussed and examples given in the RG head model. Localization errors employing the spherical LORETA, with reference to the source locations within the realistic geometry head, were about 20-30 mm, for four brain regions evaluated: frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital regions. Localization errors employing the RG head model were about 10 mm over the same four brain regions. The present simulation results suggest that the use of the RG head model reduces the localization error of LORETA, and that the RG head model based LORETA is desirable if high localization accuracy is needed

  14. Porcine head response to blast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay eShridharani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposed porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110-740 kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3-6.9 ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. The bulk head acceleration and the pressure at the surface of the head and in the cranial cavity were measured. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within thirty seconds and the remaining two recovered within 8 minutes following bagging and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80-685 kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300-2830 kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385-3845 G’s and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R2=0.90. One standard deviation corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure, and head acceleration are presented to provide experimental data for

  15. Rapid Prototyping by Single Point Incremental Forming of Sheet Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Martin

    2008-01-01

    explains a lot of experimental observation seen in the literature. SPIF of tailored blanks produced by friction stir welding. It is demonstrated that SPIF of tailored sheets produced by friction stir welding is possible and a promising way of combining two innovative manufacturing processes. Multi stage...

  16. Rapid Single-Cell Electroporation for Labeling Organotypic Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    the micropipette tip at significantly high voltages, which cause significantly higher particle velocities, a " traffic jam " of sorts may develop which...do so too quickly, we believe that a " traffic jam " may occur where more plasmids are prevented from exiting the tip, but through which small charged

  17. Rapid isolation of high molecular weight DNA from single dried ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANAND

    For studying genetic diversity in populations of predatory coccinellid, Cryptolaemus montrouzieri. Mulsant (Coccinellidae: Coleoptera), our attempts to isolate high quality DNA from individual adult beetle using several previously reported protocols and even modifications were quite unsuccessful as the insect size was small ...

  18. Rapid isolation of high molecular weight DNA from single dry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For studying genetic diversity in populations of predatory coccinellid, Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant (Coccinellidae: Coleoptera), our attempts to isolate high quality DNA from individual adult beetle using several previously reported protocols and even modifications were quite unsuccessful as the insect size was small ...

  19. SU-E-T-393: Evaluation of Large Field IMRT Versus RapidArc Planning for Carcinoma Cervix with Para-Aotic Node Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, S Kothanda; Girigesh, Y; MISHRA, M; Lalit, K [Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, New Delhi (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to evaluate and compare Large field IMRT and RapidArc planning for Carcinoma Cervix and Para-aotic node irradiation. Methods: In this study, ten patients of Cervix with para-aotic node have been selected with PTV length 35+2cm. All plans were generated in Eclipse TPS V10.0 with Dynamic IMRT and RapidArc technique using 6MV photon energy. In IMRT planning, 7 fields were chosen to get optimal plan and in RapidArc, double Full arc clockwise and counter clockwise were used for planning. All the plans were generated with single isocenter and calculated using AAA dose algorithm. For all the cases the prescribed dose to PTV was same and the plan acceptance criteria is; 95% of the PTV volume should receive 100% prescribed dose. The tolerance doses for the OAR’s is also taken in to account. The evaluation criteria used for analysis are; 1) Homogeneity Index, 2) Conformity Index, 3) Mean Dose to OAR’s, 4)Total monitor units delivered. Results: DVH analysis were performed for both IMRT and RapidArc planning. In both the plans, 95% of PTV volume receives prescribed dose and maximum dose are less than 107%. The conformity index are same in both the techniques. The mean Homogeneity index are 1.036 and 1.053 for IMRT and RapidArc plan. The mean (mean + SD) dose of bladder and rectum in IMRT is 44.2+1.55, 42.05+2.52 and RapidArc is 46.66+1.6, 44.2+2.75 respectively. There is no significant difference found in Right Femoral head, Left Femoral head and Kidney doses. It is found that total MU’s are more in IMRT compared with RapidArc planning. Conclusion: In the case of cervix with Para-arotic node single isocenter irradiation, IMRT planning in large-field is better compared to RapidArc planning in terms of Homogeneity Index and mean dose of Bladder and Rectum.

  20. Environmental Anchoring of Head Direction in a Computational Model of Retrosplenial Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicanski, Andrej; Burgess, Neil

    2016-11-16

    Allocentric (world-centered) spatial codes driven by path integration accumulate error unless reset by environmental sensory inputs that are necessarily egocentric (body-centered). Previous models of the head direction system avoided the necessary transformation between egocentric and allocentric reference frames by placing visual cues at infinity. Here we present a model of head direction coding that copes with exclusively proximal cues by making use of a conjunctive representation of head direction and location in retrosplenial cortex. Egocentric landmark bearing of proximal cues, which changes with location, is mapped onto this retrosplenial representation. The model avoids distortions due to parallax, which occur in simple models when a single proximal cue card is used, and can also accommodate multiple cues, suggesting how it can generalize to arbitrary sensory environments. It provides a functional account of the anatomical distribution of head direction cells along Papez' circuit, of place-by-direction coding in retrosplenial cortex, the anatomical connection from the anterior thalamic nuclei to retrosplenial cortex, and the involvement of retrosplenial cortex in navigation. In addition to parallax correction, the same mechanism allows for continuity of head direction coding between connected environments, and shows how a head direction representation can be stabilized by a single within arena cue. We also make predictions for drift during exploration of a new environment, the effects of hippocampal lesions on retrosplenial cells, and on head direction coding in differently shaped environments. The activity of head direction cells signals the direction of an animal's head relative to landmarks in the world. Although driven by internal estimates of head movements, head direction cells must be kept aligned to the external world by sensory inputs, which arrive in the reference frame of the sensory receptors. We present a computational model, which proposes that

  1. An extension of Box-Jenkins transfer/noise models for spatial interpolation of groundwater head series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geer, F.C. van; Zuur, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    This paper advocates an approach to extend single-output Box-Jenkins transfer/noise models for several groundwater head series to a multiple-output transfer/noise model. The approach links several groundwater head series and enables a spatial interpolation in terms of time series analysis. Our

  2. Head-to-Head Comparison of Serum Fractionation Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Zhang, Heidi; Eng, Jimmy K.; Fang, Ruihua; Piening, Brian D.; Feng, Li-Chia; lorentzen, Travis D.; Schoenherr, Regine M.; Keane, John F.; Holzman, Ted; Fitzgibbon, Matthew; Lin, Chen Wei; Zhang, Hui; Cooke, Kelly; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Anderson, Leigh N.; Watts, Julian; Smith, Richard D.; McIntosh, Martin; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2007-02-01

    Multiple approaches for simplifying the serum proteome have been described. These techniques are generally developed across different laboratories, samples, mass spectrometry platforms, and analysis tools. Hence, comparing the available schemes is impossible from the existing literature because of confounding variables. We describe a head-to-head comparison of several serum fractionation schemes, including N-linked glycopeptide enrichment, cysteinyl-peptide enrichment, magnetic bead separation (C3, C8, and WCX), size fractionation, Protein A/G depletion, and immunoaffinity column depletion of abundant serum proteins. Each technique was compared to results obtained from unfractionated human serum. The results show immunoaffinity subtraction is the most effective means for simplifying the serum proteome and maintaining reasonable sample throughput. The reported dataset is publicly available and provides a standard against which emergent technologies can be compared and evaluated for their contribution to serum-based biomarker discovery.

  3. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with HEADS UP & CDC's Injury Center HEADS UP Resources File Formats Help: How do I view different ... 6348 Email CDC-INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov Top

  4. Head Lice: Treatment Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicine is best? Is mayonnaise effective for treating head lice? CDC does not have clear scientific evidence ... effective form of treatment. If the treatment for head lice doesn't seem to be working, does ...

  5. Humeral head size in shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaesel, M T; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1998-01-01

    Changes in kinematics after hemiarthroplasty of the glenohumeral joint were investigated in nine cadaveric specimens. During experiments the influence of the humeral head size on glenohumeral kinematics was evaluated. A modular prosthesis with five different head sizes and press-fit stems was used....... Three-dimensional kinematic measurements during abduction and adduction from 0 degree to 70 degrees showed increased external rotation with increasing head size. Small prosthetic heads translated inferiorly and large prosthetic heads superiorly compared with the intact humeral head. During forced...... anterior and posterior translation the mobility is restricted with increasing head size. This study found that when a press-fit prosthesis is used, it takes 1.25 times the volume of the intact humeral head to reconstruct the kinematics of the glenohumeral joint....

  6. Preschool Facilities - MDC_HeadStart

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — A label (point) feature class of Head Start / Early Head Start/ Delegate Agencies/ Child Care Partnership & Family Day Care Homes Programs location in Miami-Dade...

  7. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this? Submit Button Connect with HEADS UP & CDC's Injury Center HEADS UP Resources File Formats Help: How ... for Disease Control and Prevention , National Center for Injury Prevention and Control , Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention ...

  8. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Submit Button Connect with HEADS UP & CDC's Injury Center HEADS UP Resources File Formats Help: How do ... Page last updated: April 24, 2017 Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , National Center for ...

  9. Heads Up to High School Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... submit" value="Submit" /> HEADS UP to School Sports Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir To help ... organizations, developed the HEADS UP: Concussion in School Sports initiative and materials. Specific Concussion Information for... Coaches ...

  10. EmptyHeaded: A Relational Engine for Graph Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberger, Christopher R; Tu, Susan; Olukotun, Kunle; Ré, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    There are two types of high-performance graph processing engines: low- and high-level engines. Low-level engines (Galois, PowerGraph, Snap) provide optimized data structures and computation models but require users to write low-level imperative code, hence ensuring that efficiency is the burden of the user. In high-level engines, users write in query languages like datalog (SociaLite) or SQL (Grail). High-level engines are easier to use but are orders of magnitude slower than the low-level graph engines. We present EmptyHeaded, a high-level engine that supports a rich datalog-like query language and achieves performance comparable to that of low-level engines. At the core of EmptyHeaded's design is a new class of join algorithms that satisfy strong theoretical guarantees but have thus far not achieved performance comparable to that of specialized graph processing engines. To achieve high performance, EmptyHeaded introduces a new join engine architecture, including a novel query optimizer and data layouts that leverage single-instruction multiple data (SIMD) parallelism. With this architecture, EmptyHeaded outperforms high-level approaches by up to three orders of magnitude on graph pattern queries, PageRank, and Single-Source Shortest Paths (SSSP) and is an order of magnitude faster than many low-level baselines. We validate that EmptyHeaded competes with the best-of-breed low-level engine (Galois), achieving comparable performance on PageRank and at most 3× worse performance on SSSP.

  11. Integrated media presentation in multidisciplinary head and neck oncology meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo, Ricard; Morgan, Peter; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Odell, Edward; Harrison, John; Almeida, Bernice; McGurk, Mark; Lyons, Andrew; Hussain, Karim; Gleeson, Michael; O'Connell, Mary; Calman, Frances; Ng, Roy; Roblin, Paul; Connor, Steve; Fenlon, Michael; Burke, Mary; Chandra, Ashish; Herbert, Amanda; Patt, Sarah; Steward-Bagley, Lizzie; Donnelly, Rachael; Freeman, Lesley; Twinn, Claire; Mason, Carolyn

    2009-02-01

    Multidisciplinary meetings (MDMs) are an essential part of the management of head and neck cancer. Practice care guidance set up by the British Association of Head and Neck Oncologists has recommended that MDMs should have appropriate projection equipment for computer-generated images so that all members of group have access to the same information. The aim of this paper is to review our experience with the integrated visual presentation of head and neck oncology patients and to demonstrate its advantages over conventional approaches. Digital photographs are taken of patients and of their index tumour at presentation or at the time of diagnostic endoscopy. All relevant pre-treatment digitised images from tumour sites and radiological images and histological slides are incorporated into a single presentation using Microsoft PowerPoint software. During the past 2 years, on-line radiological scans have also become accessible for the meeting to aid treatment planning. Subsequently, all peri-operative pictures and post-surgical macroscopic and microscopic histopathological images are added to each patient's presentation, which is then hyperlinked into the agenda. The Guy's and St Thomas' Head and Neck Cancer Centre treats over 400 patients a year, and since 2002, all new cancer diagnoses have been discussed in the weekly MDM as described above. A total of 1,638 presentations have been incorporated in a centralized database that is updated in the event of recurrence, further primary tumours or other clinical developments. Satisfactory documentation and staging of head and neck tumours must include a verbal description, accurate measurement, diagrammatic representation, photographic recording and appropriate radiological imaging. Integrated presentation at MDM collates all relevant findings for clinical management decisions on patients with head and neck cancer. This approach is also an extremely valuable adjunct to long-term clinical monitoring.

  12. JINR rapid communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The present collection of rapid communications from JINR, Dubna, contains seven separate records on invisible Z-boson width and restrictions on next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, cosmic test of honeycomb drift chambers, fission of 209 Bi, 232 Th, 235 U, 238 U and 237 Np in a spallation neutron field, rapid screening of spontaneous and radiation-induced structural changes at the vestigial gene of Drosophila melanogaster by polymerase chain reaction, gamma-ray multiplicities in sub-barrier fission of 226 Th and the decay constants of the scalar and pseudoscalar mesons in the quark models with quasilocal interaction

  13. JINR rapid communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The present collection of rapid communications from JINR, Dubna, contains seven separate records on relativistic multiparticle processes in the central rapidity region at asymptotically high energies, a new experimental study of charged K→3π decays, pre-Cherenkov radiation as a phenomenon of 'light barrier', stable S=-2 H dibaryon found in Dubna, calculation of Green functions and gluon top in some unambiguous gauges, a method of a fast selection of inelastic nucleus-nucleus collisions for the CMS experiment and the manifestation of jet quenching in differential distributions of the total transverse energy in nucleus-nucleus collisions

  14. Perspective of culster rapid acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Yasushi

    1994-01-01

    Fast cluster ion beam is a new radiation beam which is characterized by high particle density and very short pulse when the composing atom group is considered as one ion pulse. As an important research which utilizes these features, the elucidation of nonlinear atomic collision dynamics is conceivable. The condition under which the nonlinear atomic collision occurs is discussed, and that in the relation of the acceleration energy of an ion beam with the particle number density is shown. The history and the present status of cluster rapid acceleration are reported. According to the balance of the electrostatic potential and bond energy of cluster ions, there is the limit in its allowable charge, and the rapid acceleration of cluster ions is made difficult. Accordingly, the method of doing preceding acceleration with an electrostatic accelerator and the acceleration to higher velocity with a RFQ accelerator (Lyons method) is the excellent acceleration system. The new charge conversion method by photoionization is proposed, and it is explained. The examples that suggest the possibility of the occurrence of nonlinear atomic collision by a single atom ion beam are introduced. (K.I.)

  15. Orbital Welding Head Held By Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangl, Kenneth J.; Graham, Benny F.; Nesmith, Malcolm F.; Mcferrin, David C.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital welding head positioned by robot controls motion and voltage of arc-welding torch mounted in head. New head encircles part at torch end, and held and manipulated by robot arm at opposite end. Entire welding operation automated. Useful for operations in hazardous environments.

  16. Head movements while steering around bends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Oving, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the determinants of head motions (rotations) when driving around bends were investigated when drivers viewed the scene through a head-mounted display. The scene camera was either fixed or coupled to head motions along 2 or 3 axes of rotation. Eight participants drove around a

  17. Rapid Cycling and Its Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Important security updates for DBSAlliance.org. Read more... Rapid Cycling and its Treatment What is bipolar disorder? ... Guide to Depression and Manic Depression . What is rapid cycling? Rapid cycling is defined as four or ...

  18. Update on abusive head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaahinfar, Ashkon; Whitelaw, Kevin D; Mansour, Karim M

    2015-06-01

    This article provides an update on abusive head trauma (AHT), focusing on new developments most salient to the emergency medicine clinician, including epidemiology, clinical recognition, diagnostic work-up, management of neurologic injury, and public health implications. The recent literature has focused on honing the clinician's ability to recognize AHT and its immediate sequelae, to more accurately distinguish between abusive and accidental head injuries by patterns of neuroimaging and retinal hemorrhages, and to appreciate the long-term impacts. Specifically, both a clinical prediction rule and biomarker show promise, and new research advocates for the early identification of subclinical seizures as well as cervical spine injuries. The emergency medicine provider must be able to recognize and manage children who may have AHT and to appreciate when the diagnostic findings warrant consultation with a child protection team. These authors summarize the recent and notable advances in our understanding of AHT.

  19. Rapid Prototyping Reconsidered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosier, James

    2011-01-01

    Continuing educators need additional strategies for developing new programming that can both reduce the time to market and lower the cost of development. Rapid prototyping, a time-compression technique adapted from the high technology industry, represents one such strategy that merits renewed evaluation. Although in higher education rapid…

  20. Navigate the Digital Rapids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Julie; Davis, Vicki

    2010-01-01

    How can teachers teach digital citizenship when the digital landscape is changing so rapidly? How can teachers teach proper online social interactions when the students are outside their classroom and thus outside their control? Will encouraging students to engage in global collaborative environments land teachers in hot water? These are the…