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Sample records for single qubit encoded

  1. A CNOT gate between multiphoton qubits encoded in two cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, S; Gao, Y Y; Reinhold, P; Wang, C; Axline, C J; Frunzio, L; Girvin, S M; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, M; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2018-02-13

    Entangling gates between qubits are a crucial component for performing algorithms in quantum computers. However, any quantum algorithm must ultimately operate on error-protected logical qubits encoded in high-dimensional systems. Typically, logical qubits are encoded in multiple two-level systems, but entangling gates operating on such qubits are highly complex and have not yet been demonstrated. Here we realize a controlled NOT (CNOT) gate between two multiphoton qubits in two microwave cavities. In this approach, we encode a qubit in the high-dimensional space of a single cavity mode, rather than in multiple two-level systems. We couple two such encoded qubits together through a transmon, which is driven by an RF pump to apply the gate within 190 ns. This is two orders of magnitude shorter than the decoherence time of the transmon, enabling a high-fidelity gate operation. These results are an important step towards universal algorithms on error-corrected logical qubits.

  2. Measurement strategy for spatially encoded photonic qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis-Prosser, M. A.; Neves, L.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a measurement strategy which can, probabilistically, reproduce the statistics of any observable for spatially encoded photonic qubits. It comprises the implementation of a two-outcome positive operator-valued measure followed by a detection in a fixed transverse position, making the displacement of the detection system unnecessary, unlike previous methods. This strategy generalizes a scheme recently demonstrated by one of us and co-workers, restricted to measurement of observables with equatorial eigenvectors only. The method presented here can be implemented with the current technology of programmable multipixel liquid-crystal displays. In addition, it can be straightforwardly extended to high-dimensional qudits and may be a valuable tool in optical implementations of quantum information protocols with spatial qubits and qudits.

  3. Interfacing superconducting qubits and single optical photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Sumanta; Faez, Sanli; Sørensen, Anders S.

    2016-01-01

    We propose an efficient light-matter interface at optical frequencies between a superconducting qubit and a single photon. The desired interface is based on a hybrid architecture composed of an organic molecule embedded inside an optical waveguide and electrically coupled to a superconducting qubit

  4. Autonomous calibration of single spin qubit operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Florian; Unden, Thomas; Zoller, Jonathan; Said, Ressa S.; Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2017-12-01

    Fully autonomous precise control of qubits is crucial for quantum information processing, quantum communication, and quantum sensing applications. It requires minimal human intervention on the ability to model, to predict, and to anticipate the quantum dynamics, as well as to precisely control and calibrate single qubit operations. Here, we demonstrate single qubit autonomous calibrations via closed-loop optimisations of electron spin quantum operations in diamond. The operations are examined by quantum state and process tomographic measurements at room temperature, and their performances against systematic errors are iteratively rectified by an optimal pulse engineering algorithm. We achieve an autonomous calibrated fidelity up to 1.00 on a time scale of minutes for a spin population inversion and up to 0.98 on a time scale of hours for a single qubit π/2 -rotation within the experimental error of 2%. These results manifest a full potential for versatile quantum technologies.

  5. Spectroscopy and coherent manipulation of single and coupled flux qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yu-Lin; Deng Hui; Huang Ke-Qiang; Tian Ye; Yu Hai-Feng; Xue Guang-Ming; Jin Yi-Rong; Li Jie; Zhao Shi-Ping; Zheng Dong-Ning

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of three-junction flux qubits, both single flux qubits and coupled flux qubits, using a coupled direct current superconducting quantum interference device (dc-SQUID) for readout are reported. The measurement procedure is described in detail. We performed spectroscopy measurements and coherent manipulations of the qubit states on a single flux qubit, demonstrating quantum energy levels and Rabi oscillations, with Rabi oscillation decay time T Rabi = 78 ns and energy relaxation time T 1 = 315 ns. We found that the value of T Rabi depends strongly on the mutual inductance between the qubit and the magnetic coil. We also performed spectroscopy measurements on inductively coupled flux qubits. (general)

  6. Simple scheme for encoding and decoding a qubit in unknown state for various topological codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łodyga, Justyna; Mazurek, Paweł; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michał

    2015-03-01

    We present a scheme for encoding and decoding an unknown state for CSS codes, based on syndrome measurements. We illustrate our method by means of Kitaev toric code, defected-lattice code, topological subsystem code and 3D Haah code. The protocol is local whenever in a given code the crossings between the logical operators consist of next neighbour pairs, which holds for the above codes. For subsystem code we also present scheme in a noisy case, where we allow for bit and phase-flip errors on qubits as well as state preparation and syndrome measurement errors. Similar scheme can be built for two other codes. We show that the fidelity of the protected qubit in the noisy scenario in a large code size limit is of , where p is a probability of error on a single qubit per time step. Regarding Haah code we provide noiseless scheme, leaving the noisy case as an open problem.

  7. Ultrafast geometric control of a single qubit using chirped pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, Patrick E; Malinovskaya, Svetlana A; Malinovsky, Vladimir S

    2012-01-01

    We propose a control strategy to perform arbitrary unitary operations on a single qubit based solely on the geometrical phase that the qubit state acquires after cyclic evolution in the parameter space. The scheme uses ultrafast linearly chirped pulses and provides the possibility of reducing the duration of a single-qubit operation to a few picoseconds.

  8. Single qubit manipulation in a microfabricated surface electrode ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Emily; Baek, So-Young; Blain, Matthew; Stick, Daniel; Gaultney, Daniel; Crain, Stephen; Noek, Rachel; Kim, Taehyun; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2013-09-01

    We trap individual 171Yb+ ions in a surface trap microfabricated on a silicon substrate, and demonstrate a complete set of high fidelity single qubit operations for the hyperfine qubit. Trapping times exceeding 20 min without laser cooling, and heating rates as low as 0.8 quanta ms-1, indicate stable trapping conditions in these microtraps. A coherence time of more than 1 s, high fidelity qubit state detection and single qubit rotations are demonstrated. The observation of low heating rates and demonstration of high quality single qubit gates at room temperature are critical steps toward scalable quantum information processing in microfabricated surface traps.

  9. Single qubit manipulation in a microfabricated surface electrode ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mount, Emily; Baek, So-Young; Gaultney, Daniel; Crain, Stephen; Noek, Rachel; Kim, Taehyun; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang; Blain, Matthew; Stick, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We trap individual 171 Yb + ions in a surface trap microfabricated on a silicon substrate, and demonstrate a complete set of high fidelity single qubit operations for the hyperfine qubit. Trapping times exceeding 20 min without laser cooling, and heating rates as low as 0.8 quanta ms −1 , indicate stable trapping conditions in these microtraps. A coherence time of more than 1 s, high fidelity qubit state detection and single qubit rotations are demonstrated. The observation of low heating rates and demonstration of high quality single qubit gates at room temperature are critical steps toward scalable quantum information processing in microfabricated surface traps. (paper)

  10. Quantum Privacy Amplification for a Sequence of Single Qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Fuguo; Long Guilu

    2006-01-01

    We present a scheme for quantum privacy amplification (QPA) for a sequence of single qubits. The QPA procedure uses a unitary operation with two controlled-not gates and a Hadamard gate. Every two qubits are performed with the unitary gate operation, and a measurement is made on one photon and the other one is retained. The retained qubit carries the state information of the discarded one. In this way, the information leakage is reduced. The procedure can be performed repeatedly so that the information leakage is reduced to any arbitrarily low level. With this QPA scheme, the quantum secure direct communication with single qubits can be implemented with arbitrarily high security. We also exploit this scheme to do privacy amplification on the single qubits in quantum information sharing for long-distance communication with quantum repeaters.

  11. Implementation of single qubit in QD ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alegre, T.P. Mayer

    2004-01-01

    Full text: During the last decades the semiconductor industry has achieved the production of exponentially shrinking components. This fact points to fundamental limits of integration, making computation with single atoms or particles like an electron an ultimate goal. To get to this limit, quantum systems in solid state have to be manipulated in a controllable fashion. The assessment of quantum degrees of freedom for information processing may allow exponentially faster performance for certain classes of problems. The essential aspect to be explored in quantum information processing resides in the superposition of states that allows resources such as entangled states to be envisaged. The quest for the optimal system to host a quantum variable that is sufficiently isolated from the environment encompasses implementations spanning optical, atomic, molecular and solid state systems. In the solid state, a variety of proposals have come forth, each one having its own advantages and disadvantages. The main conclusion from these e efforts is that there is no decisive technology upon which quantum information devices will be built. Self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs or QDs), can be grown with size uniformity that enables the observation of single electron loading events. They can in turn be used to controllably trap single electrons into discrete levels, atom-like, with their corresponding shells. Hund's rules and Pauli exclusion principle are observed in these nanostructures and are key in allowing and preserving a particular quantum state. Provided that one can trap one electron in a QD ensemble, the corresponding spin can be manipulated by an external magnetic field by either conventional Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) techniques or g-tensor modulation resonance (g-TMR). By analogy with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, single qubit operations are proposed, which at some point in time should be scaled, provided that spin-spin interactions can be controlled. Read out can be

  12. Optimal control of a single qubit by direct inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenin, M.; Poetz, W.

    2006-01-01

    Optimal control of a driven single dissipative qubit is formulated as an inverse problem. We show that direct inversion is possible which allows an analytic construction of optimal control fields. Exact inversion is shown to be possible for dissipative qubits which can be described by a Lindblad equation. It is shown that optimal solutions are not unique. For a qubit with weak coupling to phonons we choose, among the set of exact solutions for the dissipationless qubit, one which minimizes the dissipative contribution in the kinetic equations. Examples are given for state trapping and Z-gate operation. Using analytic expressions for optimal control fields, favorable domains for dynamic stabilization in the Bloch sphere are identified. In the case of approximate inversion, the identified approximate solution may be used as a starting point for further optimization following standard methods

  13. Crosstalk error correction through dynamical decoupling of single-qubit gates in capacitively coupled singlet-triplet semiconductor spin qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buterakos, Donovan; Throckmorton, Robert E.; Das Sarma, S.

    2018-01-01

    In addition to magnetic field and electric charge noise adversely affecting spin-qubit operations, performing single-qubit gates on one of multiple coupled singlet-triplet qubits presents a new challenge: crosstalk, which is inevitable (and must be minimized) in any multiqubit quantum computing architecture. We develop a set of dynamically corrected pulse sequences that are designed to cancel the effects of both types of noise (i.e., field and charge) as well as crosstalk to leading order, and provide parameters for these corrected sequences for all 24 of the single-qubit Clifford gates. We then provide an estimate of the error as a function of the noise and capacitive coupling to compare the fidelity of our corrected gates to their uncorrected versions. Dynamical error correction protocols presented in this work are important for the next generation of singlet-triplet qubit devices where coupling among many qubits will become relevant.

  14. Nondestructive fluorescent state detection of single neutral atom qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Michael J; Hamley, Christopher D; Shih, Chung-Yu; Chapman, Michael S

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate nondestructive (lossless) fluorescent state detection of individual neutral atom qubits trapped in an optical lattice. The hyperfine state of the atom is measured with a 95% accuracy and an atom loss rate of 1%. Individual atoms are initialized and detected over 100 times before being lost from the trap, representing a 100-fold improvement in data collection rates over previous experiments. Microwave Rabi oscillations are observed with repeated measurements of one and the same single atom. © 2011 American Physical Society

  15. Realization of Arbitrary Positive-Operator-Value Measurement of Single Atomic Qubit via Cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Han; Wei, Wu; Chun-Wang, Wu; Hong-Yi, Dai; Cheng-Zu, Li

    2008-01-01

    Positive-operator-value measurement (POVM) is the most general class of quantum measurement. We propose a scheme to deterministically implement arbitrary POVMs of single atomic qubit via cavity QED catalysed by only one ancilla atomic qubit. By appropriately entangling two atomic qubits and sequentially measuring the ancilla qubit, any POVM can be implemented step by step. As an application of our scheme, the realization of a specific POVM for optimal unambiguous discrimination (OUD) between two nonorthogonal states is given

  16. Realization of arbitrary positive-operator-value measurement of single atomic qubit via cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yang; Wu Wei; Wu Chunwang; Dai Hongyi; Li Chengzu

    2008-01-01

    Positive-operator-value measurement (POVM) is the most general class of quantum measurement. We propose a scheme to deterministically implement arbitrary POVMs of single atomic qubit via cavity QED catalysed by only one ancilla atomic qubit. By appropriately entangling two atomic qubits and sequentially measuring the ancilla qubit, any POVM can be implemented step by step. As an application of our scheme, the realization of a specific POVM for optimal unambiguous discrimination (OUD) between two nonorthogonal states is given. (authors)

  17. Realization of Arbitrary Positive-Operator-Value Measurement of Single Atomic Qubit via Cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yang; Wu, Wei; Wu, Chun-Wang; Dai, Hong-Yi; Li, Cheng-Zu

    2008-12-01

    Positive-operator-value measurement (POVM) is the most general class of quantum measurement. We propose a scheme to deterministically implement arbitrary POVMs of single atomic qubit via cavity QED catalysed by only one ancilla atomic qubit. By appropriately entangling two atomic qubits and sequentially measuring the ancilla qubit, any POVM can be implemented step by step. As an application of our scheme, the realization of a specific POVM for optimal unambiguous discrimination (OUD) between two nonorthogonal states is given.

  18. Improved Sensing with a Single Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekatski, P.; Skotiniotis, M.; Dür, W.

    2017-04-01

    We consider quantum metrology with arbitrary prior knowledge of the parameter. We demonstrate that a single sensing two-level system can act as a virtual multilevel system that offers increased sensitivity in a Bayesian single-shot metrology scenario, and that allows one to estimate (arbitrary) large parameter values by avoiding phase wraps. This is achieved by making use of additional degrees of freedom or auxiliary systems not participating in the sensing process. The joint system is manipulated by intermediate control operations in such a way that an effective Hamiltonian, with an arbitrary spectrum, is generated that mimics the spectrum of a multisystem interacting with the field. We show how to use additional internal degrees of freedom of a single trapped ion to achieve a high-sensitivity magnetic field sensor for fields with arbitrary prior knowledge.

  19. Security of BB84 with weak randomness and imperfect qubit encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang-Yuan; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Li, Hong-Wei; Chen, Wei; Fang, Xi; Han, Zheng-Fu; Huang, Wei

    2018-03-01

    The main threats for the well-known Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) practical quantum key distribution (QKD) systems are that its encoding is inaccurate and measurement device may be vulnerable to particular attacks. Thus, a general physical model or security proof to tackle these loopholes simultaneously and quantitatively is highly desired. Here we give a framework on the security of BB84 when imperfect qubit encoding and vulnerability of measurement device are both considered. In our analysis, the potential attacks to measurement device are generalized by the recently proposed weak randomness model which assumes the input random numbers are partially biased depending on a hidden variable planted by an eavesdropper. And the inevitable encoding inaccuracy is also introduced here. From a fundamental view, our work reveals the potential information leakage due to encoding inaccuracy and weak randomness input. For applications, our result can be viewed as a useful tool to quantitatively evaluate the security of a practical QKD system.

  20. Single-qubit remote manipulation by magnetic solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuccoli, Alessandro, E-mail: cuccoli@fi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); CNISM – c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Nuzzi, Davide, E-mail: nuzzi@fi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Vaia, Ruggero, E-mail: ruggero.vaia@isc.cnr.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Verrucchi, Paola, E-mail: verrucchi@fi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Magnetic solitons can constitute a means for manipulating qubits from a distance. This would overcome the necessity of directly applying selective magnetic fields, which is unfeasible in the case of a matrix of qubits embedded in a solid-state quantum device. If the latter contained one-dimensional Heisenberg spin chains coupled to each qubit, one can originate a soliton in a selected chain by applying a time-dependent field at one end of it, far from the qubits. The generation of realistic solitons has been simulated. When a suitable soliton passes by, the coupled qubit undergoes nontrivial operations, even in the presence of moderate thermal noise. - Highlights: • Proposal for the remote control of qubits coupled to a spin chain supporting solitons. • Traveling solitons can be generated on the chain by acting far from the qubit. • Suitable magnetic solitons can properly change the qubit state. • This qubit manipulation mechanism is shown to be resilient to thermal noise.

  1. Interfacing Superconducting Qubits and Single Optical Photons Using Molecules in Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sumanta; Elfving, Vincent E.; Faez, Sanli; Sørensen, Anders S.

    2017-04-01

    We propose an efficient light-matter interface at optical frequencies between a single photon and a superconducting qubit. The desired interface is based on a hybrid architecture composed of an organic molecule embedded inside an optical waveguide and electrically coupled to a superconducting qubit placed near the outside surface of the waveguide. We show that high fidelity, photon-mediated, entanglement between distant superconducting qubits can be achieved with incident pulses at the single photon level. Such a low light level is highly desirable for achieving a coherent optical interface with superconducting qubit, since it minimizes decoherence arising from the absorption of light.

  2. Trapped Ion Qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm

    2017-04-01

    Qubits can be encoded in clock states of trapped ions. These states are well isolated from the environment resulting in long coherence times [1] while enabling efficient high-fidelity qubit interactions mediated by the Coulomb coupled motion of the ions in the trap. Quantum states can be prepared with high fidelity and measured efficiently using fluorescence detection. State preparation and detection with 99.93% fidelity have been realized in multiple systems [1,2]. Single qubit gates have been demonstrated below rigorous fault-tolerance thresholds [1,3]. Two qubit gates have been realized with more than 99.9% fidelity [4,5]. Quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on systems of 5 to 15 qubits [6–8].

  3. Single qubit operations using microwave hyperbolic secant pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, H. S.; Long, J. L.; Wu, X.; Bal, M.; Lake, R. E.; Barnes, Edwin; Economou, Sophia E.; Pappas, D. P.

    2017-10-01

    It has been known since the early days of quantum mechanics that hyperbolic secant pulses possess the unique property that they can perform full-cycle Rabi oscillations on two-level quantum systems independently of the pulse detuning. More recently, it was realized that they induce detuning-controlled phases without changing state populations. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the properties of hyperbolic secant pulses on superconducting transmon qubits and contrast them with the more commonly used Gaussian and square waves. We further show that these properties can be exploited to implement phase gates, nominally without exiting the computational subspace. This enables us to demonstrate a microwave-driven Z rotation with a single control parameter, the detuning.

  4. Threshold quantum secret sharing based on single qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Changbin; Miao, Fuyou; Meng, Keju; Yu, Yue

    2018-03-01

    Based on unitary phase shift operation on single qubit in association with Shamir's ( t, n) secret sharing, a ( t, n) threshold quantum secret sharing scheme (or ( t, n)-QSS) is proposed to share both classical information and quantum states. The scheme uses decoy photons to prevent eavesdropping and employs the secret in Shamir's scheme as the private value to guarantee the correctness of secret reconstruction. Analyses show it is resistant to typical intercept-and-resend attack, entangle-and-measure attack and participant attacks such as entanglement swapping attack. Moreover, it is easier to realize in physic and more practical in applications when compared with related ones. By the method in our scheme, new ( t, n)-QSS schemes can be easily constructed using other classical ( t, n) secret sharing.

  5. High-fidelity state detection and tomography of a single-ion Zeeman qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keselman, A; Glickman, Y; Akerman, N; Kotler, S; Ozeri, R

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate high-fidelity Zeeman qubit state detection in a single trapped 88 Sr + ion. Qubit readout is performed by shelving one of the qubit states to a metastable level using a narrow linewidth diode laser at 674 nm, followed by state-selective fluorescence detection. The average fidelity reached for the readout of the qubit state is 0.9989(1). We then measure the fidelity of state tomography, averaged over all possible single-qubit states, which is 0.9979(2). We also fully characterize the detection process using quantum process tomography. This readout fidelity is compatible with recent estimates of the detection error threshold required for fault-tolerant computation, whereas high-fidelity state tomography opens the way for high-precision quantum process tomography.

  6. High-fidelity state detection and tomography of a single-ion Zeeman qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keselman, A; Glickman, Y; Akerman, N; Kotler, S; Ozeri, R, E-mail: ozeri@weizmann.ac.il [Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2011-07-15

    We demonstrate high-fidelity Zeeman qubit state detection in a single trapped {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ion. Qubit readout is performed by shelving one of the qubit states to a metastable level using a narrow linewidth diode laser at 674 nm, followed by state-selective fluorescence detection. The average fidelity reached for the readout of the qubit state is 0.9989(1). We then measure the fidelity of state tomography, averaged over all possible single-qubit states, which is 0.9979(2). We also fully characterize the detection process using quantum process tomography. This readout fidelity is compatible with recent estimates of the detection error threshold required for fault-tolerant computation, whereas high-fidelity state tomography opens the way for high-precision quantum process tomography.

  7. Superconducting Qubit with Integrated Single Flux Quantum Controller Part I: Theory and Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Matthew; Leonard, Edward, Jr.; Thorbeck, Ted; Zhu, Shaojiang; Howington, Caleb; Nelson, Jj; Plourde, Britton; McDermott, Robert

    As the size of quantum processors grow, so do the classical control requirements. The single flux quantum (SFQ) Josephson digital logic family offers an attractive route to proximal classical control of multi-qubit processors. Here we describe coherent control of qubits via trains of SFQ pulses. We discuss the fabrication of an SFQ-based pulse generator and a superconducting transmon qubit on a single chip. Sources of excess microwave loss stemming from the complex multilayer fabrication of the SFQ circuit are discussed. We show how to mitigate this loss through judicious choice of process workflow and appropriate use of sacrificial protection layers. Present address: IBM T.J. Watson Research Center.

  8. Joint Remote State Preparation of a Single-Atom Qubit State via a GHZ Entangled State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao-Qi; Yao, Fengwei; Lin, Xiaochen; Gong, Lihua

    2018-04-01

    We proposed a physical protocol for the joint remote preparation of a single-atom qubit state via a three-atom entangled GHZ-type state previously shared by the two senders and one receiver. Only rotation operations of single-atom, which can be achieved though the resonant interaction between the two-level atom and the classical field, are required in the scheme. It shows that the splitting way of the classical information of the secret qubit not only determines the success of reconstruction of the secret qubit, but also influences the operations of the senders.

  9. Stabilizer Quantum Error Correction Toolbox for Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Simon E.; Girvin, S. M.

    2013-06-01

    We present a general protocol for stabilizer operator measurements in a system of N superconducting qubits. Using the dispersive coupling between the qubits and the field of a resonator as well as single qubit rotations, we show how to encode the parity of an arbitrary subset of M≤N qubits, onto two quasiorthogonal coherent states of the resonator. Together with a fast cavity readout, this enables the efficient measurement of arbitrary stabilizer operators without locality constraints.

  10. Rapid single-flux quantum control of the energy potential in a double SQUID qubit circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Chiarello, Fabio; Leoni, Roberto; Torrioli, Guido; Carelli, Pasquale; Cosmelli, Carlo; Khabipov, Marat; Zorin, Alexander B; Balashov, Dmitri

    2007-01-01

    We report on the development and test of an integrated system composed of a flux qubit and a rapid single-flux quantum (RSFQ) circuit that allows qubit manipulation. The goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of control electronics integrated on the same chip as the qubit, in view of the application in quantum computation with superconducting devices. RSFQ logic relies on the storage and transmission of magnetic flux quanta and can be profitably used with superconducting qubits because of the speed, scalability, compatibility with the qubit fabrication process and low temperature environment. While standard RSFQ circuitry is well assessed, the application to quantum computing requires a complete rescaling of parameter values, in order to preserve the qubit coherence and reduce the power dissipation. In the system presented in this paper, the qubit role is played by a superconducting loop interrupted by a small dc SQUID, usually called a double SQUID, which behaves as a tunable rf-SQUID. Its energy potential has the shape of a double well, with the barrier between the wells controlled by magnetic flux applied to the inner dc SQUID. Here for the first time we report measurements at a base temperature of 370 mK in which flux control pulses with desired characteristics were supplied by a RSFQ circuit fabricated using non-standard parameters in the same chip as the qubit

  11. Hierarchically controlled remote preparation of an arbitrary single-qubit state by using a four-qubit |χ > entangled state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Gui-Bin; Li, Xiao-Wei; Zhan, You-Bang

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we present a scheme for Hierarchically controlled remote preparation of an arbitrary single-qubit state via a four-qubit |χ > state as the quantum channel. In this scheme, a sender wishes to help three agents to remotely prepare a quantum state, respectively. The three agents are divided into two grades, that is, an agent is in the upper grade and other two agents are in the lower grade. It is shown that the agent of the upper grade only needs the assistance of any one of the other two agents for recovering the sender's original state, while an agent of the lower grade needs the collaboration of all the other two agents. In other words, the agents of two grades have different authorities to recover sender's original state.

  12. Single-Shot Readout of a Superconducting Qubit using a Josephson Parametric Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-11

    Single-shot Readout of a Superconducting Qubit using a Josephson Parametric Oscillator Philip Kranz1, Andreas Bengtsson1, Michaël Simoen1, Simon...Josephson Parametric Oscillator Philip Krantz1, Andreas Bengtsson1, Michaël Simoen1, Simon Gustavsson2, Vitaly Shumeiko1, W. D. Oliver2,3, C. M...2016) We propose and demonstrate a new read-out technique for a superconducting qubit by dispersively coupling it to a Josephson parametric

  13. Non-Markovian dynamics of a qubit due to single-photon scattering in a waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yao-Lung L.; Ciccarello, Francesco; Baranger, Harold U.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the open dynamics of a qubit due to scattering of a single photon in an infinite or semi-infinite waveguide. Through an exact solution of the time-dependent multi-photon scattering problem, we find the qubit's dynamical map. Tools of open quantum systems theory allow us then to show the general features of this map, find the corresponding non-Linbladian master equation, and assess in a rigorous way its non-Markovian nature. The qubit dynamics has distinctive features that, in particular, do not occur in emission processes. Two fundamental sources of non-Markovianity are present: the finite width of the photon wavepacket and the time delay for propagation between the qubit and the end of the semi-infinite waveguide.

  14. Superconducting Qubit with Integrated Single Flux Quantum Controller Part II: Experimental Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Edward, Jr.; Beck, Matthew; Thorbeck, Ted; Zhu, Shaojiang; Howington, Caleb; Nelson, Jj; Plourde, Britton; McDermott, Robert

    We describe the characterization of a single flux quantum (SFQ) pulse generator cofabricated with a superconducting quantum circuit on a single chip. Resonant trains of SFQ pulses are used to induce coherent qubit rotations on the Bloch sphere. We describe the SFQ drive characteristics of the qubit at the fundamental transition frequency and at subharmonics (ω01 / n , n = 2 , 3 , 4 , ⋯). We address the issue of quasiparticle poisoning due to the proximal SFQ pulse generator, and we characterize the fidelity of SFQ-based rotations using randomized benchmarking. Present address: IBM T.J. Watson Research Center.

  15. Circuit-quantum electrodynamics with direct magnetic coupling to single-atom spin qubits in isotopically enriched 28Si

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Tosi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in silicon nanofabrication have allowed the manipulation of spin qubits that are extremely isolated from noise sources, being therefore the semiconductor equivalent of single atoms in vacuum. We investigate the possibility of directly coupling an electron spin qubit to a superconducting resonator magnetic vacuum field. By using resonators modified to increase the vacuum magnetic field at the qubit location, and isotopically purified 28Si substrates, it is possible to achieve coupling rates faster than the single spin dephasing. This opens up new avenues for circuit-quantum electrodynamics with spins, and provides a pathway for dispersive read-out of spin qubits via superconducting resonators.

  16. Robust QKD-based private database queries based on alternative sequences of single-qubit measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, YuGuang; Liu, ZhiChao; Chen, XiuBo; Zhou, YiHua; Shi, WeiMin

    2017-12-01

    Quantum channel noise may cause the user to obtain a wrong answer and thus misunderstand the database holder for existing QKD-based quantum private query (QPQ) protocols. In addition, an outside attacker may conceal his attack by exploiting the channel noise. We propose a new, robust QPQ protocol based on four-qubit decoherence-free (DF) states. In contrast to existing QPQ protocols against channel noise, only an alternative fixed sequence of single-qubit measurements is needed by the user (Alice) to measure the received DF states. This property makes it easy to implement the proposed protocol by exploiting current technologies. Moreover, to retain the advantage of flexible database queries, we reconstruct Alice's measurement operators so that Alice needs only conditioned sequences of single-qubit measurements.

  17. Single-shot readout of a superconducting flux qubit with a flux-driven Josephson parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z. R.; Inomata, K.; Oliver, W. D.; Koshino, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Tsai, J. S.; Yamamoto, T.

    2013-09-01

    We report single-shot readout of a superconducting flux qubit by using a flux-driven Josephson parametric amplifier (JPA). After optimizing the readout power, gain of the JPA, and timing of the data acquisition, we observe the Rabi oscillations with a contrast of 74%, which is mainly limited by the bandwidth of the JPA and the energy relaxation of the qubit. The observation of quantum jumps between the qubit eigenstates under continuous monitoring indicates the nondestructiveness of the readout scheme.

  18. Designing Kerr interactions using multiple superconducting qubit types in a single circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Matthew; Joo, Jaewoo; Ginossar, Eran

    2018-02-01

    The engineering of Kerr interactions is of great interest for processing quantum information in multipartite quantum systems and for investigating many-body physics in a complex cavity-qubit network. We study how coupling multiple different types of superconducting qubits to the same cavity modes can be used to modify the self- and cross-Kerr effects acting on the cavities and demonstrate that this type of architecture could be of significant benefit for quantum technologies. Using both analytical perturbation theory results and numerical simulations, we first show that coupling two superconducting qubits with opposite anharmonicities to a single cavity enables the effective self-Kerr interaction to be diminished, while retaining the number splitting effect that enables control and measurement of the cavity field. We demonstrate that this reduction of the self-Kerr effect can maintain the fidelity of coherent states and generalised Schrödinger cat states for much longer than typical coherence times in realistic devices. Next, we find that the cross-Kerr interaction between two cavities can be modified by coupling them both to the same pair of qubit devices. When one of the qubits is tunable in frequency, the strength of entangling interactions between the cavities can be varied on demand, forming the basis for logic operations on the two modes. Finally, we discuss the feasibility of producing an array of cavities and qubits where intermediary and on-site qubits can tune the strength of self- and cross-Kerr interactions across the whole system. This architecture could provide a way to engineer interesting many-body Hamiltonians and be a useful platform for quantum simulation in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  19. Preservation of Quantum Fisher Information and Geometric Phase of a Single Qubit System in a Dissipative Reservoir Through the Addition of Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y. N.; Tian, Q. L.; Mo, Y. F.; Zhang, G. L.; Zeng, K.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the preservation of quantum Fisher information (QFI) of a single-qubit system coupled to a common zero temperature reservoir through the addition of noninteracting qubits. The results show that, the QFI is completely protected in both Markovian and non-Markovian regimes by increasing the number of additional qubits. Besides, the phenomena of QFI display monotonic decay or non-monotonic with revival oscillations depending on the number of additional qubits N - 1 in a common dissipative reservoir. If N < N c (a critical number depending on the reservoirs parameters), the behavior of QFI with monotonic decay occurs. However, if N ≥ N c , QFI exhibits non-monotonic behavior with revival oscillations. Moreover, we extend this model to investigate the effect of additional qubits and the initial conditions of the system on the geometric phase (GP). It is found that, the robustness of GP against the dissipative reservoir has been demonstrated by increasing gradually the number of additional qubits N - 1. Besides, the GP is sensitive to the initial parameter 𝜃, and possesses symmetric in a range regime [0,2 π].

  20. Single qubit gates in a 3D array of neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcovilos, Theodore A.; Wang, Yang; Li, Xiao; Weiss, David S.; Kim, Jungsang

    2012-06-01

    We present an approach to quantum computing using single Cs atoms in a cubic 5-μm spaced 3D optical lattice. After cooling the atoms to near their vibrational ground state (76% ground state occupancy) using projection sideband cooling, we manipulate the state of individual atoms using the AC Stark shift induced by intersecting lasers and microwave pulses that are only resonant with the shifted atom. Here we demonstrate Rabi oscillations of a single atom in the center of the array and progress towards steering the beams to address the other atoms. Rapid steering of the lasers using micromirrors allows single-atom gates of ˜10 μs. This single-site addressing along with lattice polarization rotation will enable us to fill voids in the central region of the atom array by selectively moving individual atoms. Future work will couple adjacent qubits via the Rydberg blockade mechanism with expected two-qubit gate times of ˜100 ns.

  1. Single echo acquisition MRI using RF encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven M; McDougall, Mary Preston

    2009-11-01

    Encoding of spatial information in magnetic resonance imaging is conventionally accomplished by using magnetic field gradients. During gradient encoding, the position in k-space is determined by a time-integral of the gradient field, resulting in a limitation in imaging speed due to either gradient power or secondary effects such as peripheral nerve stimulation. Partial encoding of spatial information through the sensitivity patterns of an array of coils, known as parallel imaging, is widely used to accelerate the imaging, and is complementary to gradient encoding. This paper describes the one-dimensional limit of parallel imaging in which all spatial localization in one dimension is performed through encoding by the radiofrequency (RF) coil. Using a one-dimensional array of long and narrow parallel elements to localize the image information in one direction, an entire image is obtained from a single line of k-space, avoiding rapid or repeated manipulation of gradients. The technique, called single echo acquisition (SEA) imaging, is described, along with the need for a phase compensation gradient pulse to counteract the phase variation contained in the RF coil pattern which would otherwise cause signal cancellation in each imaging voxel. Image reconstruction and resolution enhancement methods compatible with the speed of the technique are discussed. MR movies at frame rates of 125 frames per second are demonstrated, illustrating the ability to monitor the evolution of transverse magnetization to steady state during an MR experiment as well as demonstrating the ability to image rapid motion. Because this technique, like all RF encoding approaches, relies on the inherent spatially varying pattern of the coil and is not a time-integral, it should enable new applications for MRI that were previously inaccessible due to speed constraints, and should be of interest as an approach to extending the limits of detection in MR imaging.

  2. Silicon Qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, Thaddeus D. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA (United States); Carroll, Malcolm S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-28

    Silicon is a promising material candidate for qubits due to the combination of worldwide infrastructure in silicon microelectronics fabrication and the capability to drastically reduce decohering noise channels via chemical purification and isotopic enhancement. However, a variety of challenges in fabrication, control, and measurement leaves unclear the best strategy for fully realizing this material’s future potential. In this article, we survey three basic qubit types: those based on substitutional donors, on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures, and on Si/SiGe heterostructures. We also discuss the multiple schema used to define and control Si qubits, which may exploit the manipulation and detection of a single electron charge, the state of a single electron spin, or the collective states of multiple spins. Far from being comprehensive, this article provides a brief orientation to the rapidly evolving field of silicon qubit technology and is intended as an approachable entry point for a researcher new to this field.

  3. Simultaneous SU(2) rotations on multiple quantum dot exciton qubits using a single shaped pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Reuble; Yang, Hong Yi Shi; Hall, Kimberley C.

    2015-10-01

    Recent experimental demonstration of a parallel (π ,2 π ) single qubit rotation on excitons in two distant quantum dots [Nano Lett. 13, 4666 (2013), 10.1021/nl4018176] is extended in numerical simulations to the design of pulses for more general quantum state control, demonstrating the feasibility of full SU(2) rotations of each exciton qubit. Our results show that simultaneous high-fidelity quantum control is achievable within the experimentally accessible parameter space for commercial Fourier-domain pulse shaping systems. The identification of a threshold of distinguishability for the two quantum dots (QDs) for achieving high-fidelity parallel rotations, corresponding to a difference in transition energies of ˜0.25 meV , points to the possibility of controlling more than 10 QDs with a single shaped optical pulse.

  4. Single-shot read-out of a superconducting qubit using a Josephson parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Philip; Bengtsson, Andreas; Simoen, Michaël; Gustavsson, Simon; Shumeiko, Vitaly; Oliver, W. D.; Wilson, C. M.; Delsing, Per; Bylander, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a read-out technique for a superconducting qubit by dispersively coupling it with a Josephson parametric oscillator. We employ a tunable quarter wavelength superconducting resonator and modulate its resonant frequency at twice its value with an amplitude surpassing the threshold for parametric instability. We map the qubit states onto two distinct states of classical parametric oscillation: one oscillating state, with 185±15 photons in the resonator, and one with zero oscillation amplitude. This high contrast obviates a following quantum-limited amplifier. We demonstrate proof-of-principle, single-shot read-out performance, and present an error budget indicating that this method can surpass the fidelity threshold required for quantum computing. PMID:27156732

  5. Simultaneous single-shot readout of multi-qubit circuits using a traveling-wave parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kevin

    Observing and controlling the state of ever larger quantum systems is critical for advancing quantum computation. Utilizing a Josephson traveling wave parametric amplifier (JTWPA), we demonstrate simultaneous multiplexed single shot readout of 10 transmon qubits in a planar architecture. We employ digital image sideband rejection to eliminate noise at the image frequencies. We quantify crosstalk and infidelity due to simultaneous readout and control of multiple qubits. Based on current amplifier technology, this approach can scale to simultaneous readout of at least 20 qubits. This work was supported by the Army Research Office.

  6. Toward Molecular 4f Single-Ion Magnet Qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Kasper S; Ariciu, Ana-Maria; McAdams, Simon; Weihe, Høgni; Bendix, Jesper; Tuna, Floriana; Piligkos, Stergios

    2016-05-11

    Quantum coherence is detected in the 4f single-ion magnet (SIM) Yb(trensal), by isotope selective pulsed EPR spectroscopy on an oriented single crystal. At X-band, the spin-lattice relaxation (T1) and phase memory (Tm) times are found to be independent of the nuclei bearing, or not, a nuclear spin. The observation of Rabi oscillations of the spin echo demonstrates the possibility to coherently manipulate the system for more than 70 rotations. This renders Yb(trensal), a sublimable and chemically modifiable SIM, an excellent candidate for quantum information processing.

  7. A two-qubit photonic quantum processor and its application to solving systems of linear equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Stefanie; Kassal, Ivan; Ringbauer, Martin; Lipp, Yannick Ole; Dakić, Borivoje; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Walther, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale quantum computers will require the ability to apply long sequences of entangling gates to many qubits. In a photonic architecture, where single-qubit gates can be performed easily and precisely, the application of consecutive two-qubit entangling gates has been a significant obstacle. Here, we demonstrate a two-qubit photonic quantum processor that implements two consecutive CNOT gates on the same pair of polarisation-encoded qubits. To demonstrate the flexibility of our system, we implement various instances of the quantum algorithm for solving of systems of linear equations. PMID:25135432

  8. Ultrafast electric phase control of a single exciton qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhalm, Alex; Mukherjee, Amlan; Krehs, Sebastian; Sharma, Nandlal; Kölling, Peter; Thiede, Andreas; Reuter, Dirk; Förstner, Jens; Zrenner, Artur

    2018-03-01

    We report on the coherent phase manipulation of quantum dot excitons by electric means. For our experiments, we use a low capacitance single quantum dot photodiode which is electrically controlled by a custom designed SiGe:C BiCMOS chip. The phase manipulation is performed and quantified in a Ramsey experiment, where ultrafast transient detuning of the exciton energy is performed synchronous to double pulse π/2 ps laser excitation. We are able to demonstrate electrically controlled phase manipulations with magnitudes up to 3π within 100 ps which is below the dephasing time of the quantum dot exciton.

  9. Towards single Ce ion detection in a bulk crystal for the development of a single-ion qubit readout scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis was concerned with investigating the relevant spectroscopic properties of Ce ions randomly doped in an Y2SiO5 crystal at low temperatures (around 4 K), in order to develop a technique and an experimental set-up to detect the fluorescence photons emitted by a single Ce ion. The aim of the work was to determine whether a single Ce ion (referred to as the readout ion) can be used as a local probe to sense the quantum state of a neighbouring single-ion qubit via ...

  10. Optimal strategy for a single-qubit gate and the trade-off between opposite types of decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicki, Robert; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Horodecki, Ryszard; Jacak, Lucjan; Machnikowski, Paweł

    2004-07-01

    We study reliable quantum-information processing (QIP) under two different types of environment. The first type is Markovian exponential decay, and the appropriate elementary strategy of protection of qubit is to apply fast gates. The second one is strongly non-Markovian and occurs solely during operations on the qubit. The best strategy is then to work with slow gates. If the two types are both present, one has to optimize the speed of gate. We show that such a trade-off is present for a single-qubit operation in a semiconductor quantum dot implementation of QIP, where recombination of exciton (qubit) is Markovian, while phonon dressing gives rise to the non-Markovian contribution.

  11. Characterization of a fabrication process for the integration of superconducting qubits and rapid-single-flux-quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Groenberg, Leif; Carelli, Pasquale; Chiarello, Fabio; Cosmelli, Carlo; Leoni, Roberto; Poletto, Stefano; Torrioli, Guido; Hassel, Juha; Helistoe, Panu

    2006-01-01

    In order to integrate superconducting qubits with rapid-single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) control circuitry, it is necessary to develop a fabrication process that simultaneously fulfils the requirements of both elements: low critical current density, very low operating temperature (tens of millikelvin) and reduced dissipation on the qubit side; high operation frequency, large stability margins, low dissipated power on the RSFQ side. For this purpose, VTT has developed a fabrication process based on Nb trilayer technology, which allows the on-chip integration of superconducting qubits and RSFQ circuits even at very low temperature. Here we present the characterization (at 4.2 K) of the process from the point of view of the Josephson devices and show that they are suitable to build integrated superconducting qubits

  12. Optimal strategy for a single-qubit gate and the trade-off between opposite types of decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study reliable quantum-information processing (QIP) under two different types of environment. The first type is Markovian exponential decay, and the appropriate elementary strategy of protection of qubit is to apply fast gates. The second one is strongly non-Markovian and occurs solely during operations on the qubit. The best strategy is then to work with slow gates. If the two types are both present, one has to optimize the speed of gate. We show that such a trade-off is present for a single-qubit operation in a semiconductor quantum dot implementation of QIP, where recombination of exciton (qubit) is Markovian, while phonon dressing gives rise to the non-Markovian contribution

  13. Single-Qubit-Gate Error below 0.0001 in a Trapped Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    nuclear spins in liquid-state nuclear-magnetic resonance experiments [6] and with neutral atoms confined in optical lattices [7]; here we demonstrate...Single trapped ion 2.0(2)×10−5 Reference [6] (2009) Nuclear magnetic resonance 1.3(1)×10−4 Reference [7] (2010) Atoms in an optical lattice 1.4(1)×10...determined by comparing the qubit frequency measured in a Ramsey experiment with that of a Rabi experiment. Such back-to-back comparisons yielded values

  14. Single Qubit Manipulation in a Microfabricated Surface Electrode Ion Trap (Open Access, Publisher’s Version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    electrode ion trap with field compensation using a modulated Raman effect D T C Allcock, J A Sherman, D N Stacey et al. Spatially uniform single-qubit gate...in thermal states of motion G Kirchmair, J Benhelm, F Zähringer et al. Normal modes of trapped ions in the presence of anharmonic trap potentials J P...Qloaded = 280) [35]. New Journal of Physics 15 (2013) 093018 (http://www.njp.org/) 5 2.1 GHz Zeeman = 1.4 MHz/G 36 9. 5 nm HF = 12.6 GHz 171Yb+ 2P 1

  15. Computing with a single qubit faster than the computation quantum speed limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2018-02-01

    The possibility to save and process information in fundamentally indistinguishable states is the quantum mechanical resource that is not encountered in classical computing. I demonstrate that, if energy constraints are imposed, this resource can be used to accelerate information-processing without relying on entanglement or any other type of quantum correlations. In fact, there are computational problems that can be solved much faster, in comparison to currently used classical schemes, by saving intermediate information in nonorthogonal states of just a single qubit. There are also error correction strategies that protect such computations.

  16. Environment-assisted error correction of single-qubit phase damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trendelkamp-Schroer, Benjamin; Helm, Julius; Strunz, Walter T.

    2011-01-01

    Open quantum system dynamics of random unitary type may in principle be fully undone. Closely following the scheme of environment-assisted error correction proposed by Gregoratti and Werner [J. Mod. Opt. 50, 915 (2003)], we explicitly carry out all steps needed to invert a phase-damping error on a single qubit. Furthermore, we extend the scheme to a mixed-state environment. Surprisingly, we find cases for which the uncorrected state is closer to the desired state than any of the corrected ones.

  17. Experimental Implementation of High-Fidelity Single-Qubit Gates for Two-Electron Spin Qubits in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerfontaine, Pascal; Botzem, Tim; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    High fidelity gate operations for manipulating individual and multiple qubits in the presence of decoherence are a prerequisite for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. However, the control methods used in earlier experiments on GaAs two-electron spin qubits are based on unrealistic approximations which preclude reaching the required fidelities. An attractive remedy is to use control pulses found in numerical simulations that minimize the infidelity from decoherence and take the experimentally important imperfections and constraints into account. We show that the experimental implementation of these numerically optimized control pulses is possible by using a self-consistent calibration routine we proposed earlier. In our experiment this calibration routine succeeds in removing systematic gate errors to a high degree without increasing the pulses' decoherence. We extract the Bloch sphere trajectories of the resulting gate sequences using self-consistent state tomography and find good agreement with the theoretically predicted trajectories. Furthermore, we prepare different states using these gates and determine their fidelities. Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach - Foundation, Deutsche Telekom Foundation.

  18. Observing pure effects of counter-rotating terms without ultrastrong coupling: A single photon can simultaneously excite two qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Miranowicz, Adam; Li, Hong-Rong; Nori, Franco

    2017-12-01

    The coherent process that a single photon simultaneously excites two qubits has recently been theoretically predicted by Garziano et al. [L. Garziano, V. Macrì, R. Stassi, O. Di Stefano, F. Nori, and S. Savasta, One Photon Can Simultaneously Excite two or More Atoms, Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 043601 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.043601]. We propose a different approach to observe a similar dynamical process based on a superconducting quantum circuit, where two coupled flux qubits longitudinally interact with the same resonator. We show that this simultaneous excitation of two qubits (assuming that the sum of their transition frequencies is close to the cavity frequency) is related to the counter-rotating terms in the dipole-dipole coupling between two qubits, and the standard rotating-wave approximation is not valid here. By numerically simulating the adiabatic Landau-Zener transition and Rabi-oscillation effects, we clearly verify that the energy of a single photon can excite two qubits via higher-order transitions induced by the longitudinal couplings and the counter-rotating terms. Compared with previous studies, the coherent dynamics in our system only involves one intermediate state and, thus, exhibits a much faster rate. We also find transition paths which can interfere. Finally, by discussing how to control the two longitudinal-coupling strengths, we find a method to observe both constructive and destructive interference phenomena in our system.

  19. Realization of three-qubit quantum error correction with superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M D; DiCarlo, L; Nigg, S E; Sun, L; Frunzio, L; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2012-02-01

    Quantum computers could be used to solve certain problems exponentially faster than classical computers, but are challenging to build because of their increased susceptibility to errors. However, it is possible to detect and correct errors without destroying coherence, by using quantum error correcting codes. The simplest of these are three-quantum-bit (three-qubit) codes, which map a one-qubit state to an entangled three-qubit state; they can correct any single phase-flip or bit-flip error on one of the three qubits, depending on the code used. Here we demonstrate such phase- and bit-flip error correcting codes in a superconducting circuit. We encode a quantum state, induce errors on the qubits and decode the error syndrome--a quantum state indicating which error has occurred--by reversing the encoding process. This syndrome is then used as the input to a three-qubit gate that corrects the primary qubit if it was flipped. As the code can recover from a single error on any qubit, the fidelity of this process should decrease only quadratically with error probability. We implement the correcting three-qubit gate (known as a conditional-conditional NOT, or Toffoli, gate) in 63 nanoseconds, using an interaction with the third excited state of a single qubit. We find 85 ± 1 per cent fidelity to the expected classical action of this gate, and 78 ± 1 per cent fidelity to the ideal quantum process matrix. Using this gate, we perform a single pass of both quantum bit- and phase-flip error correction and demonstrate the predicted first-order insensitivity to errors. Concatenation of these two codes in a nine-qubit device would correct arbitrary single-qubit errors. In combination with recent advances in superconducting qubit coherence times, this could lead to scalable quantum technology.

  20. Coherent manipulation of three-qubit states in a molecular single-ion magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, M. D.; Duan, Y.; Diosdado, B.; García-Ripoll, J. J.; Gaita-Ariño, A.; Giménez-Saiz, C.; Alonso, P. J.; Coronado, E.; Luis, F.

    2017-02-01

    We study the quantum spin dynamics of nearly isotropic Gd3 + ions entrapped in polyoxometalate molecules and diluted in crystals of a diamagnetic Y3 + derivative. The full energy-level spectrum and the orientations of the magnetic anisotropy axes have been determined by means of continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance experiments, using X-band (9-10 GHz) cavities and on-chip superconducting waveguides and 1.5-GHz resonators. The results show that seven allowed transitions between the 2 S +1 spin states can be separately addressed. Spin coherence T2 and spin-lattice relaxation T1 rates have been measured for each of these transitions in properly oriented single crystals. The results suggest that quantum spin coherence is limited by residual dipolar interactions with neighbor electronic spins. Coherent Rabi oscillations have been observed for all transitions. The Rabi frequencies increase with microwave power and agree quantitatively with predictions based on the spin Hamiltonian of the molecular spin. We argue that the spin states of each Gd3 + ion can be mapped onto the states of three addressable qubits (or, alternatively, of a d =8 -level "qudit"), for which the seven allowed transitions form a universal set of operations. Within this scheme, one of the coherent oscillations observed experimentally provides an implementation of a controlled-controlled-NOT (or Toffoli) three-qubit gate.

  1. Single Qubit Spin Readout and Initialization in a Quantum Dot Quantum Computer: Design and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahan, Charles; Friesen, Mark; Joynt, Robert; Eriksson, M. A.

    2003-03-01

    Although electron spin qubits in semiconductors are attractive from the viewpoint of low environmental coupling and long coherence times, spin readout remains a challenge for quantum dot quantum computing. Unfortunately, promising schemes based on spin-charge transduction introduce external couplings in the form of reference qubits or Coulomb blockade leads. Here, we propose a twist on the spin-charge transduction scheme, converting spin information to orbital information within a single quantum dot (QD). The same QD can be used for initialization, gating, and readout, without unnecessary external couplings. We present detailed investigations into such a scheme in both SiGe and GaAs systems: simulations, including capacitive coupling to a RF-SET, calculations of coherent oscillation times which determine the read-out speed, and calculations of electron spin relaxation times which determine the initialization speed. We find that both initialization and readout can be performed within the same architecture. Work supported by NSF-QuBIC and MRSEC programs, ARDA, and NSA.

  2. Optimized driving of superconducting artificial atoms for improved single-qubit gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, J. M.; Dicarlo, L.; Gambetta, J. M.; Motzoi, F.; Frunzio, L.; Girvin, S. M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2010-10-01

    We employ simultaneous shaping of in-phase and out-of-phase resonant microwave drives to reduce single-qubit gate errors arising from the weak anharmonicity of transmon superconducting artificial atoms. To reduce the effect of higher levels present in the transmon spectrum, we apply Gaussian and derivative-of-Gaussian envelopes to the in-phase and out-of-phase quadratures, respectively, and optimize over their relative amplitude. Using randomized benchmarking, we obtain a minimum average error per gate of 0.007±0.005 using 4-ns-wide pulses, which is limited by decoherence. This simple optimization technique works for multiple transmons coupled to a single microwave resonator in a quantum bus architecture.

  3. Quantum discord dynamics of two qubits in single-mode cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chen; Chen Qing-Hu

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of quantum discord for two identical qubits in two independent single-mode cavities and a common single-mode cavity are discussed. For the initial Bell state with correlated spins, while the entanglement sudden death can occur, the quantum discord vanishes only at discrete moments in the independent cavities and never vanishes in the common cavity. Interestingly, quantum discord and entanglement show opposite behavior in the common cavity, unlike in the independent cavities. For the initial Bell state with anti-correlated spins, quantum discord and entanglement behave in the same way for both independent cavities and a common cavity. It is found that the detunings always stabilize the quantum discord. (general)

  4. Single-shot readout of multiple nuclear spin qubits in diamond under ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear spins are attractive candidates for solid-state quantum information storage and processing owing to their extremely long coherence time. However, since this appealing property results from a high level of isolation from the environment, it remains a challenging task to polarize, manipulate and readout with high fidelity individual nuclear spins. A promising approach to overcome this limitation consists in utilizing an ancillary single electronic spin to detect and control remote nuclear spins coupled by hyperfine interaction. In this talk, I will show how the electronic spin of a single Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) defect in diamond can be used as a robust platform to observe the real-time evolution of surrounding single nuclear spins under ambient conditions. Using a diamond sample with a natural abundance of 13C isotopes, we first demonstrate high fidelity initialization and single-shot readout of an individual 13C nuclear spin. By including the intrinsic 14N nuclear spin of the NV defect in the quantum register, we then report the simultaneous observation of quantum jumps linked to both nuclear spin species, providing an efficient initialization of the two qubits. These results open up new avenues for diamond-based quantum information processing (QIP) including active feedback in quantum error correction protocols and tests of quantum correlations with solid-state single spins at room temperature.

  5. Realization of a Cascaded Quantum System: Heralded Absorption of a Single Photon Qubit by a Single-Electron Charged Quantum Dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delteil, Aymeric; Sun, Zhe; Fält, Stefan; Imamoğlu, Atac

    2017-04-28

    Photonic losses pose a major limitation for the implementation of a quantum state transfer between nodes of a quantum network. A measurement that heralds a successful transfer without revealing any information about the qubit may alleviate this limitation. Here, we demonstrate the heralded absorption of a single photonic qubit, generated by a single neutral quantum dot, by a single-electron charged quantum dot that is located 5 m away. The transfer of quantum information to the spin degree of freedom takes place upon the emission of a photon; for a properly chosen or prepared quantum dot, the detection of this photon yields no information about the qubit. We show that this process can be combined with local operations optically performed on the destination node by measuring classical correlations between the absorbed photon color and the final state of the electron spin. Our work suggests alternative avenues for the realization of quantum information protocols based on cascaded quantum systems.

  6. Exact dimension estimation of interacting qubit systems assisted by a single quantum probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Akira; Cappellaro, Paola

    2017-12-01

    Estimating the dimension of an Hilbert space is an important component of quantum system identification. In quantum technologies, the dimension of a quantum system (or its corresponding accessible Hilbert space) is an important resource, as larger dimensions determine, e.g., the performance of quantum computation protocols or the sensitivity of quantum sensors. Despite being a critical task in quantum system identification, estimating the Hilbert space dimension is experimentally challenging. While there have been proposals for various dimension witnesses capable of putting a lower bound on the dimension from measuring collective observables that encode correlations, in many practical scenarios, especially for multiqubit systems, the experimental control might not be able to engineer the required initialization, dynamics, and observables. Here we propose a more practical strategy that relies not on directly measuring an unknown multiqubit target system, but on the indirect interaction with a local quantum probe under the experimenter's control. Assuming only that the interaction model is given and the evolution correlates all the qubits with the probe, we combine a graph-theoretical approach and realization theory to demonstrate that the system dimension can be exactly estimated from the model order of the system. We further analyze the robustness in the presence of background noise of the proposed estimation method based on realization theory, finding that despite stringent constrains on the allowed noise level, exact dimension estimation can still be achieved.

  7. Hybrid spin and valley quantum computing with singlet-triplet qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohling, Niklas; Russ, Maximilian; Burkard, Guido

    2014-10-24

    The valley degree of freedom in the electronic band structure of silicon, graphene, and other materials is often considered to be an obstacle for quantum computing (QC) based on electron spins in quantum dots. Here we show that control over the valley state opens new possibilities for quantum information processing. Combining qubits encoded in the singlet-triplet subspace of spin and valley states allows for universal QC using a universal two-qubit gate directly provided by the exchange interaction. We show how spin and valley qubits can be separated in order to allow for single-qubit rotations.

  8. Rational design of single-ion magnets and spin qubits based on mononuclear lanthanoid complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldoví, José J; Cardona-Serra, Salvador; Clemente-Juan, Juan M; Coronado, Eugenio; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Palii, Andrew

    2012-11-19

    Here we develop a general approach to calculating the energy spectrum and the wave functions of the low-lying magnetic levels of a lanthanoid ion submitted to the crystal field created by the surrounding ligands. This model allows us to propose general criteria for the rational design of new mononuclear lanthanoid complexes behaving as single-molecule magnets (SMMs) or acting as robust spin qubits. Three typical environments exhibited by these metal complexes are considered, namely, (a) square antiprism, (b) triangular dodecahedron, and (c) trigonal prism. The developed model is used to explain the properties of some representative examples showing these geometries. Key questions in this area, such as the chemical tailoring of the superparamagnetic energy barrier, tunneling gap, or spin relaxation time, are discussed. Finally, in order to take into account delocalization and/or covalent effects of the ligands, this point-charge model is complemented with ab initio calculations, which provide accurate information on the charge distribution around the metal, allowing for an explanation of the SMM behavior displayed by some sandwich-type organometallic compounds.

  9. Structural Encoding of Static Single Assignment Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Andreas; Probst, Christian; Franz, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Static Single Assignment (SSA) form is often used as an intermediate representation during code optimization in Java Virtual Machines. Recently, SSA has successfully been used for bytecode verification. However, constructing SSA at the code consumer is costly. SSAbased mobile code transport formats...... Java bytecode. While the resulting bytecode sequence can still be directly executed by traditional Virtual Machines, our novel VM can infer SSA form and confirm its safety with virtually no overhead....

  10. Rapid High-Fidelity Single-Shot Dispersive Readout of Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, T.; Kurpiers, P.; Gasparinetti, S.; Magnard, P.; Potočnik, A.; Salathé, Y.; Pechal, M.; Mondal, M.; Oppliger, M.; Eichler, C.; Wallraff, A.

    2017-05-01

    The speed of quantum gates and measurements is a decisive factor for the overall fidelity of quantum protocols when performed on physical qubits with a finite coherence time. Reducing the time required to distinguish qubit states with high fidelity is, therefore, a critical goal in quantum-information science. The state-of-the-art readout of superconducting qubits is based on the dispersive interaction with a readout resonator. Here, we bring this technique to its current limit and demonstrate how the careful design of system parameters leads to fast and high-fidelity measurements without affecting qubit coherence. We achieve this result by increasing the dispersive-interaction strength, by choosing an optimal linewidth of the readout resonator, by employing a Purcell filter, and by utilizing phase-sensitive parametric amplification. In our experiment, we measure 98.25% readout fidelity in only 48 ns, when minimizing readout time, and 99.2% in 88 ns, when maximizing the fidelity, limited predominantly by the qubit lifetime of 7.6 μ s . The presented scheme is also expected to be suitable for integration into a multiplexed readout architecture.

  11. Simple non-Markovian microscopic models for the depolarizing channel of a single qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca Romero, K M; Lo Franco, R

    2012-01-01

    The archetypal one-qubit noisy channels - depolarizing, phase-damping and amplitude-damping channels - describe both Markovian and non-Markovian evolution. Simple microscopic models for the depolarizing channel, both classical and quantum, are considered. Microscopic models that describe phase-damping and amplitude-damping channels are briefly reviewed.

  12. Distributed quantum computing with single photon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beige, A.; Kwek, L.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Distributed quantum computing requires the ability to perform nonlocal gate operations between the distant nodes (stationary qubits) of a large network. To achieve this, it has been proposed to interconvert stationary qubits with flying qubits. In contrast to this, we show that distributed quantum computing only requires the ability to encode stationary qubits into flying qubits but not the conversion of flying qubits into stationary qubits. We describe a scheme for the realization of an eventually deterministic controlled phase gate by performing measurements on pairs of flying qubits. Our scheme could be implemented with a linear optics quantum computing setup including sources for the generation of single photons on demand, linear optics elements and photon detectors. In the presence of photon loss and finite detector efficiencies, the scheme could be used to build large cluster states for one way quantum computing with a high fidelity. (author)

  13. Highly-efficient quantum memory for polarization qubits in a spatially-multiplexed cold atomic ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernaz-Gris, Pierre; Huang, Kun; Cao, Mingtao; Sheremet, Alexandra S; Laurat, Julien

    2018-01-25

    Quantum memory for flying optical qubits is a key enabler for a wide range of applications in quantum information. A critical figure of merit is the overall storage and retrieval efficiency. So far, despite the recent achievements of efficient memories for light pulses, the storage of qubits has suffered from limited efficiency. Here we report on a quantum memory for polarization qubits that combines an average conditional fidelity above 99% and efficiency around 68%, thereby demonstrating a reversible qubit mapping where more information is retrieved than lost. The qubits are encoded with weak coherent states at the single-photon level and the memory is based on electromagnetically-induced transparency in an elongated laser-cooled ensemble of cesium atoms, spatially multiplexed for dual-rail storage. This implementation preserves high optical depth on both rails, without compromise between multiplexing and storage efficiency. Our work provides an efficient node for future tests of quantum network functionalities and advanced photonic circuits.

  14. Deterministic implementations of single-photon multi-qubit Deutsch–Jozsa algorithms with linear optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Hai-Rui, E-mail: hrwei@ustb.edu.cn; Liu, Ji-Zhen

    2017-02-15

    It is very important to seek an efficient and robust quantum algorithm demanding less quantum resources. We propose one-photon three-qubit original and refined Deutsch–Jozsa algorithms with polarization and two linear momentums degrees of freedom (DOFs). Our schemes are constructed by solely using linear optics. Compared to the traditional ones with one DOF, our schemes are more economic and robust because the necessary photons are reduced from three to one. Our linear-optic schemes are working in a determinate way, and they are feasible with current experimental technology.

  15. Entanglement between a Photonic Time-Bin Qubit and a Collective Atomic Spin Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrera, Pau; Heinze, Georg; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2018-03-01

    Entanglement between light and matter combines the advantage of long distance transmission of photonic qubits with the storage and processing capabilities of atomic qubits. To distribute photonic states efficiently over long distances several schemes to encode qubits have been investigated—time-bin encoding being particularly promising due to its robustness against decoherence in optical fibers. Here, we demonstrate the generation of entanglement between a photonic time-bin qubit and a single collective atomic spin excitation (spin wave) in a cold atomic ensemble, followed by the mapping of the atomic qubit onto another photonic qubit. A magnetic field that induces a periodic dephasing and rephasing of the atomic excitation ensures the temporal distinguishability of the two time bins and plays a central role in the entanglement generation. To analyze the generated quantum state, we use largely imbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometers to perform projective measurements in different qubit bases and verify the entanglement by violating a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell inequality.

  16. Universal Stabilization of a Parametrically Coupled Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Chakram, S.; Leung, N.; Earnest, N.; Naik, R. K.; Huang, Ziwen; Groszkowski, Peter; Kapit, Eliot; Koch, Jens; Schuster, David I.

    2017-10-01

    We autonomously stabilize arbitrary states of a qubit through parametric modulation of the coupling between a fixed frequency qubit and resonator. The coupling modulation is achieved with a tunable coupling design, in which the qubit and the resonator are connected in parallel to a superconducting quantum interference device. This allows for quasistatic tuning of the qubit-cavity coupling strength from 12 MHz to more than 300 MHz. Additionally, the coupling can be dynamically modulated, allowing for single-photon exchange in 6 ns. Qubit coherence times exceeding 20 μ s are maintained over the majority of the range of tuning, limited primarily by the Purcell effect. The parametric stabilization technique realized using the tunable coupler involves engineering the qubit bath through a combination of photon nonconserving sideband interactions realized by flux modulation, and direct qubit Rabi driving. We demonstrate that the qubit can be stabilized to arbitrary states on the Bloch sphere with a worst-case fidelity exceeding 80%.

  17. Rapid chemical shift encoding with single-acquisition single-slab 3D GRASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hahnsung; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Jaeseok

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of chemical shift encoded, single-slab 3D GRASE for rapid fat-water separation within a single acquisition. The proposed method incorporates signal-to-noise-ratio-optimal chemical shift encoding into single-slab 3D GRASE with variable flip angles. Chemical shift induced phase information was encoded in succession to different positions in k-space by inserting phase encoding blips between adjacent lobes of the oscillating readout gradients. To enhance imaging efficiency, signal prescription-based variable flip angles were used in the long refocusing pulse train. After echo-independent phase correction, missing signals in k-echo space were interpolated using convolution kernels that span over all echoes. Fat-water separation in a single acquisition was performed using both multi-echo fast spin echo and GRASE as compared to conventional multiacquisition fast spin echo with echo shifts. The proposed single-slab 3D GRASE shows superior performance in accurately delineating cartilage structures compared to its counterpart, multi-echo 3D fast spin echo. Compared with multiacquisition fast spin echo with three echo shifts (63 min), the proposed method substantially speeds up imaging time (7 min), and achieves 0.6 mm isotropic resolution in knee imaging with reduced artifacts and noise. We successfully demonstrated the feasibility of rapid chemical shift encoding and separation using the proposed, single-acquisition single-slab 3D GRASE for high resolution isotropic imaging within clinically acceptable time. Magn Reson Med 78:1852-1861, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Heralded noiseless amplification of a photon polarization qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, S.; Xiang, G. Y.; Ralph, T. C.; Pryde, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Photons are the best long-range carriers of quantum information, but the unavoidable absorption and scattering in a transmission channel places a serious limitation on viable communication distances. Signal amplification will therefore be an essential feature of quantum technologies, with direct applications to quantum communication, metrology and fundamental tests of quantum theory. Non-deterministic noiseless amplification of a single mode can circumvent the challenges related to amplifying a quantum signal, such as the no-cloning theorem and the minimum noise cost for deterministic quantum state amplification. However, existing devices are not suitable for amplifying the fundamental optical quantum information carrier: a qubit coherently encoded across two optical modes. Here, we construct a coherent two-mode amplifier to demonstrate the first heralded noiseless linear amplification of a qubit encoded in the polarization state of a single photon. In doing so, we increase the transmission fidelity of a realistic qubit channel by up to a factor of five. Qubit amplifiers promise to extend the range of secure quantum communication and other quantum information science and technology protocols.

  19. Topological qubit design and leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, R; Slingerland, J K, E-mail: robert.ainsworth@nuim.ie, E-mail: joost@thphys.nuim.ie [Department of Mathematical Physics, National University of Ireland Maynooth, Co. Kildare (Ireland)

    2011-06-15

    We examine how best to design qubits for use in topological quantum computation. These qubits are topological Hilbert spaces associated with small groups of anyons. Operations are performed on these by exchanging the anyons. One might argue that in order to have as many simple single-qubit operations as possible, the number of anyons per group should be maximized. However, we show that there is a maximal number of particles per qubit, namely 4, and more generally a maximal number of particles for qudits of dimension d. We also look at the possibility of having topological qubits for which one can perform two-qubit gates without leakage into non-computational states. It turns out that the requirement that all two-qubit gates are leakage free is very restrictive and this property can only be realized for two-qubit systems related to Ising-like anyon models, which do not allow for universal quantum computation by braiding. Our results follow directly from the representation theory of braid groups, which implies that they are valid for all anyon models. We also make some remarks about generalizations to other exchange groups.

  20. Coupling superconducting qubits via a cavity bus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer, J; Chow, J M; Gambetta, J M; Koch, Jens; Johnson, B R; Schreier, J A; Frunzio, L; Schuster, D I; Houck, A A; Wallraff, A; Blais, A; Devoret, M H; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2007-09-27

    Superconducting circuits are promising candidates for constructing quantum bits (qubits) in a quantum computer; single-qubit operations are now routine, and several examples of two-qubit interactions and gates have been demonstrated. These experiments show that two nearby qubits can be readily coupled with local interactions. Performing gate operations between an arbitrary pair of distant qubits is highly desirable for any quantum computer architecture, but has not yet been demonstrated. An efficient way to achieve this goal is to couple the qubits to a 'quantum bus', which distributes quantum information among the qubits. Here we show the implementation of such a quantum bus, using microwave photons confined in a transmission line cavity, to couple two superconducting qubits on opposite sides of a chip. The interaction is mediated by the exchange of virtual rather than real photons, avoiding cavity-induced loss. Using fast control of the qubits to switch the coupling effectively on and off, we demonstrate coherent transfer of quantum states between the qubits. The cavity is also used to perform multiplexed control and measurement of the qubit states. This approach can be expanded to more than two qubits, and is an attractive architecture for quantum information processing on a chip.

  1. Quantum electronics. Probing Johnson noise and ballistic transport in normal metals with a single-spin qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkowitz, S; Safira, A; High, A A; Devlin, R C; Choi, S; Unterreithmeier, Q P; Patterson, D; Zibrov, A S; Manucharyan, V E; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2015-03-06

    Thermally induced electrical currents, known as Johnson noise, cause fluctuating electric and magnetic fields in proximity to a conductor. These fluctuations are intrinsically related to the conductivity of the metal. We use single-spin qubits associated with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to probe Johnson noise in the vicinity of conductive silver films. Measurements of polycrystalline silver films over a range of distances (20 to 200 nanometers) and temperatures (10 to 300 kelvin) are consistent with the classically expected behavior of the magnetic fluctuations. However, we find that Johnson noise is markedly suppressed next to single-crystal films, indicative of a substantial deviation from Ohm's law at length scales below the electron mean free path. Our results are consistent with a generalized model that accounts for the ballistic motion of electrons in the metal, indicating that under the appropriate conditions, nearby electrodes may be used for controlling nanoscale optoelectronic, atomic, and solid-state quantum systems. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Hybrid quantum systems: Outsourcing superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Andrew

    Superconducting qubits offer excellent prospects for manipulating quantum information, with good qubit lifetimes, high fidelity single- and two-qubit gates, and straightforward scalability (admittedly with multi-dimensional interconnect challenges). One interesting route for experimental development is the exploration of hybrid systems, i.e. coupling superconducting qubits to other systems. I will report on our group's efforts to develop approaches that will allow interfacing superconducting qubits in a quantum-coherent fashion to spin defects in solids, to optomechanical devices, and to resonant nanomechanical structures. The longer term goals of these efforts include transferring quantum states between different qubit systems; generating and receiving ``flying'' acoustic phonon-based as well as optical photon-based qubits; and ultimately developing systems that can be used for quantum memory, quantum computation and quantum communication, the last in both the microwave and fiber telecommunications bands. Work is supported by Grants from AFOSR, ARO, DOE and NSF.

  3. Optimal attacks on qubit-based Quantum Key Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leermakers, Daan; Škorić, Boris

    2018-03-01

    Quantum Key Recycling (QKR) is a quantum cryptographic primitive that allows one to reuse keys in an unconditionally secure way. By removing the need to repeatedly generate new keys, it improves communication efficiency. Škorić and de Vries recently proposed a QKR scheme based on 8-state encoding (four bases). It does not require quantum computers for encryption/decryption but only single-qubit operations. We provide a missing ingredient in the security analysis of this scheme in the case of noisy channels: accurate upper bounds on the required amount of privacy amplification. We determine optimal attacks against the message and against the key, for 8-state encoding as well as 4-state and 6-state conjugate coding. We provide results in terms of min-entropy loss as well as accessible (Shannon) information. We show that the Shannon entropy analysis for 8-state encoding reduces to the analysis of quantum key distribution, whereas 4-state and 6-state suffer from additional leaks that make them less effective. From the optimal attacks we compute the required amount of privacy amplification and hence the achievable communication rate (useful information per qubit) of qubit-based QKR. Overall, 8-state encoding yields the highest communication rates.

  4. Three-electron spin qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Maximilian; Burkard, Guido

    2017-10-01

    The goal of this article is to review the progress of three-electron spin qubits from their inception to the state of the art. We direct the main focus towards the exchange-only qubit (Bacon et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 1758-61, DiVincenzo et al 2000 Nature 408 339) and its derived versions, e.g. the resonant exchange (RX) qubit, but we also discuss other qubit implementations using three electron spins. For each three-spin qubit we describe the qubit model, the envisioned physical realization, the implementations of single-qubit operations, as well as the read-out and initialization schemes. Two-qubit gates and decoherence properties are discussed for the RX qubit and the exchange-only qubit, thereby completing the list of requirements for quantum computation for a viable candidate qubit implementation. We start by describing the full system of three electrons in a triple quantum dot, then discuss the charge-stability diagram, restricting ourselves to the relevant subsystem, introduce the qubit states, and discuss important transitions to other charge states (Russ et al 2016 Phys. Rev. B 94 165411). Introducing the various qubit implementations, we begin with the exchange-only qubit (DiVincenzo et al 2000 Nature 408 339, Laird et al 2010 Phys. Rev. B 82 075403), followed by the RX qubit (Medford et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 050501, Taylor et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 050502), the spin-charge qubit (Kyriakidis and Burkard 2007 Phys. Rev. B 75 115324), and the hybrid qubit (Shi et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 140503, Koh et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 250503, Cao et al 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 086801, Thorgrimsson et al 2016 arXiv:1611.04945). The main focus will be on the exchange-only qubit and its modification, the RX qubit, whose single-qubit operations are realized by driving the qubit at its resonant frequency in the microwave range similar to electron spin resonance. Two different types of two-qubit operations are presented for the exchange

  5. Single-Photon Switching and Entanglement of Solid- State Qubits in an Integrated Nanophotonic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ruffin; Sipahigil, Alp; Sukachev, Denis; Burek, Michael; Borregaard, Johannes; Bhaskar, Mihir; Nguyen, Christian; Pacheco, Jose; Bielejec, Edward; Loncar, Marko; Lukin, Mikhail

    2017-04-01

    Efficient interfaces between photons and quantum emitters form the basis for quantum networks and enable optical nonlinearities at the single-photon level. We demonstrate a platform for scalable quantum nanophotonics based on silicon-vacancy (SiV) color centers coupled to diamond nanodevices. By placing SiV centers inside diamond photonic crystal cavities, we realize a quantum-optical switch controlled by a single color center. We control the switch using SiV metastable states and observe switching at the single-photon level. Raman transitions are used to realize a single-photon source with a tunable frequency and bandwidth in a diamond waveguide. By measuring intensity correlations of indistinguishable Raman photons emitted into a single waveguide, we observe quantum interference resulting from the superradiant emission of two entangled SiV centers. We also discuss current work to extend the coherence time of the SiV spin degree of freedom, engineer deterministic multi-emitter interactions via the cavity mode, and related work with the Germanium-Vacancy center.

  6. Strong coupling of a single photon to a superconducting qubit using circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallraff, A; Schuster, D I; Blais, A; Frunzio, L; Huang, R- S; Majer, J; Kumar, S; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2004-09-09

    The interaction of matter and light is one of the fundamental processes occurring in nature, and its most elementary form is realized when a single atom interacts with a single photon. Reaching this regime has been a major focus of research in atomic physics and quantum optics for several decades and has generated the field of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we perform an experiment in which a superconducting two-level system, playing the role of an artificial atom, is coupled to an on-chip cavity consisting of a superconducting transmission line resonator. We show that the strong coupling regime can be attained in a solid-state system, and we experimentally observe the coherent interaction of a superconducting two-level system with a single microwave photon. The concept of circuit quantum electrodynamics opens many new possibilities for studying the strong interaction of light and matter. This system can also be exploited for quantum information processing and quantum communication and may lead to new approaches for single photon generation and detection.

  7. One-step implementation of a hybrid Fredkin gate with quantum memories and single superconducting qubit in circuit QED and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Guo, Bao-Qing; Yu, Chang-Shui; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2018-02-01

    In a recent remarkable experiment [R. B. Patel et al., Science advances 2, e1501531 (2016)], a 3-qubit quantum Fredkin (i.e., controlled-SWAP) gate was demonstrated by using linear optics. Here we propose a simple experimental scheme by utilizing the dispersive interaction in superconducting quantum circuit to implement a hybrid Fredkin gate with a superconducting flux qubit as the control qubit and two separated quantum memories as the target qudits. The quantum memories considered here are prepared by the superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators or nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles. In particular, it is shown that this Fredkin gate can be realized using a single-step operation and more importantly, each target qudit can be in an arbitrary state with arbitrary degrees of freedom. Furthermore, we show that this experimental scheme has many potential applications in quantum computation and quantum information processing such as generating arbitrary entangled states (discrete-variable states or continuous-variable states) of the two memories, measuring the fidelity and the entanglement between the two memories. With state-of-the-art circuit QED technology, the numerical simulation is performed to demonstrate that two-memory NOON states, entangled coherent states, and entangled cat states can be efficiently synthesized.

  8. Anything but qubits

    OpenAIRE

    Neergaard-Nielsen, Jonas; Laghaout, Amine; Rigas, Ioannes; Kragh, Christian; Ros, Elisa Da; Hansen, Jacob Kjærsgaard; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2013-01-01

    Poster presented at the Photons Beyond Qubits workshop in Olomouc, April 2013. Three topics are briefly covered:   * Cat state amplification by conditional homodyning  * Displacement-enhanced entanglement distillation  * Towards an efficient single photon source with NV centres in an open microcavity The first two are theoretical schemes for quantum information processing with squeezed and cat states, published in Physical Review A 87, 043826 (2013) and Optics Express 21, 6670-...

  9. Information gain when measuring an unknown qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Gunnar

    2018-01-01

    In quantum information the fundamental information-containing system is the qubit. A measurement of a single qubit can at most yield one classical bit. However, a dichotomous measurement of an unknown qubit will yield much less information about the qubit state. We use Bayesian inference to compute how much information one progressively gets by making sucessive, individual measurements on an ensemble of identically prepared qubits. Perhaps surprisingly, even if the measurements are arranged so that each measurement yields one classical bit, that is, the two possible measurement outcomes are a priori equiprobable, it takes almost a handful of measurements before one has gained one bit of information about the gradually concentrated qubit probability density. We also show that by following a strategy that reaps the maximum information per measurement, we are led to a mutually unbiased basis as our measurement bases. This is a pleasing, although not entirely surprising, result.

  10. Remote state preparation of spatial qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis-Prosser, M. A.; Neves, L.

    2011-01-01

    We study the quantum communication protocol of remote state preparation (RSP) for pure states of qubits encoded in single photons transmitted through a double slit, the so-called spatial qubits. Two measurement strategies that one can adopt to remotely prepare the states are discussed. The first strategy is the well-known spatial postselection, where a single-pixel detector measures the transverse position of the photon between the focal and the image plane of a lens. The second strategy, proposed by ourselves, is a generalized measurement divided into two steps: the implementation of a two-outcome positive operator-valued measurement (POVM) followed by the spatial postselection at the focal plane of the lens by a two-pixel detector in each output of the POVM. In both cases we analyze the effects of the finite spatial resolution of the detectors over three figures of merit of the protocol, namely, the probability of preparation, the fidelity, and purity of the remotely prepared states. It is shown that our strategy improves these figures compared with spatial postselection, at the expense of increasing the classical communication cost as well as the required experimental resources. In addition, we present a modified version of our strategy for RSP of spatial qudits which is able to prepare arbitrary pure states, unlike spatial postselection alone. We expect that our study may also be extended for RSP of the angular spectrum of a single-photon field as an alternative for quantum teleportation which requires very inefficient nonlinear interactions.

  11. Scheme for secure swapping two unknown states of a photonic qubit and an electron-spin qubit using simultaneous quantum transmission and teleportation via quantum dots inside single-sided optical cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jino [College of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Chungdae-ro 1, Seowon-Gu, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Min-Sung [Center for Quantum Information, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Chang-Ho [National Security Research Institute, P.O.Box 1, Yuseong, Daejeon, 34188 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Gon [College of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Chungdae-ro 1, Seowon-Gu, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jong-Phil, E-mail: jongph@cbnu.ac.kr [College of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Chungdae-ro 1, Seowon-Gu, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    We propose a scheme for swapping two unknown states of a photon and electron spin confined to a charged quantum dot (QD) between two users by transferring a single photon. This scheme simultaneously transfers and teleports an unknown state (electron spin) between two users. For this bidirectional quantum communication, we utilize the interactions between a photonic and an electron-spin qubits of a QD located inside a single-sided optical cavity. Thus, our proposal using QD-cavity systems can obtain a certain success probability with high fidelity. Furthermore, compared to a previous scheme using cross-Kerr nonlinearities and homodyne detections, our scheme (using QD-cavity systems) can improve the feasibility under the decoherence effect in practice. - Highlights: • Design of Simultaneous quantum transmission and teleportation scheme via quantum dots and cavities. • We have developed the experimental feasibility of this scheme compared with the existing scheme. • Analysis of some benefits when our scheme is experimentally implemented using quantum dots and single-sided cavities.

  12. Error-Transparent Quantum Gates for Small Logical Qubit Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapit, Eliot

    2018-02-01

    One of the largest obstacles to building a quantum computer is gate error, where the physical evolution of the state of a qubit or group of qubits during a gate operation does not match the intended unitary transformation. Gate error stems from a combination of control errors and random single qubit errors from interaction with the environment. While great strides have been made in mitigating control errors, intrinsic qubit error remains a serious problem that limits gate fidelity in modern qubit architectures. Simultaneously, recent developments of small error-corrected logical qubit devices promise significant increases in logical state lifetime, but translating those improvements into increases in gate fidelity is a complex challenge. In this Letter, we construct protocols for gates on and between small logical qubit devices which inherit the parent device's tolerance to single qubit errors which occur at any time before or during the gate. We consider two such devices, a passive implementation of the three-qubit bit flip code, and the author's own [E. Kapit, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 150501 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.150501] very small logical qubit (VSLQ) design, and propose error-tolerant gate sets for both. The effective logical gate error rate in these models displays superlinear error reduction with linear increases in single qubit lifetime, proving that passive error correction is capable of increasing gate fidelity. Using a standard phenomenological noise model for superconducting qubits, we demonstrate a realistic, universal one- and two-qubit gate set for the VSLQ, with error rates an order of magnitude lower than those for same-duration operations on single qubits or pairs of qubits. These developments further suggest that incorporating small logical qubits into a measurement based code could substantially improve code performance.

  13. Cavity state manipulation using a dispersively coupled qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeres, Reinier; Vlastakis, Brian; Holland, Eric; Krastanov, Stefan; Albert, Victor V.; Shen, Chao; Jiang, Liang; Schoelkopf, Robert

    2015-03-01

    The large available Hilbert space and high coherence of cavity resonators makes them an interesting resource in quantum information processing. For example, several schemes exist to encode a logical qubit in such a harmonic oscillator in a way that would be protected against certain kinds of errors. Here we demonstrate a method to manipulate a cavity state using a far off-resonantly coupled qubit, using only linear controls and a gate we call the Selective Number Arbitrary Phase (SNAP) gate. This gate allows to impart an arbitrary phase on each Fock-state component of the cavity. We show how we can use these tools to correct for the effects of Kerr-evolution as well as how to create a single-photon Fock state. Our scheme can be generalized to arbitrary cavity state creation and even allows to construct arbitrary unitary operators to give universal control of the oscillator.

  14. Tracking errors of a logical qubit comprised of superpositions of cat states in a superconducting resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, A.; Ofek, N.; Heeres, R.; Reinhold, P.; Liu, Y.; Leghtas, Z.; Vlastakis, B.; Frunzio, L.; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, M.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    QEC schemes involve redundantly encoding a qubit into a larger space of states that has symmetry properties that allow one to measure error syndromes. Traditional approaches involve encodings that employ large numbers of physical qubits, enhancing decay rates significantly and requiring considerable hardware overhead to realize. A hardware-efficient proposal, which we term the cat code, sheds much of this complexity by encoding a qubit in superpositions of cat states in a superconducting resonator, which has one dominant error syndrome: single photon loss. As these cat states are eigenstates of photon number parity, the loss of a photon changes the parity without corrupting the encoded information. In a superconducting cQED architecture, we demonstrate that we track these errors in real-time with repeated single shot parity measurements and map their occurrence onto applications of a unitary rotation of an arbitrary encoded state in the logical space. Our results illustrate the utility of long-lived resonators in the context of a full QEC system by highlighting the advantages of employing the cat code to suppress decoherence.

  15. Efficient one- and two-qubit pulsed gates for an oscillator-stabilized Josephson qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Frederico; DiVincenzo, David P; Koch, Roger H; Steffen, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    We present theoretical schemes for performing high-fidelity one- and two-qubit pulsed gates for a superconducting flux qubit. The 'IBM qubit' consists of three Josephson junctions, three loops and a superconducting transmission line. Assuming a fixed inductive qubit-qubit coupling, we show that the effective qubit-qubit interaction is tunable by changing the applied fluxes, and can be made negligible, allowing one to perform high-fidelity single qubit gates. Our schemes are tailored to alleviate errors due to 1/f noise; we find gates with only 1% loss of fidelity due to this source, for pulse times in the range of 20-30 ns for one-qubit gates (Z rotations, Hadamard) and 60 ns for a two-qubit gate (controlled-Z). Our relaxation and dephasing time estimates indicate a comparable loss of fidelity from this source. The control of leakage plays an important role in the design of our shaped pulses, preventing shorter pulse times. However, we have found that imprecision in the control of the quantum phase plays a major role in the limitation of the fidelity of our gates

  16. Coupling spin qubits via superconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leijnse, Martin; Flensberg, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We show how superconductors can be used to couple, initialize, and read out spatially separated spin qubits. When two single-electron quantum dots are tunnel coupled to the same superconductor, the singlet component of the two-electron state partially leaks into the superconductor via crossed...... Andreev reflection. This induces a gate-controlled singlet-triplet splitting which, with an appropriate superconductor geometry, remains large for dot separations within the superconducting coherence length. Furthermore, we show that when two double-dot singlet-triplet qubits are tunnel coupled...

  17. Detecting highly entangled states with a joint qubit readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, J. M.; Dicarlo, L.; Gambetta, J. M.; Nunnenkamp, A.; Bishop, Lev S.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Girvin, S. M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2010-06-01

    A single-channel joint readout is used to analyze highly entangled two-qubit states in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture. The measurement model for the readout is fully characterized, demonstrating a large sensitivity to two-qubit correlations. We quantify the high degree of entanglement by measuring a violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality with a value of 2.61±0.04, without optimizing the preparation of the two-qubit state. In its present form, this joint readout can resolve improvements to the fidelity of two-qubit operations and be extended to three or four qubits.

  18. Dynamically protected cat-qubits: a new paradigm for universal quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Leghtas, Zaki; Albert, Victor V; Touzard, Steven; Schoelkopf, Robert J; Jiang, Liang; Devoret, Michel H

    2014-01-01

    We present a new hardware-efficient paradigm for universal quantum computation which is based on encoding, protecting and manipulating quantum information in a quantum harmonic oscillator. This proposal exploits multi-photon driven dissipative processes to encode quantum information in logical bases composed of Schrödinger cat states. More precisely, we consider two schemes. In a first scheme, a two-photon driven dissipative process is used to stabilize a logical qubit basis of two-component Schrödinger cat states. While such a scheme ensures a protection of the logical qubit against the photon dephasing errors, the prominent error channel of single-photon loss induces bit-flip type errors that cannot be corrected. Therefore, we consider a second scheme based on a four-photon driven dissipative process which leads to the choice of four-component Schrödinger cat states as the logical qubit. Such a logical qubit can be protected against single-photon loss by continuous photon number parity measurements. Next, applying some specific Hamiltonians, we provide a set of universal quantum gates on the encoded qubits of each of the two schemes. In particular, we illustrate how these operations can be rendered fault-tolerant with respect to various decoherence channels of participating quantum systems. Finally, we also propose experimental schemes based on quantum superconducting circuits and inspired by methods used in Josephson parametric amplification, which should allow one to achieve these driven dissipative processes along with the Hamiltonians ensuring the universal operations in an efficient manner

  19. Tools for Persistent-Current Qubits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mooij, J

    2004-01-01

    ...) Josephson junctions. This Final Report presents the major achievements obtained during the project, highlighting the progress from the initial spectroscopy and first Rabi results on a single qubit to the most...

  20. Detecting bit-flip errors in a logical qubit using stabilizer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristè, D.; Poletto, S.; Huang, M.-Z.; Bruno, A.; Vesterinen, V.; Saira, O.-P.; DiCarlo, L.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum data are susceptible to decoherence induced by the environment and to errors in the hardware processing it. A future fault-tolerant quantum computer will use quantum error correction to actively protect against both. In the smallest error correction codes, the information in one logical qubit is encoded in a two-dimensional subspace of a larger Hilbert space of multiple physical qubits. For each code, a set of non-demolition multi-qubit measurements, termed stabilizers, can discretize and signal physical qubit errors without collapsing the encoded information. Here using a five-qubit superconducting processor, we realize the two parity measurements comprising the stabilizers of the three-qubit repetition code protecting one logical qubit from physical bit-flip errors. While increased physical qubit coherence times and shorter quantum error correction blocks are required to actively safeguard the quantum information, this demonstration is a critical step towards larger codes based on multiple parity measurements. PMID:25923318

  1. Linear optical quantum computing in a single spatial mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Peter C; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Spring, Justin B; Moore, Merritt; Jin, Xian-Min; Barbieri, Marco; Kolthammer, W Steven; Walmsley, Ian A

    2013-10-11

    We present a scheme for linear optical quantum computing using time-bin-encoded qubits in a single spatial mode. We show methods for single-qubit operations and heralded controlled-phase (cphase) gates, providing a sufficient set of operations for universal quantum computing with the Knill-Laflamme-Milburn [Nature (London) 409, 46 (2001)] scheme. Our protocol is suited to currently available photonic devices and ideally allows arbitrary numbers of qubits to be encoded in the same spatial mode, demonstrating the potential for time-frequency modes to dramatically increase the quantum information capacity of fixed spatial resources. As a test of our scheme, we demonstrate the first entirely single spatial mode implementation of a two-qubit quantum gate and show its operation with an average fidelity of 0.84±0.07.

  2. Effect of photonic band gap on entanglement dynamics of qubits

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jing-Nuo; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Cheng, Szu-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    We study how the environment of photonic band gap (PBG) materials affects entanglement dynamics of qubits. Entanglement between the single qubit and the PBG environment is investigated through the von Neumann entropy while that for two initially entangled qubits in this PBG reservoir is through concurrence. Dynamics of these measurements are solved in use of the fractional calculus which has been shown appropriate for the systems with non-Markovian dynamics. Entropy dynamics of the single qub...

  3. DeActs : genetically encoded tools for perturbing the actin cytoskeleton in single cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harterink, Martin; Santos Esteves da Silva, Marta; Will, Lena; Turan, Julia; Ibrahim, Adiljan; Lang, Alexander E; Van Battum, Eljo Y; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Kapitein, Lukas C; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Barres, Ben A; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Zuchero, J Bradley

    2017-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is essential for many fundamental biological processes, but tools for directly manipulating actin dynamics are limited to cell-permeable drugs that preclude single-cell perturbations. Here we describe DeActs, genetically encoded actin-modifying polypeptides, which effectively

  4. Spin-orbit mediated control of spin qubits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flindt, Christian; Sørensen, A.S; Flensberg, Karsten

    2006-01-01

    We propose to use the spin-orbit interaction as a means to control electron spins in quantum dots, enabling both single-qubit and two-qubit operations. Very fast single-qubit operations may be achieved by temporarily displacing the electrons. For two-qubit operations the coupling mechanism is based...... on a combination of the spin-orbit coupling and the mutual long-ranged Coulomb interaction. Compared to existing schemes using the exchange coupling, the spin-orbit induced coupling is less sensitive to random electrical fluctuations in the electrodes defining the quantum dots....

  5. Qubits and chirotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    We show that qubit and chirotope concepts are closely related. In fact, we prove that the qubit concept leads to a generalization of the chirotope concept, which we call qubitope. Moreover, we argue that a possible qubitope theory may suggest interesting applications of oriented matroid theory in at least three physical contexts, in which qubits make their appearance, namely string theory, black holes and quantum information.

  6. Qubits and chirotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto, J.A., E-mail: nieto@uas.uasnet.m [Mathematical, Computational and Modeling Science Center, Arizona State University, PO Box 871904, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, 80010, Culiacan Sinaloa (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica de la Universidad de Sonora, 83000, Hermosillo Sonora (Mexico)

    2010-08-16

    We show that qubit and chirotope concepts are closely related. In fact, we prove that the qubit concept leads to a generalization of the chirotope concept, which we call qubitope. Moreover, we argue that a possible qubitope theory may suggest interesting applications of oriented matroid theory in at least three physical contexts, in which qubits make their appearance, namely string theory, black holes and quantum information.

  7. Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. X.; Wei, L. F.; Johansson, J. R.; Tsai, J. S.; Nori, F.

    2009-03-01

    Exploiting the intrinsic nonlinearity of superconducting Josephson junctions, we propose a scalable circuit with superconducting qubits (SCQs) which is very similar to the successful one now being used for trapped ions. The SCQs are coupled to the ``vibrational'' mode provided by a superconducting LC circuit or its equivalent (e.g., a superconducting quantum interference device). Both single-qubit rotations and qubit-LC-circuit couplings and/or decouplings can be controlled by the frequencies of the time-dependent magnetic fluxes. The circuit is scalable since the qubit-qubit interactions, mediated by the LC circuit, can be selectively performed, and the information transfer can be realized in a controllable way. [4pt] Y.X. Liu, L.F. Wei, J.R. Johansson, J.S. Tsai, F. Nori, Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions, Phys. Rev. B 76, 144518 (2007). URL: http://link.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v76/e144518

  8. A universal encoding scheme for MIMO transmission using a single active element for PSK modulation schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrabadi, Osama; Papadias, C.B.; Kalis, A.

    2009-01-01

    A universal scheme for encoding multiple symbol streams using a single driven element (and consequently a single radio frequency (RF) frontend) surrounded by parasitic elements (PE) loaded with variable reactive loads, is proposed in this paper. The proposed scheme is based on creating a MIMO...... systems. The array can spatially multiplex the input streams by creating all the desired linear combinations (for a given modulation scheme) of the basis functions. The desired combinations are obtained by projecting the ratio of the symbols to be spatially multiplexed on the ratio of the basis functions...

  9. Entanglement and Quantum Error Correction with Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Quantum information science seeks to take advantage of the properties of quantum mechanics to manipulate information in ways that are not otherwise possible. Quantum computation, for example, promises to solve certain problems in days that would take a conventional supercomputer the age of the universe to decipher. This power does not come without a cost however, as quantum bits are inherently more susceptible to errors than their classical counterparts. Fortunately, it is possible to redundantly encode information in several entangled qubits, making it robust to decoherence and control imprecision with quantum error correction. I studied one possible physical implementation for quantum computing, employing the ground and first excited quantum states of a superconducting electrical circuit as a quantum bit. These ``transmon'' qubits are dispersively coupled to a superconducting resonator used for readout, control, and qubit-qubit coupling in the cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) architecture. In this talk I will give an general introduction to quantum computation and the superconducting technology that seeks to achieve it before explaining some of the specific results reported in my thesis. One major component is that of the first realization of three-qubit quantum error correction in a solid state device, where we encode one logical quantum bit in three entangled physical qubits and detect and correct phase- or bit-flip errors using a three-qubit Toffoli gate. My thesis is available at arXiv:1311.6759.

  10. Self-Calibrating Wave-Encoded Variable-Density Single-Shot Fast Spin Echo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feiyu; Taviani, Valentina; Tamir, Jonathan I; Cheng, Joseph Y; Zhang, Tao; Song, Qiong; Hargreaves, Brian A; Pauly, John M; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2018-04-01

    It is highly desirable in clinical abdominal MR scans to accelerate single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) imaging and reduce blurring due to T 2 decay and partial-Fourier acquisition. To develop and investigate the clinical feasibility of wave-encoded variable-density SSFSE imaging for improved image quality and scan time reduction. Prospective controlled clinical trial. With Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent, the proposed method was assessed on 20 consecutive adult patients (10 male, 10 female, range, 24-84 years). A wave-encoded variable-density SSFSE sequence was developed for clinical 3.0T abdominal scans to enable high acceleration (3.5×) with full-Fourier acquisitions by: 1) introducing wave encoding with self-refocusing gradient waveforms to improve acquisition efficiency; 2) developing self-calibrated estimation of wave-encoding point-spread function and coil sensitivity to improve motion robustness; and 3) incorporating a parallel imaging and compressed sensing reconstruction to reconstruct highly accelerated datasets. Image quality was compared pairwise with standard Cartesian acquisition independently and blindly by two radiologists on a scale from -2 to 2 for noise, contrast, confidence, sharpness, and artifacts. The average ratio of scan time between these two approaches was also compared. A Wilcoxon signed-rank tests with a P value under 0.05 considered statistically significant. Wave-encoded variable-density SSFSE significantly reduced the perceived noise level and improved the sharpness of the abdominal wall and the kidneys compared with standard acquisition (mean scores 0.8, 1.2, and 0.8, respectively, P variable-density sampling SSFSE achieves improved image quality with clinically relevant echo time and reduced scan time, thus providing a fast and robust approach for clinical SSFSE imaging. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 6 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:954-966. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Entanglement and Metrology with Singlet-Triplet Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Michael Dean

    Electron spins confined in semiconductor quantum dots are emerging as a promising system to study quantum information science and to perform sensitive metrology. Their weak interaction with the environment leads to long coherence times and robust storage for quantum information, and the intrinsic tunability of semiconductors allows for controllable operations, initialization, and readout of their quantum state. These spin qubits are also promising candidates for the building block for a scalable quantum information processor due to their prospects for scalability and miniaturization. However, several obstacles limit the performance of quantum information experiments in these systems. For example, the weak coupling to the environment makes inter-qubit operations challenging, and a fluctuating nuclear magnetic field limits the performance of single-qubit operations. The focus of this thesis will be several experiments which address some of the outstanding problems in semiconductor spin qubits, in particular, singlet-triplet (S-T0) qubits. We use these qubits to probe both the electric field and magnetic field noise that limit the performance of these qubits. The magnetic noise bath is probed with high bandwidth and precision using novel techniques borrowed from the field of Hamiltonian learning, which are effective due to the rapid control and readout available in S-T 0 qubits. These findings allow us to effectively undo the undesired effects of the fluctuating nuclear magnetic field by tracking them in real-time, and we demonstrate a 30-fold improvement in the coherence time T2*. We probe the voltage noise environment of the qubit using coherent qubit oscillations, which is partially enabled by control of the nuclear magnetic field. We find that the voltage noise bath is frequency-dependent, even at frequencies as high as 1MHz, and it shows surprising and, as of yet, unexplained temperature dependence. We leverage this knowledge of the voltage noise environment, the

  12. A programmable two-qubit quantum processor in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, T. F.; Philips, S. G. J.; Kawakami, E.; Ward, D. R.; Scarlino, P.; Veldhorst, M.; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    2018-03-01

    Now that it is possible to achieve measurement and control fidelities for individual quantum bits (qubits) above the threshold for fault tolerance, attention is moving towards the difficult task of scaling up the number of physical qubits to the large numbers that are needed for fault-tolerant quantum computing. In this context, quantum-dot-based spin qubits could have substantial advantages over other types of qubit owing to their potential for all-electrical operation and ability to be integrated at high density onto an industrial platform. Initialization, readout and single- and two-qubit gates have been demonstrated in various quantum-dot-based qubit representations. However, as seen with small-scale demonstrations of quantum computers using other types of qubit, combining these elements leads to challenges related to qubit crosstalk, state leakage, calibration and control hardware. Here we overcome these challenges by using carefully designed control techniques to demonstrate a programmable two-qubit quantum processor in a silicon device that can perform the Deutsch–Josza algorithm and the Grover search algorithm—canonical examples of quantum algorithms that outperform their classical analogues. We characterize the entanglement in our processor by using quantum-state tomography of Bell states, measuring state fidelities of 85–89 per cent and concurrences of 73–82 per cent. These results pave the way for larger-scale quantum computers that use spins confined to quantum dots.

  13. A programmable two-qubit quantum processor in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, T F; Philips, S G J; Kawakami, E; Ward, D R; Scarlino, P; Veldhorst, M; Savage, D E; Lagally, M G; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S N; Eriksson, M A; Vandersypen, L M K

    2018-03-29

    Now that it is possible to achieve measurement and control fidelities for individual quantum bits (qubits) above the threshold for fault tolerance, attention is moving towards the difficult task of scaling up the number of physical qubits to the large numbers that are needed for fault-tolerant quantum computing. In this context, quantum-dot-based spin qubits could have substantial advantages over other types of qubit owing to their potential for all-electrical operation and ability to be integrated at high density onto an industrial platform. Initialization, readout and single- and two-qubit gates have been demonstrated in various quantum-dot-based qubit representations. However, as seen with small-scale demonstrations of quantum computers using other types of qubit, combining these elements leads to challenges related to qubit crosstalk, state leakage, calibration and control hardware. Here we overcome these challenges by using carefully designed control techniques to demonstrate a programmable two-qubit quantum processor in a silicon device that can perform the Deutsch-Josza algorithm and the Grover search algorithm-canonical examples of quantum algorithms that outperform their classical analogues. We characterize the entanglement in our processor by using quantum-state tomography of Bell states, measuring state fidelities of 85-89 per cent and concurrences of 73-82 per cent. These results pave the way for larger-scale quantum computers that use spins confined to quantum dots.

  14. Telecom-Wavelength Atomic Quantum Memory in Optical Fiber for Heralded Polarization Qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jeongwan; Saglamyurek, Erhan; Puigibert, Marcel lí Grimau; Verma, Varun; Marsili, Francesco; Nam, Sae Woo; Oblak, Daniel; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2015-10-02

    Polarization-encoded photons at telecommunication wavelengths provide a compelling platform for practical realizations of photonic quantum information technologies due to the ease of performing single qubit manipulations, the availability of polarization-entangled photon-pair sources, and the possibility of leveraging existing fiber-optic links for distributing qubits over long distances. An optical quantum memory compatible with this platform could serve as a building block for these technologies. Here we present the first experimental demonstration of an atomic quantum memory that directly allows for reversible mapping of quantum states encoded in the polarization degree of freedom of a telecom-wavelength photon. We show that heralded polarization qubits at a telecom wavelength are stored and retrieved with near-unity fidelity by implementing the atomic frequency comb protocol in an ensemble of erbium atoms doped into an optical fiber. Despite remaining limitations in our proof-of-principle demonstration such as small storage efficiency and storage time, our broadband light-matter interface reveals the potential for use in future quantum information processing.

  15. Four qubits can be entangled in nine different ways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verstraete, F.; Dehaene, J.; Moor, B. de; Verschelde, H.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a single copy of a pure four-partite state of qubits and investigate its behavior under the action of stochastic local quantum operations assisted by classical communication (SLOCC). This leads to a complete classification of all different classes of pure states of four qubits. It is shown that there exist nine families of states corresponding to nine different ways of entangling four qubits. The states in the generic family give rise to Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-like entanglement. The other ones contain essentially two-or three-qubit entanglement distributed among the four parties. The concept of concurrence and 3-tangle is generalized to the case of mixed states of four qubits, giving rise to a seven-parameter family of entanglement monotones. Finally, the SLOCC operations maximizing all these entanglement monotones are derived, yielding the optimal single-copy distillation protocol

  16. Time domain spectral phase encoding/DPSK data modulation using single phase modulator for OCDMA application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Gao, Zhensen; Kataoka, Nobuyuki; Wada, Naoya

    2010-05-10

    A novel scheme using single phase modulator for simultaneous time domain spectral phase encoding (SPE) signal generation and DPSK data modulation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Array- Waveguide-Grating and Variable-Bandwidth-Spectrum-Shaper based devices can be used for decoding the signal directly in spectral domain. The effects of fiber dispersion, light pulse width and timing error on the coding performance have been investigated by simulation and verified in experiment. In the experiment, SPE signal with 8-chip, 20GHz/chip optical code patterns has been generated and modulated with 2.5 Gbps DPSK data using single modulator. Transmission of the 2.5 Gbps data over 34km fiber with BEROCDMA) and secure optical communication applications. (c) 2010 Optical Society of America.

  17. Use of incidentally encoded memory from a single experience in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Saho; Tsuzuki, Mana; Chijiiwa, Hitomi; Arahori, Minori; Watanabe, Arii; Saito, Atsuko; Fujita, Kazuo

    2017-08-01

    We examined whether cats could retrieve and utilize incidentally encoded information from a single past event in a simple food-exploration task previously used for dogs (Fujita et al., 2012). In Experiment 1, cats were led to four open, baited containers and allowed to eat from two of them (Exposure phase). After a 15-min delay during which the cats were absent and all containers were replaced with empty ones, the cats were unexpectedly returned to the room and allowed to explore the containers (Test phase). Although the cats' first choice of container to visit was random, they explored containers from which they had not previously eaten for longer than those from which they did previously eat. In the Exposure phase of Experiment 2, two containers held food, one held a nonedible object, and the fourth was empty. Cats were allowed to eat from one of them. In the post-delay Test phase, the cats first visited the remaining baited-uneaten container significantly more often than chance and they spent more time exploring this container. Because the cats' behavior in the Test phase cannot be explained by association of the container with a pleasant experience (eating), the results suggest that cats retrieved and utilized "what" and "where" information from an incidentally encoded memory from a single experience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Silicon-Vacancy Spin Qubit in Diamond: A Quantum Memory Exceeding 10 ms with Single-Shot State Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukachev, D. D.; Sipahigil, A.; Nguyen, C. T.; Bhaskar, M. K.; Evans, R. E.; Jelezko, F.; Lukin, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    The negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV- ) color center in diamond has recently emerged as a promising system for quantum photonics. Its symmetry-protected optical transitions enable the creation of indistinguishable emitter arrays and deterministic coupling to nanophotonic devices. Despite this, the longest coherence time associated with its electronic spin achieved to date (˜250 ns ) has been limited by coupling to acoustic phonons. We demonstrate coherent control and suppression of phonon-induced dephasing of the SiV- electronic spin coherence by 5 orders of magnitude by operating at temperatures below 500 mK. By aligning the magnetic field along the SiV- symmetry axis, we demonstrate spin-conserving optical transitions and single-shot readout of the SiV- spin with 89% fidelity. Coherent control of the SiV- spin with microwave fields is used to demonstrate a spin coherence time T2 of 13 ms and a spin relaxation time T1 exceeding 1 s at 100 mK. These results establish the SiV- as a promising solid-state candidate for the realization of quantum networks.

  19. Ultrafast optical control of individual quantum dot spin qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Greve, Kristiaan; Press, David; McMahon, Peter L; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Single spins in semiconductor quantum dots form a promising platform for solid-state quantum information processing. The spin-up and spin-down states of a single electron or hole, trapped inside a quantum dot, can represent a single qubit with a reasonably long decoherence time. The spin qubit can be optically coupled to excited (charged exciton) states that are also trapped in the quantum dot, which provides a mechanism to quickly initialize, manipulate and measure the spin state with optical pulses, and to interface between a stationary matter qubit and a ‘flying’ photonic qubit for quantum communication and distributed quantum information processing. The interaction of the spin qubit with light may be enhanced by placing the quantum dot inside a monolithic microcavity. An entire system, consisting of a two-dimensional array of quantum dots and a planar microcavity, may plausibly be constructed by modern semiconductor nano-fabrication technology and could offer a path toward chip-sized scalable quantum repeaters and quantum computers. This article reviews the recent experimental developments in optical control of single quantum dot spins for quantum information processing. We highlight demonstrations of a complete set of all-optical single-qubit operations on a single quantum dot spin: initialization, an arbitrary SU(2) gate, and measurement. We review the decoherence and dephasing mechanisms due to hyperfine interaction with the nuclear-spin bath, and show how the single-qubit operations can be combined to perform spin echo sequences that extend the qubit decoherence from a few nanoseconds to several microseconds, more than 5 orders of magnitude longer than the single-qubit gate time. Two-qubit coupling is discussed, both within a single chip by means of exchange coupling of nearby spins and optically induced geometric phases, as well as over longer-distances. Long-distance spin–spin entanglement can be generated if each spin can emit a photon that is

  20. Embedding qubits into fermionic Fock space: Peculiarities of the four-qubit case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévay, Péter; Holweck, Frédéric

    2015-06-01

    We give a fermionic Fock space description of embedded entangled qubits. Within this framework the problem of classification of pure state entanglement boils down to the problem of classifying spinors. The usual notion of separable states turns out to be just a special case of the one of pure spinors. By using the notion of single, double and mixed occupancy representation with intertwiners relating them a natural physical interpretation of embedded qubits is found. As an application of these ideas one can make a physical sound meaning of some of the direct sum structures showing up in the context of the so-called black-hole/qubit correspondence. We discuss how the usual invariants for qubits serving as measures of entanglement can be obtained from invariants for spinors in an elegant manner. In particular a detailed case study for recovering the invariants for four-qubits within a spinorial framework is presented. We also observe that reality conditions on complex spinors defining Majorana spinors for embedded qubits boil down to self-conjugate states under the Wootters spin flip operation. Finally we conduct a study on the explicit structure of Spin(16 ,C ) invariant polynomials related to the structure of possible measures of entanglement for fermionic systems with eight modes. Here we find an algebraically independent generating set of the generalized stochastic local operations and classical communication invariants and calculate their restriction to the dense orbit. We point out the special role the largest exceptional group E8 is playing in these considerations.

  1. Partial Fourier techniques in single-shot cross-term spatiotemporal encoded MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Frydman, Lucio

    2018-03-01

    Cross-term spatiotemporal encoding (xSPEN) is a single-shot approach with exceptional immunity to field heterogeneities, the images of which faithfully deliver 2D spatial distributions without requiring a priori information or using postacquisition corrections. xSPEN, however, suffers from signal-to-noise ratio penalties due to its non-Fourier nature and due to diffusion losses-especially when seeking high resolution. This study explores partial Fourier transform approaches that, acting along either the readout or the spatiotemporally encoded dimensions, reduce these penalties. xSPEN uses an orthogonal (e.g., z) gradient to read, in direct space, the low-bandwidth (e.g., y) dimension. This substantially changes the nature of partial Fourier acquisitions vis-à-vis conventional imaging counterparts. A suitable theoretical analysis is derived to implement these procedures, along either the spatiotemporally or readout axes. Partial Fourier single-shot xSPEN images were recorded on preclinical and human scanners. Owing to their reduction in the experiments' acquisition times, this approach provided substantial sensitivity gains vis-à-vis previous implementations for a given targeted in-plane resolution. The physical origins of these gains are explained. Partial Fourier approaches, particularly when implemented along the low-bandwidth spatiotemporal dimension, provide several-fold sensitivity advantages at minimal costs to the execution and processing of the single-shot experiments. Magn Reson Med 79:1506-1514, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Tuning decoherence in superconducting transmon qubits by mechanical strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brehm, Jan; Bilmes, Alexander; Weiss, Georg; Ustinov, Alexey; Lisenfeld, Juergen [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Two-level tunneling systems (TLS) are formed by structural defects in disordered materials. They gained recent attention as an important decoherence source in superconducting qubits, where they appear on surface oxides and at film interfaces. Although the most advanced qubits do not show avoided level crossings arising from a strong coupling to individual TLS, they commonly display a pronounced frequency dependence of relaxation rates, with distinguishable peaks that may point towards weak resonant coupling to single TLS. Previously, we have shown that TLS are tunable via an applied mechanical strain. Here, we employ this method to test whether the characteristic decoherence spectrum of a transmon qubit sample responds to changes in the applied strain, as it can be expected when the decohering bath is formed of atomic TLS. In our experiment, we will employ a highly coherent X-mon qubit sample and tune the strain by bending the qubit chip via a piezo actuator. Our latest results will be presented.

  3. Tunable coupling between fixed-frequency superconducting transmon qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipp, Stefan [IBM Research Zurich, 8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland); McKay, David C.; Magesan, Easwar; Mezzacapo, Antonio; Chow, Jerry M.; Gambetta, Jay M. [IBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The controlled realization of qubit-qubit interactions is essential for both the physical implementation of quantum error-correction codes and for reliable quantum simulations. Ideally, the fidelity and speed of corresponding two-qubit gate operations is comparable to those of single qubit operations. In particular, in a scalable superconducting qubit architecture coherence must not be compromised by the presence of additional coupling elements mediating the interaction between qubits. Here we present a coupling method between fixed-frequency transmon qubits based on the frequency modulation of an auxiliary circuit coupling to the individual transmons. Since the coupler remains in its ground state at all times, its coherence does not significantly influence the fidelity of consequent entangling operations. Moreover, with the possibility to create interactions along different directions, our method is suited to engineer Hamiltonians with adjustable coupling terms. This property can be utilized for quantum simulations of spins or fermions in transmon arrays, in which pairwise couplings between adjacent qubits can be activated on demand.

  4. Decoherence of superconducting qubits caused by quasiparticle tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelani, G.; Nigg, S. E.; Girvin, S. M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Glazman, L. I.

    2012-11-01

    In superconducting qubits, the interaction of the qubit degree of freedom with quasiparticles defines a fundamental limitation for the qubit coherence. We develop a theory of the pure dephasing rate Γϕ caused by quasiparticles tunneling through a Josephson junction and of the inhomogeneous broadening due to changes in the occupations of Andreev states in the junction. To estimate Γϕ, we derive a master equation for the qubit dynamics. The tunneling rate of free quasiparticles is enhanced by their large density of states at energies close to the superconducting gap. Nevertheless, we find that Γϕ is small compared to the rates determined by extrinsic factors in most of the current qubit designs (phase and flux qubits, transmon, fluxonium). The split transmon, in which a single junction is replaced by a SQUID loop, represents an exception that could make possible the measurement of Γϕ. Fluctuations of the qubit frequency leading to inhomogeneous broadening may be caused by the fluctuations in the occupation numbers of the Andreev states associated with a phase-biased Josephson junction. This mechanism may be revealed in qubits with small-area junctions, since the smallest relative change in frequency it causes is of the order of the inverse number of transmission channels in the junction.

  5. ac Stark shift and dephasing of a superconducting qubit strongly coupled to a cavity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, D I; Wallraff, A; Blais, A; Frunzio, L; Huang, R-S; Majer, J; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2005-04-01

    We have performed spectroscopy of a superconducting charge qubit coupled nonresonantly to a single mode of an on-chip resonator. The strong coupling induces a large ac Stark shift in the energy levels of both the qubit and the resonator. The dispersive shift of the resonator frequency is used to nondestructively determine the qubit state. Photon shot noise in the measurement field induces qubit level fluctuations leading to dephasing which is characteristic for the measurement backaction. A crossover in line shape with measurement power is observed and theoretically explained. For weak measurement a long intrinsic dephasing time of T2>200 ns of the qubit is found.

  6. How to implement a quantum algorithm on a large number of qubits by controlling one central qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagoskin, Alexander; Ashhab, Sahel; Johansson, J. R.; Nori, Franco

    2010-03-01

    It is desirable to minimize the number of control parameters needed to perform a quantum algorithm. We show that, under certain conditions, an entire quantum algorithm can be efficiently implemented by controlling a single central qubit in a quantum computer. We also show that the different system parameters do not need to be designed accurately during fabrication. They can be determined through the response of the central qubit to external driving. Our proposal is well suited for hybrid architectures that combine microscopic and macroscopic qubits. More details can be found in: A.M. Zagoskin, S. Ashhab, J.R. Johansson, F. Nori, Quantum two-level systems in Josephson junctions as naturally formed qubits, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 077001 (2006); and S. Ashhab, J.R. Johansson, F. Nori, Rabi oscillations in a qubit coupled to a quantum two-level system, New J. Phys. 8, 103 (2006).

  7. Designing Better Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Mark; Joynt, Robert; Eriksson, M. A.

    2002-03-01

    The quantum dot implementation for quantum computation offers numerous advantages, in terms of qubit control and design. We extend our recent proposal for a Si-Ge based quantum computer by exploring the parameter space of the device. Split top gates confine electrons in a quantum well layer, while controlling the interactions between neighboring dots. Tunnel coupling to a back gate allows precise tuning of the number of electrons in each dot. By varying the arrangement of top gates, the size of tunnel barriers, and the heterostructure composition, it is possible to tailor devices that are well suited for general purpose quantum computation, or optimized for particular algorithms or protocols. Specifications that can be engineered include the magnitude of qubit interactions, the number of electrons per dot, and the connectivity of qubits. For a conventional, linear qubit array, with qubit separations of d =100 nm, the exchange coupling, J, can be tuned between δ (an exponentially small number that shrinks for large d) to approximately 20 μeV. In this range, the stability energy for retaining exactly one electron per dot is above 3 meV or 30 K. Work supported by NSF-QuBIC and MRSEC programs, ARDA, and NSA.

  8. Manipulation of qubits in non-orthogonal collective storage modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Jonas; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of transfer of quantum information between the collective spin degrees of freedom of a large ensemble of two-level systems and a single central qubit. The coupling between the central qubit and the individual ensemble members may be varied and thus provides access to more......, for concreteness, we study the transfer of quantum states between a single electron spin and an ensemble of nuclear spins in a quantum dot....

  9. Circuit QED with transmon qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Puertas, Javier; Baust, Alexander; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Haeberlein, Max; Schwarz, Manuel; Xie, Edwar; Zhong, Ling; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Marx, Achim; Menzel, Edwin; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Huebl, Hans [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Weides, Martin [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Superconducting quantum bits are basic building blocks for circuit QED systems. Applications in the fields of quantum computation and quantum simulation require long coherence times. We have fabricated and characterized superconducting transmon qubits which are designed to operate at a high ratio of Josephson energy and charging energy. Due to their low sensitivity to charge noise transmon qubits show good coherence properties. We couple transmon qubits to coplanar waveguide resonators and coplanar slotline resonators and characterize the devices at mK-temperatures. From the experimental data we derive the qubit-resonator coupling strength, the qubit relaxation time and calibrate the photon number in the resonator via Stark shifts.

  10. Experiments with double-SQUID qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerling, Bernhard; Poletto, Stefano; Ustinov, Alexey V. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Chiarello, Fabio [Instituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, Roma (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    A double-SQUID qubit (flash-qubit) allows the manipulation of quantum states by very short pulses of magnetic flux, without using microwaves. It consists of an rf-SQUID with a dc-SQUID replacing the single Josephson junction. The energy potential profile is controllable by dc bias fluxes threading the two loops. The initial qubit state in a double well is prepared by applying a dc flux pulse to one loop, thereby tilting the double well so that only one of the two states remains stable. To manipulate the state of the qubit a dc flux pulse is applied to the other loop to change the potential into a single well, where coherent Larmor oscillations between the two lowest eigenstates take place. Reading out the state is once again performed in the double well situation, where our readout dc-SQUID is able to discriminate between the two computational states due to their flux difference. We hope to present measurements done on a new sample, fabricated using shadow evaporation of aluminium and silicon nitride as the dielectric.

  11. Coherent manipulation of a 40Ca+ spin qubit in a micro ion trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poschinger, U.G.; Huber, G.; Ziesel, F.

    2009-01-01

    the initialization and readout of the qubit levels with 99.5% efficiency. We employ a Raman transition close to the S1/2-P1/2 resonance for coherent manipulation of the qubit. We observe single qubit rotations with 96% fidelity and gate times below 5 µs. Rabi oscillations on the blue motional sideband are used...

  12. Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Taballione, Caterina; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Slussarenko, Sergei; Aolita, Leandro; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P.; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However, there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission fidelity. In our experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-filtering mechanism that maps errors into losses.

  13. Protection of qubit-coherence on a Bloch sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Xiao-Lan; Chu, Wen-Jing; Yang, Ming; Yang, Qing; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2017-07-01

    Single qubit pure state is a fundamental resource in quantum information and quantum computation. Therefore, it is of great importance to protect the coherence of single qubits against decoherence. In this letter, we demonstrate that decoherence caused by spontaneous emission can be effectively suppressed by adding a universal static external field. In order to have an intuitive view to the protection effects and its physical mechanisms, we study the coherence evolution of a single qubit on a Bloch sphere. We can clearly see that different external resonant drivings can rotate the Bloch vector around different axes, and the steady-state solution of the master equation (under protection) are visualized on the Bloch sphere. Furthermore, the frequency detuning between the qubit system and the driving is taken into account, and the results show that our protection scheme still works fine in the detuned cases and the smaller the detuning is, the better the protection effect is. In addition, this protocol can protect the coherence of single qubit states with a wide range of driving parameters, and help people to design simple coherence protection schemes for qubit states. The simplicity and the abundance of the current scheme may warrant its experimental realization.

  14. Mitochondrial Genes of Dinoflagellates Are Transcribed by a Nuclear-Encoded Single-Subunit RNA Polymerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ying Teng

    Full Text Available Dinoflagellates are a large group of algae that contribute significantly to marine productivity and are essential photosynthetic symbionts of corals. Although these algae have fully-functioning mitochondria and chloroplasts, both their organelle genomes have been highly reduced and the genes fragmented and rearranged, with many aberrant transcripts. However, nothing is known about their RNA polymerases. We cloned and sequenced the gene for the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial polymerase (RpoTm of the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra and showed that the protein presequence targeted a GFP construct into yeast mitochondria. The gene belongs to a small gene family, which includes a variety of 3'-truncated copies that may have originated by retroposition. The catalytic C-terminal domain of the protein shares nine conserved sequence blocks with other single-subunit polymerases and is predicted to have the same fold as the human enzyme. However, the N-terminal (promoter binding/transcription initiation domain is not well-conserved. In conjunction with the degenerate nature of the mitochondrial genome, this suggests a requirement for novel accessory factors to ensure the accurate production of functional mRNAs.

  15. Human coronavirus 229E encodes a single ORF4 protein between the spike and the envelope genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, Ronald; Jebbink, Maarten F.; Wilbrink, Berry; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Minor, Philip D.; Franklin, Sally; Berkhout, Ben; Thiel, Volker; van der Hoek, Lia

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The genome of coronaviruses contains structural and non-structural genes, including several so-called accessory genes. All group 1b coronaviruses encode a single accessory protein between the spike and envelope genes, except for human coronavirus (HCoV) 229E. The prototype virus has a

  16. Qubit compatible superconducting interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxen, B.; Mutus, J. Y.; Lucero, E.; Graff, R.; Megrant, A.; Chen, Yu; Quintana, C.; Burkett, B.; Kelly, J.; Jeffrey, E.; Yang, Yan; Yu, Anthony; Arya, K.; Barends, R.; Chen, Zijun; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A.; Gidney, C.; Giustina, M.; Huang, T.; Klimov, P.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Martinis, John M.

    2018-01-01

    We present a fabrication process for fully superconducting interconnects compatible with superconducting qubit technology. These interconnects allow for the three dimensional integration of quantum circuits without introducing lossy amorphous dielectrics. They are composed of indium bumps several microns tall separated from an aluminum base layer by titanium nitride which serves as a diffusion barrier. We measure the whole structure to be superconducting (transition temperature of 1.1 K), limited by the aluminum. These interconnects have an average critical current of 26.8 mA, and mechanical shear and thermal cycle testing indicate that these devices are mechanically robust. Our process provides a method that reliably yields superconducting interconnects suitable for use with superconducting qubits.

  17. Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer (SQOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-05

    has photon loss in the optical fibre would appear has an effective T1 process and destroy any entanglement. 2.2.3 TEMPORAL MODE FILTER FUNCTION To...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The SQOT (Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer) project proposes to build a novel electro- optic system which can...exchange quantum information between optical qubits at telecom frequencies and superconducting qubits. A direct quantum information transfer between

  18. Randomized benchmarking and process tomography for gate errors in a solid-state qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, J M; Gambetta, J M; Tornberg, L; Koch, Jens; Bishop, Lev S; Houck, A A; Johnson, B R; Frunzio, L; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2009-03-06

    We present measurements of single-qubit gate errors for a superconducting qubit. Results from quantum process tomography and randomized benchmarking are compared with gate errors obtained from a double pi pulse experiment. Randomized benchmarking reveals a minimum average gate error of 1.1+/-0.3% and a simple exponential dependence of fidelity on the number of gates. It shows that the limits on gate fidelity are primarily imposed by qubit decoherence, in agreement with theory.

  19. Quasi-lattices of qubits for generating inequivalent multipartite entanglements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ian, Hou

    2016-06-01

    The mesoscopic scale of superconducting qubits makes their inter-spacings comparable to the scale of wavelength of a circuit cavity field to which they commonly couple. This comparability results in inhomogeneous coupling strengths for each qubit and hence asynchronous Rabi excitation cycles among the qubits that form a quasi-lattice. We find that such inhomogeneous coupling benefits the formation of multi-photon resonances between the single-mode cavity field and the quasi-lattice. The multi-photon resonances lead, in turn, to the simultaneous generation of inequivalent |\\text{GHZ}> and |W> types of multipartite entanglement states, which are not transformable to each other through local operations with classical communications. Applying the model on the 3-qubit quasi-lattice and using the entanglement measures of both concurrence and 3-tangle, we verify that the inhomogeneous coupling specifically promotes the generation of the totally inseparable |\\text{GHZ}> state.

  20. Transformed composite sequences for improved qubit addressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, J. True; Doret, S. Charles; Vittorini, Grahame; Addison, J. P.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2014-10-01

    Selective laser addressing of a single atom or atomic ion qubit can be improved using narrow-band composite pulse sequences. We describe a Lie-algebraic technique to generalize known narrow-band sequences and introduce sequences related by dilation and rotation of sequence generators. Our method improves known narrow-band sequences by decreasing both the pulse time and the residual error. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate these composite sequences using 40Ca+ ions trapped in a surface-electrode ion trap.

  1. Fault-tolerant computing with biased-noise superconducting qubits: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliferis, P; Brito, F; DiVincenzo, D P; Steffen, M; Terhal, B M; Preskill, J

    2009-01-01

    We present a universal scheme of pulsed operations suitable for the IBM oscillator-stabilized flux qubit comprising the controlled-σ z (cphase) gate, single-qubit preparations and measurements. Based on numerical simulations, we argue that the error rates for these operations can be as low as about 0.5% and that noise is highly biased, with phase errors being stronger than all other types of errors by a factor of nearly 10 3 . In contrast, the design of a controlled-σ x (cnot) gate for this system with an error rate of less than about 1.2% seems extremely challenging. We propose a special encoding that exploits the noise bias allowing us to implement a logicalcnot gate where phase errors and all other types of errors have nearly balanced rates of about 0.4%. Our results illustrate how the design of an encoding scheme can be adjusted and optimized according to the available physical operations and the particular noise characteristics of experimental devices.

  2. Experimental demonstration of high fidelity entanglement distribution over decoherence channels via qubit transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyang-Tag; Hong, Kang-Hee; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2015-10-21

    Quantum coherence and entanglement, which are essential resources for quantum information, are often degraded and lost due to decoherence. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration of high fidelity entanglement distribution over decoherence channels via qubit transduction. By unitarily switching the initial qubit encoding to another, which is insensitive to particular forms of decoherence, we have demonstrated that it is possible to avoid the effect of decoherence completely. In particular, we demonstrate high-fidelity distribution of photonic polarization entanglement over quantum channels with two types of decoherence, amplitude damping and polarization-mode dispersion, via qubit transduction between polarization qubits and dual-rail qubits. These results represent a significant breakthrough in quantum communication over decoherence channels as the protocol is input-state independent, requires no ancillary photons and symmetries, and has near-unity success probability.

  3. Influence of external fields and environment on the dynamics of a phase-qubit-resonator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, G. P.; Chumak, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a qubit-resonator system coupled with a thermal bath and external electromagnetic fields. Using the evolution equations for the set of Heisenberg operators that describe the whole system, we derive an expression for the resonator field, accounting for the resonator-drive, -bath, and -qubit interaction. The renormalization of the resonator frequency caused by the qubit-resonator interaction is accounted for. Using solutions for the resonator field, we derive the equation describing qubit dynamics. The influence of the qubit evolution during measurement time on the fidelity of a single-shot measurement is studied. The relation between fidelity and measurement time is shown explicitly. Also, an expression describing relaxation of the superposition qubit state toward its stationary value is derived. The possibility of controlling this state by varying the amplitude and frequency of drive is shown.

  4. Quantum coherence and entanglement preservation in Markovian and non-Markovian dynamics via additional qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Naghi; Ahansaz, Bahram; Faizi, Esfandyar

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate preservation of quantum coherence of a single-qubit interacting with a zero-temperature reservoir through the addition of non-interacting qubits in the reservoir. Moreover, we extend this scheme to preserve quantum entanglement between two and three distant qubits, each of which interacts with a dissipative reservoir independently. At the limit t → ∞, we obtained analytical expressions for the coherence measure and the concurrence of two and three qubits in terms of the number of additional qubits. It is observed that, by increasing the number of additional qubits in each reservoir, the initial coherence and the respective entanglements are completely protected in both Markovian and non-Markovian regimes. Interestingly, the protection of entanglements occurs even under the individually different behaviors of the reservoirs.

  5. Superconducting Qubits and Quantum Resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forn-Díaz, P.

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting qubits are fabricated "loss-free" electrical circuits on a chip with size features of tens of nanometers. If cooled to cryogenic temperatures below -273 °C they behave as quantum elements, similar to atoms and molecules. Such a qubit can be manipulated by fast-oscillating magnetic

  6. Fast Quantum Nondemolition Readout by Parametric Modulation of Longitudinal Qubit-Oscillator Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Nicolas; Bourassa, Jérôme; Blais, Alexandre

    2015-11-13

    We show how to realize fast and high-fidelity quantum nondemolition qubit readout using longitudinal qubit-oscillator interaction. This is accomplished by modulating the longitudinal coupling at the cavity frequency. The qubit-oscillator interaction then acts as a qubit-state dependent drive on the cavity, a situation that is fundamentally different from the standard dispersive case. Single-mode squeezing can be exploited to exponentially increase the signal-to-noise ratio of this readout protocol. We present an implementation of this longitudinal parametric readout in circuit quantum electrodynamics and a possible multiqubit architecture.

  7. Characterizing Ensembles of Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Adam; Birenbaum, Jeff; Hover, David; Rosenberg, Danna; Weber, Steven; Yoder, Jonilyn L.; Kerman, Jamie; Gustavsson, Simon; Kamal, Archana; Yan, Fei; Oliver, William

    We investigate ensembles of up to 48 superconducting qubits embedded within a superconducting cavity. Such arrays of qubits have been proposed for the experimental study of Ising Hamiltonians, and efficient methods to characterize and calibrate these types of systems are still under development. Here we leverage high qubit coherence (> 70 μs) to characterize individual devices as well as qubit-qubit interactions, utilizing the common resonator mode for a joint readout. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  8. Autonomous stabilization of an entangled state of two transmon qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, S.; Leghtas, Z.; Hatridge, M.; Narla, A.; Vool, U.; Girvin, S. M.; Mirrahimi, M.; Devoret, M. H.

    2013-03-01

    Recent circuit QED (cQED) experiments on superconducting transmon qubits have shown good progress towards measurement-based quantum feedback, that should allow the stabilization of interesting quantum states, such as an entangled state of two qubits. These experiments crucially depend on fast, high-fidelity, quantum non-demolition qubit readout using superconducting parametric amplifiers as well as high-speed room-temperature electronics. We describe an alternate autonomous-feedback strategy to stabilize two qubits dispersively coupled to a single cavity into an entangled state, while obviating the need for an optimized measurement chain. The system Hamiltonian is designed to be in the strong dispersive cQED regime where the dispersive shifts of the two qubits are tuned to be equal (χ / 2 π = 5 MHz) and larger than the cavity linewidth (κ / 2 π = 1 . 5 MHz). By applying continuous microwave drives at the cavity and qubit frequencies, the system is forced into the desired quantum state. The stabilization rate of this scheme is of order κ which can be made much faster than all decoherence rates 1/T1, 1/Tϕ that take the system out of the entangled state. We will discuss initial experimental progress towards the goal of autonomous high-fidelity entanglement. Work supported by IARPA, ARO, and NSF.

  9. Electromagnetically induced interference in a superconducting flux qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du lingjie; Yu Yang; Lan Dong

    2013-01-01

    Interaction between quantum two-level systems (qubits) and electromagnetic fields can provide additional coupling channels to qubit states. In particular, the interwell relaxation or Rabi oscillations, resulting, respectively, from the multi- or single-mode interaction, can produce effective crossovers, leading to electromagnetically induced interference in microwave driven qubits. The environment is modeled by a multimode thermal bath, generating the interwell relaxation. Relaxation induced interference, independent of the tunnel coupling, provides deeper understanding to the interaction between the qubits and their environment. It also supplies a useful tool to characterize the relaxation strength as well as the characteristic frequency of the bath. In addition, we demonstrate the relaxation can generate population inversion in a strongly driving two-level system. On the other hand, different from Rabi oscillations, Rabi-oscillation-induced interference involves more complicated and modulated photon exchange thus offers an alternative means to manipulate the qubit, with more controllable parameters including the strength and position of the tunnel coupling. It also provides a testing ground for exploring nonlinear quantum phenomena and quantum state manipulation in qubits either with or without crossover structure.

  10. Multi-party quantum key agreement with five-qubit brown states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tao; Jiang, Min; Cao, Gang

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-party quantum key agreement protocol with five-qubit brown states and single-qubit measurements. Our multi-party protocol ensures each participant to contribute equally to the agreement key. Each party performs three single-qubit unitary operations on three qubits of each brown state. Finally, by measuring brown states and decoding the measurement results, all participants can negotiate a shared secret key without classical bits exchange between them. With the analysis of security, our protocol demonstrates that it can resist against both outsider and participant attacks. Compared with other schemes, it also possesses a higher information efficiency. In terms of physical operation, it requires single-qubit measurements only which weakens the hardware requirements of participant and has a better operating flexibility.

  11. Multi-Qubit Algorithms in Josephson Phase Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-15

    state measurement in superconducting qubits, ( ) Josh Mutus, Ted White, Rami Barends, Yu Chen, Zijun Chen, Ben Chiaro, Andrew Dunsworth, Evan...Wenner, Yi Yin, Yu Chen, Rami Barends, Ben Chiaro, Evan Jeffrey, Julian Kelly, Anthony Megrant, Josh Mutus, Charles Neill, Peter O’Malley, Pedram...UCSB nal report for the CSQ program:Review of decoherence and materials physics for superconducting qubits, Unknown (07 2015) John M. Martinis, Rami

  12. Quantum Information Processing with Atomic Qubits and Optical Frequency Combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Wesley

    2010-03-01

    Pulsed optical fields from mode-locked lasers have found widespread use as tools for precision quantum control and are well suited for implementation in quantum information processing and quantum simulation. We experimentally demonstrate two distinct regimes of the interaction between hyperfine atomic ion qubits and stimulated Raman transitions driven by picosecond pulses from a far off- resonant mode-locked laser. In the weak pulse regime, the coherent accumulation of successive pulses from an optical frequency comb performs single qubit operations and is used to entangle two trapped atomic ion qubits. In the strong pulse regime, a single pulse is used to implement a fast (kicks. To entangle multiple ions, optical frequency combs operated near the strong pulse regime may be used to implement motion-mediated gates that can be performed much faster than a collective motional period.[4pt] [1] Garc'ia-Ripoll et al., PRL 91, 157901 (2003).[0pt] [2] Duan, PRL 93, 100502 (2004).

  13. Deterministic doping and the exploration of spin qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, T.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A. [Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lo, C. C. [Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); London Centre for Nanotechnology (United Kingdom); Chakarov, I. [Global Foundries, Malta, NY 12020 (United States); Schneider, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bokor, J. [Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    Deterministic doping by single ion implantation, the precise placement of individual dopant atoms into devices, is a path for the realization of quantum computer test structures where quantum bits (qubits) are based on electron and nuclear spins of donors or color centers. We present a donor - quantum dot type qubit architecture and discuss the use of medium and highly charged ions extracted from an Electron Beam Ion Trap/Source (EBIT/S) for deterministic doping. EBIT/S are attractive for the formation of qubit test structures due to the relatively low emittance of ion beams from an EBIT/S and due to the potential energy associated with the ions' charge state, which can aid single ion impact detection. Following ion implantation, dopant specific diffusion mechanisms during device processing affect the placement accuracy and coherence properties of donor spin qubits. For bismuth, range straggling is minimal but its relatively low solubility in silicon limits thermal budgets for the formation of qubit test structures.

  14. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in uridine/cytidine kinase gene encoding metabolic enzyme of 3'-ethynylcytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Takako; Futagami, Michiko; Kim, Hey-Sook; Matsuda, Akira; Wataya, Yusuke

    2002-01-01

    We investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in uck2 gene encoding metabolic enzyme of 3'-ethynylcytidine (ECyd) which were associated with drug response of ECyd, and the newly synthesized antitumor ribonucleoside analog. We analized that on exon-intron junction and exon region to affect the qualitative alteration of gene product directly in ECyd sensitive and resistant human cancer cell lines. As the results, cSNP and sSNP were detected in exon 4. In the promoter region, 3 SNPs were detected. Our data seem to be able to give an important knowledge, when ECyd is applied clinically.

  15. Characterization of the single stranded DNA binding protein SsbB encoded in the Gonoccocal Genetic Island.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samta Jain

    Full Text Available Most strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae carry a Gonococcal Genetic Island which encodes a type IV secretion system involved in the secretion of ssDNA. We characterize the GGI-encoded ssDNA binding protein, SsbB. Close homologs of SsbB are located within a conserved genetic cluster found in genetic islands of different proteobacteria. This cluster encodes DNA-processing enzymes such as the ParA and ParB partitioning proteins, the TopB topoisomerase, and four conserved hypothetical proteins. The SsbB homologs found in these clusters form a family separated from other ssDNA binding proteins.In contrast to most other SSBs, SsbB did not complement the Escherichia coli ssb deletion mutant. Purified SsbB forms a stable tetramer. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and fluorescence titration assays, as well as atomic force microscopy demonstrate that SsbB binds ssDNA specifically with high affinity. SsbB binds single-stranded DNA with minimal binding frames for one or two SsbB tetramers of 15 and 70 nucleotides. The binding mode was independent of increasing Mg(2+ or NaCl concentrations. No role of SsbB in ssDNA secretion or DNA uptake could be identified, but SsbB strongly stimulated Topoisomerase I activity.We propose that these novel SsbBs play an unknown role in the maintenance of genetic islands.

  16. Optically encoded nanoprobes using single walled carbon nanotube as the building scaffold for magnetic field guided cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Zhuyuan; Ye, Minglang; Zong, Shenfei; Li, Mingyue; Chen, Peng; Ma, Xueqin; Cui, Yiping

    2014-02-01

    We construct a novel fluorescent, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) encoded and magnetic nanoprobe for live cell imaging. To fabricate this nanoprobe, single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) is used as the building scaffold while gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and quantum dots (QDs) are employed as the building blocks. Here, Au NPs serve as the SERS substrate and QDs act as the fluorescent agent. Au NPs and SPIONs are first adsorbed on the SWNT via electrostatic interactions. Then a silica layer is coated on the SWNT. Finally, QDs are attached on the silica shell. With such a structure, various optical signals can be readily encoded to the nanoprobe simply by using different Raman molecules and QDs with different emission wavelengths. Experimental results show that the as-prepared nanoprobe exhibits well fluorescence and SERS performance. Furthermore, in vitro experiments demonstrate that the nanoprobe can fulfill magnetic field guided fluorescence and SERS dual mode imaging of live cells. As a fascinating optical encoding material and a multifunctional nanoplatform, the presented nanoprobe holds genuine potential in future biosensing applications. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Quantum control of finite-time disentanglement in qubit-qubit and qubit-qutrit systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Mazhar

    2009-07-13

    This thesis is a theoretical study of entanglement dynamics and its control of qubit-qubit and qubit-qutrit systems. In particular, we focus on the decay of entanglement of quantum states interacting with dissipative environments. Qubit-qubit entanglement may vanish suddenly while interacting with statistically independent vacuum reservoirs. Such finite- time disentanglement is called sudden death of entanglement (ESD). We investigate entanglement sudden death of qubit-qubit and qubit-qutrit systems interacting with statistically independent reservoirs at zero- and finite-temperature. It is shown that for zero-temperature reservoirs, some entangled states exhibit sudden death while others lose their entanglement only after infinite time. Thus, there are two possible routes of entanglement decay, namely sudden death and asymptotic decay. We demonstrate that starting with an initial condition which leads to finite-time disentanglement, we can alter the future course of entanglement by local unitary actions. In other words, it is possible to put the quantum states on other track of decay once they are on a particular route of decay. We show that one can accelerate or delay sudden death. However, there is a critical time such that if local actions are taken before that critical time then sudden death can be delayed to infinity. Any local unitary action taken after that critical time can only accelerate or delay sudden death. In finite-temperature reservoirs, we demonstrate that a whole class of entangled states exhibit sudden death. This conclusion is valid if at least one of the reservoirs is at finite-temperature. However, we show that we can still hasten or delay sudden death by local unitary transformations up to some finite time. We also study sudden death for qubit-qutrit systems. Similar to qubit-qubit systems, some states exhibit sudden death while others do not. However, the process of disentanglement can be effected due to existence of quantum interference

  18. Single-cell genomics reveals pyrrolysine-encoding potential in members of uncultivated archaeal candidate division MSBL1

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Yue

    2017-05-11

    Pyrrolysine (Pyl), the 22nd canonical amino acid, is only decoded and synthesized by a limited number of organisms in the domains Archaea and Bacteria. Pyl is encoded by the amber codon UAG, typically a stop codon. To date, all known Pyl-decoding archaea are able to carry out methylotrophic methanogenesis. The functionality of methylamine methyltransferases, an important component of corrinoid-dependent methyltransfer reactions, depends on the presence of Pyl. Here, we present a putative pyl gene cluster obtained from single-cell genomes of the archaeal Mediterranean Sea Brine Lakes group 1 (MSBL1) from the Red Sea. Functional annotation of the MSBL1 single cell amplified genomes (SAGs) also revealed a complete corrinoid-dependent methyl-transfer pathway suggesting that members of MSBL1 may possibly be capable of synthesizing Pyl and metabolizing methylated amines. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Reference-free unwarping of single-shot spatiotemporally encoded MRI using asymmetric self-refocused echoes acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Song; Zhong, Jianhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a phase evolution rewinding algorithm for correcting the geometric and intensity distortions in single-shot spatiotemporally encoded (SPEN) MRI with acquisition of asymmetric self-refocused echo trains. Using the field map calculated from the phase distribution of the source image, the off-resonance induced phase errors are successfully rewound through deconvolution. The alias-free partial Fourier transform reconstruction helps improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the field maps and the output images. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was validated through 7 T MRI experiments on a lemon, a water phantom, and in vivo rat head. SPEN imaging was evaluated using rapid acquisition by sequential excitation and refocusing (RASER) which produces uniform T2 weighting. The results indicate that the new technique can more robustly deal with the cases in which the images obtained with conventional single-shot spin-echo EPI are difficult to be restored due to serious field variations.

  20. Josephson quartic oscillator as a superconducting phase qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorin, Alexander [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Chiarello, Fabio [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, 00156 Rome (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    Due to interplay between the cosine Josephson potential and parabolic magnetic-energy potential the radio-frequency SQUID with the screening parameter value {beta}{sub L} {identical_to}(2{pi}/{phi}{sub 0})LI{sub c} {approx}1 presents an oscillator circuit which energy well can dramatically change its shape. Ultimately, the magnetic flux bias of half flux quantum {phi}{sub e}={phi}{sub 0}/2 leads to the quartic polynomial shape of the well and, therefore, to significant anharmonicity of oscillations (> 30%). We show that the two lowest eigenstates in this symmetric global minimum perfectly suit for designing the qubit which is inherently insensitive to the charge variable, always biased in the optimal point and allows efficient dispersive and bifurcation-based readouts. Moreover, in the case of a double-SQUID configuration (dc SQUID instead of a single junction) the transition frequency in this Josephson phase qubit can be easy tuned within an appreciable range allowing variable qubit-qubit and qubit-resonator couplings.

  1. Characterization of classical static noise via qubit as probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Muhammad; Khan, Salman; Ullah, Sayed Arif

    2018-03-01

    The dynamics of quantum Fisher information (QFI) of a single qubit coupled to classical static noise is investigated. The analytical relation for QFI fixes the optimal initial state of the qubit that maximizes it. An approximate limit for the time of coupling that leads to physically useful results is identified. Moreover, using the approach of quantum estimation theory and the analytical relation for QFI, the qubit is used as a probe to precisely estimate the disordered parameter of the environment. Relation for optimal interaction time with the environment is obtained, and condition for the optimal measurement of the noise parameter of the environment is given. It is shown that all values, in the mentioned range, of the noise parameter are estimable with equal precision. A comparison of our results with the previous studies in different classical environments is made.

  2. Asymptotic properties of entanglement polytopes for large number of qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciążek, Tomasz; Sawicki, Adam

    2018-02-01

    Entanglement polytopes have been recently proposed as a way of witnessing the stochastic local operations and classical communication (SLOCC) multipartite entanglement classes using single particle information. We present first asymptotic results concerning the feasibility of this approach for a large number of qubits. In particular, we show that entanglement polytopes of the L-qubit system accumulate in the distance O(\\frac{1}{\\sqrt{L}}) from the point corresponding to the maximally mixed reduced one-qubit density matrices. This implies existence of a possibly large region where many entanglement polytopes overlap, i.e. where the witnessing power of entanglement polytopes is weak. Moreover, we argue that the witnessing power cannot be strengthened by any entanglement distillation protocol, as for large L the required purity is above current capability.

  3. Shaping the Spontaneous Emission Pulse from a Superconducting Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Srikanth; Liu, Yanbing; Zhang, Gengyan; Yu, Terri; Gambetta, Jay; Girvin, Steven; Houck, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    We report on measurements of spontaneous emission in a circuit quantum electrodynamics system. A superconducting qubit with tunable coupling to a coplanar waveguide cavity is operated in a regime where the qubit relaxation time, and consequently the spontaneous emission rate, is dominated by the interaction strength. This fast control knob on the coupling strength is used to shape the emitted single photon's wavepacket. The independent control over the coupling allows the dressed qubit frequency to remain truly constant during the emission. The wavepacket shape becomes important in experiments where quantum information needs to be transported between various nodes in a quantum network. The transfer can happen with a very high fidelity if the wavepacket is time-symmetric, since emission by the source and absorption by the destination become time reversed processes. Authors would like to thank IARPA for their generous support.

  4. Room Temperature Memory for Few Photon Polarization Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupchak, Connor; Mittiga, Thomas; Jordan, Bertus; Nazami, Mehdi; Nolleke, Christian; Figueroa, Eden

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a room temperature quantum memory device based on Electromagnetically Induced Transparency capable of reliably storing and retrieving polarization qubits on the few photon level. Our system is realized in a vapor of 87Rb atoms utilizing a Λ-type energy level scheme. We create a dual-rail storage scheme mediated by an intense control field to allow storage and retrieval of any arbitrary polarization state. Upon retrieval, we employ a filtering system to sufficiently remove the strong pump field, and subject retrieved light states to polarization tomography. To date, our system has produced signal-to-noise ratios near unity with a memory fidelity of >80 % using coherent state qubits containing four photons on average. Our results thus demonstrate the feasibility of room temperature systems for the storage of single-photon-level photonic qubits. Such room temperature systems will be attractive for future long distance quantum communication schemes.

  5. High coherence plane breaking packaging for superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronn, Nicholas T.; Adiga, Vivekananda P.; Olivadese, Salvatore B.; Wu, Xian; Chow, Jerry M.; Pappas, David P.

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate a pogo pin package for a superconducting quantum processor specifically designed with a nontrivial layout topology (e.g., a center qubit that cannot be accessed from the sides of the chip). Two experiments on two nominally identical superconducting quantum processors in pogo packages, which use commercially available parts and require modest machining tolerances, are performed at low temperature (10 mK) in a dilution refrigerator and both found to behave comparably to processors in standard planar packages with wirebonds where control and readout signals come in from the edges. Single- and two-qubit gate errors are also characterized via randomized benchmarking, exhibiting similar error rates as in standard packages, opening the possibility of integrating pogo pin packaging with extensible qubit architectures.

  6. A single gene (Eu4) encodes the tissue-ubiquitous urease of soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torisky, R S; Griffin, J D; Yenofsky, R L; Polacco, J C

    1994-02-01

    We sought to determine the genetic basis of expression of the ubiquitous (metabolic) urease of soybean. This isozyme is termed the metabolic urease because its loss, in eu4/eu4 mutants, leads to accumulation of urea, whereas loss of the embryo-specific urease isozyme does not. The eu4 lesion eliminated the expression of the ubiquitous urease in vegetative and embryonic tissues. RFLP analysis placed urease clone LC4 near, or within, the Eu4 locus. Sequence comparison of urease proteins (ubiquitous and embryo-specific) and clones (LC4 and LS1) indicated that LC4 and LS1 encode ubiquitous and embryo-specific ureases, respectively. That LC4 is transcribed into poly(A)+ RNA in all tissues was indicated by the amplification of its transcript by an LC4-specific PCR primer. (The LS1-specific primer, on the other hand, amplified poly(A)+ RNA only from developing embryos expressing the embryo-specific urease.) These observations are consistent with Eu4 being the ubiquitous urease structural gene contained in the LC4 clone. In agreement with this notion, the mutant phenotype of eu4/eu4 callus was partially corrected by the LC4 urease gene introduced by particle bombardment.

  7. Quantum behavior of a SQUID qubit manipulated with fast pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spilla, Samuele; Messina, Antonino; Napoli, Anna [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90123 Palermo (Italy); Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Chiarello, Fabio [Istituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Roma (Italy); Migliore, Rosanna [Institute of Biophysics, National Research Council, via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    A SQUID qubit manipulated with fast variation of the energy potential is analyzed. Varying the potential shape from a single to a double-well configuration, quantum behaviors are brought into light and discussed. We show that the presence of quantum coherences in the initial state of the system plays a central role in the appearance of these quantum effects.

  8. A qubit strongly coupled to a resonant cavity: asymmetry of the spontaneous emission spectrum beyond the rotating wave approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); You, J Q; Nori, F [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Zheng, H, E-mail: xfcao@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the spontaneous emission (SE) spectrum of a qubit in a lossy resonant cavity. We use neither the rotating-wave approximation nor the Markov approximation. For the weak-coupling case, the SE spectrum of the qubit is a single peak, with its location depending on the spectral density of the qubit environment. Then, the asymmetry (of the location and heights of the two peaks) of the two SE peaks (which are related to the vacuum Rabi splitting) changes as the qubit-cavity coupling increases. Explicitly, for a qubit in a low-frequency intrinsic bath, the height asymmetry of the splitting peaks is enhanced as the qubit-cavity coupling strength increases. However, for a qubit in an Ohmic bath, the height asymmetry of the spectral peaks is inverted compared to the low-frequency bath case. With further increasing the qubit-cavity coupling to the ultra-strong regime, the height asymmetry of the left and right peaks is slightly inverted, which is consistent with the corresponding case of a low-frequency bath. This inversion of the asymmetry arises from the competition between the Ohmic bath and the cavity bath. Therefore, after considering the anti-rotating terms, our results explicitly show how the height asymmetry in the SE spectrum peaks depends on the qubit-cavity coupling and the type of intrinsic noise experienced by the qubit.

  9. Preparation and measurement of three-qubit entanglement in a superconducting circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicarlo, L; Reed, M D; Sun, L; Johnson, B R; Chow, J M; Gambetta, J M; Frunzio, L; Girvin, S M; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2010-09-30

    Traditionally, quantum entanglement has been central to foundational discussions of quantum mechanics. The measurement of correlations between entangled particles can have results at odds with classical behaviour. These discrepancies grow exponentially with the number of entangled particles. With the ample experimental confirmation of quantum mechanical predictions, entanglement has evolved from a philosophical conundrum into a key resource for technologies such as quantum communication and computation. Although entanglement in superconducting circuits has been limited so far to two qubits, the extension of entanglement to three, eight and ten qubits has been achieved among spins, ions and photons, respectively. A key question for solid-state quantum information processing is whether an engineered system could display the multi-qubit entanglement necessary for quantum error correction, which starts with tripartite entanglement. Here, using a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture, we demonstrate deterministic production of three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states with fidelity of 88 per cent, measured with quantum state tomography. Several entanglement witnesses detect genuine three-qubit entanglement by violating biseparable bounds by 830 ± 80 per cent. We demonstrate the first step of basic quantum error correction, namely the encoding of a logical qubit into a manifold of GHZ-like states using a repetition code. The integration of this encoding with decoding and error-correcting steps in a feedback loop will be the next step for quantum computing with integrated circuits.

  10. A balanced, superconducting multiplier circuit for fast-switching and multiplexed qubit readout: Design and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Eric I.; Chapman, Benjamin J.; Moores, Brad A.; Kerckhoff, Joseph; Lehnert, K. W.

    Superconducting qubits hold great promise for the development of new quantum-information technology. Coherence times of individual transmon qubits in microwave cavities are consistently improving. While qubits are becoming well developed tools, scaling qubit readout for many-qubit architectures remains prohibitively complex and expensive. Here, we present a concept for a multipurpose device that enables time or code domain multiplexing of qubit readout. It is a two-port, microwave device that can be switched rapidly between three modes of operation: transmission, reflection and inversion. The design is based on a Wheatstone bridge-like structure of tunable inductors, which we realize with arrays of SQUIDs. A single bias line modulates the flux through the SQUIDs, and hence the imbalance of the bridge, putting the device in one of its three modes of operation. This talk will discuss the theory, design and layout behind the device and its potential use for multiplexing of qubit networks. The device is designed to operate over a broad bandwidth (4-8 GHz), and to have low dissipation, appropriate for integration with superconducting qubit networks.

  11. Tailoring multi-qubit measurement operators through dynamic cavity states (Part 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, K.; Blumoff, J.; Nigg, S.; Reed, M.; Vlastakis, B.; Heeres, R.; Frunzio, L.; Girvin, S.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2014-03-01

    Recent improvements in cavity coherence in cQED have allowed high precision manipulation of photonic cavity states, illustrating a powerful toolbox for manipulating and encoding quantum information in either superconducting qubits or cavity states. In order for this architecture to become a viable system for computation, it will be necessary to have the flexibility to probe both global as well as limited properties of a register of qubits. In particular, the ability to tailor measurement operators is a technology that will be required for error correction. Extending the theoretical framework discussed in the previous talk, we will show experimental work toward realizing this goal. Our design consists of a register of qubits coupled to a high Q storage cavity and ancilla qubit enabled fast readout through a low Q cavity. Work supported by IARPA and ARO.

  12. Optimizing JPC-based remote entanglement of transmon qubits via stochastic master equation simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalys-Geller, E.; Hatridge, M.; Silveri, M.; Narla, A.; Sliwa, K. M.; Shankar, S.; Girvin, S. M.; Devoret, M. H.

    2015-03-01

    Remote entanglement of two superconducting qubits may be accomplished by first entangling them with flying coherent microwave pulses, and then erasing the which-path information of these pulses by using a non-degenerate parametric amplifier such as the Josephson Parametric Converter (JPC). Crucially, this process requires no direct interaction between the two qubits. The JPC, however, will fail to completely erase the which-path information if the flying microwave pulses encode any difference in dynamics of the two qubit-cavity systems. This which-path information can easily arise from mismatches in the cavity linewidths and the cavity dispersive shifts from their respective qubits. Through analysis of the Stochastic Master Equation for this system, we have found a strategy for shaping the measurement pulses to eliminate the effect of these mismatches on the entangling measurement. We have then confirmed the effectiveness of this strategy by numerical simulation. Work supported by: IARPA, ARO, and NSF.

  13. Optimizing qubit resources for quantum chemistry simulations in second quantization on a quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, Nikolaj; Fuhrer, Andreas; Staar, Peter; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2016-01-01

    Quantum chemistry simulations on a quantum computer suffer from the overhead needed for encoding the Fermionic problem in a system of qubits. By exploiting the block diagonality of a Fermionic Hamiltonian, we show that the number of required qubits can be reduced while the number of terms in the Hamiltonian will increase. All operations for this reduction can be performed in operator space. The scheme is conceived as a pre-computational step that would be performed prior to the actual quantum simulation. We apply this scheme to reduce the number of qubits necessary to simulate both the Hamiltonian of the two-site Fermi–Hubbard model and the hydrogen molecule. Both quantum systems can then be simulated with a two-qubit quantum computer. Despite the increase in the number of Hamiltonian terms, the scheme still remains a useful tool to reduce the dimensionality of specific quantum systems for quantum simulators with a limited number of resources. (paper)

  14. Optimal cloning of qubits given by an arbitrary axisymmetric distribution on the Bloch sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Miranowicz, Adam

    2010-01-01

    We find an optimal quantum cloning machine, which clones qubits of arbitrary symmetrical distribution around the Bloch vector with the highest fidelity. The process is referred to as phase-independent cloning in contrast to the standard phase-covariant cloning for which an input qubit state is a priori better known. We assume that the information about the input state is encoded in an arbitrary axisymmetric distribution (phase function) on the Bloch sphere of the cloned qubits. We find analytical expressions describing the optimal cloning transformation and fidelity of the clones. As an illustration, we analyze cloning of qubit state described by the von Mises-Fisher and Brosseau distributions. Moreover, we show that the optimal phase-independent cloning machine can be implemented by modifying the mirror phase-covariant cloning machine for which quantum circuits are known.

  15. Controlling electron quantum dot qubits by spin-orbit interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stano, P.

    2007-01-01

    Single electron confined in a quantum dot is studied. A special emphasis is laid on the spin properties and the influence of spin-orbit interactions on the system. The study is motivated by a perspective exploitation of the spin of the confined electron as a qubit, a basic building block of in a foreseen quantum computer. The electron is described using the single band effective mass approximation, with parameters typical for a lateral electrostatically defined quantum dot in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The stemming data for the analysis are obtained by numerical methods of exact diagonalization, however, all important conclusions are explained analytically. The work focuses on three main areas -- electron spectrum, phonon induced relaxation and electrically and magnetically induced Rabi oscillations. It is shown, how spin-orbit interactions influence the energy spectrum, cause finite spin relaxation and allow for all-electrical manipulation of the spin qubit. Among the main results is the discovery of easy passages, where the spin relaxation is unusually slow and the qubit is protected against parasitic electrical fields connected with manipulation by resonant electromagnetic fields. The results provide direct guide for manufacturing quantum dots with much improved properties, suitable for realizing single electron spin qubits. (orig.)

  16. Controlling electron quantum dot qubits by spin-orbit interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stano, P.

    2007-01-15

    Single electron confined in a quantum dot is studied. A special emphasis is laid on the spin properties and the influence of spin-orbit interactions on the system. The study is motivated by a perspective exploitation of the spin of the confined electron as a qubit, a basic building block of in a foreseen quantum computer. The electron is described using the single band effective mass approximation, with parameters typical for a lateral electrostatically defined quantum dot in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The stemming data for the analysis are obtained by numerical methods of exact diagonalization, however, all important conclusions are explained analytically. The work focuses on three main areas -- electron spectrum, phonon induced relaxation and electrically and magnetically induced Rabi oscillations. It is shown, how spin-orbit interactions influence the energy spectrum, cause finite spin relaxation and allow for all-electrical manipulation of the spin qubit. Among the main results is the discovery of easy passages, where the spin relaxation is unusually slow and the qubit is protected against parasitic electrical fields connected with manipulation by resonant electromagnetic fields. The results provide direct guide for manufacturing quantum dots with much improved properties, suitable for realizing single electron spin qubits. (orig.)

  17. A depth-encoding PET detector that uses light sharing and single-ended readout with silicon photomultipliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Zhonghua; Yang, Qian; Wang, Xiaohui; Fu, Xin; Ren, Ning; Sang, Ziru; Wu, San; Zheng, Yunfei; Zhang, Xianming; Hu, Zhanli; Du, Junwei; Liang, Dong; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Yang, Yongfeng

    2018-02-13

    Detectors with depth-encoding capability and good timing resolution are required to develop high-performance whole-body or total-body PET scanners. In this work, depth-encoding PET detectors that use light sharing between two discrete crystals and single-ended readout with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) were manufactured and evaluated. The detectors consisted of two unpolished 3  ×  3  ×  20 mm 3 LYSO crystals with different coupling materials between them and were read out by Hamamatsu 3  ×  3 mm 2 SiPMs with one-to-one coupling. The ratio of the energy of one SiPM to the total energy of two SiPMs was used to measure the depth of interaction (DOI). Detectors with different coupling materials in-between the crystals were measured in the singles mode in an effort to obtain detectors that can provide good DOI resolution. The DOI resolution and energy resolution of three types of detector were measured and the timing resolution was measured for the detector with the best DOI and energy resolution. The optimum detector, with 5 mm optical glue, a 9 mm triangular ESR and a 6 mm rectangular ESR in-between the unpolished crystals, provides a DOI resolution of 2.65 mm, an energy resolution of 10.0% and a timing resolution of 427 ps for events of E  >  400 keV. The detectors simultaneously provide good DOI and timing resolution, and show great promise for the development of high-performance whole-body and total-body PET scanners.

  18. A depth-encoding PET detector that uses light sharing and single-ended readout with silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Zhonghua; Yang, Qian; Wang, Xiaohui; Fu, Xin; Ren, Ning; Sang, Ziru; Wu, San; Zheng, Yunfei; Zhang, Xianming; Hu, Zhanli; Du, Junwei; Liang, Dong; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Yang, Yongfeng

    2018-02-01

    Detectors with depth-encoding capability and good timing resolution are required to develop high-performance whole-body or total-body PET scanners. In this work, depth-encoding PET detectors that use light sharing between two discrete crystals and single-ended readout with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) were manufactured and evaluated. The detectors consisted of two unpolished 3  ×  3  ×  20 mm3 LYSO crystals with different coupling materials between them and were read out by Hamamatsu 3  ×  3 mm2 SiPMs with one-to-one coupling. The ratio of the energy of one SiPM to the total energy of two SiPMs was used to measure the depth of interaction (DOI). Detectors with different coupling materials in-between the crystals were measured in the singles mode in an effort to obtain detectors that can provide good DOI resolution. The DOI resolution and energy resolution of three types of detector were measured and the timing resolution was measured for the detector with the best DOI and energy resolution. The optimum detector, with 5 mm optical glue, a 9 mm triangular ESR and a 6 mm rectangular ESR in-between the unpolished crystals, provides a DOI resolution of 2.65 mm, an energy resolution of 10.0% and a timing resolution of 427 ps for events of E  >  400 keV. The detectors simultaneously provide good DOI and timing resolution, and show great promise for the development of high-performance whole-body and total-body PET scanners.

  19. Microresonators for electron spin qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suter, D.; Stonies, R.; Voges, E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The traditional high-Q EPR resonators are optimized for large samples. For small samples and individual qubits, it is possible to design different resonators that have much better power handling properties, create less interference with other peripheral lines and, if they are used for detection, have better sensitivity. Other parameters being equal, the sensitivity of the resonator can be increased by minimizing its size and thus increasing the filling factor. In contrast to cavity type resonators, microcoils can be made much smaller than the operation wavelength. For this type of resonator, it has been established theoretically and experimentally that the sensitivity varies inversely with its linear dimensions. Moreover, the planar coil geometry is ideal to be manufactured in a small size by means of standard microtechnology. It also offers advantages for the excitation of electron spins in prototype quantum computer systems. High microwave power to the magnetic field conversion factor of the microresonator allows to achieve 24 ns L/2 - pulses with less than 20 mW of incident power. Within the QIPDDF-ROSES project, we are using such resonators to measure the EPR parameters of monolayer molecular films of N at C60 and for excitation of the single electron spin in a defect center in diamond. The microresonator prototypes consisting of a 200 μm planar microcoil tuned and matched at 14 GHz with distributed elements have been fabricated on Si substrate. The sensitivity tests with a DPPH samples resulted in the sensitivity value 10E9 spins/G/Hz1/2 at 300 K. The designed layouts of the microresonator can be scaled down up to a tens of micrometers, and with a different microwave coupling approach hundreds of nanometers could be achieved, allowing the operation frequency up to 100 THz (author)

  20. Black holes, qubits and octonions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsten, L.; Dahanayake, D.; Duff, M.J.; Ebrahim, H.; Rubens, W.

    2009-01-01

    We review the recently established relationships between black hole entropy in string theory and the quantum entanglement of qubits and qutrits in quantum information theory. The first example is provided by the measure of the tripartite entanglement of three qubits (Alice, Bob and Charlie), known as the 3-tangle, and the entropy of the 8-charge STU black hole of N=2 supergravity, both of which are given by the [SL(2)] 3 invariant hyperdeterminant, a quantity first introduced by Cayley in 1845. Moreover the classification of three-qubit entanglements is related to the classification of N=2 supersymmetric STU black holes. There are further relationships between the attractor mechanism and local distillation protocols and between supersymmetry and the suppression of bit flip errors. At the microscopic level, the black holes are described by intersecting D3-branes whose wrapping around the six compact dimensions T 6 provides the string-theoretic interpretation of the charges and we associate the three-qubit basis vectors, |ABC>(A,B,C=0 or 1), with the corresponding 8 wrapping cycles. The black hole/qubit correspondence extends to the 56 charge N=8 black holes and the tripartite entanglement of seven qubits where the measure is provided by Cartan's E 7 contains [SL(2)] 7 invariant. The qubits are naturally described by the seven vertices ABCDEFG of the Fano plane, which provides the multiplication table of the seven imaginary octonions, reflecting the fact that E 7 has a natural structure of an O-graded algebra. This in turn provides a novel imaginary octonionic interpretation of the 56=7x8 charges of N=8: the 24=3x8 NS-NS charges correspond to the three imaginary quaternions and the 32=4x8 R-R to the four complementary imaginary octonions. We contrast this approach with that based on Jordan algebras and the Freudenthal triple system. N=8 black holes (or black strings) in five dimensions are also related to the bipartite entanglement of three qutrits (3-state systems

  1. Single nucleotide polymorphism of the growth hormone (GH encoding gene in inbred and outbred domestic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyana Gencheva Hristova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Taking into consideration that the growth hormone (GH gene in rabbits is a candidate for meat production, understanding the genetic diversity and variation in this locus is of particular relevance. The present study comprised 86 rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus divided into 3 groups: New Zealand White (NZW outbred rabbits; first-generation inbred rabbits (F1 and second-generation inbred rabbits (F2. They were analysed by polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism method. A 231 bp fragment of the polymorphic site of the GH gene was digested with Bsh1236 restriction enzyme. Single nucleotide polymorphisms for the studied GH locus corresponding to 3 genotypes were detected in the studied rabbit populations: CC, CT and TT. In the synthetic inbred F1 and F2 populations, the frequency of the heterozygous genotype CT was 0.696 and 0.609, respectively, while for the homozygous CC genotype the frequency was lower (0.043 and 0.000, and respective values for the homozygous TT genotype were 0.261 and 0.391. This presumed a preponderance of the T allele (0.609 and 0.696 over the C allele (0.391 and 0.304 in these groups. In outbred rabbits, the allele frequencies were 0.613 (allele C and 0.387 (allele Т; consequently, the frequency of the homozygous CC genotype was higher than that of the homozygous TT genotype (0.300 vs. 0.075. Observed heterozygosity for the GH gene was higher than expected, and the result was therefore a negative inbreeding coefficient (Fis=–0.317 for outbred NZW rabbits; –0.460 for inbred F1 and –0.438 for inbred F2, indicating a sufficient number of heterozygous forms in all studied groups of rabbits. The application of narrow inbreeding by breeding full sibs in the synthetic population did not cause a rapid increase in homozygosity.

  2. Notes on qubit phase space and discrete symplectic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livine, Etera R

    2010-01-01

    We start from Wootter's construction of discrete phase spaces and Wigner functions for qubits and more generally for finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces. We look at this framework from a non-commutative space perspective and we focus on the Moyal product and the differential calculus on these discrete phase spaces. In particular, the qubit phase space provides the simplest example of a four-point non-commutative phase space. We give an explicit expression of the Moyal bracket as a differential operator. We then compare the quantum dynamics encoded by the Moyal bracket to the classical dynamics: we show that the classical Poisson bracket does not satisfy the Jacobi identity thus leaving the Moyal bracket as the only consistent symplectic structure. We finally generalize our analysis to Hilbert spaces of prime dimensions d and their associated d x d phase spaces.

  3. Notes on qubit phase space and discrete symplectic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livine, Etera R, E-mail: etera.livine@ens-lyon.f [Laboratoire de Physique, ENS Lyon, CNRS UMR 5672, 46 Allee d' Italie, 69364 Lyon (France)

    2010-02-19

    We start from Wootter's construction of discrete phase spaces and Wigner functions for qubits and more generally for finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces. We look at this framework from a non-commutative space perspective and we focus on the Moyal product and the differential calculus on these discrete phase spaces. In particular, the qubit phase space provides the simplest example of a four-point non-commutative phase space. We give an explicit expression of the Moyal bracket as a differential operator. We then compare the quantum dynamics encoded by the Moyal bracket to the classical dynamics: we show that the classical Poisson bracket does not satisfy the Jacobi identity thus leaving the Moyal bracket as the only consistent symplectic structure. We finally generalize our analysis to Hilbert spaces of prime dimensions d and their associated d x d phase spaces.

  4. Remote entanglement of transmon qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatridge, M.; Sliwa, K.; Narla, A.; Shankar, S.; Leghtas, Z.; Mirrahimi, M.; Girvin, S. M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Devoret, M. H.

    2014-03-01

    An open challenge in quantum information processing with superconducting circuits is to entangle distant (non-nearest neighbor) qubits. This can be accomplished by entangling the qubits with flying microwave oscillators (traveling pulses), and then performing joint operations on a pair of these oscillators. Remarkably, such a process is embedded in the act of phase-preserving amplification, which transforms two input modes (termed signal and idler) into a two-mode squeezed output state. For an ideal system, this process generates heralded, perfectly entangled states between remote qubits with a fifty percent success rate. For an imperfect system, the loss of information from the flying states degrades the purity of the entanglement. We show data on such a protocol involving two transmon qubits imbedded in superconducting cavities connected to the signal and idler inputs of a Josephson Parametric Converter (JPC) operated as a nearly-quantum limited phase-preserving amplifier. Strategies for optimizing performance will also be discussed. Work supported by: IARPA, ARO, and NSF.

  5. Sharing of Nonlocality of a Single Member of an Entangled Pair of Qubits Is Not Possible by More than Two Unbiased Observers on the Other Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiladitya Mal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We address the recently posed question as to whether the nonlocality of a single member of an entangled pair of spin 1 / 2 particles can be shared among multiple observers on the other wing who act sequentially and independently of each other. We first show that the optimality condition for the trade-off between information gain and disturbance in the context of weak or non-ideal measurements emerges naturally when one employs a one-parameter class of positive operator valued measures (POVMs. Using this formalism we then prove analytically that it is impossible to obtain violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH inequality by more than two Bobs in one of the two wings using unbiased input settings with an Alice in the other wing.

  6. Silicon-Vacancy Spin Qubit in Diamond: A Quantum Memory Exceeding 10 ms with Single-Shot State Readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukachev, D D; Sipahigil, A; Nguyen, C T; Bhaskar, M K; Evans, R E; Jelezko, F; Lukin, M D

    2017-12-01

    The negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV^{-}) color center in diamond has recently emerged as a promising system for quantum photonics. Its symmetry-protected optical transitions enable the creation of indistinguishable emitter arrays and deterministic coupling to nanophotonic devices. Despite this, the longest coherence time associated with its electronic spin achieved to date (∼250  ns) has been limited by coupling to acoustic phonons. We demonstrate coherent control and suppression of phonon-induced dephasing of the SiV^{-} electronic spin coherence by 5 orders of magnitude by operating at temperatures below 500 mK. By aligning the magnetic field along the SiV^{-} symmetry axis, we demonstrate spin-conserving optical transitions and single-shot readout of the SiV^{-} spin with 89% fidelity. Coherent control of the SiV^{-} spin with microwave fields is used to demonstrate a spin coherence time T_{2} of 13 ms and a spin relaxation time T_{1} exceeding 1 s at 100 mK. These results establish the SiV^{-} as a promising solid-state candidate for the realization of quantum networks.

  7. The Relationship Between Transcript Expression Levels of Nuclear Encoded (TFAM, NRF1 and Mitochondrial Encoded (MT-CO1 Genes in Single Human Oocytes During Oocyte Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffari Novin M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In some cases of infertility in women, human oocytes fail to mature when they reach the metaphase II (MII stage. Mitochondria plays an important role in oocyte maturation. A large number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, copied in oocytes, is essential for providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP during oocyte maturation. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between transcript expression levels of the mitochondrial encoded gene (MT-CO1 and two nuclear encoded genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM in various stages of human oocyte maturation. Nine consenting patients, age 21-35 years old, with male factors were selected for ovarian stimulation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI procedures. mRNA levels of mitochondrial- related genes were performed by singlecell TaqMan® quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. There was no significant relationship between the relative expression levels in germinal vesicle (GV stage oocytes (p = 0.62. On the contrary, a significant relationship was seen between the relative expression levels of TFAM and NRF1 and the MT-CO1 genes at the stages of metaphase I (MI and MII (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002. A relationship exists between the transcript expression levels of TFAM and NRF1, and MT-CO1 genes in various stages of human oocyte maturation.

  8. Observation of a many-body dynamical phase transition with a 53-qubit quantum simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Pagano, G.; Hess, P. W.; Kyprianidis, A.; Becker, P.; Kaplan, H.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Gong, Z.-X.; Monroe, C.

    2017-11-01

    A quantum simulator is a type of quantum computer that controls the interactions between quantum bits (or qubits) in a way that can be mapped to certain quantum many-body problems. As it becomes possible to exert more control over larger numbers of qubits, such simulators will be able to tackle a wider range of problems, such as materials design and molecular modelling, with the ultimate limit being a universal quantum computer that can solve general classes of hard problems. Here we use a quantum simulator composed of up to 53 qubits to study non-equilibrium dynamics in the transverse-field Ising model with long-range interactions. We observe a dynamical phase transition after a sudden change of the Hamiltonian, in a regime in which conventional statistical mechanics does not apply. The qubits are represented by the spins of trapped ions, which can be prepared in various initial pure states. We apply a global long-range Ising interaction with controllable strength and range, and measure each individual qubit with an efficiency of nearly 99 per cent. Such high efficiency means that arbitrary many-body correlations between qubits can be measured in a single shot, enabling the dynamical phase transition to be probed directly and revealing computationally intractable features that rely on the long-range interactions and high connectivity between qubits.

  9. Observing quantum jumps of a transmon qubit with a Josephson parametric converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, S.; Hatridge, M.; Schackert, F.; Geerlings, K.; Brecht, T.; Sliwa, K.; Abdo, B.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Devoret, M. H.

    2012-02-01

    A high fidelity linear quantum non-demolition (QND) readout of a superconducting qubit opens up the possibility of observing quantum jumps and is a prerequisite for quantum feedback and error correction. This readout is challenging since the qubit, the readout resonator and the following amplifier chain have to be simultaneously optimized to achieve the desired performance. We fabricated a superconducting transmon qubit at 5.7 GHz coupled to a compact resonator at 7.5 GHz, designed to produce a dispersive shift (χ) of 6 MHz of the resonator frequency when the qubit is excited. The resonator linewidth matches χ to produce maximum readout contrast in a transmission measurement, while maintaining a Purcell limited T1 of about 3 μs. Using a Josephson parametric converter that is tuned to match the resonator frequency, we achieved a system noise temperature of the following amplifier chain of about 0.5 K, roughly thrice the standard quantum limit. Using these optimized parameters, we measured the qubit state with about 5 photons in the readout resonator and observed quantum jumps with fidelity above 90 %. Further, by looking at the statistics of the jumps and the evolution of the qubit population in single shot traces, we find that the average qubit T1 during the readout matches the Purcell limited T1, as expected for a QND measurement.

  10. How to Recover a Qubit That Has Fallen into a Black Hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatwin-Davies, Aidan; Jermyn, Adam S; Carroll, Sean M

    2015-12-31

    We demonstrate an algorithm for the retrieval of a qubit, encoded in spin angular momentum, that has been dropped into a no-firewall black hole. Retrieval is achieved analogously to quantum teleportation by collecting Hawking radiation and performing measurements on the black hole. Importantly, these methods require only the ability to perform measurements from outside the event horizon.

  11. Deep-well ultrafast manipulation of a SQUID flux qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellano, M G; Chiarello, F; Mattioli, F; Torrioli, G [Istituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie-CNR, Roma (Italy); Carelli, P [Dip. Ingegneria Elettrica e dell' Informazione, Universita dell' Aquila, L' Aquila (Italy); Cosmelli, C, E-mail: mgcastellano@ifn.cnr.i [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Universita di Roma (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Superconducting devices based on the Josephson effect are effectively used for the implementation of qubits and quantum gates. The manipulation of superconducting qubits is generally performed by using microwave pulses with frequencies from 5 to 15 GHz, obtaining a typical operating frequency from 100 MHz to 1 GHz. A manipulation based on simple pulses in the absence of microwaves is also possible. In our system, a magnetic flux pulse modifies the potential of a double SQUID qubit from a symmetric double well to a single deep-well condition. By using this scheme with a Nb/AlO{sub x}/Nb system, we obtained coherent oscillations with sub-nanosecond period (tunable from 50 to 200 ps), very fast with respect to other manipulating procedures, and with a coherence time up to 10 ns, of the order of that obtained with similar devices and technologies but using microwave manipulation. We introduce ultrafast manipulation, presenting experimental results, new issues related to this approach (such as the use of a compensation procedure for canceling the effect of 'slow' fluctuations) and open perspectives, such as the possible use of RSFQ logic for qubit control.

  12. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B

    2016-09-02

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and swap tests. Our formalism inherits the advantages that the quantum information is decoupled from collective noise, and logical qubits with different encodings can be brought to interact without decoding. We also propose a possible implementation of the required operations by using interactions that are available in a variety of continuous-variable systems. Our work separates the "hardware" problem of engineering quantum-computing-universal interactions, from the "software" problem of designing encodings for specific purposes. The development of quantum computer architecture could hence be simplified.

  13. A New Genetically Encoded Single-Chain Biosensor for Cdc42 Based on FRET, Useful for Live-Cell Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Dianne; Hodgson, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Cdc42 is critical in a myriad of cellular morphogenic processes, requiring precisely regulated activation dynamics to affect specific cellular events. To facilitate direct observations of Cdc42 activation in live cells, we developed and validated a new biosensor of Cdc42 activation. The biosensor is genetically encoded, of single-chain design and capable of correctly localizing to membrane compartments as well as interacting with its upstream regulators including the guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor. We characterized this new biosensor in motile mouse embryonic fibroblasts and observed robust activation dynamics at leading edge protrusions, similar to those previously observed for endogenous Cdc42 using the organic dye-based biosensor system. We then extended our validations and observations of Cdc42 activity to macrophages, and show that this new biosensor is able to detect differential activation patterns during phagocytosis and cytokine stimulation. Furthermore, we observe for the first time, a highly transient and localized activation of Cdc42 during podosome formation in macrophages, which was previously hypothesized but never directly visualized. PMID:24798463

  14. Diffusion-weighted single shot echo planar imaging of colorectal cancer using a sensitivity-encoding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasu, Katsuhiro; Kuroki, Yoshihumi; Murakami, Koji; Nawano, Shigeru; Kuroki, Seiko; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2004-01-01

    We wanted to determine the feasibility of diffusion-weighted single shot echo planar imaging using a sensitivity encoding diffusion weighted imaging (SENSE-DWI) technique in depicting colorectal cancer. Forty-two patients with sigmoid colon cancer and rectal cancer, all proven pathologically, were examined on T2-turbo spin echo (TSE) and SENSE-DWI. No bowel preparation was performed before examination. The b-factors used in SENSE-DWI were zero and 1000 s/mm 2 . In 10 randomly selected cases, the images whose b-factors were 250 and 500 s/mm 2 were also obtained. The reduction factor of SENSE was 2.0 in all sequences. Two radiologists evaluated the obtained images from the viewpoints of tumor detectability, image distortion and misregistration of the tumors. The apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of the tumors and urine in the urinary bladders in each patient were measured to evaluate the correlation between ADC and pathological classification of each tumor. All tumors were depicted hyperintensely on SENSE-DWI. Even though single shot echo planar imaging (EPI) was used, the image distortion and misregistration was quite pronounced because of simultaneous use of SENSE. On SENSE-DWI whose b-factor was 1000 s/mm 2 , the normal colon wall and feces were always hypointense and easily differentiated from the tumors. The mean ADC value of each tumor was 1.02±0.1 (x 10 -3 ) mm 2 /s. No overt correlation can be pointed out between ADC and pathological classification of each tumor. SENSE-DWI is a feasible method for depicting colorectal cancer. SENSE-DWI provides strong contrast among colorectal cancers, normal rectal wall and feces. (authors)

  15. Universal quantum computation with unlabelled qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severini, Simone [Department of Mathematics and Department of Computer Science, University of York, Heslington, YO10 5DD York (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-30

    We show that an nth root of the Walsh-Hadamard transform (obtained from the Hadamard gate and a cyclic permutation of the qubits), together with two diagonal matrices, namely a local qubit-flip (for a fixed but arbitrary qubit) and a non-local phase-flip (for a fixed but arbitrary coefficient), can do universal quantum computation on n qubits. A quantum computation, making use of n qubits and based on these operations, is then a word of variable length, but whose letters are always taken from an alphabet of cardinality three. Therefore, in contrast with other universal sets, no choice of qubit lines is needed for the application of the operations described here. A quantum algorithm based on this set can be interpreted as a discrete diffusion of a quantum particle on a de Bruijn graph, corrected on-the-fly by auxiliary modifications of the phases associated with the arcs.

  16. Flux qubit to a transmission line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberlein, Max; Baust, Alexander; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Anderson, Gustav; Wang, Lujun; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Xie, Edwar; Schwarz, Manuel; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Within the last decade, superconducting qubits coupled to microwave resonators have been extensively studied within the framework of quantum electrodynamics. Ultimately, quantum computing seems within reach in such architectures. However, error correction schemes are necessary to achieve the required fidelity in multi-qubit operations, drastically increasing the number of qubits involved. In this work, we couple a flux qubit to a transmission line where it interacts with itinerant microwave photons granting access to all-optical quantum computing. In this approach, travelling photons generate entanglement between two waveguides, containing the qubit information. In this presentation, we show experimental data on flux qubits coupled to transmission lines. Furthermore, we will discuss entanglement generation between two separate paths.

  17. One-qubit fingerprinting schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaudrap, J. Niel de

    2004-01-01

    Fingerprinting is a technique in communication complexity in which two parties (Alice and Bob) with large data sets send short messages to a third party (a referee), who attempts to compute some function of the larger data sets. For the equality function, the referee attempts to determine whether Alice's data and Bob's data are the same. In this paper, we consider the extreme scenario of performing fingerprinting where Alice and Bob both send either one bit (classically) or one qubit (in the quantum regime) messages to the referee for the equality problem. Restrictive bounds are demonstrated for the error probability of one-bit fingerprinting schemes, and show that it is easy to construct one-qubit fingerprinting schemes which can outperform any one-bit fingerprinting scheme. The author hopes that this analysis will provide results useful for performing physical experiments, which may help to advance implementations for more general quantum communication protocols

  18. Black holes, qubits and octonions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borsten, L. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: leron.borsten@imperial.ac.uk; Dahanayake, D. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: duminda.dahanayake@imperial.ac.uk; Duff, M.J. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.duff@imperial.ac.uk; Ebrahim, H. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Theory Group, Martin Fisher School of Physics, Brandeis University, MS057, 415 South Street, Waltham, MA 02454 (United States)], E-mail: hebrahim@brandeis.edu; Rubens, W. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: william.rubens06@imperial.ac.uk

    2009-02-15

    We review the recently established relationships between black hole entropy in string theory and the quantum entanglement of qubits and qutrits in quantum information theory. The first example is provided by the measure of the tripartite entanglement of three qubits (Alice, Bob and Charlie), known as the 3-tangle, and the entropy of the 8-charge STU black hole of N=2 supergravity, both of which are given by the [SL(2)]{sup 3} invariant hyperdeterminant, a quantity first introduced by Cayley in 1845. Moreover the classification of three-qubit entanglements is related to the classification of N=2 supersymmetric STU black holes. There are further relationships between the attractor mechanism and local distillation protocols and between supersymmetry and the suppression of bit flip errors. At the microscopic level, the black holes are described by intersecting D3-branes whose wrapping around the six compact dimensions T{sup 6} provides the string-theoretic interpretation of the charges and we associate the three-qubit basis vectors, |ABC>(A,B,C=0 or 1), with the corresponding 8 wrapping cycles. The black hole/qubit correspondence extends to the 56 charge N=8 black holes and the tripartite entanglement of seven qubits where the measure is provided by Cartan's E{sub 7} contains [SL(2)]{sup 7} invariant. The qubits are naturally described by the seven vertices ABCDEFG of the Fano plane, which provides the multiplication table of the seven imaginary octonions, reflecting the fact that E{sub 7} has a natural structure of an O-graded algebra. This in turn provides a novel imaginary octonionic interpretation of the 56=7x8 charges of N=8: the 24=3x8 NS-NS charges correspond to the three imaginary quaternions and the 32=4x8 R-R to the four complementary imaginary octonions. We contrast this approach with that based on Jordan algebras and the Freudenthal triple system. N=8 black holes (or black strings) in five dimensions are also related to the bipartite entanglement of

  19. Qubit-based memcapacitors and meminductors

    OpenAIRE

    Shevchenko, Sergey N.; Pershin, Yuriy V.; Nori, Franco

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that superconducting charge and phase qubits are quantum versions of memory capacitive and inductive systems, respectively. We demonstrate that such quantum memcapacitive and meminductive devices offer remarkable and rich response functionalities. In particular, when subjected to periodic input, qubit-based memcapacitors and meminductors exhibit unusual hysteresis curves. Our work not only extends the set of known memcapacitive and meminductive systems to qubit-based quantum devic...

  20. Quantum acoustics with superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yiwen

    2017-04-01

    The ability to engineer and manipulate different types of quantum mechanical objects allows us to take advantage of their unique properties and create useful hybrid technologies. Thus far, complex quantum states and exquisite quantum control have been demonstrated in systems ranging from trapped ions to superconducting resonators. Recently, there have been many efforts to extend these demonstrations to the motion of complex, macroscopic objects. These mechanical objects have important applications as quantum memories or transducers for measuring and connecting different types of quantum systems. In particular, there have been a few experiments that couple motion to nonlinear quantum objects such as superconducting qubits. This opens up the possibility of creating, storing, and manipulating non-Gaussian quantum states in mechanical degrees of freedom. However, before sophisticated quantum control of mechanical motion can be achieved, we must realize systems with long coherence times while maintaining a sufficient interaction strength. These systems should be implemented in a simple and robust manner that allows for increasing complexity and scalability in the future. In this talk, I will describe our recent experiments demonstrating a high frequency bulk acoustic wave resonator that is strongly coupled to a superconducting qubit using piezoelectric transduction. In contrast to previous experiments with qubit-mechanical systems, our device requires only simple fabrication methods, extends coherence times to many microseconds, and provides controllable access to a multitude of phonon modes. We use this system to demonstrate basic quantum operations on the coupled qubit-phonon system. Straightforward improvements to the current device will allow for advanced protocols analogous to what has been shown in optical and microwave resonators, resulting in a novel resource for implementing hybrid quantum technologies.

  1. Characterization of the Single Stranded DNA Binding Protein SsbB Encoded in the Gonoccocal Genetic Island

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, Samta; Zweig, Maria; Peeters, Eveline; Siewering, Katja; Hackett, Kathleen T.; Dillard, Joseph P.; van der Does, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Background: Most strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae carry a Gonococcal Genetic Island which encodes a type IV secretion system involved in the secretion of ssDNA. We characterize the GGI-encoded ssDNA binding protein, SsbB. Close homologs of SsbB are located within a conserved genetic cluster found in

  2. Vector Monte Carlo simulations on atmospheric scattering of polarization qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Lu, Pengfei; Yu, Zhongyuan; Yan, Lei; Chen, Zhihui; Yang, Chuanghua; Luo, Xiao

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a vector Monte Carlo (MC) method is proposed to study the influence of atmospheric scattering on polarization qubits for satellite-based quantum communication. The vector MC method utilizes a transmittance method to solve the photon free path for an inhomogeneous atmosphere and random number sampling to determine whether the type of scattering is aerosol scattering or molecule scattering. Simulations are performed for downlink and uplink. The degrees and the rotations of polarization are qualitatively and quantitatively obtained, which agree well with the measured results in the previous experiments. The results show that polarization qubits are well preserved in the downlink and uplink, while the number of received single photons is less than half of the total transmitted single photons for both links. Moreover, our vector MC method can be applied for the scattering of polarized light in other inhomogeneous random media.

  3. A New Quantum Gray-Scale Image Encoding Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mosayeb; Abdolmaleky, Mona; Parandin, Fariborz; Fatahi, Negin; Farouk, Ahmed; Nazari, Reza

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a new quantum images encoding scheme is proposed. The proposed scheme mainly consists of four different encoding algorithms. The idea behind of the scheme is a binary key generated randomly for each pixel of the original image. Afterwards, the employed encoding algorithm is selected corresponding to the qubit pair of the generated randomized binary key. The security analysis of the proposed scheme proved its enhancement through both randomization of the generated binary image key and altering the gray-scale value of the image pixels using the qubits of randomized binary key. The simulation of the proposed scheme assures that the final encoded image could not be recognized visually. Moreover, the histogram diagram of encoded image is flatter than the original one. The Shannon entropies of the final encoded images are significantly higher than the original one, which indicates that the attacker can not gain any information about the encoded images. Supported by Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah, IRAN

  4. Analysis and synthesis of multi-qubit, multi-mode quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solgun, Firat

    2015-03-27

    In this thesis we propose new methods in multi-qubit multi-mode circuit quantum electrodynamics (circuit-QED) architectures. First we describe a direct parity measurement method for three qubits, which can be realized in 2D circuit-QED with a possible extension to four qubits in a 3D circuit-QED setup for the implementation of the surface code. In Chapter 3 we show how to derive Hamiltonians and compute relaxation rates of the multi-mode superconducting microwave circuits consisting of single Josephson junctions using an exact impedance synthesis technique (the Brune synthesis) and applying previous formalisms for lumped element circuit quantization. In the rest of the thesis we extend our method to multi-junction (multi-qubit) multi-mode circuits through the use of state-space descriptions which allows us to quantize any multiport microwave superconducting circuit with a reciprocal lossy impedance response.

  5. Experimental Time-Optimal Universal Control of Spin Qubits in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jianpei; Wu, Yang; Wang, Xiaoting; Xu, Kebiao; Shi, Fazhan; Xie, Yijin; Rong, Xing; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-10-01

    Quantum control of systems plays an important role in modern science and technology. The ultimate goal of quantum control is to achieve high-fidelity universal control in a time-optimal way. Although high-fidelity universal control has been reported in various quantum systems, experimental implementation of time-optimal universal control remains elusive. Here, we report the experimental realization of time-optimal universal control of spin qubits in diamond. By generalizing a recent method for solving quantum brachistochrone equations [X. Wang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 170501 (2015)], we obtained accurate minimum-time protocols for multiple qubits with fixed qubit interactions and a constrained control field. Single- and two-qubit time-optimal gates are experimentally implemented with fidelities of 99% obtained via quantum process tomography. Our work provides a time-optimal route to achieve accurate quantum control and unlocks new capabilities for the emerging field of time-optimal control in general quantum systems.

  6. Asymptotically optimal purification and dilution of mixed qubit and Gaussian states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowles, Peter; Guta, Madalin; Adesso, Gerardo [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    Given an ensemble of mixed qubit states, it is possible to increase the purity of the constituent states using a procedure known as state purification. The reverse operation, which we refer to as dilution, produces a larger ensemble, while reducing the purity level of the systems. In this paper we find asymptotically optimal procedures for purification and dilution of an ensemble of independently and identically distributed mixed qubit states, for some given input and output purities and an asymptotic output rate. Our solution involves using the statistical tool of local asymptotic normality, which recasts the qubit problem in terms of attenuation and amplification of a single-mode displaced Gaussian state. Therefore, to obtain the qubit solutions, we must first solve the analogous problems in the Gaussian setup. We provide full solutions to all of the above for the (global) trace-norm figure of merit.

  7. Novel Approaches to Quantum Computation Using Solid State Qubits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Averin, D. V; Han, S; Likharev, K. K; Lukens, J. E; Semenov, V. K

    2007-01-01

    ...: the design of sophisticated instrumentation for the control and measurements of superconductor flux qubits, the refinement of qubit fabrication technology, the demonstration of coherent operation...

  8. Quantum cloning machines for equatorial qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Heng; Matsumoto, Keiji; Wang Xiangbin; Wadati, Miki

    2002-01-01

    Quantum cloning machines for equatorial qubits are studied. For the case of a one to two phase-covariant quantum cloning machine, we present the networks consisting of quantum gates to realize the quantum cloning transformations. The copied equatorial qubits are shown to be separable by using Peres-Horodecki criterion. The optimal one to M phase-covariant quantum cloning transformations are given

  9. Subcloning of a DNA fragment encoding a single cohesin domain of the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome-integrating protein CipA: purification, crystallization, and preliminary diffraction analysis of the encoded polypeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béguin, P; Raynaud, O; Chaveroche, M K; Dridi, A; Alzari, P M

    1996-06-01

    An Escherichia coli clone encoding a single cohesin domain of the cellulosome-integrating protein CipA from Clostridium thermocellum was constructed, and the corresponding polypeptide was purified, treated with papain, and crystallized from a PEG 8000 solution. Crystals exhibit orthorhombic symmetry, space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with cell dimensions a = 37.7 A, b = 80.7 A, c = 93.3 A, and four or eight molecules in the unit cell. The crystals diffract X-rays to beyond 2 A resolution and are suitable for further crystallographic studies.

  10. Classical chaos and its correspondence in superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, C.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fang, M.; Hoi, I.; Kelly, J.; Megrant, A.; O'Malley, P.; Quintana, C.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Barends, R.; Chen, Yu; Fowler, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Mutus, J.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Martinis, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    Advances in superconducting qubits have made it possible to experimentally investigate quantum-classical correspondence by constructing quantum systems with chaotic classical limits. We study the quantum equivalent of a classical spinning top using three fully coupled qubits that behave as a single spin-3/2 and subject the spin to a sequence of non-linear rotations. The resulting entanglement bears a striking resemblance to the classical phase space, including bifurcation, and suggests that classical chaos manifests itself as quantum entanglement. Studying the orientation of the spin-3/2 reveals that the rotations which generate chaos and entanglement are at the same time the source of disagreement between the quantum and classical trajectories. Our experiment highlights the correspondence between classical non-linear dynamics and interacting quantum systems.

  11. Geometric inductance effects in the spectrum of split transmon qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, R. T.; Blumoff, J.; Chou, K.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Girvin, S. M.

    2014-03-01

    The low-energy spectra of transmon superconducting qubits in a cavity can be accurately calculated using the black-box quantization approach. This method involves finding the normal modes of the circuit with a linearized Josephson junction and using these as the basis in which to express the non-linear terms. A split transmon qubit consists of two Josephson junctions in a SQUID loop. This configuration allows the Josephson energy to be tuned by applying external flux. Ideally, the system otherwise behaves as a conventional transmon with a single effective Josephson junction. However, the finite geometric inductance of the SQUID loop causes deviations from the simplest ideal description of a split transmon. This alters both the linearized and non-linear behaviour of the Josephson junctions in the superconducting circuit. We study how these changes can be incorporated into the black-box quantization approach and their effects on the low-energy spectrum of the split transmon.

  12. Graphene antidot lattices: Designed defects and spin qubits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas; Flindt, Christian; Pedersen, Jesper Goor

    2008-01-01

    similar phenomenology, but within a much more favorable energy scale, a consequence of the Dirac fermion nature of the states around the Fermi level. Further, by leaving out some of the holes one can create defect states, or pairs of coupled defect states, which can function as hosts for electron spin......Antidot lattices, defined on a two-dimensional electron gas at a semiconductor heterostructure, are a well-studied class of man-made structures with intriguing physical properties. We point out that a closely related system, graphene sheets with regularly spaced holes ("antidots"), should display...... qubits. We present a detailed study of the energetics of periodic graphene antidot lattices, analyze the level structure of a single defect, calculate the exchange coupling between a pair of spin qubits, and identify possible avenues for further developments....

  13. Towards a spin-ensemble quantum memory for superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grezes, Cécile; Kubo, Yuimaru; Julsgaard, Brian; Umeda, Takahide; Isoya, Junichi; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Ohshima, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Diniz, Igor; Auffeves, Alexia; Jacques, Vincent; Roch, Jean-François; Vion, Denis; Esteve, Daniel; Moelmer, Klaus; Bertet, Patrice

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews efforts to build a new type of quantum device, which combines an ensemble of electronic spins with long coherence times, and a small-scale superconducting quantum processor. The goal is to store over long times arbitrary qubit states in orthogonal collective modes of the spin-ensemble, and to retrieve them on-demand. We first present the protocol devised for such a multi-mode quantum memory. We then describe a series of experimental results using NV (as in nitrogen vacancy) center spins in diamond, which demonstrate its main building blocks: the transfer of arbitrary quantum states from a qubit into the spin ensemble, and the multi-mode retrieval of classical microwave pulses down to the single-photon level with a Hahn-echo like sequence. A reset of the spin memory is implemented in-between two successive sequences using optical repumping of the spins. xml:lang="fr"

  14. 3-qubit entanglement: A Jordan algebraic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsten, L.

    2014-09-01

    It is by now well known that three qubits can be totally entangled in two physically distinct ways. Here we review work classifying the physically distinct forms of 3-qubit entanglement using the elegant framework of Jordan algebras, Freudenthal-Kantor triple systems and groups of type E7. In particular, it is shown that the four Freudenthal-Kantor ranks correspond precisely to the four 3-qubit entanglement classes: (1) Totally separable A-B-C, (2) Biseparable A-BC, B-CA, C-AB, (3) Totally entangled W, (4) Totally entangled GHZ. The rank 4 GHZ class is regarded as maximally entangled in the sense that it has non-vanishing quartic norm, the defining invariant of the Freudenthal-Kantor triple system. While this framework is specific to three qubits, we show here how the essential features may be naturally generalised to an arbitrary number of qubits.

  15. 3-qubit entanglement: A Jordan algebraic perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsten, L

    2014-01-01

    It is by now well known that three qubits can be totally entangled in two physically distinct ways. Here we review work classifying the physically distinct forms of 3-qubit entanglement using the elegant framework of Jordan algebras, Freudenthal-Kantor triple systems and groups of type E 7 . In particular, it is shown that the four Freudenthal-Kantor ranks correspond precisely to the four 3-qubit entanglement classes: (1) Totally separable A-B-C, (2) Biseparable A-BC, B-CA, C-AB, (3) Totally entangled W, (4) Totally entangled GHZ. The rank 4 GHZ class is regarded as maximally entangled in the sense that it has non-vanishing quartic norm, the defining invariant of the Freudenthal-Kantor triple system. While this framework is specific to three qubits, we show here how the essential features may be naturally generalised to an arbitrary number of qubits.

  16. Indistinguishable encoding for bidirectional quantum key distribution: Theory to experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsul Shaari, Jesni; Soekardjo, Suryadi

    2017-12-01

    We present a bidirectional quantum key distribution protocol with minimal encoding operations derived from the use of only two “nonorthogonal” unitary transformations selected from two mutually unbiased unitary bases. Differently from many bidirectional protocols, these transformations are indistinguishable in principle for a single use. Along with its decoding procedure, it is unique compared to its “orthogonal encoding” predecessors. Given the nature of such protocols where key rates are usually dependent on two different types of error rates, we define a more relevant notion of security threshold for such protocols to allow for proper comparisons to be made. The current protocol outperforms its predecessor in terms of security as the amount of information an eavesdropper can glean is limited by the indistinguishability of the transformations. We further propose adaptations for a practical scenario and report on a proof of concept experimental scheme based on polarised photons from an attenuated pulsed laser for qubits, demonstrating the feasibility of such a protocol.

  17. Localized qubits in curved spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Matthew C.; Takahashi, Maki; Westman, Hans F.

    2012-04-01

    We provide a systematic and self-contained exposition of the subject of localized qubits in curved spacetimes. This research was motivated by a simple experimental question: if we move a spatially localized qubit, initially in a state |ψ1>, along some spacetime path Γ from a spacetime point x1 to another point x2, what will the final quantum state |ψ2> be at point x2? This paper addresses this question for two physical realizations of the qubit: spin of a massive fermion and polarization of a photon. Our starting point is the Dirac and Maxwell equations that describe respectively the one-particle states of localized massive fermions and photons. In the WKB limit we show how one can isolate a two-dimensional quantum state which evolves unitarily along Γ. The quantum states for these two realizations are represented by a left-handed 2-spinor in the case of massive fermions and a four-component complex polarization vector in the case of photons. In addition we show how to obtain from this WKB approach a fully general relativistic description of gravitationally induced phases. We use this formalism to describe the gravitational shift in the Colella-Overhauser-Werner 1975 experiment. In the non-relativistic weak field limit our result reduces to the standard formula in the original paper. We provide a concrete physical model for a Stern-Gerlach measurement of spin and obtain a unique spin operator which can be determined given the orientation and velocity of the Stern-Gerlach device and velocity of the massive fermion. Finally, we consider multipartite states and generalize the formalism to incorporate basic elements from quantum information theory such as quantum entanglement, quantum teleportation, and identical particles. The resulting formalism provides a basis for exploring precision quantum measurements of the gravitational field using techniques from quantum information theory.

  18. Nonlocality and entanglement in qubit systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batle, J [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, 07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Casas, M, E-mail: vdfsjbv4@uib.es [Departament de Fisica and IFISC-CSIC, Universitat de les Illes Balears, 07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2011-11-04

    Nonlocality and quantum entanglement constitute two special aspects of the quantum correlations existing in quantum systems, which are of paramount importance in quantum-information theory. Traditionally, they have been regarded as identical (equivalent, in fact, for pure two qubit states, that is, Gisin's Theorem), yet they constitute different resources. Describing nonlocality by means of the violation of several Bell inequalities, we obtain by direct optimization those states of two qubits that maximally violate a Bell inequality, in terms of their degree of mixture as measured by either their participation ratio R = 1/Tr({rho}{sup 2}) or their maximum eigenvalue {lambda}{sub max}. This optimum value is obtained as well, which coincides with previous results. Comparison with entanglement is performed too. An example of an application is given in the XY model. In this novel approximation, we also concentrate on the nonlocality for linear combinations of pure states of two qubits, providing a closed form for their maximal nonlocality measure. The case of Bell diagonal mixed states of two qubits is also extensively studied. Special attention concerning the connection between nonlocality and entanglement for mixed states of two qubits is paid to the so-called maximally entangled mixed states. Additional aspects for the case of two qubits are also described in detail. Since we deal with qubit systems, we will perform an analogous study for three qubits, employing similar tools. Relation between distillability and nonlocality is explored quantitatively for the whole space of states of three qubits. We finally extend our analysis to four-qubit systems, where nonlocality for generalized Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of arbitrary number of parties is computed. (paper)

  19. Thermodynamics of a periodically driven qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donvil, Brecht

    2018-04-01

    We present a new approach to the open system dynamics of a periodically driven qubit in contact with a temperature bath. We are specifically interested in the thermodynamics of the qubit. It is well known that by combining the Markovian approximation with Floquet theory it is possible to derive a stochastic Schrödinger equation in for the state of the qubit. We follow here a different approach. We use Floquet theory to embed the time-non autonomous qubit dynamics into time-autonomous yet infinite dimensional dynamics. We refer to the resulting infinite dimensional system as the dressed-qubit. Using the Markovian approximation we derive the stochastic Schrödinger equation for the dressed-qubit. The advantage of our approach is that the jump operators are ladder operators of the Hamiltonian. This simplifies the formulation of the thermodynamics. We use the thermodynamics of the infinite dimensional system to recover the thermodynamical description for the driven qubit. We compare our results with the existing literature and recover the known results.

  20. Quantum state transfer between hybrid qubits in a circuit QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhi-Bo

    2012-01-01

    In this Brief Report, we propose a theoretical scheme to transfer quantum states between superconducting charge qubits and semiconductor spin qubits in a circuit QED device. Under dispersive conditions, resonator-assisted state transfer between qubits can be performed controllably only by addressing the flux bias applied to the charge qubits. The low infidelity and existing advantages show that the proposal may provide an effective route toward scalable quantum-information transfer with solid-state hybrid qubits.

  1. Single-charge tunneling in ambipolar silicon quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Filipp

    2015-01-01

    Spin qubits in coupled quantum dots (QDs) are promising for future quantum information processing (QIP). A quantum bit (qubit) is the quantum mechanical analogon of a classical bit. In general, each quantum mechanical two-level system can represent a qubit. For the spin of a single charge carrier

  2. Spinor Slow Light and Two-Color Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ite; Lee, Meng-Jung; Ruseckas, Julius; Lee, Chin-Yuan; Kudriasov, Viaceslav; Chang, Kao-Fang; Cho, Hung-Wen; Juzeliunas, Gediminas; Yu, Ite A.

    2015-05-01

    We report the first experimental demonstration of two-component or spinor slow light (SSL) using a double tripod (DT) atom-light coupling scheme. The scheme involves three atomic ground states coupled to two excited states by six light fields. The oscillation due to the interaction between the two components was observed. SSL can be used to achieve high conversion efficiencies in the sum frequency generation and is a better method than the widely-used double- Λ scheme. On the basis of the stored light, our data showed that the DT scheme behaves like the two outcomes of an interferometer enabling precision measurements of frequency detuning. Furthermore, the single-photon SSL can be considered as the qubit with the superposition state of two frequency modes or, simply, as the two-color qubit. We experimentally demonstrated a possible application of the DT scheme as quantum memory/rotator for the two-color qubit. This work opens up a new direction in the EIT/slow light research. yu@phys.nthu.edu.tw

  3. Violation of Bell's inequality in Josephson phase qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansmann, Markus; Wang, H; Bialczak, Radoslaw C; Hofheinz, Max; Lucero, Erik; Neeley, M; O'Connell, A D; Sank, D; Weides, M; Wenner, J; Cleland, A N; Martinis, John M

    2009-09-24

    The measurement process plays an awkward role in quantum mechanics, because measurement forces a system to 'choose' between possible outcomes in a fundamentally unpredictable manner. Therefore, hidden classical processes have been considered as possibly predetermining measurement outcomes while preserving their statistical distributions. However, a quantitative measure that can distinguish classically determined correlations from stronger quantum correlations exists in the form of the Bell inequalities, measurements of which provide strong experimental evidence that quantum mechanics provides a complete description. Here we demonstrate the violation of a Bell inequality in a solid-state system. We use a pair of Josephson phase qubits acting as spin-1/2 particles, and show that the qubits can be entangled and measured so as to violate the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) version of the Bell inequality. We measure a Bell signal of 2.0732 +/- 0.0003, exceeding the maximum amplitude of 2 for a classical system by 244 standard deviations. In the experiment, we deterministically generate the entangled state, and measure both qubits in a single-shot manner, closing the detection loophole. Because the Bell inequality was designed to test for non-classical behaviour without assuming the applicability of quantum mechanics to the system in question, this experiment provides further strong evidence that a macroscopic electrical circuit is really a quantum system.

  4. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, S; Linke, N M; Figgatt, C; Landsman, K A; Wright, K; Monroe, C

    2016-08-04

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  5. The gradiometer flux qubit without an external flux bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C E; Liu, Y; Chi, C C

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the potential of the gradiometer flux qubit (GFQ), which should be insensitive to flux noise because of the nature of the gradiometer structure. However, to enjoy the benefit of such a design, we must be careful in choosing the initial condition. In the fluxoid quantization condition the flux integer n, which is set to zero in the usual single-loop flux qubit analysis, plays an important role in the GFQ potential. We found that it is impossible to construct a double-well potential if we choose the wrong initial condition. For a qubit application, n must be a small odd integer and the best choice would be n = 1. We also provide a precise and efficient numerical method for calculating the energy spectrum of the arbitrary GFQ potential; this will become useful in designing the circuitry parameters. The state control and read-out schemes are also optimized to a situation where a minimum requirement for using electronics is possible, which reduces noise from instruments directly

  6. A tunable rf SQUID manipulated as flux and phase qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletto, S; Lisenfeld, J; Lukashenko, A; Ustinov, A V [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Thailand), D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Chiarello, F; Castellano, M G [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, 00156 Roma (Italy); Carelli, P [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Universita dell' Aquila, 67040 Monteluco di Roio (Italy)], E-mail: ustinov@physik.uni-karlsruhe.de

    2009-12-15

    We report on two different manipulation procedures of a tunable rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). First, we operate this system as a flux qubit, where the coherent evolution between the two flux states is induced by a rapid change of the energy potential, turning it from a double well into a single well. The measured coherent Larmor-like oscillation of the retrapping probability in one of the wells has a frequency ranging from 6 to 20 GHz, with a theoretically expected upper limit of 40 GHz. Furthermore, here we also report a manipulation of the same device as a phase qubit. In the phase regime, the manipulation of the energy states is realized by applying a resonant microwave drive. In spite of the conceptual difference between these two manipulation procedures, the measured decay times of Larmor oscillation and microwave-driven Rabi oscillation are rather similar. Due to the higher frequency of the Larmor oscillations, the microwave-free qubit manipulation allows for much faster coherent operations.

  7. Coherence properties in superconducting flux qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spilla, Samuele

    2015-02-16

    The research work discussed in this thesis deals with the study of superconducting Josephson qubits. Superconducting qubits are solid-state artificial atoms which are based on lithographically defined Josephson tunnel junctions properties. When sufficiently cooled, these superconducting devices exhibit quantized states of charge, flux or junction phase depending on their design parameters. This allows to observe coherent evolutions of their states. The results presented can be divided into two parts. In a first part we investigate operations of superconducting qubits based on the quantum coherence in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID). We explain experimental data which has been observed in a SQUID subjected to fast, large-amplitude modifications of its effective potential shape. The motivations for this work come from the fact that in the past few years there have been attempts to interpret the supposed quantum behavior of physical systems, such as Josephson devices, within a classical framework. Moreover, we analyze the possibility of generating GHZ states, namely maximally entangled states, in a quantum system made out of three Josephson qubits. In particular, we investigate the possible limitations of the GHZ state generation due to coupling to bosonic baths. In the second part of the thesis we address a particular cause of decoherence of flux qubits which has been disregarded until now: thermal gradients, which can arise due to accidental non equilibrium quasiparticle distributions. The reason for these detrimental effects is that heat currents flowing through Josephson tunnel junctions in response to a temperature gradient are periodic functions of the phase difference between the electrodes. The phase dependence of the heat current comes from Andreev reflection, namely an interplay between the quasiparticles which carry heat and the superconducting condensate which is sensitive to the superconducting phase difference. Generally speaking

  8. Volume of the space of qubit-qubit channels and state transformations under random quantum channels

    OpenAIRE

    Lovas, Attila; Andai, Attila

    2017-01-01

    The simplest building blocks for quantum computations are the qubit-qubit quantum channels. In this paper, we analyze the structure of these channels via their Choi representation. The restriction of a quantum channel to the space of classical states (i.e. probability distributions) is called the underlying classical channel. The structure of quantum channels over a fixed classical channel is studied, the volume of general and unital qubit channels with respect to the Lebesgue measure is comp...

  9. Spatially multiplexed orbital-angular-momentum-encoded single photon and classical channels in a free-space optical communication link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongxiong; Liu, Cong; Pang, Kai; Zhao, Jiapeng; Cao, Yinwen; Xie, Guodong; Li, Long; Liao, Peicheng; Zhao, Zhe; Tur, Moshe; Boyd, Robert W; Willner, Alan E

    2017-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate spatial multiplexing of an orbital angular momentum (OAM)-encoded quantum channel and a classical Gaussian beam with a different wavelength and orthogonal polarization. Data rates as large as 100 MHz are achieved by encoding on two different OAM states by employing a combination of independently modulated laser diodes and helical phase holograms. The influence of OAM mode spacing, encoding bandwidth, and interference from the co-propagating Gaussian beam on registered photon count rates and quantum bit error rates is investigated. Our results show that the deleterious effects of intermodal crosstalk effects on system performance become less important for OAM mode spacing Δ≥2 (corresponding to a crosstalk value of less than -18.5  dB). The use of OAM domain can additionally offer at least 10.4 dB isolation besides that provided by wavelength and polarization, leading to a further suppression of interference from the classical channel.

  10. Environmental Effects on Two-Qubit Correlation in the Dispersive Jaynes-Cummings Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Masashi

    2018-02-01

    Total, classical and quantum correlations as well as entanglement are studied for a two-qubit system, where each qubit is placed in a micro cavity described by the dispersive Jaynes-Cummings model. Not only the loss of cavity photons but also the effect of the qubit-photon interaction on the loss is taken into account. The two-qubit system is initially prepared in a Bell diagonal state with a single mixing parameter and the cavity photon is either in a superposition of vacuum and single-photon states or in a weak coherent state. It is shown that more correlation of the two qubits can survive as an initial value of the cavity photon number is smaller. There is a threshold value of the cavity photon number, below which the stationary state becomes inseparable. Furthermore it is found that the external environment which causes the cavity loss has two effects; one brings about the decay of the correlations and the other suppresses the decay.

  11. Experimental Demonstration of Fault-Tolerant State Preparation with Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takita, Maika; Cross, Andrew W.; Córcoles, A. D.; Chow, Jerry M.; Gambetta, Jay M.

    2017-11-01

    Robust quantum computation requires encoding delicate quantum information into degrees of freedom that are hard for the environment to change. Quantum encodings have been demonstrated in many physical systems by observing and correcting storage errors, but applications require not just storing information; we must accurately compute even with faulty operations. The theory of fault-tolerant quantum computing illuminates a way forward by providing a foundation and collection of techniques for limiting the spread of errors. Here we implement one of the smallest quantum codes in a five-qubit superconducting transmon device and demonstrate fault-tolerant state preparation. We characterize the resulting code words through quantum process tomography and study the free evolution of the logical observables. Our results are consistent with fault-tolerant state preparation in a protected qubit subspace.

  12. A quantum-dot spin qubit with coherence limited by charge noise and fidelity higher than 99.9%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Allison, Giles; Honda, Takumu; Kodera, Tetsuo; Oda, Shunri; Hoshi, Yusuke; Usami, Noritaka; Itoh, Kohei M.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2018-02-01

    The isolation of qubits from noise sources, such as surrounding nuclear spins and spin-electric susceptibility1-4, has enabled extensions of quantum coherence times in recent pivotal advances towards the concrete implementation of spin-based quantum computation. In fact, the possibility of achieving enhanced quantum coherence has been substantially doubted for nanostructures due to the characteristic high degree of background charge fluctuations5-7. Still, a sizeable spin-electric coupling will be needed in realistic multiple-qubit systems to address single-spin and spin-spin manipulations8-10. Here, we realize a single-electron spin qubit with an isotopically enriched phase coherence time (20 μs)11,12 and fast electrical control speed (up to 30 MHz) mediated by extrinsic spin-electric coupling. Using rapid spin rotations, we reveal that the free-evolution dephasing is caused by charge noise—rather than conventional magnetic noise—as highlighted by a 1/f spectrum extended over seven decades of frequency. The qubit exhibits superior performance with single-qubit gate fidelities exceeding 99.9% on average, offering a promising route to large-scale spin-qubit systems with fault-tolerant controllability.

  13. Designing quantum-information-processing superconducting qubit circuits that exhibit lasing and other atomic-physics-like phenomena on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco

    2008-03-01

    Superconducting (SC) circuits can behave like atoms making transitions between a few energy levels. Such circuits can test quantum mechanics at macroscopic scales and be used to conduct atomic-physics experiments on a silicon chip. This talk overviews a few of our theoretical studies on SC circuits and quantum information processing (QIP) including: SC qubits for single photon generation and for lasing; controllable couplings among qubits; how to increase the coherence time of qubits using a capacitor in parallel to one of the qubit junctions; hybrid circuits involving both charge and flux qubits; testing Bell's inequality in SC circuits; generation of GHZ states; quantum tomography in SC circuits; preparation of macroscopic quantum superposition states of a cavity field via coupling to a SC qubit; generation of nonclassical photon states using a SC qubit in a microcavity; scalable quantum computing with SC qubits; and information processing with SC qubits in a microwave field. Controllable couplings between qubits can be achieved either directly or indirectly. This can be done with and without coupler circuits, and with and without data-buses like EM fields in cavities (e.g., we will describe both the variable-frequency magnetic flux approach and also a generalized double-resonance approach that we introduced). It is also possible to ``turn a quantum bug into a feature'' by using microscopic defects as qubits, and the macroscopic junction as a controller of it. We have also studied ways to implement radically different approaches to QIP by using ``cluster states'' in SC circuits. For a general overview of this field, see, J.Q. You and F. Nori, Phys. Today 58 (11), 42 (2005)

  14. Superconducting qubit in a nonstationary transmission line cavity: Parametric excitation, periodic pumping, and energy dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, A.A. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shapiro, D.S., E-mail: shapiro.dima@gmail.com [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); V.A. Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125009 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISIS, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Remizov, S.V. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); V.A. Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125009 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pogosov, W.V. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Lozovik, Yu.E. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142190 Moscow Region, Troitsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-12

    We consider a superconducting qubit coupled to the nonstationary transmission line cavity with modulated frequency taking into account energy dissipation. Previously, it was demonstrated that in the case of a single nonadiabatical modulation of a cavity frequency there are two channels of a two-level system excitation which are due to the absorption of Casimir photons and due to the counterrotating wave processes responsible for the dynamical Lamb effect. We show that the parametric periodical modulation of the resonator frequency can increase dramatically the excitation probability. Remarkably, counterrotating wave processes under such a modulation start to play an important role even in the resonant regime. Our predictions can be used to control qubit-resonator quantum states as well as to study experimentally different channels of a parametric qubit excitation. - Highlights: • Coupled qubit-resonator system under the modulation of a resonator frequency is considered. • Counterrotating terms of the Hamiltonian are of importance even in the resonance. • Qubit excited state population is highest if driving frequency matches dressed-state energy.

  15. High-Fidelity Entangling Gates for Two-Electron Spin Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerfontaine, Pascal; Mehl, Sebastian; Divincenzo, David P.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    High fidelity gate operations for manipulating individual and multiple qubits are a prerequisite for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Recently, we have shown that single-qubit gates for singlet-triplet qubits in GaAs can be pulse-engineered to reduce systematic errors and mitigate magnetic field fluctuations from the abundant nuclear spins, leading to experimentally demonstrated gate fidelities of 98.5%. We expect that a similar approach will be successful for two-qubit gates. We now describe short gating sequences for exchange-based two-qubit gates, showing that gate infidelities below 0.1% can be reached in realistic quantum dot setups. Additionally, we perform numerical pulse optimization to fully take the experimentally important imperfections into account, minimizing systematic errors and noise sensitivity. Since transferring the optimal control pulses to an experimental setting will inevitably incur systematic errors, we discuss how these errors can be calibrated on the experiment Supported by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach Foundation, DFG Grant BL 1197/2- 1, and the Deutsche Telekom Foundation.

  16. Controlled Bidirectional Hybrid of Remote State Preparation and Quantum Teleportation via Seven-Qubit Entangled State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Zha, Xin-Wei; Yang, Yu-Quan

    2018-01-01

    We propose a new protocol of implementing four-party controlled joint remote state preparation and meanwhile realizing controlled quantum teleportation via a seven-qubit entangled state. That is to say, Alice wants to teleport an arbitrary single-qubit state to Bob and Bob wants to remotely prepare a known state for Alice via the control of supervisors Fred and David. Compared with previous studies for the schemes of solely bidirectional quantum teleportation and remote state preparation, the new protocol is a kind of hybrid approach of information communication which makes the quantum channel multipurpose.

  17. Coherence Times of Dressed States of a Superconducting Qubit under Extreme Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. M.; Duty, T.; Persson, F.; Sandberg, M.; Johansson, G.; Delsing, P.

    2007-06-01

    We measure longitudinal dressed states of a superconducting qubit, the single Cooper-pair box, and an intense microwave field. The dressed states represent the hybridization of the qubit and photon degrees of freedom and appear as avoided level crossings in the combined energy diagram. By embedding the circuit in an rf oscillator, we directly probe the dressed states. We measure their dressed gap as a function of photon number and microwave amplitude, finding good agreement with theory. In addition, we extract the relaxation and dephasing rates of these states.

  18. Experimental realization of quantum cheque using a five-qubit quantum computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Bikash K.; Banerjee, Anindita; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2017-12-01

    Quantum cheques could be a forgery-free way to make transaction in a quantum networked banking system with perfect security against any no-signalling adversary. Here, we demonstrate the implementation of quantum cheque, proposed by Moulick and Panigrahi (Quantum Inf Process 15:2475-2486, 2016), using the five-qubit IBM quantum computer. Appropriate single qubit, CNOT and Fredkin gates are used in an optimized configuration. The accuracy of implementation is checked and verified through quantum state tomography by comparing results from the theoretical and experimental density matrices.

  19. Speed of quantum evolution of entangled two qubits states: Local vs. global evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curilef, S [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Antofagasta (Chile); Zander, C; Plastino, A R [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)], E-mail: arplastino@maple.up.ac.za

    2008-11-01

    There is a lower bound for the 'speed' of quantum evolution as measured by the time needed to reach an orthogonal state. We show that, for two-qubits systems, states saturating the quantum speed limit tend to exhibit a small amount of local evolution, as measured by the fidelity between the initial and final single qubit states after the time {tau} required by the composite system to reach an orthogonal state. Consequently, a trade-off between the speed of global evolution and the amount of local evolution seems to be at work.

  20. Quantum memories. A review based on the European integrated project ``Qubit Applications (QAP)''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, C.; Afzelius, M.; Appel, J.; Boyer de La Giroday, A.; Dewhurst, S. J.; Gisin, N.; Hu, C. Y.; Jelezko, F.; Kröll, S.; Müller, J. H.; Nunn, J.; Polzik, E. S.; Rarity, J. G.; de Riedmatten, H.; Rosenfeld, W.; Shields, A. J.; Sköld, N.; Stevenson, R. M.; Thew, R.; Walmsley, I. A.; Weber, M. C.; Weinfurter, H.; Wrachtrup, J.; Young, R. J.

    2010-05-01

    We perform a review of various approaches to the implementation of quantum memories, with an emphasis on activities within the quantum memory sub-project of the EU integrated project “Qubit Applications”. We begin with a brief overview over different applications for quantum memories and different types of quantum memories. We discuss the most important criteria for assessing quantum memory performance and the most important physical requirements. Then we review the different approaches represented in “Qubit Applications” in some detail. They include solid-state atomic ensembles, NV centers, quantum dots, single atoms, atomic gases and optical phonons in diamond. We compare the different approaches using the discussed criteria.

  1. Manipulations with qubit states by short control pulses: the interpolation method for evolution operator and fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisenko, M. V.; Klenov, N. V.; Satanin, A. M.

    2018-01-01

    In this article the dynamics of the qubits states based on solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is investigated. Using the Magnus method we obtain an explicit interpolation representation for the propagator, which allows to find wave function at an arbitrary time. To illustrate the effectiveness of the approach, the population of the levels a single and two coupled qubits have been calculated by applying the Magnus propagator and the result have been compared with the numerical solution of the Schrödinger equation. As a measure of the approximation of the wave function, we calculate fidelity, which indicates proximity when the exact and approximate evolution operator acts on the initial state. We discuss the possibility of extending the developed methods to multi-qubits system, when high-speed calculation methods of the operators of evolution is particularly relevant.

  2. Universal gate-set for trapped-ion qubits using a narrow linewidth diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Navon, Nir; Kotler, Shlomi; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2015-01-01

    We report on the implementation of a high fidelity universal gate-set on optical qubits based on trapped 88 Sr + ions for the purpose of quantum information processing. All coherent operations were performed using a narrow linewidth diode laser. We employed a master-slave configuration for the laser, where an ultra low expansion glass Fabry–Perot cavity is used as a stable reference as well as a spectral filter. We characterized the laser spectrum using the ions with a modified Ramsey sequence which eliminated the affect of the magnetic field noise. We demonstrated high fidelity single qubit gates with individual addressing, based on inhomogeneous micromotion, on a two-ion chain as well as the Mølmer–Sørensen two-qubit entangling gate. (paper)

  3. A nuclear-encoded chloroplast protein harboring a single CRM domain plays an important role in the Arabidopsis growth and stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwanuk; Lee, Hwa Jung; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeon, Young; Pai, Hyun-Sook; Kang, Hunseung

    2014-04-16

    Although several chloroplast RNA splicing and ribosome maturation (CRM) domain-containing proteins have been characterized for intron splicing and rRNA processing during chloroplast gene expression, the functional role of a majority of CRM domain proteins in plant growth and development as well as chloroplast RNA metabolism remains largely unknown. Here, we characterized the developmental and stress response roles of a nuclear-encoded chloroplast protein harboring a single CRM domain (At4g39040), designated CFM4, in Arabidopsis thaliana. Analysis of CFM4-GFP fusion proteins revealed that CFM4 is localized to chloroplasts. The loss-of-function T-DNA insertion mutants for CFM4 (cfm4) displayed retarded growth and delayed senescence, suggesting that CFM4 plays a role in growth and development of plants under normal growth conditions. In addition, cfm4 mutants showed retarded seed germination and seedling growth under stress conditions. No alteration in the splicing patterns of intron-containing chloroplast genes was observed in the mutant plants, but the processing of 16S and 4.5S rRNAs was abnormal in the mutant plants. Importantly, CFM4 was determined to possess RNA chaperone activity. These results suggest that the chloroplast-targeted CFM4, one of two Arabidopsis genes encoding a single CRM domain-containing protein, harbors RNA chaperone activity and plays a role in the Arabidopsis growth and stress response by affecting rRNA processing in chloroplasts.

  4. An Optimal Dissipative Encoder for the Toric Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-16

    corresponding Liouvillian is made up of four local Lindblad operators . For a qubit lattice of size L × L , we show that this process prepares encoded...this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence . Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to...associated correction operations . For the toric code, an encoding procedure of this form was given [7]. It involves active error correction operations

  5. Theory of the Quantum Dot Hybrid Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The quantum dot hybrid qubit, formed from three electrons in two quantum dots, combines the desirable features of charge qubits (fast manipulation) and spin qubits (long coherence times). The hybridized spin and charge states yield a unique energy spectrum with several useful properties, including two different operating regimes that are relatively immune to charge noise due to the presence of optimal working points or ``sweet spots.'' In this talk, I will describe dc and ac-driven gate operations of the quantum dot hybrid qubit. I will analyze improvements in the dephasing that are enabled by the sweet spots, and I will discuss the outlook for quantum hybrid qubits in terms of scalability. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607), NSF (PHY-1104660), the USDOD, and the Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program. The views and conclusions contained in this presentation are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of the US government.

  6. 3D Integration for Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Danna; Kim, David; Yost, Donna-Ruth; Mallek, Justin; Yoder, Jonilyn; Das, Rabindra; Racz, Livia; Hover, David; Weber, Steven; Kerman, Andrew; Oliver, William

    Superconducting qubits are a prime candidate for constructing a large-scale quantum processor due to their lithographic scalability, speed, and relatively long coherence times. Moving beyond the few qubit level, however, requires the use of a three-dimensional approach for routing control and readout lines. 3D integration techniques can be used to construct a structure where the sensitive qubits are shielded from a potentially-lossy readout and interconnect chip by an intermediate chip with through-substrate vias, with indium bump bonds providing structural support and electrical conductivity. We will discuss our work developing 3D-integrated coupled qubits, focusing on the characterization of 3D integration components and the effects on qubit performance and design. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) via MIT Lincoln Laboratory under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  7. Open reading frame 122 of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus encodes a novel structurual protein of occlusion-derived virions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, G.; Chen Xinwen,; Peters, D.; Vlak, J.M.; Hu, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV) and its closely related variant H. zea SNPV (HzSNPV) contain 20 open reading frames (ORFs) unique among baculoviruses. In this report, the function of HaSNPV ORF 122 (Ha122) is investigated. Ha122 was transcribed as a

  8. An optimal dissipative encoder for the toric code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengis, John; König, Robert; Pastawski, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of preparing specific encoded resource states for the toric code by local, time-independent interactions with a memoryless environment. We propose the construction of such a dissipative encoder which converts product states to topologically ordered ones while preserving logical information. The corresponding Liouvillian is made up of four local Lindblad operators. For a qubit lattice of size L × L, we show that this process prepares encoded states in time O(L), which is optimal. This scaling compares favorably with known local unitary encoders for the toric code which take time of order Ω(L2) and require active time-dependent control.

  9. Simulation of n-qubit quantum systems. V. Quantum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2010-02-01

    The FEYNMAN program has been developed during the last years to support case studies on the dynamics and entanglement of n-qubit quantum registers. Apart from basic transformations and (gate) operations, it currently supports a good number of separability criteria and entanglement measures, quantum channels as well as the parametrizations of various frequently applied objects in quantum information theory, such as (pure and mixed) quantum states, hermitian and unitary matrices or classical probability distributions. With the present update of the FEYNMAN program, we provide a simple access to (the simulation of) quantum measurements. This includes not only the widely-applied projective measurements upon the eigenspaces of some given operator but also single-qubit measurements in various pre- and user-defined bases as well as the support for two-qubit Bell measurements. In addition, we help perform generalized and POVM measurements. Knowing the importance of measurements for many quantum information protocols, e.g., one-way computing, we hope that this update makes the FEYNMAN code an attractive and versatile tool for both, research and education. New version program summaryProgram title: FEYNMAN Catalogue identifier: ADWE_v5_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWE_v5_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 210 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 960 471 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Maple 12 Computer: Any computer with Maple software installed Operating system: Any system that supports Maple; the program has been tested under Microsoft Windows XP and Linux Classification: 4.15 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADWE_v4_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun

  10. Four-qubit entanglement classification from string theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsten, L; Dahanayake, D; Duff, M J; Marrani, A; Rubens, W

    2010-09-03

    We invoke the black-hole-qubit correspondence to derive the classification of four-qubit entanglement. The U-duality orbits resulting from timelike reduction of string theory from D=4 to D=3 yield 31 entanglement families, which reduce to nine up to permutation of the four qubits.

  11. Fast quantum logic gates with trapped-ion qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, V. M.; Ballance, C. J.; Thirumalai, K.; Stephenson, L. J.; Ballance, T. G.; Steane, A. M.; Lucas, D. M.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum bits (qubits) based on individual trapped atomic ions are a promising technology for building a quantum computer. The elementary operations necessary to do so have been achieved with the required precision for some error-correction schemes. However, the essential two-qubit logic gate that is used to generate quantum entanglement has hitherto always been performed in an adiabatic regime (in which the gate is slow compared with the characteristic motional frequencies of the ions in the trap), resulting in logic speeds of the order of 10 kilohertz. There have been numerous proposals of methods for performing gates faster than this natural ‘speed limit’ of the trap. Here we implement one such method, which uses amplitude-shaped laser pulses to drive the motion of the ions along trajectories designed so that the gate operation is insensitive to the optical phase of the pulses. This enables fast (megahertz-rate) quantum logic that is robust to fluctuations in the optical phase, which would otherwise be an important source of experimental error. We demonstrate entanglement generation for gate times as short as 480 nanoseconds—less than a single oscillation period of an ion in the trap and eight orders of magnitude shorter than the memory coherence time measured in similar calcium-43 hyperfine qubits. The power of the method is most evident at intermediate timescales, at which it yields a gate error more than ten times lower than can be attained using conventional techniques; for example, we achieve a 1.6-microsecond-duration gate with a fidelity of 99.8 per cent. Faster and higher-fidelity gates are possible at the cost of greater laser intensity. The method requires only a single amplitude-shaped pulse and one pair of beams derived from a continuous-wave laser. It offers the prospect of combining the unrivalled coherence properties, operation fidelities and optical connectivity of trapped-ion qubits with the submicrosecond logic speeds that are usually

  12. Parametric amplification by coupled flux qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehák, M.; Neilinger, P.; Grajcar, M. [Department of Experimental Physics, Comenius University, SK-84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Science, 845 11 Bratislava (Slovakia); Oelsner, G.; Hübner, U.; Meyer, H.-G. [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, P.O. Box 100239, D-07702 Jena (Germany); Il' ichev, E. [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, P.O. Box 100239, D-07702 Jena (Germany); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 K. Marx Ave., 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-21

    We report parametric amplification of a microwave signal in a Kerr medium formed from superconducting qubits. Two mutually coupled flux qubits, embedded in the current antinode of a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator, are used as a nonlinear element. Shared Josephson junctions provide the qubit-resonator coupling, resulting in a device with a tunable Kerr constant (up to 3 × 10{sup −3}) and a measured gain of about 20 dB. This arrangement represents a unit cell which can be straightforwardly extended to a quasi one-dimensional quantum metamaterial with large tunable Kerr nonlinearity, providing a basis for implementation of wide-band travelling wave parametric amplifiers.

  13. Adiabatic Motion of Fault Tolerant Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, David Edward

    This work proposes and analyzes the adiabatic motion of fault tolerant qubits in two systems as candidates for the building blocks of a quantum computer. The first proposal examines a pair of electron spins in double quantum dots, finding that the leading source of decoherence, hyperfine dephasing, can be suppressed by adiabatic rotation of the dots in real space. The additional spin-orbit effects introduced by this motion are analyzed, simulated, and found to result in an infidelity below the error-correction threshold. The second proposal examines topological qubits formed by Majorana zero modes theorized to exist at the ends of semiconductor nanowires coupled to conventional superconductors. A model is developed to design adiabatic movements of the Majorana bound states to produce entangled qubits. Analysis and simulations indicate that these adiabatic operations can also be used to demonstrate entanglement experimentally by testing Bell's theorem.

  14. The validity of the RWA and gate operation speedup by violating RWA in resonant-driven qubit systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang

    The rotating wave approximation (RWA) is ubiquitously used in understanding (quasi)resonant driven systems and designing pulses for state evolution. Following the practice in atomic and NMR physics, a wide range of semiconducting qubit systems are driven resonantly to manipulate the qubit, including single-spin/resonant exchange (RX)/various singlet-triplet(ST)/spin-charge hybrid qubits. The purpose of this talk is twofold: (I) Examine the validity of RWA in different qubit systems and analyze the error in terms of quantum computation; (II) Present faster gate operations by going into RWA-invalid regime for resonant-driven qubits (esp. for ST and RX types). We measure the RWA-induced infidelity and discuss it in view of the fault-tolerant error correction threshold and operation speeds. Applying the analytical extension (two orders higher than RWA) greatly reduces the infidelity, in the regime where the RWA is attempted to be used. Moreover, we show that the resonant-driven system is not limited by the Rabi-like weak coupling limit and the associated slow gate speed, much smaller than the level splitting (e.g., the small Zeeman energy gradient in ST qubits). We demonstrate the universal one qubit gates for driving strength up to a few level splitting, achieving fast control with only simple sinusoidal pulses. We also solve for the `shifted sinusoidal' pulses needed for ST qubits where the exchange coupling cannot change signs. In collaboration with Xin Wang, Jason Kestner and Sankar Das Sarma, and supported by LPS-MPO-CMTC and IARPA-MQCO.

  15. PREFACE: Nobel Symposium 141: Qubits for Future Quantum Information Nobel Symposium 141: Qubits for Future Quantum Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeson, Tord; Delsing, Per; Wendin, Göran

    2009-12-01

    Quantum mechanics is the most ground-breaking and fascinating theoretical concept developed in physics during the past century. Much of our present understanding of the microscopic world and its extension into the macroscopic world, including modern technical applications, is based upon quantum mechanics. We have experienced a remarkable development of information and communication technology during the past two decades, to a large extent depending upon successful fabrication of smaller and smaller components and circuits. However, we are finally approaching the physical limits of component miniaturization as we enter a microscopic world ruled by quantum mechanics. Present technology is mainly based upon classical physics such as mechanics and electromagnetism. We now face a similar paradigm shift as was experienced two hundred years ago, at the time of the industrial revolution. Engineered construction of systems is currently increasingly based on quantum physics instead of classical physics, and quantum information is replacing much of classical communication. Quantum computing is one of the most exciting sub-fields of this revolution. Individual quantum systems can be used to store and process information. They are called quantum bits, or qubits for short. A quantum computer could eventually be constructed by combining a number of qubits that act coherently. Important computations can be performed much more quickly than by classical computers. However, while we control and measure a qubit, it must be sufficiently isolated from its environment to avoid noise that causes decoherence at the same time. Currently, low temperature is generally needed to obtain sufficiently long decoherence times. Single qubits of many different kinds can be built and manipulated; some research groups have managed to successfully couple qubits and perform rudimentary logic operations. However, the fundamental problems, such as decoherence, entanglement, quantum measurements and error

  16. Single Neurons in the Avian Auditory Cortex Encode Individual Identity and Propagation Distance in Naturally Degraded Communication Calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouterde, Solveig C; Elie, Julie E; Mathevon, Nicolas; Theunissen, Frédéric E

    2017-03-29

    One of the most complex tasks performed by sensory systems is "scene analysis": the interpretation of complex signals as behaviorally relevant objects. The study of this problem, universal to species and sensory modalities, is particularly challenging in audition, where sounds from various sources and localizations, degraded by propagation through the environment, sum to form a single acoustical signal. Here we investigated in a songbird model, the zebra finch, the neural substrate for ranging and identifying a single source. We relied on ecologically and behaviorally relevant stimuli, contact calls, to investigate the neural discrimination of individual vocal signature as well as sound source distance when calls have been degraded through propagation in a natural environment. Performing electrophysiological recordings in anesthetized birds, we found neurons in the auditory forebrain that discriminate individual vocal signatures despite long-range degradation, as well as neurons discriminating propagation distance, with varying degrees of multiplexing between both information types. Moreover, the neural discrimination performance of individual identity was not affected by propagation-induced degradation beyond what was induced by the decreased intensity. For the first time, neurons with distance-invariant identity discrimination properties as well as distance-discriminant neurons are revealed in the avian auditory cortex. Because these neurons were recorded in animals that had prior experience neither with the vocalizers of the stimuli nor with long-range propagation of calls, we suggest that this neural population is part of a general-purpose system for vocalizer discrimination and ranging. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Understanding how the brain makes sense of the multitude of stimuli that it continually receives in natural conditions is a challenge for scientists. Here we provide a new understanding of how the auditory system extracts behaviorally relevant information

  17. Dependence of transmon qubit relaxation rate on readout drive power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhada, S. O.; Shankar, S.; Narla, A.; Zalys-Geller, E.; Girvin, S. M.; Devoret, M. H.

    In circuit QED experiments, microwave drives are applied to the readout mode for qubit measurement, control and to realize various multi-photon processes. These microwave drives have been observed to detrimentally affect the qubit mode by increasing the qubit relaxation rates for both upward and downward transitions. These transitions demolish the qubit state during a measurement, limiting the maximum measurement strength and thus the readout fidelity and speed. Here, we experimentally investigate this effect for transmon qubits coupled to different realizations of the readout mode: 3-dimensional microwave cavities, strip-line resonators and nonlinear readout modes in a waveguide. Work supported by: NSF, ARO, AFOSR and YINQE.

  18. Generation of cluster states with Josephson charge qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Xiao-Hu; Dong, Ping; Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2007-01-01

    A scheme for the generation of the cluster states based on the Josephson charge qubits is proposed. The two-qubit generation case is introduced first, and then generalized to multi-qubit case. The successful probability and fidelity of current multi-qubit cluster state are both 1.0. The scheme is simple and can be easily manipulated, because any two charge qubits can be selectively and effectively coupled by a common inductance. More manipulations can be realized before decoherence sets in. All the devices in the scheme are well within the current technology

  19. Coherent coupling of a superconducting flux qubit to an electron spin ensemble in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Saito, Shiro; Kemp, Alexander; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Karimoto, Shin-Ichi; Nakano, Hayato; Munro, William J.; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Everitt, Mark S.; Nemoto, Kae; Kasu, Makoto; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Semba, Kouichi

    2012-02-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated coherent strong coupling between a single macroscopic superconducting artificial atom (a gap tunable flux qubit [1]) and an ensemble of electron spins in the form of nitrogen--vacancy color centres in diamond. We have observed coherent exchange of a single quantum of energy between a flux qubit and a macroscopic ensemble consisting of about 3.0*10^7 NV- centers [2]. This is the first step towards the realization of a long-lived quantum memory and hybrid devices coupling microwave and optical systems. [1] Coherent operation of a gap-tunable flux qubit X. B. Zhu, A. Kemp, S. Saito, K. Semba, APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS, Volume: 97, Issue: 10 pp. 102503 (2010) [2] Coherent coupling of a superconducting flux qubit to an electron spin ensemble in diamond Xiaobo Zhu, Shiro Saito, Alexander Kemp, Kosuke Kakuyanagi, Shin-ichi Karimoto, Hayato Nakano, William J. Munro, Yasuhiro Tokura, Mark S. Everitt, Kae Nemoto, Makoto Kasu, Norikazu Mizuochi, and Kouichi Semba, Nature, Volume: 478, 221-224 (2011)

  20. Long-term correction of obesity and diabetes in genetically obese mice by a single intramuscular injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding mouse leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J E; Zhou, S; Giese, K; Williams, L T; Escobedo, J A; Dwarki, V J

    1997-12-09

    The ob/ob mouse is genetically deficient in leptin and exhibits a phenotype that includes obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. This phenotype closely resembles the morbid obesity seen in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that a single intramuscular injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding mouse leptin (rAAV-leptin) in ob/ob mice leads to prevention of obesity and diabetes. The treated animals show normalization of metabolic abnormalities including hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, and lethargy. The effects of a single injection have lasted through the 6-month course of the study. At all time points measured the circulating levels of leptin in the serum were similar to age-matched control C57 mice. These results demonstrate that maintenance of normal levels of leptin (2-5 ng/ml) in the circulation can prevent both the onset of obesity and associated non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Thus a single injection of a rAAV vector expressing a therapeutic gene can lead to complete and long-term correction of a genetic disorder. Our study demonstrates the long-term correction of a disease caused by a genetic defect and proves the feasibility of using rAAV-based vectors for the treatment of chronic disorders like obesity.

  1. Long-term correction of obesity and diabetes in genetically obese mice by a single intramuscular injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding mouse leptin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John E.; Zhou, Shangzhen; Giese, Klaus; Williams, Lewis T.; Escobedo, Jaime A.; Dwarki, Varavani J.

    1997-01-01

    The ob/ob mouse is genetically deficient in leptin and exhibits a phenotype that includes obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes melitus. This phenotype closely resembles the morbid obesity seen in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that a single intramuscular injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding mouse leptin (rAAV-leptin) in ob/ob mice leads to prevention of obesity and diabetes. The treated animals show normalization of metabolic abnormalities including hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, and lethargy. The effects of a single injection have lasted through the 6-month course of the study. At all time points measured the circulating levels of leptin in the serum were similar to age-matched control C57 mice. These results demonstrate that maintenance of normal levels of leptin (2–5 ng/ml) in the circulation can prevent both the onset of obesity and associated non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Thus a single injection of a rAAV vector expressing a therapeutic gene can lead to complete and long-term correction of a genetic disorder. Our study demonstrates the long-term correction of a disease caused by a genetic defect and proves the feasibility of using rAAV-based vectors for the treatment of chronic disorders like obesity. PMID:9391128

  2. Application of Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Nitric Oxide (NO•) Probes, the geNOps, for Real-time Imaging of NO• Signals in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Emrah; Rost, Rene; Bischof, Helmut; Blass, Sandra; Schreilechner, Anna; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Depaoli, Maria R; Klec, Christiane; Charoensin, Suphachai; Madreiter-Sokolowski, Corina T; Ramadani, Jeta; Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Graier, Wolfgang F; Malli, Roland

    2017-03-16

    Nitric Oxide (NO•) is a small radical, which mediates multiple important cellular functions in mammals, bacteria and plants. Despite the existence of a large number of methods for detecting NO• in vivo and in vitro, the real-time monitoring of NO• at the single-cell level is very challenging. The physiological or pathological effects of NO• are determined by the actual concentration and dwell time of this radical. Accordingly, methods that allow the single-cell detection of NO• are highly desirable. Recently, we expanded the pallet of NO• indicators by introducing single fluorescent protein-based genetically encoded nitric oxide (NO•) probes (geNOps) that directly respond to cellular NO• fluctuations and, hence, addresses this need. Here we demonstrate the usage of geNOps to assess intracellular NO• signals in response to two different chemical NO•-liberating molecules. Our results also confirm that freshly prepared 3-(2-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-nitrosohydrazino)-N-methyl-1-propanamine (NOC-7) has a much higher potential to evoke change in intracellular NO• levels as compared with the inorganic NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Furthermore, dual-color live-cell imaging using the green geNOps (G-geNOp) and the chemical Ca 2+ indicator fura-2 was performed to visualize the tight regulation of Ca 2+ -dependent NO• formation in single endothelial cells. These representative experiments demonstrate that geNOps are suitable tools to investigate the real-time generation and degradation of single-cell NO• signals in diverse experimental setups.

  3. Dependence of transmon qubit relaxation rate on cavity photon population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhada, S. O.; Shankar, S.; Liu, Y.; Hatridge, M.; Narla, A.; Sliwa, K. M.; Girvin, S. M.; Devoret, M. H.

    2015-03-01

    In circuit QED experiments, a qubit is dispersively coupled to a cavity such that the cavity frequency depends on the qubit state. This dispersive shift enables quantum non-demolition readout of the qubit by exciting the cavity with a microwave pulse and detecting the phase shift of the reflected signal. However, this cavity excitation has been observed in experiments to increase the qubit relaxation rate, hence demolishing the qubit state and limiting the maximum measurement strength. Here we experimentally study this effect in a transmon qubit coupled to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity. We also explore alternate qubit circuits designed to mitigate this demolition effect. Work supported by: IARPA, ARO, and NSF.

  4. A single cDNA encodes two isoforms of stathmin, a developmentally regulated neuron-enriched phosphoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doye, V; Soubrier, F; Bauw, G; Boutterin, M C; Beretta, L; Koppel, J; Vandekerckhove, J; Sobel, A

    1989-07-25

    Stathmin, a 19-kDa neuron-enriched soluble phosphoprotein, has been recently proposed as an ubiquitous intracellular relay for the diverse extracellular signals regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and functions through various second messenger pathways (Sobel, A., Boutterin, M.C., Beretta, L., Chneiweiss, H., Doye, V., and peyro-Saint-Paul, H. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 3765-3772). Internal sequences of the protein from rat brain were determined after purification by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, electrotransfer onto Immobilon, and in situ proteolysis. Oligonucleotide mixtures based on these sequences were used to clone a cDNA for stathmin from a rat PC12 cell lambda gt 10 library. The deduced amino acid sequence reveals partial homologies with the coiled coil structural regions of several intracellular matrix phosphoproteins. Using this cDNA as a probe, we show that the expression of stathmin mRNA parallels that of the protein during brain ontogenesis, reaching a maximum at the neonatal stage. In vitro translation of the derived cRNA yielded all the known molecular forms of stathmin, namely its alpha and beta isoforms in their unphosphorylated and phosphorylated states. Thus, a single cDNA codes for both biologically relevant isoforms of the protein, indicating that they differ by co- or post-translational modifications.

  5. Frame independent nonlocality for three qubit state

    OpenAIRE

    Moradi, Shahpoor; Aghaee, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Bell's inequality is investigated for the three qubit GHZ state in relativistic regime. Two different relativistic spin operator are considered. One of them is defined by Lee, and the other is the Pauli-Lubanski pseudovector used by Kim \\textit{et al}. It is shown that for both spin operator Bell's inequality is still maximally violated in a Lorentz-boosted frame.

  6. Projective Ring Line Encompassing Two-Qubits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saniga, M.; Planat, M.; Pracna, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 155, č. 3 (2008), s. 905-913 ISSN 0040-5779 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400400410 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : two-qubits * projective ring line * generalized quadrangle of order two Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.721, year: 2008

  7. Weak measurements with a qubit meter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Shengjun; Mølmer, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    We derive schemes to measure the so-called weak values of quantum system observables by coupling of the system to a qubit meter system. We highlight, in particular, the meaning of the imaginary part of the weak values, and show how it can be measured directly on equal footing with the real part...

  8. Robust Concurrent Remote Entanglement Between Two Superconducting Qubits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Narla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Entangling two remote quantum systems that never interact directly is an essential primitive in quantum information science and forms the basis for the modular architecture of quantum computing. When protocols to generate these remote entangled pairs rely on using traveling single-photon states as carriers of quantum information, they can be made robust to photon losses, unlike schemes that rely on continuous variable states. However, efficiently detecting single photons is challenging in the domain of superconducting quantum circuits because of the low energy of microwave quanta. Here, we report the realization of a robust form of concurrent remote entanglement based on a novel microwave photon detector implemented in the superconducting circuit quantum electrodynamics platform of quantum information. Remote entangled pairs with a fidelity of 0.57±0.01 are generated at 200 Hz. Our experiment opens the way for the implementation of the modular architecture of quantum computation with superconducting qubits.

  9. Coherent Processing of a Qubit Using One Squeezed State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Tameshtit

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In a departure from most work in quantum information utilizing Gaussian states, we use a single such state to represent a qubit and model environmental noise with a class of quadratic dissipative equations. A benefit of this single Gaussian representation is that with one deconvolution, we can eliminate noise. In this deconvolution picture, a basis of squeezed states evolves to another basis of such states. One of the limitations of our approach is that noise is eliminated only at a privileged time. We suggest that this limitation may actually be used advantageously to send information securely: the privileged time is only known to the sender and the receiver, and any intruder accessing the information at any other time encounters noisy data.

  10. Endo-Fullerene and Doped Diamond Nanocrystallite Based Models of Qubits for Solid-State Quantum Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongjun; Srivastava, Deepak; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Models of encapsulated 1/2 nuclear spin H-1 and P-31 atoms in fullerene and diamond nanocrystallite, respectively, are proposed and examined with ab-initio local density functional method for possible applications as single quantum bits (qubits) in solid-state quantum computers. A H-1 atom encapsulated in a fully deuterated fullerene, C(sub 20)D(sub 20), forms the first model system and ab-initio calculation shows that H-1 atom is stable in atomic state at the center of the fullerene with a barrier of about 1 eV to escape. A P-31 atom positioned at the center of a diamond nanocrystallite is the second model system, and 3 1P atom is found to be stable at the substitutional site relative to interstitial sites by 15 eV, Vacancy formation energy is 6 eV in diamond so that substitutional P-31 atom will be stable against diffusion during the formation mechanisms within the nanocrystallite. The coupling between the nuclear spin and weakly bound (valance) donor electron coupling in both systems is found to be suitable for single qubit applications, where as the spatial distributions of (valance) donor electron wave functions are found to be preferentially spread along certain lattice directions facilitating two or more qubit applications. The feasibility of the fabrication pathways for both model solid-state qubit systems within practical quantum computers is discussed with in the context of our proposed solid-state qubits.

  11. Human renal carcinoma expresses two messages encoding a parathyroid hormone-like peptide: Evidence for the alternative splicing of a single-copy gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiede, M.A.; Strewler, G.J.; Nissenson, R.A.; Rosenblatt, M.; Rodan, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    A peptide secreted by tumors associated with the clinical syndrome of humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy was recently purified from human renal carcinoma cell line 786-0. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this peptide has considerable similarity with those of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and of peptides isolated from human breast and lung carcinoma (cell line BEN). In this study the authors obtained the nucleotide sequence of a 1595-base cDNA complementary to mRNA encoding the PTH-like peptide produced by 786-0 cells. The cDNA contains an open reading frame encoding a leader sequence of 36 amino acids and a 139-residue peptide, in which 8 of the first 13 residues are identical to the N terminus of PTH. Through the first 828 bases the sequence of this cDNA is identical with one recently isolated from a BEN cell cDNA library; however, beginning with base 829 the sequences diverge, shortening the open reading frame by 2 amino acids. Differential RNA blot analysis revealed that 786-0 cells express two major PTH-like peptide mRNAs with different 3' untranslated sequences, one of which hybridizes with the presently described sequence and the other one with that reported for the BEN cell PTH-like peptide cDNA. Primer-extension analysis of 786-0 poly(A) + RNA together with Southern blot analysis of human DNA confirmed the presence of a single-copy gene coding for multiple mRNAs through alternate splicing. In addition, the 3' untranslated sequence of the cDNA described here has significant similarity to the c-myc protooncogene

  12. Ultrafast time scale X-rotation of cold atom storage qubit using Rubidium clock states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yunheung; Lee, Han-Gyeol; Kim, Hyosub; Jo, Hanlae; Ahn, Jaewook

    2017-04-01

    Ultrafast-time-scale optical interaction is a local operation on the electronic subspace of an atom, thus leaving its nuclear state intact. However, because atomic clock states are maximally entangled states of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom, their entire Hilbert space should be accessible only with local operations and classical communications (LOCC). Therefore, it may be possible to achieve hyperfine qubit gates only with electronic transitions. Here we show an experimental implementation of ultrafast X-rotation of atomic hyperfine qubits, in which an optical Rabi oscillation induces a geometric phase between the constituent fine-structure states, thus bringing about the X-rotation between the two ground hyperfine levels. In experiments, cold atoms in a magneto-optical trap were controlled with a femtosecond laser pulse from a Ti:sapphire laser amplifier. Absorption imaging of the as-controlled atoms initially in the ground hyperfine state manifested polarization dependence, strongly agreeing with the theory. The result indicates that single laser pulse implementations of THz clock speed qubit controls are feasible for atomic storage qubits. Samsung Science and Technology Foundation [SSTF-BA1301-12].

  13. Quantum teleportation and information splitting via four-qubit cluster state and a Bell state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Marlon David González; Falaye, Babatunde James; Sun, Guo-Hua; Cruz-Irisson, M.; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2017-10-01

    Quantum teleportation provides a "bodiless" way of transmitting the quantum state from one object to another, at a distant location, using a classical communication channel and a previously shared entangled state. In this paper, we present a tripartite scheme for probabilistic teleportation of an arbitrary single qubit state, without losing the information of the state being teleported, via a fourqubit cluster state of the form | ϕ>1234 = α|0000>+ β|1010>+ γ|0101>- η|1111>, as the quantum channel, where the nonzero real numbers α, β, γ, and η satisfy the relation j αj2 + | β|2 + | γ|2 + | η|2 = 1. With the introduction of an auxiliary qubit with state |0>, using a suitable unitary transformation and a positive-operator valued measure (POVM), the receiver can recreate the state of the original qubit. An important advantage of the teleportation scheme demonstrated here is that, if the teleportation fails, it can be repeated without teleporting copies of the unknown quantum state, if the concerned parties share another pair of entangled qubit. We also present a protocol for quantum information splitting of an arbitrary two-particle system via the aforementioned cluster state and a Bell-state as the quantum channel. Problems related to security attacks were examined for both the cases and it was found that this protocol is secure. This protocol is highly efficient and easy to implement.

  14. Discrete Wigner formalism for qubits and noncontextuality of Clifford gates on qubit stabilizer states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocia, Lucas; Love, Peter

    2017-12-01

    We show that qubit stabilizer states can be represented by non-negative quasiprobability distributions associated with a Wigner-Weyl-Moyal formalism where Clifford gates are positive state-independent maps. This is accomplished by generalizing the Wigner-Weyl-Moyal formalism to three generators instead of two—producing an exterior, or Grassmann, algebra—which results in Clifford group gates for qubits that act as a permutation on the finite Weyl phase space points naturally associated with stabilizer states. As a result, a non-negative probability distribution can be associated with each stabilizer state's three-generator Wigner function, and these distributions evolve deterministically to one another under Clifford gates. This corresponds to a hidden variable theory that is noncontextual and local for qubit Clifford gates while Clifford (Pauli) measurements have a context-dependent representation. Equivalently, we show that qubit Clifford gates can be expressed as propagators within the three-generator Wigner-Weyl-Moyal formalism whose semiclassical expansion is truncated at order ℏ0 with a finite number of terms. The T gate, which extends the Clifford gate set to one capable of universal quantum computation, requires a semiclassical expansion of the propagator to order ℏ1. We compare this approach to previous quasiprobability descriptions of qubits that relied on the two-generator Wigner-Weyl-Moyal formalism and find that the two-generator Weyl symbols of stabilizer states result in a description of evolution under Clifford gates that is state-dependent, in contrast to the three-generator formalism. We have thus extended Wigner non-negative quasiprobability distributions from the odd d -dimensional case to d =2 qubits, which describe the noncontextuality of Clifford gates and contextuality of Pauli measurements on qubit stabilizer states.

  15. Encoded recoupling and decoupling: An alternative to quantum error-correcting codes applied to trapped-ion quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidar, D.A.; Wu, L.-A.

    2003-01-01

    A recently developed theory for eliminating decoherence and design constraints in quantum computers, 'encoded recoupling and decoupling', is shown to be fully compatible with a promising proposal for an architecture enabling scalable ion-trap quantum computation [D. Kielpinski et al., Nature (London) 417, 709 (2002)]. Logical qubits are encoded into pairs of ions. Logic gates are implemented using the Soerensen-Moelmer (SM) scheme applied to pairs of ions at a time. The encoding offers continuous protection against collective dephasing. Decoupling pulses, that are also implemented using the SM scheme directly to the encoded qubits, are capable of further reducing various other sources of qubit decoherence, such as due to differential dephasing and due to decohered vibrational modes. The feasibility of using the relatively slow SM pulses in a decoupling scheme quenching the latter source of decoherence follows from the observed 1/f spectrum of the vibrational bath

  16. Extending the coherence of a quantum dot hybrid qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Kim, Dohun; Yang, Yuan-Chi; Smith, L. W.; Simmons, C. B.; Ward, Daniel R.; Foote, Ryan H.; Corrigan, J.; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    Identifying and ameliorating dominant sources of decoherence are important steps in understanding and improving quantum systems. Here, we show that the free induction decay time (T2*) and the Rabi decay rate (ΓRabi) of the quantum dot hybrid qubit can be increased by more than an order of magnitude by appropriate tuning of the qubit parameters and operating points. By operating in the spin-like regime of this qubit, and choosing parameters that increase the qubit's resilience to charge noise (which we show is presently the limiting noise source for this qubit), we achieve a Ramsey decay time T2* of 177 ns and a Rabi decay time 1/ΓRabi exceeding 1 μs. We find that the slowest ΓRabi is limited by fluctuations in the Rabi frequency induced by charge noise and not by fluctuations in the qubit energy itself.

  17. Experimental evaluation of quantum computing elements (qubits) made of electrons trapped over a liquid helium film; Evaluation experimentale d'elements de calcul quantique (qubit) formes d'electrons pieges sur l'helium liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, E

    2006-12-15

    An electron on helium presents a quantized energy spectrum. The interaction with the environment is considered sufficiently weak in order to allow the realization of a quantum bit (qubit) by using the first two energy levels. The first stage in the realization of this qubit was to trap and control a single electron. This is carried out thanks to a set of micro-fabricated electrodes defining a well of potential in which the electron is trapped. We are able with such a sample to trap and detect a variables number of electrons varying between one and around twenty. This then allowed us to study the static behaviour of a small number of electrons in a trap. They are supposed to crystallize and form structures called Wigner molecules. Such molecules have not yet been observed yet with electrons above helium. Our results bring circumstantial evidence for of Wigner crystallization. We then sought to characterize the qubit more precisely. We sought to carry out a projective reading (depending on the state of the qubit) and a measurement of the relaxation time. The results were obtained by exciting the electron with an incoherent electric field. A clean measurement of the relaxation time would require a coherent electric field. The conclusion cannot thus be final but it would seem that the relaxation time is shorter than calculated theoretically. That is perhaps due to a measurement of the relaxation between the oscillating states in the trap and not between the states of the qubit. (author)

  18. Parallel quantum computing in a single ensemble quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Guilu; Xiao, L.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a parallel quantum computing mode for ensemble quantum computer. In this mode, some qubits are in pure states while other qubits are in mixed states. It enables a single ensemble quantum computer to perform 'single-instruction-multidata' type of parallel computation. Parallel quantum computing can provide additional speedup in Grover's algorithm and Shor's algorithm. In addition, it also makes a fuller use of qubit resources in an ensemble quantum computer. As a result, some qubits discarded in the preparation of an effective pure state in the Schulman-Varizani and the Cleve-DiVincenzo algorithms can be reutilized

  19. RF Control and Measurement of Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-14

    Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics Using the Jaynes-Cummings Nonlinearity, Physical Review Letters, (10 2010): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.173601...unwanted classical backaction. We have realized a microwave quantum-limited amplifier that is directional and can therefore function without the...high fidelity qubit state measurement in circuit quantum electrodynamics , in the book Fluctuating Nonlinear Oscillators. From nanomechanics to quantum

  20. Teleportation of charge qubits via superradiance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.N.; Li, C.M.; Chuu, D.S.; Brandes, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Quantum entanglement has achieved a prime position in current research due to its central role in quantum information science, e.g., in quantum cryptography, quantum computing, and teleportation. Many efforts have been devoted to the study of entanglement induced by a direct interaction between the individual subsystems. Very recently, attention has been focused on 'reservoir-induced' entanglement with the purpose of shedding light on the generation of entangled qubits at remote separation. Entangled states can also be generated via sub- and superradiance, i.e. the collective spontaneous decay first introduced by Dicke. For the simplest case of two identical two level atoms interacting with the vacuum fluctuations of a common photon reservoir, entanglement naturally appears in the two intermediate states. An experimental demonstration of two-ion collective decay as a function of inter-ion separation was shown by Devoe and Brewer in 1996. Experiments of teleportation have already been realized in NMR, photonic, and atomic systems. Turning to solid state systems, however, experimental demonstration of teleportation in charge qubits is still lacking, and only few theoretical schemes are proposed. In this work, we propose a teleportation scheme for atomic and solid state qubits. First of all, singlet entangled state between two qubits is generated by superradiance. The unknown state in the third dot is then collective recombined with the exciton in one of the previous two dots. Successful teleportation is examined directly from the detection of a subradiant photon with long lifetime. In contrast to usual schemes, the remarkable feature of our proposal is the 'one-pass' teleportation by a joint measurement, and deserved to be tested with present technologies. (author)

  1. 133 Ba+: a new ion qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Justin; Hucul, David; Campbell, Wesley; Hudson, Eric

    2017-04-01

    133 Ba+ combines many of the advantages of commonly used trapped ion qubits. 133Ba+ has a nuclear spin 1/2, allowing for a robust hyperfine qubit with simple state preparation and readout. The existence of long-lived metastable D-states and a lack of low-lying F-states simplifies shelving, which will allow high fidelity state detection. The visible wavelength optical transitions enable the use of high-power lasers, low-loss fibers, high quantum efficiency detectors, and other optical technologies developed for visible wavelength light. Furthermore, background-free qubit readout, where the readout is insensitive to laser scatter, is possible in 133Ba+, and simplifies its use in small ion traps and the study of ions near surfaces. We report progress on realizing this qubit. We load barium ions into an ion trap using thermal ionization from a platinum ribbon. We experimentally demonstrate the isotopic purification of large numbers of barium ions using laser heating and cooling along with mass filtering to produce isotopically pure chains of any naturally-occurring barium isotope. This purification process has allowed us to laser cool rare, naturally-occurring barium isotopes 132Ba+and130Ba+, and we report the isotope shifts from 138Ba+ of the P1/2 to D3/2 transitions near 650 nm for the first time. In addition, we have developed an ion gun to produce high luminosity ion beams with adjustable mean kinetic energy by combining a surface ionization source and ion optics.

  2. Generation of concurrence between two qubits locally coupled to a one-dimensional spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Tanay; Dutta, Amit

    2016-08-01

    We consider a generalized central spin model, consisting of two central qubits and an environmental spin chain (with periodic boundary condition) to which these central qubits are locally and weakly connected either at the same site or at two different sites separated by a distance d . Our purpose is to study the subsequent temporal generation of entanglement, quantified by concurrence, when initially the qubits are in an unentangled state. In the equilibrium situation, we show that the concurrence survives for a larger value of d when the environmental spin chain is critical. Importantly, a common feature observed both in the equilibrium and the nonequilibrium situations while the latter is created by a sudden but global change of the environmental transverse field is that the two qubits become maximally entangled for the critical quenching. Following a nonequilibrium evolution of the spin chain, our study for d ≠0 indicates that there exists a threshold time above which concurrence attains a finite value. Additionally, we show that the number of independent decohering channels (DCs) is determined by d as well as the local difference of the transverse field of the two underlying Hamiltonians governing the time evolution; the concurrence can be enhanced by a higher number of independent channels. The qualitatively similar behavior displayed by the concurrence for critical and off-critical quenches, as reported here, is characterized by analyzing the nonequilibrium evolution of these channels. The concurrence is maximum when the decoherence factor or the echo associated with the most rapidly DC decays to zero; on the contrary, the condition when the concurrence vanishes is determined nontrivially by the associated decay of one of the intermediate DCs. Analyzing the reduced density of a single qubit, we also explain the observation that the dephasing rate is always slower than the unentanglement rate. We further establish that the maximally and minimally decohering

  3. Implementing a noise protected logical qubit in methyl groups via microwave irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annabestani, Razieh; Cory, David G.

    2018-02-01

    We propose a proof-of-principle experiment to encode one logical qubit in noise protected subspace of three identical spins in a methyl group. The symmetry analysis of the wavefunction shows that this fermionic system exhibits a symmetry correlation between the spatial degree of freedom and the spin degree of freedom. We show that one can use this correlation to populate the noiseless subsystem by relying on the interaction between the electric dipole moment of the methyl group with a circularly polarized microwave field. Logical gates are implemented by controlling both the intensity and phase of the applied field.

  4. Human α2-HS-glycoprotein: the A and B chains with a connecting sequence are encoded by a single mRNA transcript

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.C.; Bowman, B.H.; Yang, F.

    1987-01-01

    The α 2 -HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) is a plasma protein reported to play roles in bone mineralization and in the immune response. It is composed of two subunits, the A and B chains. Recombinant plasmids containing human cDNA AHSG have been isolated by screening an adult human liver library with a mixed oligonucleotide probe. The cDNA clones containing AHSG inserts span approximately 1.5 kilobase pairs and include the entire AHSG coding sequence, demonstrating that the A and B chains are encoded by a single mRNA transcript. The cDNA sequence predicts an 18-amino-acid signal peptide, followed by the A-chain sequence of AHSG. A heretofore unseen connecting sequence of 40 amino acids was deduced between the A- and B-chain sequences. The connecting sequence demonstrates the unique amino acid doublets and collagen triplets found in the A and B chains; it is not homologous with other reported amino acid sequences. The connecting sequence may be cleaved in a posttranslational step by limited proteolysis before mature AHSG is released into the circulation or may vary in its presence because of alternative processing. The AHSG cDNA was utilized for mapping the AHSG gene to the 3q21→qter region of human chromosome 3. The availability of the AHSG cDNA clone will facilitate the analysis of its genetic control and gene expression during development and bone formation

  5. Entanglement and the power of one qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Animesh; Flammia, Steven T.; Caves, Carlton M.

    2005-01-01

    The 'power of one qubit' refers to a computational model that has access to only one pure bit of quantum information, along with n qubits in the totally mixed state. This model, though not as powerful as a pure-state quantum computer, is capable of performing some computational tasks exponentially faster than any known classical algorithm. One such task is to estimate with fixed accuracy the normalized trace of a unitary operator that can be implemented efficiently in a quantum circuit. We show that circuits of this type generally lead to entangled states, and we investigate the amount of entanglement possible in such circuits, as measured by the multiplicative negativity. We show that the multiplicative negativity is bounded by a constant, independent of n, for all bipartite divisions of the n+1 qubits, and so becomes, when n is large, a vanishingly small fraction of the maximum possible multiplicative negativity for roughly equal divisions. This suggests that the global nature of entanglement is a more important resource for quantum computation than the magnitude of the entanglement

  6. Driven Nonlinear Dynamics of Two Coupled Exchange-Only Qubits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arijeet Pal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the creation of a fast exchange-only qubit [Medford et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 050501 (2013], we develop a theory describing the nonlinear dynamics of two such qubits that are capacitively coupled, when one of them is driven resonantly at a frequency equal to its level splitting. We include conditions of strong driving, where the Rabi frequency is a significant fraction of the level splitting, and we consider situations where the splitting for the second qubit may be the same as or different than the first. We demonstrate that coupling between qubits can be detected by reading the response of the second qubit, even when the coupling between them is only of about 1% of their level splittings, and we calculate entanglement between qubits. Patterns of nonlinear dynamics of coupled qubits and their entanglement are strongly dependent on the geometry of the system, and the specific mechanism of interqubit coupling deeply influences dynamics of both qubits. In particular, we describe the development of irregular dynamics in a two-qubit system, explore approaches for inhibiting it, and demonstrate the existence of an optimal range of coupling strength maintaining stability during the operational time.

  7. Quantum information transfer between topological and spin qubit systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leijnse, Martin; Flensberg, Karsten [Nano-Science Center and Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-07-01

    In this talk I introduce a method to coherently transfer quantum information, and to create entanglement, between topological qubits and conventional spin qubits. The transfer method uses gated control to transfer an electron (spin qubit) between a quantum dot and edge Majorana modes in adjacent topological superconductors. Because of the spin polarization of the Majorana modes, the electron transfer translates spin superposition states into superposition states of the Majorana system, and vice versa. Furthermore, I discuss how a topological superconductor can be used to facilitate long-distance quantum information transfer and entanglement between spatially separated spin qubits.

  8. Superconducting tunable flux qubit with direct readout scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarello, Fabio; Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Leoni, Roberto; Torrioli, Guido; Carelli, Pasquale; Cosmelli, Carlo; Gangemi, Lorenzo; Poletto, Stefano; Simeone, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    We describe a simple and efficient scheme for the readout of a tunable flux qubit, and present preliminary experimental tests for the preparation, manipulation and final readout of the qubit state, performed in the incoherent regime at liquid helium temperature. The tunable flux qubit is realized by a double SQUID with an extra Josephson junction inserted in the large superconducting loop, and the readout is performed by applying a current ramp to the junction and recording the value for which there is a voltage response, depending on the qubit state. This preliminary work indicates the feasibility and efficiency of the scheme

  9. Quantum dynamics of a two-atom-qubit system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Hieu; Nguyen Bich Ha; Le Thi Ha Linh

    2009-01-01

    A physical model of the quantum information exchange between two qubits is studied theoretically. The qubits are two identical two-level atoms, the physical mechanism of the quantum information exchange is the mutual dependence of the reduced density matrices of two qubits generated by their couplings with a multimode radiation field. The Lehmberg-Agarwal master equation is exactly solved. The explicit form of the mutual dependence of two reduced density matrices is established. The application to study the entanglement of two qubits is discussed.

  10. Memory coherence of a sympathetically cooled trapped-ion qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Home, J. P.; McDonnell, M. J.; Szwer, D. J.; Keitch, B. C.; Lucas, D. M.; Stacey, D. N.; Steane, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate sympathetic cooling of a 43 Ca + trapped-ion 'memory' qubit by a 40 Ca + 'coolant' ion sufficiently near the ground state of motion for fault-tolerant quantum logic, while maintaining coherence of the qubit. This is an essential ingredient in trapped-ion quantum computers. The isotope shifts are sufficient to suppress decoherence and phase shifts of the memory qubit due to the cooling light which illuminates both ions. We measure the qubit coherence during ten cycles of sideband cooling, finding a coherence loss of 3.3% per cooling cycle. The natural limit of the method is O(10 -4 ) infidelity per cooling cycle.

  11. Qubit lattice coherence induced by electromagnetic pulses in superconducting metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivić, Z; Lazarides, N; Tsironis, G P

    2016-07-12

    Quantum bits (qubits) are at the heart of quantum information processing schemes. Currently, solid-state qubits, and in particular the superconducting ones, seem to satisfy the requirements for being the building blocks of viable quantum computers, since they exhibit relatively long coherence times, extremely low dissipation, and scalability. The possibility of achieving quantum coherence in macroscopic circuits comprising Josephson junctions, envisioned by Legett in the 1980's, was demonstrated for the first time in a charge qubit; since then, the exploitation of macroscopic quantum effects in low-capacitance Josephson junction circuits allowed for the realization of several kinds of superconducting qubits. Furthermore, coupling between qubits has been successfully achieved that was followed by the construction of multiple-qubit logic gates and the implementation of several algorithms. Here it is demonstrated that induced qubit lattice coherence as well as two remarkable quantum coherent optical phenomena, i.e., self-induced transparency and Dicke-type superradiance, may occur during light-pulse propagation in quantum metamaterials comprising superconducting charge qubits. The generated qubit lattice pulse forms a compound "quantum breather" that propagates in synchrony with the electromagnetic pulse. The experimental confirmation of such effects in superconducting quantum metamaterials may open a new pathway to potentially powerful quantum computing.

  12. Universal and Deterministic Manipulation of the Quantum State of Harmonic Oscillators: A Route to Unitary Gates for Fock State Qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Marcelo Franca

    2005-01-01

    We present a simple quantum circuit that allows for the universal and deterministic manipulation of the quantum state of confined harmonic oscillators. The scheme is based on the selective interactions of the referred oscillator with an auxiliary three-level system and a classical external driving source, and enables any unitary operations on Fock states, two by two. One circuit is equivalent to a single qubit unitary logical gate on Fock states qubits. Sequences of similar protocols allow for complete, deterministic, and state-independent manipulation of the harmonic oscillator quantum state

  13. The Topological Basis Realization for Six Qubits and the Corresponding Heisenberg Spin -{1/2} Chain Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyin; Teng, Yue; Meng, Yanli; Wang, Gangcheng; Sun, Chunfang; Xue, Kang

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we construct a new set of orthonormal topological basis states for six qubits with the topological single loop d = 2. By acting on the subspace, we get a new five-dimensional (5D) reduced matrix. In addition, it is shown that the Heisenberg XXX spin-1/2 chain of six qubits can be constructed from the Temperley-Lieb algebra (TLA) generator, both the energy ground state and the spin singlet states of the system can be described by the set of topological basis states.

  14. Probabilistic Broadcast-Based Multiparty Remote State Preparation scheme via Four-Qubit Cluster State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun-Jing; Tao, Yuan-Hong

    2018-02-01

    In this letter,we propose a broadcast-based multiparty remote state preparation scheme which realizes the process among three participants. It allows two distant receivers to obtain the arbitrary single-qubit states separately and simultaneously, and the success probability is {d2}/{1+d2}, thus generalize the results in Yu et al. (Quantum. Inf. Process 16(2), 41, 2017).

  15. Coherent Control of a Single Trapped Rydberg Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Gerard; Pokorny, Fabian; Zhang, Chi; Bodart, Quentin; Hennrich, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Trapped Rydberg ions are a promising novel approach to quantum computing and simulations. They are envisaged to combine the exquisite control of trapped ion qubits with the fast two-qubit Rydberg gates already demonstrated in neutral atom experiments. Coherent Rydberg excitation is a key requirement for these gates. Here, we carry out the first coherent Rydberg excitation of an ion and perform a single-qubit Rydberg gate, thus demonstrating basic elements of a trapped Rydberg ion quantum computer.

  16. RNA-Seq-based analysis of cold shock response in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, a bacterium harboring a single cold shock protein encoding gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although cold shock responses and the roles of cold shock proteins in microorganisms containing multiple cold shock protein genes have been well characterized, related studies on bacteria possessing a single cold shock protein gene have not been reported. Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4, a thermophile harboring only one known cold shock protein gene (TtescpC, can survive from 50° to 80 °C, but has poor natural competence under cold shock at 50 °C. We therefore examined cold shock responses and their effect on natural competence in this bacterium. RESULTS: The transcriptomes of T. tengcongensis before and after cold shock were analyzed by RNA-seq and over 1200 differentially expressed genes were successfully identified. These genes were involved in a wide range of biological processes, including modulation of DNA replication, recombination, and repair; energy metabolism; production of cold shock protein; synthesis of branched amino acids and branched-chain fatty acids; and sporulation. RNA-seq analysis also suggested that T. tengcongensis initiates cell wall and membrane remodeling processes, flagellar assembly, and sporulation in response to low temperature. Expression profiles of TtecspC and failed attempts to produce a TtecspC knockout strain confirmed the essential role of TteCspC in the cold shock response, and also suggested a role of this protein in survival at optimum growth temperature. Repression of genes encoding ComEA and ComEC and low energy metabolism levels in cold-shocked cells are the likely basis of poor natural competence at low temperature. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated changes in global gene expression under cold shock and identified several candidate genes related to cold shock in T. tengcongensis. At the same time, the relationship between cold shock response and poor natural competence at low temperature was preliminarily elucidated. These findings provide a foundation for future studies on genetic

  17. Dephasing of a qubit due to quantum and classical noise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The qubit (or a system of two quantum dots) has become a standard paradigm for studying quantum information processes. Our focus is decoherence due to interaction of the qubit with its environment, leading to noise. We consider quantum noise generated by a dissipative quantum bath. A detailed comparative study with ...

  18. Towards long lived tunable transmon qubit in microstrip geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braumueller, Jochen; Radtke, Lucas; Rotzinger, Hannes; Weides, Martin; Ustinov, Alexey V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Physikalisches Institut, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Qubits constitute the main building blocks of a prospective quantum computer. One main challenge is given by short decoherence times. In this work we investigate a transmon qubit based on a superconducting charge qubit with reduced sensitivity to charge noise. This is achieved by operating the qubit at a Josephson to charging energy ratio of about 100. At the same time, a sufficiently large anharmonicity of the energy levels is preserved. The qubit is realized in a 2D geometry based on large capacitor pads being connected by two Josephson junctions in parallel. This split Josephson junction allows the qubit to be tunable in Josephson energy and therefore in resonance frequency. The large area capacitor pads mainly coupled through the substrate and a backside metalization reduce the surface loss contribution. Manipulation and readout of the qubit is mediated by a microstrip resonator coupled to a feedline. We present resonator and qubit designs together with respective microwave simulations. Preliminary results on circuit fabrication and low temperature measurements are also discussed.

  19. Decoherence patterns of topological qubits from Majorana modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Shih-Hao; Chao, Sung-Po; Chou, Chung-Hsien; Lin, Feng-Li

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the decoherence patterns of topological qubits in contact with the environment using a novel way of deriving the open system dynamics, rather than using the Feynman–Vernon approach. Each topological qubit is made up of two Majorana modes of a 1D Kitaev chain. These two Majorana modes interact with the environment in an incoherent way which yields peculiar decoherence patterns of the topological qubit. More specifically, we consider the open system dynamics of topological qubits which are weakly coupled to fermionic/bosonic Ohmic-like environments. We find atypical patterns of quantum decoherence. In contrast to the case for non-topological qubits—which always decohere completely in all Ohmic-like environments—topological qubits decohere completely in Ohmic and sub-Ohmic environments but not in super-Ohmic ones. Moreover, we find that the fermion parities of the topological qubits, though they cannot prevent the qubit states from exhibiting decoherence in sub-Ohmic environments, can prevent thermalization turning the state into a Gibbs state. We also study the cases in which each Majorana mode can couple to different Ohmic-like environments, and the time dependence of concurrence for two topological qubits. (paper)

  20. Entanglement-based linear-optical qubit amplifier

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meyer-Scott, E.; Bula, M.; Bartkiewicz, K.; Černoch, Antonín; Soubusta, Jan; Jennewein, T.; Lemr, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 1 (2013), "012327-1"-"012327-7" ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : quantum physics * photonics qubits * qubit amplifier Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.991, year: 2013

  1. Hierarchical Controlled Remote State Preparation by Using a Four-Qubit Cluster State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Gui-Bin; Li, Xiao-Wei; Zhan, You-Bang

    2018-02-01

    We propose a scheme for hierarchical controlled remote preparation of an arbitrary single-qubit state via a four-qubit cluster state as the quantum channel. In this scheme, a sender wishes to help three agents to remotely prepare a quantum state, respectively. The three agents are divided into two grades, that is, an agent is in the upper grade and other two agents are in the lower grade. In this process of remote state preparation, the agent of the upper grade only needs the assistance of any one of the other two agents for recovering the sender's original state, while an agent of the lower grade needs the collaboration of all the other two agents. In other words, the agents of two grades have different authorities to reconstruct sender's original state.

  2. Flying spin-qubit gates implemented through Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, S.J.; Yang, Z.Q.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical scheme is proposed to implement flying spin-qubit gates based on two semiconductor wires with Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit couplings (SOCs), respectively. It is found that under the manipulation of the Dresselhaus/Rashba SOC, spin rotates around x/y axis in the three-dimensional spin space. By combining the two kinds of manipulations, i.e. connecting the two kinds of semiconductor wires in series, we obtain a universal set of losses flying single-qubit gates including Hadamard, phase, and π/8 gates. A ballistic switching effect of electronic flow is also found in the investigation. Our results may be useful in future spin or nanoscale electronics

  3. Two-Party Quantum Private Comparison with Five-Qubit Entangled States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tian-Yu; Ji, Zhao-Xu

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a two-party quantum private comparison (QPC) protocol is proposed by using five-qubit entangled states as the quantum resource. The proposed protocol needs the help from a semi-honest third party (TP), who is allowed to misbehave on his own but not allowed to conspire with the adversary including the dishonest user. The proposed protocol has the following distinct features: (1) One five-qubit entangled state can be used to achieve the equality comparison of two bits in each round of comparison; (2) Neither unitary operations nor quantum entanglement swapping technology is needed, both of which may consume expensive quantum devices; (3) Only Bell measurements and single-particle measurements are employed, both of which can be realized with current quantum technologies; (4) The security toward both the outside attack and the participant attack can be guaranteed; (5) The private information of two parties is not leaked out to TP.

  4. Background Noise Analysis in a Few-Photon-Level Qubit Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittiga, Thomas; Kupchak, Connor; Jordaan, Bertus; Namazi, Mehdi; Nolleke, Christian; Figeroa, Eden

    2014-05-01

    We have developed an Electromagnetically Induced Transparency based polarization qubit memory. The device is composed of a dual-rail probe field polarization setup colinear with an intense control field to store and retrieve any arbitrary polarization state by addressing a Λ-type energy level scheme in a 87Rb vapor cell. To achieve a signal-to-background ratio at the few photon level sufficient for polarization tomography of the retrieved state, the intense control field is filtered out through an etalon filtrating system. We have developed an analytical model predicting the influence of the signal-to-background ratio on the fidelities and compared it to experimental data. Experimentally measured global fidelities have been found to follow closely the theoretical prediction as signal-to-background decreases. These results suggest the plausibility of employing room temperature memories to store photonic qubits at the single photon level and for future applications in long distance quantum communication schemes.

  5. Fully connected network of superconducting qubits in a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsomokos, Dimitris I; Ashhab, Sahel; Nori, Franco

    2008-01-01

    A fully connected qubit network is considered, where every qubit interacts with every other one. When the interactions between the qubits are homogeneous, the system is a special case of the finite Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick (LMG) model. We propose a natural implementation of this model using superconducting qubits in state-of-the-art circuit QED. The ground state, the low-lying energy spectrum and the dynamical evolution are investigated. We find that, under realistic conditions, highly entangled states of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) and W types can be generated. We also comment on the influence of disorder on the system and discuss the possibility of simulating complex quantum systems, such as Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) spin glasses, with superconducting qubit networks.

  6. Multi-qubit circuit quantum electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viehmann, Oliver

    2013-09-03

    Circuit QED systems are macroscopic, man-made quantum systems in which superconducting artificial atoms, also called Josephson qubits, interact with a quantized electromagnetic field. These systems have been devised to mimic the physics of elementary quantum optical systems with real atoms in a scalable and more flexible framework. This opens up a variety of possible applications of circuit QED systems. For instance, they provide a promising platform for processing quantum information. Recent years have seen rapid experimental progress on these systems, and experiments with multi-component circuit QED architectures are currently starting to come within reach. In this thesis, circuit QED systems with multiple Josephson qubits are studied theoretically. We focus on simple and experimentally realistic extensions of the currently operated circuit QED setups and pursue investigations in two main directions. First, we consider the equilibrium behavior of circuit QED systems containing a large number of mutually noninteracting Josephson charge qubits. The currently accepted standard description of circuit QED predicts the possibility of superradiant phase transitions in such systems. However, a full microscopic treatment shows that a no-go theorem for superradiant phase transitions known from atomic physics applies to circuit QED systems as well. This reveals previously unknown limitations of the applicability of the standard theory of circuit QED to multi-qubit systems. Second, we explore the potential of circuit QED for quantum simulations of interacting quantum many-body systems. We propose and analyze a circuit QED architecture that implements the quantum Ising chain in a time-dependent transverse magnetic field. Our setup can be used to study quench dynamics, the propagation of localized excitations, and other non-equilibrium features in this paradigmatic model in the theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics and quantumcritical phenomena. The setup is based on a

  7. Quantum gambling using mesoscopic ring qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakula, Ireneusz

    2007-01-01

    Quantum Game Theory provides us with new tools for practising games and some other risk related enterprices like, for example, gambling. The two party gambling protocol presented by Goldenberg et al. is one of the simplest yet still hard to implementapplications of Quantum Game Theory. We propose potential physical realisation of the quantum gambling protocol with use of three mesoscopic ring qubits. We point out problems in implementation of such game. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Analytical modeling of parametrically modulated transmon qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Nicolas; Sete, Eyob A.; da Silva, Marcus P.; Rigetti, Chad

    2018-02-01

    Building a scalable quantum computer requires developing appropriate models to understand and verify its complex quantum dynamics. We focus on superconducting quantum processors based on transmons for which full numerical simulations are already challenging at the level of qubytes. It is thus highly desirable to develop accurate methods of modeling qubit networks that do not rely solely on numerical computations. Using systematic perturbation theory to large orders in the transmon regime, we derive precise analytic expressions of the transmon parameters. We apply our results to the case of parametrically modulated transmons to study recently implemented, parametrically activated entangling gates.

  9. Multi-qubit circuit quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viehmann, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Circuit QED systems are macroscopic, man-made quantum systems in which superconducting artificial atoms, also called Josephson qubits, interact with a quantized electromagnetic field. These systems have been devised to mimic the physics of elementary quantum optical systems with real atoms in a scalable and more flexible framework. This opens up a variety of possible applications of circuit QED systems. For instance, they provide a promising platform for processing quantum information. Recent years have seen rapid experimental progress on these systems, and experiments with multi-component circuit QED architectures are currently starting to come within reach. In this thesis, circuit QED systems with multiple Josephson qubits are studied theoretically. We focus on simple and experimentally realistic extensions of the currently operated circuit QED setups and pursue investigations in two main directions. First, we consider the equilibrium behavior of circuit QED systems containing a large number of mutually noninteracting Josephson charge qubits. The currently accepted standard description of circuit QED predicts the possibility of superradiant phase transitions in such systems. However, a full microscopic treatment shows that a no-go theorem for superradiant phase transitions known from atomic physics applies to circuit QED systems as well. This reveals previously unknown limitations of the applicability of the standard theory of circuit QED to multi-qubit systems. Second, we explore the potential of circuit QED for quantum simulations of interacting quantum many-body systems. We propose and analyze a circuit QED architecture that implements the quantum Ising chain in a time-dependent transverse magnetic field. Our setup can be used to study quench dynamics, the propagation of localized excitations, and other non-equilibrium features in this paradigmatic model in the theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics and quantumcritical phenomena. The setup is based on a

  10. Trichromatic Open Digraphs for Understanding Qubits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Lang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a trichromatic graphical calculus for quantum computing. The generators represent three complementary observables that are treated on equal footing, hence reflecting the symmetries of the Bloch sphere. We derive the Euler angle decomposition of the Hadamard gate within it as well as the so-called supplementary relationships, which are valid equations for qubits that were not derivable within Z/X-calculus of Coecke and Duncan. More specifically, we have: dichromatic Z/X-calculus + Euler angle decomposition of the Hadamard gate = trichromatic calculus.

  11. Protocol for counterfactually transporting an unknown qubit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim eSalih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum teleportation circumvents the uncertainty principle using dual channels: a quantum one consisting of previously-shared entanglement, and a classical one, together allowing the disembodied transport of an unknown quantum state over distance. It has recently been shown that a classical bit can be counterfactually communicated between two parties in empty space, Alice and Bob. Here, by using our dual version of the chained quantum Zeno effect to achieve a counterfactual CNOT gate, we propose a protocol for transporting an unknown qubit counterfactually, that is without any physical particles travelling between Alice and Bob—no classical channel and no previously-shared entanglement.

  12. Entanglement of mixed quantum states for qubits and qudit in double photoionization of atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, M., E-mail: bminakshi@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Asansol Girls’ College, Asansol 713304 (India); Sen, S. [Department of Physics, Triveni Devi Bhalotia College, Raniganj 713347 (India)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We study tripartite entanglement between two electronic qubits and an ionic qudit. • We study bipartite entanglement between any two subsystems of a tripartite system. • We have presented a quantitative application of entangled properties in Neon atom. - Abstract: Quantum entanglement and its paradoxical properties are genuine physical resources for various quantum information tasks like quantum teleportation, quantum cryptography, and quantum computer technology. The physical characteristic of the entanglement of quantum-mechanical states, both for pure and mixed, has been recognized as a central resource in various aspects of quantum information processing. In this article, we study the bipartite entanglement of one electronic qubit along with the ionic qudit and also entanglement between two electronic qubits. The tripartite entanglement properties also have been investigated between two electronic qubits and an ionic qudit. All these studies have been done for the single-step double photoionization from an atom following the absorption of a single photon without observing spin orbit interaction. The dimension of the Hilbert space of the qudit depends upon the electronic state of the residual photoion A{sup 2+}. In absence of SOI, when Russell–Saunders coupling (L–S coupling) is applicable, dimension of the qudit is equal to the spin multiplicity of A{sup 2+}. For estimations of entanglement and mixedness, we consider the Peres–Horodecki condition, concurrence, entanglement of formation, negativity, linear and von Neumann entropies. In case of L–S coupling, all the properties of a qubit–qudit system can be predicted merely with the knowledge of the spins of the target atom and the residual photoion.

  13. Economic scheme for remote preparation of an arbitrary five-qubit ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A scheme for remotely preparing an arbitrary five-qubit Brown state by using three three-qubit GHZ states as the quantum channel is proposed. It is shown that, after the sender per- forms two different three-qubit projective measurements, the receiver should introduce two auxiliary qubits and employ suitable ...

  14. Approaching unit visibility for control of a superconducting qubit with dispersive readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallraff, A; Schuster, D I; Blais, A; Frunzio, L; Majer, J; Devoret, M H; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2005-08-05

    In a Rabi oscillation experiment with a superconducting qubit we show that a visibility in the qubit excited state population of more than 95% can be attained. We perform a dispersive measurement of the qubit state by coupling the qubit non-resonantly to a transmission line resonator and probing the resonator transmission spectrum. The measurement process is well characterized and quantitatively understood. In a measurement of Ramsey fringes, the qubit coherence time is larger than 500 ns.

  15. The Design of Control Pulses for Heisenberg Always-On Qubit Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Rudolph

    2015-03-01

    One model for a universal quantum computer is a spin array with constant nearest neighbor interactions and a controlled unidirectional site-specific magnetic field to generate unitary transformations. This system can be described by a Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian and can be simulated for on the order of 50 spins. It has recently been shown that time-dependent density functional inspired methods may be used to relate various spin models of qubits to ones that may be easier to compute numerically allowing potentially the efficient simulation of greater numbers of spins. One of the challenges of such an agenda is the identification of control pulses that produce desired gate operations (CNOT and single qubit phase gates). We apply control theory to design a universal set of pulses for a Heisenberg always-on model Hamiltonian for a few qubits and compare to known pulses when available. We suggest how this approach may be useful to design control pulses in other realistic designs. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Reflective Amplification without Population Inversion from a Strongly Driven Superconducting Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, P. Y.; Kockum, A. F.; Ian, H.; Chen, J. C.; Nori, F.; Hoi, I.-C.

    2018-02-01

    Amplification of optical or microwave fields is often achieved by strongly driving a medium to induce population inversion such that a weak probe can be amplified through stimulated emission. Here we strongly couple a superconducting qubit, an artificial atom, to the field in a semi-infinite waveguide. When driving the qubit strongly on resonance such that a Mollow triplet appears, we observe a 7% amplitude gain for a weak probe at frequencies in between the triplet. This amplification is not due to population inversion, neither in the bare qubit basis nor in the dressed-state basis, but instead results from a four-photon process that converts energy from the strong drive to the weak probe. We find excellent agreement between the experimental results and numerical simulations without any free fitting parameters. Since our device consists of a single two-level artificial atom, the simplest possible quantum system, it can be viewed as the most fundamental version of a four-wave-mixing parametric amplifier.

  17. Efficient experimental design of high-fidelity three-qubit quantum gates via genetic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devra, Amit; Prabhu, Prithviraj; Singh, Harpreet; Arvind; Dorai, Kavita

    2018-03-01

    We have designed efficient quantum circuits for the three-qubit Toffoli (controlled-controlled-NOT) and the Fredkin (controlled-SWAP) gate, optimized via genetic programming methods. The gates thus obtained were experimentally implemented on a three-qubit NMR quantum information processor, with a high fidelity. Toffoli and Fredkin gates in conjunction with the single-qubit Hadamard gates form a universal gate set for quantum computing and are an essential component of several quantum algorithms. Genetic algorithms are stochastic search algorithms based on the logic of natural selection and biological genetics and have been widely used for quantum information processing applications. We devised a new selection mechanism within the genetic algorithm framework to select individuals from a population. We call this mechanism the "Luck-Choose" mechanism and were able to achieve faster convergence to a solution using this mechanism, as compared to existing selection mechanisms. The optimization was performed under the constraint that the experimentally implemented pulses are of short duration and can be implemented with high fidelity. We demonstrate the advantage of our pulse sequences by comparing our results with existing experimental schemes and other numerical optimization methods.

  18. Long-Distance Entanglement of Spin Qubits via Ferromagnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Trifunovic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose a mechanism of coherent coupling between distant spin qubits interacting dipolarly with a ferromagnet. We derive an effective two-spin interaction Hamiltonian and find a regime where the dynamics is coherent. Finally, we present a sequence for the implementation of the entangling controlled-not gate and estimate the corresponding operation time to be a few tens of nanoseconds. A particularly promising application of our proposal is to atomistic spin qubits such as silicon-based qubits and nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to which existing coupling schemes do not apply.

  19. Controlling the spontaneous emission of a superconducting transmon qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, A A; Schreier, J A; Johnson, B R; Chow, J M; Koch, Jens; Gambetta, J M; Schuster, D I; Frunzio, L; Devoret, M H; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2008-08-22

    We present a detailed characterization of coherence in seven transmon qubits in a circuit QED architecture. We find that spontaneous emission rates are strongly influenced by far off-resonant modes of the cavity and can be understood within a semiclassical circuit model. A careful analysis of the spontaneous qubit decay into a microwave transmission-line cavity can accurately predict the qubit lifetimes over 2 orders of magnitude in time and more than an octave in frequency. Coherence times T1 and T_{2};{*} of more than a microsecond are reproducibly demonstrated.

  20. Energy flow in a dispersive qubit read-out

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuorila, Jani; Thuneberg, Erkki [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, FI-90014 (Finland)], E-mail: jani.tuorila@oulu.fi

    2009-02-01

    We analyze a superconducting charge qubit that is dispersively coupled to an electric resonator. The system is connected to a transmission line that allows a reflection measurement. In this paper we derive the equations of motion of the system by using the quantum network theory. We assume that the measurement signal is so strong that the resonator behaves classically. The time evolution of the qubit is calculated with the Bloch equations. We have simulated the system in the adiabatic eigenbasis of the qubit to bring out the effects of the changing band curvatures under strong driving. We use circuit theory to calculate the energy flow in different parts of the circuit.

  1. Local unitary representation of braids and N-qubit entanglements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Wei

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, by utilizing the idea of stabilizer codes, we give some relationships between one local unitary representation of braid group in N-qubit tensor space and the corresponding entanglement properties of the N-qubit pure state |Ψ >, where the N-qubit state |Ψ > is obtained by applying the braiding operation on the natural basis. Specifically, we show that the separability of |Ψ > =B|0> ^{⊗ N} is closely related to the diagrammatic version of the braid operator B. This may provide us more insights about the topological entanglement and quantum entanglement.

  2. Implementation of the Grover search algorithm with Josephson charge qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Xiaohu; Dong Ping; Xue Zhengyuan; Cao Zhuoliang

    2007-01-01

    A scheme of implementing the Grover search algorithm based on Josephson charge qubits has been proposed, which would be a key step to scale more complex quantum algorithms and very important for constructing a real quantum computer via Josephson charge qubits. The present scheme is simple but fairly efficient, and easily manipulated because any two-charge-qubit can be selectively and effectively coupled by a common inductance. More manipulations can be carried out before decoherence sets in. Our scheme can be realized within the current technology

  3. Three qubit entanglement within graphical Z/X-calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Coecke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The compositional techniques of categorical quantum mechanics are applied to analyse 3-qubit quantum entanglement. In particular the graphical calculus of complementary observables and corresponding phases due to Duncan and one of the authors is used to construct representative members of the two genuinely tripartite SLOCC classes of 3-qubit entangled states, GHZ and W. This nicely illustrates the respectively pairwise and global tripartite entanglement found in the W- and GHZ-class states. A new concept of supplementarity allows us to characterise inhabitants of the W class within the abstract diagrammatic calculus; these method extends to more general multipartite qubit states.

  4. Single-nucleotide variations in the genes encoding the mitochondrial Hsp60/Hsp10 chaperone system and their disease-causing potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bross, Peter; Li, Zhijie; Hansen, Jakob; Hansen, Jens Jacob; Nielsen, Marit Nyholm; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Georgopoulos, Costa; Ang, Debbie; Lundemose, Jytte Banner; Niezen-Koning, Klary; Eiberg, Hans; Yang, Huanming; Kolvraa, Steen; Bolund, Lars; Gregersen, Niels

    Molecular chaperones assist protein folding, and variations in their encoding genes may be disease-causing in themselves or influence the phenotypic expression of disease-associated or susceptibility-conferring variations in many different genes. We have screened three candidate patient groups for

  5. Online evolution reconstruction from a single measurement record with random time intervals for quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Su, Yang; Wang, Rong; Zhu, Yong; Shen, Huiping; Pu, Tao; Wu, Chuanxin; Zhao, Jiyong; Zhang, Baofu; Xu, Zhiyong

    2017-10-01

    Online reconstruction of a time-variant quantum state from the encoding/decoding results of quantum communication is addressed by developing a method of evolution reconstruction from a single measurement record with random time intervals. A time-variant two-dimensional state is reconstructed on the basis of recovering its expectation value functions of three nonorthogonal projectors from a random single measurement record, which is composed from the discarded qubits of the six-state protocol. The simulated results prove that our method is robust to typical metro quantum channels. Our work extends the Fourier-based method of evolution reconstruction from the version for a regular single measurement record with equal time intervals to a unified one, which can be applied to arbitrary single measurement records. The proposed protocol of evolution reconstruction runs concurrently with the one of quantum communication, which can facilitate the online quantum tomography.

  6. One-Step Generation of Multi-Qubit GHZ and W States in Superconducting Transmon Qubit System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Guilong; Huang Shousheng; Wang Mingfeng; Jiang Nianquan; Cai Genchang

    2012-01-01

    We propose a one-step method to prepare multi-qubit GHZ and W states with transmon qubits capacitively coupled to a superconducting transmission line resonator (TLR). Compared with the scheme firstly introduced by Wang et al. [Phys. Rev. B 81 (2010) 104524], our schemes have longer dephasing time and much shorter operation time because the transmon qubits we used are not only more robust to the decoherence and the unavoidable parameter variations, but also have much stronger coupling constant with TLR. Based on the favourable properties of transmons and TLR, our method is more feasible in experiment. (general)

  7. Andreev spin qubits in multichannel Rashba nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunghun; Yeyati, A. Levy

    2017-09-01

    We theoretically analyze the Andreev bound states and their coupling to external radiation in superconductor-nanowire-superconductor Josephson junctions. We provide an effective Hamiltonian for the junction projected onto the Andreev level subspace and incorporating the effects of nanowire multichannel structure, Rashba spin-orbit coupling, and Zeeman field. Based on this effective model, we investigate the dependence of the Andreev levels and the matrix elements of the current operator on system parameters such as chemical potential, nanowire dimensions, and normal transmission. We show that the combined effect of the multichannel structure and the spin-orbit coupling gives rise to finite current matrix elements between odd-parity states having different spin polarizations. Moreover, our analytical results allow to determine the appropriate parameters range for the detection of transitions between even as well as odd states in circuit-QED-like experiments, which may provide a way for the Andreev spin-qubit manipulation.

  8. Random frequency modulation of a superconducting qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveri, Matti; Li, Jian; Sampath, Karthikeyan; Pirkkalainen, Juha-Matti; Vepsäläinen, Antti; Chien, Wei-Cheng; Tuorila, Jani; Sillanpää, Mika; Hakonen, Pertti; Thuneberg, Erkki; Paraoanu, Gheorghe

    2013-03-01

    Superconducting circuits with Josephson junctions are a promising platform not only for developing quantum technologies, but, importantly, also for the study of effects that typically occur in complex condensed-matter systems. Here, we employ a transmon qubit to conduct an analog simulation of motional averaging, a phenomenon initially observed in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. To realize this effect, the flux bias of the transmon is modulated by a controllable pseudo-random telegraph noise, which results in stochastic jumping of the energy separation (frequency) between two discrete values. This can also be seen as a simulated fast-fluctuation environment under direct experimental control. Additionally, we discuss the population dynamics using an analytical master equation, and apply the motional averaging analysis on phenomena where the fluctuation of the energy is due to quasiparticles or to photon shot noise.

  9. Overlap junctions for high coherence superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X.; Long, J. L.; Ku, H. S.; Lake, R. E.; Bal, M.; Pappas, D. P.

    2017-07-01

    Fabrication of sub-micron Josephson junctions is demonstrated using standard processing techniques for high-coherence, superconducting qubits. These junctions are made in two separate lithography steps with normal-angle evaporation. Most significantly, this work demonstrates that it is possible to achieve high coherence with junctions formed on aluminum surfaces cleaned in situ by Ar plasma before junction oxidation. This method eliminates the angle-dependent shadow masks typically used for small junctions. Therefore, this is conducive to the implementation of typical methods for improving margins and yield using conventional CMOS processing. The current method uses electron-beam lithography and an additive process to define the top and bottom electrodes. Extension of this work to optical lithography and subtractive processes is discussed.

  10. Teleportation of a two-qubit arbitrary unknown state using a four-qubit genuine entangled state with the combination of bell-state measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Li; Xiu, Xiao-Ming, E-mail: xiuxiaomingdl@126.com [Dalian University of Technology, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology (China); Ren, Yuan-Peng [Bohai University, Higher Professional Technical Institute (China); Gao, Ya-Jun [Bohai University, College of Mathematics and Physics (China); Yi, X. X. [Dalian University of Technology, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology (China)

    2013-01-15

    We propose a protocol transferring an arbitrary unknown two-qubit state using the quantum channel of a four-qubit genuine entangled state. Simplifying the four-qubit joint measurement to the combination of Bell-state measurements, it can be realized more easily with currently available technologies.

  11. Qubit transport model for unitary black hole evaporation without firewalls*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuga, Kento; Page, Don N.

    2018-03-01

    We give an explicit toy qubit transport model for transferring information from the gravitational field of a black hole to the Hawking radiation by a continuous unitary transformation of the outgoing radiation and the black hole gravitational field. The model has no firewalls or other drama at the event horizon, and it avoids a counterargument that has been raised for subsystem transfer models as resolutions of the firewall paradox. Furthermore, it fits the set of six physical constraints that Giddings has proposed for models of black hole evaporation. It does utilize nonlocal qubits for the gravitational field but assumes that the radiation interacts locally with these nonlocal qubits, so in some sense the nonlocality is confined to the gravitational sector. Although the qubit model is too crude to be quantitatively correct for the detailed spectrum of Hawking radiation, it fits qualitatively with what is expected.

  12. Reduced phase error through optimized control of a superconducting qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero, Erik; Kelly, Julian; Bialczak, Radoslaw C.; Lenander, Mike; Mariantoni, Matteo; Neeley, Matthew; O'Connell, A. D.; Sank, Daniel; Wang, H.; Weides, Martin; Wenner, James; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Minimizing phase and other errors in experimental quantum gates allows higher fidelity quantum processing. To quantify and correct for phase errors, in particular, we have developed an experimental metrology - amplified phase error (APE) pulses - that amplifies and helps identify phase errors in general multilevel qubit architectures. In order to correct for both phase and amplitude errors specific to virtual transitions and leakage outside of the qubit manifold, we implement 'half derivative', an experimental simplification of derivative reduction by adiabatic gate (DRAG) control theory. The phase errors are lowered by about a factor of five using this method to ∼1.6 deg. per gate, and can be tuned to zero. Leakage outside the qubit manifold, to the qubit |2> state, is also reduced to ∼10 -4 for 20% faster gates.

  13. Quantum Zeno Effects from Measurement Controlled Qubit-Bath Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, P. M.; Monroe, J. T.; Murch, K. W.

    2017-06-01

    The Zeno and anti-Zeno effects are features of measurement-driven quantum evolution where frequent measurement inhibits or accelerates the decay of a quantum state. Either type of evolution can emerge depending on the system-environment interaction and measurement method. In this experiment, we use a superconducting qubit to map out both types of Zeno effect in the presence of structured noise baths and variable measurement rates. We observe both the suppression and acceleration of qubit decay as repeated measurements are used to modulate the qubit spectrum causing the qubit to sample different portions of the bath. We compare the Zeno effects arising from dispersive energy measurements and purely dephasing "quasimeasurements," showing energy measurements are not necessary to accelerate or suppress the decay process.

  14. Entanglement and discord for qubits and higher spin systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-26

    . A specific example is of entanglement decay resulting from a simple dissipative process and how to alter that decay. An analytical prescription for computing quantum discord when a qubit (spin-1/2 or two-level quantum ...

  15. Equation of motion for estimation fidelity of monitored oscillating qubits

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bassa, H

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We study the convergence properties of state estimates of an oscillating qubit being monitored by a sequence of discrete, unsharp measurements. Our method derives a differential equation determining the evolution of the estimation fidelity from a...

  16. Nonlinearities in the quantum measurement process of superconducting qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serban, Ioana

    2008-05-15

    The work described in this thesis focuses on the investigation of decoherence and measurement backaction, on the theoretical description of measurement schemes and their improvement. The study presented here is centered around quantum computing implementations using superconducting devices and most important, the Josephson effect. The measured system is invariantly a qubit, i. e. a two-level system. The objective is to study detectors with increasing nonlinearity, e. g. coupling of the qubit to the frequency a driven oscillator, or to the bifurcation amplifier, to determine the performance and backaction of the detector on the measured system and to investigate the importance of a strong qubit-detector coupling for the achievement of a quantum non-demolition type of detection. The first part gives a very basic introduction to quantum information, briefly reviews some of the most promising physical implementations of a quantum computer before focusing on the superconducting devices. The second part presents a series of studies of different qubit measurements, describing the backaction of the measurement onto the measured system and the internal dynamics of the detector. Methodology adapted from quantum optics and chemical physics (master equations, phase-space analysis etc.) combined with the representation of a complex environment yielded a tool capable of describing a nonlinear, non-Markovian environment, which couples arbitrarily strongly to the measured system. This is described in chapter 3. Chapter 4 focuses on the backaction on the qubit and presents novel insights into the qubit dephasing in the strong coupling regime. Chapter 5 uses basically the same system and technical tools to explore the potential of a fast, strong, indirect measurement, and determine how close such a detection would ideally come to the quantum non-demolition regime. Chapter 6 focuses on the internal dynamics of a strongly driven Josephson junction. The analytical results are based on

  17. Nonlinearities in the quantum measurement process of superconducting qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serban, Ioana

    2008-05-01

    The work described in this thesis focuses on the investigation of decoherence and measurement backaction, on the theoretical description of measurement schemes and their improvement. The study presented here is centered around quantum computing implementations using superconducting devices and most important, the Josephson effect. The measured system is invariantly a qubit, i. e. a two-level system. The objective is to study detectors with increasing nonlinearity, e. g. coupling of the qubit to the frequency a driven oscillator, or to the bifurcation amplifier, to determine the performance and backaction of the detector on the measured system and to investigate the importance of a strong qubit-detector coupling for the achievement of a quantum non-demolition type of detection. The first part gives a very basic introduction to quantum information, briefly reviews some of the most promising physical implementations of a quantum computer before focusing on the superconducting devices. The second part presents a series of studies of different qubit measurements, describing the backaction of the measurement onto the measured system and the internal dynamics of the detector. Methodology adapted from quantum optics and chemical physics (master equations, phase-space analysis etc.) combined with the representation of a complex environment yielded a tool capable of describing a nonlinear, non-Markovian environment, which couples arbitrarily strongly to the measured system. This is described in chapter 3. Chapter 4 focuses on the backaction on the qubit and presents novel insights into the qubit dephasing in the strong coupling regime. Chapter 5 uses basically the same system and technical tools to explore the potential of a fast, strong, indirect measurement, and determine how close such a detection would ideally come to the quantum non-demolition regime. Chapter 6 focuses on the internal dynamics of a strongly driven Josephson junction. The analytical results are based on

  18. Controlled Secure Direct Communication with Seven-Qubit Entangled States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Kai; Zha, Xin-Wei; Wu, Hao

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a new controlled secure direct communication protocol based on a maximally seven-qubit entangled state is proposed. the outcomes of measurement is performed by the sender and the controller, the receiver can obtain different secret messages in a deterministic way with unit successful probability.In this scheme,by using entanglement swapping, no qubits carrying secret messages are transmitted.Therefore, the protocol is completely secure.

  19. No-go theorem for passive single-rail linear optical quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Walther, Philip; Lidar, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Photonic quantum systems are among the most promising architectures for quantum computers. It is well known that for dual-rail photons effective non-linearities and near-deterministic non-trivial two-qubit gates can be achieved via the measurement process and by introducing ancillary photons. While in principle this opens a legitimate path to scalable linear optical quantum computing, the technical requirements are still very challenging and thus other optical encodings are being actively investigated. One of the alternatives is to use single-rail encoded photons, where entangled states can be deterministically generated. Here we prove that even for such systems universal optical quantum computing using only passive optical elements such as beam splitters and phase shifters is not possible. This no-go theorem proves that photon bunching cannot be passively suppressed even when extra ancilla modes and arbitrary number of photons are used. Our result provides useful guidance for the design of optical quantum computers.

  20. Two Superconducting Charge Qubits Coupled by a Josephson Inductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Michio; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Pashkin, Yuri A.; Astafiev, Oleg; Nakamura, Yasunobu; Tsai, Jaw-Shen

    2007-03-01

    When the quantum oscillations [Pashkin et al., Nature 421, 823 (2003)] and the conditional gate operation [Yamamoto et al., Nature 425, 941 (2003)] were demonstrated using superconducting charge qubits, the charge qubits were coupled capacitively, where the coupling was always on and the coupling strength was not tunable. This fixed coupling, however, is not ideal because for example, it makes unconditional gate operations difficult. In this work, we aimed to tunably couple two charge qubits. We fabricated circuits based on the theoretical proposal by You, Tsai, and Nori [PRB 68, 024510 (2003)], where the inductance of a Josephson junction, which has a much larger junction area than the qubit junctions, couples the qubits and the coupling strength is controlled by the external magnetic flux. We confirmed by spectroscopy that the large Josephson junction was indeed coupled to the qubits and that the coupling was turned on and off by the external magnetic flux. In the talk, we will also discuss the quantum oscillations in the circuits.

  1. Deterministic Assisted Clone of an Arbitrary Two- and Three-qubit States via Multi-qubit Brown State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Kui; Zhu, Cheng-Jie; Yang, Ya-Ping

    2017-08-01

    We present two schemes for deterministic assisted clone(DAC) of an unknown two- and three-qubit entangled states with assistance via muti-qubit Brown state. In the schemes, the sender wish to teleport an unknown original entangled state which from the state preparer, and then create a perfect copy of the unknown state at her place. The DAC schemes include two stages. The first stage requires teleportation with Bell-state measurements via a five-qubit Brown state(or seven-qubit Brown state) as the quantum channel. In the second stage, to help the sender realize the quantum cloning, the state preparer performs projective measurements on their own particles which from the sender, then the sender can acquire a perfect copy of the unknown state by means of some appropriate unitary operations. Furthermore, the total success probability for assisted cloning a perfect copy of the unknown state can reach 1 in our schemes.

  2. SCB Quantum Computers Using iSWAP and 1-Qubit Rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Colin; Echtemach, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Units of superconducting circuitry that exploit the concept of the single- Cooper-pair box (SCB) have been built and are undergoing testing as prototypes of logic gates that could, in principle, constitute building blocks of clocked quantum computers. These units utilize quantized charge states as the quantum information-bearing degrees of freedom. An SCB is an artificial two-level quantum system that comprises a nanoscale superconducting electrode connected to a reservoir of Cooper-pair charges via a Josephson junction. The logical quantum states of the device, .0. and .1., are implemented physically as a pair of charge-number states that differ by 2e (where e is the charge of an electron). Typically, some 109 Cooper pairs are involved. Transitions between the logical states are accomplished by tunneling of Cooper pairs through the Josephson junction. Although the two-level system contains a macroscopic number of charges, in the superconducting regime, they behave collectively, as a Bose-Einstein condensate, making possible a coherent superposition of the two logical states. This possibility makes the SCB a candidate for the physical implementation of a qubit. A set of quantum logic operations and the gates that implement them is characterized as universal if, in principle, one can form combinations of the operations in the set to implement any desired quantum computation. To be able to design a practical quantum computer, one must first specify how to decompose any valid quantum computation into a sequence of elementary 1- and 2-qubit quantum gates that are universal and that can be realized in hardware that is feasible to fabricate. Traditionally, the set of universal gates has been taken to be the set of all 1-qubit quantum gates in conjunction with the controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate, which is a 2-qubit gate. Also, it has been known for some time that the SWAP gate, which implements square root of the simple 2-qubit exchange interaction, is as computationally

  3. Observation of Quantum Jumps of a Single Quantum Dot Spin Using Submicrosecond Single-Shot Optical Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delteil, Aymeric; Gao, Wei-bo; Fallahi, Parisa; Miguel-Sanchez, Javier; Imamoǧlu, Atac

    2014-03-01

    Single-shot readout of individual qubits is typically the slowest process among the elementary single- and two-qubit operations required for quantum information processing. Here, we use resonance fluorescence from a single-electron charged quantum dot to read out the spin-qubit state in 800 nanoseconds with a fidelity exceeding 80%. Observation of the spin evolution on longer time scales reveals quantum jumps of the spin state: we use the experimentally determined waiting-time distribution to characterize the quantum jumps.

  4. Noise suppression and long-range exchange coupling for gallium arsenide spin qubits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinowski, Filip

    This thesis presents the results of the experimental study performed on spin qubits realized in gate-defined gallium arsenide quantum dots, with the focus on noise suppression and long-distance coupling. First, we show that the susceptibility to charge noise can be reduced by reducing the gradient...... to put the highest, up to date, lower bound on the electron spin coherence time in gallium arsenide: 870 ms. Later, we study the perspectives of exploiting a multielectron quantum dot as a mediator of the exchange interaction. We investigate interaction between a single spin and the multelectron quantum...

  5. Quantum teleportation and entanglement swapping of matter qubits with multiphoton signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Juan Mauricio [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Germany (Germany); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Bernad, Jozsef Zsolt; Alber, Gernot [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Germany (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    We introduce a probabilistic Bell measurement of atomic qubits based on two consecutive photonic field measurements of two single mode cavities with which the atoms interact in two separate stages. To this end, we solve the two-atoms Tavis-Cummings model and exploit the property that the antisymmetric Bell state is insensitive to the interaction with the field. We consider implementations for quantum teleportation and for entanglement swapping protocols both of which can be achieved with 25% success probability and with unit fidelity. We emphasize possible applications for hybrid quantum repeaters where the aforementioned quantum protocols play an essential role.

  6. All-electric control of donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigillito, Anthony J.; Tyryshkin, Alexei M.; Schenkel, Thomas; Houck, Andrew A.; Lyon, Stephen A.

    2017-10-01

    The electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom of donor impurities in silicon form ultra-coherent two-level systems that are potentially useful for applications in quantum information and are intrinsically compatible with industrial semiconductor processing. However, because of their smaller gyromagnetic ratios, nuclear spins are more difficult to manipulate than electron spins and are often considered too slow for quantum information processing. Moreover, although alternating current magnetic fields are the most natural choice to drive spin transitions and implement quantum gates, they are difficult to confine spatially to the level of a single donor, thus requiring alternative approaches. In recent years, schemes for all-electrical control of donor spin qubits have been proposed but no experimental demonstrations have been reported yet. Here, we demonstrate a scalable all-electric method for controlling neutral 31P and 75As donor nuclear spins in silicon. Using coplanar photonic bandgap resonators, we drive Rabi oscillations on nuclear spins exclusively using electric fields by employing the donor-bound electron as a quantum transducer, much in the spirit of recent works with single-molecule magnets. The electric field confinement leads to major advantages such as low power requirements, higher qubit densities and faster gate times. Additionally, this approach makes it possible to drive nuclear spin qubits either at their resonance frequency or at its first subharmonic, thus reducing device bandwidth requirements. Double quantum transitions can be driven as well, providing easy access to the full computational manifold of our system and making it convenient to implement nuclear spin-based qudits using 75As donors.

  7. Fault-tolerant architectures for superconducting qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiVincenzo, David P [IBM Research Division, Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)], E-mail: divince@watson.ibm.com

    2009-12-15

    In this short review, I draw attention to new developments in the theory of fault tolerance in quantum computation that may give concrete direction to future work in the development of superconducting qubit systems. The basics of quantum error-correction codes, which I will briefly review, have not significantly changed since their introduction 15 years ago. But an interesting picture has emerged of an efficient use of these codes that may put fault-tolerant operation within reach. It is now understood that two-dimensional surface codes, close relatives of the original toric code of Kitaev, can be adapted as shown by Raussendorf and Harrington to effectively perform logical gate operations in a very simple planar architecture, with error thresholds for fault-tolerant operation simulated to be 0.75%. This architecture uses topological ideas in its functioning, but it is not 'topological quantum computation'-there are no non-abelian anyons in sight. I offer some speculations on the crucial pieces of superconducting hardware that could be demonstrated in the next couple of years that would be clear stepping stones towards this surface-code architecture.

  8. Magnetic qubits as hardware for quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejada, J.; Chudnovsky, E.; Barco, E. del

    2000-01-01

    We propose two potential realisations for quantum bits based on nanometre scale magnetic particles of large spin S and high anisotropy molecular clusters. In case (1) the bit-value basis states vertical bar-0> and vertical bar-1> are the ground and first excited spin states S z = S and S-1, separated by an energy gap given by the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency. In case (2), when there is significant tunnelling through the anisotropy barrier, the qubit states correspond to the symmetric, vertical bar-0>, and antisymmetric, vertical bar-1>, combinations of the two-fold degenerate ground state S z = ± S. In each case the temperature of operation must be low compared to the energy gap, Δ, between the states vertical bar-0> and vertical bar-1>. The gap Δ in case (2) can be controlled with an external magnetic field perpendicular to the easy axis of the molecular cluster. The states of different molecular clusters and magnetic particles may be entangled by connecting them by superconducting lines with Josephson switches, leading to the potential for quantum computing hardware. (author)

  9. Magnetic qubits as hardware for quantum computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejada, J.; Chudnovsky, E.; Barco, E. del [and others

    2000-07-01

    We propose two potential realisations for quantum bits based on nanometre scale magnetic particles of large spin S and high anisotropy molecular clusters. In case (1) the bit-value basis states vertical bar-0> and vertical bar-1> are the ground and first excited spin states S{sub z} = S and S-1, separated by an energy gap given by the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency. In case (2), when there is significant tunnelling through the anisotropy barrier, the qubit states correspond to the symmetric, vertical bar-0>, and antisymmetric, vertical bar-1>, combinations of the two-fold degenerate ground state S{sub z} = {+-} S. In each case the temperature of operation must be low compared to the energy gap, {delta}, between the states vertical bar-0> and vertical bar-1>. The gap {delta} in case (2) can be controlled with an external magnetic field perpendicular to the easy axis of the molecular cluster. The states of different molecular clusters and magnetic particles may be entangled by connecting them by superconducting lines with Josephson switches, leading to the potential for quantum computing hardware. (author)

  10. Demonstration of universal parametric entangling gates on a multi-qubit lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagor, Matthew; Osborn, Christopher B; Tezak, Nikolas; Staley, Alexa; Prawiroatmodjo, Guenevere; Scheer, Michael; Alidoust, Nasser; Sete, Eyob A; Didier, Nicolas; da Silva, Marcus P; Acala, Ezer; Angeles, Joel; Bestwick, Andrew; Block, Maxwell; Bloom, Benjamin; Bradley, Adam; Bui, Catvu; Caldwell, Shane; Capelluto, Lauren; Chilcott, Rick; Cordova, Jeff; Crossman, Genya; Curtis, Michael; Deshpande, Saniya; El Bouayadi, Tristan; Girshovich, Daniel; Hong, Sabrina; Hudson, Alex; Karalekas, Peter; Kuang, Kat; Lenihan, Michael; Manenti, Riccardo; Manning, Thomas; Marshall, Jayss; Mohan, Yuvraj; O'Brien, William; Otterbach, Johannes; Papageorge, Alexander; Paquette, Jean-Philip; Pelstring, Michael; Polloreno, Anthony; Rawat, Vijay; Ryan, Colm A; Renzas, Russ; Rubin, Nick; Russel, Damon; Rust, Michael; Scarabelli, Diego; Selvanayagam, Michael; Sinclair, Rodney; Smith, Robert; Suska, Mark; To, Ting-Wai; Vahidpour, Mehrnoosh; Vodrahalli, Nagesh; Whyland, Tyler; Yadav, Kamal; Zeng, William; Rigetti, Chad T

    2018-02-01

    We show that parametric coupling techniques can be used to generate selective entangling interactions for multi-qubit processors. By inducing coherent population exchange between adjacent qubits under frequency modulation, we implement a universal gate set for a linear array of four superconducting qubits. An average process fidelity of ℱ = 93% is estimated for three two-qubit gates via quantum process tomography. We establish the suitability of these techniques for computation by preparing a four-qubit maximally entangled state and comparing the estimated state fidelity with the expected performance of the individual entangling gates. In addition, we prepare an eight-qubit register in all possible bitstring permutations and monitor the fidelity of a two-qubit gate across one pair of these qubits. Across all these permutations, an average fidelity of ℱ = 91.6 ± 2.6% is observed. These results thus offer a path to a scalable architecture with high selectivity and low cross-talk.

  11. Two-qubit gate operations in superconducting circuits with strong coupling and weak anharmonicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lü Xinyou; Ashhab, S; Cui Wei; Wu Rebing; Nori, Franco

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically study the implementation of two-qubit gates in a system of two coupled superconducting qubits. In particular, we analyze two-qubit gate operations under the condition that the coupling strength is comparable with or even larger than the anharmonicity of the qubits. By numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation under the assumption of negligible decoherence, we obtain the dependence of the two-qubit gate fidelity on the system parameters in the case of both direct and indirect qubit-qubit coupling. Our numerical results can be used to identify the ‘safe’ parameter regime for experimentally implementing two-qubit gates with high fidelity in these systems. (paper)

  12. Silicon quantum processor with robust long-distance qubit couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Guilherme; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A; Schmitt, Vivien; Tenberg, Stefanie; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard; Morello, Andrea

    2017-09-06

    Practical quantum computers require a large network of highly coherent qubits, interconnected in a design robust against errors. Donor spins in silicon provide state-of-the-art coherence and quantum gate fidelities, in a platform adapted from industrial semiconductor processing. Here we present a scalable design for a silicon quantum processor that does not require precise donor placement and leaves ample space for the routing of interconnects and readout devices. We introduce the flip-flop qubit, a combination of the electron-nuclear spin states of a phosphorus donor that can be controlled by microwave electric fields. Two-qubit gates exploit a second-order electric dipole-dipole interaction, allowing selective coupling beyond the nearest-neighbor, at separations of hundreds of nanometers, while microwave resonators can extend the entanglement to macroscopic distances. We predict gate fidelities within fault-tolerance thresholds using realistic noise models. This design provides a realizable blueprint for scalable spin-based quantum computers in silicon.Quantum computers will require a large network of coherent qubits, connected in a noise-resilient way. Tosi et al. present a design for a quantum processor based on electron-nuclear spins in silicon, with electrical control and coupling schemes that simplify qubit fabrication and operation.

  13. Coupled Qubits for Next Generation Quantum Annealing: Improving Coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Steven; Samach, Gabriel; Hover, David; Rosenberg, Danna; Yoder, Jonilyn; Kim, David K.; Kerman, Andrew; Oliver, William D.

    Quantum annealing is an optimization technique which potentially leverages quantum tunneling to enhance computational performance. Existing quantum annealers use superconducting flux qubits with short coherence times, limited primarily by the use of large persistent currents. Here, we examine an alternative approach, using flux qubits with smaller persistent currents and longer coherence times. We demonstrate tunable coupling, a basic building-block for quantum annealing, between two such qubits. Furthermore, we characterize qubit coherence as a function of coupler setting and investigate the effect of flux noise in the coupler loop on qubit coherence. Our results provide insight into the available design space for next-generation quantum annealers with improved coherence. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  14. The two-qubit quantum Rabi model: inhomogeneous coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Lijun; Huai, Sainan; Zhang, Yunbo

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the analytic solution of the two-qubit quantum Rabi model with inhomogeneous coupling and transition frequencies using a displaced oscillator basis. This approach enables us to apply the same truncation rules and techniques adopted in the Rabi model to the two qubits system. The derived analytical spectra match perfectly with the numerical solutions in the parameter regime where the qubits’ transition frequencies are far off-resonance with the field frequency and the interaction strengths reach the ultrastrong coupling regime. We further explore the dynamical behavior of the two qubits as well as the evolution of entanglement. The analytical methods provide unexpectedly accurate results in describing the dynamics of the two qubits in the present experimentally accessible coupling regime. The time evolutions of the probability for the qubits show that the collapse-revival phenomena emerge, survive and finally disappear when one coupling strength increases from weak to strong coupling regimes and the other coupling strength is well into the ultrastrong coupling regime. The inhomogeneous coupling system exhibits new dynamics, which are different from the homogeneous coupling case. (paper)

  15. Faithful qubit transmission in a quantum communication network with heterogeneous channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Na; Zhang, Lin Xi; Pei, Chang Xing

    2018-04-01

    Quantum communication networks enable long-distance qubit transmission and distributed quantum computation. In this paper, a quantum communication network with heterogeneous quantum channels is constructed. A faithful qubit transmission scheme is presented. Detailed calculations and performance analyses show that even in a low-quality quantum channel with serious decoherence, only modest number of locally prepared target qubits are required to achieve near-deterministic qubit transmission.

  16. A single-shot T2mapping protocol based on echo-split gradient-spin-echo acquisition and parametric multiplexed sensitivity encoding based on projection onto convex sets reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Mei-Lan; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Oshio, Koichi; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2018-01-01

    To develop a high-speed T 2 mapping protocol that is capable of accurately measuring T 2 relaxation time constants from a single-shot acquisition. A new echo-split single-shot gradient-spin-echo (GRASE) pulse sequence is developed to acquire multicontrast data while suppressing signals from most nonprimary echo pathways in Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) echoes. Residual nonprimary pathway signals are taken into consideration when performing T 2 mapping using a parametric multiplexed sensitivity encoding based on projection onto convex sets (parametric-POCSMUSE) reconstruction method that incorporates extended phase graph modeling of GRASE signals. The single-shot echo-split GRASE-based T 2 mapping procedure was evaluated in human studies at 3 Tesla. The acquired data were compared with reference data obtained with a more time-consuming interleaved spin-echo echo planar imaging protocol. T 2 maps derived from conventional single-shot GRASE scans, in which nonprimary echo pathways were not appropriately addressed, were also evaluated. Using the developed single-shot T 2 mapping protocol, quantitatively accurate T 2 maps can be obtained with a short scan time (parametric-POCSMUSE reconstruction. Magn Reson Med 79:383-393, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Strong Coupling of a Quantum Oscillator to a Flux Qubit at Its Symmetry Point

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorov, A.; Feofanov, A.K.; Macha, P.; Forn-Díaz, P.; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Mooij, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    A flux qubit biased at its symmetry point shows a minimum in the energy splitting (the gap), providing protection against flux noise. We have fabricated a qubit of which the gap can be tuned fast and have coupled this qubit strongly to an LC oscillator. We show full spectroscopy of the

  18. Engineering decoherence in Josephson persistent-current qubits : Measurement apparatus and other electromagnetic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, C.H.; Wilhelm, F.K.; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Mooij, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the relaxation and dephasing rates that result from the control and the measurement setup itself in experiments on Josephson persistent-current qubits. For control and measurement of the qubit state, the qubit is inductively coupled to electromagnetic circuitry. We show how this system

  19. Synthesis of a wild-type and three mutant Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-encoding genes by a single-strand approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botes, D P; Qobose, M D; Corfield, V A

    1991-09-15

    A single-strand approach to gene assembly, based on a modification of an in vitro complementary oligodeoxyribonucleotide template-directed ligation of the desired sequence to a linearized vector [Chen et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 18 (1990) 871-878], is described. The gene coding for the wild-type Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor of 29 amino acid residues [Bode et al., FEBS Lett. 242 (1989) 285-292], as well as three mutant forms of the gene, in which two of the three disulfide bonds have been replaced singly or as a pair, have been synthesized in a single synthesis run with minimal manual intervention. Subsequent to ligation to pUC9 and in vivo gapped duplex repair by Escherichia coli, their sequences have been verified.

  20. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  1. Atomic Evolution and Entanglement of Two Qubits in Photon Superfluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Miao; Zhang, Xiongfeng; Deng, Yunlong; Deng, Huaqiu

    2018-03-01

    By using reservoir theory, we investigate the evolution of an atom placed in photon superfluid and study the entanglement properties of two qubits interacting with photon superfluid. It is found that the atomic decay rate in photon superfluid changes periodically with position of the atom and the decay rate can be inhibited compared to that in usual electromagnetic environment without photon superfluid. It is also found that when two atoms are separately immersed in their own local photon-superfluid reservoir, the entanglement sudden death or birth occurs or not only depends on the initial state of the qubits. What is more, we find a possible case that the concurrence between two qubits can remain a constant value by choosing proper values of parameters of the system, which may provide a new way to preserve quantum entanglement.

  2. Characterization of hidden modes in networks of superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Sarah; Sandberg, Martin; Paik, Hanhee; Abdo, Baleegh; Chow, Jerry M.; Steffen, Matthias; Gambetta, Jay M.

    2017-11-01

    We present a method for detecting electromagnetic (EM) modes that couple to a superconducting qubit in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture. Based on measurement-induced dephasing, this technique allows the measurement of modes that have a high quality factor (Q) and may be difficult to detect through standard transmission and reflection measurements at the device ports. In this scheme, the qubit itself acts as a sensitive phase meter, revealing modes that couple to it through measurements of its coherence time. Such modes are indistinguishable from EM modes that do not couple to the qubit using a vector network analyzer. Moreover, this technique provides useful characterization parameters including the quality factor and the coupling strength of the unwanted resonances. We demonstrate the method for detecting both high-Q coupling resonators in planar devices as well as spurious modes produced by a 3D cavity.

  3. Weak coupling polaron and Landau-Zener scenario: Qubits modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jipdi, M. N.; Tchoffo, M.; Fokou, I. F.; Fai, L. C.; Ateuafack, M. E.

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents a weak coupling polaron in a spherical dot with magnetic impurities and investigates conditions for which the system mimics a qubit. Particularly, the work focuses on the Landau-Zener (LZ) scenario undergone by the polaron and derives transition coefficients (transition probabilities) as well as selection rules for polaron's transitions. It is proven that, the magnetic impurities drive the polaron to a two-state superposition leading to a qubit structure. We also showed that the symmetry deficiency induced by the magnetic impurities (strong magnetic field) yields to the banishment of transition coefficients with non-stacking states. However, the transition coefficients revived for large confinement frequency (or weak magnetic field) with the orbital quantum numbers escorting transitions. The polaron is then shown to map a qubit independently of the number of relevant states with the transition coefficients lifted as LZ probabilities and given as a function of the electron-phonon coupling constant (Fröhlich constant).

  4. A quick and easy test for deciding entanglement status of an N-qubit pure quantum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehendale, D.P.; Joag, P.S.

    2018-01-01

    We develop a simple criterion in terms of a necessary-sufficient condition (NS condition) for deciding separability of an arbitrary n-qubit pure quantum state. This NS condition provides a quick and easy test procedure to determine the entanglement status of a pure quantum state. We normalize the given quantum state and using this normalized state we can easily build a simplest system of equations containing trigonometric functions by making use of the well known Bloch Sphere representation for single qubit states and check whether or not this system of equations is consistent. According to proposed NS condition the given pure quantum state is separable (entangled) if and only if the above mentioned system of equations is consistent (inconsistent). We build this system of equations by equating the coefficients of computational basis states in the superposition representing the given pure quantum state with certain products of trigonometric functions obtained using standard Bloch Sphere representation for single qubit states. To establish separability of given state one requires to find a valid solution of the above mentioned system of equations but entanglement on the other hand follows when any two equations in this system of equations are mutually inconsistent. Thus, entanglement of the state can follow easily if one succeeds in finding any two mutually inconsistent equations in the above mentioned system of equations.

  5. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding GLUT1 and diabetic nephropathy in Brazilian patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, T; Patente, T A; Monteiro, M B; Cavaleiro, A M; Queiroz, M S; Nery, M; de Azevedo, M J; Canani, L H; Parisi, M C; Moura-Neto, A; Passarelli, M; Giannella-Neto, D; Machado, U F; Corrêa-Giannella, M L

    2015-04-15

    Mesangial cells subject to high extracellular glucose concentrations, as occur in hyperglycaemic states, are unable to down regulate glucose influx, resulting in intracellular activation of deleterious biochemical pathways. A high expression of GLUT1 participates in the development of diabetic glomerulopathy. Variants in the gene encoding GLUT1 (SLC2A1) have been associated to this diabetic complication. The aim of this study was to test whether polymorphisms in SLC2A1 confer susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy (DN) in Brazilian type 1 diabetes patients. Four polymorphisms (rs3820589, rs1385129, rs841847 and rs841848) were genotyped in a Brazilian cohort comprised of 452 patients. A prospective analysis was performed in 155 patients. Mean duration of follow-up was 5.6 ± 2.4 years and the incidence of renal events was 18.0%. The rs3820589 presented an inverse association with the prevalence of incipient DN (OR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.16 - 0.80, p=0.01) and with progression to renal events (HR: 0.20; 95% CI: 0.03 - 0.70; p=0.009). AGGT and AGAC haplotypes were associated with the prevalence of incipient DN and the AGAC haplotype was also associated with the prevalence of established/advanced DN. In conclusion, rs3820589 in the SLC2A1 gene modulates the risk to DN in Brazilian patients with inadequate type 1 diabetes control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Joint and weak measurements on qubit systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, J.L.; Pryde, G.J.; Bartlett, S.D.; Ralph, T.C.; Wiseman, H.M.; White, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Along with the well-known concept of projective measurements, quantum mechanics allows various kinds of generalized measurement operators. Two important examples are: joint measurements on two or more quantum systems that cannot be achieved by local operations (LOCC); and weak measurements that obtain less information about a system than does a projective measurement, but with correspondingly less disturbance. Unlike the result of a strong measurement, the average value of a weak measurement of an observable (its weak value), when followed by projective postselection in a complementary basis, can lie outside the range of eigenvalues. This discrepancy is not observed in analogous classical measurements. Weak values aid the resolution of quantum paradoxes, and can simplify analysis of weakly coupled systems. We use a generalized measurement device to measure the weak value of a photon's polarization in the horizontal/vertical basis (the Stokes operator S1 = |H> weak up to 47, outside the usual range -1 ≤ S1 ≤ 1. Unlike previous observations of weak values, our measurement works by entangling two separate systems, and thus can only be described by quantum theory, not a classical wave theory. Also, we have used a two-qubit joint measurement based on a controlled-NOT gate by which certain twoqubit unentangled states can be more reliably distinguished than by using LOCC. We quantify this using a payoff function, for which the optimal LOCC measurement attains 2/3, and our experimental measurement attains 0.72 ± 0.02, close to the global optimum of 3/4. (author)

  7. Adiabatic quantum computing with spin qubits hosted by molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Sato, Kazunobu; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2015-01-28

    A molecular spin quantum computer (MSQC) requires electron spin qubits, which pulse-based electron spin/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) techniques can afford to manipulate for implementing quantum gate operations in open shell molecular entities. Importantly, nuclear spins, which are topologically connected, particularly in organic molecular spin systems, are client qubits, while electron spins play a role of bus qubits. Here, we introduce the implementation for an adiabatic quantum algorithm, suggesting the possible utilization of molecular spins with optimized spin structures for MSQCs. We exemplify the utilization of an adiabatic factorization problem of 21, compared with the corresponding nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) case. Two molecular spins are selected: one is a molecular spin composed of three exchange-coupled electrons as electron-only qubits and the other an electron-bus qubit with two client nuclear spin qubits. Their electronic spin structures are well characterized in terms of the quantum mechanical behaviour in the spin Hamiltonian. The implementation of adiabatic quantum computing/computation (AQC) has, for the first time, been achieved by establishing ESR/MR pulse sequences for effective spin Hamiltonians in a fully controlled manner of spin manipulation. The conquered pulse sequences have been compared with the NMR experiments and shown much faster CPU times corresponding to the interaction strength between the spins. Significant differences are shown in rotational operations and pulse intervals for ESR/MR operations. As a result, we suggest the advantages and possible utilization of the time-evolution based AQC approach for molecular spin quantum computers and molecular spin quantum simulators underlain by sophisticated ESR/MR pulsed spin technology.

  8. Deterministic quantum state transfer between remote qubits in cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogell, B.; Vermersch, B.; Northup, T. E.; Lanyon, B. P.; Muschik, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Performing a faithful transfer of an unknown quantum state is a key challenge for enabling quantum networks. The realization of networks with a small number of quantum links is now actively pursued, which calls for an assessment of different state transfer methods to guide future design decisions. Here, we theoretically investigate quantum state transfer between two distant qubits, each in a cavity, connected by a waveguide, e.g., an optical fiber. We evaluate the achievable success probabilities of state transfer for two different protocols: standard wave packet shaping and adiabatic passage. The main loss sources are transmission losses in the waveguide and absorption losses in the cavities. While special cases studied in the literature indicate that adiabatic passages may be beneficial in this context, it remained an open question under which conditions this is the case and whether their use will be advantageous in practice. We answer these questions by providing a full analysis, showing that state transfer by adiabatic passage—in contrast to wave packet shaping—can mitigate the effects of undesired cavity losses, far beyond the regime of coupling to a single waveguide mode and the regime of lossless waveguides, as was proposed so far. Furthermore, we show that the photon arrival probability is in fact bounded in a trade-off between losses due to non-adiabaticity and due to coupling to off-resonant waveguide modes. We clarify that neither protocol can avoid transmission losses and discuss how the cavity parameters should be chosen to achieve an optimal state transfer.

  9. State determination for composite systems of two spatial qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, G; Torres-Ruiz, F A; Neves, L; Delgado, A; Saavedra, C; Padua, S

    2007-01-01

    In a recent letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 100501 (2005)], we presented a scheme for generating pure entangled states of spatial qudits using transverse correlations of parametric down-converted photons. Here we show how the modication of this scheme can be used to generate mixed states and we investigate the state determination for composite systems of two spatial qubits, motivated by the fact that quantum information protocols may be easier to be implemented for this case. By means of local operations on the twin photons we were able to perform the quantum tomography process to reconstruct the density matrix of a mixed state of two spatial qubits

  10. Tunable Hybrid Qubit in a Triple Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao-Chuan; Cao, Gang; Li, Hai-Ou; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Hu, Xuedong; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2017-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate quantum-coherent dynamics of a triple-dot-based multielectron hybrid qubit. Pulsed experiments show that this system can be conveniently initialized, controlled, measured electrically, and has a good ratio Q ˜29 between the coherence time and gate time. Furthermore, the current multielectron hybrid qubit has an operation frequency that is tunable in a wide range, from 2 to about 15 GHz. We also provide a qualitative understanding of the experimental observations by mapping them onto a three-electron system. The demonstration of the high tunability in a triple dot system could be potentially useful for future quantum control.

  11. $E_7$ and the tripartite entanglement of seven qubits

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    In quantum information theory, it is well known that the tripartite entanglement of three qubits is described by the group [SL(2,C)]^3 and that the entanglement measure is given by Cayley's hyperdeterminant. This has provided an analogy with certain N=2 supersymmetric black holes in string theory, whose entropy is also given by the hyperdeterminant. In this paper, we extend the analogy to N=8. We propose that a particular tripartite entanglement of seven qubits is described by the exceptional group E_7(C) and that the entanglement measure is given by Cartan's quartic E_7 invariant.

  12. Co-ordinate single-cell expression of LEE4- and LEE5-encoded proteins of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Andrew J; Naylor, Stuart W; Spears, Kevin J; Yull, Helen M; Dransfield, Tracy A; Oxford, Matthew; McKendrick, Iain J; Porter, Megan; Woodward, Martin J; Smith, David G E; Gally, David L

    2004-10-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a zoonotic pathogen that can express a type III secretion system (TTSS) considered important for colonization and persistence in ruminants. E. coli O157:H7 strains have been shown to vary markedly in levels of protein secreted using the TTSS and this study has confirmed that a high secretion phenotype is more prevalent among isolates associated with human disease than isolates shed by healthy cattle. The variation in secretion levels is a consequence of heterogeneous expression, being dependent on the proportion of bacteria in a population that are actively engaged in protein secretion. This was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence and eGFP fusions that examined the expression of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE)-encoded factors in individual bacteria. In liquid media, the expression of EspA, tir::egfp, intimin, but not map::egfp were co-ordinated in a subpopulation of bacteria. In contrast to E. coli O157:H7, expression of tir::egfp in EPEC E2348/69 was equivalent in all bacteria although the same fusion exhibited variable expression when transformed into an E. coli O157:H7 background. An E. coli O157:H7 strain deleted for the LEE demonstrated weak but variable expression of tir::egfp indicating that the elements controlling the heterogeneous expression lie outside the LEE. The research also demonstrated the rapid induction of tir::egfp and map::egfp on contact with bovine epithelial cells. This control in E. coli O157:H7 may be required to limit exposure of key surface antigens, EspA, Tir and intimin during colonization of cattle but allow their rapid production on contact with bovine gastrointestinal epithelium at the terminal rectum.

  13. Toxicity and biodistribution of the serotype 2 recombinant adeno-associated viral vector, encoding Aquaporin-1, after retroductal delivery to a single mouse parotid gland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariya Momot

    Full Text Available In preparation for testing the safety of using serotype 2 recombinant adeno-associated vector, encoding Aquaporin-1 to treat radiation-induced salivary gland damage in a phase 1 clinical trial, we conducted a 13 week GLP biodistribution and toxicology study using Balb/c mice. To best assess the safety of rAAV2hAQP1 as well as resemble clinical delivery, vector (10(8, 10(9, 10(10, or 4.4 × 10(10 vector particles/gland or saline was delivered to the right parotid gland of mice via retroductal cannulation. Very mild surgically induced inflammation was caused by this procedure, seen in 3.6% of animals for the right parotid gland, and 5.3% for the left parotid gland. Long term distribution of vector appeared to be localized to the site of cannulation as well as the right and left draining submandibular lymph nodes at levels >50 copies/μg in some animals. As expected, there was a dose-related increase in neutralizing antibodies produced by day 29. Overall, animals appeared to thrive, with no differences in mean body weight, food or water consumption between groups. There were no significant adverse effects due to treatment noted by clinical chemistry and pathology evaluations. Hematology assessment of serum demonstrated very limited changes to the white blood cell, segmented neutrophils, and hematocrit levels and were concluded to not be vector-associated. Indicators for liver, kidney, cardiac functions and general tissue damage showed no changes due to treatment. All of these indicators suggest the treatment is clinically safe.

  14. Measurement-induced qubit state mixing in circuit QED from up-converted dephasing noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slichter, D H; Vijay, R; Weber, S J; Boutin, S; Boissonneault, M; Gambetta, J M; Blais, A; Siddiqi, I

    2012-10-12

    We observe measurement-induced qubit state mixing in a transmon qubit dispersively coupled to a planar readout cavity. Our results indicate that dephasing noise at the qubit-readout detuning frequency is up-converted by readout photons to cause spurious qubit state transitions, thus limiting the nondemolition character of the readout. Furthermore, we use the qubit transition rate as a tool to extract an equivalent flux noise spectral density at f~1 GHz and find agreement with values extrapolated from a 1/f(α) fit to the measured flux noise spectral density below 1 Hz.

  15. Coherent control and detection of spin qubits in semiconductor with magnetic field engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokura, Yasuhiro

    2012-02-01

    Electrical control and detection of the spin qubits in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are among the major rapidly progressing fields for possible implementation of scalable quantum information processing. Coherent control of one-[1-3] and two-[4,5] spin qubits by electrical means had been demonstrated with various approaches. We have used an engineered magnetic field structure realized with proximal micro-magnets to transduce the spin and charge degrees of freedom and to selectively address one of the two spins [3]. We have demonstrated an all-electrical two-qubit gate consisting of single-spin rotations and interdot spin exchange in double QDs. A partially entangled output state is obtained by the application of the two-qubit gate to an initial, uncorrelated state. Our calculations taking into account of the nuclear spin fluctuation show the degree of entanglement. Non-uniform magnetic field also enables spin selective photon-assisted tunneling in double QDs, which then constitutes non-demolition spin read-out system in combination with a near-by charge detector [6]. [4pt] In collaboration with R. Brunner, Inst. of Phys., Montanuniversitaet Leoben, 8700, Austria, M. Pioro-Ladrière, D'ep. de Phys., Universit'e de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Qu'ebec, J1K-2R1, Canada, T. Kubo, Y. -S. Shin, T. Obata, and S. Tarucha, ICORP-JST and Dep. of Appl. Phys., Univ. of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656, Japan.[4pt] [1] F. H. Koppens, et al., Nature 442, 766 (2006).[0pt] [2] K. C. Nowack, et al., Science 318, 1430 (2007).[0pt] [3] M. Pioro-Ladrière, et al., Nature Physics 4, 776 (2008).[0pt] [4] J. R. Petta, et al., Science 309, 2180 (2005).[0pt] [5] R. Brunner, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 146801 (2011).[0pt] [6] Y. -S. Shin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 046802 (2010).

  16. Steady-state entanglement and thermalization of coupled qubits in two common heat baths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li-Zhen; Man, Zhong-Xiao; Xia, Yun-Jie

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we study the steady-state entanglement and thermalization of two coupled qubits embedded in two common baths with different temperatures. The common bath is relevant when the two qubits are difficult to be isolated to only contact with their local baths. With the quantum master equation constructed in the eigenstate representation of the coupled qubits, we have demonstrated the variations of steady-state entanglement with respect to various parameters of the qubits' system in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium cases of the baths. The coupling strength and energy detuning of the qubits as well as the temperature gradient of the baths are found to be beneficial to the enhancement of the entanglement. We note a dark state of the qubits that is free from time-evolution and its initial population can greatly influence the steady-state entanglement. By virtues of effective temperatures, we also study the thermalization of the coupled qubits and their variations with energy detuning.

  17. Secret key rates for an encoded quantum repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratzik, Sylvia; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruß, Dagmar

    2014-03-01

    We investigate secret key rates for the quantum repeater using encoding [L. Jiang et al., Phys. Rev. A 79, 032325 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevA.79.032325] and compare them to the standard repeater scheme by Briegel, Dür, Cirac, and Zoller. The former scheme has the advantage of a minimal consumption of classical communication. We analyze the trade-off in the secret key rate between the communication time and the required resources. For this purpose we introduce an error model for the repeater using encoding which allows for input Bell states with a fidelity smaller than one, in contrast to the model given by L. Jiang et al. [Phys. Rev. A 79, 032325 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevA.79.032325]. We show that one can correct additional errors in the encoded connection procedure of this repeater and develop a suitable decoding algorithm. Furthermore, we derive the rate of producing entangled pairs for the quantum repeater using encoding and give the minimal parameter values (gate quality and initial fidelity) for establishing a nonzero secret key. We find that the generic quantum repeater is optimal regarding the secret key rate per memory per second and show that the encoded quantum repeater using the simple three-qubit repetition code can even have an advantage with respect to the resources compared to other recent quantum repeater schemes with encoding.

  18. Few-electron Qubits in Silicon Quantum Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    me with the pure fun of spending lab money. Mike Peloso and Bill Dix had introduced me to the art of the machining with a great selection of...to implement the qubit in a material environment whose deco - herence and relaxation mechanisms are significantly reduced. As a result, silicon 23 40

  19. Entanglement dynamics of two interacting qubits under the influence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-06-21

    qubit system in the non-Markovian setting. A quantum ... time-scales in an open system exist to characterize non-. Markovian dynamics: (i) the ...... [15] H P Beuer and F Petruccione, The theory of open quantum systems (Oxford ...

  20. Local ontology for a dual-rail qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasiak, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    We show that quantum predictions for the dual-rail realisation of a qubit can be faithfully simulated with classical stochastic gates and particles which interact entirely in a local manner. In the presented model 'non-locality' appears only on the epistemic level of description. (paper)

  1. Efficient amplification of photonic qubits by optimal quantum cloning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartkiewicz, K.; Černoch, A.; Lemr, K.; Soubusta, Jan; Stobińska, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 6 (2014), "062322-1"-"062322-10" ISSN 1050-2947 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : optimal quantum cloning * cryptography * qubit * phase-independent quantum amplifier Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.808, year: 2014

  2. State-dependent linear-optical qubit amplifier

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartkiewicz, K.; Černoch, Antonín; Lemr, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 6 (2013), "062304-1"-"062304-7" ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : linear-optical qubit amplifier * quantum cloning * quantum cryptography Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.991, year: 2013

  3. Entanglement and discord for qubits and higher spin systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    larger memory and for the speed-up of calculations that lend excitement to the field of quantum computing. Next, a quantum system built-up of at least two parts, such as a pair of qubits, exhibits unique correlations between them, entanglement being the best known [2]. Such pairs lead to logic gates for quantum computation ...

  4. Entangling capabilities of symmetric two-qubit gates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-25

    Jul 25, 2014 ... Our work addresses the problem of generating maximally entangled two spin-1/2 (qubit) symmetric states using NMR, NQR, Lipkin–Meshkov–Glick Hamiltonians. Time evolution of such Hamiltonians provides various logic gates which can be used for quantum processing tasks. Pairs of spin-1/2s have ...

  5. Full reconstruction of a 14-qubit state within four hours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Zhibo; Zhong, Han-Sen; Tian, Ye; Xiang, Guo-Yong; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can; Dong, Daoyi; Wang, Yuanlong; Qi, Bo; Li, Li; Nori, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Full quantum state tomography (FQST) plays a unique role in the estimation of the state of a quantum system without a priori knowledge or assumptions. Unfortunately, since FQST requires informationally (over)complete measurements, both the number of measurement bases and the computational complexity of data processing suffer an exponential growth with the size of the quantum system. A 14-qubit entangled state has already been experimentally prepared in an ion trap, and the data processing capability for FQST of a 14-qubit state seems to be far away from practical applications. In this paper, the computational capability of FQST is pushed forward to reconstruct a 14-qubit state with a run time of only 3.35 hours using the linear regression estimation (LRE) algorithm, even when informationally overcomplete Pauli measurements are employed. The computational complexity of the LRE algorithm is first reduced from ∼10 19 to ∼10 15 for a 14-qubit state, by dropping all the zero elements, and its computational efficiency is further sped up by fully exploiting the parallelism of the LRE algorithm with parallel Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) programming. Our result demonstrates the effectiveness of using parallel computation to speed up the postprocessing for FQST, and can play an important role in quantum information technologies with large quantum systems. (paper)

  6. A continental-wide perspective: the genepool of nuclear encoded ribosomal DNA and single-copy gene sequences in North American Boechera (Brassicaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Kiefer

    Full Text Available 74 of the currently accepted 111 taxa of the North American genus Boechera (Brassicaceae were subject to pyhlogenetic reconstruction and network analysis. The dataset comprised 911 accessions for which ITS sequences were analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses yielded largely unresolved trees. Together with the network analysis confirming this result this can be interpreted as an indication for multiple, independent, and rapid diversification events. Network analyses were superimposed with datasets describing i geographical distribution, ii taxonomy, iii reproductive mode, and iv distribution history based on phylogeographic evidence. Our results provide first direct evidence for enormous reticulate evolution in the entire genus and give further insights into the evolutionary history of this complex genus on a continental scale. In addition two novel single-copy gene markers, orthologues of the Arabidopsis thaliana genes At2g25920 and At3g18900, were analyzed for subsets of taxa and confirmed the findings obtained through the ITS data.

  7. Pattern Classifications Using Grover's and Ventura's Algorithms in a Two-qubits System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manu Pratap; Radhey, Kishori; Rajput, B. S.

    2018-03-01

    Carrying out the classification of patterns in a two-qubit system by separately using Grover's and Ventura's algorithms on different possible superposition, it has been shown that the exclusion superposition and the phase-invariance superposition are the most suitable search states obtained from two-pattern start-states and one-pattern start-states, respectively, for the simultaneous classifications of patterns. The higher effectiveness of Grover's algorithm for large search states has been verified but the higher effectiveness of Ventura's algorithm for smaller data base has been contradicted in two-qubit systems and it has been demonstrated that the unknown patterns (not present in the concerned data-base) are classified more efficiently than the known ones (present in the data-base) in both the algorithms. It has also been demonstrated that different states of Singh-Rajput MES obtained from the corresponding self-single- pattern start states are the most suitable search states for the classification of patterns |00>,|01 >, |10> and |11> respectively on the second iteration of Grover's method or the first operation of Ventura's algorithm.

  8. Solid State Spin-Wave Quantum Memory for Time-Bin Qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündoğan, Mustafa; Ledingham, Patrick M; Kutluer, Kutlu; Mazzera, Margherita; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2015-06-12

    We demonstrate the first solid-state spin-wave optical quantum memory with on-demand read-out. Using the full atomic frequency comb scheme in a Pr(3+):Y2SiO5 crystal, we store weak coherent pulses at the single-photon level with a signal-to-noise ratio >10. Narrow-band spectral filtering based on spectral hole burning in a second Pr(3+):Y2SiO5 crystal is used to filter out the excess noise created by control pulses to reach an unconditional noise level of (2.0±0.3)×10(-3) photons per pulse. We also report spin-wave storage of photonic time-bin qubits with conditional fidelities higher than achievable by a measure and prepare strategy, demonstrating that the spin-wave memory operates in the quantum regime. This makes our device the first demonstration of a quantum memory for time-bin qubits, with on-demand read-out of the stored quantum information. These results represent an important step for the use of solid-state quantum memories in scalable quantum networks.

  9. Entanglement loss in molecular quantum-dot qubits due to interaction with the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Enrique P.; Tóth, Géza; Lent, Craig S.

    2018-05-01

    We study quantum entanglement loss due to environmental interaction in a condensed matter system with a complex geometry relevant to recent proposals for computing with single electrons at the nanoscale. We consider a system consisting of two qubits, each realized by an electron in a double quantum dot, which are initially in an entangled Bell state. The qubits are widely separated and each interacts with its own environment. The environment for each is modeled by surrounding double quantum dots placed at random positions with random orientations. We calculate the unitary evolution of the joint system and environment. The global state remains pure throughout. We examine the time dependence of the expectation value of the bipartite Clauser–Horne–Shimony–Holt (CHSH) and Brukner–Paunković–Rudolph–Vedral (BPRV) Bell operators and explore the emergence of correlations consistent with local realism. Though the details of this transition depend on the specific environmental geometry, we show how the results can be mapped on to a universal behavior with appropriate scaling. We determine the relevant disentanglement times based on realistic physical parameters for molecular double-dots.

  10. Quantum simulation with an array of transmon qubits: Bose-Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen-Gourgy, Shay; Ramasesh, Vinay; de Grandi, Claudia; Girvin, Steven; Siddiqi, Irfan

    2015-03-01

    Chains of capacitively-coupled transmons can emulate the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian when one considers the full level-structure of the circuit. Here, each individual transmon plays the role of a lattice site, with the excitation level of each transmon corresponding to the number of bosons occupying that particular site. The transmon's anharmonicity gives rise to the attractive contact-interaction term, while the capacitive coupling realizes the hopping amplitude. We implement such a chain of 3 capacitvely-coupled transmons in a single 3D microwave cavity. In our parameter regime, the ground state of the 3-excitation subspace is one in which all excitations lie on a single qubit. Using cavity-assisted bath engineering, it should be possible to cool from an initial state in this subspace to the ground state. We present the current status of this goal. This work is supported by AFOSR, Army Research Office W911NF1410011 and NSF DMR-1301798.

  11. Phylogeny and evolutionary history of Leymus (Triticeae; Poaceae based on a single-copy nuclear gene encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Cun-Bang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single- and low- copy genes are less likely subject to concerted evolution, thus making themselves ideal tools for studying the origin and evolution of polyploid taxa. Leymus is a polyploid genus with a diverse array of morphology, ecology and distribution in Triticeae. The genomic constitution of Leymus was assigned as NsXm, where Ns was presumed to be originated from Psathyrostachys, while Xm represented a genome of unknown origin. In addition, little is known about the evolutionary history of Leymus. Here, we investigate the phylogenetic relationship, genome donor, and evolutionary history of Leymus based on a single-copy nuclear Acc1 gene. Results Two homoeologues of the Acc1 gene were isolated from nearly all the sampled Leymus species using allele-specific primer and were analyzed with those from 35 diploid taxa representing 18 basic genomes in Triticeae. Sequence diversity patterns and genealogical analysis suggested that (1 Leymus is closely related to Psathyrostachys, Agropyron, and Eremopyrum; (2 Psathyrostachys juncea is an ancestral Ns-genome donor of Leymus species; (3 the Xm genome in Leymus may be originated from an ancestral lineage of Agropyron and Eremopyrum triticeum; (4 the Acc1 sequences of Leymus species from the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau are evolutionarily distinct; (5 North America Leymus species might originate from colonization via the Bering land bridge; (6 Leymus originated about 11-12MYA in Eurasia, and adaptive radiation might have occurred in Leymus during the period of 3.7-4.3 MYA and 1.7-2.1 MYA. Conclusion Leymus species have allopolyploid origin. It is hypothesized that the adaptive radiation of Leymus species might have been triggered by the recent upliftings of the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau and subsequent climatic oscillations. Adaptive radiation may have promoted the rapid speciation, as well as the fixation of unique morphological characters in Leymus. Our results shed new light on our

  12. Characterization of gana-1, a Caenorhabditis elegans gene encoding a single ortholog of vertebrate α-galactosidase and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostrouchová Marta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human α-galactosidase A (α-GAL and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (α-NAGA are presumed to share a common ancestor. Deficiencies of these enzymes cause two well-characterized human lysosomal storage disorders (LSD – Fabry (α-GAL deficiency and Schindler (α-NAGA deficiency diseases. Caenorhabditis elegans was previously shown to be a relevant model organism for several late endosomal/lysosomal membrane proteins associated with LSDs. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize C. elegans orthologs to both human lysosomal luminal proteins α-GAL and α-NAGA. Results BlastP searches for orthologs of human α-GAL and α-NAGA revealed a single C. elegans gene (R07B7.11 with homology to both human genes (α-galactosidase and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase – gana-1. We cloned and sequenced the complete gana-1 cDNA and elucidated the gene organization. Phylogenetic analyses and homology modeling of GANA-1 based on the 3D structure of chicken α-NAGA, rice α-GAL and human α-GAL suggest a close evolutionary relationship of GANA-1 to both human α-GAL and α-NAGA. Both α-GAL and α-NAGA enzymatic activities were detected in C. elegans mixed culture homogenates. However, α-GAL activity on an artificial substrate was completely inhibited by the α-NAGA inhibitor, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. A GANA-1::GFP fusion protein expressed from a transgene, containing the complete gana-1 coding region and 3 kb of its hypothetical promoter, was not detectable under the standard laboratory conditions. The GFP signal was observed solely in a vesicular compartment of coelomocytes of the animals treated with Concanamycin A (CON A or NH4Cl, agents that increase the pH of the cellular acidic compartment. Immunofluorescence detection of the fusion protein using polyclonal anti-GFP antibody showed a broader and coarsely granular cytoplasmic expression pattern in body wall muscle cells, intestinal cells, and a vesicular compartment of

  13. Robust and Addressable Control of Atomic Qubits and Qudits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Poul

    2014-03-01

    The standard paradigm for quantum computation and simulation with neutral atoms assumes that constituent atoms can be used as individually addressable qubits. To accomplish this in optical lattices with sub-micron atom separation, we have developed a resonance addressing scheme that combines a position dependent light shift of the qubit transition with resonant microwave (μw) pulses. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we show that numerically optimized composite pulses can implement quantum gates on Cs qubits at targeted lattice sites, with minimal cross-talk to neighboring sites and significant robustness against uncertainty in the atom position. Coherence is verified through two-pulse experiments, and the average gate fidelity is measured to be 95 +/-3%. Because most atoms have more than two accessible levels, one might also consider if the existing toolbox for qubit control can be extended to d-level systems (qudits). Over the past several years we have used the 16-dimensional ground hyperfine manifold of cold, untrapped Cs atoms as an experimental testbed for such work. Driving the atoms with a combination of phase modulated radio frequency (rf) and μw magnetic fields, we use numerical optimization techniques to design control waveforms (rf and μw phases as function of time) that accomplish a wide range of control tasks, from quantum state-to-state maps to full unitary transformations, with average fidelities that vary from >99% for the former to ~ 98% for the latter. We further show that tools for inhomogeneous control and dynamical decoupling can be generalized to qudits, allowing transformations that are robust to static as well as dynamic perturbations, and thus in principle compatible with optical traps and the resonance addressing scheme demonstrated for qubits.

  14. Synthetic Elucidation of Design Principles for Molecular Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael James

    Quantum information processing (QIP) is an emerging computational paradigm with the potential to enable a vast increase in computational power, fundamentally transforming fields from structural biology to finance. QIP employs qubits, or quantum bits, as its fundamental units of information, which can exist in not just the classical states of 0 or 1, but in a superposition of the two. In order to successfully perform QIP, this superposition state must be sufficiently long-lived. One promising paradigm for the implementation of QIP involves employing unpaired electrons in coordination complexes as qubits. This architecture is highly tunable and scalable, however coordination complexes frequently suffer from short superposition lifetimes, or T2. In order to capitalize on the promise of molecular qubits, it is necessary to develop a set of design principles that allow the rational synthesis of complexes with sufficiently long values of T2. In this dissertation, I report efforts to use the synthesis of series of complexes to elucidate design principles for molecular qubits. Chapter 1 details previous work by our group and others in the field. Chapter 2 details the first efforts of our group to determine the impact of varying spin and spin-orbit coupling on T2. Chapter 3 examines the effect of removing nuclear spins on coherence time, and reports a series of vanadyl bis(dithiolene) complexes which exhibit extremely long coherence lifetimes, in excess of the 100 mus threshold for qubit viability. Chapters 4 and 5 form two complimentary halves of a study to determine the exact relationship between electronic spin-nuclear spin distance and the effect of the nuclear spins on T2. Finally, chapter 6 suggests next directions for the field as a whole, including the potential for work in this field to impact the development of other technologies as diverse as quantum sensors and magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

  15. Enhancement of antitumor activity by using a fully human gene encoding a single-chain fragmented antibody specific for carcinoembryonic antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Motomu; Kuroki, Masahide

    2017-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen and/or costimulatory molecules are frequently lacking in metastatic tumor cells, and thus tumor cells are able to escape from the immune system. Although lymphocytes with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a promising approach for overcoming this challenge in cancer immunotherapy, administration of modified T cells alone often demonstrates little efficacy in patients. Therefore, in order to enhance the antitumor activity of immune cells in the cancer microenvironment, we used lymphocytes expressing CAR in combination with a fusion protein of IL-2 that contained the single-chain fragmented antibody (scFv) specific for the carcinoembryonic antigen. Among a series of CAR constructs, with or without a spacer and the intracellular domain of CD28, the CAR construct containing CD8α, CD28, and CD3ζ most effectively activated and expressed INF-γ in CAR-bearing T cells. Furthermore, in comparison with free IL-2, the combination of peripheral blood mononuclear cells expressing CAR and the fusion protein containing IL-2 significantly enhanced the antitumor activity against MKN-45 cells, a human gastric cancer cell line. In conclusion, this novel combination therapy of CAR and a fusion protein consisting of a functional cytokine and a fully human scFv may be a promising approach for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28860806

  16. Degeneracy-Preserving Quantum Nondemolition Measurement of Parity-Type Observables for Cat Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joachim; Smith, W. Clarke; Devoret, Michel H.; Mirrahimi, Mazyar

    2017-08-01

    A central requirement for any quantum error correction scheme is the ability to perform quantum nondemolition measurements of an error syndrome, corresponding to a special symmetry property of the encoding scheme. It is in particular important that such a measurement does not introduce extra error mechanisms, not included in the error model of the correction scheme. In this Letter, we ensure such a robustness by designing an interaction with a measurement device that preserves the degeneracy of the measured observable. More precisely, we propose a scheme to perform continuous and quantum nondemolition measurement of photon-number parity in a microwave cavity. This corresponds to the error syndrome in a class of error correcting codes called the cat codes, which have recently proven to be efficient and versatile for quantum information processing. In our design, we exploit the strongly nonlinear Hamiltonian of a high-impedance Josephson circuit, coupling a high-Q cavity storage cavity mode to a low-Q readout one. By driving the readout resonator at its resonance, the phase of the reflected or transmitted signal carries directly exploitable information on parity-type observables for encoded cat qubits of the high-Q mode.

  17. Enhancement of antitumor activity by using a fully human gene encoding a single-chain fragmented antibody specific for carcinoembryonic antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibaguchi H

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hirotomo Shibaguchi,1,* Naixiang Luo,1,* Naoto Shirasu,1,* Motomu Kuroki,2 Masahide Kuroki1 1Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka, Japan; 2School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka, Japan *These authors equally contributed to this work Abstract: Human leukocyte antigen and/or costimulatory molecules are frequently lacking in metastatic tumor cells, and thus tumor cells are able to escape from the immune system. Although lymphocytes with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR is a promising approach for overcoming this challenge in cancer immunotherapy, administration of modified T cells alone often demonstrates little efficacy in patients. Therefore, in order to enhance the antitumor activity of immune cells in the cancer microenvironment, we used lymphocytes expressing CAR in combination with a fusion protein of IL-2 that contained the single-chain fragmented antibody (scFv specific for the carcinoembryonic antigen. Among a series of CAR constructs, with or without a spacer and the intracellular domain of CD28, the CAR construct containing CD8α, CD28, and CD3ζ most effectively activated and expressed INF-γ in CAR-bearing T cells. Furthermore, in comparison with free IL-2, the combination of peripheral blood mononuclear cells expressing CAR and the fusion protein containing IL-2 significantly enhanced the antitumor activity against MKN-45 cells, a human gastric cancer cell line. In conclusion, this novel combination therapy of CAR and a fusion protein consisting of a functional cytokine and a fully human scFv may be a promising approach for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. Keywords: chimeric antigen receptor, fusion protein, human scFv, CEA, combination therapy

  18. Deterministically encoding quantum information using 100-photon Schrödinger cat states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastakis, Brian; Kirchmair, Gerhard; Leghtas, Zaki; Nigg, Simon E; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, S M; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2013-11-01

    In contrast to a single quantum bit, an oscillator can store multiple excitations and coherences provided one has the ability to generate and manipulate complex multiphoton states. We demonstrate multiphoton control by using a superconducting transmon qubit coupled to a waveguide cavity resonator with a highly ideal off-resonant coupling. This dispersive interaction is much greater than decoherence rates and higher-order nonlinearities to allow simultaneous manipulation of hundreds of photons. With a tool set of conditional qubit-photon logic, we mapped an arbitrary qubit state to a superposition of coherent states, known as a "cat state." We created cat states as large as 111 photons and extended this protocol to create superpositions of up to four coherent states. This control creates a powerful interface between discrete and continuous variable quantum computation and could enable applications in metrology and quantum information processing.

  19. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Regulator-Encoding Genes Have an Additive Effect on Virulence Gene Expression in a Vibrio cholerae Clinical Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignan, Bailey M; Brumfield, Kyle D; Son, Mike S

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the etiological agent of the infectious disease cholera, which is characterized by vomiting and severe watery diarrhea. Recently, V. cholerae clinical isolates have demonstrated increased virulence capabilities, causing more severe symptoms with a much higher rate of disease progression than previously observed. We have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four virulence-regulatory genes (hapR, hns, luxO, and vieA) of a hypervirulent V. cholerae clinical isolate, MQ1795. Herein, all SNPs and SNP combinations of interest were introduced into the prototypical El Tor reference strain N16961, and the effects on the production of numerous virulence-related factors, including cholera toxin (CT), the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), and ToxT, were analyzed. Our data show that triple-SNP (hapR hns luxO and hns luxO vieA) and quadruple-SNP combinations produced the greatest increases in CT, TCP, and ToxT production. The hns and hns luxO SNP combinations were sufficient for increased TCP and ToxT production. Notably, the hns luxO vieA triple-SNP combination strain produced TCP and ToxT levels similar to those of MQ1795. Certain SNP combinations (hapR and hapR vieA) had the opposite effect on CT, TCP, and ToxT expression. Interestingly, the hns vieA double-SNP combination strain increased TCP production while decreasing CT production. Our findings suggest that SNPs identified in the four regulatory genes, in various combinations, are associated with increased virulence capabilities observed in V. cholerae clinical isolates. These studies provide insight into the evolution of highly virulent strains. IMPORTANCE Cholera, an infectious disease of the small intestine caused by the aquatic bacterium Vibrio cholerae, often results in vomiting and acute watery diarrhea. If left untreated or if the response is too slow, the symptoms can quickly lead to extreme dehydration and ultimately death of the patient. Recent anecdotal evidence of cholera

  20. A single-atom quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Holger P; Nölleke, Christian; Reiserer, Andreas; Uphoff, Manuel; Figueroa, Eden; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2011-05-12

    The faithful storage of a quantum bit (qubit) of light is essential for long-distance quantum communication, quantum networking and distributed quantum computing. The required optical quantum memory must be able to receive and recreate the photonic qubit; additionally, it must store an unknown quantum state of light better than any classical device. So far, these two requirements have been met only by ensembles of material particles that store the information in collective excitations. Recent developments, however, have paved the way for an approach in which the information exchange occurs between single quanta of light and matter. This single-particle approach allows the material qubit to be addressed, which has fundamental advantages for realistic implementations. First, it enables a heralding mechanism that signals the successful storage of a photon by means of state detection; this can be used to combat inevitable losses and finite efficiencies. Second, it allows for individual qubit manipulations, opening up avenues for in situ processing of the stored quantum information. Here we demonstrate the most fundamental implementation of such a quantum memory, by mapping arbitrary polarization states of light into and out of a single atom trapped inside an optical cavity. The memory performance is tested with weak coherent pulses and analysed using full quantum process tomography. The average fidelity is measured to be 93%, and low decoherence rates result in qubit coherence times exceeding 180  microseconds. This makes our system a versatile quantum node with excellent prospects for applications in optical quantum gates and quantum repeaters.

  1. Static flux bias of a flux qubit using persistent current trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Chiarello, Fabio; Torrioli, Guido; Carelli, Pasquale

    2006-01-01

    Qubits based on the magnetic flux degree of freedom require a flux bias, the stability and precision of which strongly affect the qubit performance, up to a point of forbidding the qubit operation. Moreover, in multiqubit systems it must be possible to flux bias each qubit independently, hence avoiding the traditional use of externally generated magnetic fields in favour of on-chip techniques that minimize cross-couplings. The solution discussed in this paper exploits a persistent current trapped in a superconducting circuit integrated on chip that can be inductively coupled with an individual qubit. The circuit does not make use of resistive elements which can be detrimental for qubit coherence. The trapping procedure allows us to control and change stepwise the amount of stored current; after that the circuit can be completely disconnected from the external sources. We show in a practical case how this works and how to drive the bias circuit at the required value

  2. Proof-of-principle experimental realization of a qubit-like qudit-based quantum key distribution scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Chau, H. F.; Chen, Wei; Wang, Chao; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2018-04-01

    In comparison to qubit-based protocols, qudit-based quantum key distribution ones generally allow two cooperative parties to share unconditionally secure keys under a higher channel noise. However, it is very hard to prepare and measure the required quantum states in qudit-based protocols in general. One exception is the recently proposed highly error tolerant qudit-based protocol known as the Chau15 (Chau 2015 Phys. Rev. A 92 062324). Remarkably, the state preparation and measurement in this protocol can be done relatively easily since the required states are phase encoded almost like the diagonal basis states of a qubit. Here we report the first proof-of-principle demonstration of the Chau15 protocol. One highlight of our experiment is that its post-processing is based on practical one-way manner, while the original proposal in Chau (2015 Phys. Rev. A 92 062324) relies on complicated two-way post-processing, which is a great challenge in experiment. In addition, by manipulating time-bin qudit and measurement with a variable delay interferometer, our realization is extensible to qudit with high-dimensionality and confirms the experimental feasibility of the Chau15 protocol.

  3. Ground states and excitations of inductively coupled fluxonium qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, R. T.; Meier, H.; Kou, A.; Glazman, L. I.; Girvin, S. M.

    2015-03-01

    We consider fluxonium qubits arranged in a one dimensional array, where the inductors are shared between neighboring qubits. For an infinite system with small charging energies, there are a series of different phases that depend on the applied magnetic flux and the ratio of the inductive and Josephson energies. For small flux and large Josephson energy, the behavior of the classical ground state is similar to the Frenkel-Kontorova model, while when the flux is half a flux quantum it is similar to an Ising antiferromagnet. A realistic finite system will not exhibit a phase transition but some features of the infinite-size limit should persist. We investigate theoretically the ground and low-lying excited states for experimentally relevant parameters. We discuss how the nature of the ground state changes, and what experimental signatures would be expected.

  4. Complete 3-Qubit Grover search on a programmable quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figgatt, C; Maslov, D; Landsman, K A; Linke, N M; Debnath, S; Monroe, C

    2017-12-04

    The Grover quantum search algorithm is a hallmark application of a quantum computer with a well-known speedup over classical searches of an unsorted database. Here, we report results for a complete three-qubit Grover search algorithm using the scalable quantum computing technology of trapped atomic ions, with better-than-classical performance. Two methods of state marking are used for the oracles: a phase-flip method employed by other experimental demonstrations, and a Boolean method requiring an ancilla qubit that is directly equivalent to the state marking scheme required to perform a classical search. We also report the deterministic implementation of a Toffoli-4 gate, which is used along with Toffoli-3 gates to construct the algorithms; these gates have process fidelities of 70.5% and 89.6%, respectively.

  5. Negative inductance SQUID qubit operating in a quantum regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. Y.; Su, F. F.; Xu, H. K.; Li, Z. Y.; Tian, Ye; Zhu, X. B.; Lu, Li; Han, Siyuan; Zhao, S. P.

    2018-04-01

    Two-junction SQUIDs with negative mutual inductance between their two arms, called nSQUIDs, have been proposed for significantly improving quantum information transfer but their quantum nature has not been experimentally demonstrated. We have designed, fabricated, and characterized superconducting nSQUID qubits. Our results provide clear evidence of the quantum coherence of the device, whose properties are well described by theoretical calculations using parameters determined from spectroscopic measurement. In addition to their future application for fast quantum information transfer, the nSQUID qubits exhibit rich characteristics in their tunable two-dimensional (2D) potentials, energy levels, wave function symmetries, and dipole matrix elements, which are essential to the study of a wide variety of macroscopic quantum phenomena such as tunneling in 2D potential landscapes.

  6. Silicon photonic processor of two-qubit entangling quantum logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagati, R.; Silverstone, J. W.; Strain, M. J.; Sorel, M.; Miki, S.; Yamashita, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Sasaki, M.; Terai, H.; Tanner, M. G.; Natarajan, C. M.; Hadfield, R. H.; O'Brien, J. L.; Thompson, M. G.

    2017-11-01

    Entanglement is a fundamental property of quantum mechanics, and is a primary resource in quantum information systems. Its manipulation remains a central challenge in the development of quantum technology. In this work, we demonstrate a device which can generate, manipulate, and analyse two-qubit entangled states, using miniature and mass-manufacturable silicon photonics. By combining four photon-pair sources with a reconfigurable six-mode interferometer, embedding a switchable entangling gate, we generate two-qubit entangled states, manipulate their entanglement, and analyse them, all in the same silicon chip. Using quantum state tomography, we show how our source can produce a range of entangled and separable states, and how our switchable controlled-Z gate operates on them, entangling them or making them separable depending on its configuration.

  7. Theory of real-time feedback on oscillating qubits using weak measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uys, Hermann; Du Toit, Pieter; Burd, Shaun; Bassa, Humairah; Konrad, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    We review our recent work on state estimation and feedback control of single quantum systems based on weak measurement. We discuss two classes of feedback protocols used to control qubit oscillations. The first relies on standard proportional-integral-differential control while the second comprises unitary operations aimed at reversing the phase kicks due to measurement back-action. Analytical expressions for the convergence of state estimation fidelity are also obtained in the continuous measurement limit, by evaluating the fidelity change in an incremental step of the estimation protocol. This work was supported in part by a Grant from the South African National Research Foundation (Grant 93602), as well as an award by the United States Airforce Office of Scientific Research (Award FA9550-14-1-0151).

  8. Stabilizing Rabi oscillation of a charge qubit via the atomic clock technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deshui; Landra, Alessandro; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2018-02-01

    We propose a superconducting circuit-atom hybrid, where the Rabi oscillation of single excess Cooper pair in the island is stabilized via the common atomic clock technique. The noise in the superconducting circuit is mapped onto the voltage source which biases the Cooper-pair box via an inductor and a gate capacitor. The fast fluctuations of the gate charge are significantly suppressed by an inductor-capacitor resonator, leading to a long-relaxation-time Rabi oscillation. More importantly, the residual low-frequency fluctuations are further reduced by using the general feedback-control method, in which the voltage bias is stabilized via continuously measuring the dc-Stark-shift-induced atomic Ramsey signal. The stability and coherence time of the resulting charge-qubit Rabi oscillation are both enhanced. The principal structure of this Cooper-pair-box oscillator is studied in detail.

  9. Upper-Bounds on Qubit Coherence Set by Master Clock Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-10

    Upper-bounds on qubit coherence set by master clock instabilities Harrison Ball1, William D. Oliver2,3, and Michael J. Biercuk1 1ARC Centre for...States Government. Upper-bounds on qubit coherence set by master clock instabilities Harrison Ball,1 William D. Oliver,2, 3 and Michael J. Biercuk1...quantum superposition, however, the coherence that must be preserved ultimately includes that of the qubit relative to the system clock . In this

  10. Dynamic behavior of superconducting flux qubit excited by a series of electromagnetic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyko, A.S.; Omelyanchouk, A.N.; Shevchenko, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    We study theoretically the behavior of the superconducting flux qubit subjected to a series of electromagnetic pulses. The possibility of controlling system state via changing the parameters of the pulse is studied. We calculated the phase shift in a tank circuit weakly coupled to the qubit which can be measured by the impedance measurement technique. For the flux qubit we consider the possibility of estimating the relaxation rate from the impedance measurements by varying the delay time between the pulses

  11. Negativity of Two-Qubit System Through Spin Coherent States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrada, K.; El Baz, M.; Hassouni, Y.; Eleuch, H.

    2009-12-01

    Using the negativity, we express and analyze the entanglement of two-qubit nonorthogonal pure states through the spin coherent states. We formulate this measure in terms of the amplitudes of coherent states and we give the conditions for the minimal and the maximal entanglement. We generalize this formalism to the case of a class of mixed states and show that the negativity is also a function of probabilities. (author)

  12. Qubit state tomography in a superconducting circuit via weak measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lupei; Xu, Luting; Feng, Wei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2017-03-01

    In this work we present a study on a new scheme for measuring the qubit state in a circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) system, based on weak measurement and the concept of weak value. To be applicable under generic parameter conditions, our formulation and analysis are carried out for finite-strength weak measurement, and in particular beyond the bad-cavity and weak-response limits. The proposed study is accessible to present state-of-the-art circuit QED experiments.

  13. High threshold distributed quantum computing with three-qubit nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Benjamin, Simon C.

    2012-09-01

    In the distributed quantum computing paradigm, well-controlled few-qubit ‘nodes’ are networked together by connections which are relatively noisy and failure prone. A practical scheme must offer high tolerance to errors while requiring only simple (i.e. few-qubit) nodes. Here we show that relatively modest, three-qubit nodes can support advanced purification techniques and so offer robust scalability: the infidelity in the entanglement channel may be permitted to approach 10% if the infidelity in local operations is of order 0.1%. Our tolerance of network noise is therefore an order of magnitude beyond prior schemes, and our architecture remains robust even in the presence of considerable decoherence rates (memory errors). We compare the performance with that of schemes involving nodes of lower and higher complexity. Ion traps, and NV-centres in diamond, are two highly relevant emerging technologies: they possess the requisite properties of good local control, rapid and reliable readout, and methods for entanglement-at-a-distance.

  14. Coherent oscillations in a superconducting flux qubit without microwave pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletto, Stefano; Lisenfeld, Juergen; Lukashenko, Alexander; Ustinov, Alexey V. [Physikalisches Institut III, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Chiarello, Fabio [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie del CNR, Roma (Italy); Cosmelli, Carlo [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Universita' di Roma La Sapienza (Italy); Carelli, Pasquale [Universita' degli Studi dell' Acquila (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    We report on observation of coherent oscillations in a superconducting flux qubit by using no microwave excitation but only nanosecond-long dc flux pulses. The investigated circuit is a double-SQUID consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by a small dc-SQUID, which we control via two bias fluxes {phi}{sub c} and {phi}{sub x}. The potential energy profile of the qubit has the shape of a double well, where the flux {phi}{sub c} controls the height of the barrier between the two minima and the flux {phi}{sub x} changes the potential symmetry. The two computational states of the qubit are identified with the two energy minima and physically correspond to clockwise or anticlockwise circulating currents in the double-SQUID main loop. We observed coherent oscillations, in the frequency range between 8 and 20 GHz, induced by fast pulses of the control flux {phi}{sub c} modulating the barrier between the two potential wells. The quantum dynamics that leads to this kind of oscillations is composed of a non-adiabatic and adiabatic evolution of the two lowest energy states.

  15. Silicon quantum processor with robust long-distance qubit couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosi, Guilherme; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Schmitt, Vivien; Tenberg, Stefanie; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard; Morello, Andrea

    2017-09-06

    Practical quantum computers require a large network of highly coherent qubits, interconnected in a design robust against errors. Donor spins in silicon provide state-of-the-art coherence and quantum gate fidelities, in a platform adapted from industrial semiconductor processing. Here we present a scalable design for a silicon quantum processor that does not require precise donor placement and leaves ample space for the routing of interconnects and readout devices. We introduce the flip-flop qubit, a combination of the electron-nuclear spin states of a phosphorus donor that can be controlled by microwave electric fields. Two-qubit gates exploit a second-order electric dipole-dipole interaction, allowing selective coupling beyond the nearest-neighbor, at separations of hundreds of nanometers, while microwave resonators can extend the entanglement to macroscopic distances. We predict gate fidelities within fault-tolerance thresholds using realistic noise models. This design provides a realizable blueprint for scalable spin-based quantum computers in silicon.

  16. The tensor rank of tensor product of two three-qubit W states is eight

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lin; Friedland, Shmuel

    2017-01-01

    We show that the tensor rank of tensor product of two three-qubit W states is not less than eight. Combining this result with the recent result of M. Christandl, A. K. Jensen, and J. Zuiddam that the tensor rank of tensor product of two three-qubit W states is at most eight, we deduce that the tensor rank of tensor product of two three-qubit W states is eight. We also construct the upper bound of the tensor rank of tensor product of many three-qubit W states.

  17. Coupling nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to superconducting flux qubits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos, D.; Wubs, Martijn; Taylor, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method to achieve coherent coupling between nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond and superconducting (SC) flux qubits. The resulting coupling can be used to create a coherent interaction between the spin states of distant NV centers mediated by the flux qubit. Furthermore, the ma......, the magnetic coupling can be used to achieve a coherent transfer of quantum information between the flux qubit and an ensemble of NV centers. This enables a long-term memory for a SC quantum processor and possibly an interface between SC qubits and light....

  18. Inverse Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry for the measurement of a resonator's state using a qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Sergey; Ashhab, Sahel; Nori, Franco

    2013-03-01

    We consider theoretically a superconducting qubit - nanomechanical resonator system, which was realized recently by LaHaye et al. [Nature 459, 960 (2009)]. We formulate and solve the inverse Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg problem, where we assume the driven qubit's state to be known (i.e. measured by some other device) and aim to find the parameters of the qubit's Hamiltonian. In particular, for our system the qubit's bias is defined by the nanomechanical resonator's displacement. This may provide a tool for monitoring the nanomechanical resonator 's position. [S. N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. B 85, 094502 (2012).

  19. Qubits and quantum Hamiltonian computing performances for operating a digital Boolean 1/2-adder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dridi, Ghassen; Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Joachim, Christian

    2018-04-01

    Quantum Boolean (1 + 1) digits 1/2-adders are designed with 3 qubits for the quantum computing (Qubits) and 4 quantum states for the quantum Hamiltonian computing (QHC) approaches. Detailed analytical solutions are provided to analyse the time operation of those different 1/2-adder gates. QHC is more robust to noise than Qubits and requires about the same amount of energy for running its 1/2-adder logical operations. QHC is faster in time than Qubits but its logical output measurement takes longer.

  20. "Wormhole" geometry for entrapping topologically-protected qubits in non-Abelian quantum Hall states and probing them with voltage and noise measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Chang-Yu; Chamon, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    We study a tunneling geometry defined by a single point-contact constriction that brings to close vicinity two points sitting at the same edge of a quantum Hall liquid, shortening the trip between the otherwise spatially separated points along the normal chiral edge path. This ``wormhole''-like geometry allows for entrapping bulk quasiparticles between the edge path and the tunnel junction, possibly realizing a topologically protected qubit if the quasiparticles have non-Abelian statistics. W...

  1. Universal quantum gates for Single Cooper Pair Box based quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echternach, P.; Williams, C. P.; Dultz, S. C.; Braunstein, S.; Dowling, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for achieving arbitrary 1-qubit gates and controlled-NOT gates within the context of the Single Cooper Pair Box (SCB) approach to quantum computing. Such gates are sufficient to support universal quantum computation.

  2. A Blueprint for Demonstrating Quantum Supremacy with Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kechedzhi, Kostyantyn

    2018-01-01

    Long coherence times and high fidelity control recently achieved in scalable superconducting circuits paved the way for the growing number of experimental studies of many-qubit quantum coherent phenomena in these devices. Albeit full implementation of quantum error correction and fault tolerant quantum computation remains a challenge the near term pre-error correction devices could allow new fundamental experiments despite inevitable accumulation of errors. One such open question foundational for quantum computing is achieving the so called quantum supremacy, an experimental demonstration of a computational task that takes polynomial time on the quantum computer whereas the best classical algorithm would require exponential time and/or resources. It is possible to formulate such a task for a quantum computer consisting of less than a 100 qubits. The computational task we consider is to provide approximate samples from a non-trivial quantum distribution. This is a generalization for the case of superconducting circuits of ideas behind boson sampling protocol for quantum optics introduced by Arkhipov and Aaronson. In this presentation we discuss a proof-of-principle demonstration of such a sampling task on a 9-qubit chain of superconducting gmon qubits developed by Google. We discuss theoretical analysis of the driven evolution of the device resulting in output approximating samples from a uniform distribution in the Hilbert space, a quantum chaotic state. We analyze quantum chaotic characteristics of the output of the circuit and the time required to generate a sufficiently complex quantum distribution. We demonstrate that the classical simulation of the sampling output requires exponential resources by connecting the task of calculating the output amplitudes to the sign problem of the Quantum Monte Carlo method. We also discuss the detailed theoretical modeling required to achieve high fidelity control and calibration of the multi-qubit unitary evolution in the

  3. Rapid characterization of microscopic two-level systems using Landau-Zener transitions in a superconducting qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Xinsheng; Yu, Haifeng; Yu, Yang; Han, Siyuan

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a fast method to detect microscopic two-level systems in a superconducting phase qubit. By monitoring the population leak after sweeping the qubit bias flux, we are able to measure the two-level systems that are coupled with the qubit. Compared with the traditional method that detects two-level systems by energy spectroscopy, our method is faster and more sensitive. This method supplies a useful tool to investigate two-level systems in solid-state qubits

  4. High-capacity quantum secure direct communication with two-photon six-qubit hyperentangled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, FangZhou; Yang, GuoJian; Wang, HaiBo; Xiong, Jun; Alzahrani, Faris; Hobiny, Aatef; Deng, FuGuo

    2017-12-01

    This study proposes the first high-capacity quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) with two-photon six-qubit hyper-entangled Bell states in two longitudinal momentum and polarization degrees of freedom (DOFs) of photon pairs, which can be generated using two 0.5 mm-thick type-I β barium borate crystal slabs aligned one behind the other and an eight-hole screen. The secret message can be independently encoded on the photon pairs with 64 unitary operations in all three DOFs. This protocol has a higher capacity than previous QSDC protocols because each photon pair can carry 6 bits of information, not just 2 or 4 bits. Our QSDC protocol decreases the influence of decoherence from environment noise by exploiting the decoy photons to check the security of the transmission of the first photon sequence. Compared with two-way QSDC protocols, our QSDC protocol is immune to an attack by an eavesdropper using Trojan horse attack strategies because it is a one-way quantum communication. The QSDC protocol has good applications in the future quantum communication because of all these features.

  5. Independent, extensible control of same-frequency superconducting qubits by selective broadcasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asaad, S.; Dickel, C.; Langford, N.K.; Poletto, S.; Bruno, A.; Rol, M.A.; Deurloo, D.; DiCarlo, L.

    2016-01-01

    A critical ingredient for realising large-scale quantum information processors will be the ability to make economical use of qubit control hardware. We demonstrate an extensible strategy for reusing control hardware on same-frequency transmon qubits in a circuit QED chip with surface-code-compatible

  6. The information about the state of a qubit gained by a weakly coupled detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashhab, S; You, J Q; Nori, Franco

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the information that one can learn about the state of a quantum two-level system, i.e. a qubit, when probed weakly by a nearby detector. In particular, we focus on the case when the qubit Hamiltonian and the qubit's operator being probed by the detector do not commute. Because the qubit's state keeps evolving while being probed and because the measurement data is mixed with detector-related background noise, one might expect the detector to fail in this case. We show, however, that under suitable conditions and by proper analysis of the measurement data useful information about the state of the qubit can be extracted. It turns out that the measurement basis is stochastically determined every time the experiment is repeated. We analyze in detail the probability distributions that govern the choice of measurement bases. We also analyze the information acquisition rate and show that it is largely unaffected by the apparent conflict between the measurement and intrinsic qubit dynamics. We discuss the relation between our analysis and the stochastic master equation that describes the evolution of the qubit's state under the influence of measurement and decoherence. In particular, we write down a stochastic equation that encompasses the usual stochastic master equation for the evolution of the qubit's density matrix and additionally contains the measurement information that can be extracted from the observed signal.

  7. Two qubits for C.G. Jung’s theory of personality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blutner, R.; Hochnadel, E.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a formalization of C.G. Jung’s theory of personality using a four-dimensional Hilbert-space for the representation of two qubits. The first qubit relates to Jung’s four psychological functions: Thinking, Feeling, Sensing and iNtuition, which are represented by two groups of projection

  8. Berry phase in superconducting charge qubits interacting with a cavity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aty, Mahmoud

    2009-01-01

    We propose a method for analyzing Berry phase for a multi-qubit system of superconducting charge qubits interacting with a microwave field. By suitably choosing the system parameters and precisely controlling the dynamics, novel connection found between the Berry phase and entanglement creations.

  9. Entanglement-assisted quantum parameter estimation from a noisy qubit pair: A Fisher information analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François, E-mail: chapeau@univ-angers.fr

    2017-04-25

    Benefit from entanglement in quantum parameter estimation in the presence of noise or decoherence is investigated, with the quantum Fisher information to asses the performance. When an input probe experiences any (noisy) transformation introducing the parameter dependence, the performance is always maximized by a pure probe. As a generic estimation task, for estimating the phase of a unitary transformation on a qubit affected by depolarizing noise, the optimal separable probe and its performance are characterized as a function of the level of noise. By entangling qubits in pairs, enhancements of performance over that of the optimal separable probe are quantified, in various settings of the entangled pair. In particular, in the presence of the noise, enhancement over the performance of the one-qubit optimal probe can always be obtained with a second entangled qubit although never interacting with the process to be estimated. Also, enhancement over the performance of the two-qubit optimal separable probe can always be achieved by a two-qubit entangled probe, either partially or maximally entangled depending on the level of the depolarizing noise. - Highlights: • Quantum parameter estimation from a noisy qubit pair is investigated. • The quantum Fisher information is used to assess the ultimate best performance. • Theoretical expressions are established and analyzed for the Fisher information. • Enhanced performances are quantified with various entanglements of the pair. • Enhancement is shown even with one entangled qubit noninteracting with the process.

  10. Feedback Control of a Solid-State Qubit Using High-Fidelity Projective Measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riste, D.; Bultink, C.C.; Lehnert, K.W.; DiCarlo, L.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate feedback control of a superconducting transmon qubit using discrete, projective measurement and conditional coherent driving. Feedback realizes a fast and deterministic qubit reset to a target state with 2.4% error averaged over input superposition states, and allows concatenating

  11. Instantaneous coherent destruction of tunneling and fast quantum state preparation for strongly pulsed spin qubits in diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubs, Martijn

    2010-01-01

    Qubits driven by resonant strong pulses are studied and a parameter regime is explored in which the dynamics can be solved in closed form. Instantaneous coherent destruction of tunneling can be seen for longer pulses, whereas shorter pulses allow a fast preparation of the qubit state. Results...... are compared with recent experiments of pulsed nitrogen-vacancy center spin qubits in diamond....

  12. Molecular processors: from qubits to fuzzy logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Pier Luigi

    2011-03-14

    Single molecules or their assemblies are information processing devices. Herein it is demonstrated how it is possible to process different types of logic through molecules. As long as decoherent effects are maintained far away from a pure quantum mechanical system, quantum logic can be processed. If the collapse of superimposed or entangled wavefunctions is unavoidable, molecules can still be used to process either crisp (binary or multi-valued) or fuzzy logic. The way for implementing fuzzy inference engines is declared and it is supported by the examples of molecular fuzzy logic systems devised so far. Fuzzy logic is drawing attention in the field of artificial intelligence, because it models human reasoning quite well. This ability may be due to some structural analogies between a fuzzy logic system and the human nervous system. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Characterization of double-loop four-Josephson-junction flux qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Y.; Saito, Y.; Wada, Z.

    2009-01-01

    An advantage of a double-loop four-Josephson-junction (4-JJ) flux qubit is the tunability of the energy gap at a symmetry point, i.e., the point at which the double-well potential of the qubit is symmetric. The energy gap is controlled via the magnetic flux in a DC superconducting quantum interference device (DC-SQUID) loop incorporated in a 4-JJ qubit. We investigate the locus of the symmetry point in the plane of two control fluxes of the qubit, taking into account the asymmetry in the DC-SQUID, which is inevitable in practical cases. The observed positions of the qubit steps are in reasonable agreement with the calculated locus of the symmetry point. We estimate the asymmetry parameter of the DC-SQUID from this analysis.

  14. Kraus Operators for a Pair of Interacting Qubits: a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenijević, M.; Jeknić-Dugić, J.; Dugić, M.

    2018-04-01

    The Kraus form of the completely positive dynamical maps is appealing from the mathematical and the point of the diverse applications of the open quantum systems theory. Unfortunately, the Kraus operators are poorly known for the two-qubit processes. In this paper, we derive the Kraus operators for a pair of interacting qubits, while the strength of the interaction is arbitrary. One of the qubits is subjected to the x-projection spin measurement. The obtained results are applied to calculate the dynamics of the entanglement in the qubits system. We obtain the loss of the correlations in the finite time interval; the stronger the inter-qubit interaction, the longer lasting entanglement in the system.

  15. Long-lived qubit from three spin-(1/2) atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Rui; Loerch, Niels; Suzuki, Jun; Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2011-01-01

    A system of three spin-(1/2) atoms allows the construction of a reference-frame-free (RFF) qubit in the subspace with total angular momentum j=1/2. The RFF qubit stays coherent perfectly as long as the spins of the three atoms are affected homogeneously. The inhomogeneous evolution of the atoms causes decoherence, but this decoherence can be suppressed efficiently by applying a bias magnetic field of modest strength perpendicular to the plane of the atoms. The resulting lifetime of the RFF qubit can be many days, making RFF qubits of this kind promising candidates for quantum information storage units. Specifically, we examine the situation of three 6 Li atoms trapped in a CO 2 -laser-generated optical lattice and find that, with conservatively estimated parameters, a stored qubit maintains a fidelity of 0.9999 for two hours.

  16. Universal Quantum Computing:. Third Gen Prototyping Utilizing Relativistic `Trivector' R-Qubit Modeling Surmounting Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Richard L.; Kauffman, Louis H.; Giandinoto, Salvatore

    2013-09-01

    We postulate bulk universal quantum computing (QC) cannot be achieved without surmounting the quantum uncertainty principle, an inherent barrier by empirical definition in the regime described by the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum theory - the last remaining hurdle to bulk QC. To surmount uncertainty with probability 1, we redefine the basis for the qubit utilizing a unique form of M-Theoretic Calabi-Yau mirror symmetry cast in an LSXD Dirac covariant polarized vacuum with an inherent `Feynman synchronization backbone'. This also incorporates a relativistic qubit (r-qubit) providing additional degrees of freedom beyond the traditional Block 2-sphere qubit bringing the r-qubit into correspondence with our version of Relativistic Topological Quantum Field Theory (RTQFT). We present a 3rd generation prototype design for simplifying bulk QC implementation.

  17. Hybrid quantum circuit with a superconducting qubit coupled to a spin ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yuimaru; Grezes, Cecile; Dewes, Andreas; Vion, Denis; Isoya, Junichi; Jacques, Vincent; Dreau, Anais; Roch, Jean-Francois; Diniz, Igor; Auffeves, Alexia; Esteve, Daniel; Bertet, Patrice

    2012-02-01

    We report the experimental realization of a hybrid quantum circuit combining a superconducting qubit and an ensemble of electronic spins. The qubit, of the transmon type, is coherently coupled to the spin ensemble consisting of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in a diamond crystal via a frequency-tunable superconducting resonator acting as a quantum bus [1,2]. Using this circuit, we prepare arbitrary superpositions of the qubit states that we store into collective excitations of the spin ensemble and retrieve back later on into the qubit [3]. These results constitute a first proof of concept of spin-ensemble based quantum memory for superconducting qubits.[4pt] [1] Y. Kubo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 140502 (2010).[0pt] [2] Y. Kubo et al., arXiv: 1109.3960.[0pt] [3] Y. Kubo et al., arXiv: 1110.2978.

  18. Circuit QED and engineering charge-based superconducting qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girvin, S M; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208284, New Haven, CT 06520-8248 (United States)], E-mail: steven.girvin@yale.edu, E-mail: michel.devoret@yale.edu, E-mail: robert.schoelkopf@yale.edu

    2009-12-15

    The last two decades have seen tremendous advances in our ability to generate and manipulate quantum coherence in mesoscopic superconducting circuits. These advances have opened up the study of quantum optics of microwave photons in superconducting circuits as well as providing important hardware for the manipulation of quantum information. Focusing primarily on charge-based qubits, we provide a brief overview of these developments and discuss the present state of the art. We also survey the remarkable progress that has been made in realizing circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) in which superconducting artificial atoms are strongly coupled to individual microwave photons.

  19. Detection of quantum critical points by a probe qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingfu; Peng, Xinhua; Rajendran, Nageswaran; Suter, Dieter

    2008-03-14

    Quantum phase transitions occur when the ground state of a quantum system undergoes a qualitative change when an external control parameter reaches a critical value. Here, we demonstrate a technique for studying quantum systems undergoing a phase transition by coupling the system to a probe qubit. It uses directly the increased sensibility of the quantum system to perturbations when it is close to a critical point. Using an NMR quantum simulator, we demonstrate this measurement technique for two different types of quantum phase transitions in an Ising spin chain.

  20. Permanent spin currents in cavity-qubit systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Manas; Hein, Sven M.; Kapit, Eliot; Aron, Camille

    2018-02-01

    In a recent experiment [P. Roushan et al., Nat. Phys. 13, 146 (2017), 10.1038/nphys3930], a spin current in an architecture of three superconducting qubits was produced during a few microseconds by creating synthetic magnetic fields. The lifetime of the current was set by the typical dissipative mechanisms that occur in those systems. We propose a scheme for the generation of permanent currents, even in the presence of such imperfections, and scalable to larger system sizes. It relies on striking a subtle balance between multiple nonequilibrium drives and the dissipation mechanisms, in order to engineer and stimulate chiral excited states which can carry current.

  1. Excess energy and decoherence factor of a qubit coupled to a one-dimensional periodically driven spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Tanay

    2016-06-01

    We take a central spin model (CSM), consisting of a one-dimensional environmental Ising spin chain and a single qubit connected globally to all the spins of the environment, to study the excess energy (EE) of the environment and the logarithm of decoherence factor namely, generalized fidelity susceptibility per site (GFSS), associated with the qubit under a periodic driving of the transverse field term of environment across its critical point using the Floquet theory. The coupling to the qubit, prepared in a pure state, with the transverse field of the spin chain yields two sets of EE corresponding to the two species of Floquet operators. In the limit of weak coupling, we derive an approximated expression of GFSS after an infinite number of driving period which can successfully estimate the low- and intermediate-frequency behavior of GFSS obtained numerically with a large number of time periods. Our main focus is to analytically investigate the effect of system-environment coupling strength on the EEs and GFSS and relate the behavior of GFSS to EEs as a function of frequency by plausible analytical arguments. We explicitly show that the low-frequency beatinglike pattern of GFSS is an outcome of two frequencies, causing the oscillations in the two branches of EEs, that are dependent on the coupling strength. In the intermediate frequency regime, dip structure observed in GFSS can be justified by the resonance peaks of EEs at those coupling parameter-dependent frequencies; high-frequency saturation behavior of EEs and GFSS are controlled by the same static Hamiltonian and the associated saturation values are related to the coupling strength.

  2. Quantum-classical interface based on single flux quantum digital logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, R.; Vavilov, M. G.; Plourde, B. L. T.; Wilhelm, F. K.; Liebermann, P. J.; Mukhanov, O. A.; Ohki, T. A.

    2018-04-01

    We describe an approach to the integrated control and measurement of a large-scale superconducting multiqubit array comprising up to 108 physical qubits using a proximal coprocessor based on the Single Flux Quantum (SFQ) digital logic family. Coherent control is realized by irradiating the qubits directly with classical bitstreams derived from optimal control theory. Qubit measurement is performed by a Josephson photon counter, which provides access to the classical result of projective quantum measurement at the millikelvin stage. We analyze the power budget and physical footprint of the SFQ coprocessor and discuss challenges and opportunities associated with this approach.

  3. The value of fluorimetry (Qubit) and spectrophotometry (NanoDrop) in the quantification of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in malignant melanoma and prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Giovanni; Maccaferri, Monia; Manfredini, Marco; Kaleci, Shaniko; Mandrioli, Mauro; Pellacani, Giovanni; Ozben, Tomris; Depenni, Roberta; Bianchi, Giampaolo; Pirola, Giacomo Maria; Tomasi, Aldo

    2018-04-01

    Circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) is of crucial interest in oncology. cfDNA constitutes a potential prognostic and therapeutic marker for different solid tumors and can be used in the diagnostic and therapeutic management of cancer patients for which nowadays there are no valid laboratory markers. In the present study, the quality and quantity of the cfDNA were assessed by different quantification procedures, in order to identify the potential applications of these techniques in the preliminary cfDNA quantification. Qubit with single (ss) and double strand (ds) DNA assay kits, NanoDrop and quantitative Real Time PCR (qPCR), were adopted to assess the cfDNA in the blood samples of 18 melanoma patients, 67 prostate cancer patients and 15 healthy controls. The quantification by NanoDrop (average value 8.48ng/μl, 95% confidence limit (CL)=7.23-9.73), Qubit ssDNA (average value 23.08ng/μl, CL=19.88-26.28), dsDNA (average value 4.32ng/μl, CL=3.52-5.12) assay kits and qPCR (average value 0.39ng/μl, CL=0.31-0.47) revealed differences among the four procedures. Qubit 2.0 ss-DNA kit gave higher cfDNA concentration values for all the samples analyzed. In detail, Qubit ssDNA assay revealed higher sensitivity in the quantification of small amounts of pure ss-DNA and ds-DNA, while NanoDrop allowed the assessment of the purity of cfDNA samples. The NanoDrop and Qubit 2.0 measurements were analyzed in order to define their correlation with qPCR cfDNA assessment, showing good correlation values with the qPCR that should be considered the "gold standard". In our proposal, the sequential combination of NanoDrop and Qubit ssDNA methods should be adopted for a cost-effective preliminary assessment of total circulating cfDNA in melanoma and prostate cancer patients, and only discordant values should undergo qPCR assessment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficient reverse time migration with amplitude encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiangtao; Wang, Huazhong; Zhao, Lei; Shao, Yu; Wang, Meixia; Osen, Are

    2015-08-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is an accurate seismic imaging method for imaging the complex subsurface structure. Traditional common shot RTM suffers from low efficiency due to the large number of single shot gathers, especially for marine seismic data. Phase encoding is commonly used to reduce the computational cost of RTM. Phase encoding in the frequency domain is usually related to time shift in the time domain. Therefore, phase-encoding-based RTM needs time padding to avoid information loss which degrades the efficiency of the time-domain wavefield extrapolator. In this paper, an efficient time-domain RTM scheme based on the amplitude encoding is proposed. This scheme uses the orthogonal cosine basis as the encoding function, which has similar physical meaning to plane wave encoding (i.e. plane-wave components with different surface shooting angles). The proposed scheme can generate a qualified imaging result as well as common shot RTM but with less computational cost. Since this scheme does not need time padding, it is more efficient than the phase encoding schemes and can be conveniently implemented in the time domain. Numerical examples on the Sigsbee2a synthetic dataset demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  5. New entropic inequalities for qubit and unimodal Gaussian states

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Saldívar, J. A.; Castaños, O.; Man'ko, M. A.; Man'ko, V. I.

    2018-02-01

    The Tsallis relative entropy Sq(ρ ˆ , σ ˆ) measures the distance between two arbitrary density matrices ρ ˆ and σ ˆ . In this work the approximation to this quantity when q = 1 + δ (δ ≪ 1) is obtained. It is shown that the resulting series is equal to the von Neumann relative entropy when δ = 0. Analyzing the von Neumann relative entropy for an arbitrary ρ ˆ and a thermal equilibrium state σ ˆ =e - β H ˆ / Tr(e - β H ˆ) is possible to define a new inequality relating the energy, the entropy, and the partition function of the system. From this inequality, a parameter that measures the distance between the two states is defined. This distance is calculated for a general qubit system and for an arbitrary unimodal Gaussian state. In the qubit case, the dependence on the purity of the system is studied for T ≥ 0 and also for T thermal light state as a thermal equilibrium state of the parametric amplifier is presented.

  6. Silicon qubit performance in the presence of inhomogeneous strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, N. Tobias; Ward, Daniel R.; Baczewski, Andrew D.; Gamble, John K.; Montano, Ines; Rudolph, Martin; Nielsen, Erik; Carroll, Malcolm

    While gate electrode voltages largely define the potential landscape experienced by electrons in quantum dot (QD) devices, mechanical strain also plays a role. Inhomogeneous strain established over the course of device fabrication, followed by mismatched contraction under cooling to cryogenic temperatures, may significantly perturb this potential. A recent investigation by Thorbeck & Zimmerman suggests that unintentional QDs may form as a result of the latter thermal contraction mismatch mechanism. In this work, we investigate the effects of inhomogeneous strain on QD tunnel barriers and other properties, from the perspective of QD and donor-based qubit performance. Through semiconductor process simulation, we estimate the relative magnitude of strain established during fabrication as compared with thermal expansion coefficient mismatch. Combining these predictions with multi-valley effective mass theory modeling of qubit characteristics, we identify whether strain effects may compel stricter than expected constraints on device dimensions. Finally, we investigate the degree to which strain and charge disorder effects may be distinguished. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Coupled Qubits for Next Generation Quantum Annealing: Novel Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samach, Gabriel; Weber, Steven; Hover, David; Rosenberg, Danna; Yoder, Jonilyn; Kim, David; Oliver, William D.; Kerman, Andrew J.

    While the first generation of quantum annealers based on Josephson junction technology have been successfully engineered to represent arrays of spins in the quantum transverse-field Ising model, no circuit architecture to date has succeeded in emulating the more complicated non-stoquastic Hamiltonians of interest for next generation quantum annealing. Here, we present our recent results for tunable ZZ- and XX-coupling between high coherence superconducting flux qubits. We discuss the larger architectures these coupled two-qubit building blocks will enable, as well as comment on the limitations of such architectures. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  8. Absorption spectra of superconducting qubits driven by bichromatic microwave fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jiazheng; Jooya, Hossein Z.; Sun, Guozhu; Fan, Yunyi; Wu, Peiheng; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.; Han, Siyuan

    2017-11-01

    We report experimental observation of two distinct quantum interference patterns in the absorption spectra when a transmon superconducting qubit is subjected to a bichromatic microwave field with the same Rabi frequencies. Within the two-mode Floquet formalism with no dissipation processes, we propose a graph-theoretical representation to model the interaction Hamiltonian for each of these observations. This theoretical framework provides a clear visual representation of various underlying physical processes in a systematic way beyond rotating-wave approximation. The presented approach is valuable to gain insights into the behavior of multichromatic field driven quantum two-level systems, such as two-level atoms and superconducting qubits. Each of the observed interference patterns is represented by appropriate graph products on the proposed color-weighted graphs. The underlying mechanisms and the characteristic features of the observed fine structures are identified by the transitions between the graph vertices, which represent the doubly dressed states of the system. The good agreement between the numerical simulation and experimental data confirms the validity of the theoretical method. Such multiphoton interference may be used in manipulating the quantum states and/or generate nonclassical microwave photons.

  9. Leakage and sweet spots in triple-quantum-dot spin qubits: A molecular-orbital study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengxian; Yang, Xu-Chen; Wang, Xin

    2018-04-01

    A triple-quantum-dot system can be operated as either an exchange-only qubit or a resonant-exchange qubit. While it is generally believed that the decisive advantage of the resonant-exchange qubit is the suppression of charge noise because it is operated at a sweet spot, we show that the leakage is also an important factor. Through molecular-orbital-theoretic calculations, we show that when the system is operated in the exchange-only scheme, the leakage to states with double electron occupancy in quantum dots is severe when rotations around the axis 120∘ from z ̂ is performed. While this leakage can be reduced by either shrinking the dots or separating them further, the exchange interactions are also suppressed at the same time, making the gate operations unfavorably slow. When the system is operated as a resonant-exchange qubit, the leakage is three to five orders of magnitude smaller. We have also calculated the optimal detuning point which minimizes the leakage for the resonant-exchange qubit, and have found that although it does not coincide with the double sweet spot for the charge noise, they are rather close. Our results suggest that the resonant-exchange qubit has another advantage, that leakage can be greatly suppressed compared to the exchange-only qubit, and operating at the double sweet spot point should be optimal both for reducing charge noise and suppressing leakage.

  10. Progress toward coupled flux qubits with high connectivity and long coherence times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Steven; Hover, David; Rosenberg, Danna; Samach, Gabriel; Yoder, Jonilyn; Kerman, Andrew; Oliver, William

    The ability to engineer interactions between qubits is essential to all areas of quantum information science. The capability to tune qubit-qubit couplings in situ is desirable for gate-based quantum computing and analog quantum simulation and necessary for quantum annealing. Consequently, tunable coupling has been the subject of several experimental efforts using both transmon qubits and flux qubits. Recently, our group has demonstrated robust and long-lived capacitively shunted (C-shunt) flux qubits. Here, we discuss our efforts to develop architectures for tunably coupling these qubits. In particular, we focus on optimizing the RF SQUID coupler to achieve high connectivity. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  11. On the validity of microscopic calculations of double-quantum-dot spin qubits based on Fock-Darwin states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, GuoXuan; Wang, Xin

    2018-04-01

    We consider two typical approximations that are used in the microscopic calculations of double-quantum dot spin qubits, namely, the Heitler-London (HL) and the Hund-Mulliken (HM) approximations, which use linear combinations of Fock-Darwin states to approximate the two-electron states under the double-well confinement potential. We compared these results to a case in which the solution to a one-dimensional Schr¨odinger equation was exactly known and found that typical microscopic calculations based on Fock-Darwin states substantially underestimate the value of the exchange interaction, which is the key parameter that controls the quantum dot spin qubits. This underestimation originates from the lack of tunneling of Fock-Darwin states, which is accurate only in the case with a single potential well. Our results suggest that the accuracies of the current two-dimensional molecular- orbit-theoretical calculations based on Fock-Darwin states should be revisited since underestimation could only deteriorate in dimensions that are higher than one.

  12. Simulation of a quantum NOT gate for a single qutrit system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    arises. In particular, a three-level system or qutrit has attracted the attention [9]. The qutrit has proved to be more efficient than qubit systems for executing some tasks. For instance, for quantum key distribution it provides better security than that obtained by employing two-level encoding protocols [10,11]. In fact, it has been ...

  13. Quantum interface between a transmon qubit and spins of nitrogen-vacancy centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaowen; Song, Yipu; Duan, Luming

    2017-12-01

    Hybrid quantum circuits combining advantages of each individual system have provided a promising platform for quantum information processing. Here we propose an experimental scheme to directly couple a transmon qubit to an individual spin in the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center, with a coupling strength three orders of magnitude larger than that for a single spin coupled to a coplanar waveguide microwave cavity. This direct coupling between the transmon and the NV center could be utilized to make a transmon bus, leading to a coherently virtual exchange among different single spins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, by coupling a transmon to a low-density NV ensemble, a swap operation between the transmon and NV ensemble is feasible and a quantum nondemolition measurement on the state of the NV ensemble can be realized on the cavity-transmon-NV-ensemble hybrid system. Moreover, in this system, a virtual coupling can be achieved between the cavity and NV ensemble, which is much larger in magnitude than the direct coupling between the cavity and the NV ensemble. The photon state in the cavity can thus be stored into NV spins more efficiently through this virtual coupling.

  14. Demonstration of Geometric Landau-Zener Interferometry in a Superconducting Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xinsheng; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Zhang, Zhentao; Yu, Yang; Han, Siyuan; Zhu, Shi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Geometric quantum manipulation and Landau-Zener interferometry have been separately explored in many quantum systems. In this Letter, we combine these two approaches to study the dynamics of a superconducting phase qubit. We experimentally demonstrate Landau-Zener interferometry based on the pure geometric phases in this solid-state qubit. We observe the interference caused by a pure geometric phase accumulated in the evolution between two consecutive Landau-Zener transitions, while the dynamical phase is canceled out by a spin-echo pulse. The full controllability of the qubit state as a function of the intrinsically robust geometric phase provides a promising approach for quantum state manipulation.

  15. Thermodynamic fingerprints of non-Markovianity in a system of coupled superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedani Raja, Sina; Borrelli, Massimo; Schmidt, Rebecca; Pekola, Jukka P.; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2018-03-01

    The exploitation and characterization of memory effects arising from the interaction between system and environment is a key prerequisite for quantum reservoir engineering beyond the standard Markovian limit. In this paper we investigate a prototype of non-Markovian dynamics experimentally implementable with superconducting qubits. We rigorously quantify non-Markovianity, highlighting the effects of the environmental temperature on the Markovian to non-Markovian crossover. We investigate how memory effects influence, and specifically suppress, the ability to perform work on the driven qubit. We show that the average work performed on the qubit can be used as a diagnostic tool to detect the presence or absence of memory effects.

  16. Continuous Quantum Nondemolition Measurement of the Transverse Component of a Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vool, U.; Shankar, S.; Mundhada, S. O.; Ofek, N.; Narla, A.; Sliwa, K.; Zalys-Geller, E.; Liu, Y.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Girvin, S. M.; Devoret, M. H.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum jumps of a qubit are usually observed between its energy eigenstates, also known as its longitudinal pseudospin component. Is it possible, instead, to observe quantum jumps between the transverse superpositions of these eigenstates? We answer positively by presenting the first continuous quantum nondemolition measurement of the transverse component of an individual qubit. In a circuit QED system irradiated by two pump tones, we engineer an effective Hamiltonian whose eigenstates are the transverse qubit states, and a dispersive measurement of the corresponding operator. Such transverse component measurements are a useful tool in the driven-dissipative operation engineering toolbox, which is central to quantum simulation and quantum error correction.

  17. Reduction of entropic uncertainty in entangled qubits system by local PT-symmetric operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shi-Yang; Fang Mao-Fa; Zhang Yan-Liang; Guo You-Neng; Zhao Yan-Jun; Tang Wu-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty for an entangled two-qubit system in a local quantum noise channel with -symmetric operation performing on one of the two particles. Our results show that the quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty in the qubits system can be reduced effectively by the local -symmetric operation. Physical explanations for the behavior of the quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty are given based on the property of entanglement of the qubits system and the non-locality induced by the re-normalization procedure for the non-Hermitian -symmetric operation. (paper)

  18. Measurement-induced two-qubit entanglement in a bad cavity: Fundamental and practical considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julsgaard, Brian; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    An entanglement-generating protocol is described for two qubits coupled to a cavity field in the bad-cavity limit. By measuring the amplitude of a field transmitted through the cavity, an entangled spin-singlet state can be established probabilistically. Both fundamental limitations and practical...... measurement schemes are discussed, and the influence of dissipative processes and inhomogeneities in the qubits are analyzed. The measurement-based protocol provides criteria for selecting states with an infidelity scaling linearly with the qubit-decoherence rate....

  19. Measurement-induced two-qubit entanglement in a bad cavity: Fundamental and practical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julsgaard, Brian; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    An entanglement-generating protocol is described for two qubits coupled to a cavity field in the bad-cavity limit. By measuring the amplitude of a field transmitted through the cavity, an entangled spin-singlet state can be established probabilistically. Both fundamental limitations and practical measurement schemes are discussed, and the influence of dissipative processes and inhomogeneities in the qubits are analyzed. The measurement-based protocol provides criteria for selecting states with an infidelity scaling linearly with the qubit-decoherence rate.

  20. Towards realizing a quantum memory for a superconducting qubit: storage and retrieval of quantum states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shiro; Zhu, Xiaobo; Amsüss, Robert; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Shimo-Oka, Takaaki; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J; Semba, Kouichi

    2013-09-06

    We have built a hybrid system composed of a superconducting flux qubit (the processor) and an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond (the memory) that can be directly coupled to one another, and demonstrated how information can be transferred from the flux qubit to the memory, stored, and subsequently retrieved. We have established the coherence properties of the memory and succeeded in creating an entangled state between the processor and memory, demonstrating how the entangled state's coherence is preserved. Our results are a significant step towards using an electron spin ensemble as a quantum memory for superconducting qubits.

  1. Coherent oscillations in a superconducting tunable flux qubit manipulated without microwaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletto, S; Lisenfeld, J; Lukashenko, A; Ustinov, A V [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Thailand), D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Chiarello, F; Castellano, M G; Torrioli, G [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, 00156 Roma (Italy); Cosmelli, C [Dipartimento Fisica, Universita di Roma La Sapienza, 00185 Roma (Italy); Carelli, P [Dipartimento Ingegneria Elettrica, Universita dell' Aquila, 67040 Monteluco di Roio (Italy)], E-mail: ustinov@physik.uni-karlsruhe.de

    2009-01-15

    We experimentally demonstrate coherent oscillations of a tunable superconducting flux qubit by manipulating its energy potential with a nanosecond-long pulse of magnetic flux. The occupation probabilities of two persistent current states oscillate at a frequency ranging from 6 GHz to 21 GHz, tunable by changing the amplitude of the flux pulse. The demonstrated operation mode could allow quantum gates to be realized in less than 100 ps, which is much shorter than gate times attainable in other superconducting qubits. Another advantage of this type of qubit is its immunity to both thermal and magnetic field fluctuations.

  2. Quantum beat and entanglement of multi-qubits interacting with a common reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Arata; Ishi-Hayase, Junko; Minami, Fujio; Sasaki, Masahide

    2006-01-01

    The qubits can be entangled when they interact with a common Ohmic reservoir. We analyze how the reservoir-induced entanglement of qubits can be observed as the beat signal in the decay curve of the macroscopic polarization. The origin of this effect is the Lamb phase shift on the qubit array. We quantify the amount of the reservoir-induced entanglement and show how to experimentally evaluate it from the decay curve of the macroscopic polarization. We discuss how the beat signal can be discriminated from the other kinds of beat signals. We also show that our analysis can be used to estimate the reservoir characteristics

  3. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  4. Encoders and Fault Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persis, Claudio De

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring large-scale systems is of fundamental importance in modern infrastructures. Many of these large-scale systems are complex interconnections of sub-components which interact by means of communication channels with limited bandwidth. Therefore the information must be encoded in order to be

  5. Observation of single artificial atom optical bi-stability and its application to single-shot readout in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luyan; Ginossar, Eran; Guy, Mikhael; Reed, Matthew; Paik, Hanhee; Bishop, Lev S.; Sears, Adam; Petrenko, Andrei; Brecht, Teresa; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, Steven; Schoelkopf, Robert

    2012-02-01

    The high power transient behavior of superconducting qubit-cavity systems has recently been used to perform high fidelity readout of transmon qubits [1]. We show that in the steady state, the system exhibits a bi-stable behavior that can be observed on the single-shot level, with the cavity state switching stochastically between dim and bright states. The switching times are shown to be long compared to the cavity and qubit lifetimes. Some features of the bi-stability can be explained by mean field theory, while its switching dynamics is studied with large scale simulations. Understanding these dynamics will be crucial for studying the transient response, an essential aspect of the qubit readout. We will discuss progress on optimizing readout by shaping the measurement pulse. [4pt] [1] M. D. Reed, L. DiCarlo, B. R. Johnson, L. Sun, D. I. Schuster, L. Frunzio, and R. J. Schoelkopf, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 173601 (2010)

  6. Trade-off between information and disturbance in qubit thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seveso, Luigi; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2018-03-01

    We address the trade-off between information and disturbance in qubit thermometry from the perspective of quantum estimation theory. Given a quantum measurement, we quantify information via the Fisher information of the measurement and disturbance via four different figures of merit, which capture different aspects (statistical, thermodynamical, geometrical) of the trade-off. For each disturbance measure, the efficient measurements, i.e., the measurements that introduce a disturbance not greater than any other measurement extracting the same amount of information, are determined explicitly. The family of efficient measurements varies with the choice of the disturbance measure. On the other hand, commutativity between the elements of the probability operator-valued measure (POVM) and the equilibrium state of the thermometer is a necessary condition for efficiency with respect to any figure of disturbance.

  7. Engineering and manipulating topological qubits in 1D quantum wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotetes, Panagiotis; Schön, Gerd; Shnirman, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the Josephson effect in TNT and NTN junctions, consisting of topological (T) and normal (N) phases of semiconductor-superconductor 1D heterostructures in the presence of a Zeeman field. A key feature of our setup is that, in addition to the variation of the phase of the superconducting order parameter, we allow the orientation of the magnetic field to change along the junction. We find a novel magnetic contribution to the Majorana Josephson coupling that permits the Josephson current to be tuned by changing the orientation of the magnetic field along the junction. We also predict that a spin current can be generated by a finite superconducting phase difference, rendering these materials potential candidates for spintronic applications. Finally, this new type of coupling not only constitutes a unique fingerprint for the existence of Majorana bound states but also provides an alternative pathway for manipulating and braiding topological qubits in networks of wires.

  8. Secret key distillation from shielded two-qubit states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Joonwoo

    2010-01-01

    The quantum states corresponding to a secret key are characterized using the so-called private states, where the key part consisting of a secret key is shielded by the additional systems. Based on the construction, it was shown that a secret key can be distilled from bound entangled states. In this work, I consider the shielded two-qubit states in a key-distillation scenario and derive the conditions under which a secret key can be distilled using the recurrence protocol or the two-way classical distillation, advantage distillation together with one-way postprocessing. From the security conditions, it is shown that a secret key can be distilled from bound entangled states in a much wider range. In addition, I consider the case that in which white noise is added to quantum states and show that the classical distillation protocol still works despite a certain amount of noise although the recurrence protocol does not.

  9. Multi-path interferometric Josephson directional amplifier for qubit readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, Baleegh; Bronn, Nicholas T.; Jinka, Oblesh; Olivadese, Salvatore; Brink, Markus; Chow, Jerry M.

    2018-04-01

    We realize and characterize a quantum-limited, directional Josephson amplifier suitable for qubit readout. The device consists of two nondegenerate, three-wave-mixing amplifiers that are coupled together in an interferometric scheme, embedded in a printed circuit board. Nonreciprocity is generated by applying a phase gradient between the same-frequency pumps feeding the device, which plays the role of the magnetic field in a Faraday medium. Directional amplification and reflection-gain elimination are induced via wave interference between multiple paths in the system. We measure and discuss the main figures of merit of the device and show that the experimental results are in good agreement with theory. An improved version of this directional amplifier is expected to eliminate the need for bulky, off-chip isolation stages that generally separate quantum systems and preamplifiers in high-fidelity, quantum-nondemolition measurement setups.

  10. Symplectic structure of quantum phase and stochastic simulation of qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybakov, Yu.P.; Kamalov, T.F.

    2009-01-01

    Starting from the projective interpretation of the Hilbert space, a special stochastic representation of the wave function in Quantum Mechanics (QM), based on soliton realization of extended particles, is considered with the aim to model quantum states via classical computer. Entangled solitons construction having been earlier introduced in the nonlinear spinor field model for the calculation of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) spin correlation for the spin-1/2 particles in the singlet state, another example is now studied. The latter concerns the entangled envelope solitons in Kerr dielectric with cubic nonlinearity, where we use two-soliton configurations for modeling the entangled states of photons. Finally, the concept of stochastic qubits is used for quantum computing modeling

  11. Josephson Vortex Qubit based on a Confocal Annular Josephson Junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, Roberto; Mygind, Jesper; Koshelets, Valery P.

    2017-01-01

    . Thisintrinsic vortex potential can be tuned by an externally applied magnetic fieldand tilted by a bias current. The two-state system is accurately modeled by aone-dimensional sine-Gordon like equation by means of which one can numericallycalculate both the magnetic field needed to set the vortex in a given...... state aswell as the vortex depinning currents. Experimental data taken at 4.2K onhigh-quality Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb CAJTJs with an individual trapped fluxon advocatethe presence of a robust and finely tunable double-well potential for whichreliable manipulation of the vortex state has been classically...... demonstrated.The vortex is prepared in a given potential by means of an externally appliedmagnetic field, while the state readout is accomplished by measuring thevortex-depinning current in a small magnetic field. Our proof of principleexperiment convincingly demonstrates that the proposed vortex qubit based...

  12. Incoherent Qubit Control Using the Quantum Zeno Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen-Gourgy, S.; García-Pintos, L. P.; Martin, L. S.; Dressel, J.; Siddiqi, I.

    2018-01-01

    The quantum Zeno effect is the suppression of Hamiltonian evolution by repeated observation, which pins the system to an eigenstate of the measurement observable. Using measurement alone, control of the state can be achieved if the observable is slowly varied, so that the state tracks the now time-dependent eigenstate. We demonstrate this using a circuit-QED readout technique that couples to a dynamically controllable observable of a qubit. Continuous monitoring of the measurement record allows us to detect an escape from the eigenstate, thus serving as a built-in form of error detection. We show this by postselecting on realizations with high fidelity with respect to the target state. Our dynamical measurement operator technique offers a new tool for numerous forms of quantum feedback protocols, including adaptive measurements and rapid state purification.

  13. Experimental Pauli-frame randomization on a superconducting qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew; Ribeill, Guilhem; Riste, Diego; Ryan, Colm; Johnson, Blake; da Silva, Marcus P.

    Coherent errors can interfere, and in this manner, conspire to be much more damaging than stochastic errors of similar infidelity. One technique to deal with such errors is Pauli-frame randomization, which works by randomizing computational gates so that the effective errors becomes incoherent, and therefore, less damaging. In this talk we describe the practical implementation of Pauli-frame randomization on a transmon qubit (including its automation), as well as how to rigorously test Pauli-frame randomization through the use of gate set tomography. This effort is supported in part by the U.S. Army Research Office under contract W911NF-14-C-0048. The content of the information does not necessarily reflect the position or the policy of the Government, and no official endorsement should be inferred.

  14. Max 2-SAT with up to 108 qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santra, Siddhartha; Quiroz, Gregory; Ver Steeg, Greg; Lidar, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally study the performance of a programmable quantum annealing processor, the D-Wave One (DW1) with up to 108 qubits, on maximum SAT problem with 2 variables per clause (MAX 2-SAT) problems. We consider ensembles of random problems characterized by a fixed clause density, an external parameter which we tune through its critical value in our experiments. We demonstrate that the DW1 is sensitive to the critical value of the clause density. The DW1 results are verified and compared with akmaxsat, an exact, state-of-the-art algorithm. We study the relative performance of the two solvers and how they correlate in terms of problem hardness. We find that the DW1 performance scales more favorably with problem size and that problem hardness correlation is essentially non-existent. We discuss the relevance and limitations of such a comparison. (paper)

  15. Experimental quantum compressed sensing for a seven-qubit system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riofrío, C A; Gross, D; Flammia, S T; Monz, T; Nigg, D; Blatt, R; Eisert, J

    2017-05-17

    Well-controlled quantum devices with their increasing system size face a new roadblock hindering further development of quantum technologies. The effort of quantum tomography-the reconstruction of states and processes of a quantum device-scales unfavourably: state-of-the-art systems can no longer be characterized. Quantum compressed sensing mitigates this problem by reconstructing states from incomplete data. Here we present an experimental implementation of compressed tomography of a seven-qubit system-a topological colour code prepared in a trapped ion architecture. We are in the highly incomplete-127 Pauli basis measurement settings-and highly noisy-100 repetitions each-regime. Originally, compressed sensing was advocated for states with few non-zero eigenvalues. We argue that low-rank estimates are appropriate in general since statistical noise enables reliable reconstruction of only the leading eigenvectors. The remaining eigenvectors behave consistently with a random-matrix model that carries no information about the true state.

  16. Bellman equations for optimal feedback control of qubit states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouten, Luc; Edwards, Simon; Belavkin, V P

    2005-01-01

    Using results from quantum filtering theory and methods from classical control theory, we derive an optimal control strategy for an open two-level system (a qubit in interaction with the electromagnetic field) controlled by a laser. The aim is to optimally choose the laser's amplitude and phase in order to drive the system into a desired state. The Bellman equations are obtained for the case of diffusive and counting measurements for vacuum field states. A full exact solution of the optimal control problem is given for a system with simpler, linear, dynamics. These linear dynamics can be obtained physically by considering a two-level atom in a strongly driven, heavily damped, optical cavity

  17. Entanglement Evolution of Three-Qubit States under Local Decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiaosan; Liu Gaosheng; Wang Anmin

    2010-01-01

    By using negativity as entanglement measure, we have investigated the effect of local decoherence from a non-Markovian environment on the time evolution of entanglement of three-qubit states including the GHZ state, the W state, and the Werner state. From the results, we find that the entanglement dynamics depends not only on the coupling strengths but also on the specific states of concern. Specifically, the entanglement takes different behaviors under weak or strong coupling and it varies with the quantum states under study. The entanglement of the GHZ state and the Werner state can be destroyed completely by the local decoherence, while the entanglement of the W state can survive through the local decoherence partially. (general)

  18. Minimax estimation of qubit states with Bures risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Anirudh; Guţă, Mădălin

    2018-04-01

    The central problem of quantum statistics is to devise measurement schemes for the estimation of an unknown state, given an ensemble of n independent identically prepared systems. For locally quadratic loss functions, the risk of standard procedures has the usual scaling of 1/n. However, it has been noticed that for fidelity based metrics such as the Bures distance, the risk of conventional (non-adaptive) qubit tomography schemes scales as 1/\\sqrt{n} for states close to the boundary of the Bloch sphere. Several proposed estimators appear to improve this scaling, and our goal is to analyse the problem from the perspective of the maximum risk over all states. We propose qubit estimation strategies based on separate adaptive measurements, and collective measurements, that achieve 1/n scalings for the maximum Bures risk. The estimator involving local measurements uses a fixed fraction of the available resource n to estimate the Bloch vector direction; the length of the Bloch vector is then estimated from the remaining copies by measuring in the estimator eigenbasis. The estimator based on collective measurements uses local asymptotic normality techniques which allows us to derive upper and lower bounds to its maximum Bures risk. We also discuss how to construct a minimax optimal estimator in this setup. Finally, we consider quantum relative entropy and show that the risk of the estimator based on collective measurements achieves a rate O(n-1log n) under this loss function. Furthermore, we show that no estimator can achieve faster rates, in particular the ‘standard’ rate n ‑1.

  19. Magnetically Defined Qubits on 3D Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Gerson J.; Loss, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We explore potentials that break time-reversal symmetry to confine the surface states of 3D topological insulators into quantum wires and quantum dots. A magnetic domain wall on a ferromagnet insulator cap layer provides interfacial states predicted to show the quantum anomalous Hall effect. Here, we show that confinement can also occur at magnetic domain heterostructures, with states extended in the inner domain, as well as interfacial QAHE states at the surrounding domain walls. The proposed geometry allows the isolation of the wire and dot from spurious circumventing surface states. For the quantum dots, we find that highly spin-polarized quantized QAHE states at the dot edge constitute a promising candidate for quantum computing qubits. See [Ferreira and Loss, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 106802 (2013)]. We explore potentials that break time-reversal symmetry to confine the surface states of 3D topological insulators into quantum wires and quantum dots. A magnetic domain wall on a ferromagnet insulator cap layer provides interfacial states predicted to show the quantum anomalous Hall effect. Here, we show that confinement can also occur at magnetic domain heterostructures, with states extended in the inner domain, as well as interfacial QAHE states at the surrounding domain walls. The proposed geometry allows the isolation of the wire and dot from spurious circumventing surface states. For the quantum dots, we find that highly spin-polarized quantized QAHE states at the dot edge constitute a promising candidate for quantum computing qubits. See [Ferreira and Loss, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 106802 (2013)]. We acknowledge support from the Swiss NSF, NCCR Nanoscience, NCCR QSIT, and the Brazillian Research Support Center Initiative (NAP Q-NANO) from Pró-Reitoria de Pesquisa (PRP/USP).

  20. Three-stage decoherence dynamics of an electron spin qubit in an optically active quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Alexander; Rauch, Dominik; Li, Fuxiang; Simmet, Tobias; Ardelt, Per-Lennart; Regler, Armin; Müller, Kai; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.; Finley, Jonathan J.

    2015-12-01

    The control of solid-state qubits requires a detailed understanding of the decoherence mechanisms. Despite considerable progress in uncovering the qubit dynamics in strong magnetic fields, decoherence at very low magnetic fields remains puzzling, and the role of quadrupole coupling of nuclear spins is poorly understood. For spin qubits in semiconductor quantum dots, phenomenological models of decoherence include two basic types of spin relaxation: fast dephasing due to static but randomly distributed hyperfine fields (~2 ns) and a much slower process (>1 μs) of irreversible monotonic relaxation due either to nuclear spin co-flips or other complex many-body interaction effects. Here we show that this is an oversimplification; the spin qubit relaxation is determined by three rather than two distinct stages. The additional stage corresponds to the effect of coherent precession processes that occur in the nuclear spin bath itself, leading to a relatively fast but incomplete non-monotonic relaxation at intermediate timescales (~750 ns).

  1. Optimal Estimate of a Pure Qubit State from Uhlmann-Josza Fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Manuel Avila

    2012-04-01

    In the framework of collective measurements, efforts have been made to reconstruct one-qubit states. Such schemes find an obstacle in the no-cloning theorem, which prevents full reconstruction of a quantum state. Quantum Mechanics thus restricts us to obtaining estimates of the reconstruction of a pure qubit. We discuss the optimal estimate on the basis of the Uhlmann-Josza fidelity, respecting the limitations imposed by the no-cloning theorem. We derive a realistic optimal expression for the average fidelity. Our formalism also introduces an optimization parameter L. Values close to zero imply full reconstruction of the qubit (i. e., the classical limit), while larger L's represent good quantum optimization of the qubit estimate. The parameter L is interpreted as the degree of quantumness of the average fidelity associated with the reconstruction.

  2. High fidelity all-microwave controlled-phase gate for superconducting qubits by cavity vacuum displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Hanhee; Zhou, D.; Reed, M. D.; Kirchmair, G.; Frunzio, L.; Girvin, S. M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a new all-microwave controlled phase entangling gate for the superconducting qubits in the three-dimensional circuit QED (3D cQED) architecture. The gate exploits the strong coupling between qubits and a cavity, wherein the cavity frequency dispersively shifts depending on the qubit register state. We off-resonantly displace the cavity vacuum state; each computational state evolves a different phase due to the dispersive coupling, yielding a conditional phase. While designed to exploit the advantages of the 3D cQED architecture, the gate requires only dispersive coupling, making the gate applicable to a wide variety of superconducting qubit architectures. We demonstrate 98% gate fidelity evaluated by quantum process tomography, and will discuss how appropriate choices of system parameters could increase this number and how we could minimize the gate infidelity due to measurement induced dephasing and non-adiabatic gate procedure.

  3. Robust 2-Qubit Gates in a Linear Ion Crystal Using a Frequency-Modulated Driving Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Pak Hong; Landsman, Kevin A.; Figgatt, Caroline; Linke, Norbert M.; Monroe, Christopher; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2018-01-01

    In an ion trap quantum computer, collective motional modes are used to entangle two or more qubits in order to execute multiqubit logical gates. Any residual entanglement between the internal and motional states of the ions results in loss of fidelity, especially when there are many spectator ions in the crystal. We propose using a frequency-modulated driving force to minimize such errors. In simulation, we obtained an optimized frequency-modulated 2-qubit gate that can suppress errors to less than 0.01% and is robust against frequency drifts over ±1 kHz . Experimentally, we have obtained a 2-qubit gate fidelity of 98.3(4)%, a state-of-the-art result for 2-qubit gates with five ions.

  4. Completely mixed state is a critical point for three-qubit entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaryan, Sayatnova

    2011-01-01

    Pure three-qubit states have five algebraically independent and one algebraically dependent polynomial invariants under local unitary transformations and an arbitrary entanglement measure is a function of these six invariants. It is shown that if the reduced density operator of a some qubit is a multiple of the unit operator, than the geometric entanglement measure of the pure three-qubit state is absolutely independent of the polynomial invariants and is a constant for such tripartite states. Hence a one-particle completely mixed state is a critical point for the geometric measure of entanglement. -- Highlights: → Geometric measure of pure three-qubits is expressed in terms of polynomial invariants. → When one Bloch vector is zero the measure is independent of the remaining invariants. → Hence a one-particle completely mixed state is a critical point for the geometric measure. → The existence of the critical points is an inherent feature of the entanglement.

  5. The birth of quantum networks: merging remote entanglement with local multi-qubit control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Ronald

    The realization of a highly connected network of qubit registers is a central challenge for quantum information processing and long-distance quantum communication. Diamond spins associated with NV centers are promising building blocks for such a network: they combine a coherent spin-photon interface that has already enabled creation of spin-spin entanglement over 1km with a local register of robust and well-controlled nuclear spin qubits for information processing and error correction. We are now entering a new research stage in which we can exploit these features simultaneously and build multi-qubit networks. I will present our latest results towards the first of such experiments: entanglement distillation between remote quantum network nodes. Finally, I will discuss the challenges and opportunities ahead on the road to large-scale networks of qubit registers for quantum computation and communication.

  6. Generation of an N-qubit phase gate via atom—cavity nonidentical coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying-Qiao, Zhang; Shou, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    A scheme for approximate generation of an N-qubit phase gate is proposed in cavity QED based on nonidentical coupling between the atoms and the cavity. The atoms interact with a highly detuned cavity-field mode, but quantum information does not transfer between the atoms and cavity field, and thus the cavity decay is negligible. The gate time does not rise with an increase in the number of qubits. With the choice of a smaller odd number l (related to atom–cavity coupling constants), the phase gate can be generated with a higher fidelity and a higher success probability in a shorter time (the gate time is much shorter than the atomic radiative lifetime and photon lifetime). When the number of qubits N exceeds certain small values, the fidelity and success probability rise slowly with an increase in the number of qubits N. When N → ∞, the fidelity and success probability infinitely approach 1, but never exceed 1. (general)

  7. Genuine tripartite entanglement in quantum brachistochrone evolution of a three-qubit system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bao-Kui; Deng, Fu-Guo; Zhang, Feng-Shou; Zhou, Hong-Yu

    2009-11-01

    We explore the connection between quantum brachistochrone (time-optimal) evolution of a three-qubit system and its residual entanglement called three-tangle. The result shows that the entanglement between two qubits is not required for some brachistochrone evolutions of a three-qubit system. However, the evolution between two distinct states cannot be implemented without its three-tangle, except for the trivial cases in which less than three qubits attend evolution. Although both the probability density function of the time-averaged three-tangle and that of the time-averaged squared concurrence between two subsystems become more and more uniform with the decrease in angles of separation between an initial state and a final state, the features of their most probable values exhibit a different trend.

  8. Comparison of the TLDA with the Nanodrop and the reference Qubit system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, M; Arthure, K; Riedel, S; McMillan, ND; McPartlin, J

    2011-01-01

    The TLDA (transmitted light drop analyser) is a new microvolume UV-visible drop spectrophotometer new to the market. Assays were compared between a TLDA, NanoDrop and the Qubit system which is based on the gold standard for DNA assay, PicoGreen. The evaluation was carried out by the Trinity Biobank in St. James Hospital, Dublin on Buccal swabs and Blood samples. The data is discussed in this paper. The Qubit system is seen as the reference method in most studies as this is believed to provide more accurate results than UV absorbance methods because it distinguishes between DNA, RNA, free nucleotides, and other contaminants. The Qubit system uses fluorescent dyes to measure the concentration of the molecule of interest. The results compare both the spectrophotometric methods against the Qubit fluorescence technique.

  9. Quantum State Transmission in a Superconducting Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Hybrids consisting of macroscopic superconducting circuits and microscopic components, such as atoms and spins, have the potential of transmitting an arbitrary state between different quantum species, leading to the prospective of high-speed operation and long-time storage of quantum information. Here we propose a novel hybrid structure, where a neutral-atom qubit directly interfaces with a superconducting charge qubit, to implement the qubit-state transmission. The highly-excited Rydberg atom located inside the gate capacitor strongly affects the behavior of Cooper pairs in the box while the atom in the ground state hardly interferes with the superconducting device. In addition, the DC Stark shift of the atomic states significantly depends on the charge-qubit states. By means of the standard spectroscopic techniques and sweeping the gate voltage bias, we show how to transfer an arbitrary quantum state from the superconducting device to the atom and vice versa. PMID:27922087

  10. State Purification and Decoherence Suppression by Continuous Measurement of a Qubit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Korotkov, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    .... This initial goal has been somewhat extended in the course of the project and also included theoretical analysis of the RF-SET operation and close collaboration with experimental group at JPL on superconducting qubits...

  11. Efficient gate set tomography on a multi-qubit superconducting processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Erik; Rudinger, Kenneth; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Bestwick, Andrew; Bloom, Benjamin; Block, Maxwell; Caldwell, Shane; Curtis, Michael; Hudson, Alex; Orgiazzi, Jean-Luc; Papageorge, Alexander; Polloreno, Anthony; Reagor, Matt; Rubin, Nicholas; Scheer, Michael; Selvanayagam, Michael; Sete, Eyob; Sinclair, Rodney; Smith, Robert; Vahidpour, Mehrnoosh; Villiers, Marius; Zeng, William; Rigetti, Chad

    Quantum information processors with five or more qubits are becoming common. Complete, predictive characterization of such devices e.g. via any form of tomography, including gate set tomography appears impossible because the parameter space is intractably large. Randomized benchmarking scales well, but cannot predict device behavior or diagnose failure modes. We introduce a new type of gate set tomography that uses an efficient ansatz to model physically plausible errors, but scales polynomially with the number of qubits. We will describe the theory behind this multi-qubit tomography and present experimental results from using it to characterize a multi-qubit processor made by Rigetti Quantum Computing. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Superconducting qubit manipulated by fast pulses: experimental observation of distinct decoherence regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarello, F; Castellano, M G; Torrioli, G; Paladino, E; D'Arrigo, A; Falci, G; Cosmelli, C

    2012-01-01

    A particular superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubit, namely the double SQUID qubit, can be manipulated by rapidly modifying its potential with the application of fast flux pulses. In this system we observe coherent oscillations exhibiting non-exponential decay, indicating an unconventional decoherence mechanism. Moreover, via tuning the qubit in different conditions (different oscillation frequencies) by changing the pulse height, we observe a crossover between two distinct decoherence regimes and the existence of an ‘optimal’ point where the qubit is only weakly sensitive to intrinsic noise. We find that this behavior is in agreement with a model considering the decoherence caused essentially by low-frequency noise contributions, and we discuss the experimental results and possible issues. (paper)

  13. Integrability and solvability of the simplified two-qubit Rabi model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jie; Ren Zhongzhou; Guo Guangjie; Ju Guoxing

    2012-01-01

    The simplified two-qubit Rabi model is proposed and its analytical solution is presented. There are no level crossings in the spectral graph of the model, which indicates that it is not integrable. The criterion of integrability for the Rabi model proposed by Braak (2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 100401) is also used for the simplified two-qubit Rabi model and the same conclusion, consistent with what the spectral graph shows, can be drawn, which indicates that the criterion remains valid when applied to the two-qubit case. The simplified two-qubit Rabi model is another example of a non-integrable but exactly solvable system except for the generalized Rabi model. (paper)

  14. Comparison of the TLDA with the Nanodrop and the reference Qubit system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, M; Arthure, K; Riedel, S; McMillan, ND [Drop Technology Ltd., Tallaght Business Park, Whitestown, Dublin 24 (Ireland); McPartlin, J, E-mail: martina.oneill@droptechnology.com [Vitamin Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Sir Patrick Duns Laboratory, CPL, St. James' s Hospital, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2011-08-17

    The TLDA (transmitted light drop analyser) is a new microvolume UV-visible drop spectrophotometer new to the market. Assays were compared between a TLDA, NanoDrop and the Qubit system which is based on the gold standard for DNA assay, PicoGreen. The evaluation was carried out by the Trinity Biobank in St. James Hospital, Dublin on Buccal swabs and Blood samples. The data is discussed in this paper. The Qubit system is seen as the reference method in most studies as this is believed to provide more accurate results than UV absorbance methods because it distinguishes between DNA, RNA, free nucleotides, and other contaminants. The Qubit system uses fluorescent dyes to measure the concentration of the molecule of interest. The results compare both the spectrophotometric methods against the Qubit fluorescence technique.

  15. High Fidelity, Numerical Investigation of Cross Talk in a Multi-Qubit Xmon Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi-Yazdi, Alireza; Kelly, Julian; Martinis, John

    Unwanted electromagnetic interference between qubits, transmission lines, flux lines and other elements of a superconducting quantum processor poses a challenge in engineering such devices. This problem is exacerbated with scaling up the number of qubits. High fidelity, massively parallel computational toolkits, which can simulate the 3D electromagnetic environment and all features of the device, are instrumental in addressing this challenge. In this work, we numerically investigated the crosstalk between various elements of a multi-qubit quantum processor designed and tested by the Google team. The processor consists of 6 superconducting Xmon qubits with flux lines and gatelines. The device also consists of a Purcell filter for readout. The simulations are carried out with a high fidelity, massively parallel EM solver. We will present our findings regarding the sources of crosstalk in the device, as well as numerical model setup, and a comparison with available experimental data.

  16. Decoherence and disentanglement of qubits detecting scalar fields in an expanded spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujie; Dai, Yue; Shi, Yu

    2017-09-01

    We consider Unruh-Wald qubit detector model adopted for the far future region of an exactly solvable 1+1 dimensional scalar field theory in a toy model of Robertson-Walker expanding spacetime. It is shown that the expansion of the spacetime in its history enhances the decoherence of the qubit coupled with a scalar field. Moreover, we consider two entangled qubits, each locally coupled with a scalar field. The expansion of the spacetime in its history degrades the entanglement between the qubits, and it can lead to entanglement's sudden death if the initial entanglement is small enough. The details depend on the parameters characterizing the expansion of the spacetime. This work, on a toy model, suggests that the history of the spacetime might be probed through the coherent and entanglement behavior of the future detectors of quantum fields. In the present toy model, the two cosmological parameters can be determined from the quantum informational quantities of the detectors.

  17. Polynomial invariants for discrimination and classification of four-qubit entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viehmann, Oliver; Eltschka, Christopher; Siewert, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The number of entanglement classes in stochastic local operations and classical communication (SLOCC) classifications increases with the number of qubits and is already infinite for four qubits. Criteria for explicitly discriminating and classifying pure states of four and more qubits are highly desirable and therefore at the focus of intense theoretical research. We develop a general criterion for the discrimination of pure N-partite entangled states in terms of polynomial SL(d,C) xN invariants. By means of this criterion, existing SLOCC classifications of four-qubit entanglement are reproduced. Based on this we propose a polynomial classification scheme in which entanglement types are identified through 'tangle patterns'. This scheme provides a practicable way to classify states of arbitrary multipartite systems. Moreover, the use of polynomials induces a corresponding quantification of the different types of entanglement.

  18. Large gain quantum-limited qubit measurement using a two-mode nonlinear cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S; Clerk, A A; Vijay, R; Siddiqi, I

    2014-01-01

    We provide a thorough theoretical analysis of qubit state measurement in a setup where a driven, parametrically-coupled cavity system is directly coupled to the qubit, with one of the cavities having a weak Kerr nonlinearity. Such a system could be readily realized using circuit QED architectures. We demonstrate that this setup is capable in the standard linear-response regime of both producing a highly amplified output signal while at the same time achieving near quantum-limited performance: the measurement backaction on the qubit is near the minimal amount required by the uncertainty principle. This setup thus represents a promising route for performing efficient large-gain qubit measurement that is completely on-chip, and that does not rely on the use of circulators or complex non-reciprocal amplifiers. (paper)

  19. Neural Semantic Encoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkhdalai, Tsendsuren; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    We present a memory augmented neural network for natural language understanding: Neural Semantic Encoders. NSE is equipped with a novel memory update rule and has a variable sized encoding memory that evolves over time and maintains the understanding of input sequences through read , compose and write operations. NSE can also access multiple and shared memories. In this paper, we demonstrated the effectiveness and the flexibility of NSE on five different natural language tasks: natural language inference, question answering, sentence classification, document sentiment analysis and machine translation where NSE achieved state-of-the-art performance when evaluated on publically available benchmarks. For example, our shared-memory model showed an encouraging result on neural machine translation, improving an attention-based baseline by approximately 1.0 BLEU.

  20. Correlations, Nonlocality and Usefulness of an Efficient Class of Two-Qubit Mixed Entangled States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Parvinder; Kumar, Atul

    2018-02-01

    We establish an analytical relation between the Bell-Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (Bell-CHSH) inequality and weak measurement strengths under noisy conditions. We show that the analytical results obtained in this article are of utmost importance for proposing a new class of two-qubit mixed states for quantum information processing. Our analysis further shows that the states proposed here are better resources for quantum information in comparison to other two-qubit mixed entangled states.