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Sample records for single particle soot

  1. Technical Note: The single particle soot photometer fails to reliably detect PALAS soot nanoparticles

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    M. Gysel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The single particle soot photometer (SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence (LII for the measurement of atmospheric black carbon (BC particles. The BC mass concentration is obtained by combining quantitative detection of BC mass in single particles with a counting efficiency of 100% above its lower detection limit. It is commonly accepted that a particle must contain at least several tenths of a femtogram BC in order to be detected by the SP2.

    Here we show the result that most BC particles from a PALAS spark discharge soot generator remain undetected by the SP2, even if their BC mass, as independently determined with an aerosol particle mass analyser (APM, is clearly above the typical lower detection limit of the SP2. Comparison of counting efficiency and effective density data of PALAS soot with flame generated soot (combustion aerosol standard burner, CAST, fullerene soot and carbon black particles (Cabot Regal 400R reveals that particle morphology can affect the SP2's lower detection limit. PALAS soot particles are fractal-like agglomerates of very small primary particles with a low fractal dimension, resulting in a very low effective density. Such loosely packed particles behave like "the sum of individual primary particles" in the SP2's laser. Accordingly, most PALAS soot particles remain undetected as the SP2's laser intensity is insufficient to heat the primary particles to their vaporisation temperature because of their small size (Dpp ≈ 5–10 nm. Previous knowledge from pulsed laser-induced incandescence indicated that particle morphology might have an effect on the SP2's lower detection limit, however, an increase of the lower detection limit by a factor of ∼5–10, as reported here for PALAS soot, was not expected.

    In conclusion, the SP2's lower detection limit at a certain laser power depends primarily on the total BC mass per particle for compact particles with sufficiently high effective

  2. Single Particle Soot Photometer intercomparison at the AIDA chamber

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    M. Laborde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles, consisting of black carbon (BC, organic carbon (OC, inorganic salts, and trace elements, are emitted into the atmosphere during incomplete combustion. Accurate measurements of atmospheric BC are important as BC particles cause adverse health effects and impact the climate.

    Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the properties and mass concentrations of BC particles remains difficult. The Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2 can contribute to improving this situation by measuring the mass of refractory BC in individual particles as well as its mixing state.

    Here, the results of the first detailed SP2 intercomparison, involving 6 SP2s from 6 different research groups, are presented, including the most evolved data products that can presently be calculated from SP2 measurements.

    It was shown that a detection efficiency of almost 100% down to 1 fg BC per particle can readily be achieved, and that this limit can be pushed down to ∼0.2 fg BC with optimal SP2 setup. Number and mass size distributions of BC cores agreed within ±5% and ±10%, respectively, in between the SP2s, with larger deviations in the range below 1 fg BC.

    The accuracy of the SP2's mass concentration measurement depends on the calibration material chosen. The SP2 has previously been shown to be equally sensitive to fullerene soot and ambient BC from sources where fossil fuel was dominant and less sensitive to fullerene soot than to Aquadag. Fullerene soot was therefore chosen as the standard calibration material by the SP2 user community; however, many data sets rely solely on Aquadag calibration measurements. The difference in SP2 sensitivity was found to be almost equal (fullerene soot to Aquadag response ratio of ∼0.75 at 8.9 fg BC for all SP2s. This allows the calculation of a fullerene soot equivalent calibration curve from a measured Aquadag calibration, when no fullerene soot calibration is available. It could be

  3. Studies of propane flame soot acting as heterogeneous ice nuclei in conjunction with single particle soot photometer measurements

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    I. Crawford

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation efficiency of propane flame soot particles with and without a sulphuric acid coating was investigated using the aerosol and cloud chamber facility AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere. The test soot for cloud formation simulations was produced using a propane flame Combustion Aerosol Standard generator (CAST, Jing-CAST Technologies. The organic carbon content (OC of the test soot was altered in a reproducible fashion by changing the fuel/air mixture of the generator. The soot content of ice nuclei was subsequently investigated using a combination of a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI to separate and evaporate the ice crystals, and a DMT single particle soot photometer (SP2 to examine the mixing state of the BC containing ice residuals.

    Ice nucleation was found to be most efficient for uncoated soot of low organic carbon content (~5 % organic carbon content where deposition freezing occurred at an ice saturation ratio Sice ~ 1.22 at a temperature T = 226.6 K with 25 % of the test soot becoming active as ice nuclei. Propane flame soot of higher organic carbon content (~30 % and ~70 % organic carbon content showed significantly lower ice nucleation efficiency (an activated fraction of the order of a few percent in the experiments than the low organic carbon content soot, with water saturation being required for freezing to occur. Ice nucleation occurred over the range Sice = 1.22–1.70, and T = 223.2–226.6 K. Analysis of the SP2 data showed that the 5 % organic carbon content soot had an undetectable OC coating whereas the 30 % organic carbon content soot had a thicker or less volatile OC coating.

    The application of a sulphuric acid coating to the flame soot shifted the threshold of the onset of freezing towards that of the homogeneous freezing of sulphuric acid; for the minimum OC flame soot this inhibited nucleation since the

  4. Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, Arthur [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The SP2 is an instrument that measures, in situ, the time-dependent scattering and incandescence signals produced by individual BC-containing particles as they travel through a continuous-wave laser beam. Any particle traversing the laser beam will scatter light, and the BC component of a BC-containing particle will absorb some of the laser energy until its temperature is raised to the point at which it incandesces (hereafter we adopt the standard terminology of the SP2 community and denote any substance determined by the SP2 to be BC as refractory black carbon (rBC)). The amplitude of the rBC incandescence signal is related to the amount of refractory material contained in the illuminated particle. By binning the individual incandescence signals per unit sample volume, the mass concentration [ng/m3] of rBC can be derived. By binning the individual signals by volume equivalent diameter the size distribution (dN/dlogDVED) per unit time can be derived. The rBC mass loading per unit time and the rBC size distribution unit time are the core data products produced by the SP2. Additionally, the scattering channel can be used to provide information on the rBC particle population-based mixing states within ambient aerosols. However, this data product is produced on a requested-basis since additional detailed analysis and QC/QA must be conducted.

  5. Sensitivity of the Single Particle Soot Photometer to different black carbon types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde, M.; Mertes, P.; Zieger, P.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Gysel, M.

    2012-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) is now mainly of anthropogenic origin. It is the dominant light absorbing component of atmospheric aerosols, playing an important role in the earth's radiative balance and therefore relevant to climate change studies. In addition, BC is known to be harmful to human beings making it relevant to policy makers. Nevertheless, the measurement of BC remains biased by the instrument-based definition of BC. The Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), allows the measurement of the refractory BC (rBC) mass of individual particles using laser-induced incandescence. However, the SP2 needs an empirical calibration to retrieve the rBC mass from the incandescence signal and the sensitivity of the SP2 differs between different BC types. Ideally, for atmospheric studies, the SP2 should be calibrated using ambient particles containing a known mass of ambient rBC. However, such "ambient BC" calibration particles cannot easily be obtained and thus commercially available BC particles are commonly used for SP2 calibration instead. In this study we tested the sensitivity of the SP2 to different BC types in order to characterize the potential error introduced by using non-ambient BC for calibration. The sensitivity of the SP2 was determined, using an aerosol particle mass analyzer, for rBC from thermodenuded diesel exhaust, wood burning exhaust and ambient particles as well as for commercially available products: Aquadag® and fullerene soot. Thermodenuded, fresh diesel exhaust has been found to be ideal for SP2 calibration for two reasons. First, the small amount of non-BC matter upon emission reduces the risk of bias due to incomplete removal of non-BC matter and second, it is considered to represent atmospheric rBC in urban locations where diesel exhaust is the main source of BC. The SP2 was found to be up to 16% less sensitive to rBC from thermodenuded ambient particles (≤15 fg) than rBC from diesel exhaust, however, at least part of this difference can be explained

  6. Biomass Burning Research Using DOE ARM Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onasch, Timothy B [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Sedlacek, Arthur J [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lewis, Ernie [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The focus of this laboratory study was to investigate the chemical and optical properties, and the detection efficiencies, of tar balls generated in the laboratory using the same instruments deployed on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Gulfstream-1 (G-1) aircraft during the 2013 Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field study, during which tar balls were observed in wildland biomass burning particulate emissions. Key goals of this laboratory study were: (a) measuring the chemical composition of tar balls to provide insights into the atmospheric processes that form (evaporation/oxidation) and modify them in biomass burning plumes, (b) identifying whether tar balls contain refractory black carbon, (c) determining the collection efficiencies of tar balls impacting on the 600oC heated tungsten vaporizer in the Aerodyne Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) (i.e., given the observed low volatilities, AMS measurements might underestimate organic biomass burning plume loadings), and (d) measuring the wavelength-dependent, mass-specific absorption cross-sections of brown carbon components of tar balls. This project was funded primarily by the DOE Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program, and the ARM Facility made their single-particle soot photometer (SP2) available for September 1-September 31, 2016 in the Aerodyne laboratories. The ARM mentor (Dr. Sedlacek) requested no funds for mentorship or data reduction. All ARM SP2 data collected as part of this project are archived in the ARM Data Archive in accordance with established protocols. The main objectives of the ARM Biomass Burning Observation Period (BBOP, July-October, 2013) field campaign were to (1) assess the impact of wildland fires in the Pacific Northwest on climate, through near-field and regional intensive measurement campaigns, and (2) investigate agricultural burns to determine how those biomass burn plumes differ from

  7. FIREX-Related Biomass Burning Research Using ARM Single-Particle Soot Photometer Field Campaign Report

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    Onasch, Timothy B [Aerodyne Research, Inc.; Sedlacek, Arthur J [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The scientific focus of this study was to investigate and quantify the mass loadings, chemical compositions, and optical properties of biomass burning particulate emissions generated in the laboratory from Western U.S. fuels using a similar instrument suite to the one deployed on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Gulfstream-1 (G-1) aircraft during the 2013 Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field study (Kleinman and Sedlacek, 2013). We deployed the single-particle soot photometer (SP2) to make measurements of biomass burning refractory black carbon (rBC) mass loadings and size distributions to correlate with non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM; i.e., HR-AMS) and rBC (SP-AMS) measurements as a function of photo-oxidation processes in an environmental chamber. With these measurements, we will address the following scientific questions: 1. What are the emission indices (g/kg fuel) of rBC from various wildland fuels from the Pacific Northwest (i.e., relevant to BBOP analysis) as a function of combustion conditions and simulated atmospheric processing in an environmental chamber? 2. What are the optical properties (e.g., mass-specific absorption cross-section [MAC], single-scattering albedo [SSA], and absorption Angstrom exponent [AAE)] of rBC emitted from various wildland fuels and how are they impacted by atmospheric processing? 3. How does the mixing state of rBC in biomass-burning plumes relate to the optical properties? 4. How does the emitted rBC affect radiative forcing?

  8. Black carbon aerosol properties measured by a single particle soot photometer in emissions from biomass burning in the laboratory and field

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. R. McMeeking; J. W. Taylor; A. P. Sullivan; M. J. Flynn; S. K. Akagi; C. M. Carrico; J. L. Collett; E. Fortner; T. B. Onasch; S. M. Kreidenweis; R. J. Yokelson; C. Hennigan; A. L. Robinson; H. Coe

    2010-01-01

    We present SP2 observations of BC mass, size distributions and mixing state in emissions from laboratory and field biomass fires in California, USA. Biomass burning is the primary global black carbon (BC) source, but understanding of the amount emitted and its physical properties at and following emission are limited. The single particle soot photometer (SP2) uses a...

  9. Emissions of soot particles from heat generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubov, V. K.; Popov, A. N.; Popova, E. I.

    2017-11-01

    «Soot carbon» or «Soot» - incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition particulate carbon product of hydrocarbons consisting of particles of various shapes and sizes. Soot particles are harmful substances Class 2 and like a dust dispersed by wind for thousands of kilometers. Soot have more powerful negative factor than carbon dioxide. Therefore, more strict requirements on ecological and economical performance for energy facilities at Arctic areas have to be developed to protect fragile Arctic ecosystems and global climate change from degradation and destruction. Quantity of soot particles in the flue gases of energy facilities is a criterion of effectiveness for organization of the burning process. Some of heat generators do not provide the required energy and environmental efficiency which results in irrational use of energy resources and acute pollution of environment. The paper summarizes the results of experimental study of solid particles emission from wide range of capacity boilers burning different organic fuels (natural gas, fuel oil, coal and biofuels). Special attention is paid to environmental and energy performance of the biofuels combustion. Emissions of soot particles PM2.5 are listed. Structure, composition and dimensions of entrained particles with the use of electronic scanning microscope Zeiss SIGMA VP were also studied. The results reveal an impact of several factors on soot particles emission.

  10. Arctic Black Carbon Loading and Profile Using the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, Arthur J [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-05-01

    One of the major issues confronting aerosol climate simulations of the Arctic and Antarctic cryospheres is the lack of detailed data on the vertical and spatial distribution of aerosols with which to test these models. This is due, in part, to the inherent difficulty of conducting such measurements in extreme environments. However given the pronounced sensitivity of the polar regions to radiative balance perturbations, it is incumbent upon our community to better understand and quantify these perturbations, and their unique feedbacks, so that robust model predictions of this region can be realized. One class of under-measured radiative forcing agents in the polar region is the absorbing aerosol—black carbon and brown carbon. Black carbon (BC; also referred to as light-absorbing carbon [LAC], refractory black carbon [rBC], and soot) is second only to CO2 as a positive forcing agent. Roughly 60% of BC emissions can be attributed to anthropogenic sources (fossil fuel combustion and open-pit cooking), with the remaining fraction being due to biomass burning. Brown carbon (BrC), a major component of biomass burning, collectively refers to non-BC carbonaceous aerosols that typically possess minimal light absorption at visible wavelengths but exhibit pronounced light absorption in the near-ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. Both species can be sourced locally or be remotely transported to the Arctic region and are expected to perturb the radiative balance. The work conducted in this field campaign addresses one of the more glaring deficiencies currently limiting improved quantification of the impact of BC radiative forcing in the cryosphere: the paucity of data on the vertical and spatial distributions of BC. By expanding the Gulfstream aircraft (G-1) payload for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility-sponsored ACME-V campaign to include the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2)) and leveraging the ACME-V campaign

  11. Water interaction with hydrophobic and hydrophilic soot particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovicheva, Olga; Persiantseva, Natalia M; Shonija, Natalia K; DeMott, Paul; Koehler, Kirsten; Petters, Markus; Kreidenweis, Sonia; Tishkova, Victoria; Demirdjian, Benjamin; Suzanne, Jean

    2008-05-07

    The interaction of water with laboratory soots possessing a range of properties relevant for atmospheric studies is examined by two complementary methods: gravimetrical measurement of water uptake coupled with chemical composition and porosity analysis and HTDMA (humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer) inference of water uptake accompanied by separate TEM (transmission electron microscopy) analysis of single particles. The first method clarifies the mechanism of water uptake for bulk soot and allows the classification of soot with respect to its hygroscopicity. The second method highlights the dependence of the soot aerosol growth factor on relative humidity (RH) for quasi-monodisperse particles. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic soot are qualitatively defined by their water uptake and surface polarity: laboratory soot particles are thus classified from very hydrophobic to very hydrophilic. Thermal soot particles produced from natural gas combustion are classified as hydrophobic with a surface of low polarity since water is found to cover only half of the surface. Graphitized thermal soot particles are proposed for comparison as extremely hydrophobic and of very low surface polarity. Soot particles produced from laboratory flame of TC1 aviation kerosene are less hydrophobic, with their entire surface being available for statistical monolayer water coverage at RH approximately 10%. Porosity measurements suggest that, initially, much of this surface water resides within micropores. Consequently, the growth factor increase of these particles to 1.07 at RH > 80% is attributed to irreversible swelling that accompanies water uptake. Hysteresis of adsorption/desorption cycles strongly supports this conclusion. In contrast, aircraft engine soot, produced from burning TC1 kerosene in a gas turbine engine combustor, has an extremely hydrophilic surface of high polarity. Due to the presence of water soluble organic and inorganic material it can be covered by many water

  12. Determination of and evidence for non-core-shell structure of particles containing black carbon using the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2)

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    Sedlacek, Arthur J., III; Lewis, Ernie R.; Kleinman, Lawrence; Xu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Qi

    2012-03-01

    The large uncertainty associated with black carbon (BC) direct forcing is due, in part, to the dependence of light absorption of BC-containing particles on the position of the BC within the particle. It is predicted that this absorption will be greatest for an idealized core-shell configuration in which the BC is a sphere at the center of the particle whereas much less absorption should be observed for particles in which the BC is located near or on the surface. Such microphysical information on BC-containing particles has previously been provided only by labor-intensive microscopy techniques, thus often requiring that climate modelers make assumptions about the location of the BC within the particle that are based more on mathematical simplicity than physical reality. The present paper describes a novel analysis method that utilizes the temporal behavior of the scattering and incandescence signals from individual particles containing refractory BC (rBC) measured by the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) to distinguish particles with rBC near the surface from those that have structures more closely resembling the core-shell configuration. This approach permits collection of a high-time-resolution data set of the fraction of rBC-containing particles with rBC near the surface. By application of this method to a plume containing tracers for biomass burning, it was determined that this fraction was greater than 60%. Such a data set will not only provide previously unavailable information to the climate modeling community, allowing greater accuracy in calculating rBC radiative forcing, but also will yield insight into aerosol processes.

  13. Thermal fragmentation and deactivation of combustion-generated soot particles

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet

    2014-09-01

    The effect of thermal treatment on diesel soot and on a commercial soot in an inert environment under isothermal conditions at intermediate temperatures (400-900°C) is studied. Two important phenomena are observed in both the soot samples: soot fragmentation leading to its mass loss, and loss of soot reactivity towards O2. Several experimental techniques such as high resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis with mass spectrometry, elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction have been used to identify the changes in structures, functional groups such as oxygenates and aliphatics, σ and π bonding, O/C and H/C ratios, and crystallite parameters of soot particles, introduced by heat. A decrease in the size of primary particles and an increase in the average polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) size was observed in soots after thermal treatment. The activation energies of soot oxidation for thermally treated soot samples were found to be higher than those for the untreated ones at most conversion levels. The cyclic or acyclic aliphatics with sp3 hybridization were present in significant amounts in all the soot samples, but their concentration decreased with thermal treatment. Interestingly, the H/C and the O/C ratios of soot particles increased after thermal treatment, and thus, they do not support the decrease in soot reactivity. The increase in the concentration of oxygenates on soot surface indicate that their desorption from soot surface in the form of CO, CO2 and other oxygenated compounds may not be significant at the temperatures (400-900°C) studied in this work. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  14. Evaluation of a Lagrangian Soot Tracking Method for the prediction of primary soot particle size under engine-like conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai Ong, Jiun; Pang, Kar Mun; Walther, Jens Honore

    2018-01-01

    particles when the mass of incipient soot exceeds a designated threshold value. Their trajectories are then computed using the particle momentum equation. The change of primary soot particle size is dependent on the modified Lagrangian surface growth and soot oxidation models. Performance of the LST model...

  15. Assessing Single Particle Soot Photometer and Integrating Sphere/Integrating Sandwich Spectrophotometer measurement techniques for quantifying black carbon concentration in snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Schwarz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the performance of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2 and the Integrating Sphere/Integrating Sandwich Spectrophotometer (ISSW in quantifying the concentration of refractory black carbon (BC in snow samples. We find that the SP2 can be used to measure BC mass concentration in snow with substantially larger uncertainty (60% than for atmospheric sampling (<30%. Achieving this level of accuracy requires careful assessment of nebulizer performance and SP2 calibration with consideration of the fact that BC in snow can exist in larger sizes than typically observed in the atmosphere. Once these issues are addressed, the SP2 is able to measure the size distribution and mass concentration of BC in the snow. Laboratory comparison of the SP2 and the ISSW revealed significant biases in the estimate of BC concentration from the ISSW when test samples contained dust or non-absorbing particulates. These results suggest that current estimates of BC mass concentration in snow or ice formed from fallen snow using either the SP2 or the ISSW may be associated with significant underestimates of uncertainty.

  16. Fractal-like dimension of nanometer Diesel soot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skillas, G.; Baltensperger, U. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Siegmann, K. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-11-01

    Measurements with a low-pressure impactor and a differential mobility analyser were conducted for Diesel soot at various engine loads. By means of these measurements a fractal-like dimension of Diesel soot particles, with diameters ranging from 55 up to 260 nm, was established. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs.

  17. Biomass burning plumes and the aging of black carbon aerosols in the tropopause region observed with the CARIBIC single particle soot photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditas, J.; Ma, N.; Zhang, Y.; Assmann, D. N.; Neumaier, M.; Wang, S.; Wang, J.; Zahn, A.; Hermann, M.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Poeschl, U.; Su, H.; Cheng, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) events can release large amounts of refractory black carbon (rBC) into the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UT/LMS) (Dahlkötter et al., 2014). To explore this effect, a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) was added to the scientific payload of the instrumented CARIBIC container that is installed monthly in the cargo bay of a passenger aircraft (the IAGOS-CARIBIC atmospheric observatory, www.iagos.org). Regular measurement flights with different destinations are performed, covering an area of about 120°W to 120°E and 75°N to 30°S. A wide range of in situ measurements (CO, O3, greenhouse gases, aerosol particles and volatile organic compounds) is combined with a collection of air and aerosol samples for laboratory analyses. Since August 2014, the SP2 measures BC number and mass concentration at altitudes between 8 and 12 km. More than 600 BC measurement hours show a strong impact of BB emissions on the lowermost stratosphere. The BB plumes are identified with the help of concurrent carbon monoxide and acetonitrile measurements showing substantially increased concentrations compared to their background level. Transported into the lowermost stratosphere, BB smoke can be transported over long distances and the BC particles can stay in the atmosphere up to one year. The monthly missions of four consecutive CARIBIC flights sometimes enable to revisit a certain air mass, as was the case during a measurement flight to San Francisco in August 2014, with a stopover time of 2h. The revisited biomass burning plume located over the Altlantic ocean near Greenland was traced back by backward and forward trajectories to open fires in Canada (upper Fig.). The transit time of the smoke plume was estimated to 16 - 19h which perfectly matches our flight time difference ( 18h). Based on the LEO-fit method (Leading Edge Only fit) from Gao et al. (2007), the mixing state of the BC particles within the BB plume was calculated. Our unique data set

  18. Emission of ions and charged soot particles by aircraft engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sorokin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a model which examines the formation and evolution of chemiions in an aircraft engine is proposed. This model which includes chemiionisation, electron thermo-emission, electron attachment to soot particles and to neutral molecules, electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, ion-soot interaction, allows the determination of the ion concentration at the exit of the combustor and at the nozzle exit of the engine. It also allows the determination of the charge of the soot particles. For the engine considered, the upper limit for the ion emission index EIi is of the order of (2-5 x1016 ions/kg-fuel if ion-soot interactions are ignored and the introduction of ion-soot interactions lead about to a 50% reduction. The results also show that most of the soot particles are either positively or negatively charged, the remaining neutral particles representing approximately 20% of the total particles. A comparison of the model results with the available ground-based experimental data obtained on the ATTAS research aircraft engines during the SULFUR experiments (Schumann, 2002 shows an excellent agreement.

  19. Ice Formation by Soot-Containing Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demott, P. J.; Petters, M. D.; Prenni, A. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Carrico, C. M.; Bennett, M. R.; Stanglmaier, R.; Volckens, J.; Popovicheva, O. B.

    2006-12-01

    A role for soot particles as atmospheric ice forming nuclei remains highly uncertain and poorly quantified. A relatively small amount of data exists and most of this is for laboratory surrogates that may not be well characterized or of assured relevance to the atmosphere. It is important to constrain the role of soot particles as ice nuclei due to their abundance in the atmosphere and the large contribution from anthropogenic activities. Further, global climate models are beginning to be capable of treating the impact of different aerosol types, including soot particles. This paper reports on studies of ice formation by or within surrogates for hydrophobic soot and realistic carbonaceous particles from combustion of fuel in a diesel engine, burning of an assortment biomass materials, and real jet fuel combustor particles. Measurements of primarily monodisperse particles were focused below -30°C to emphasize the transition between temperatures where heterogeneous ice nucleation is required for ice formation and those for which homogeneous freezing processes are also possible. Ice nucleation measurements were made with a continuous flow diffusion chamber. Simultaneous measurements of hygroscopic water uptake and cloud condensation nucleation behavior were also made at 30°C for each aerosol type. Small fractions of hydrophobic soot particles are found capable of initiating heterogeneous ice formation at low temperatures. Results of studies of more realistic particles suggest that any process that increases hygroscopicity tends to limit the conditions for ice formation within soot particles. Most biomass burning particles, showing a range of dry/wet diameter hygroscopic growth factors (1.03 activity as CCN to 102% RH, yet behaved as particles containing solutions in which homogeneous freezing was supported at temperatures below -38°C. This is tentatively attributed to condensation of semi-volatiles during cooling. Ice forming ability as warm as -30°C was limited to

  20. Morphology and nano-structure analysis of soot particles sampled from high pressure diesel jet flames under diesel-like conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Li, Tie; Wang, Yifeng; He, Pengfei

    2018-04-01

    Soot particles emitted from diesel engines have a significant impact on the atmospheric environment. Detailed understanding of soot formation and oxidation processes is helpful for reducing the pollution of soot particles, which requires information such as the size and nano-structure parameters of the soot primary particles sampled in a high-temperature and high-pressure diesel jet flame. Based on the thermophoretic principle, a novel sampling probe minimally disturbing the diesel jet flame in a constant volume combustion vessel is developed for analysing soot particles. The injected quantity of diesel fuel is less than 10 mg, and the soot particles sampled by carriers with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) grid and lacey TEM grid can be used to analyse the morphologies of soot aggregates and the nano-structure of the soot primary particles, respectively. When the quantity of diesel fuel is more than 10 mg, in order to avoid burning-off of the carriers in higher temperature and pressure conditions, single-crystal silicon chips are employed. Ultrasonic oscillations and alcohol extraction are then implemented to obtain high quality soot samples for observation using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope. An in-house Matlab-based code is developed to extract the nano-structure parameters of the soot particles. A complete sampling and analysis procedure of the soot particles is provided to study the formation and oxidation mechanism of soot.

  1. Numerical investigation on soot particles emission in compression ignition diesel engine by using particulate mimic soot model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Fadzli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research via computational method, specifically by detailed-kinetic soot model offers much more advantages than the simple model as more detailed formation/oxidation process is taken into consideration, thus providing better soot mass concentration, soot size, soot number density as well as information regarding other related species. In the present computational study, investigation of in-cylinder soot concentration as well as other emissions in a single cylinder diesel engine has been conducted, using a commercial multidimensional CFD software, CONVERGE CFD. The simulation was carried out for a close-cycle combustion environment from inlet valve closing (IVC to exhaust valve opening (EVO. In this case, detailed-kinetic Particulate Mimic (PM soot model was implemented as to take benefit of the method of moment, instead of commonly implemented simple soot model. Analyses of the results are successfully plotted to demonstrate that the soot size and soot mass concentration are strongly dependent on the detailed soot formation and oxidation process rates. The calculated of soot mass concentration and average soot size at EVO provide the end value of 29.2 mg/m3 and 2.04 × 10−8 m, respectively. Besides, post-processing using EnSight shows the qualitative results of soot concentration along simulation period in the combustion chamber.

  2. Nanoparticle production by UV irradiation of combustion generated soot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stipe, Christopher B.; Choi, Jong Hyun; Lucas, Donald; Koshland, Catherine P.; Sawyer, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Laser ablation of surfaces normally produce high temperature plasmas that are difficult to control. By irradiating small particles in the gas phase, we can better control the size and concentration of the resulting particles when different materials are photofragmented. Here, we irradiate soot with 193 nm light from an ArF excimer laser. Irradiating the original agglomerated particles at fluences ranging from 0.07 to 0.26 J/cm 2 with repetition rates of 20 and 100 Hz produces a large number of small, unagglomerated particles, and a smaller number of spherical agglomerated particles. Mean particle diameters from 20 to 50 nm are produced from soot originally having a mean electric mobility diameter of 265nm. We use a non-dimensional parameter, called the photon/atom ratio (PAR), to aid in understanding the photofragmentation process. This parameter is the ratio of the number of photons striking the soot particles to the number of the carbon atoms contained in the soot particles, and is a better metric than the laser fluence for analyzing laser-particle interactions. These results suggest that UV photofragmentation can be effective in controlling particle size and morphology, and can be a useful diagnostic for studying elements of the laser ablation process

  3. Dependence of soot optical properties on particle morphology: measurements and model comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radney, James G; You, Rian; Ma, Xiaofei; Conny, Joseph M; Zachariah, Michael R; Hodges, Joseph T; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2014-03-18

    We report the first mass-specific absorption and extinction cross sections for size- and mass-selected laboratory-generated soot aerosol. Measurement biases associated with aerosols possessing multiple charges were eliminated using mass selection to isolate singly charged particles for a specified electrical mobility diameter. Aerosol absorption and extinction coefficients were measured using photoacoustic and cavity ring-down spectroscopy techniques, respectively, for lacey and compacted soot morphologies. The measurements show that the mass-specific absorption cross sections are proportional to particle mass and independent of morphology, with values between 5.7 and 6 m(2) g(-1). Mass-specific extinction cross sections were morphology dependent and ranged between 12 and 16 m(2) g(-1) for the lacey and compact morphologies, respectively. The resulting single-scattering albedos ranged from 0.5 to 0.6. Results are also compared to theoretical calculations of light absorption and scattering from simulated particle agglomerates. The observed absorption is relatively well modeled, with minimum differences between the calculated and measured mass absorption cross sections ranging from ∼ 5% (lacey soot) to 14% (compact soot). The model, however, was unable to satisfactorily reproduce the measured extinction, underestimating the single-scattering albedo for both particle morphologies. These discrepancies between calculations and measurements underscore the need for validation and refinement of existing models of light scattering and absorption by soot agglomerates.

  4. Hygroscopic properties of Diesel engine soot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Burtscher, H. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-11-01

    The hygroscopic properties of combustion particles, freshly emitted from a Diesel engine were investigated. It was found that these particles start to grow by water condensation at a relative humidity (RH)>80%. The hygroscopicity of these particles was enhanced when the sulfur content of the fuel was increased or when the particles were artificially aged (i.e. particles were subjected to an ozone or UV pre-treatment). (author) 2 figs., 5 refs.

  5. Small particles big effect? - Investigating ice nucleation abilities of soot particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrt, Fabian; David, Robert O.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Stopford, Chris; Wu, Zhijun; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric soot particles are primary particles produced by incomplete combustion of biomass and/or fossil fuels. Thus soot mainly originates from anthropogenic emissions, stemming from combustion related processes in transport vehicles, industrial and residential uses. Such soot particles are generally complex mixtures of black carbon (BC) and organic matter (OM) (Bond et al., 2013; Petzold et al., 2013), depending on the sources and the interaction of the primary particles with other atmospheric matter and/or gases BC absorbs solar radiation having a warming effect on global climate. It can also act as a heterogeneous ice nucleating particle (INP) and thus impact cloud-radiation interactions, potentially cooling the climate (Lohmann, 2002). Previous studies, however, have shown conflicting results concerning the ice nucleation ability of soot, limiting the ability to predict its effects on Earth's radiation budget. Here we present a laboratory study where we systematically investigate the ice nucleation behavior of different soot particles. Commercial soot samples are used, including an amorphous, industrial carbon frequently used in coatings and coloring (FW 200, Orion Engineered Carbons) and a fullerene soot (572497 ALDRICH), e.g. used as catalyst. In addition, we use soot generated from a propane flame Combustion Aerosol Standard Generator (miniCAST, JING AG), as a proxy for atmospheric soot particles. The ice nucleation ability of these soot types is tested on size-selected particles for a wide temperature range from 253 K to 218 K, using the Horizontal Ice Nucleation Chamber (HINC), a Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC) (Kanji and Abbatt, 2009). Ice nucleation results from these soot surrogates will be compared to chemically more complex real world samples, collected on filters. Filters will be collected during the 2016/2017 winter haze periods in Beijing, China and represent atmospheric soot particles with sources from both industrial and residential

  6. Experimental Investigation of Nascent Soot Physical Properties and The Influence on Particle Morphology and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, Sydnie Marie

    Soot released to the atmosphere is a dangerous pollutant for human health and the environment. Understanding the physical properties and surface properties of these particles is important to properly explaining the growth of soot particles in flames as well as their interactions with other particles and gases in the environment. Particles below 15 nm in diameter, nascent soot particles, dominate the early growth stages of soot formation; previously these particles were characterized as hard graphitic spheres. New evidence derived from the current dissertation work, to a large extent, challenges this prior characterization. This dissertation study begins by revisiting the use of atomic force microscope (AFM) as a tool to investigate the structural properties of nascent soot. The impact of tip artifacts, which are known to complicate measurements of features below 10 nm in diameter, are carefully considered so as to provide a concise interpretation of the morphology of nascent soot as seen by AFM. The results of the AFM morphology collaborate with earlier photo- and thermal-fragmentation particle mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy that nascent soot is not a graphitized carbon material and that they are not spherical. Furthermore, phase mode imaging is introduced as a method to investigate the physical properties of nascent soot particles in a greater detail and finer resolution. The helium ion microscope (HIM) has been identified as a useful technique for the imaging of nascent soot. Using this imaging method nascent soot particles were imaged with a high resolution that had not been obtained by prior techniques. The increased contrast provides a closer look at the nascent soot particles and further suggested that these particles are not as structurally homogeneous as previously thought. Geometric shape analysis was performed to characterize the particles in terms of sphericity, circularity, and fractal dimension. The geometric analysis

  7. Sulfuric Acid and Soot Particle Formation in Aircraft Exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Verma, S.; Ferry, G. V.; Howard, S. D.; Vay, S.; Kinne, S. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Dermott, P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Goodman, J.; hide

    1997-01-01

    A combination of CN counts, Ames wire impactor size analyses and optical particle counter data in aircraft exhaust results in a continuous particle size distribution between 0.01 micrometer and 1 micrometer particle radius sampled in the exhaust of a Boeing 757 research aircraft. The two orders of magnitude size range covered by the measurements correspond to 6-7 orders of magnitude particle concentration. CN counts and small particle wire impactor data determine a nucleation mode, composed of aircraft-emitted sulfuric acid aerosol, that contributes between 62% and 85% to the total aerosol surface area and between 31% and 34% to its volume. Soot aerosol comprises 0.5% of the surface area of the sulfuric acid aerosol. Emission indices are: EIH2SO4 = 0.05 g/kgFUEL and (0.2-0.5) g/kgFUEL (for 75 ppmm and 675 ppmm fuel-S, respectively), 2.5E4sulfur (gas) to H2SO4 (particle) conversion efficiency is between 10% and 25%.

  8. Nanostructure and Oxidation Reactivity of Nascent Soot Particles in Ethylene/Pentanol Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoyao Ying

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As byproducts of the combustion process of hydrocarbon fuels, soot particles are difficult to remove, and they can greatly harm human health and pollute the environment. Therefore, the formation and growth processes of the soot particles has become a study focus of researchers. In this paper, the nanostructure and oxidation reactivity of carbonaceous particles collected from ethylene inverse diffusion flames with or without the additions of three pentanol isomers (1-pentanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-methyl-1-butanol were investigated in detail. The nanostructure and oxidation characteristics of nascent soot particles were characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, X-ray diffractometry (XRD and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. It was found that the nascent soot cluster of pure ethylene flame had a loose structure, while the additions of pentanol isomers made the soot agglomerates more compact and delayed the growth of graphitic structures. The pentanol isomer additions also contributed to a higher disorder of the crystallite arrangement in the soot nanostructure. According to the TGA experiments, the results showed that the addition of pentanol isomers enhanced the oxidation reactivity of soot particles, which could help to reduce soot particle emissions.

  9. Internally mixed soot, sulfates, and organic matter in aerosol particles from Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    2008-05-01

    Soot particles are major aerosol constituents that result from emissions of burning of fossil fuel and biomass. Because they both absorb sunlight and contribute to cloud formation, they are an influence on climate on local, regional, and global scales. It is therefore important to evaluate their optical and hygroscopic properties and those effects on the radiation budget. Those properties commonly change through reaction with other particles or gases, resulting in complex internal mixtures. Using transmission electron microscopy, we measured ~8000 particles (25 samples) with aerodynamic diameters from 0.05 to 0.3 μm that were collected in March 2006 from aircraft over Mexico City (MC) and adjacent areas. More than 50% of the particles consist of internally mixed soot, organic matter, and sulfate. Imaging combined with chemical analysis of individual particles show that many are coated, consist of aggregates, or both. Coatings on soot particles can amplify their light absorption, and coagulation with sulfates changes their hygroscopic properties, resulting in shorter lifetime. Our results suggest that a mixture of materials from multiple sources such as vehicles, power plants, and biomass burning occurs in individual particles, thereby increasing their complexity. Through changes in their optical and hygroscopic properties, internally mixed soot particles have a greater effect on the regional climate than uncoated soot particles. Moreover, soot occurs in more than 60% of all particles in the MC plumes, suggesting its important role in the formation of secondary aerosol particles.

  10. Detection of Soot Using a Resistivity Sensor Device Employing Thermophoretic Particle Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doina Lutic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Results are reported for thermophoretic deposition of soot particles on resistivity sensors as a monitoring technique for diesel exhaust particles with the potential of improved detection limit and sensitivity. Soot with similar characteristics as from diesel exhausts was generated by a propane flame and diluted in stages. The soot in a gas flow at 240–270C∘ was collected on an interdigitated electrode structure held at a considerably lower temperature, 105–125C∘. The time delay for reaching measurable resistance values, the subsequent rate, and magnitude of resistance decrease were a function of the distance between the fingers in the electrodes and the degree of dilution of the soot containing flow. Soot deposition and subsequent removal by heating the sensor support was also performed in a real diesel exhaust. Good similarities between the behavior in our laboratory system and the real diesel exhaust were noticed.

  11. Laboratory measurements of soot particle density change due to water uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, E.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon containing soot particles are an important aerosol subclass owing to their light-absorbing properties. Furthermore, soot particles present challenges with regard to characterization and modeling of their microphysical, chemical, and optical properties, because of their inherent non-spherical, fractal morphology. Aggregation/coagulation of soot adds to the complexity of the particle morphology, while co-emitted organic compounds affect the chemical composition both during emission and though aging, which causes partitioning of secondary organic aerosol. Measurements of soot particles from vehicular and jet engine exhaust plumes have shown that the effective density can vary over a broad range (0.3-1.8 gm-3) and is affected by the fuel burn characteristics (fuel type, fuel equivalence ratio, combustion temperature), the particle size, and the extent of the aggregation. The action of organic coatings and the uptake of particle water, through hygroscopic growth, can cause a dramatic change in the morphology of soot. Restructuring of the fractal morphology into a more compact form has the effect of increasing the effective particle density, thus reducing the particle size, with important implications for the optical and hygroscopic properties. We present measurements of size-resolved particle density from laboratory generated fresh soot particles, under a range of operating conditions. We first filter by particle mass using an aerosol particle mass (APM) centrifugal analyzer and then subject the sample to a pre-humidification cycle in order to initiate particle restructuring. Finally, the sample is dried and the mobility size distribution is measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). A range of particle masses is scanned to determine the density as a function of size and, for each mass set point, a range of relative humidity settings are scanned to determine the extent of restructuring. We discuss the findings in relation to atmospherically

  12. Exploring Soot Particle Concentration and Emissivity by Transient Thermocouples Measurements in Laminar Partially Premixed Coflow Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi De Falco

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Soot formation in combustion represents a complex phenomenon that strongly depends on several factors such as pressure, temperature, fuel chemical composition, and the extent of premixing. The effect of partial premixing on soot formation is of relevance also for real combustion devices and still needs to be fully understood. An improved version of the thermophoretic particle densitometry (TPD method has been used in this work with the aim to obtain both quantitative and qualitative information of soot particles generated in a set of laminar partially-premixed coflow flames characterized by different equivalence ratios. To this aim, the transient thermocouple temperature response has been analyzed to infer particle concentration and emissivity. A variety of thermal emissivity values have been measured for flame-formed carbonaceous particles, ranging from 0.4 to 0.5 for the early nucleated soot particles up to the value of 0.95, representing the typical value commonly attributed to mature soot particles, indicating that the correct determination of the thermal emissivity is necessary to accurately evaluate the particle volume fraction. This is particularly true at the early stage of the soot formation, when particle concentration measurement is indeed particularly challenging as in the central region of the diffusion flames. With increasing premixing, an initial increase of particles is detected both in the maximum radial soot volume fraction region and in the central region of the flame, while the further addition of primary air determines the particle volume fraction drop. Finally, a modeling analysis based on a sectional approach has been performed to corroborate the experimental findings.

  13. Application of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method to nanoscale heat transfer between a soot particle and the surrounding gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M.; Liu, F.; Smallwood, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Laser-Induced Incandescence (LII) technique has been widely used to measure soot volume fraction and primary particle size in flames and engine exhaust. Currently there is lack of quantitative understanding of the shielding effect of aggregated soot particles on its conduction heat loss rate to the surrounding gas. The conventional approach for this problem would be the application of the Monte Carlo (MC) method. This method is based on simulation of the trajectories of individual molecules and calculation of the heat transfer at each of the molecule/molecule collisions and the molecule/particle collisions. As the first step toward calculating the heat transfer between a soot aggregate and the surrounding gas, the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used in this study to calculate the heat transfer rate between a single spherical aerosol particle and its cooler surrounding gas under different conditions of temperature, pressure, and the accommodation coefficient. A well-defined and simple hard sphere model was adopted to describe molecule/molecule elastic collisions. A combination of the specular reflection and completely diffuse reflection model was used to consider molecule/particle collisions. The results obtained by DSMC are in good agreement with the known analytical solution of heat transfer rate for an isolated, motionless sphere in the free-molecular regime. Further the DSMC method was applied to calculate the heat transfer in the transition regime. Our present DSMC results agree very well with published DSMC data. (author)

  14. Soot Particle Size Distribution Functions in a Turbulent Non-Premixed Ethylene-Nitrogen Flame

    KAUST Repository

    Boyette, Wesley

    2017-02-21

    A scanning mobility particle sizer with a nano differential mobility analyzer was used to measure nanoparticle size distribution functions in a turbulent non-premixed flame. The burner utilizes a premixed pilot flame which anchors a C2H4/N2 (35/65) central jet with ReD = 20,000. Nanoparticles in the flame were sampled through a N2-filled tube with a 500- μm orifice. Previous studies have shown that insufficient dilution of the nanoparticles can lead to coagulation in the sampling line and skewed particle size distribution functions. A system of mass flow controllers and valves were used to vary the dilution ratio. Single-stage and two-stage dilution systems were investigated. A parametric study on the effect of the dilution ratio on the observed particle size distribution function indicates that particle coagulation in the sampling line can be eliminated using a two-stage dilution process. Carbonaceous nanoparticle (soot) concentration particle size distribution functions along the flame centerline at multiple heights in the flame are presented. The resulting distributions reveal a pattern of increasing mean particle diameters as the distance from the nozzle along the centerline increases.

  15. Mixing state of regionally transported soot particles and the coating effect on their size and shape at a mountain site in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kouji; Zaizen, Yuji; Kajino, Mizuo; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2014-05-01

    Soot particles influence the global climate through interactions with sunlight. A coating on soot particles increases their light absorption by increasing their absorption cross section and cloud condensation nuclei activity when mixed with other hygroscopic aerosol components. Therefore, it is important to understand how soot internally mixes with other materials to accurately simulate its effects in climate models. In this study, we used a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with an auto particle analysis system, which enables more particles to be analyzed than a conventional TEM. Using the TEM, soot particle size and shape (shape factor) were determined with and without coating from samples collected at a remote mountain site in Japan. The results indicate that ~10% of aerosol particles between 60 and 350 nm in aerodynamic diameters contain or consist of soot particles and ~75% of soot particles were internally mixed with nonvolatile ammonium sulfate or other materials. In contrast to an assumption that coatings change soot shape, both internally and externally mixed soot particles had similar shape and size distributions. Larger aerosol particles had higher soot mixing ratios, i.e., more than 40% of aerosol particles with diameters >1 µm had soot inclusions, whereas <20% of aerosol particles with diameters <1 µm included soot. Our results suggest that climate models may use the same size distributions and shapes for both internally and externally mixed soot; however, changing the soot mixing ratios in the different aerosol size bins is necessary.

  16. Soot particle size measurements in ethylene diffusion flames at elevated pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Steinmetz, Scott

    2016-05-07

    Soot particle size is investigated in laminar nitrogen-diluted ethylene coflow diffusion flames at 4, 8, 12 and 16 atm. Line of sight attenuation and scattering are used to measure two-dimensional soot volume fraction and particle size fields for the first time at elevated pressures. Soot volume fraction dependence on pressure is consistent with the observations of similar studies, scaling approximately with the square of pressure. Scattering intensity is analyzed through Rayleigh and Rayleigh-Debye-Gans polydisperse fractal aggregate theories to provide two estimates of particle size. An increase in overall particle sizes with pressure is found, consistent with similar one-dimensional studies. Particle diameters in the annulus of the flame increase faster with pressure than those on centerline. Contrary to previous studies, the dependence of particle size on pressure was found to taper off between 8 and 12 atm, with little observed growth beyond 12 atm. The measurements provide additional data for one of the International Sooting Flame (ISF) workshop\\'s target pressurized flames.

  17. Simulation and analysis of the soot particle size distribution in a turbulent nonpremixed flame

    KAUST Repository

    Lucchesi, Marco

    2017-02-05

    A modeling framework based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is employed to simulate the evolution of the soot particle size distribution in turbulent sooting flames. The stochastic reactor describes the evolution of soot in fluid parcels following Lagrangian trajectories in a turbulent flow field. The trajectories are sampled from a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a n-heptane turbulent nonpremixed flame. The DSMC method is validated against experimentally measured size distributions in laminar premixed flames and found to reproduce quantitatively the experimental results, including the appearance of the second mode at large aggregate sizes and the presence of a trough at mobility diameters in the range 3–8 nm. The model is then applied to the simulation of soot formation and growth in simplified configurations featuring a constant concentration of soot precursors and the evolution of the size distribution in time is found to depend on the intensity of the nucleation rate. Higher nucleation rates lead to a higher peak in number density and to the size distribution attaining its second mode sooner. The ensemble-averaged PSDF in the turbulent flame is computed from individual samples of the PSDF from large sets of Lagrangian trajectories. This statistical measure is equivalent to time-averaged, scanning mobility particle size (SMPS) measurements in turbulent flames. Although individual trajectories display strong bimodality as in laminar flames, the ensemble-average PSDF possesses only one mode and a long, broad tail, which implies significant polydispersity induced by turbulence. Our results agree very well with SMPS measurements available in the literature. Conditioning on key features of the trajectory, such as mixture fraction or radial locations does not reduce the scatter in the size distributions and the ensemble-averaged PSDF remains broad. The results highlight and explain the important role of turbulence in broadening the size distribution of

  18. Structural effects on the oxidation of soot particles by O2: Experimental and theoretical study

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet

    2013-09-01

    Soot particles are composed of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which have either planar or curved structures. The oxidation behaviors of soot particles differ depending on their structures, arrangement of PAHs, and the type of surface functional groups. The oxidation rate of curved PAHs in soot is thought to be higher than that of planar ones. To understand the role that PAH structure plays in soot reactivity towards O2, experimental studies are conducted on two types of commercially produced soot, Printex-U and Fullerene soot, using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis and elemental analysis. The relative concentrations of active sites, oxygenated functional groups, aliphatics and aromatics present in soots are evaluated. The activation energies for soot oxidation at different conversion levels are determined. The average activation energies of the two soots are found to differ by 26kJ/mol. To understand the reason for this difference, quantum calculations using density functional (B3LYP) and Hartree-Fock theories are conducted to study the reaction pathways of the oxidation by O2 of planar and curved PAHs using 4-pyrenyl and 1-corannulenyl as their model molecules, respectively. The energetically preferred channels for curved PAH oxidation differ from the planar one. The addition of O2 on a radical site of a six-membered ring to form a peroxyl radical is found to be barrierless for both the model PAHs. For peroxyl decomposition, three pathways are suggested, each of which involve the activation energies of 108, 170 and 121kJ/mol to form stable molecules in the case of planar PAH, and 94, 155 and 125kJ/mol in the case of curved PAH. During the oxidation of a five-membered ring, to form stable molecules, the activation energies of 90kJ/mol for the curved PAH and 169kJ/mol for the planar PAH relative to the energy of the peroxyl radical are required. The low activation barriers of

  19. Influence of soot mixing state on aerosol light absorption and single scattering albedo during air mass aging at a polluted regional site in northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y. F.; Berghof, M.; Garland, R. M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Wehner, B.; Müller, T.; Su, H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Achtert, P.; Nowak, A.; PöSchl, U.; Zhu, T.; Hu, M.; Zeng, L. M.

    2009-01-01

    An aerosol optical closure study was performed using the observed high time- and size-resolved soot mixing states determined by a Volatility Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (VTDMA) at a polluted regional site, Yufa, in the south of Beijing during the summer of 2006. Good agreement was found between the simulated and measured aerosol absorption (σap, R = 0.9) and scattering (σsp, R ≥ 0.95). The soot mixing state at Yufa can be generally determined by VTDMA, in terms of properly predicting the σap using a simple optical model combined with spherical homogeneous and core-shell coated Mie codes. The possible uncertainties in the modeled σap were discussed. Rapid soot aging was observed, which led to large variations in the fractional contributions to σap by externally mixed and coated soot. On average, about 37% of the σap (˜10-60%) arose by the coated soot. The coating enhancement in σap and σsp of the coated soot can reach up to a factor of 8-10 within several hours owing to the secondary processing during daytime. It was contributed not only by the increased thickness of coating shell, but also the transition of soot from externally mixed to coated one. Hence, assuming constant soot mixing state for the regional climate model is not realistic and may lead to uncertainties. In the highly polluted region in northeastern China, the aerosol single scattering albedo may increase very fast owing to the rapid secondary particle formation and condensation (up to 0.90-0.95). This increase took place although the concurrent coating processing enhanced the light absorption capability of soot.

  20. TEM and HRTEM of Soot-in-oil particles and agglomerates from internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, M W; Rocca, A La; Shayler, P J

    2014-01-01

    Over time, the performance of lubricating oil in a diesel engine is affected by the build-up of carbon soot produced by the combustion process. TEM and HRTEM are commonly used to investigate the characteristics of individual and agglomerated particles from diesel exhaust, to understand the structure and distribution of the carbon sheets in the primary particles and the nanostructure morphology. However, high resolution imaging of soot-in-oil is more challenging, as mineral oil is a contaminant for the electron microscope and leads to instability under the electron beam. In this work we compare solvent extraction and centrifugation techniques for removing the mineral oil contaminant, and the effect on particle size distribution

  1. Temporal Evolution of Soot Particles from C2H2/O2 Combustion in a Closed Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertran Celso A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of soot formation in C2H2/O2 flames at different C/O ratios in a closed chamber was carried out. The evolution temporal behavior and the volume fraction of soot particles were determined by laser extinction. It was found that total time for the soot formation phenomenon in flames from C2H2/O2 with C/O ratio > 0.75 or C2H2/O2/Ar with C/O ratio = 1.00 was around 3.0-4.0 ms after ignition. At almost the same time the excited radicals reached their maximum emission intensity and the gases under combustion reached their maximum pressure. The micrographs show compact and approximately spherical soot particles with diameters within 60-150 nm. However, soot aggregates are not compact and they present a netlike structure similar to that of an aerogel.

  2. Comprehensive Laser-induced Incandescence (LII) modeling for soot particle sizing

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel

    2015-03-30

    To evaluate the current state of the art in LII particle sizing, a comprehensive model for predicting the temporal incandescent response of combustion-generated soot to absorption of a pulsed laser is presented. The model incorporates particle heating through laser absorption, thermal annealing, and oxidation at the surface as well as cooling through sublimation and photodesorption, radiation, conduction and thermionic emission. Thermodynamic properties and the thermal accommodation coefficient utilized in the model are temperature dependent. In addition, where appropriate properties are also phase dependent, thereby accounting for annealing effects during laser heating and particle cooling.

  3. Ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering characterization of diesel/gasoline soot: sizes and particle-packing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameya, Yuki; Lee, Kyeong O.

    2013-10-01

    Regulations on particulate emissions from internal combustion engines tend to become more stringent, accordingly the importance of particulate filters in the after-treatment system has been increasing. In this work, the applicability of ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) to diesel soot cake and gasoline soot was investigated. Gasoline-direct-injection engine soot was collected at different fuel injection timings. The unified fits method was applied to analyze the resultant scattering curves. The validity of analysis was supported by comparing with carbon black and taking the sample images using a transmission electron microscope, which revealed that the primary particle size ranged from 20 to 55 nm. In addition, the effects of particle-packing conditions on the USAXS measurement were demonstrated by using samples suspended in acetone. Then, the investigation was extended to characterization of diesel soot cake deposited on a diesel particulate filter (DPF). Diesel soot was trapped on a small piece of DPF at different deposition conditions which were specified using the Peclet number. The dependence of scattering curve on soot-deposition conditions was demonstrated. To support the interpretation of the USAXS results, soot cake samples were observed using a scanning electron microscope and the influence of particle-packing conditions on scattering curve was discussed.

  4. Ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering characterization of diesel/gasoline soot: sizes and particle-packing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameya, Yuki; Lee, Kyeong O.

    2013-01-01

    Regulations on particulate emissions from internal combustion engines tend to become more stringent, accordingly the importance of particulate filters in the after-treatment system has been increasing. In this work, the applicability of ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) to diesel soot cake and gasoline soot was investigated. Gasoline-direct-injection engine soot was collected at different fuel injection timings. The unified fits method was applied to analyze the resultant scattering curves. The validity of analysis was supported by comparing with carbon black and taking the sample images using a transmission electron microscope, which revealed that the primary particle size ranged from 20 to 55 nm. In addition, the effects of particle-packing conditions on the USAXS measurement were demonstrated by using samples suspended in acetone. Then, the investigation was extended to characterization of diesel soot cake deposited on a diesel particulate filter (DPF). Diesel soot was trapped on a small piece of DPF at different deposition conditions which were specified using the Peclet number. The dependence of scattering curve on soot-deposition conditions was demonstrated. To support the interpretation of the USAXS results, soot cake samples were observed using a scanning electron microscope and the influence of particle-packing conditions on scattering curve was discussed

  5. Quantitative effects of rapid heating on soot-particle sizing through analysis of two-pulse LII

    KAUST Repository

    Cenker, Emre

    2017-02-27

    During the rapid laser pulse heating and consecutive cooling in laser-induced incandescence (LII), soot particles may undergo thermal annealing and sublimation processes which lead to a permanent change in its optical properties and its primary particle size, respectively. Overall, effects of these two processes on soot and LII model-based particle sizing are investigated by measuring the two-color time-resolved (2C-TiRe) LII signal decay from in-flame soot after two consecutive laser pulses at 1064-nm wavelength. Experiments are carried out on a non-premixed laminar ethylene/air flame from a Santoro burner with both low and moderate laser fluences suitable for particle sizing. The probe volume is set to a radial position close to the flame axis where the soot particles are known to be immature or less graphitic. With the first pulse, soot is pre-heated, and the LII signal after the consecutive second pulse is used for analysis. The two-color incandescence emission technique is used for the pyrometric determination of the LII-heated peak soot temperature at the second pulse. A new LII simulation tool is developed which accounts for particle heating via absorption and annealing, and cooling via sublimation, conduction, and radiation with various existing sub-models from the literature. The same approach of using two laser pulses is implemented in the simulations. Measurements indicate that thermal annealing and associated absorption enhancement becomes important at laser fluences above 0.17 J/cm2 for the immature in-flame soot. After a heating pulse at 0.33 J/cm2, the increase of the soot absorption function is calculated as 35% using the temperature measured at the second pulse and an absorption model based on the Rayleigh approximation. Present annealing model, on the other hand, predicts graphitization of soot even in the absence of laser heating at typical flame temperatures. Recorded experimental LII signal decays and LII-heated peak soot temperature

  6. Models for the optical simulations of fractal aggregated soot particles thinly coated with non-absorbing aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Light absorption enhancement of aged soot aerosols is highly sensitive to the morphologies and mixing states of soot aggregates and their non-absorbing coatings, such as organic materials. The quantification of these effects on the optical properties of thinly coated soot aerosols is simulated using an effective model with fixed volume fractions. Fractal aggregated soot was simulated using the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) algorithm and discretized into soot dipoles. The dipoles of non-absorbing aerosols, whose number was fixed by the volume fraction, were further generated from the neighboring random edge dipoles. Their optical properties were calculated using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method and were compared with other commonly used models. The optical properties of thinly coated soot calculated using the fixed volume fraction model are close to (less than ~10% difference) the results of the fixed coating thickness model, except their asymmetry parameters (up to ~25% difference). In the optical simulations of thinly coated soot aerosols, this relative difference of asymmetry parameters and phase functions between these realistic models may be notable. The realizations of the fixed volume fraction model may introduce smaller variation of optical results than those of the fixed coating thickness model. Moreover, the core-shell monomers model and homogeneous aggregated spheres model with the Maxwell-Garnett (MG) theory may underestimate (up to ~20%) the cross sections of thinly coated soot aggregates. The single core-shell sphere model may largely overestimate (up to ~150%) the cross sections and single scattering albedo of thinly coated soot aggregates, and it underestimated (up to ~60%) their asymmetry parameters. It is suggested that the widely used single core-shell sphere approximation may not be suitable for the single scattering calculations of thinly coated soot aerosols.

  7. Carbon Nanostructure of Diesel Soot Particles Emitted from 2 and 4 Stroke Marine Engines Burning Different Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Ju; Park, Seul-Hyun; Jang, Se-Hyun; Kim, Hwajin; Choi, Sung Kuk; Cho, Kwon-Hae; Cho, Ik-Soon; Lee, Sang-Min; Choi, Jae-Hyuk

    2018-03-01

    Diesel soot particles were sampled from 2-stroke and 4-stroke engines that burned two different fuels (Bunker A and C, respectively), and the effects of the engine and fuel types on the structural characteristics of the soot particle were analyzed. The carbon nanostructures of the sampled particles were characterized using various techniques. The results showed that the soot sample collected from the 4-stroke engine, which burned Bunker C, has a higher degree of order of the carbon nanostructure than the sample collected from the 2-stroke engine, which burned Bunker A. Furthermore, the difference in the exhaust gas temperatures originating from the different engine and fuel types can affect the nanostructure of the soot emitted from marine diesel engines.

  8. Application of a robust and efficient Lagrangian particle scheme to soot transport in turbulent flames

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    A Lagrangian particle scheme is applied to the solution of soot dynamics in turbulent nonpremixed flames. Soot particulate is described using a method of moments and the resulting set of continuum advection-reaction equations is solved using the Lagrangian particle scheme. The key property of the approach is the independence between advection, described by the movement of Lagrangian notional particles along pathlines, and internal aerosol processes, evolving on each notional particle via source terms. Consequently, the method overcomes the issues in Eulerian grid-based schemes for the advection of moments: errors in the advective fluxes pollute the moments compromising their realizability and the stiffness of source terms weakens the stability of the method. The proposed scheme exhibits superior properties with respect to conventional Eulerian schemes in terms of stability, accuracy, and grid convergence. Taking into account the quality of the solution, the Lagrangian approach can be computationally more economical than commonly used Eulerian schemes as it allows the resolution requirements dictated by the different physical phenomena to be independently optimized. Finally, the scheme posseses excellent scalability on massively parallel computers. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Determination of the spectral behaviour of atmospheric soot using different particle models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupski, Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    In the atmosphere, black carbon aggregates interact with both organic and inorganic matter. In many studies they are modeled using different, less complex, geometries. However, some common simplification might lead to many inaccuracies in the following light scattering simulations. The goal of this study was to compare the spectral behavior of different, commonly used soot particle models. For light scattering simulations, in the visible spectrum, the ADDA algorithm was used. The results prove that the relative extinction error δCext, in some cases, can be unexpectedly large. Therefore, before starting excessive simulations, it is important to know what error might occur.

  10. Electrically charged small soot particles in the exhaust of an aircraft gas-turbine engine combustor: comparison of model and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, A.; Arnold, F.

    The emission of electrically charged soot particles by an aircraft gas-turbine combustor is investigated using a theoretical model. Particular emphasis is placed on the influence of the fuel sulfur content (FSC). The model considers the production of primary "combustion" electrons and ions in the flame zone and their following interaction with molecular oxygen, sulfur-bearing molecules (e.g. O 2, SO 2, SO 3, etc.) and soot particles. The soot particle size distribution is approximated by two different populations of mono-dispersed large and small soot particles with diameters of 20-30 and 5-7 nm, respectively. The effect of thermal ionization of soot and its interaction with electrons and positive and negative ions is included in the model. The computed positive and negative chemiion (CI) concentrations at the combustor exit and relative fractions of small neutral and charged soot particles were found to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The results show that the FSC indeed may influence the concentration of negative CI at low fuel flow into combustor. Importantly the simulation indicates a very efficient mutual interaction of electrons and ions with soot particles with a large effect on both ion and charged soot particle concentrations. This result may be interpreted as a possible indirect effect of FSC on the growth and size distribution of soot particles.

  11. Immobilization of soot particles in a silica matrix: A sorbent-carrier system for studying organic chemical sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh H; Sabbah, Isam; Ball, William P

    2005-09-01

    A new method for studying sorption with diesel and hexane sootwas developed, tested, and applied. A commercial silica-based chromatography medium was used as an inert inorganic carrier for immobilization (entrapment) of soot particles and their aggregates, thus creating a combined sorbent for sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs). After precombustion to remove potential organic carbon contaminants, the silica particles and soot samples were mixed under dry conditions that allowed the soot to be incorporated within the pore structure of the much larger (> 180 microm) carrier particles. Unincorporated soot was removed by multiple rinses with Milli-Q water. Sorption rate and equilibrium experiments were conducted, using phenanthrene as a probe HOC. Strong nonlinear sorption of phenanthrene was observed, in agreement with results previously obtained using air-bridge and flocculation-based methods. Batch kinetic studies suggested that 60 d of prewetting is required to obtain full water saturation, as perhaps needed for proper assessment of phenanthrene uptake rate by soot in aqueous systems. Forthe determination of equilibrium phenanthrene sorption, however, 1-d prewetting is sufficient so long as final equilibration is for at least 60 d. The new method is a practical approach to sorption measurement that may prove especially useful for study of strongly sorbing chemicals.

  12. Dielectric properties of PMMA/Soot nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Lanetra M; Cinke, Martin; Meyyappan, M; Harmon, Julie P

    2007-07-01

    Dielectric analysis (DEA) of relaxation behavior in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) soot nanocomposites is described herein. The soot, an inexpensive material, consists of carbon nanotubes, amorphous and graphitic carbon and metal particles. Results are compared to earlier studies on PMMA/multi-walled nanotube (MWNT) composites and PMMA/single-walled nanotube (SWNT) composites. The beta relaxation process appeared to be unaffected by the presence of the soot, as was noted earlier in nanotube composites. The gamma relaxation region in PMMA, normally dielectrically inactive, was "awakened" in the PMMA/soot composite. This occurrence is consistent with previously published data on nanotube composites. The dielectric permittivity, s', increased with soot content. The sample with 1% soot exhibited a permittivity (at 100 Hz and 25 degrees C) of 7.3 as compared to 5.1 for neat PMMA. Soot increased the dielectric strength, deltaE, of the composites. The 1% soot sample exhibited a dielectric strength of 6.38, while the neat PMMA had a value of 2.95 at 40 degrees C. The symmetric broadening term (alpha) was slightly higher for the 1% composite at temperatures near the secondary relaxation and near the primary relaxation, but all samples deviated from symmetrical semi-circular behavior (alpha = 1). The impact of the soot filler is seen more clearly in dielectric properties than in mechanical properties studies conducted earlier.

  13. Soot, unburned carbon and ultrafine particle emissions from air- and oxy-coal flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, W.J.; Yu, Dunxi; Wendt, J.O.L.

    2010-01-01

    Oxy-coal combustion is one possible solution for the mitigation of greenhouse gases. In this process coal is burned in oxygen, rather than air, and the temperatures in the boiler are mitigated by recycling flue gases, so that the inlet mixture may contain either 27 % O 2 to match adiabatic flame temperatures, or 32 % O 2 to match gaseous radiation heat fluxes in the combustion chamber. However, a major issue for heat transfer from coal combustion is the radiative heat transmission from soot. For this research, air and oxy coal firing were compared regarding the emission of soot. A 100 kW down-fired laboratory combustor was used to determine effects of switching from air to oxy-firing on soot, unburned carbon and ultrafine particle emissions from practical pulverized coal flames. Of interest here were potential chemical effects of substitution of the N 2 in air by CO 2 in practical pulverized coal flames. The oxy-coal configuration investigated used once-through CO 2 , simulating cleaned flue gas recycle with all contaminants and water removed. Three coals were each burned in: a) air, b) 27 % O 2 / 73 % CO 2 , c) 32 % O 2 / 68 % CO 2 . Tests were conducted at (nominally) 3 %, 2 %, 1 % and 0 % O 2 in the exhaust (dry basis). For each condition, particulate samples were iso kinetically withdrawn far from the radiant zone, and analyzed using a photoacoustic analyzer (PA) for black carbon, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) for ultrafine particles, and a total sample loss on ignition (LOI) method for unburned carbon in ash. Data suggest that at low stoichiometric ratios, ultrafine particles consist primarily of black carbon, which, for the bituminous coal, is produced in lesser amounts under oxy-fired conditions than under the air-fired condition, even when adiabatic flame temperatures are matched. However, significant changes in mineral matter vaporization were not observed unless the flames were hotter. These and other results are interpreted in the light of

  14. Investigation of soot morphology and particle size distrib ution in a turbulent nonpremixed flame via Monte Carlo simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelgadir, Ahmed

    2015-03-30

    Recently, our group performed a set of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of soot formation and growth in a n-heptane three dimensional non-premixed jet flame [Attili et al., Proc. Comb. Inst, 35, 2015], [Attili et al., Comb. Flame, 161, 2014], [Bisetti et al.,Trans of the Royal Soc, 372, 2014]. The evolution of species relevant to soot formation and growth have been sampled along a large number of Lagrangian trajectories in the DNS. In this work, the DNS results are post-processed to compute the soot evolution along selected Lagrangian trajectories using a Monte Carlo method. An operator splitting approach is adopted to split the deterministic processes (nucleation, surface growth and oxidation) from coagulation, which is treated stochastically. The morphological properties of soot and the particlesize distribution are investigated. For trajectories that experience an early strong nucleation event, the particle size distribution is found to be bimodal, as the soot particles have enough time to coagulate and grow while it is unimodal for trajectories characterized by only late nucleation events. As a results, the average size distribution at two different crosswise positions in the flame is unimodal.

  15. Effects of DME mixing on number density and size properties of soot particles in counterflow non-premixed ethylene flames

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the effect of DME mixing on the number density and size of soot particles, DME was mixed in a counter flow non-premixed ethylene flame with mixture ratios of 5%, 14% and 30%. A laser extinction/scattering technique has been adopted to measure the volume fraction, number density, and mean size of soot particles. The experimental results showed that the highest soot concentrations were observed for flames with mixture ratios of 5% and 14%; however, for a mixture ratio of 30% the soot concentration decreased. Numerical results showed that the concentrations of propargyl radicals (C3H3) at the 5% and 14% ratios were higher than those measured in the ethylene-based flame, and the production of benzene (C6H6) in the 5% and 14% DME mixture flames was also increased. This indicates the crucial role of propargyl in benzene ring formation. These reactions generally become stronger with increased DME mixing, except for A1- + H2 → A1 + H (-R554) and n-C4H5 + C2H2 → A1 + H (R542). Therefore, it is indicated that adding DME to ethylene flames promotes benzene ring formation. Note that although the maximum C6H6 concentration is largest in the 30% DME mixing flame, the soot volume fraction is smaller than those for the 5% and 14% mixture ratios. This is because the local C6H6 concentration decreases in the relatively low temperature region in the fuel side where soot growth occurs. © 2015, The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  16. Facile synthesis of nano cauliflower and nano broccoli like hierarchical superhydrophobic composite coating using PVDF/carbon soot particles via gelation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Bichitra Nanda; Balasubramanian, Kandasubramanian

    2014-12-15

    We have elucidated a cost effective fabrication technique to produce superhydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF/DMF/candle soot particle and PVDF/DMF/camphor soot particle composite) porous materials. The water repellent dry composite was formed by the interaction of non-solvent (methanol) into PVDF/carbon soot particles suspension in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). It is seen that longer quenching time effectively changes the surface morphology of dry composites. The nano broccoli like hierarchical microstructure with micro or nano scaled roughen surface was obtained for PVDF/DMF/camphor soot particle, which reveals water contact angle of 172° with roll off angle of 2°. However, composite coating of PVDF/DMF/candle soot particle shows nano cauliflower like hierarchical, which illustrates water contact angle of 169° with roll off angle of 3°. To elucidate the enhancement of water repellent property of PVDF composites, we further divulge the evolution mechanism of nano cauliflower and nano broccoli structure. In order to evaluate the water contact angle of PVDF composites, surface diffusion of water inside the pores is investigated. Furthermore, the addition of small amount of carbon soot particles in composite not only provides the crystallization of PVDF, but also leads to dramatical amendment of surface morphology which increases the surface texture and roughness for superhydrophobicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of Transition from HCCI to CI via PPC with Low Octane Gasoline Fuels Using Optical Diagnostics and Soot Particle Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    An, Yanzhao

    2017-10-10

    In-cylinder visualization, combustion stratification, and engine-out particulate matter (PM) emissions were investigated in an optical engine fueled with Haltermann straight-run naphtha fuel and corresponding surrogate fuel. The combustion mode was transited from homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) to conventional compression ignition (CI) via partially premixed combustion (PPC). Single injection strategy with the change of start of injection (SOI) from early to late injections was employed. The high-speed color camera was used to capture the in-cylinder combustion images. The combustion stratification was analyzed based on the natural luminosity of the combustion images. The regulated emission of unburned hydrocarbon (UHC), carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides (NO) were measured to evaluate the combustion efficiency together with the in-cylinder rate of heat release. Soot mass concentration was measured and linked with the combustion stratification and the integrated red channel intensity of the high-speed images for the soot emissions. The nucleation nanoscale particle number and the particle size distribution were sampled to understand the effect of combustion mode switch.

  18. Time-averaged probability density functions of soot nanoparticles along the centerline of a piloted turbulent diffusion flame using a scanning mobility particle sizer

    KAUST Repository

    Chowdhury, Snehaunshu

    2017-01-23

    In this study, we demonstrate the use of a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) as an effective tool to measure the probability density functions (PDFs) of soot nanoparticles in turbulent flames. Time-averaged soot PDFs necessary for validating existing soot models are reported at intervals of ∆x/D∆x/D = 5 along the centerline of turbulent, non-premixed, C2H4/N2 flames. The jet exit Reynolds numbers of the flames investigated were 10,000 and 20,000. A simplified burner geometry based on a published design was chosen to aid modelers. Soot was sampled directly from the flame using a sampling probe with a 0.5-mm diameter orifice and diluted with N2 by a two-stage dilution process. The overall dilution ratio was not evaluated. An SMPS system was used to analyze soot particle concentrations in the diluted samples. Sampling conditions were optimized over a wide range of dilution ratios to eliminate the effect of agglomeration in the sampling probe. Two differential mobility analyzers (DMAs) with different size ranges were used separately in the SMPS measurements to characterize the entire size range of particles. In both flames, the PDFs were found to be mono-modal in nature near the jet exit. Further downstream, the profiles were flatter with a fall-off at larger particle diameters. The geometric mean of the soot size distributions was less than 10 nm for all cases and increased monotonically with axial distance in both flames.

  19. Determination of mass and velocity distributions of soot particles in a nozzle beam from a flame by means of a Wien filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homann, K.H.; Wiese, W. [Institute fuer Physikalische Chemie, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    Size distributions of soot particles in flames have mainly been determined from electron micrographs of particles. However, there is a limit of about 3 nm below which the uncertainty in particle diameter determined in this way becomes too large for a sufficiently accurate mass determination. For an understanding of the soot formation mechanism it is of particular interest to study the mass growth of the first soot particles after their inception from large hydrocarbon molecules. This concerns a mass range of some 10{sup 3} to some 10{sup 4} u. High-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) has the shortcoming that ionization of soot particles in an ion source does not seem to be very effective. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the usually applied electron multiplier detectors decreases with ion mass in a uncontrollable way. The authors therefore developed a new method for the mass analysis of very small particles. Charged soot particles can be sampled from low-pressure flames via a nozzle beam which generates a current large enough to be measured with a Faraday detector and a sensitive electrometer. Their mass distribution is quasi-continuous so that high mass resolution is not necessary.

  20. A single particle energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics

    1993-09-01

    We consider the binding energies of {Lambda} hypernuclei (HN), in particular the single-particle (s.p.) energy data, which have been obtained for a wide range of HN with mass numbers A {le} 89 and for orbital angular momenta {ell}{sub {Lambda}} {le} 4. We briefly review some of the relevant properties of A hypernuclei. These are nuclei {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}Z with baryon number A in which a single {Lambda} hyperon (baryon number = 1) is bound to an ordinary nucleus {sup A}Z consisting of A - 1 nucleons = Z protons + N neutrons. The {Lambda} hyperon is neutral, has spin 1/2, strangeness S = {minus}1, isospin I = O and a mass M{sub {Lambda}} = 1116 MeV/c{sup 2}. Although the {Lambda} interacts with a nucleon, its interaction is only about half as strong as that between two nucleons, and thus very roughly V{sub {Lambda}N} {approx} 0.5 V{sub NN}. As a result, the two-body {Lambda}N system is unbound, and the lightest bound HN is the three-body hypertriton {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H in which the {Lambda} is bound to a deuteron with the {Lambda}-d separation energy being only {approx} 0.1 MeV corresponding to an exponential tail of radius {approx} 15 fm! In strong interactions the strangeness S is of course conserved, and the {Lambda} is distinct from the nucleons. In a HN strangeness changes only in the weak decays of the {Lambda} which can decay either via ``free`` pionic decay {Lambda} {yields} N + {pi} or via induced decay {Lambda} + N {yields} N + N which is only possible in the presence of nucleons. Because of the small energy release the pionic decay is strongly suppressed in all but the lightest HN and the induced decay dominates. However, the weak decay lifetime {approx} 10{sup {minus}10}s is in fact close to the lifetime of a free {Lambda}. Since this is much longer than the strong interaction time {approx} 10{sup {minus}22}s we can ignore the weak interactions when considering the binding of HN, just as for ordinary nuclei.

  1. A single particle energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the binding energies of Λ hypernuclei (HN), in particular the single-particle (s.p.) energy data, which have been obtained for a wide range of HN with mass numbers A ≤ 89 and for orbital angular momenta ell Λ ≤ 4. We briefly review some of the relevant properties of A hypernuclei. These are nuclei Λ A Z with baryon number A in which a single Λ hyperon (baryon number = 1) is bound to an ordinary nucleus A Z consisting of A - 1 nucleons = Z protons + N neutrons. The Λ hyperon is neutral, has spin 1/2, strangeness S = -1, isospin I = O and a mass M Λ = 1116 MeV/c 2 . Although the Λ interacts with a nucleon, its interaction is only about half as strong as that between two nucleons, and thus very roughly V ΛN ∼ 0.5 V NN . As a result, the two-body ΛN system is unbound, and the lightest bound HN is the three-body hypertriton Λ 3 H in which the Λ is bound to a deuteron with the Λ-d separation energy being only ∼ 0.1 MeV corresponding to an exponential tail of radius ∼ 15 fm exclamation point In strong interactions the strangeness S is of course conserved, and the Λ is distinct from the nucleons. In a HN strangeness changes only in the weak decays of the Λ which can decay either via ''free'' pionic decay Λ → N + π or via induced decay Λ + N → N + N which is only possible in the presence of nucleons. Because of the small energy release the pionic decay is strongly suppressed in all but the lightest HN and the induced decay dominates. However, the weak decay lifetime ∼ 10 -10 s is in fact close to the lifetime of a free Λ. Since this is much longer than the strong interaction time ∼ 10 -22 s we can ignore the weak interactions when considering the binding of HN, just as for ordinary nuclei

  2. Simulation of soot size distribution in an ethylene counterflow flame

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2014-01-06

    Soot, an aggregate of carbonaceous particles produced during the rich combustion of fossil fuels, is an undesirable pollutant and health hazard. Soot evolution involves various dynamic processes: nucleation soot formation from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) condensation PAHs condensing on soot particle surface surface processes hydrogen-abstraction-C2H2-addition, oxidation coagulation two soot particles coagulating to form a bigger particle This simulation work investigates soot size distribution and morphology in an ethylene counterflow flame, using i). Chemkin with a method of moments to deal with the coupling between vapor consumption and soot formation; ii). Monte Carlo simulation of soot dynamics.

  3. Molecular Characterization of the Gas-Particle Interface of Soot Sampled from a Diesel Engine Using a Titration Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, A; Salgado, M S; Martín, María Pilar; Lapuerta, M; Rodríguez-Fernández, J; Rossi, M J; Cabañas, B

    2016-03-15

    Surface functional groups of two different types of combustion aerosols, a conventional diesel (EN 590) and a hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) soot, have been investigated using heterogeneous chemistry (i.e., gas-particle surface reactions). A commercial sample of amorphous carbon (Printex XE2-B) was analyzed as a reference substrate. A Knudsen flow reactor was used to carry out the experiments under molecular flow conditions. The selected gases for the titration experiments were: N(CH3)3 for the identification of acidic sites, NH2OH for the presence of carbonyl groups, CF3COOH and HCl for basic sites of different strength, and O3 and NO2 for reducing groups. Reactivity with N(CH3)3 indicates a lower density of acidic functionalities for Printex XE2-B in relation to diesel and HVO soot. Results for NH2OH experiments indicates that commercial amorphous carbon exhibits a lower abundance of available carbonyl groups at the interface compared to the results from diesel and HVO soot, the latter being the one with the largest abundance of carbonyl functions. Reactions with acids indicate the presence of weak basic oxides on the particle surface that preferentially interact with the strong acid CF3COOH. Finally, reactions with O3 and NO2 reveal that diesel and especially HVO have a significantly higher reactivity with both oxidizers compared to that of Printex XE2-B because they have more reducing sites by roughly a factor of 10 and 30, respectively. The kinetics of titration reactions have also been investigated.

  4. Soot Nanoparticles Could Partake in Nucleation of Biogenic Particles in the Atmosphere: Using Fullerene as a Model Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The detection of existence of fullerenes (C60 and C70 makes it necessary to explore whether soot nanoparticles can participate in new nanometer-sized particle formation and growth in the atmosphere. This study describes a theoretical investigation at multiple levels on the role of the fullerenes (as model compounds to represent nanoparticles of soot in the formation of complexes with a common atmospheric nucleating precursor (sulfuric acid, SA and a biogenic organic acid (cis-pinonic acid, CPA, as well as initial growth of nano-sized biogenic aerosols. Quantum chemical density-functional theory calculations identify the formation of stable fullerene-[CPA-SA] ternary complexes, which likely leads to an enhanced nucleation of SA with CPA. Relevant thermochemical parameters including the changes of Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy for the complex formation also support that fullerene-[CPA-SA] is most likely to be a newly formed nuclei. The sizes of the critical nucleus of the fullerene-[CPA-SA-H2O] systems were found to be approximately 1.3 nm by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. This study may provide a new insight into the mechanisms underlying the formation of new particle in the atmospheric environment.

  5. Collection efficiency of the soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam-laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements are used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam-particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of 2. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.

  6. Single-particle Analyses of Compositions, Morphology, and Viscosity of Aerosol Particles Collected During GoAmazon2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, K.; Gong, Z.; Bateman, A. P.; Martin, S. T.; Cirino, G. G.; Artaxo, P.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Single-particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles collected during the GoAmazon2014 campaign. These TEM results indicate aerosol types and mixing states, both of which are important for evaluating particle optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity. The samples were collected at the T3 site, which is located in the Amazon forest with influences from the urban pollution plume from Manaus. Samples were also collected from the T0 site, which is in the middle of the jungle with minimal to no influences of anthropogenic sources. The aerosol particles mainly originated from 1) anthropogenic pollution (e.g., nanosphere soot, sulfate), 2) biogenic emissions (e.g., primary biogenic particles, organic aerosols), and 3) long-range transport (e.g., sea salts). We found that the biogenic organic aerosol particles contain homogeneously distributed potassium. Particle viscosity is important for evaluating gas-particle interactions and atmospheric chemistry for the particles. Viscosity can be estimated from the rebounding behavior at controlled relative humidities, i.e., highly viscous particles display less rebound on a plate than low-viscosity particles. We collected 1) aerosol particles from a plate (non-rebounded), 2) those that had rebounded from the plate and were then captured onto an adjacent sampling plate, and 3) particles from ambient air using a separate impactor sampler. Preliminary results show that more than 90% of non-rebounded particles consisted of nanosphere soot with or without coatings. The coatings mostly consisted of organic matter. Although rebounded particles also contain nanosphere soot (number fraction 64-69%), they were mostly internally mixed with sulfate, organic matter, or their mixtures. TEM tilted images suggested that the rebounded particles were less deformed on the substrate, whereas the non-rebounded particles were more deformed, which could

  7. Laboratory Measurements of the Effect of Sulfuric and Organic Acid Coatings on the Optical Properties of Carbon Soot Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, H.; Khalizov, A.; Zhang, R.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol particles perturb the Earth-atmosphere radiative balance through scattering and absorption of the solar energy. Soot or black carbon, produced during combustion of fossil fuels and biofuels, is the major component responsible for light absorption by aerosol particles. The variation in the reported mass-specific absorption cross-sections (MAC) of fresh soot and increased light absorption by aged soot aerosols internally mixed with non-absorbing materials are the major factors leading to large uncertainties in the evaluation of the aerosol optical effects. We have investigated the optical properties of submicron carbon soot aerosols during simulated atmospheric processing with sulfuric acid and dicarboxylic organic acids. Internally mixed soot particles with known size, morphology, and the mixing state were produced by exposing the size-classified, flame-generated soot to sulfuric acid and organic acid vapor. Light extinction and scattering by fresh and internally mixed soot were measured at 532 nm wavelength using a cavity ring-down spectrometer and an integrating nephelometer, respectively; light absorption was derived as the difference between extinction and scattering. Mass-specific absorption cross-sections for fresh and internally mixed soot aggregates were calculated using the measured effective densities of soot cores. The optical properties of fresh soot were independent of the relative humidity (RH). Internally mixed soot exhibited significant enhancement in light absorption and scattering, increasing with the mass fraction of the coating material and RH. Sulfuric acid was found to cause greater enhancement in soot optical properties than organic acids. The higher absorption and scattering resulted in the increased single scattering albedo of coated soot aerosol. The measurements indicate that the irreversible restructuring of soot aggregates to more compact globules is a major contributor to the enhanced optical properties of internally mixed soot.

  8. On the radiative properties of soot aggregates - Part 2: Effects of coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengshan; Yon, Jérôme; Bescond, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    The effects of weakly absorbing material coating on soot have attracted considerable research attention in recent years due to the significant influence of such coating on soot radiative properties and the large differences predicted by different numerical models. Soot aggregates were first numerically generated using the diffusion limited cluster aggregation algorithm to produce fractal aggregates formed by log-normally distributed polydisperse spherical primary particles in point-touch. These aggregates were then processed by adding a certain amount of primary particle overlapping and necking to simulate the soot morphology observed from transmission electron microscopy images. After this process, a layer of WAM coating of different thicknesses was added to these more realistic soot aggregates. The radiative properties of these coated soot aggregates over the spectral range of 266-1064 nm were calculated by the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) using the spectrally dependent refractive index of soot for four aggregates containing Np=1, 20, 51 and 96 primary particles. The considered coating thicknesses range from 0% (no coating) up to 100% coating in terms of the primary particle diameter. Coating enhances both the particle absorption and scattering cross sections, with much stronger enhancement to the scattering one, as well as the asymmetry factor and the single scattering albedo. The absorption enhancement is stronger in the UV than in the visible and the near infrared. The simple corrections to the Rayleigh-Debye-Gans fractal aggregates theory for uncoated soot aggregates are found not working for coated soot aggregates. The core-shell model significantly overestimates the absorption enhancement by coating in the visible and the near infrared compared to the DDA results of the coated soot particle. Treating an externally coated soot aggregate as an aggregate formed by individually coated primary particles significantly underestimates the absorption

  9. Laboratory and modeling studies on the effects of water and soot emissions and ambient conditions on the properties of contrail ice particles in the jet regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Wong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Contrails and contrail-induced cirrus clouds are identified as the most uncertain components in determining aviation impacts on global climate change. Parameters affecting contrail ice particle formation immediately after the engine exit plane (< 5 s in plume age may be critical to ice particle properties used in large-scale models predicting contrail radiative forcing. Despite this, detailed understanding of these parametric effects is still limited. In this paper, we present results from recent laboratory and modeling studies conducted to investigate the effects of water and soot emissions and ambient conditions on near-field formation of contrail ice particles and ice particle properties. The Particle Aerosol Laboratory (PAL at the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Aerodyne microphysical parcel model for contrail ice particle formation were employed. Our studies show that exhaust water concentration has a significant impact on contrail ice particle formation and properties. When soot particles were introduced, ice particle formation was observed only when exhaust water concentration was above a critical level. When no soot or sulfuric acid was introduced, no ice particle formation was observed, suggesting that ice particle formation from homogeneous nucleation followed by homogeneous freezing of liquid water was unfavorable. Soot particles were found to compete for water vapor condensation, and higher soot concentrations emitted into the chamber resulted in smaller ice particles being formed. Chamber conditions corresponding to higher cruising altitudes were found to favor ice particle formation. The microphysical model captures trends of particle extinction measurements well, but discrepancies between the model and the optical particle counter measurements exist as the model predicts narrower ice particle size distributions and ice particle sizes nearly a factor of two larger than measured. These discrepancies are likely due to particle

  10. Use of a Wien filter for mass and velocity analysis of charged soot particles in a nozzle beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homann, K.H.; Traube, J.

    1987-08-01

    A simple Wien filter in combination with an energy-discriminating detector was used to determine mass and velocity distributions of positively and negatively charged particles in a nozzle beam. The particles were sampled from different heights in a 26.7 hPa flat, premixed C/sub 2/H/sub 2//O/sub 2/ flame. The method allows the measurement of mass distributions of particles with different velocities in the beam, of velocity distributions of particles with different masses, and of over-all-mass and velocity distributions, examples of which are given. There is a velocity slip of the large species during expansion of the flow. Particles with larger mass reach a lower final velocity in the beam. The velocity distributions are non-gaussian displaying a long tail to lower velocities. The growth of positively charged soot particles from an average mass of about 1 . 10/sup 3/ u to 1 . 10/sup 4/ u takes place over a distance of 4 mm in the flame.

  11. Determination of the attractive force, adhesive force, adhesion energy and Hamaker constant of soot particles generated from a premixed methane/oxygen flame by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Song, Chonglin; Lv, Gang; Chen, Nan; Zhou, Hua; Jing, Xiaojun

    2018-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the attractive force, adhesive force and adhesion energy between an AFM probe tip and nanometric soot particle generated by a premixed methane/oxygen flame. Different attractive force distributions were found when increasing the height above burner (HAB), with forces ranging from 1.1-3.5 nN. As the HAB was increased, the average attractive force initially increased, briefly decreased, and then underwent a gradual increase, with a maximum of 2.54 nN observed at HAB = 25 mm. The mean adhesive force was 6.5-7.5 times greater than the mean attractive force at the same HAB, and values were in the range of 13.5-24.5 nN. The adhesion energy was in the range of 2.0-5.6 × 10-17 J. The variations observed in the average adhesion energy with increasing HAB were different from those of the average adhesion force, implying that the stretched length of soot particles is an important factor affecting the average adhesion energy. The Hamaker constants of the soot particles generated at different HABs were determined from AFM force-separation curves. The average Hamaker constant exhibited a clear correlation with the graphitization degree of soot particles as obtained from Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Enhanced light absorption and scattering by carbon soot aerosol internally mixed with sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalizov, Alexei F; Xue, Huaxin; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jun; Zhang, Renyi

    2009-02-12

    Light absorption by carbon soot increases when the particles are internally mixed with nonabsorbing materials, leading to increased radiative forcing, but the magnitude of this enhancement is a subject of great uncertainty. We have performed laboratory experiments of the optical properties of fresh and internally mixed carbon soot aerosols with a known particle size, morphology, and the mixing state. Flame-generated soot aerosol is size-selected with a double-differential mobility analyzer (DMA) setup to eliminate multiply charged particle modes and then exposed to gaseous sulfuric acid (10(9)-10(10) molecule cm(-3)) and water vapor (5-80% relative humidity, RH). Light extinction and scattering by fresh and internally mixed soot aerosol are measured at 532 nm wavelength using a cavity ring-down spectrometer and an integrating nephelometer, respectively, and the absorption is derived as the difference between extinction and scattering. The optical properties of fresh soot are independent of RH, whereas soot internally mixed with sulfuric acid exhibits significant enhancement in light absorption and scattering, increasing with the mass fraction of sulfuric acid coating and relative humidity. For soot particles with an initial mobility diameter of 320 nm and a 40% H(2)SO(4) mass coating fraction, absorption and scattering are increased by 1.4- and 13-fold at 80% RH, respectively. Also, the single scattering albedo of soot aerosol increases from 0.1 to 0.5 after coating and humidification. Additional measurements with soot particles that are first coated with sulfuric acid and then heated to remove the coating show that both scattering and absorption are enhanced by irreversible restructuring of soot aggregates to more compact globules. Depending on the initial size and density of soot aggregates, restructuring acts to increase or decrease the absorption cross-section, but the combination of restructuring and encapsulation always results in an increased absorption for

  13. Particle Formation from Pulsed Laser Irradiation of SootAggregates studied with scanning mobility particle sizer, transmissionelectron microscope and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelsen, Hope A.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.; vanPoppel, Laura H.; Dansson, Mark A.; Buseck, Peter R.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2007-02-20

    We investigated the physical and chemical changes induced in soot aggregates exposed to laser radiation using a scanning mobility particle sizer, a transmission electron microscope, and a scanning transmission x-ray microscope to perform near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Laser-induced nanoparticle production was observed at fluences above 0.12 J/cm(2) at 532 nm and 0.22 J/cm(2) at 1064 nm. Our results indicate that new particle formation proceeds via (1) vaporization of small carbon clusters by thermal or photolytic mechanisms, followed by homogeneous nucleation, (2) heterogeneous nucleation of vaporized carbon clusters onto material ablated from primary particles, or (3) both processes.

  14. Particle (Soot) Pollution in Port Harcourt Rivers State, Nigeria—Double Air Pollution Burden? Understanding and Tackling Potential Environmental Public Health Impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Okhumode H. Yakubu

    2017-01-01

    Residents of Port Harcourt in Rivers State, Nigeria, and its environs have since the last quarter of 2016 been experiencing adverse environmental impacts of particle (soot) pollution. This “double air pollution burden”—the unresolved prevailing widespread air pollution and the “added” emergence of particle pollution considered an environmental health threat, led to protests against government inaction in some parts of the state. In February 2017, several months following the onset of the poll...

  15. Hybrid fs/ps CARS for Sooting and Particle-laden Flames [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmeister, Kathryn N. Gabet; Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert; Kearney, Sean P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the application of ultrafast rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for temperature and relative oxygen concentration measurements in the plume emanating from a burning aluminized ammonium perchlorate propellant strand. Combustion of these metal-based propellants is a particularly hostile environment for laserbased diagnostics, with intense background luminosity, scattering and beam obstruction from hot metal particles that can be as large as several hundred microns in diameter. CARS spectra that were previously obtained using nanosecond pulsed lasers in an aluminumparticle- seeded flame are examined and are determined to be severely impacted by nonresonant background, presumably as a result of the plasma formed by particulateenhanced laser-induced breakdown. Introduction of fs/ps laser pulses enables CARS detection at reduced pulse energies, decreasing the likelihood of breakdown, while simultaneously providing time-gated elimination of any nonresonant background interference. Temperature probability densities and temperature/oxygen correlations were constructed from ensembles of several thousand single-laser-shot measurements from the fs/ps rotational CARS measurement volume positioned within 3 mm or less of the burning propellant surface. Preliminary results in canonical flames are presented using a hybrid fs/ps vibrational CARS system to demonstrate our progress towards acquiring vibrational CARS measurements for more accurate temperatures in the very high temperature propellant burns.

  16. Hybrid fs/ps CARS for Sooting and Particle-laden Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmeister, Kathryn N. Gabet; Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert; Kearney, Sean P.

    2015-12-01

    We report the application of ultrafast rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for temperature and relative oxygen concentration measurements in the plume emanating from a burning aluminized ammonium perchlorate propellant strand. Combustion of these metal-based propellants is a particularly hostile environment for laserbased diagnostics, with intense background luminosity, scattering and beam obstruction from hot metal particles that can be as large as several hundred microns in diameter. CARS spectra that were previously obtained using nanosecond pulsed lasers in an aluminumparticle- seeded flame are examined and are determined to be severely impacted by nonresonant background, presumably as a result of the plasma formed by particulateenhanced laser-induced breakdown. Introduction of fs/ps laser pulses enables CARS detection at reduced pulse energies, decreasing the likelihood of breakdown, while simultaneously providing time-gated elimination of any nonresonant background interference. Temperature probability densities and temperature/oxygen correlations were constructed from ensembles of several thousand single-laser-shot measurements from the fs/ps rotational CARS measurement volume positioned within 3 mm or less of the burning propellant surface. Preliminary results in canonical flames are presented using a hybrid fs/ps vibrational CARS system to demonstrate our progress towards acquiring vibrational CARS measurements for more accurate temperatures in the very high temperature propellant burns.

  17. Molecular beam/Wien filter application to the study of charged soot in flames: Methodology and mass distributions of particles in butadiene flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegert, R.; Wiese, W.; Homann, K.H. (Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie)

    1993-10-01

    Charge soot particles during their initial growth have been investigated at 27 mbar in premixed butadiene/oxygen and ethyne/oxygen flames. They were withdrawn in a skimmed nozzle beam and analyzed for their mass distribution by use of a Wien filter (velocity selector) combined with an energy discriminator. The use of this novel device and the method of determining mass distributions are described in detail. Simultaneously, velocity distributions of the relatively heavy soot particles in the seeded'' gas beam were obtained. Computer simulations showing the validity of the method are presented, together with investigations of the influence of the nozzle diameter on the particles' velocity and mass distributions in the beam. Distributions of mass, mainly of positively charged particles between m = 2 [times] 10[sup 3] and 30 [times] 10[sup 3] u, and their change with height in the flame, are reported for sooting butadiene flames with 0.88 < C/O < 0.92 and 38 < velocity of unburned gas, v[sub u] < 46 cm/s. The influence of a pressure change and the distribution of masses for negatively charged particles are also presented. The change in the masses and the increase of the average mass with time can be explained through surface growth by hydrocarbons, such as ethyne, being proportional to the surface area of the soot particles. In the ranges of flame conditions investigated the growth rate does not depend on C/O, but is sensitive to flame temperature, which was dependent on v[sub u] and the burning pressure.

  18. Aging fingerprints in combustion particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenay, V.; Mooser, R.; Tritscher, T.; Křepelová, A.; Heringa, M. F.; Chirico, R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.; Watts, B.; Raabe, J.; Huthwelker, T.; Ammann, M.

    2011-05-01

    Soot particles can significantly influence the Earth's climate by absorbing and scattering solar radiation as well as by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. However, despite their environmental (as well as economic and political) importance, the way these properties are affected by atmospheric processing is still a subject of discussion. In this work, soot particles emitted from two different cars, a EURO 2 transporter, a EURO 3 passenger vehicle, and a wood stove were investigated on a single-particle basis. The emitted exhaust, including the particulate and the gas phase, was processed in a smog chamber with artificial solar radiation. Single particle specimens of both unprocessed and aged soot were characterized using x-ray absorption spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Comparison of the spectra from the unprocessed and aged soot particles revealed changes in the carbon functional group content, such as that of carboxylic carbon, which can be ascribed to both the condensation of secondary organic compounds on the soot particles and oxidation of primary soot particles upon photochemical aging. Changes in the morphology and size of the single soot particles were also observed upon aging. Furthermore, we show that the soot particles take up water in humid environments and that their water uptake capacity increases with photochemical aging.

  19. Sintering effect on material properties of electrochemical reactors used for removal of nitrogen oxides and soot particles emitted from diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Zeming; Andersen, Kjeld Bøhm; Keel, Li

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, 12-layered electrochemical reactors (comprising five cells) with a novel configuration including supporting layer lanthanum strontium manganate (LSM)-yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ), electrode layer LSM-gadolinia-doped cerium oxide (CGO) and electrolyte layer CGO were fabric...... route, porous, flat and crack-free electrochemical reactors were successfully achieved. The produced electrochemical reactors have the potential application in the removal of NOx and soot particles emitted from the diesel engines....

  20. Numerical simulation of DPF filter for selected regimes with deposited soot particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovařík Petr

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of accumulation of particulate matter from Diesel engine exhaust gas, particle filters are used (referred to as DPF or FAP filters in the automotive industry. However, the cost of these filters is quite high. As the emission limits become stricter, the requirements for PM collection are rising accordingly. Particulate matters are very dangerous for human health and these are not invisible for human eye. They can often cause various diseases of the respiratory tract, even what can cause lung cancer. Performed numerical simulations were used to analyze particle filter behavior under various operating modes. The simulations were especially focused on selected critical states of particle filter, when engine is switched to emergency regime. The aim was to prevent and avoid critical situations due the filter behavior understanding. The numerical simulations were based on experimental analysis of used diesel particle filters.

  1. Computational Investigation of Soot and Radiation in Turbulent Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalit, Harshad

    This study delves into computational modeling of soot and infrared radiation for turbulent reacting flows, detailed understanding of both of which is paramount in the design of cleaner engines and pollution control. In the first part of the study, the concept of Stochastic Time and Space Series Analysis (STASS) as a numerical tool to compute time dependent statistics of radiation intensity is introduced for a turbulent premixed flame. In the absence of high fidelity codes for large eddy simulation or direct numerical simulation of turbulent flames, the utility of STASS for radiation imaging of reacting flows to understand the flame structure is assessed by generating images of infrared radiation in spectral bands dominated by radiation from gas phase carbon dioxide and water vapor using an assumed PDF method. The study elucidates the need for time dependent computation of radiation intensity for validation with experiments and the need for accounting for turbulence radiation interactions for correctly predicting radiation intensity and consequently the flame temperature and NOx in a reacting fluid flow. Comparison of single point statistics of infrared radiation intensity with measurements show that STASS can not only predict the flame structure but also estimate the dynamics of thermochemical scalars in the flame with reasonable accuracy. While a time series is used to generate realizations of thermochemical scalars in the first part of the study, in the second part, instantaneous realizations of resolved scale temperature, CO2 and H2O mole fractions and soot volume fractions are extracted from a large eddy simulation (LES) to carry out quantitative imaging of radiation intensity (QIRI) for a turbulent soot generating ethylene diffusion flame. A primary motivation of the study is to establish QIRI as a computational tool for validation of soot models, especially in the absence of conventional flow field and measured scalar data for sooting flames. Realizations of

  2. Characterization of particulate matter emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmann, T. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Worton, D. R.; Fortner, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Franklin, J. P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Harley, R. A.

    2014-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions were measured in July 2010 from on-road motor vehicles driving through a highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. A soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was used to measure the chemical composition of PM emitted by gasoline and diesel vehicles at high time resolution. Organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) concentrations were measured during various time periods that had different levels of diesel influence, as well as directly in the exhaust plumes of individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks. BC emission factor distributions for HD trucks were more skewed than OA distributions, with the highest 10% of trucks accounting for 56 and 42% of total measured BC and OA emissions, respectively. A comparison of measured OA and BC mass spectra across various sampling periods revealed a high degree of similarity in BC and OA emitted by gasoline and diesel engines. Cycloalkanes predominate in exhaust OA emissions relative to saturated alkanes (i.e., normal and iso-paraffins), suggesting that lubricating oil rather than fuel is the dominant source of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions in diesel vehicle exhaust. This finding is supported by the detection of trace elements such as zinc and phosphorus in the exhaust plumes of individual trucks. Trace elements were emitted relative to total OA at levels that are consistent with typical weight fractions of commonly used additives present in lubricating oil. The presence of trace elements in vehicle exhaust raises the concern that ash deposits may accumulate over time in diesel particle filter systems, and may eventually lead to performance problems that require servicing.

  3. On the Response of Nascent Soot Nanostructure and Oxidative Reactivity to Photoflash Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles are a kind of major pollutant from fuel combustion. To enrich the understanding of soot, this work focuses on investigating detailed influences of instantaneous external irradiation (conventional photoflash exposure on nanostructure as well as oxidation reactivity of nascent soot particles. By detailed soot characterizations flash can reduce the mass of soot and soot nanostructure can be reconstructed substantially without burning. After flash, the degree of soot crystallization increases while the soot reactive rate decreases and the activation energy increases. In addition, nanostructure and oxidative reactivity of soot in air and Ar after flash are different due to their different thermal conductivities.

  4. Effect of Drive Cycle and Gasoline Particulate Filter on the Size and Morphology of Soot Particles Emitted from a Gasoline-Direct-Injection Vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffaripour, Meghdad; Chan, Tak W; Liu, Fengshan; Thomson, Kevin A; Smallwood, Gregory J; Kubsh, Joseph; Brezny, Rasto

    2015-10-06

    The size and morphology of particulate matter emitted from a light-duty gasoline-direct-injection (GDI) vehicle, over the FTP-75 and US06 transient drive cycles, have been characterized by transmission-electron-microscope (TEM) image analysis. To investigate the impact of gasoline particulate filters on particulate-matter emission, the results for the stock-GDI vehicle, that is, the vehicle in its original configuration, have been compared to the results for the same vehicle equipped with a catalyzed gasoline particulate filter (GPF). The stock-GDI vehicle emits graphitized fractal-like aggregates over all driving conditions. The mean projected area-equivalent diameter of these aggregates is in the 78.4-88.4 nm range and the mean diameter of primary particles varies between 24.6 and 26.6 nm. Post-GPF particles emitted over the US06 cycle appear to have an amorphous structure, and a large number of nucleation-mode particles, depicted as low-contrast ultrafine droplets, are observed in TEM images. This indicates the emission of a substantial amount of semivolatile material during the US06 cycle, most likely generated by the incomplete combustion of accumulated soot in the GPF during regeneration. The size of primary particles and soot aggregates does not vary significantly by implementing the GPF over the FTP-75 cycle; however, particles emitted by the GPF-equipped vehicle over the US06 cycle are about 20% larger than those emitted by the stock-GDI vehicle. This may be attributed to condensation of large amounts of organic material on soot aggregates. High-contrast spots, most likely solid nonvolatile cores, are observed within many of the nucleation-mode particles emitted over the US06 cycle by the GPF-equipped vehicle. These cores are either generated inside the engine or depict incipient soot particles which are partially carbonized in the exhaust line. The effect of drive cycle and the GPF on the fractal parameters of particles, such as fractal dimension and

  5. Single Particle Entropy in Heated Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Chankova, R.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Sunde, A. C.; Syed, N. U. H.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal motion of single particles represents the largest contribution to level density (or entropy) in atomic nuclei. The concept of single particle entropy is presented and shown to be an approximate extensive (additive) quantity for mid-shell nuclei. A few applications of single particle entropy are demonstrated

  6. Characterization of particulate matter emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmann, T. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Worton, D. R.; Fortner, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Franklin, J. P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Harley, R. A.

    2014-07-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions were measured in July 2010 from on-road motor vehicles driving through a highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. A soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was used to measure the chemical composition of PM emitted by gasoline and diesel vehicles at high time resolution. Organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) concentrations were measured during various time periods that had different levels of diesel influence, as well as directly in the exhaust plumes of individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks. BC emission factor distributions for HD trucks were more skewed than OA distributions (N = 293), with the highest 10% of trucks accounting for 56 and 42% of total measured BC and OA emissions, respectively. OA mass spectra measured for HD truck exhaust plumes show cycloalkanes are predominate in exhaust OA emissions relative to saturated alkanes (i.e., normal and iso-paraffins), suggesting that lubricating oil rather than fuel is the dominant source of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions in diesel vehicle exhaust. This finding is supported by the detection of trace elements such as zinc and phosphorus in the exhaust plumes of individual trucks. Trace elements were emitted relative to total OA at levels that are consistent with typical weight fractions of commonly used additives present in lubricating oil. A comparison of measured OA and BC mass spectra across various sampling periods revealed a high degree of similarity in OA and BC emitted by gasoline and diesel engines. This finding indicates a large fraction of OA in gasoline exhaust is lubricant-derived as well. The similarity in OA and BC mass spectra for gasoline and diesel engine exhaust is likely to confound ambient source apportionment efforts to determine contributions to air pollution from these two important sources.

  7. Effect of secondary organic aerosol coating thickness on the real-time detection and characterization of biomass-burning soot by two particle mass spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Adam T.; Subramanian, Ramachandran; Saliba, Georges; Lipsky, Eric M.; Donahue, Neil M.; Sullivan, Ryan C.

    2016-12-01

    Biomass burning is a large source of light-absorbing refractory black carbon (rBC) particles with a wide range of morphologies and sizes. The net radiative forcing from these particles is strongly dependent on the amount and composition of non-light-absorbing material internally mixed with the rBC and on the morphology of the mixed particles. Understanding how the mixing state and morphology of biomass-burning aerosol evolves in the atmosphere is critical for constraining the influence of these particles on radiative forcing and climate. We investigated the response of two commercial laser-based particle mass spectrometers, the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ablation LAAPTOF and the IR vaporization SP-AMS, to monodisperse biomass-burning particles as we sequentially coated the particles with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from α-pinene ozonolysis. We studied three mobility-selected soot core sizes, each with a number of successively thicker coatings of SOA applied. Using IR laser vaporization, the SP-AMS had different changes in sensitivity to rBC compared to potassium as a function of applied SOA coatings. We show that this is due to different effective beam widths for the IR laser vaporization region of potassium versus black carbon. The SP-AMS's sensitivity to black carbon (BC) mass was not observed to plateau following successive SOA coatings, despite achieving high OA : BC mass ratios greater than 9. We also measured the ion fragmentation pattern of biomass-burning rBC and found it changed only slightly with increasing SOA mass. The average organic matter ion signal measured by the LAAPTOF demonstrated a positive correlation with the condensed SOA mass on individual particles, despite the inhomogeneity of the particle core compositions. This demonstrates that the LAAPTOF can obtain quantitative mass measurements of aged soot-particle composition from realistic biomass-burning particles with complex morphologies and composition.

  8. Effect of secondary organic aerosol coating thickness on the real-time detection and characterization of biomass-burning soot by two particle mass spectrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Ahern

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning is a large source of light-absorbing refractory black carbon (rBC particles with a wide range of morphologies and sizes. The net radiative forcing from these particles is strongly dependent on the amount and composition of non-light-absorbing material internally mixed with the rBC and on the morphology of the mixed particles. Understanding how the mixing state and morphology of biomass-burning aerosol evolves in the atmosphere is critical for constraining the influence of these particles on radiative forcing and climate. We investigated the response of two commercial laser-based particle mass spectrometers, the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV ablation LAAPTOF and the IR vaporization SP-AMS, to monodisperse biomass-burning particles as we sequentially coated the particles with secondary organic aerosol (SOA from α-pinene ozonolysis. We studied three mobility-selected soot core sizes, each with a number of successively thicker coatings of SOA applied. Using IR laser vaporization, the SP-AMS had different changes in sensitivity to rBC compared to potassium as a function of applied SOA coatings. We show that this is due to different effective beam widths for the IR laser vaporization region of potassium versus black carbon. The SP-AMS's sensitivity to black carbon (BC mass was not observed to plateau following successive SOA coatings, despite achieving high OA : BC mass ratios greater than 9. We also measured the ion fragmentation pattern of biomass-burning rBC and found it changed only slightly with increasing SOA mass. The average organic matter ion signal measured by the LAAPTOF demonstrated a positive correlation with the condensed SOA mass on individual particles, despite the inhomogeneity of the particle core compositions. This demonstrates that the LAAPTOF can obtain quantitative mass measurements of aged soot-particle composition from realistic biomass-burning particles with complex morphologies and composition.

  9. Catalytic combustion of diesel soot particles. Activity and characterization of Co/MgO and Co,K/MgO catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Querini, C.A.; Ulla, M.A.; Sedran, U.A.; Miro, E.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica - INCAPE, Santa Fe (Argentina); Requejo, F. [Departamento de Fisica, Fac. de Ciencias Exactas, UNLP, La Plata (Argentina); Soria, J. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, Madrid (Spain)

    1998-01-15

    The catalytic combustion of diesel soot particles was studied on Co/MgO (12wt% Co) and potassium-promoted Co/MgO (1.5wt% K) that were calcined at different temperatures in the 300 to 700C range. Catalyst samples were characterized by various techniques including nitrogen adsorption (BET), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), electron spin resonance (ESR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed oxidation (TPO). As observed by TPO experiments, the catalyst activity depends strongly on the calcination temperature: calcination at 300 and 400C produced samples that were much more active than those calcined at higher temperatures, on which an inactive Mg-Co mixed oxide is formed, as suggested by TPR, ESR and XRD results. FTIR shows carbonate species on the surface. Unpromoted samples seem to correlate their activity with the amount of reducible Co species present. Potassium not only increased the sample activity, probably due to the improvement in surface mobility, but also enhanced stability at high temperatures. Experiments with different soot to catalyst ratios showed no significant variation in combustion temperature. The K-promoted catalyst burns off soot at a temperature lower than the one needed for calcination, thus proving to be a promising catalyst

  10. Fundamental insight in soot oxidation over a Ag/Co3O4 catalyst by means of Environmental TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego; Christiansen, J. M.; Jensen, Anker Degn

    A novel Ag/Co3O4 catalyst for low-temperature soot oxidation has been studied by means of environmental TEM in order to get fundamental insight in the oxidation mechanism. Soot particles generated in diesel engines are responsible for respiratory diseases, lung cancer and affect the climate both....... Catalytic tests of the novel Ag/Co3O4 system carried out in a flow reactor show high conversion efficiencies. The temperature dependence of the soot oxidation rate for this new system cannot be directly described in terms of the activity of the single Ag and Co3O4 components, but is strongly dependent...... on preparation method, degree of contact with the soot and temperature range. In order to fully understand the role of the single constituents and the influence of different operating conditions in the overall catalytic activity, flow reactor experiments have been coupled with in situ soot oxidation...

  11. Saha equation, single and two particle states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeft, W. D.; Girardeau, M. D.; Strege, B.

    1990-01-01

    Single- and two-particle properties in a dense plasma are discussed in connection with their role in the mass action law for a partially ionized plasma. The two-particle-bound states are nearly density independent, while the continuum is essentially shifted. The single-particle states are damped, and their energy has a negative shift and a parabolic behavior for small momenta.

  12. Brightness calibrates particle size in single particle fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihe; Sun, Zezhou; Di, Weihua; Qin, Weiping; Yuan, Zhen; Wu, Changfeng

    2015-04-01

    This Letter provides a novel approach to quantify the particle sizes of highly bright semiconductor polymer dots (Pdots) for single-particle imaging and photobleaching studies. A quadratic dependence of single-particle brightness on particle size was determined by single-particle fluorescence imaging and intensity statistics. In terms of the same imaging conditions, the particle diameter can be quantified by comparing the individual brightness intensity with associated calibration curve. Based on this sizing method, photobleaching trajectories and overall photon counts emitted by single particles were analyzed. It is found that photobleaching rate constants of different sized Pdots are not strongly dependent on particle diameter except the sparsely occurring fluorescence blinking in certain dim particles and the rapid photobleaching component in some bright particles. The overall photon counts increase with increasing particle diameter. However, those larger than 30 nm deviate away from the increasing tendency. These results reveal the significance of selecting appropriate Pdots (≤30  nm) for single-particle imaging and tracking applications.

  13. Numerical simulation of combustion and soot under partially premixed combustion of low-octane gasoline

    KAUST Repository

    An, Yanzhao

    2017-09-23

    In-cylinder combustion visualization and engine-out soot particle emissions were investigated in an optical diesel engine fueled with low octane gasoline. Single injection strategy with an early injection timing (−30 CAD aTDC) was employed to achieve partially premixed combustion (PPC) condition. A high-speed color camera was used to record the combustion images for 150 cycles. The regulated emission of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and soot mass concentration were measured experimentally. Full cycle engine simulations were performed using CONVERGE™ and the simulation results matched with the experimental results. The in-cylinder soot particle evolution was performed by coupling a reduced toluene reference fuel mechanism including the PAHs formation/oxidation reactions with particulate size mimic model. The results showed that PPC presents typical stratified combustion characteristics, which is significantly different from the conventional diesel spray-driven combustion. The in-cylinder temperature and equivalence ratio overlaid with soot-NO formation regime revealed that PPC operating condition under study mostly avoided the main sooting conditions throughout the entire combustion. The evaluation of temperature distribution showed formaldehyde could be regarded as an indicator for low temperature reactions, while hydroxyl group represents the high temperature reactions. Soot evolution happened during the combustion process, hydroxyl radicals promoted the soot oxidation.

  14. Numerical Computation of Optical Properties of Internally Mixed Soot in Biomass Burning Constrained by Field and Laboratory Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    China, S.; Scarnato, B. V.; Gorkowski, K.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Dubey, M. K.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol emitted from biomass burning (BB) contributes significantly to atmospheric aerosol loadings regionally and globally. Direct radiative forcing of BB aerosol is highly uncertain due to its complex composition, morphology and mixing state. Soot particles are the strongest light absorbing aerosols in BB smoke. In BB smoke, soot particles are normally internally mixed with other material and the mixing state can affect their optical properties. In this study we investigated morphology and mixing state of soot particles emitted from BB smoke from field and laboratory measurements. Smoke particles were collected 1) during the Las Conchas wildfire in New Mexico (June, 2011) and 2) at the U.S. Forest Service's Fire Science Laboratory in 2012, during the fourth Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4). Single particles were analyzed with electron microscopy, and were categorized and characterized by their morphology, and mixing state. We found that soot particles were mostly heavily coated. Based on the characterization on field and laboratory samples, synthetic soot particles with various morphologies and mixing states were generated and their optical properties were numerically calculated using the discrete dipole approximation. We used organic material as a coating agent and investigated the spectral dependency of scattering and absorption for internally mixed soot particles. We found enhancement in scattering and absorption when most of the soot particle was embedded within the organic coating. The aim of this study is to improve our understanding of the effect of morphology and mixing on light scattering and absorption by soot particles and ultimately their effects on the direct radiative forcing.

  15. The remarkable metrological history of 14C dating: from ancient Egyptian artifacts to particles of soot and grains of pollen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    . Sensitivity enhancement by some six orders of magnitude was the result, where 14 C atoms are measured directly by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), in place of beta particle (decay) counting. (Apart from differences in detection efficiency, the relative sensitivity derives from the first order relationship between the nuclear disintegration rate and the ratio of the 14 C atom concentration to the mean life.) The resultant ability to date ca. 100 μg of carbon has fostered major developments in 'molecular dating' (e.g., via GC/AMS) that have had a profound impact on artifact dating accuracy, and provided new insights into the sources, transport, and age of individual carbonaceous species in the environment. The talk concluded with some current applications of the advanced 14 C metrology, such as the dating of individual amino acids in prehistoric bones, and efforts to extract the recent history of fossil and biomass burning from soot particles trapped in polar and mid-latitude ice cores. (author)

  16. Effective density of Aquadag and fullerene soot black carbon reference materials used for SP2 calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gysel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The mass and effective density of black carbon (BC particles generated from aqueous suspensions of Aquadag and fullerene soot was measured and parametrized as a function of their mobility diameter. The measurements were made by two independent research groups by operating a differential mobility analyser (DMA in series with an aerosol particle mass analyser (APM or a Couette centrifugal particle mass analyser (CPMA. Consistent and reproducible results were found in this study for different production lots of Aquadag, indicating that the effective density of these particles is a stable quantity and largely unaffected by differences in aerosol generation procedures and suspension treatments. The effective density of fullerene soot particles from one production lot was also found to be stable and independent of suspension treatments. Some differences to previous literature data were observed for both Aquadag and fullerene soot at larger particle diameters. Knowledge of the exact relationship between mobility diameter and particle mass is of great importance, as DMAs are commonly used to size-select particles from BC reference materials for calibration of single particle soot photometers (SP2, which quantitatively detect the BC mass in single particles.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1990-01-01

    The focus of this work was on kinetic modeling. The specific objectives were: detailed modeling of soot formation in premixed flames, elucidation of the effects of fuel structure on the pathway to soot, and the development of a numerical technique for accurate modeling of soot particle coagulation and surface growth. Those tasks were successfully completed and are briefly summarized.

  18. The impact of carbon dioxide and exhaust gas recirculation on the oxidative reactivity of soot from ethylene flames and diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qurashi, Khalid O.

    Restrictive emissions standards to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions from diesel engines necessitate the development of advanced emission control technology. The engine manufacturers in the United States have implemented the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and diesel particulate filters (DPF) to meet the stringent emissions limits on NOx and PM, respectively. Although the EGR-DPF system is an effective means to control diesel engine emissions, there are some concerns associated with its implementation. The chief concern with this system is the DPF regenerability, which depends upon several factors, among which are the physicochemical properties of the soot. Despite the plethora of research that has been conducted on DPF regenerability, the impact of EGR on soot reactivity and DPF regenerability is yet to be examined. This work concerns the impact of EGR on the oxidative reactivity of diesel soot. It is part of ongoing research to bridge the gap in establishing a relationship between soot formation conditions, properties, and reactivity. This work is divided into three phases. In the first phase, carbon dioxide (CO2) was added to the intake charge of a single cylinder engine via cylinders of compressed CO2. This approach simulates the cold-particle-free EGR. The results showed that inclusion of CO2 changes the soot properties and yields synergistic effects on the oxidative reactivity of the resulting soot. The second phase of this research was motivated by the findings from the first phase. In this phase, post-flame ethylene soot was produced from a laboratory co-flow laminar diffusion flame to better understand the mechanism by which the CO2 affects soot reactivity. This phase was accomplished by successfully isolating the dilution, thermal, and chemical effects of the CO2. The results showed that all of these effects account for a measurable increase in soot reactivity. Nevertheless, the thermal effect was found to be the most

  19. Single-particle dispersion in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Xiao, Zuoli

    2018-04-01

    Single-particle dispersion statistics in compressible box turbulence are studied using direct numerical simulation. Focus is placed on the detailed discussion of effects of the particle Stokes number and turbulent Mach number, as well as the forcing type. When solenoidal forcing is adopted, it is found that the single-particle dispersion undergoes a transition from the ballistic regime at short times to the diffusive regime at long times, in agreement with Taylor's particle dispersion argument. The strongest dispersion of heavy particles is announced when the Stokes number is of order 1, which is similar to the scenario in incompressible turbulence. The dispersion tends to be suppressed as the Mach number increases. When hybrid solenoidal and compressive forcing at a ratio of 1/2 is employed, the flow field shows apparent anisotropic property, characterized by the appearance of large shock wave structures. Accordingly, the single-particle dispersion shows extremely different behavior from the solenoidal forcing case.

  20. Single particle aerosol mass spectrometry of coal combustion particles associated with high lung cancer rates in Xuanwei and Fuyuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Senlin; Tan, Zhengying; Liu, Pinwei; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Dingyu; Yu, Shang; Cheng, Ping; Win, Myat Sandar; Hu, Jiwen; Tian, Linwei; Wu, Minghong; Yonemochi, Shinich; Wang, Qingyue

    2017-11-01

    Coal combustion particles (CCPs) are linked to the high incidence of lung cancer in Xuanwei and in Fuyuan, China, but studies on the chemical composition of the CCPs are still limited. Single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was recently developed to measure the chemical composition and size of single particles in real-time. In this study, SPAMS was used to measure individual combustion particles emitted from Xuanwei and Fuyuan coal samples and the results were compared with those by ICP-MS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The total of 38,372 particles mass-analyzed by SPAMS can be divided into 9 groups based on their chemical composition and their number percentages: carbonaceous, Na-rich, K-rich, Al-rich, Fe-rich, Si-rich, Ca-rich, heavy metal-bearing, and PAH-bearing particles. The carbonaceous and PAH-bearing particles are enriched in the size range below 0.56 μm, Fe-bearing particles range from 0.56 to 1.0 μm in size, and heavy metals such as Ti, V, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Pb have diameters below 1 μm. The TEM results show that the particles from Xuanwei and Fuyuan coal combustion can be classified into soot aggregates, Fe-rich particles, heavy metal containing particles, and mineral particles. Non-volatile particles detected by SPAMS could also be observed with TEM. The number percentages by SPAMS also correlate with the mass concentrations measured by ICP-MS. Our results could provide valuable insight for understanding high lung cancer incidence in the area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Extrusion of single-wall carbon nanotubes via formation of small particles condensed near an arc evaporation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yahachi; Okuda, Mitsumasa; Tomita, Masato; Hayashi, Takayoshi

    1995-04-01

    Single-wall (SW) tubes were produced by co-evaporation of carbon and lanthanum in helium gas and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM samples were collected directly from a space near the arc evaporation source during evaporation. SW tubes growing radially from compound particles were observed 4 cm above the source, but not 2 cm. The 'sea urchin'-like morphology of these tubes were similar to those observed for soot deposited on the inner walls of the reaction chamber, suggesting that soot particles were formed first in the gas phase and SW tubes grew from them before deposition on the chamber wall. The temperature distribution and flow velocity of convection around the source are used for discussion of the growth mechanism of the SW tubes.

  2. Distribution of lead in single atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D. M.; Hudson, P. K.; Cziczo, D. J.; Gallavardin, S.; Froyd, K. D.; Johnston, M. V.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Reinard, M. S.; Thomson, D. S.; Thornberry, T.; Wexler, A. S.

    2007-06-01

    Three independent single particle mass spectrometers measured Pb in individual aerosol particles. These data provide unprecedented sensitivity and statistical significance for the measurement of Pb in single particles. This paper explores the reasons for the frequency of Pb in fine particles now that most gasoline is unleaded. Trace amounts of Pb were found in 5 to 25% of 250 to 3000 nm diameter particles sampled by both aircraft and surface instruments in the eastern and western United States. Over 5% of particles at a mountain site in Switzerland contained Pb. Particles smaller than 100 nm with high Pb content were also observed by an instrument that was only operated in urban areas. Lead was found on all types of particles, including Pb present on biomass burning particles from remote fires. Less common particles with high Pb contents contributed a majority of the total amount of Pb. Single particles with high Pb content often also contained alkali metals, Zn, Cu, Sn, As, and Sb. The association of Pb with Zn and other metals is also found in IMPROVE network filter data from surface sites. Sources of airborne Pb in the United States are reviewed for consistency with these data. The frequent appearance of trace Pb is consistent with widespread emissions of fine Pb particles from combustion sources followed by coagulation with larger particles during long-range transport. Industrial sources that directly emit Pb-rich particles also contribute to the observations. Clean regions of the western United States show some transport of Pb from Asia but most Pb over the United States comes from North American sources. Resuspension of Pb from soil contaminated by the years of leaded gasoline was not directly apparent.

  3. Electrometric Aviation Soot Monitor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a sensitive PM measurement instrument to determine soot particle mass distribution from aircraft engine exhausts as well as from other IC...

  4. Electrometric aviation soot monitor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a highly sensitive and portable device to monitor soot particle mass distribution from aircraft engine exhaust. The proposed method is based on...

  5. Monte carlo simulation for soot dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2012-01-01

    A new Monte Carlo method termed Comb-like frame Monte Carlo is developed to simulate the soot dynamics. Detailed stochastic error analysis is provided. Comb-like frame Monte Carlo is coupled with the gas phase solver Chemkin II to simulate soot formation in a 1-D premixed burner stabilized flame. The simulated soot number density, volume fraction, and particle size distribution all agree well with the measurement available in literature. The origin of the bimodal distribution of particle size distribution is revealed with quantitative proof.

  6. Source Estimation of Wintertime Soot Particles for an Urban Site Varanasi (25.30 N, 83.00 E) in Central Indo-Gangetic Plain Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Srivastava, M. K.; Dumka, U. C.; Singh, R. K.; Singh, R. S.; Tiwari, S.; Mehrotra, B. J.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2017-12-01

    Black carbon particles (BC: also called Soot) are formed by incomplete combustion of hydrocarbon based fuels (fossil fuel: coal, diesel, petrol, etc.) as well as due to burning of biomass and bio-fuels (wood, shrubs, dry leaves, etc.). Soot particles are warming agent to the atmosphere that gained wide attention in recent years due to their direct and indirect impacts on local, regional as well as global climate. The climatic effects due to soot are not well understood as indicated by large uncertainties in their climate forcing estimation, particularly in South and East Asian region, possibly due to unavailability of adequate database and information about the source. Measurement of wintertime BC mass concentrations for urban site in central IGP, `Varanasi' (25.30 N, 83.00 E), using a seven wavelength Aethalometer is reported in this work. Delta-C (=BC370 - BC880), which is an indicator of biomass/bio-fuels or residential coal burning is used to understand the source. Aethalometer based source apportionment model "Aethalometer model" was used to apportion the fossil fuel/traffic and wood/biomass burning mass concentration to the total BC mass. The preliminary results for representative month (January-2015) show that daily-average BC mass ranged from 4.47 to 20.70 μg m-3 (Average: 9.45 ± 4.15 μg m-3). The daily Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) and the ratio of BCff/BC and BCff/BCwb varied between 1.09 - 1.32, 0.67 - 0.92 and 2 - 40, respectively, due to the changes in BC emissions rates. The total BC, BC from fossil fuel (BCff) and BC from wood/biomass burning (BCwb) behaved in the remarkable diurnal pattern, behaving opposite to the mixing layer heights (MLHs). During daytime, MLHs are higher due to surface based solar warming and causes more volume of atmosphere for the BC dispersion. This phenomenon causes the surface measurement of lower BC mass during the daytime. The data is, however, still being processed for multi-year wintertime observations and the

  7. Multiplex single particle analysis in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhauser, D; Romeo, G; Causa, F; De Santo, I; Netti, P A

    2014-10-21

    A straightforward way to measure separated micrometric sized particles in microfluidic flow is reported. The light scattering profile (LSP) of each single particle is fully characterized by using a CMOS-camera based small angle light scattering (SALS) apparatus, ranging from 2° up to 30°. To ensure controlled particle passage through the incident laser, a viscoelastic 3D alignment effect by viscoelastic induced particle migration has been implemented in a simple and cost-effective microfluidic device. Different polystyrene particle sizes are measured in microfluidic flows and the obtained scattering signatures are matched with the Lorenz-Mie based scattering theory. The results confirm the possibility of using this apparatus for real multiplex particle analyses in microfluidic particle flows.

  8. Light changes the atmospheric reactivity of soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Anna, Barbara; Monge, Maria-Eugenia; George, Christian; Ammann, Markus; Donaldson, D. Jamie

    2010-05-01

    Soot particles formed by incomplete combustion processes comprise a significant portion of the fine aerosol loading (below 1micron). These particles affect the radiative forcing contributing to global warming and have increased toxicity relative to larger particles because they may settle and persist in the deeper respiratory tract, and can even cross biological barriers. In addition, they are often coated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Soot particles exhibit a large specific surface area, approx. 100 m2 g-1, which suggests a potential for heterogeneous interactions with atmospheric trace gases. Consequently, soot was suggested to be an important sink for some atmospheric oxidants such as O3 or NOx and its heterogeneous chemistry has been largely investigated in the past years. However, its atmospheric impact was suggested to be negligible due to a rapid soot surface deactivation under atmospheric conditions. As previous studies were done under dark conditions, we decided to investigate the effect of light on the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on various soot samples. As well, we studied the effect of O3 and light exposure on the aging of soot samples. The heterogeneous reaction between soot particles and NO2 was studied by means of a coated flow tube equipped with near-UV emitting lamps (300-420 nm). The effect of O3 and light on the wettability of soot was studied by contact angle measurements. The characterization of the soot particles was performed by TEM, ESEM and AMS. Different combustion conditions were used to produce the soot samples, which were generated with a mini-CAST soot generator using propane as fuel. We determined the uptake coefficients for different gas phase NO2 concentrations (15-120 ppbv) under near UV irradiation. The results showed that the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 and soot under irradiation leads to NO and HONO production with different yields according to the combustion conditions of the generated soot particles. The

  9. The probe rules in single particle tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mathias P.; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) enables light microscopy at a sub-diffraction limited spatial resolution by a combination of imaging at low molecular labeling densities and computational image processing. SPT and related single molecule imaging techniques have found a rapidly expanded use within...

  10. The circular thermo-phoretic spectrometer (CTSM), a new device for the study of the thermophoresis, Application on the fractals soot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugiere, E.

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to improve the understanding of soot particle deposition by thermophoresis. In order to show the influence of the morphology of a fractal aggregate on its thermo-phoretic behavior, a new experimental device has been developed; the SpectroMetre Thermophoretique Circulaire (SMTC). This instrument is used to measure the mean thermo-phoretic velocity of particles selected between a hot plate and a cold plate thanks to a transfer function based on the geometry of the radial flow differential mobility analyser RF-DMA or SMEC (Spectrometre de Mobilite Electrique Circulaire). For the experimental validation, effective thermo-phoretic velocities of monodispersed spherical latex particles for diameters ranging from 64 nm to 500 nm and a temperature gradient equal to 50 750 K/m are measured and compared with theoretical values. The good agreement between the experimental results and theoretical values of Beresnev and Chernyak (1995) helps us to validate the operation of the instrument. Then we compare experimental thermo-phoretic velocity obtained with the SMTC for spherical particles and aggregates produced by a combustion aerosol generator. Contrary to the results obtained with the PSL particles, we observe that the thermo-phoretic velocity of aggregates increases with the electrical mobility diameter. Thanks to a morphological study of the aggregates, we showed that the thermo-phoretic velocity depends on the number of primary particles of the aggregate. These experimental results confirm, for the first time, the theoretical data of Mackowski (2006) obtained by a Monte Carlo simulation. Moreover, a comparison with the experimental results of Messerer et al. (2003) shows that the thermo-phoretic velocity of aggregates seems independent of the primary particle size. (author)

  11. Fundamental study of single biomass particle combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, M.

    2013-06-01

    This thesis is a comprehensive study of single biomass particle combustion. The effect of particle shape and size and operating conditions on biomass conversion characteristics were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experimental samples were divided in two groups: particles with regular shapes (spheres and cylinders) and particles with irregular shapes (almost flake-like). A CAMSIZER analyser (Retsch Technology GMBH) was used to determine the size and shape of the particles via Dynamical Digital Image Processing. The experiments were performed in a single particle reactor under well-defined conditions, and the complete combustion processes were recorded as video sequences by a CCD camera installed in the set-up. One of the project objectives is to simulate conditions reasonably close to the conditions in a power plant boiler, i.e., reasonably high temperatures (up to 1600 deg. C) and varying oxygen concentrations in the 5 to 20% range. A one-dimensional mathematical model was used to simulate all the intraparticle conversion processes (drying, recondensation, devolatilisation, char gasification/oxidation and heat/mass/momentum transfer) within single particles of different shapes and size under various conditions. The model also predicts the flame layer domain of a single particle. The model was validated by experimental results under different conditions; good agreement between the model predictions and the experimental data was observed. Both the experimental and modelling results showed that cylindrical particles lose mass faster than spherical particles of a similar volume (mass) and that the burnout time is reduced by increasing the particle aspect ratio (surface area to volume ratio). Very similar conversion times were observed for cylindrical particles with nearly identical surface area to volume ratios. Similar conversion times were also observed for two size classes of pulverised particles (with irregular shapes) made from the same type of

  12. Particle (Soot Pollution in Port Harcourt Rivers State, Nigeria—Double Air Pollution Burden? Understanding and Tackling Potential Environmental Public Health Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okhumode H. Yakubu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Residents of Port Harcourt in Rivers State, Nigeria, and its environs have since the last quarter of 2016 been experiencing adverse environmental impacts of particle (soot pollution. This “double air pollution burden”—the unresolved prevailing widespread air pollution and the “added” emergence of particle pollution considered an environmental health threat, led to protests against government inaction in some parts of the state. In February 2017, several months following the onset of the pollution, the government declared an Emergency, and set up a Task Force to investigate and find a solution to the problem. Global research suggests that particle pollution correlates positively with a range of morbidities and an increased risk of mortality among exposed populations. This underscores the need for rigorous implementation of existing environmental legislations established to protect the environment and public health. Nigeria’s rapid response to the 2014–2015 Ebola Virus Disease (EVD and successful prevention of its spread provides some lessons for addressing such environmental health emergencies—strategic action, including effective environmental risk communication, environmental audit, and monitoring is key. Epidemiological studies of the affected population is imperative. A concerted effort by the Rivers State Ministries of Environment and Health, as well as academia and private organizations is required. Public service campaign in terms of government providing up to date information on the existing situation is required.

  13. Soot precursor measurements in benzene and hexane diffusion flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Furuhata, T.; Amagai, K.; Arai, M. [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu-shi, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    To clarify the mechanism of soot formation in diffusion flames of liquid fuels, measurements of soot and its precursors were carried out. Sooting diffusion flames formed by a small pool combustion equipment system were used for this purpose. Benzene and hexane were used as typical aromatic and paraffin fuels. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method was used to obtain spatial distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are considered as soot particles. Spatial distributions of soot in test flames were measured by a laser-induced incandescence (LII) method. Soot diameter was estimated from the temporal change of LII intensity. A region of transition from PAHs to soot was defined from the results of LIF and LII. Flame temperatures, PAH species, and soot diameters in this transition region were investigated for both benzene and hexane flames. The results show that though the flame structures of benzene and hexane were different, the temperature in the PAHs-soot transition region of the benzene flame was similar to that of the hexane flame. Furthermore, the relationship between the PAH concentrations measured by gas chromatography in both flames and the PAH distributions obtained from LIF are discussed. It was found that PAHs with smaller molecular mass, such as benzene and toluene, remained in both the PAHs-soot transition and sooting regions, and it is thought that molecules heavier than pyrene are the leading candidates for soot precursor formation. (author)

  14. Particle segmentation algorithm for flexible single particle reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiang; Zhou, Niyun; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2017-01-01

    As single particle cryo-electron microscopy has evolved to a new era of atomic resolution, sample heterogeneity still imposes a major limit to the resolution of many macromolecular complexes, especially those with continuous conformational flexibility. Here, we describe a particle segmentation algorithm towards solving structures of molecules composed of several parts that are relatively flexible with each other. In this algorithm, the different parts of a target molecule are segmented from raw images according to their alignment information obtained from a preliminary 3D reconstruction and are subjected to single particle processing in an iterative manner. This algorithm was tested on both simulated and experimental data and showed improvement of 3D reconstruction resolution of each segmented part of the molecule than that of the entire molecule.

  15. Single-particle Schroedinger fluid. I. Formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, K.K.; Griffin, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of a single quantal particle moving in a time-dependent external potential well is formulated specifically to emphasize and develop the fluid dynamical aspects of the matter flow. This idealized problem, the single-particle Schroedinger fluid, is shown to exhibit already a remarkably rich variety of fluid dynamical features, including compressible flow and line vortices. It provides also a sufficient framework to encompass simultaneously various simplified fluidic models for nuclei which have earlier been postulated on an ad hoc basis, and to illuminate their underlying restrictions. Explicit solutions of the single-particle Schroedinger fluid problem are studied in the adiabatic limit for their mathematical and physical implications (especially regarding the collective kinetic energy). The basic generalizations for extension of the treatment to the many-body Schroedinger fluid are set forth

  16. Dual color single particle tracking via nanobodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, David; Winterflood, Christian M; Ewers, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Single particle tracking is a powerful tool to investigate the function of biological molecules by following their motion in space. However, the simultaneous tracking of two different species of molecules is still difficult to realize without compromising the length or density of trajectories, the localization accuracy or the simplicity of the assay. Here, we demonstrate a simple dual color single particle tracking assay using small, bright, high-affinity labeling via nanobodies of accessible targets with widely available instrumentation. We furthermore apply a ratiometric step-size analysis method to visualize differences in apparent membrane viscosity. (paper)

  17. Single particle tomography in EMAN2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaz-Montoya, Jesús G; Flanagan, John; Schmid, Michael F; Ludtke, Steven J

    2015-06-01

    Single particle tomography (SPT or subtomogram averaging) offers a powerful alternative to traditional 2-D single particle reconstruction for studying conformationally or compositionally heterogeneous macromolecules. It can also provide direct observation (without labeling or staining) of complexes inside cells at nanometer resolution. The development of computational methods and tools for SPT remains an area of active research. Here we present the EMAN2.1 SPT toolbox, which offers a full SPT processing pipeline, from particle picking to post-alignment analysis of subtomogram averages, automating most steps. Different algorithm combinations can be applied at each step, providing versatility and allowing for procedural cross-testing and specimen-specific strategies. Alignment methods include all-vs-all, binary tree, iterative single-model refinement, multiple-model refinement, and self-symmetry alignment. An efficient angular search, Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) acceleration and both threaded and distributed parallelism are provided to speed up processing. Finally, automated simulations, per particle reconstruction of subtiltseries, and per-particle Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) correction have been implemented. Processing examples using both real and simulated data are shown for several structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Projection operator treatment of single particle resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev, A.; Beres, W.P.

    1976-01-01

    A projection operator method is used to obtain the energy and width of a single particle resonance. The resonance energy is found without scanning. An example of the first g/sub 9/2/ neutron resonance in 40 Ca is given and compared with the traditional phase shift method. The results of both approaches are quite similar. 4 figures

  19. Nanoscale three-dimensional single particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Aurélie; Lamb, Don C

    2011-11-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) in biological systems is a quickly growing field. Many new technologies are being developed providing new tracking capabilities, which also lead to higher demands and expectations for SPT. Following a single biomolecule as it performs its function provides quantitative mechanistic information that cannot be obtained in classical ensemble methods. From the 3D trajectory, information is available over the diffusional behavior of the particle and precise position information can also be used to elucidate interactions of the tracked particle with its surroundings. Thus, three-dimensional (3D) SPT is a very valuable tool for investigating cellular processes. This review presents recent progress in 3D SPT, from image-based techniques toward more sophisticated feedback approaches. We focus mainly on the feedback technique known as orbital tracking. We present here a modified version of the original orbital tracking in which the intensities from two z-planes are simultaneously measured allowing a concomitant wide-field imaging. The system can track single particles with a precision down to 5 nm in the x-y plane and 7 nm in the axial direction. The capabilities of the system are demonstrated using single virus tracing to follow the infection pathway of Prototype Foamy Virus in living cells.

  20. Single particle raster image analysis of diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longfils, M; Schuster, E; Lorén, N; Särkkä, A; Rudemo, M

    2017-04-01

    As a complement to the standard RICS method of analysing Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy images with estimation of the image correlation function, we introduce the method SPRIA, Single Particle Raster Image Analysis. Here, we start by identifying individual particles and estimate the diffusion coefficient for each particle by a maximum likelihood method. Averaging over the particles gives a diffusion coefficient estimate for the whole image. In examples both with simulated and experimental data, we show that the new method gives accurate estimates. It also gives directly standard error estimates. The method should be possible to extend to study heterogeneous materials and systems of particles with varying diffusion coefficient, as demonstrated in a simple simulation example. A requirement for applying the SPRIA method is that the particle concentration is low enough so that we can identify the individual particles. We also describe a bootstrap method for estimating the standard error of standard RICS. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Microorganism characterization by single particle mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Scott C

    2009-01-01

    In recent years a major effort by several groups has been undertaken to identify bacteria by mass spectrometry at the single cell level. The intent of this review is to highlight the recent progress made in the application of single particle mass spectrometry to the analysis of microorganisms. A large portion of the review highlights improvements in the ionization and mass analysis of bio-aerosols, or particles that contain biologically relevant molecules such as peptides or proteins. While these are not direct applications to bacteria, the results have been central to a progression toward single cell mass spectrometry. Developments in single particle matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) are summarized. Recent applications of aerosol laser desorption/ionization (LDI) to the analysis of single microorganisms are highlighted. Successful applications of off-line and on-the-fly aerosol MALDI to microorganism detection are discussed. Limitations to current approaches and necessary future achievements are also addressed. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

    2005-03-29

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

  3. The many faces of soot: characterization of soot nanoparticles produced by engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessner, Reinhard

    2014-11-10

    Soot nanoparticles produced by engines constitute a threat to human health. For the analytical chemist, soot is a hard nut to crack as the released particles undergo rapid changes in their size, shape, and number concentration. The complete characterization of soot will be essential to meet future low-emission standards. Besides measuring the light extinction, modern analytical chemistry can determine a variety of less-known effects, such as condensation properties, immune response in vertebrates, and impact on the cardiovascular function of a beating heart. Photon emission and in particular Raman spectroscopy provides information on the nanocrystallinity, while thermoelectron emission allows the number of electrical particles to be counted. Even the "simple" combustion of soot nanoparticles offers potential for the characterization of the particles. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Single particle raster image analysis of diffusion for particle mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longfils, M; Röding, M; Altskär, A; Schuster, E; Lorén, N; Särkkä, A; Rudemo, M

    2018-03-01

    Recently we complemented the raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) method of analysing raster images via estimation of the image correlation function with the method single particle raster image analysis (SPRIA). In SPRIA, individual particles are identified and the diffusion coefficient of each particle is estimated by a maximum likelihood method. In this paper, we extend the SPRIA method to analyse mixtures of particles with a finite set of diffusion coefficients in a homogeneous medium. In examples with simulated and experimental data with two and three different diffusion coefficients, we show that SPRIA gives accurate estimates of the diffusion coefficients and their proportions. A simple technique for finding the number of different diffusion coefficients is also suggested. Further, we study the use of RICS for mixtures with two different diffusion coefficents and investigate, by plotting level curves of the correlation function, how large the quotient between diffusion coefficients needs to be in order to allow discrimination between models with one and two diffusion coefficients. We also describe a minor correction (compared to published papers) of the RICS autocorrelation function. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Single particle closed orbits in Yukawa potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, R.; Sounda, S.

    2018-02-01

    Orbit of a single particle moving under the Yukawa potential is studied and there exists precessing ellipse type orbits. The amount of precession can be tuned through the coupling parameter α. With a suitable choice of the coupling parameter; we get a closed bound orbit. In some cases few petals are observed which is possessed of a closed bound nature for suitably chosen coupling parameter. Threshold energy has also been calculated for bound orbits.

  6. Single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bräuchle, Christoph; Michaelis, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Closing a gap in the literature, this handbook gathers all the information on single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer. It covers all aspects of this hot and modern topic, from detecting virus entry to membrane diffusion, and from protein folding using spFRET to coupled dye systems, as well recent achievements in the field. Throughout, the first-class editors and top international authors present content of the highest quality, making this a must-have for physical chemists, spectroscopists, molecular physicists and biochemists.

  7. Variation of diesel soot characteristics by different types and blends of biodiesel in a laboratory combustion chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omidvarborna, Hamid; Kumar, Ashok [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Kim, Dong-Shik, E-mail: dong.kim@utoledo.edu [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Very little information is available on the physical and chemical properties of soot particles produced in the combustion of different types and blends of biodiesel fuels. A variety of feedstock can be used to produce biodiesel, and it is necessary to better understand the effects of feedstock-specific characteristics on soot particle emissions. Characteristics of soot particles, collected from a laboratory combustion chamber, are investigated from the blends of ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and biodiesel with various proportions. Biodiesel samples were derived from three different feedstocks, soybean methyl ester (SME), tallow oil (TO), and waste cooking oil (WCO). Experimental results showed a significant reduction in soot particle emissions when using biodiesel compared with ULSD. For the pure biodiesel, no soot particles were observed from the combustion regardless of their feedstock origins. The overall morphology of soot particles showed that the average diameter of ULSD soot particles is greater than the average soot particles from the biodiesel blends. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of oxidized soot particles are presented to investigate how the addition of biodiesel fuels may affect structures of soot particles. In addition, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were conducted for characterization of soot particles. Unsaturated methyl esters and high oxygen content of biodiesel are thought to be the major factors that help reduce the formation of soot particles in a laboratory combustion chamber. - Highlights: • The unsaturation of biodiesel fuel was correlated with soot characteristics. • Average diameters of biodiesel soot were smaller than that of ULSD. • Eight elements were detected as the marker metals in biodiesel soot particles. • As the degree of unsaturation increased, the oxygen content in FAMEs increased. • Biodiesel

  8. Diesel soot aging in urban plumes within hours under cold dark and humid conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, A C; Wittbom, C; Roldin, P; Sporre, M; Öström, E; Nilsson, P; Martinsson, J; Rissler, J; Nordin, E Z; Svenningsson, B; Pagels, J; Swietlicki, E

    2017-09-28

    Fresh and aged diesel soot particles have different impacts on climate and human health. While fresh diesel soot particles are highly aspherical and non-hygroscopic, aged particles are spherical and hygroscopic. Aging and its effect on water uptake also controls the dispersion of diesel soot in the atmosphere. Understanding the timescales on which diesel soot ages in the atmosphere is thus important, yet knowledge thereof is lacking. We show that under cold, dark and humid conditions the atmospheric transformation from fresh to aged soot occurs on a timescale of less than five hours. Under dry conditions in the laboratory, diesel soot transformation is much less efficient. While photochemistry drives soot aging, our data show it is not always a limiting factor. Field observations together with aerosol process model simulations show that the rapid ambient diesel soot aging in urban plumes is caused by coupled ammonium nitrate formation and water uptake.

  9. Damping of unbound single-particle modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortier, S.; Beaumel, D.; Gales, S.; Guillot, J.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Laurent, H.; Maison, J.M.; Bordewijk, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Crawley, G.M.; Massolo, C.P.; Renteria, M.; Khendriche, A.

    1995-01-01

    The (α, 3 He-n) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy on 64 Ni, 90 Zr, and 120 Sn target nuclei. Neutrons in coincidence with 3 He particles emitted at 0 degree were detected using the multidetector array EDEN, in order to get information about the decay of single-particle states embedded in the (α, 3 He) continuum. Neutron angular correlations, multiplicity values, and branching ratios to low-lying states of the final nuclei have been compared with the predictions of the statistical decay model. Evidence for a significant nonstatistical decay branch has been observed in the three nuclei below about 15 MeV excitation energy. Direct branching ratios in 91 Zr deduced from this analysis are compared with the predictions of two nuclear structure models. At higher excitation energy, the decay characteristics of the (α, 3 He) continuum are shown to be mainly statistical

  10. An analysis of direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) soot morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Teresa L.; Storey, John M. E.; Youngquist, Adam D.; Szybist, James P.

    2012-03-01

    We have characterized particle emissions produced by a 4-cylinder, 2.0 L DISI engine using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and image analysis. Analyses of soot morphology provide insight to particle formation mechanisms and strategies for prevention. Particle emissions generated by two fueling strategies were investigated, early injection and injection modified for low particle number concentration emissions. A blend of 20% ethanol and 80% emissions certification gasoline was used for the study given the likelihood of increased ethanol content in widely available fuel. In total, about 200 particles and 3000 primary soot spherules were individually measured. For the fuel injection strategy which produced low particle number concentration emissions, we found a prevalence of single solid sub-25 nm particles and fractal-like aggregates. The modal diameter of single solid particles and aggregate primary particles was between 10 and 15 nm. Solid particles as small as 6 nm were present. Although nanoparticle aggregates had fractal-like morphology similar to diesel soot, the average primary particle diameter per aggregate had a much wider range that spanned from 7 to 60 nm. For the early fuel injection strategy, liquid droplets were prevalent, and the modal average primary particle diameter was between 20 and 25 nm. The presence of liquid droplets may have been the result of unburned fuel and/or lubricating oil originating from fuel impingement on the piston or cylinder wall; the larger modal aggregate primary particle diameter suggests greater fuel-rich zones in-cylinder than for the low particle number concentration point. However, both conditions produced aggregates with a wide range of primary particle diameters, which indicates heterogeneous fuel and air mixing.

  11. Light absorption and morphological properties of soot-containing aerosols observed at an East Asian outflow site, Noto Peninsula, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ueda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The coating of black carbon (BC with inorganic salts and organic compounds can enhance the magnitude of light absorption by BC. To elucidate the enhancement of light absorption of aged BC particles and its relation to the mixing state and morphology of individual particles, we conducted observations of particles at an Asian outflow site in Noto Peninsula, Japan, in the spring of 2013. Absorption and scattering coefficients at 405, 532, and 781 nm and mass concentrations/mixing states of refractory BC in PM2.5 were measured using a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer and a single-particle soot photometer (SP2, respectively, after passage through a thermodenuder (TD maintained at 300 or 400 °C or a bypass line maintained at room temperature (25 °C. The average enhancement factor of BC light absorption due to coating was estimated by comparing absorption coefficients at 781 nm for particles that with and without passing through the TD at 300 °C and was found to be 1.22. The largest enhancements (> 1.30 were observed under high absorption coefficient periods when the air mass was long-range transported from urban areas in China. Aerosol samples were also analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. The morphological features and mixing states of soot-containing particles of four samples collected during the high absorption events were analyzed by comparing microphotographs before and after the evaporation of beam-sensitive materials by irradiation with a high-density electron beam. The majority of the soot in all samples was found as mixed particles with sulfate-containing spherules or as clusters of such spherules. For samples showing high enhancement (> 1.30 of BC light absorption, the TEM showed that the internally mixed soot-containing particles tended to have a more spherical shape and to be thickly coated. The SP2 measurements also suggested that the

  12. Light absorption and morphological properties of soot-containing aerosols observed at an East Asian outflow site, Noto Peninsula, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Sayako; Nakayama, Tomoki; Taketani, Fumikazu; Adachi, Kouji; Matsuki, Atsushi; Iwamoto, Yoko; Sadanaga, Yasuhiro; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    The coating of black carbon (BC) with inorganic salts and organic compounds can enhance the magnitude of light absorption by BC. To elucidate the enhancement of light absorption of aged BC particles and its relation to the mixing state and morphology of individual particles, we conducted observations of particles at an Asian outflow site in Noto Peninsula, Japan, in the spring of 2013. Absorption and scattering coefficients at 405, 532, and 781 nm and mass concentrations/mixing states of refractory BC in PM2.5 were measured using a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer and a single-particle soot photometer (SP2), respectively, after passage through a thermodenuder (TD) maintained at 300 or 400 °C or a bypass line maintained at room temperature (25 °C). The average enhancement factor of BC light absorption due to coating was estimated by comparing absorption coefficients at 781 nm for particles that with and without passing through the TD at 300 °C and was found to be 1.22. The largest enhancements (> 1.30) were observed under high absorption coefficient periods when the air mass was long-range transported from urban areas in China. Aerosol samples were also analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. The morphological features and mixing states of soot-containing particles of four samples collected during the high absorption events were analyzed by comparing microphotographs before and after the evaporation of beam-sensitive materials by irradiation with a high-density electron beam. The majority of the soot in all samples was found as mixed particles with sulfate-containing spherules or as clusters of such spherules. For samples showing high enhancement (> 1.30) of BC light absorption, the TEM showed that the internally mixed soot-containing particles tended to have a more spherical shape and to be thickly coated. The SP2 measurements also suggested that the proportion of thickly coated

  13. Single-Particle States in $^{133}$Sn

    CERN Multimedia

    Huck, A

    2002-01-01

    % IS338 \\\\ \\\\ It is suggested to investigate the $\\beta^- $-decay of $^{133}$In and $^{134}$In in order to determine the single-particle states in $^{133}$Sn, which are so far unknown and needed for the shell-model description of the region close to $^{132}$Sn. Large hyper-pure Ge-detectors will be used for the $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy. In the experiments with $^{134}$In, delayed neutrons in coincidence with $\\gamma$-rays from excited states in $^{133}$Sn provide the opportunity for a very selective detection of the states in question.

  14. Performance of single mechanoluminescent particle as ubiquitous light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Nao; Xu, Chao-Nan

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we have investigated mechanoluminescent (ML) performance of single ML particle as ubiquitous light source. When using high-speed CCD camera with image intensifier and microscopic equipment, mechanoluminescence from single particle was observed. As to the quantitative ML evaluation of the single ML particle was carried out using photomultiplier, and successfully estimated the performance of the single ML particle as an intensity controllable light source in nW order. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. New Nanotech from an Ancient Material: Chemistry Demonstrations Involving Carbon-Based Soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Dean J.; Andrews, Mark J.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon soot has been known since antiquity, but has recently been finding new uses as a robust, inexpensive nanomaterial. This paper describes the superhydrophobic properties of carbon soot films prepared by combustion of candle wax or propane gas and introduces some of the optical absorption and fluorescence properties of carbon soot particles.…

  16. Single-particle characterization of ice-nucleating particles and ice particles residuals sampled by three different techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandler, Konrad; Worringen, Annette; Benker, Nathalie; Dirsch, Thomas; Mertes, Stephan; Schenk, Ludwig; Kästner, Udo; Frank, Fabian; Nillius, Björn; Bundke, Ulrich; Rose, Diana; Curtius, Joachim; Kupiszewski, Piotr; Weingartner, Ernest; Vochezer, Paul; Schneider, Johannes; Schmidt, Susan; Weinbruch, Stephan; Ebert, Martin

    2015-04-01

    During January/February 2013, at the High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch a measurement campaign was carried out, which was centered on atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INP) and ice particle residuals (IPR). Three different techniques for separation of INP and IPR from the non-ice-active particles are compared. The Ice Selective Inlet (ISI) and the Ice Counterflow Virtual Impactor (Ice-CVI) sample ice particles from mixed phase clouds and allow for the analysis of the residuals. The combination of the Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber (FINCH) and the Ice Nuclei Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor (IN-PCVI) provides ice-activating conditions to aerosol particles and extracts the activated INP for analysis. Collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis to determine size, chemical composition and mixing state. All INP/IPR-separating techniques had considerable abundances (median 20 - 70 %) of instrumental contamination artifacts (ISI: Si-O spheres, probably calibration aerosol; Ice-CVI: Al-O particles; FINCH+IN-PCVI: steel particles). Also, potential sampling artifacts (e.g., pure soluble material) occurred with a median abundance of metal oxides were the major INP/IPR particle types separated by all three techniques. Soot was a minor contributor. Lead was detected in less than 10 % of the particles, of which the majority were internal mixtures with other particle types. Sea-salt and sulfates were identified by all three methods as INP/IPR. Most samples showed a maximum of the INP/IPR size distribution at 400 nm geometric diameter. In a few cases, a second super-micron maximum was identified. Soot/carbonaceous material and metal oxides were present mainly in the submicron range. ISI and FINCH yielded silicates and Ca-rich particles mainly with diameters above 1 µm, while the Ice-CVI also separated many submicron IPR. As strictly parallel sampling could not be performed, a part of the discrepancies between

  17. Towards predictive simulations of soot formation: from surrogate to turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanquart, Guillaume [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-03-28

    The combustion of transportation fuels leads to the formation of several kinds of pollutants, among which are soot particles. These particles, also formed during coal combustion and in fires, are the source of several health problems and environmental issues. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the chemical and physical phenomena leading to the formation of soot particles remains incomplete, and as a result, the predictive capability of our numerical tools is lacking. The objective of the work was to reduce the gap in the present understanding and modeling of soot formation both in laminar and turbulent flames. The effort spanned several length scales from the molecular level to large scale turbulent transport.

  18. Light Absorption By Coated Soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lee, J.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Cross, E. S.

    2009-12-01

    The contribution of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering and, in part, because the primary absorbing aerosol of interest, soot, exhibits complex aging behavior that alters its optical properties. The consequences of this can be evidenced by the work of Ramanathan and Carmichael (2008) who suggest that incorporating the atmospheric heating due to brown clouds will increase black carbon (BC) radiative forcing from the IPCC best estimate of 0.34 Wm-2 (±0.25 Wm-2) (IPCC 2007) to 0.9 Wm-2. This noteworthy degree of the uncertainty is due largely to the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, each of which changes as the particle ages in the atmosphere and becomes encapsulated within a coating of inorganic and/or organic substances. With the advent of techniques that can directly measure aerosol light absorption without influences due to collection substrate or light scattering (e.g., photoacoustic spectroscopy (Arnott et al., 2005; Lack et al., 2006) and photothermal interferometry (Sedlacek and Lee 2007)) the potential exists for quantifying this interdependence. In July 2008, a laboratory-based measurement campaign, led by Boston College and Aerodyne, was initiated to begin addressing this interdependence. To achieve this objective measurements of both the optical and physical properties of flame-generated soot under nascent, coated and denuded conditions were conducted. In this paper, light absorption by dioctyl sebacate (DOS) encapsulated soot and sulfuric acid coated soot using the technique of photothermal interferometry will be presented. In the case of DOS-coated soot, a monotonic increase in light absorption as a function DOS coating thickness to nearly 100% is observed. This observation is consistent with a coating-induced amplification in particle light absorption. (Bond et al. 2006) However

  19. Sooting Characteristics and Modeling in Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2013-11-01

    Soot formation is one of the most complex phenomena in combustion science and an understanding of the underlying physico-chemical mechanisms is important. This work adopted both experimental and numerical approaches to study soot formation in laminar counterfl ow diffusion flames. As polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the precursors of soot particles, a detailed gas-phase chemical mechanism describing PAH growth upto coronene for fuels with 1 to 4 carbon atoms was validated against laminar premixed and counter- flow diffusion fl ames. Built upon this gas-phase mechanism, a soot model was then developed to describe soot inception and surface growth. This soot model was sub- sequently used to study fuel mixing effect on soot formation in counterfl ow diffusion flames. Simulation results showed that compared to the baseline case of the ethylene flame, the doping of 5% (by volume) propane or ethane in ethylene tends to increase the soot volume fraction and number density while keeping the average soot size almost unchanged. These results are in agreement with experimental observations. Laser light extinction/scattering as well as laser induced fluorescence techniques were used to study the effect of strain rate on soot and PAH formation in counterfl ow diffusion ames. The results showed that as strain rate increased both soot volume fraction and PAH concentrations decreased. The concentrations of larger PAH were more sensitive to strain rate compared to smaller ones. The effect of CO2 addition on soot formation was also studied using similar experimental techniques. Soot loading was reduced with CO2 dilution. Subsequent numerical modeling studies were able to reproduce the experimental trend. In addition, the chemical effect of CO2 addition was analyzed using numerical data. Critical conditions for the onset of soot were systematically studied in counterfl ow diffusion ames for various gaseous hydrocarbon fuels and at different strain rates. A sooting

  20. Measurement of ambient aerosols in northern Mexico City by single particle mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Moffet

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous ambient measurements with aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS were made in an industrial/residential section in the northern part of Mexico City as part of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area-2006 campaign (MCMA-2006. Results are presented for the period of 15–27 March 2006. The submicron size mode contained both fresh and aged biomass burning, aged organic carbon (OC mixed with nitrate and sulfate, elemental carbon (EC, nitrogen-organic carbon, industrial metal, and inorganic NaK inorganic particles. Overall, biomass burning and aged OC particle types comprised 40% and 31%, respectively, of the submicron mode. In contrast, the supermicron mode was dominated by inorganic NaK particle types (42% which represented a mixture of dry lake bed dust and industrial NaK emissions mixed with soot. Additionally, aluminosilicate dust, transition metals, OC, and biomass burning contributed to the supermicron particles. Early morning periods (2–6 a.m. showed high fractions of inorganic particles from industrial sources in the northeast, composed of internal mixtures of Pb, Zn, EC and Cl, representing up to 73% of the particles in the 0.2–3μm size range. A unique nitrogen-containing organic carbon (NOC particle type, peaking in the early morning hours, was hypothesized to be amines from local industrial emissions based on the time series profile and back trajectory analysis. A strong dependence on wind speed and direction was observed in the single particle types that were present during different times of the day. The early morning (3:30–10 a.m. showed the greatest contributions from industrial emissions. During mid to late mornings (7–11 a.m., weak northerly winds were observed along with the most highly aged particles. Stronger winds from the south picked up in the late morning (after 11 a.m., resulting in a decrease in the concentrations of the major aged particle types and an increase in the number fraction of fresh

  1. Online single particle measurements of black carbon coatings, structure and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, James; Liu, Dantong; Taylor, Jonathan; Flynn, Michael; Williams, Paul; Morgan, William; Whitehead, James; Alfarra, Rami; McFiggans, Gordon; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    The impacts of black carbon on meteorology and climate remain a major source of uncertainty, owing in part to the complex relationship between the bulk composition of the particulates and their optical properties. A particular complication stems from how light interacts with particles in response to the microphysical configuration and any 'coatings', i.e. non-black carbon material that is either co-emitted or subsequently obtained through atmospheric processing. This may cause the particle to more efficiently absorb or scatter light and may even change the sign of its radiative forcing potential. While much insight has been gained through measurements of bulk aerosol properties, either while suspended or after collection on a filter or impactor substrate, this does not provide a complete picture and thus may not adequately constrain the system. Here we present an overview of recent work to better constrain the properties of black carbon using online, in situ measurements of single particles, primarily using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). We have developed novel methods of inverting the data produced and combining the different metrics derived so as to give the most effective insights into black carbon sources, processes and properties. We have also used this measurement in conjunction with other instruments (sometimes in series) and used the data to challenge many commonly used models of optical properties such as core-shell Mie, Rayleigh-Debeye-Gans and effective medium. This work has been carried out in a variety of atmospheric environments and with laboratory-produced soots, e.g. from a diesel engine rig. Highlights include the finding that with real-world atmospheric aerosols, bulk optical measurements may be insufficient to derive brown carbon parameters without detailed morphological data. We also show that the enhancement of absorption for both ambient and laboratory generated particles only occurs after the coating mass fraction reaches a certain

  2. Damping of unbound single-particle modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortier, S.; Beaumel, D.; Gales, S.; Guillot, J.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Laurent, H.; Maison, J.M.; Bordewijk, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Crawley, G.M.; Massolo, C.P.; Renteria, M.; Khendriche, A. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)]|[Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)]|[Nuclear Research Institute, Debrecen P.O. Box 51, H-4001 (Hungary)]|[NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)]|[Dep. Fisica, Fac. Cs. Exactas, UNLP, CC Nio 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)]|[Institut de Sciences Exactes,Universite de Tizi-Ouzou, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    1995-11-01

    The ({alpha},{sup 3}He-{ital n}) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy on {sup 64}Ni, {sup 90}Zr, and {sup 120}Sn target nuclei. Neutrons in coincidence with {sup 3}He particles emitted at 0{degree} were detected using the multidetector array EDEN, in order to get information about the decay of single-particle states embedded in the ({alpha},{sup 3}He) continuum. Neutron angular correlations, multiplicity values, and branching ratios to low-lying states of the final nuclei have been compared with the predictions of the statistical decay model. Evidence for a significant nonstatistical decay branch has been observed in the three nuclei below about 15 MeV excitation energy. Direct branching ratios in {sup 91}Zr deduced from this analysis are compared with the predictions of two nuclear structure models. At higher excitation energy, the decay characteristics of the ({alpha},{sup 3}He) continuum are shown to be mainly statistical.

  3. Single particle level scheme for alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirea, M.

    1998-01-01

    The fine structure phenomenon in alpha decay was evidenced by Rosenblum. In this process the kinetic energy of the emitted particle has several determined values related to the structure of the parent and the daughter nucleus. The probability to find the daughter in a low lying state was considered strongly dependent on the spectroscopic factor defined as the square of overlap between the wave function of the parent in the ground state and the wave functions of the specific excited states of the daughter. This treatment provides a qualitative agreement with the experimental results if the variations of the penetrability between different excited states are neglected. Based on single particle structure during fission, a new formalism explained quantitatively the fine structure of the cluster decay. It was suggested that this formalism can be applied also to alpha decay. For this purpose, the first step is to construct the level scheme of this type of decay. Such a scheme, obtained with the super-asymmetric two-center potential, is plotted for the alpha decay of 223 Ra. It is interesting to note that, diabatically, the level with spin 3/2 emerging from 1i 11/2 (ground state of the parent) reaches an excited state of the daughter in agreement with the experiment. (author)

  4. Characterisation of Black Carbon (BC) mixing state and flux in Beijing using single particle measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rutambhara; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh; Flynn, Michael; Broda, Kurtis; Olfert, Jason; Irwin, Martin; Sun, Yele; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Junfeng; Ge, Xinlei; Langford, Ben; Nemitz, Eiko; Mullinger, Neil

    2017-04-01

    BC is generated by the incomplete combustion of carbonaceous fuels and it is an important component of fine PM2.5. In the atmosphere BC particles have a complex structure and its mixing state has crucial impact on optical properties. Quantifying the sources and emissions of black carbon in urban environments is important and presently uncertain, particularly in megacities undergoing rapid growth and change in emissions. During the winter of 2016 (10th Nov-10th Dec) the BC was characterised as part of a large joint UK-China field experiment in Beijing. This paper focuses on understanding the mixing state of BC as well as identification and quantification of BC sources. We used a combination of a Centrifugal Particle Mass Analyser (CPMA) and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) to uniquely quantify the morphology independent mass of single refractory BC particles and their coating content. The CPMA allows us to select pre-charged aerosol particles according to their mass to charge ratio and the SP2 provides information on the mass of refractory BC through a laser-induced incandescence method. Furthermore, another SP2 was used to measure the BC flux at 100m height using the Eddy Covariance method. We have successfully gathered 4 weeks of continuous measurements which include several severe pollution events in Beijing. Here we present preliminary results, characterising the distribution of coating mass on BC particles in Beijing and linking this to the main sources of BC in the city. We will provide initial estimates of the BC flux over a several kilometre footprint. Such analysis will provide important information for the further investigation of source distribution, emission, lifetime and optical properties of BC under complex environments in Beijing.

  5. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust soot dispersed in phospholipid surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, W.; Keane, M.; Xing, S.; Harrison, J.; Gautam, M.; Ong, T.

    1994-06-01

    Organics extractable from respirable diesel exhaust soot particles by organic solvents have been known for some time to be direct acting frameshift mutagens in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion assay. Upon deposition in a pulmonary alveolus or respiratory bronchiole, respirable diesel soot particles will contact first the hypophase which is coated by and laden with surfactants. To model interactions of soot and pulmonary surfactant, the authors dispersed soots in vitro in the primary phospholipid pulmonary surfactant dipalmitoyl glycerophosphorylcholine (lecithin) (DPL) in physiological saline. They have shown that diesel soots dispersed in lecithin surfactant can express mutagenic activity, in the Ames assay system using S. typhimurium TA98, comparable to that expressed by equal amounts of soot extracted by dichloromethane/dimethylsulfoxide (DCM/DMSO). Here the authors report additional data on the same system using additional exhaust soots and also using two other phospholipids, dipalmitoyl glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine (DPPE), and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA), with different ionic character hydrophilic moieties. A preliminary study of the surfactant dispersed soot in an eucaryotic cell test system also is reported.

  6. Fundamental Study of Single Biomass Particle Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam

    results showed that cylindrical particles lose mass faster than spherical particles of a similar volume (mass) and that the burnout time is reduced by increasing the particle aspect ratio (surface area to volume ratio). Very similar conversion times were observed for cylindrical particles with nearly...... identical surface area to volume ratios. Similar conversion times were also observed for two size classes of pulverised particles (with irregular shapes) made from the same type of wood because of their similar surface area to volume ratios. The ignition, devolatilisation and burnout times of particles were...

  7. Single particle electrochemical sensors and methods of utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeniger, Joseph [Oakland, CA; Flounders, Albert W [Berkeley, CA; Hughes, Robert C [Albuquerque, NM; Ricco, Antonio J [Los Gatos, CA; Wally, Karl [Lafayette, CA; Kravitz, Stanley H [Placitas, NM; Janek, Richard P [Oakland, CA

    2006-04-04

    The present invention discloses an electrochemical device for detecting single particles, and methods for using such a device to achieve high sensitivity for detecting particles such as bacteria, viruses, aggregates, immuno-complexes, molecules, or ionic species. The device provides for affinity-based electrochemical detection of particles with single-particle sensitivity. The disclosed device and methods are based on microelectrodes with surface-attached, affinity ligands (e.g., antibodies, combinatorial peptides, glycolipids) that bind selectively to some target particle species. The electrodes electrolyze chemical species present in the particle-containing solution, and particle interaction with a sensor element modulates its electrolytic activity. The devices may be used individually, employed as sensors, used in arrays for a single specific type of particle or for a range of particle types, or configured into arrays of sensors having both these attributes.

  8. Single-particle characterization of ice-nucleating particles and ice particle residuals sampled by three different techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worringen, A.; Kandler, K.; Benker, N.; Dirsch, T.; Mertes, S.; Schenk, L.; Kästner, U.; Frank, F.; Nillius, B.; Bundke, U.; Rose, D.; Curtius, J.; Kupiszewski, P.; Weingartner, E.; Vochezer, P.; Schneider, J.; Schmidt, S.; Weinbruch, S.; Ebert, M.

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, three different techniques to separate ice-nucleating particles (INPs) as well as ice particle residuals (IPRs) from non-ice-active particles are compared. The Ice Selective Inlet (ISI) and the Ice Counterflow Virtual Impactor (Ice-CVI) sample ice particles from mixed-phase clouds and allow after evaporation in the instrument for the analysis of the residuals. The Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber (FINCH) coupled with the Ice Nuclei Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor (IN-PCVI) provides ice-activating conditions to aerosol particles and extracts the activated particles for analysis. The instruments were run during a joint field campaign which took place in January and February 2013 at the High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch (Switzerland). INPs and IPRs were analyzed offline by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis to determine their size, chemical composition and mixing state. Online analysis of the size and chemical composition of INP activated in FINCH was performed by laser ablation mass spectrometry. With all three INP/IPR separation techniques high abundances (median 20-70%) of instrumental contamination artifacts were observed (ISI: Si-O spheres, probably calibration aerosol; Ice-CVI: Al-O particles; FINCH + IN-PCVI: steel particles). After removal of the instrumental contamination particles, silicates, Ca-rich particles, carbonaceous material and metal oxides were the major INP/IPR particle types obtained by all three techniques. In addition, considerable amounts (median abundance mostly a few percent) of soluble material (e.g., sea salt, sulfates) were observed. As these soluble particles are often not expected to act as INP/IPR, we consider them as potential measurement artifacts. Minor types of INP/IPR include soot and Pb-bearing particles. The Pb-bearing particles are mainly present as an internal mixture with other particle types. Most samples showed a maximum of the INP/IPR size distribution at 200

  9. Investigations of Sooting Laminar Coflow Diffusion Flames at Elevated Pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Steinmetz, Scott A.

    2016-12-01

    Soot is a common byproduct of hydrocarbon based combustion systems. It poses a risk to human and environmental health, and can negatively or positively affect combustor performance. As a result, there is significant interest in understanding soot formation in order to better control it. More recently, the need to study soot formation in engine relevant conditions has become apparent. One engine relevant parameter that has had little focus is the ambient pressure. This body of work focuses on the formation of soot in elevated pressure environments, and a number of investigations are carried out with this purpose. Laminar coflow diffusion flames are used as steady, simple soot producers. First, a commonly studied flame configuration is further characterized. Coflow flames are frequently used for fundamental flame studies, particularly at elevated pressures. However, they are more susceptible to buoyancy induced instabilities at elevated pressures. The velocity of the coflow is known to have an effect on flame stability and soot formation, though these have not been characterized at elevated pressures. A series of flames are investigated covering a range of flowrates, pressures, and nozzle diameters. The stability limits of coflow flames in this range is investigated. Additionally, an alternative strategy for scaling these flames to elevated pressures is proposed. Finally, the effect of coflow rate on soot formation is evaluated. Identification of fundamental flames for coordinated research can facilitate our understanding of soot formation. The next study of this work focuses on adding soot concentration and particle size information to an existing fundamental flame dataset for the purpose of numerical model validation. Soot volume fraction and average particle diameters are successfully measured in nitrogen-diluted ethylene-air laminar coflow flames at pressures of 4, 8, 12, and 16 atm. An increase in particle size with pressure is found up to 12 atm, where particle

  10. Ignition delay and soot oxidative reactivity of MTBE blended diesel fuel

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Seung Yeon

    2014-04-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was added to diesel fuel to investigate the effect on ignition delay and soot oxidative reactivity. An ignition quality tester (IQT) was used to study the ignition propensity of MTBE blended diesel fuels in a reactive spray environment. The IQT data showed that ignition delay increases linearly as the MTBE fraction increases in the fuel. A four-stroke single cylinder diesel engine was used to generate soot samples for a soot oxidation study. Soot samples were pre-treated using a tube furnace in a nitrogen environment to remove any soluble organic fractions and moisture content. Non-isothermal oxidation of soot samples was conducted using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). It was observed that oxidation of \\'MTBE soot\\' started began at a lower temperature and had higher reaction rate than \\'diesel soot\\' across a range of temperatures. Several kinetic analyses including an isoconversional method and a combined model fitting method were carried out to evaluate kinetic parameters. The results showed that Diesel and MTBE soot samples had similar activation energy but the pre-exponential factor of MTBE soot was much higher than that of the Diesel soot. This may explain why MTBE soot was more reactive than Diesel soot. It is suggested that adding MTBE to diesel fuel is better for DPF regeneration since an MTBE blend can significantly influence the ignition characteristics and, consequently, the oxidative reactivity of soot. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.

  11. Many-particle nucleon-nucleon forces from nuclear single-particle states

    OpenAIRE

    Birbrair, B. L.; Ryazanov, V. I.

    1999-01-01

    As follows from the energies of single-particle states in ^{40}Ca, ^{90}Zr and ^{208}Pb nuclei the contribution of many-particle NN forces to the nuclear single-particle potential is at least the sum of repulsive and attractive parts resulting from three-particle and four-particle forces respectively. In addition the specified nucleon density distributions in the above nuclei are determined from both the 1 GeV proton-nucleus elastic scattering and the single-particle energies.

  12. Effect of Dimethyl Ether Mixing on Soot Size Distribution in Premixed Ethylene Flame

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zepeng

    2016-04-21

    As a byproduct of incomplete combustion, soot attracts increasing attentions as extensive researches exploring serious health and environmental effects from soot particles. Soot emission reduction requires a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and of soot formation and aging processes. Therefore, advanced experimental techniques and numerical simulations have been conducted to investigate this procedure. In order to investigate the effects of dimethyl ether (DME) mixing on soot particle size distribution functions (PSDFs), DME was mixed in premixed ethylene/oxygen/argon at flames at the equivalence ratio of 2.0 with a range of mixing ratio from 0% to 30% of the total carbon fed. Two series of atmospheric pressure flames were tested in which cold gas velocity was varied to obtain different flame temperatures. The evolution of PSDFs along the centerline of the flame was determined by burner stabilized stagnation probe and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) techniques, yielding the PSDFs for various separation distances above the burner surface. Meanwhile, the flame temperature profiles were carefully measured by a thermocouple and the comparison to that of simulated laminar premixed burner-stabilized stagnation flame was satisfactory. Additionally, to understand the chemical role of DME mixing in soot properties, characterization measurements were conducted on soot samples using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and elemental analysis (EA). Results of the evolution of PSDFs and soot volume fraction showed that adding DME into ethylene flame could reduce soot yield significantly. The addition of DME led to the decrease of both the soot nucleation rate and the particle mass growth rate. To explain the possible mechanism for the observation, numerical simulations were performed. Although DME addition resulted in the slight increase of methyl radicals from pyrolysis, the decrease in acetylene and propargyl radicals

  13. Stochastic transport of particles across single barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuter, Christian; Siems, Ullrich; Henseler, Peter; Nielaba, Peter; Leiderer, Paul; Erbe, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Transport phenomena of interacting particles are of high interest for many applications in biology and mesoscopic systems. Here we present measurements on colloidal particles, which are confined in narrow channels on a substrate and interact with a barrier, which impedes the motion along the channel. The substrate of the particle is tilted in order for the particles to be driven towards the barrier and, if the energy gained by the tilt is large enough, surpass the barrier by thermal activation. We therefore study the influence of this barrier as well as the influence of particle interaction on the particle transport through such systems. All experiments are supported with Brownian dynamics simulations in order to complement the experiments with tests of a large range of parameter space which cannot be accessed in experiments.

  14. Effects of morphology and wavelength on the measurement accuracy of soot volume fraction by laser extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-fei; Huang, Qun-xing; Wang, Fei; Chi, Yong; Yan, Jian-hua

    2018-01-01

    A novel method to evaluate the quantitative effects of soot morphology and incident wavelength on the measurement accuracy of soot volume fraction, by the laser extinction (LE) technique is proposed in this paper. The results indicate that the traditional LE technique would overestimate soot volume fraction if the effects of morphology and wavelength are not considered. Before the agglomeration of isolated soot primary particles, the overestimation of the LE technique is in the range of 2-20%, and rises with increasing primary particle diameter and with decreasing incident wavelength. When isolated primary particles are agglomerated into fractal soot aggregates, the overestimation would exceed 30%, and rise with increasing primary particle number per soot aggregate, fractal dimension and fractal prefactor and with decreasing incident wavelength to a maximum value of 55%. Finally, based on these results above, the existing formula of the LE technique gets modified, and the modification factor is 0.65-0.77.

  15. Effects of dicarboxylic acid coating on the optical properties of soot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Huaxin; Khalizov, Alexei F; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jun; Zhang, Renyi

    2009-09-28

    Soot is a major component of atmospheric aerosols responsible for absorption of visible solar radiation. Internal mixing of soot with transparent materials can enhance its ability to absorb and scatter light, resulting in a larger role of soot in climate forcing. We have investigated the absorption and scattering of visible light (532 nm) by soot aerosol internally mixed with succinic and glutaric acids using a combination of a cavity ring-down spectrometer and an integrating nephelometer. The measurements were performed for flame-generated soot aerosol with well-characterized morphology and mixing state in the particle size range from 155 to 320 nm. Thin coatings of dicarboxylic acids on soot aggregates (with a mass fraction of 0.1-0.4) enhance significantly light scattering (up to 3.8 fold) and slightly light absorption (less than 1.2 fold). Cycling the coated soot aerosol through high relative humidity (humidified to 90% RH and then dried to 5% RH) promotes further increase in light absorption and scattering for soot internally mixed with glutaric acid, but not for soot mixed with succinic acid. The larger effect of glutaric acid on light absorption and scattering is caused by the irreversible restructuring of soot aggregates induced by the coating material. Our results indicate that the enhancement in the optical properties of soot by transparent coatings is strongly related to the ability of the coating materials to change the morphology of soot aggregates.

  16. Single-particle behaviour in circulating fluidized beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1997-01-01

    . A radioactive tracking facility, which detects single radioactive particles, is developed and applied to determine the dynamic picture of the particle trajectories in the simulated boiler. The tracer particles are observed to move between the zone above and below the secondary air inlet with a mean frequency...

  17. Microprocessor-based single particle calibration of scintillation counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, G. K. D.; Pathak, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    A microprocessor-base set-up is fabricated and tested for the single particle calibration of the plastic scintillator. The single particle response of the scintillator is digitized by an A/D converter, and a 8085 A based microprocessor stores the pulse heights. The digitized information is printed. Facilities for CRT display and cassette storing and recalling are also made available.

  18. Automated data collection in single particle electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yong Zi; Cheng, Anchi; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Automated data collection is an integral part of modern workflows in single particle electron microscopy (EM) research. This review surveys the software packages available for automated single particle EM data collection. The degree of automation at each stage of data collection is evaluated, and the capabilities of the software packages are described. Finally, future trends in automation are discussed. PMID:26671944

  19. New apparatus of single particle trap system for aerosol visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hidenori; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Kitayama, Chiho; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio

    2014-08-01

    Control of transport and deposition of charged aerosol particles is important in various manufacturing processes. Aerosol visualization is an effective method to directly observe light scattering signal from laser-irradiated single aerosol particle trapped in a visualization cell. New single particle trap system triggered by light scattering pulse signal was developed in this study. The performance of the device was evaluated experimentally. Experimental setup consisted of an aerosol generator, a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), an optical particle counter (OPC) and the single particle trap system. Polystylene latex standard (PSL) particles (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 μm) were generated and classified according to the charge by the DMA. Singly charged 0.5 and 1.0 μm particles and doubly charged 2.0 μm particles were used as test particles. The single particle trap system was composed of a light scattering signal detector and a visualization cell. When the particle passed through the detector, trigger signal with a given delay time sent to the solenoid valves upstream and downstream of the visualization cell for trapping the particle in the visualization cell. The motion of particle in the visualization cell was monitored by CCD camera and the gravitational settling velocity and the electrostatic migration velocity were measured from the video image. The aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was in good agreement with Stokes diameter calculated from the electrostatic migration velocity for individual particles. It was also found that the aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was a one-to-one function of the scattered light intensity of individual particles. The applicability of this system will be discussed.

  20. Visualizing the mobility of silver during catalytic soot oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego; Christensen, Jakob M.; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic activity and mobility of silver nanoparticles used as catalysts in temperature programmed oxidation of soot:silver (1:5 wt:wt) mixtures have been investigated by means of flow reactor experiments and in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM). The carbon oxidation...... temperature was significantly lower compared to uncatalyzed soot oxidation with soot and silver loosely stirred together (loose contact) and lowered further with the two components crushed together (tight contact). The in situ TEM investigations revealed that the silver particles exhibited significant...

  1. Modeling of calcination of single kaolinitic clay particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    The present work aims at modeling of the calcination (dehydroxylation) process of clay particles, specifically kaolinite, and its thermal transformation. For such purpose, 1D single particle calcination model was developed based on the concept of shrinking core model to assess the dehydroxylation...... distribution within the clay particle and simultaneous density changes due to the reaction kinetics. Accordingly, a particular residence time was noticed as a point where kaolinitic clay particles attain optimum conversion to metakaolinite which is pozzolanic....

  2. Single Particle Studies of Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry on Aluminum Oxide Particles in a Quadrupole Trap

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunter, A

    2000-01-01

    ... on upper atmospheric chemical cycles and ozone. The experimental investigation employs a laboratory quadrupole trap electrodynamic levitation apparatus to study heterogeneous processes on single aluminum oxide particles representative...

  3. Reaction Gradients Viewed Inside Single Photoactive Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P.; Corral Arroyo, P.; Dou, J.; Kreiger, U.; Luo, B.; Peter, T.; Ammann, M.

    2017-12-01

    In terms of chemical selectivity and spatial resolution, a technique known as scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled to near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) is unmatched and will remain so for years into the future. We present a recent development coupling STXM/NEXAFS to a custom-built photochemical environmental reactor in which aerosol particles reside allowing for in situ chemical imaging. A laboratory investigation of metal-organic complex photochemistry was conducted. Transition metals are of great importance to atmospheric chemistry and aerosol photochemical aging due to their ability to catalyze oxidation reactions. Aerosol particles composed of mixtures of citric acid and iron citrate were probed for their organic carbon composition and iron oxidation state under atmospherically relevant conditions. At 40% relative humidity, oxygen diffusion and reaction was severely limited. Fe was reoxidized in the first 200 nm of the particle surface leaving reduced iron in the core. Similar gradients were observed at 60% RH, however waiting approximately 2 hours in the dark resulted in a recovery of the initial Fe(III) concentration. We draw two main conclusions from our findings. Frist, the oxidation gradients must have been the result of anoxic conditions at the interior of aerosol particles. This was predicted using a newly developed model for molecular diffusion through multiple layers with a reaction framework describing the photochemical processing of the metal organic matrix. Second, the lifetime of organic radicals in an anoxic diffusion limited organic matrix must be considerably long ( hours) to completely reoxidize iron as they wait for molecular oxygen. Long radical lifetimes in viscous organic aerosol in turn, could create high radical concentrations or favor radical-radical reactions in particles typically not considered when oxygen is plentiful. Our results impact predictions of aerosol physiochemical properties, e

  4. Soot modeling of counterflow diffusion flames of ethylene-based binary mixture fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    A soot model was developed based on the recently proposed PAH growth mechanism for C1-C4 gaseous fuels (KAUST PAH Mechanism 2, KM2) that included molecular growth up to coronene (A7) to simulate soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of ethylene and its binary mixtures with methane, ethane and propane based on the method of moments. The soot model has 36 soot nucleation reactions from 8 PAH molecules including pyrene and larger PAHs. Soot surface growth reactions were based on a modified hydrogen-abstraction-acetylene-addition (HACA) mechanism in which CH3, C3H3 and C2H radicals were included in the hydrogen abstraction reactions in addition to H atoms. PAH condensation on soot particles was also considered. The experimentally measured profiles of soot volume fraction, number density, and particle size were well captured by the model for the baseline case of ethylene along with the cases involving mixtures of fuels. The simulation results, which were in qualitative agreement with the experimental data in the effects of binary fuel mixing on the sooting structures of the measured flames, showed in particular that 5% addition of propane (ethane) led to an increase in the soot volume fraction of the ethylene flame by 32% (6%), despite the fact that propane and ethane are less sooting fuels than is ethylene, which is in reasonable agreement with experiments of 37% (14%). The model revealed that with 5% addition of methane, there was an increase of 6% in the soot volume fraction. The average soot particle sizes were only minimally influenced while the soot number densities were increased by the fuel mixing. Further analysis of the numerical data indicated that the chemical cross-linking effect between ethylene and the dopant fuels resulted in an increase in PAH formation, which led to higher soot nucleation rates and therefore higher soot number densities. On the other hand, the rates of soot surface growth per unit surface area through the HACA mechanism were

  5. DAMPING OF UNBOUND SINGLE-PARTICLE MODES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FORTIER, S; BEAUMEL, D; GALES, S; GUILLOT, J; LANGEVINJOLIOT, H; LAURENT, H; MAISON, JM; BORDEWIJK, J; BRANDENBURG, S; KRASZNAHORKAY, A; CRAWLEY, GM; MASSOLO, CP; RENTERIA, M; KHENDRICHE, A

    1995-01-01

    The (alpha, He-3-n) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy on Ni-64, Zr-90, and Sn-120 target nuclei. Neutrons in coincidence with He-3 particles emitted at 0 degrees were detected using the multidetector array EDEN, in order to get information about the decay of the

  6. Single-particle density matrix of liquid 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakarchuk, I.A.

    2008-01-01

    The density single-particle matrix in the coordinate notation was calculated based on the expression for the interacting Bose-particle N system density matrix. Under the low temperatures the mentioned matrix in the first approximation enables to reproduce the Bogoliubov theory results. In the classical terms the mentioned theory enables to reproduce the results of the theory of the classical fluids in the approximation of the chaotic phases. On the basis of the density single-particle matrix one managed to obtain the function of the pulse distribution of the particles, the Bose-liquid average kinetic energy, and to study the Bose-Einstein condensation phenomenon [ru

  7. Morphological effects on the radiative properties of soot aerosols in different internally mixing states with sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J.; Zhao, J. M.; Liu, L. H.

    2015-11-01

    The radiative properties of soot aerosols largely depend on their mixing state and morphology factors. In this paper, we generated soot aggregates in four mixing states with sulfate, including bare soot, partly coated soot, heavily coated soot and soot with inclusion. The number of monomers and fractal dimension of soot were varied in each mixing state while the radius of monomers was fixed at 0.025 μm. Using the discrete dipole approximation method (DDA), we calculated optical parameters relevant for climate forcing simulation at mid-visible wavelength (0.55 μm). Internal mixing results in enhanced absorption, scattering cross sections as well as the single scattering albedo. The enhancement ratio of the absorption is largest for heavily coated soot, which ranges from 1.5 to 1.65 with a soot volume fraction of 0.15 and is larger for soot with larger fractal dimension. The scattering cross section can be dramatically increased by factors larger than 10 when soot is heavily coated. The increasing of both the scattering cross section and the single scattering albedo is larger for soot aggregates with smaller number of monomers and fractal dimension. The asymmetry parameter is insensitive to the fractal dimension for heavily coated soot and soot with inclusion. Two simplified models including the homogeneous sphere model (HS) and the core shell sphere model (CS) were examined using the DDA results as references. The performance of the HS and CS model largely depends on the morphology factors and the mixing state of soot. For bare and partly coated soot, both the HS and CS model can introduce relative errors as large as several tens percent. For heavily coated soot, the HS model predicts the absorption with relative errors within 10%, while it overestimates the absorption with relative errors no larger than 20% for soot with inclusion. The HS model predicts the single scattering albedo and the asymmetry parameter with relative errors no larger than 10% for heavily

  8. Structure, single-particle and many-particle coefficients of Lennard ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We investigate the effects of temperature and density on the single-particle and many-particle coefficients as well as on the structures of homogenous systems in which the particles are assumed to interact via a continuous soft sphere potential in the microcanonical ensemble. The pair distribution function and therefore the ...

  9. Role of Fluid-Dynamics in Soot Formation and Microstructure in Acetylene-Air Laminar Diffusion Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Pandey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Residence time and thermo-chemical environment are important factors in the soot-formation process in flames. Studies have revealed that flow-dynamics plays a dominant role in soot formation process. For understanding the effect of flow dynamics on soot formation and physical structure of the soot formed in different combustion environments two types of laminar diffusion flames of Acetylene and air, a normal diffusion flame (NDF and an inverse diffusion flame (IDF have been investigated. The fuel and air supply in the reaction zone in two flame types were kept constant but the interchange of relative position of fuel and air altered the burner exit Reynolds and Froude numbers of gases, fuel/air velocity ratio and flame shape. Soot samples were collected using thermophoretic sampling on transmission electron microscope (TEM grids at different flame heights and were analyzed off-line in a Transmission Electron Microscope. Soot primary particle size, soot aggregate size and soot volume fraction were measured using an image analysis software. In NDF the maximum flame temperature was about 1525 K and 1230 K for IDF. The soot primary particles are distinctly smaller in size in IDF (between 19 – 26 nm compared to NDF (between 29–34 nm. Both NDF and IDF show chainlike branched structure of soot agglomerate with soot particles of a nearly spherical shape. The average number of soot primary particles per aggregate in NDF was in the range of 24 to 40 and in IDF it varied between 16 to 24. Soot volume fraction was between 0.6 to 1.5 ppm in NDF where as it was less than 0.2 ppm in IDF. The change in sooting characteristics of the two flame types is attributed to changed fuel/air velocity ratio, entrainment of gas molecules and thermophoresis on soot particles.

  10. Investigating Soot Morphology in Counterflow Flames at Elevated Pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Hafiz Muhammad Fahid

    2018-01-01

    Practical combustion devices such as gas turbines and diesel engines operate at high pressures to increase their efficiency. Pressure significantly increases the overall soot yield. Morphology of these ultra-fine particles determines their airborne lifetime and their interaction with the human respiratory system. Therefore, investigating soot morphology at high pressure is of practical relevance. In this work, a novel experimental setup has been designed and built to study the soot morphology at elevated pressures. The experimental setup consists of a pressure vessel, which can provide optical access from 10° to 165° for multi-angle light scattering, and a counterflow burner which produces laminar flames at elevated pressures. In the first part of the study, N2-diluted ethylene/air and ethane air counterflow flames are stabilized from 2 to 5 atm. Two-angle light scattering and extinction technique have been used to study the effects of pressure on soot parameters. Path averaged soot volume fraction is found to be very sensitive to pressure and increased significantly from 2 to 5 atm. Primary particle size and aggregate size also increased with pressure. Multi-angle light scattering is also performed and flames are investigated from 3 to 5 atm. Scattering to absorption ratio is calculated from multi-angle light scattering and extinction data. Scattering to absorption ratio increased with pressure whereas the number of primary particles in an aggregate decreased with increasing pressure. In the next part of the study, Thermophoretic Sampling of soot is performed, in counterflow flames from 3 to 10 atm, followed by transmission electron microscopy. Mean primary particle size increased with pressure and these trends are consistent withour light scattering measurements. Fractal properties of soot aggregates are found to be insensitive to pressure. 2D diffused light line of sight attenuation (LOSA) and Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) are used to measure local soot

  11. Morphology and mixing state of atmospheric particles: Links to optical properties and cloud processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    China, Swarup

    Atmospheric particles are ubiquitous in Earth's atmosphere and impact the environment and the climate while affecting human health and Earth's radiation balance, and degrading visibility. Atmospheric particles directly affect our planet's radiation budget by scattering and absorbing solar radiation, and indirectly by interacting with clouds. Single particle morphology (shape, size and internal structure) and mixing state (coating by organic and inorganic material) can significantly influence the particle optical properties as well as various microphysical processes, involving cloud-particle interactions and including heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake. Conversely, aerosol cloud processing can affect the morphology and mixing of the particles. For example, fresh soot has typically an open fractal-like structure, but aging and cloud processing can restructure soot into more compacted shapes, with different optical and ice nucleation properties. During my graduate research, I used an array of electron microscopy and image analysis tools to study morphology and mixing state of a large number of individual particles collected during several field and laboratory studies. To this end, I investigated various types of particles such as tar balls (spherical carbonaceous particles emitted during biomass burning) and dust particles, but with a special emphasis on soot particles. In addition, I used the Stony Brook ice nucleation cell facility to investigate heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by long-range transported particles collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory, in the Archipelago of the Azores. Finally, I used ice nucleation data from the SAAS (Soot Aerosol Aging Study) chamber study at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to understand the effects that ice nucleation and supercooled water processing has on the morphology of residual soot particles. Some highlights of our findings and implications are discussed next. We found that the

  12. Single particle measurements and two particle interferometry results from CERN experiment NA44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon-Gillo, J.

    1994-01-01

    CERN experiment NA44 is optimized for the study of identified single and multiple particle distributions to p T = 0 near mid-rapidity. We measure π +- , K +- , p, bar p, d and bar d, in p + A and A + A collisions at 450 and 20OGeV/u, respectively. Two-particle intensity interferometry results from π + π + , K + K + , and K - K - measurements and single particle distributions are presented

  13. LES of Sooting Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    investigated the formation of carbon in a well-stirred reactor. The critical C/O ratio for soot inception was observed and compared to Bunsen -Type flames ...The computations reproduced the flame structure, with reasonable agreement of the velocity field. They designed the swirl burner to match the...the vortex breakdown. 121 [203] introduced the compositional structure and flow field of two flames on the same burner . The two flames have the same

  14. Conductometric Sensor for Soot Mass Flow Detection in Exhausts of Internal Combustion Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feulner, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Müller, Andreas; Schott, Andreas; Zöllner, Christian; Brüggemann, Dieter; Moos, Ralf

    2015-11-13

    Soot sensors are required for on-board diagnostics (OBD) of automotive diesel particulate filters (DPF) to detect filter failures. Widely used for this purpose are conductometric sensors, measuring an electrical current or resistance between two electrodes. Soot particles deposit on the electrodes, which leads to an increase in current or decrease in resistance. If installed upstream of a DPF, the "engine-out" soot emissions can also be determined directly by soot sensors. Sensors were characterized in diesel engine real exhausts under varying operation conditions and with two different kinds of diesel fuel. The sensor signal was correlated to the actual soot mass and particle number, measured with an SMPS. Sensor data and soot analytics (SMPS) agreed very well, an impressing linear correlation in a double logarithmic representation was found. This behavior was even independent of the used engine settings or of the biodiesel content.

  15. The Role of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Hydrocarbons in Aging of Atmospheric Soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalizov, A. F.; Qiu, C.; Lin, Y.; Ma, Y.; Wang, L.; Zhang, R.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric soot is often found to be internally mixed with other aerosol constituents, yet the processes responsible for the soot aging are not well understood. We have conducted a systematic study on the role of several representative biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including monoterpenes and aromatics, in atmospheric aging of combustion soot. Aging experiments were conducted in a fluoropolymer chamber on size-classified soot aerosols in the presence of a VOC and an oxidant, either ozone or photolytically generated hydroxyl radical (OH). The evolution in the aging state of soot was monitored from measurements of the particle mobility size and mass, which were used to derive information about particle effective density, dynamic shape factor, and coating thickness. When exposed to VOC and oxidant, soot particles promptly gain mass due to condensation of low-volatility and partitioning of semi-volatile VOC oxidation products. Depending on the VOC, the increase in the particle mass is accompanied by an increase or a decrease in the particle mobility diameter. In either case, the effective density of coated soot particles increases during aging because the condensed material fills in the voids of fractal soot aggregates, forcing their restructuring. The latter is confirmed by thermal denuding experiments, which show an increase in the effective density for soot that was first aged and then heated to remove the coating from the soot core. Hygroscopic and optical properties of soot are significantly altered by aging. Upon humidification, the coating absorbs water, increasing in volume and causing an additional restructuring of soot aggregates. Coated particles are sufficiently hygroscopic to activate to cloud droplets at atmospherically relevant water supersaturations. Aged soot shows stronger light absorption and scattering, with an enhancement magnitude depending on the coating thickness and nature of the coating precursor. The rate of

  16. Single-camera, three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kevin; Regaard, Boris; Heinemann, Stefan; Sick, Volker

    2012-04-09

    This paper introduces single-camera, three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (SC3D-PTV), an image-based, single-camera technique for measuring 3-component, volumetric velocity fields in environments with limited optical access, in particular, optically accessible internal combustion engines. The optical components used for SC3D-PTV are similar to those used for two-camera stereoscopic-µPIV, but are adapted to project two simultaneous images onto a single image sensor. A novel PTV algorithm relying on the similarity of the particle images corresponding to a single, physical particle produces 3-component, volumetric velocity fields, rather than the 3-component, planar results obtained with stereoscopic PIV, and without the reconstruction of an instantaneous 3D particle field. The hardware and software used for SC3D-PTV are described, and experimental results are presented.

  17. Single particle orbitals of the heaviest known actinide nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.

    1992-01-01

    Single particle states in the actinide nuclei have been well characterized by decay scheme, (n, γ) and one nucleon transfer reaction studies. The energies of the single particle states are used to calculate the shell corrections which may give rise to stable superheavy elements. Large shell corrections for the superheavy elements arise from the gaps in the proton single-particle spectrum at Z = 114 and in the neutron single-particle spectrum at N = 184. The gap at Z = 114 is determined by the splitting of the f 7/2 and f 5/2 orbitals and the gap at N = 184 is determined by the locations of the h 11/2 , k 17/2 and j 13/2 spherical orbitals. Many of these states have been identified in very heavy actinide nuclei. Experiments identifying these states and the relation of the observed energies to the stability of superheavy elements are discussed

  18. Single-particle dynamics - RF acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montague, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper the rf acceleration of both synchronous and non-synchronous particles is discussed and a simple linearized equation of small amplitude synchrotron oscillations is derived. Phase stability, the hamiltonian for synchrotron oscillations, oscillation amplitudes and adiabatic damping are then briefly discussed. The final sections of the paper contain a description of the basic principles of rf beam stacking in the longitudinal phase space of intersecting Storage Rings and a description of phase displacement acceleration which inspite of certain disadvantages, remains an attractive technique for proton storage rings. (B.D.)

  19. Single particle mass spectral signatures from vehicle exhaust particles and the source apportionment of on-line PM2.5by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Ma, Shexia; Gao, Bo; Li, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yanjun; Cai, Jing; Li, Mei; Yao, Ling'ai; Huang, Bo; Zheng, Mei

    2017-09-01

    In order to accurately apportion the many distinct types of individual particles observed, it is necessary to characterize fingerprints of individual particles emitted directly from known sources. In this study, single particle mass spectral signatures from vehicle exhaust particles in a tunnel were performed. These data were used to evaluate particle signatures in a real-world PM 2.5 apportionment study. The dominant chemical type originating from average positive and negative mass spectra for vehicle exhaust particles are EC species. Four distinct particle types describe the majority of particles emitted by vehicle exhaust particles in this tunnel. Each particle class is labeled according to the most significant chemical features in both average positive and negative mass spectral signatures, including ECOC, NaK, Metal and PAHs species. A single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was also employed during the winter of 2013 in Guangzhou to determine both the size and chemical composition of individual atmospheric particles, with vacuum aerodynamic diameter (d va ) in the size range of 0.2-2μm. A total of 487,570 particles were chemically analyzed with positive and negative ion mass spectra and a large set of single particle mass spectra was collected and analyzed in order to identify the speciation. According to the typical tracer ions from different source types and classification by the ART-2a algorithm which uses source fingerprints for apportioning ambient particles, the major sources of single particles were simulated. Coal combustion, vehicle exhaust, and secondary ion were the most abundant particle sources, contributing 28.5%, 17.8%, and 18.2%, respectively. The fraction with vehicle exhaust species particles decreased slightly with particle size in the condensation mode particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Single-sheet identification method of heavy charged particles using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the single-sheet particle identification technique in CR-39 and CN-85 polycarbonate by plotting track cone length ... in neutron dosimetry, gamma and cosmic rays detection, heavy ion and nuclear physics and corpuscular ..... [13] R P Henke and E V Benton, Charged particle tracks in polymers: No. 5-A com- puter code for ...

  1. Calibration of single particle sizing velocimeters using photomask reticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirleman, E. D.; Holve, D. J.; Hovenac, E. A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of photomask reticle calibration standards for single particle instruments is discussed. The calibration method studied involves the use of photomask reticles where the particle artifacts are actually disks of chrome thin film in the clear field reticles produced by photolithography and etching processes. Consideration is given to various aspects of theory, design, and performance.

  2. Influence of Torrefaction on Single Particle Combustion of Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Zhimin; Jian, Jie; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the influence of torrefaction on the char reactivity, char yield, and combustion time of 3-5 mm spherical wood particles in a single particle combustion reactor (SPC) operating at a nominal temperature of 1231 °C. The devolatilization times were reduced and the char burnout...

  3. On the formation and early evolution of soot in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of soot formation in an n-heptane/air turbulent nonpremixed flame has been performed to investigate unsteady strain effects on soot growth and transport. For the first time in a DNS of turbulent combustion, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) are included via a validated, reduced chemical mechanism. A novel statistical representation of soot aggregates based on the Hybrid Method of Moments is used [M.E. Mueller, G. Blanquart, H. Pitsch, Combust. Flame 156 (2009) 1143-1155], which allows for an accurate state-of-the-art description of soot number density, volume fraction, and morphology of the aggregates. In agreement with previous experimental studies in laminar flames, Damköhler number effects are found to be significant for PAH. Soot nucleation and growth from PAH are locally inhibited by high scalar dissipation rate, thus providing a possible explanation for the experimentally observed reduction of soot yields at increasing levels of mixing in turbulent sooting flames. Furthermore, our data indicate that soot growth models that rely on smaller hydrocarbon species such as acetylene as a proxy for large PAH molecules ignore or misrepresent the effects of turbulent mixing and hydrodynamic strain on soot formation due to differences in the species Damköhler number. Upon formation on the rich side of the flame, soot is displaced relative to curved mixture fraction iso-surfaces due to differential diffusion effects between soot and the gas-phase. Soot traveling towards the flame is oxidized, and aggregates displaced away from the flame grow primarily by condensation of PAH on the particle surface. In contrast to previous DNS studies based on simplified soot and chemistry models, surface reactions are found to contribute barely to the growth of soot, for nucleation and condensation processes occurring in the fuel stream are responsible for the most of soot mass generation. Furthermore, the morphology of the soot aggregates is

  4. Experimental determination of soot refractive index in the infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouf, F.X.; Vendel, J.; Ouf, F.X.; Coppalle, A.; Weil, M.E.; Yon, J.

    2007-01-01

    The study of physical properties of soot particles produced during combustion is a complex subject but of a great interest within the framework of the study of the safety of an installation, with respect to the fire hazard. These characteristics are, in this case, particularly useful in order to predict the behaviour of containment barriers in situation of fire, but also in order to estimate the contribution of these particles to radiative transfers. The aim of this study is to determine the radiative properties of soot particles produced during combustion. A specific device, which establishes extinction and vertical-vertical scattering coefficients, has been developed and has allowed to determine the refractive index of soot particles in the infrared. This determination also needed the establishment of size distribution and morphological properties of soot aggregates. We present in this document the experimental device developed, and the validation of this device on latex spheres which optical properties are well known. First results of extinction coefficients will be presented and will underline the similar optical behaviour of different soot aggregates. Values of refractive index will be detailed and discussed, and a direct application of these values will be carried out in order to determine the soot volume fraction. A comparison with reference method will underline the efficiency of our method. We will conclude on the validity of the information brought by this device and on the prospects of this study. A discussion is included, on the utility of mean values of refractive index and on the determination of total emissivity of soot particles. (authors)

  5. Measurement of Soot Deposition in Automotive Components Using Neutron Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zekveld, David; Liu, Liaohui; Harrison, Andrew; Gill, Spencer; Harvel, Glenn; Chang, Jen-Shih

    2008-01-01

    About 40% of air pollution is generated by vehicles and transportation. The particulate matter (PM) emission significantly impacts human health. Fine particles below 2.5 μm (PM2.5) can enter the lungs and lead to respiratory problems. These particles not only influence human health, but also reduce the capability of many automobile exhaust heat exchanging devices. Neutron radiography is a non-destructive method of analyzing carbonaceous PM. While neutron radiography has been demonstrated for soot measurement in the past, the application has not considered the presence of unburned hydrocarbons, significant amounts of moisture nor examined complex geometrical configurations. The purpose of this work is to study a reliable non-destructive testing methodology using neutron radiography for measurement of soot distribution in automotive components. A soot standard (aluminium target) was designed and manufactured as a calibration tool. The standard is radiographed and used to measure the differences between various soot thickness and compositions. The radiograph images are analyzed to determine a calibration curve based upon the composition of the materials which can then be used for analysis of the automotive components. Experiments are performed using a diesel engine to produce soot deposits on exhaust piping. Soot distribution on exhaust piping is measured using neutron radiography. (authors)

  6. Microscopic investigation of soot and ash particulate matter derived from biofuel and diesel: implications for the reactivity of soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liati, Anthi; Spiteri, Alexander; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis; Vogel-Schäuble, Nina

    2012-11-01

    Investigation of soot and ash particulate matter deposited in diesel particulate filters (DPFs) operating with biofuel (B100) and diesel (pure diesel: B0 and diesel80/biofuel20 blend: B20) by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals the following: the rapeseed methyl ester biofuel used for this study contributes to ash production, mainly of Ca-S- and P-bearing compounds ranging in size between 50 and 300 nm. Smaller ash particles are less common and build aggregates. Ash is deposited on the inlet DPF surface, the inlet channel walls, and in B100-DPF at the plugged ends of inlet channels. The presence of Fe-Cr-Ni fragments, down to tens of nanometers in size within the ash is attributed to engine wear. Pt particles (50-400 nm large) within the ash indicate that the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) upstream of the DPF shows aging effects. Radial cracks on the coating layer of the DOC confirm this assumption. The B100-DPF contains significantly less soot than B20 and B0. Based on the generally accepted view that soot reactivity correlates with the nanostructure of its primary particles, the length and curvature of graphene sheets from biofuel- and diesel-derived soot were measured and computed on the basis of HRTEM images. The results show that biofuel-derived soot can be more easily oxidized than diesel soot, not only during early formation but also during and after considerable particle growth. Differences in the graphene sheet separation distance, degree of crystalline order and size of primary soot particles between the two fuel types are in line with this inference.

  7. Microscopic investigation of soot and ash particulate matter derived from biofuel and diesel: implications for the reactivity of soot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liati, Anthi; Spiteri, Alexander; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis; Vogel-Schäuble, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of soot and ash particulate matter deposited in diesel particulate filters (DPFs) operating with biofuel (B100) and diesel (pure diesel: B0 and diesel 80 /biofuel 20 blend: B20) by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals the following: the rapeseed methyl ester biofuel used for this study contributes to ash production, mainly of Ca–S– and P-bearing compounds ranging in size between 50 and 300 nm. Smaller ash particles are less common and build aggregates. Ash is deposited on the inlet DPF surface, the inlet channel walls, and in B100-DPF at the plugged ends of inlet channels. The presence of Fe–Cr–Ni fragments, down to tens of nanometers in size within the ash is attributed to engine wear. Pt particles (50–400 nm large) within the ash indicate that the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) upstream of the DPF shows aging effects. Radial cracks on the coating layer of the DOC confirm this assumption. The B100-DPF contains significantly less soot than B20 and B0. Based on the generally accepted view that soot reactivity correlates with the nanostructure of its primary particles, the length and curvature of graphene sheets from biofuel- and diesel-derived soot were measured and computed on the basis of HRTEM images. The results show that biofuel-derived soot can be more easily oxidized than diesel soot, not only during early formation but also during and after considerable particle growth. Differences in the graphene sheet separation distance, degree of crystalline order and size of primary soot particles between the two fuel types are in line with this inference.

  8. Infrared absorption spectroscopy of single particles using photophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.

    1985-01-01

    In situ absorption spectroscopy was performed on a single suspended salt particle using photophoresis. The charged ammonium sulfate particle was levitated in an electric-quadrpole field and illuminated by a CO 2 laser. The size-dependent absorption spectrum of ammonium sulfate particles was observed for the first time to our knowledge at 930-1080 cm -1 . The effects of gas pressure and laser power were also determined. For particles approximately 10 μm in diameter, the photophoretic force was observed to be negative

  9. Magnetophoretic circuits for digital control of single particles and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Byeonghwa; Reddy, Venu; Hu, Xinghao; Kim, Kunwoo; Jadhav, Mital; Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Noh, Young-Woock; Lim, Yong Taik; Yellen, Benjamin B.; Kim, Cheolgi

    2014-05-01

    The ability to manipulate small fluid droplets, colloidal particles and single cells with the precision and parallelization of modern-day computer hardware has profound applications for biochemical detection, gene sequencing, chemical synthesis and highly parallel analysis of single cells. Drawing inspiration from general circuit theory and magnetic bubble technology, here we demonstrate a class of integrated circuits for executing sequential and parallel, timed operations on an ensemble of single particles and cells. The integrated circuits are constructed from lithographically defined, overlaid patterns of magnetic film and current lines. The magnetic patterns passively control particles similar to electrical conductors, diodes and capacitors. The current lines actively switch particles between different tracks similar to gated electrical transistors. When combined into arrays and driven by a rotating magnetic field clock, these integrated circuits have general multiplexing properties and enable the precise control of magnetizable objects.

  10. Source identification of individual soot agglomerates in Arctic air by transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbruch, S.; Benker, N.; Kandler, K.; Schütze, K.; Kling, K.; Berlinger, B.; Thomassen, Y.; Drotikova, T.; Kallenborn, R.

    2018-01-01

    Individual soot agglomerates collected at four different locations on the Arctic archipelago Svalbard (Norway) were characterised by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. For source identification of the ambient soot agglomerates, samples from different local sources (coal burning power plants in Longyearbyen and Barentsburg, diesel and oil burning for power generation in Sveagruva and Ny Ålesund, cruise ship) as well as from other sources which may contribute to Arctic soot concentrations (biomass burning, aircraft emissions, diesel engines) were investigated. Diameter and graphene sheet separation distance of soot primary particles were found to be highly variable within each source and are not suited for source identification. In contrast, concentrations of the minor elements Si, P, K, Ca and Fe showed significant differences which can be used for source attribution. The presence/absence of externally mixed particle groups (fly ashes, tar balls, mercury particles) gives additional hints about the soot sources. Biomass/wood burning, ship emissions and coal burning in Barentsburg can be excluded as major source for ambient soot at Svalbard. The coal power plant in Longyearbyen is most likely a major source of soot in the settlement of Longyearbyen but does not contribute significantly to soot collected at the Global Atmosphere Watch station Zeppelin Mountain near Ny Ålesund. The most probable soot sources at Svalbard are aircraft emissions and diesel exhaust as well as long range transport of coal burning emissions.

  11. Single particle composition measurements of artificial Calcium Carbonate aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, S. R.; Mentel, T. F.; Schwinger, T.; Croteau, P. L.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Trimborn, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mineral dust, with an estimated total source from natural and anthropogenic emissions of up to 2800 Tg/yr, is one of the two largest contributors to total aerosol mass, with only Sea salt having a similar source strength (up to 2600 Tg/yr). The composition of dust particles varies strongly depending on the production process and, most importantly, the source location. Therefore, the composition of single dust particles can be used both to trace source regions of air masses as well as to identify chemical aging processes. Here we present results of laboratory studies on generating artificial calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles, a model compound for carbonaceous mineral dust particles. Particles were generated by atomizing an aqueous hydrogen carbonate solution. Water was removed using a silica diffusion dryer., then the particles were processed in an oven at temperatures up to 900°C, converting the hydrogen carbonate to its anhydrous form. The resulting aerosol was analyzed using an on-line single particle laser ablation aerosol particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LAAPTOF). The results confirm the conversion to calcium carbonate, and validate that the produced particles indeed can be used as a model compound for carbonaceous dust aerosols.

  12. Numerical Investigation of Soot Formation in Non-premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelgadir, Ahmed Gamaleldin

    2017-05-01

    Soot is a carbon particulate formed as a result of the combustion of fossil fuels. Due to the health hazard posed by the carbon particulate, government agencies have applied strict regulations to control soot emissions from road vehicles, airplanes, and industrial plants. Thus, understanding soot formation and evolution is critical. Practical combustion devices operate at high pressure and in the turbulent regime. Elevated pressures and turbulence on soot formation significantly and fundamental understanding of these complex interactions is still poor. In this study, the effects of pressure and turbulence on soot formation and growth are investigated numerically. As the first step, the evolution of the particle size distribution function (PSDF) and soot particles morphology are investigated in turbulent non-premixed flames. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code is developed and used. The stochastic reactor describes the evolution of soot in fluid parcels following Lagrangian trajectories in a turbulent flow field. The trajectories are sampled from a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of an n-heptane turbulent non-premixed flame. Although individual trajectories display strong bimodality as in laminar flames, the ensemble-average PSDF possesses only one mode and a broad tail, which implies significant polydispersity induced by turbulence. Secondly, the effect of the flow and mixing fields on soot formation at atmospheric and elevated pressures is investigated in coflow laminar diffusion flames. The experimental observation and the numerical prediction of the spatial distribution are in good agreement. Based on the common scaling methodology of the flames (keeping the Reynolds number constant), the scalar dissipation rate decreases as pressure increases, promoting the formation of PAH species and soot. The decrease of the scalar dissipation rate significantly contributes to soot formation occurring closer to the nozzle and outward on the flames wings as pressure

  13. Single Particle Tracking: Analysis Techniques for Live Cell Nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relich, Peter Kristopher, II

    Single molecule experiments are a set of experiments designed specifically to study the properties of individual molecules. It has only been in the last three decades where single molecule experiments have been applied to the life sciences; where they have been successfully implemented in systems biology for probing the behaviors of sub-cellular mechanisms. The advent and growth of super-resolution techniques in single molecule experiments has made the fundamental behaviors of light and the associated nano-probes a necessary concern amongst life scientists wishing to advance the state of human knowledge in biology. This dissertation disseminates some of the practices learned in experimental live cell microscopy. The topic of single particle tracking is addressed here in a format that is designed for the physicist who embarks upon single molecule studies. Specifically, the focus is on the necessary procedures to generate single particle tracking analysis techniques that can be implemented to answer biological questions. These analysis techniques range from designing and testing a particle tracking algorithm to inferring model parameters once an image has been processed. The intellectual contributions of the author include the techniques in diffusion estimation, localization filtering, and trajectory associations for tracking which will all be discussed in detail in later chapters. The author of this thesis has also contributed to the software development of automated gain calibration, live cell particle simulations, and various single particle tracking packages. Future work includes further evaluation of this laboratory's single particle tracking software, entropy based approaches towards hypothesis validations, and the uncertainty quantification of gain calibration.

  14. Three-dimensional single particle tracking in dense dust clouds by stereoscopy of fluorescent particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himpel, Michael; Killer, Carsten; Buttenschön, Birger; Melzer, André

    2012-12-01

    In dense dust clouds of a dusty plasma single particle trajectories are impossible to follow due to occlusion of particles and ambiguities in particle correspondences. By stereoscopic imaging of fluorescent tracer particles, we were able to reconstruct 3D single particle trajectories within dense dust clouds. Several measurements are shown that justify to regard the tracer particles as suitable representatives for the whole dust system. A first analysis of dust density waves in dense clouds already shows that these waves exhibit three-dimensional dynamics at larger wave amplitudes that cannot be resolved by 2D imaging techniques: a broad velocity distribution perpendicular to the oscillation plane due to dust-dust collisions is seen, while the velocity distribution in the oscillation direction is bimodal and shifted due to the bulk wave propagation.

  15. Three-dimensional single particle tracking in dense dust clouds by stereoscopy of fluorescent particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himpel, Michael; Killer, Carsten; Buttenschoen, Birger; Melzer, Andre [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    In dense dust clouds of a dusty plasma single particle trajectories are impossible to follow due to occlusion of particles and ambiguities in particle correspondences. By stereoscopic imaging of fluorescent tracer particles, we were able to reconstruct 3D single particle trajectories within dense dust clouds. Several measurements are shown that justify to regard the tracer particles as suitable representatives for the whole dust system. A first analysis of dust density waves in dense clouds already shows that these waves exhibit three-dimensional dynamics at larger wave amplitudes that cannot be resolved by 2D imaging techniques: a broad velocity distribution perpendicular to the oscillation plane due to dust-dust collisions is seen, while the velocity distribution in the oscillation direction is bimodal and shifted due to the bulk wave propagation.

  16. Electron Microscopic and Spectroscopic Characterization for Soot Source Differentiation by Laser Derivatization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddam, Chethan K.

    commercial optical grade quartz tube. Depending on the sample quantity, two different sample support systems were designed. Soot was laser-heated while in an inert (Ar) atmosphere using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. A laser beam dimension of ca 9 mm in diameter ensured that the entire sample area received uniform irradiation. To identify the optimal laser fluence, pulsed laser heating was applied at three different laser fluences to three carbon samples. Laser heating at these short timescales produced partially graphitized structures comprised of extended graphitic layers (>1 nm), and voids as material is rearranged. While laser heating the material with additional pulses did further graphitize the material, multiple pulses were not particularly beneficial for laser derivatization as this repetitive exposure decreased the degree of differentiation between the test samples. Based on visual HRTEM observations and quantified fringe analysis, a single pulse laser fluence of 250 mJ/cm2 (˜2800 K, determined from multiwavelength pyrommetry) produced the best derivatization without causing fragmentation or material ablation. For demonstrating the uniqueness of the laser-derivatized (nano)structure as dependent upon source and combustion conditions, the laser derivatization technique was validated by comparing different synthetic carbons, selected soots from transportation and residential combustion sources, and laboratory flames, each with recognizable nanostructure. After laser heating, the direction of nanostructure evolution of the synthetic carbons (possessing C:H > 10:1) appeared to be governed by their initial nanostructure as shown by HRTEM images. As illustration of chemistry's role, though nascent R250 carbon black showed structural similarity across multiple particles, laser heating led to either hollow shells or particles with internal structures. These differences were attributed to the chemistry of construction, i.e., the sp2/sp 3 bonding as quantified

  17. Single-particle detection of transcription following rotavirus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Eric N; Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Harrison, Stephen C

    2017-07-12

    Infectious rotavirus particles are triple-layered, icosahedral assemblies. The outer layer proteins, VP4 (cleaved to VP8* and VP5*) and VP7, surround a transcriptionally competent, double-layer particle (DLP), which they deliver into the cytosol. During entry of rhesus rotavirus, VP8* interacts with cell-surface gangliosides, allowing engulfment into a membrane vesicle by a clathrin-independent process. Escape into the cytosol and outer-layer shedding depend on interaction of a hydrophobic surface on VP5* with the membrane bilayer and on a large-scale conformational change. We report here experiments that detect the fate of released DLPs and their efficiency in initiating RNA synthesis. By replacing the outer layer with fluorescently tagged, recombinant proteins and also tagging the DLP, we distinguish particles that have lost their outer layer and entered the cytosol (uncoated) from those still within membrane vesicles. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization with probes for nascent transcripts to determine how soon after uncoating transcription began and what fraction of the uncoated particles were active in initiating RNA synthesis. We detected RNA synthesis by uncoated particles as early as 15 minutes after adding virus. Uncoating efficiency was 20-50%; of the uncoated particles, about 10% synthesized detectable RNA. In the format of our experiments, about 1% of the added particles attached to the cell surface, giving an overall added-particle to RNA-synthesizing particle ratio of between 1000 and 5000 to 1, in good agreement with the particle-to-focus-forming unit determined by infectivity assays. Thus, RNA synthesis by even a single, uncoated particle can initiate infection in a cell. IMPORTANCE The pathways by which a virus enters a cell transform its packaged genome into an active one. Contemporary fluorescence microscopy can detect individual virus particles as they enter cells, allowing us to map their multi-step entry pathways. Rotaviruses, like most

  18. Durable superhydrophobic carbon soot coatings for sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmeryan, K. D.; Radeva, E. I.; Avramov, I. D.

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of durable superhydrophobic (SH) carbon soot coatings used in quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) based gas or liquid sensors is reported. The method uses modification of the carbon soot through polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) by means of glow discharge RF plasma. The surface characterization shows a fractal-like network of carbon nanoparticles with diameter of ~50 nm. These particles form islands and cavities in the nanometer range, between which the plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) embeds and binds to the carbon chains and QCM surface. Such modified surface structure retains the hydrophobic nature of the soot and enhances its robustness upon water droplet interactions. Moreover, it significantly reduces the insertion loss and dynamic resistance of the QCM compared to the commonly used carbon soot/epoxy resin approach. Furthermore, the PPHMDSO/carbon soot coating demonstrates durability and no aging after more than 40 probing cycles in water based liquid environments. In addition, the surface layer keeps its superhydrophobicity even upon thermal annealing up to 540 °C. These experiments reveal an opportunity for the development of soot based SH QCMs with improved electrical characteristics, as required for high-resolution gas or liquid measurements.

  19. Durable superhydrophobic carbon soot coatings for sensor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmeryan, K D; Radeva, E I; Avramov, I D

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of durable superhydrophobic (SH) carbon soot coatings used in quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) based gas or liquid sensors is reported. The method uses modification of the carbon soot through polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) by means of glow discharge RF plasma. The surface characterization shows a fractal-like network of carbon nanoparticles with diameter of ∼50 nm. These particles form islands and cavities in the nanometer range, between which the plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) embeds and binds to the carbon chains and QCM surface. Such modified surface structure retains the hydrophobic nature of the soot and enhances its robustness upon water droplet interactions. Moreover, it significantly reduces the insertion loss and dynamic resistance of the QCM compared to the commonly used carbon soot/epoxy resin approach. Furthermore, the PPHMDSO/carbon soot coating demonstrates durability and no aging after more than 40 probing cycles in water based liquid environments. In addition, the surface layer keeps its superhydrophobicity even upon thermal annealing up to 540 °C. These experiments reveal an opportunity for the development of soot based SH QCMs with improved electrical characteristics, as required for high-resolution gas or liquid measurements. (paper)

  20. High sensitivity fluorescent single particle and single molecule detection apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathies, Richard A.; Peck, Konan; Stryer, Lubert

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus is described for ultrasensitive detection of single fluorescent particles down to the single fluorescent molecule limit in a fluid or on a substrate comprising means for illuminating a predetermined volume of the fluid or area of the substrate whereby to emit light including background light from the fluid and burst of photons from particles residing in the area. The photon burst is detected in real time to generate output representative signal. The signal is received and the burst of energy from the fluorescent particles is distinguished from the background energy to provide an indication of the number, location or concentration of the particles or molecules.

  1. Evolution of single-particle structure of silicon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalova, O. V.; Fedorov, N. A.; Klimochkina, A. A.; Markova, M. L.; Spasskaya, T. I.; Tretyakova, T. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    New data on proton and neutron single-particle energies E_{nlj} of Si isotopes with neutron number N from 12 to 28 as well as occupation probabilities N_{nlj} of single-particle states of stable isotopes 28, 30Si near the Fermi energy were obtained by the joint evaluation of the stripping and pick-up reaction data and excited state decay schemes of neighboring nuclei. The evaluated data indicate the following features of single-particle structure evolution: persistence of Z = 14 subshell closure with N increase, the new magicity of the number N = 16, and the conservation of the magic properties of the number N = 20 in Si isotopic chain. The features were described by the dispersive optical model. The calculation also predicts the weakening of N = 28 shell closure and demonstrates evolution of a bubble-like structure of the proton density distributions in neutron-rich Si isotopes.

  2. Ceria-catlyzed soot oxidation studied by environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, S.B.; Dahl, S.; Johnson, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Environmental tranmission electron microscopy (ETEM) was used to monitor in situ ceria-catalyzed oxidation of soot in relation to diesel engine emission control.  From time-lapsed ETEM image series of soot particles in contact with CeO2. or with Al2O3 as inert reference, mechanistic and kinetic...

  3. Changes of ns-soot mixing states and shapes in an urban area during CalNex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kouji; Buseck, Peter R.

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol particles from megacities influence the regional and global climate as well as the health of their occupants. We used transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) to study aerosol particles collected from the Los Angeles area during the 2010 CalNex campaign. We detected major amounts of ns-soot, defined as consisting of carbon nanospheres, sulfate, sea salt, and organic aerosol (OA) and lesser amounts of brochosome particles from leaf hoppers. Ns-soot-particle shapes, mixing states, and abundances varied significantly with sampling times and days. Within plumes having high CO2 concentrations, much ns-soot was compacted and contained a relatively large number of carbon nanospheres. Ns-soot particles from both CalNex samples and Mexico City, the latter collected in 2006, had a wide range of shapes when mixed with other aerosol particles, but neither sets showed spherical ns-soot nor the core-shell configuration that is commonly used in optical calculations. Our TEM observations and light-absorption calculations of modeled particles indicate that, in contrast to ns-soot particles that are embedded within other materials or have the hypothesized core-shell configurations, those attached to other aerosol particles hardly enhance their light absorption. We conclude that the ways in which ns-soot mixes with other particles explain the observations of smaller light amplification by ns-soot coatings than model calculations during the CalNex campaign and presumably in other areas.

  4. Optimal estimation of diffusion coefficients from single-particle trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Blainey, Paul C.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    How does one optimally determine the diffusion coefficient of a diffusing particle from a single-time-lapse recorded trajectory of the particle? We answer this question with an explicit, unbiased, and practically optimal covariance-based estimator (CVE). This estimator is regression-free and is far...... substrate, the CVE is biased by substrate motion. However, given some long time series and a substrate under some tension, an extended MLE can separate particle diffusion on the substrate from substrate motion in the laboratory frame. This provides benchmarks that allow removal of bias caused by substrate...

  5. Large Silver Halide Single Crystals as Charged Particle Track Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmiss, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The trajectory of the particle is made visible under a microscope by the accumulation of metallic silver at regions of the lattice damaged by the particle. This decoration of the particle track is accomplished by exposure of the crystal to light. The decoration of normally present lattice imperfections such as dislocations can be suppressed by the addition to the crystal of less than ten parts per million of a suitable polyvalent metal impurity. An account of some preliminary attempts to grow thin single crystals of AgCl is given also, and suggestions for a more refined technique are offered.

  6. Single particle labeling of RNA virus in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Ouyang, Ting; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Ren, Linzhu

    2017-06-02

    Real-time and visual tracking of viral infection is crucial for elucidating the infectious and pathogenesis mechanisms. To track the virus successfully, an efficient labeling method is necessary. In this review, we first discuss the practical labeling techniques for virus tracking in live cells. We then describe the current knowledge of interactions between RNA viruses (especially influenza viruses, immunodeficiency viruses, and Flaviviruses) and host cellular structures, obtained using single particle labeling techniques combined with real-time fluorescence microscopy. Single particle labeling provides an easy system for understanding the RNA virus life cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Single Particle Nanoplasmonic Sensing in Individual Nanofluidic Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Joachim; Albinsson, David; Fritzsche, Michael; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Westerlund, Fredrik; Langhammer, Christoph

    2016-12-14

    Nanoplasmonics allows label-free optical sensing and spectroscopy at the single nanoparticle level by exploiting plasmonic excitations in metal nanoparticles. Nanofluidics offers exclusive possibilities for applying and controlling fluid flow and mass transport at the nanoscale and toward nanosized objects. Here, we combine these two concepts in a single device, by integrating single particle nanoplasmonic sensing with nanofluidics using advanced nanofabrication. The developed devices enable on-chip referenced parallel single particle nanoplasmonic sensing inside multiple individual nanofluidic channels with dimensions down to the 100 nm range. Beyond detailed discussion of the nanofabrication, general device characterization, and parallelized single particle plasmonic readout concepts, we demonstrate device function on two examples: (i) in situ measurements of local buffer concentrations inside a nanofluidic channel; (ii) real time binding kinetics of alkanethiol molecules to a single plasmonic nanonatenna sensor in a single nanochannel. Our concept thus provides a powerful solution for controlling mass transport to and from individual (plasmonic) nanoparticles, which in a long-term perspective offers unique opportunities for label-free detection of analyte molecules at low concentrations and for fundamental studies of fluids in extreme confinement.

  8. Empirical soot formation and oxidation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boussouara Karima

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling internal combustion engines can be made following different approaches, depending on the type of problem to be simulated. A diesel combustion model has been developed and implemented in a full cycle simulation of a combustion, model accounts for transient fuel spray evolution, fuel-air mixing, ignition, combustion, and soot pollutant formation. The models of turbulent combustion of diffusion flame, apply to diffusion flames, which one meets in industry, typically in the diesel engines particulate emission represents one of the most deleterious pollutants generated during diesel combustion. Stringent standards on particulate emission along with specific emphasis on size of emitted particulates have resulted in increased interest in fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of soot particulate formation and oxidation in internal combustion engines. A phenomenological numerical model which can predict the particle size distribution of the soot emitted will be very useful in explaining the above observed results and will also be of use to develop better particulate control techniques. A diesel engine chosen for simulation is a version of the Caterpillar 3406. We are interested in employing a standard finite-volume computational fluid dynamics code, KIVA3V-RELEASE2.

  9. Single particle analysis with a 3600 light scattering photometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholdi, M.F.

    1979-06-01

    Light scattering by single spherical homogeneous particles in the diameter range 1 to 20 μm and relative refractive index 1.20 is measured. Particle size of narrowly dispersed populations is determined and a multi-modal dispersion of five components is completely analyzed. A 360 0 light scattering photometer for analysis of single particles has been designed and developed. A fluid stream containing single particles intersects a focused laser beam at the primary focal point of an ellipsoidal reflector ring. The light scattered at angles theta = 2.5 0 to 177.5 0 at phi = 0 0 and 180 0 is reflected onto a circular array of photodiodes. The ellipsoidal reflector is situated in a chamber filled with fluid matching that of the stream to minimize refracting and reflecting interfaces. The detector array consists of 60 photodiodes each subtending 3 0 in scattering angle on 6 0 centers around 360 0 . 32 measurements on individual particles can be acquired at rates of 500 particles per second. The intensity and angular distribution of light scattered by spherical particles are indicative of size and relative refractive index. Calculations, using Lorenz--Mie theory, of differential scattering patterns integrated over angle corresponding to the detector geometry determined the instrument response to particle size. From this the expected resolution and experimental procedures are determined.Ultimately, the photometer will be utilized for identification and discrimination of biological cells based on the sensitivity of light scattering to size, shape, refractive index differences, internal granularity, and other internal morphology. This study has demonstrated the utility of the photometer and indicates potential for application to light scattering studies of biological cells

  10. Emissions from Ethanol-Gasoline Blends: A Single Particle Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. McMurry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its agricultural origin and function as a fuel oxygenate, ethanol is being promoted as an alternative biomass-based fuel for use in spark ignition engines, with mandates for its use at state and regional levels. While it has been established that the addition of ethanol to a fuel reduces the particulate mass concentration in the exhaust, little attention has been paid to changes in the physicochemical properties of the emitted particles. In this work, a dynamometer-mounted GM Quad-4 spark ignition engine run without aftertreatment at 1,500 RPM and 100% load was used with four different fuel blends, containing 0, 20, 40 and 85 percent ethanol in gasoline. This allowed the effects of the fuel composition to be isolated from other effects. Instrumentation employed included two Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers covering different size ranges for analysis of single particle composition, an Aethalometer for black carbon, a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer for particle size distributions, a Photoelectric Aerosol Sensor for particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH species and gravimetric filter measurements for particulate mass concentrations. It was found that, under the conditions investigated here, additional ethanol content in the fuel changes the particle size distribution, especially in the accumulation mode, and decreases the black carbon and total particulate mass concentrations. The molecular weight distribution of the PAHs was found to decrease with added ethanol. However, PAHs produced from higher ethanol-content fuels are associated with NO2− (m/z—46 in the single-particle mass spectra, indicating the presence of nitro-PAHs. Compounds associated with the gasoline (e.g., sulfur-containing species are diminished due to dilution as ethanol is added to the fuel relative to those associated with the lubricating oil (e.g., calcium, zinc, phosphate in the single particle spectra. These changes have potential

  11. Spatially Resolved Sensitivity of Single-Particle Plasmon Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuwer, Michael A; van Hoof, Bas; Zijlstra, Peter

    2018-03-01

    The high sensitivity of localized surface plasmon resonance sensors to the local refractive index allows for the detection of single-molecule binding events. Though binding events of single objects can be detected by their induced plasmon shift, the broad distribution of observed shifts remains poorly understood. Here, we perform a single-particle study wherein single nanospheres bind to a gold nanorod, and relate the observed plasmon shift to the binding location using correlative microscopy. To achieve this we combine atomic force microscopy to determine the binding location, and single-particle spectroscopy to determine the corresponding plasmon shift. As expected, we find a larger plasmon shift for nanospheres binding at the tip of a rod compared to its sides, in good agreement with numerical calculations. However, we also find a broad distribution of shifts even for spheres that were bound at a similar location to the nanorod. Our correlative approach allows us to disentangle effects of nanoparticle dimensions and binding location, and by comparison to numerical calculations we find that the biggest contributor to this observed spread is the dispersion in nanosphere diameter. These experiments provide insight into the spatial sensitivity and signal-heterogeneity of single-particle plasmon sensors and provides a framework for signal interpretation in sensing applications.

  12. Measuring and predicting sooting tendencies of oxygenates, alkanes, alkenes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics on a unified scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Dhrubajyoti D.; St. John, Peter C.; McEnally, Charles S.; Kim, Seonah; Pfefferle, Lisa D.

    2018-04-01

    Databases of sooting indices, based on measuring some aspect of sooting behavior in a standardized combustion environment, are useful in providing information on the comparative sooting tendencies of different fuels or pure compounds. However, newer biofuels have varied chemical structures including both aromatic and oxygenated functional groups, which expands the chemical space of relevant compounds. In this work, we propose a unified sooting tendency database for pure compounds, including both regular and oxygenated hydrocarbons, which is based on combining two disparate databases of yield-based sooting tendency measurements in the literature. Unification of the different databases was made possible by leveraging the greater dynamic range of the color ratio pyrometry soot diagnostic. This unified database contains a substantial number of pure compounds (greater than or equal to 400 total) from multiple categories of hydrocarbons important in modern fuels and establishes the sooting tendencies of aromatic and oxygenated hydrocarbons on the same numeric scale for the first time. Using this unified sooting tendency database, we have developed a predictive model for sooting behavior applicable to a broad range of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons. The model decomposes each compound into single-carbon fragments and assigns a sooting tendency contribution to each fragment based on regression against the unified database. The model's predictive accuracy (as demonstrated by leave-one-out cross-validation) is comparable to a previously developed, more detailed predictive model. The fitted model provides insight into the effects of chemical structure on soot formation, and cases where its predictions fail reveal the presence of more complicated kinetic sooting mechanisms. This work will therefore enable the rational design of low-sooting fuel blends from a wide range of feedstocks and chemical functionalities.

  13. CoFlame: A refined and validated numerical algorithm for modeling sooting laminar coflow diffusion flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, Nick A.; Zhang, Qingan; Liu, Fengshan; Guo, Hongsheng; Dworkin, Seth B.; Thomson, Murray J.

    2016-10-01

    Mitigation of soot emissions from combustion devices is a global concern. For example, recent EURO 6 regulations for vehicles have placed stringent limits on soot emissions. In order to allow design engineers to achieve the goal of reduced soot emissions, they must have the tools to so. Due to the complex nature of soot formation, which includes growth and oxidation, detailed numerical models are required to gain fundamental insights into the mechanisms of soot formation. A detailed description of the CoFlame FORTRAN code which models sooting laminar coflow diffusion flames is given. The code solves axial and radial velocity, temperature, species conservation, and soot aggregate and primary particle number density equations. The sectional particle dynamics model includes nucleation, PAH condensation and HACA surface growth, surface oxidation, coagulation, fragmentation, particle diffusion, and thermophoresis. The code utilizes a distributed memory parallelization scheme with strip-domain decomposition. The public release of the CoFlame code, which has been refined in terms of coding structure, to the research community accompanies this paper. CoFlame is validated against experimental data for reattachment length in an axi-symmetric pipe with a sudden expansion, and ethylene-air and methane-air diffusion flames for multiple soot morphological parameters and gas-phase species. Finally, the parallel performance and computational costs of the code is investigated.

  14. Study on the fragmentation of granite due to the impact of single particle and double particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchun Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle Impact Drilling (PID is a novel method to improve the rate of penetration (ROP. In order to further improve the performance of PID, an investigation into the effect of single and double particles: (1 diameter; (2 initial velocity; (3 distance; and (4 angle of incidence was undertaken to investigate their effects on broken volume and penetration depth into hard brittle rock. For this purpose, the laboratory experiment of single particle impact rock was employed. Meanwhile, based on the LS-DYNA, a new finite element (FE simulation of the PID, including single and double particles impact rock, has been presented. The 3-dimensional (3D, aix-symmetric, dynamic-explicit, Lagrangian model has been considered in this simulation. And the Elastic and Holmquist Johnson Cook (HJC material behaviors have been used for particles and rocks, respectively. The FE simulation results of single particle impacting rock are good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, in this article the optimal impact parameters, including diameter, initial velocity, distance and the angle of incidence, are obtained in PID.

  15. Decay properties of high-lying single-particles modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumel, D; Fortier, S; Gales, S; Guillot, J; LangevinJoliot, H; Laurent, H; Maison, JM; Vernotte, J; Bordewijck, J; Brandenburg, S; Krasznahorkay, A; Crawley, GM; Massolo, CP; Renteria, M; Khendriche, A

    1996-01-01

    The neutron decay of high-lying single-particle states in Ni-64, Zr-90, Sn-120 and (208)pb excited by means of the (alpha,He-3) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy using the multidetector EDEN. The characteristics of this reaction are studied using inclusive spectra and angular

  16. Single-particle spectral density of the Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehlig, B.; Eskes, H.; Hayn, R.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the single-particle spectral function for the Hubbard model within the framework of a projection technique equivalent to the two-pole approximation. We show that the two-pole approximation can be well understood as an average characterization of the upper and the lower Hubbard bands,

  17. SINGLE-PARTICLE SPECTRAL DENSITY OF THE HUBBARD-MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEHLIG, B; ESKES, H; HAYN, R; MEINDERS, MBJ

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the single-particle spectral function for the Hubbard model within the framework of a projection technique equivalent to the two-pole approximation. We show that the two-pole approximation can be well understood as an average characterization of the upper and the lower Hubbard bands,

  18. Ergodicity of a single particle confined in a nanopore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardi, S.; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Frascolli, F.

    2012-01-01

    -ergodic component of the phase space for energy levels typical of experiments, is surprisingly small, i.e. we conclude that the ergodic hypothesis is a reasonable approximation even for a single particle trapped in a nanopore. Due to the numerical scope of this work, our focus will be the onset of ergodic behavior...

  19. Single particle degrees of freedom in the interacting boson model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is given of different aspects of the Interacting Boson Fermion Model, the extension of the interacting Boson Model to odd mass nuclei. The microscopic model for the coupling of single-particle degrees of freedom to the system of bosons is outlined and the interaction between the bosons

  20. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiniotis, Georgios; Southworth, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    Recent technological breakthroughs in image acquisition have enabled single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to achieve near-atomic resolution structural information for biological complexes. The improvements in image quality coupled with powerful computational methods for sorting distinct particle populations now also allow the determination of compositional and conformational ensembles, thereby providing key insights into macromolecular function. However, the inherent instability and dynamic nature of biological assemblies remain a tremendous challenge that often requires tailored approaches for successful implementation of the methodology. Here, we briefly describe the fundamentals of single-particle cryo-EM with an emphasis on covering the breadth of techniques and approaches, including low- and high-resolution methods, aiming to illustrate specific steps that are crucial for obtaining structural information by this method. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Effects of methyl group on aromatic hydrocarbons on the nanostructures and oxidative reactivity of combustion-generated soot

    KAUST Repository

    Guerrero Peña, Gerardo D.J.

    2016-07-23

    The substituted and unsubstituted aromatic hydrocarbons, present in transportation fuels such as gasoline and diesel, are thought to be responsible for most of the soot particles produced during their combustion. However, the effects of the substituted alkyl groups on the aromatic hydrocarbons on their sooting tendencies, and on the physical and chemical properties of soot produced from them are not well understood. In this work, the effect of the presence of methyl groups on aromatic hydrocarbons on their sooting propensity, and on the oxidative reactivity, morphology, and chemical composition of soot generated from them in diffusion flames is studied using benzene, toluene, and m-xylene as fuels. Several experimental techniques including high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are used to identify the morphological changes in soot, whereas the elemental and thermo-gravimetric analyses, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to study the changes in its chemical properties and reactivity. The activation energies for soot oxidation are calculated at different conversion levels, and a trend in the reactivity of soots from benzene, toluene and m-xylene is reported. It is observed that the sizes of primary particles and graphene-like sheets, and the concentrations of aliphatics and oxygenated groups in soot particles decreased with the addition of methyl group(s) on the aromatic ring. The physicochemical changes in soot are found to support the oxidative reactivity trends. © 2016 The Combustion Institute

  2. Soot Superaggregates from Flaming Wildfires and Their Direct Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Beres, Nicholas D.; Moosmuller,Hans; China, Swarup; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires contribute significantly to global soot emissions, yet their aerosol formation mechanisms and resulting particle properties are poorly understood and parameterized in climate models. The conventional view holds that soot is formed via the cluster-dilute aggregation mechanism in wildfires and emitted as aggregates with fractal dimension D(sub f) approximately equals 1.8 mobility diameter D(sub m) (is) less than or equal to 1 micron, and aerodynamic diameter D(sub a) (is) less than or equal to 300 nm. Here we report the ubiquitous presence of soot superaggregates (SAs) in the outflow from a major wildfire in India. SAs are porous, low-density aggregates of cluster-dilute aggregates with characteristic D(sub f) approximately equals 2.6,D(sub m) (is) greater than 1 micron, and D(sub a) is less than or equal to 300 nm that form via the cluster-dense aggregation mechanism.We present additional observations of soot SAs in wildfire smoke-laden air masses over Northern California, New Mexico, and Mexico City. We estimate that SAs contribute, per unit optical depth, up to 35% less atmospheric warming than freshly-emitted (D(sub f) approximately equals 1.8) aggregates, and approximately equals 90% more warming than the volume-equivalent spherical soot particles simulated in climate models.

  3. Experimental investigation on the morphology of soot aggregates from the burning of typical solid and liquid fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Dongmei; Guo, Chenning; Shi, Long

    2017-01-01

    Soot particles from the burning of typical fuels are one of the critical sources causing environmental problems and human disease. To understand the soot formation of these typical fuels, the size and morphology of soot aggregates produced from the burning of typical solid and liquid fuels, including diesel, kerosene, natural rubber (NR) latex foam, and wood crib, were studied by both extractive sampling and subsequent image analysis. The 2D and 3D fractal dimensions together with the diameter distribution of agglomerate and primary particles were analyzed for these four typical fuels. The average diameters of the primary particles were within 45–85 nm when sampling from different heights above the fire sources. Irregular sheet structures and flake-like masses were observed from the burning of NR latex foam and wood cribs. Superaggregates with a mean maximum length scale of over 100 μm were also found from the burning of all these four tested fuels. The fractal dimension of a single aggregate was 3 for all the tested fuels.

  4. Experimental investigation on the morphology of soot aggregates from the burning of typical solid and liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Dongmei, E-mail: 20021567@163.com; Guo, Chenning [China Jiliang University, College of Quality and Safety Engineering (China); Shi, Long [RMIT University, Civil and Infrastructure Engineering Discipline, School of Engineering (Australia)

    2017-03-15

    Soot particles from the burning of typical fuels are one of the critical sources causing environmental problems and human disease. To understand the soot formation of these typical fuels, the size and morphology of soot aggregates produced from the burning of typical solid and liquid fuels, including diesel, kerosene, natural rubber (NR) latex foam, and wood crib, were studied by both extractive sampling and subsequent image analysis. The 2D and 3D fractal dimensions together with the diameter distribution of agglomerate and primary particles were analyzed for these four typical fuels. The average diameters of the primary particles were within 45–85 nm when sampling from different heights above the fire sources. Irregular sheet structures and flake-like masses were observed from the burning of NR latex foam and wood cribs. Superaggregates with a mean maximum length scale of over 100 μm were also found from the burning of all these four tested fuels. The fractal dimension of a single aggregate was 3 for all the tested fuels.

  5. Reconstructing an icosahedral virus from single-particle diffraction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin, D. K.; Poon, H.-C.; Schwander, P.; Uddin, M.; Schmidt, M.

    2011-08-01

    The first experimental data from single-particle scattering experiments from free electron lasers (FELs) are now becoming available. The first such experiments are being performed on relatively large objects such as viruses, which produce relatively low-resolution, low-noise diffraction patterns in so-called ``diffract-and-destroy'' experiments. We describe a very simple test on the angular correlations of measured diffraction data to determine if the scattering is from an icosahedral particle. If this is confirmed, the efficient algorithm proposed can then combine diffraction data from multiple shots of particles in random unknown orientations to generate a full 3D image of the icosahedral particle. We demonstrate this with a simulation for the satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV), the atomic coordinates of whose asymmetric unit is given in Protein Data Bank entry 2BUK.

  6. Single-camera, three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, K.; Regaard, B.; Heinemann, S.; Sick, V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces single-camera, three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (SC3D-PTV), an image-based, single-camera technique for measuring 3-component, volumetric velocity fields in environments with limited optical access, in particular, optically accessible internal combustion engines. The optical components used for SC3D-PTV are similar to those used for two-camera stereoscopic-PIV, but are adapted to project two simultaneous images onto a single image sensor. A novel PTV algor...

  7. Fast Soot Aging and Pronounced Diurnal Evolution of Size-dependent Soot Mixing State in the Megacity Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y.; Su, H.; Wiedensohler, A.; Berghof, M.; Wehner, B.; Achtert, P.; Nowak, A.; Zhang, Y.; Shao, M.; Zhu, T.; Zeng, L.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2009-12-01

    The mixing state of soot has great implication in its optical and hygroscopic properties, and hence on its direct/indirect radiative effects. Up to date, understanding about the mechanism of the soot mixing state evolution is still poor and only a few techniques are able to measure the soot mixing state with a high-time and -size resolution. During the CAREBEIJING-2006 (Aug-Sep), a Volatility Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer was applied to measure the soot mixture in a particle size range of 30 to 320 nm at a regional polluted site in the area of megacity Beijing [Wehner et al., 2009]. The number fraction of externally mixed soot (Fex) varied from 5 to 60% and showed a clear size-dependent diurnal variation. After a peak in the morning, Fex started decreasing and reached a minimum at around noon. Smaller particles reached the minimum earlier than the larger ones, i.e., Fex of 30 nm particles reached its minimum at 8:00-9:00 while that of 320 nm reached the minimum at 13:00-14:00. The different Fex variations among different sizes reflect a combined effect of size-dependent condensable vapor supersaturations and particle growth rates. Fast evolution of soot mixing states was found. During a typical day with new particle formation followed by continuously condensational growth [Wiedensohler et al., 2009], the coating enhancement in light absorption (σap) and scattering of coated soot can simultaneously reach up to a factor of 8-10 within several hours. It was contributed not only by the increasing thickness of coating shell but also by the fast transition from externally mixed soots to coated ones [Cheng et al., 2009]. The number fraction of coated soot (Fcoat) is strongly correlated with the photochemical aging process (e.g., OH time integrals (TOH) calculated by the ratio of m+p xylnene to ethylbenzen). Similar phenomena were found by Moteki et al. [2007] and Shiraiwa et al. [2007]. Interestingly, an “exponential decay” of the external mixed to coated

  8. Two-Way Communication with a Single Quantum Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Santo, Flavio; Dakić, Borivoje

    2018-02-01

    In this Letter we show that communication when restricted to a single information carrier (i.e., single particle) and finite speed of propagation is fundamentally limited for classical systems. On the other hand, quantum systems can surpass this limitation. We show that communication bounded to the exchange of a single quantum particle (in superposition of different spatial locations) can result in "two-way signaling," which is impossible in classical physics. We quantify the discrepancy between classical and quantum scenarios by the probability of winning a game played by distant players. We generalize our result to an arbitrary number of parties and we show that the probability of success is asymptotically decreasing to zero as the number of parties grows, for all classical strategies. In contrast, quantum strategy allows players to win the game with certainty.

  9. Latitudinal distribution of black carbon soot in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F.; Kato, Katharine

    1995-01-01

    Black carbon soot from the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere has been systematically collected at latitudes from 90 deg N to 45 deg S. The measured latitudinal distribution of this soot at 10 to 11 km altitude is found to covary with commercial air traffic fuel use, suggesting that aircraft fuel combustion at altitude is the principal source. In addition, at latitudes where the commercial air traffic is high, measured black carbon soot values are high even at 20 km altitude, suggesting that aircraft-generated soot injected just above the tropopause may be transported to higher altitudes. During the volcanically influenced period in which these samples were collected, the number abundances, total mass, and calculated total surface area of black carbon soot are 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than similar measures of sulfuric acid aerosol. During volcanically quiescent periods, the calculated total surface area of black carbon soot aerosol is of the same order of magnitude as that of the background sulfuric acid aerosol. It appears from this comparison that black carbon soot is only capable of influencing lower stratosphere or upper troposphere chemistry during periods when the aerosol budget is not dominated by volcanic activity. It remains to determine the extent to which black carbon soot particles act as nuclei for sulfuric acid aerosol formation. However, mass balance calculations suggest that aircraft soot injected at altitude does not represent a significant source of condensation nuclei for sulfuric acid aerosols.

  10. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed mc1hane/oxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt: the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames. for reasons that still must be explained.

  11. Soot reduction under DC electric fields in counterflow non-premixed laminar ethylene flames

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Daegeun

    2014-04-23

    The effects of DC electric fields on non-premixed ethylene flames in a counterflow burner were studied experimentally with a focus on the reduction of soot particles. The experiment was conducted by connecting a high voltage terminal and a ground terminal to a lower (fuel) and upper (oxidizer) nozzle, respectively. We applied direct current (DC) potentials in a range of -5 kV < Vdc < 5 kV. Uniform electric fields were then generated in the gap between the two nozzles. The experimental conditions were selected to cover both soot formation (SF) and soot formation oxidation (SFO) flames. The flames subjected to the negative electric fields moved toward the fuel nozzle because of an ionic wind due to the Lorentz force acting on the positive ions in the flames. In addition, the yellow luminosity significantly decreased, indicating changes in the sooting characteristics. To analyze the sooting characteristics under the electric fields, planar laser induced incandescence (PLII) and fluorescence (PLIF) techniques were used to visualize the soot, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and OH radicals. The sooting limits in terms of the fuel and oxygen mole fractions were measured. No substantial soot formation due to the effects of the DC electric fields for the tested range of voltages and reactant mole fractions could be identified. The detailed flame behaviors and sooting characteristics under the DC electric fields are discussed. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  12. Particle interactions of fluticasone propionate and salmeterol xinafoate detected with single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetzer, Martin W; Morrical, Bradley D; Fergenson, David P; Imanidis, Georgios

    2017-10-30

    Particle co-associations between the active pharmaceutical ingredients fluticasone propionate and salmeterol xinafoate were examined in dry powder inhaled (DPI) and metered dose inhaled (MDI) combination products. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry was used to investigate the particle interactions in Advair Diskus ® (500/50 mcg) and Seretide ® (125/25 mcg). A simple rules tree was used to identify each compound, either alone or co-associated at the level of the individual particle, using unique marker peaks in the mass spectra for the identification of each drug. High levels of drug particle co-association (fluticasone-salmeterol) were observed in the aerosols emitted from Advair Diskus ® and Seretide ® . The majority of the detected salmeterol particles were found to be in co-association with fluticasone in both tested devices. Another significant finding was that rather coarse fluticasone particles (in DPI) and fine salmeterol particles (both MDI and DPI) were forming the particle co-associations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Impacts of fuel formulation and engine operating parameters on the nanostructure and reactivity of diesel soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehliu, Kuen

    This study focuses on the impacts of fuel formulations on the reactivity and nanostructure of diesel soot. A 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine was used in generating soot samples. The impacts of engine operating modes and the start of combustion on soot reactivity were investigated first. Based on preliminary investigations, a test condition of 2400 rpm and 64 Nm, with single and split injection strategies, was chosen for studying the impacts of fuel formulation on the characteristics of diesel soot. Three test fuels were used: an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (BP15), a pure soybean methyl-ester (B100), and a synthetic Fischer-Tropsch fuel (FT) produced in a gas-to-liquid process. The start of injection (SOI) and fuel rail pressures were adjusted such that the three test fuels have similar combustion phasing, thereby facilitating comparisons between soots from the different fuels. Soot reactivity was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). According to TGA, B100 soot exhibits the fastest oxidation on a mass basis followed by BP15 and FT derived soots in order of apparent rate constant. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates no relation between the surface oxygen content and the soot reactivity. Crystalline information for the soot samples was obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The basal plane diameter obtained from XRD was inversely related to the apparent rate constants for soot oxidation. For comparison, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) provided images of the graphene layers. Quantitative image analysis proceeded by a custom algorithm. B100 derived soot possessed the shortest mean fringe length and greatest mean fringe tortuosity. This suggests soot (nano)structural disorder correlates with a faster oxidation rate. Such results are in agreement with the X-ray analysis, as the observed fringe length is a measure of basal plane diameter. Moreover the relation

  14. A Review on Diesel Soot Emission, its Effect and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The diesel engines are energy efficient, but their particulate (soot emissions are responsible of severe environmental and health problems. This review provides a survey on published information regarding diesel soot emission, its adverse effects on the human health, environment, vegetations, climate, etc. The legislations to limit diesel emissions and ways to minimize soot emission are also summarized. Soot particles are suspected to the development of cancer; cardiovascular and respiratory health effects; pollution of air, water, and soil; impact agriculture productivity, soiling of buildings; reductions in visibility; and global climate change. The review covers important recent developments on technologies for control of particulate matter (PM; diesel particulate filters (DPFs, summarizing new filter and catalyst materials and DPM measurement. DPF technology is in a state of optimization and cost reduction. New DPF regeneration strategies (active, passive and plasma-assisted regenerations as well as the new learning on the fundamentals of soot/catalyst interaction are described. Recent developments in diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC are also summarized showing potential issues with advanced combustion strategies, important interactions on NO2 formation, and new formulations for durability. Finally, systematic compilation of the concerned newer literature on catalytic oxidation of soot in a well conceivable tabular form is given. A total of 156 references are cited. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 2nd June 2010, Revised: 17th June 2010; Accepted: 24th June 2010[How to Cite: R. Prasad, V.R. Bella. (2010. Review on Diesel Soot Emission, its Effect and Control. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 5(2: 69-86. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.2.794.69-86][DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.2.794.69-86 || or local:   http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/794 ]Cited by in: ACS 1 |

  15. A phenomenological model for particle retention in single, saturated fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sandrina; Dickson, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Fractured aquifers are some of the most poorly characterized subsurface environments despite posing one of the highest risks to the protection of potable groundwater. This research was designed to improve the understanding of the factors affecting particle transport through fractures by developing a phenomenological model based on laboratory-scale transport data. The model presented in this research employed data from over 70 particle tracer tests conducted in single, saturated, variable-aperture fractures that were obtained from the natural environment and fractured in the laboratory or cast from epoxy in the laboratory. The particles employed were Escherichia coli RS2-GFP and microspheres. The tracer experiments were conducted in natural (dolomitic limestone and granite) as well as epoxy replicas of the natural fractures. The multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the most important factors influencing particle retention in fractures are the ratio of the ionic strength of solution to collector charge, the ratio of particle to collector charge, and the ratio of advective to diffusive forces as described by the Peclet number. The model was able to reasonably (R(2)  = 0.64) predict the fraction of particles retained; however, it is evident that some factors not accounted for in the model also contributed to retention. This research presents a novel approach to understanding particle transport in fractures, and illustrates the relative importance of various factors affecting the transport mechanisms. The utility of this model lies in the increased understanding of particle transport in fractures, which is extremely useful for directing future research. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  16. Real-time analysis of insoluble particles in glacial ice using single-particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Matthew; Zawadowicz, Maria A.; Das, Sarah B.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2017-11-01

    Insoluble aerosol particles trapped in glacial ice provide insight into past climates, but analysis requires information on climatically relevant particle properties, such as size, abundance, and internal mixing. We present a new analytical method using a time-of-flight single-particle mass spectrometer (SPMS) to determine the composition and size of insoluble particles in glacial ice over an aerodynamic size range of ˜ 0.2-3.0 µm diameter. Using samples from two Greenland ice cores, we developed a procedure to nebulize insoluble particles suspended in melted ice, evaporate condensed liquid from those particles, and transport them to the SPMS for analysis. We further determined size-dependent extraction and instrument transmission efficiencies to investigate the feasibility of determining particle-class-specific mass concentrations. We find SPMS can be used to provide constraints on the aerodynamic size, composition, and relative abundance of most insoluble particulate classes in ice core samples. We describe the importance of post-aqueous processing to particles, a process which occurs due to nebulization of aerosols from an aqueous suspension of originally soluble and insoluble aerosol components. This study represents an initial attempt to use SPMS as an emerging technique for the study of insoluble particulates in ice cores.

  17. Numerical modeling of soot formation in a turbulent C2H4/air diffusion flame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manedhar Reddy Busupally

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soot formation in a lifted C2H4-Air turbulent diffusion flame is studied using two different paths for soot nucleation and oxidation; by a 2D axisymmetric RANS simulation using ANSYS FLUENT 15.0. The turbulence-chemistry interactions are modeled using two different approaches: steady laminar flamelet approach and flamelet-generated manifold. Chemical mechanism is represented by POLIMI to study the effect of species concentration on soot formation. P1 approximation is employed to approximate the radiative transfer equation into truncated series expansion in spherical harmonics while the weighted sum of gray gases is invoked to model the absorption coefficient while the soot model accounts for nucleation, coagulation, surface growth, and oxidation. The first route for nucleation considers acetylene concentration as a linear function of soot nucleation rate, whereas the second route considers two and three ring aromatic species as function of nucleation rate. Equilibrium-based and instantaneous approach has been used to estimate the OH concentration for soot oxidation. Lee and Fenimore-Jones soot oxidation models are studied to shed light on the effect of OH on soot oxidation. Moreover, the soot-radiation interactions are also included in terms of absorption coefficient of soot. Furthermore, the soot-turbulence interactions have been invoked using a temperature/mixture fraction-based single variable PDF. Both the turbulence-chemistry interaction models are able to accurately predict the flame liftoff height, and for accurate prediction of flame length, radiative heat loss should be accounted in an accurate way. The soot-turbulence interactions are found sensitive to the PDF used in present study.

  18. Single-particle response function in finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomo, S.; Texas A and M Univ., College Station

    1982-01-01

    I derive expressions for the single-particle response (structure) function S(E, q) and its sum rule, (Pauli blocking factor) P(q) = ∫ dE S(E, q), in terms of the Wiqner transforms (WTs) of the single-particle wave functions and the scattering probe sigma(q, r) and discuss the semi-classical phase-space interpretation of the results. For sigma(q, r) = esup(iq x r), I derive simple expressions for S(E, q) and P(q) for finite nuclei within the harmonic-oscillator model and compare the results with the well-known results of the Fermi-gas model. (orig.)

  19. Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) in biophysical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan; Ha, Ji Won; Augspurger, Ashley E.; Chen, Kuangcai; Zhu, Shaobin; Fang, Ning

    2013-10-01

    The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport.The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Three supplementary movies and an experimental section. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02254d

  20. Laboratory Measurements of Single-Particle Polarimetric Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, M.; Penttila, A.; Maconi, G.; Kassamakov, I.; Helander, P.; Puranen, T.; Salmi, A.; Hæggström, E.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-12-01

    Measuring scattering properties of different targets is important for material characterization, remote sensing applications, and for verifying theoretical results. Furthermore, there are usually simplifications made when we model targets and compute the scattering properties, e.g., ideal shape or constant optical parameters throughout the target material. Experimental studies help in understanding the link between the observed properties and computed results. Experimentally derived Mueller matrices of studied particles can be used as input for larger-scale scattering simulations, e.g., radiative transfer computations. This method allows to bypass the problem of using an idealized model for single-particle optical properties. While existing approaches offer ensemble- and orientation-averaged particle properties, our aim is to measure individual particles with controlled or known orientation. With the newly developed scatterometer, we aim to offer novel possibility to measure single, small (down to μm-scale) targets and their polarimetric spectra. This work presents an experimental setup that measures light scattered by a fixed small particle with dimensions ranging between micrometer and millimeter sizes. The goal of our setup is nondestructive characterization of such particles by measuring light of multiple wavelengths scattered in 360° in a horizontal plane by an ultrasonically levitating sample, whilst simultaneously controlling its 3D position and orientation. We describe the principles and design of our instrument and its calibration. We also present example measurements of real samples. This study was conducted under the support from the European Research Council, in the frame of the Advanced Grant project No. 320773 `Scattering and Absorption of Electromagnetic Waves in Particulate Media' (SAEMPL).

  1. Investigations of the long-term effects of LII on soot and bath gas

    KAUST Repository

    Cenker, Emre

    2017-08-24

    A combination of high-repetition rate imaging, laser extinction measurements, two-colour soot pyrometry imaging, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of thermophoretically sampled soot is used to investigate the long-term and permanent effects of rapid heating of in-flame soot during laser-induced incandescence (LII). Experiments are carried out on a laminar non-premixed co-annular ethylene/air flame with various laser fluences. The high-repetition rate images clearly show that the heated and the neighbouring laser-border zones undergo a permanent transformation after the laser pulse, and advect vertically with the flow while the permanent marking is preserved. The soot volume fraction at the heated zone reduces due to the sublimation of soot and the subsequent enhanced oxidation. At the laser-border zones, however, optical thickness increases that may be due to thermophoretic forces drawing hot particles towards relatively cooler zones and the rapid compression of the bath gas induced by the pressure waves created by the expansion of the desorbed carbon clusters. Additionally sublimed carbon clusters can condense onto existing particles and contribute to increase of the optical thickness. Time-resolved two-colour pyrometry imaging show that the increased temperature of soot both in the heated and neighbouring laser-border zones persists for several milliseconds. This can be associated to the increase in the bath-gas temperature, and a change in the wavelength-dependent emissivity of soot particles induced by the thermal annealing of soot. Ex-situ analysis show that the lattice structure of the soot sampled at the laser-border zones tend to change and soot becomes more graphitic. This may be attributed to thermal annealing induced by elevated temperature.

  2. Spin resonance strength calculation through single particle tracking for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The strengths of spin resonances for the polarized-proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are currently calculated with the code DEPOL, which numerically integrates through the ring based on an analytical approximate formula. In this article, we test a new way to calculate the spin resonance strengths by performing Fourier transformation to the actual transverse magnetic fields seen by a single particle traveling through the ring. Comparison of calculated spin resonance strengths is made between this method and DEPOL.

  3. Understanding particle size and distance driven competition of interparticle interactions and effective single-particle anisotropy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pacáková, Barbara; Mantlíková, Alice; Nižňanský, D.; Kubíčková, Simona; Vejpravová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 20 (2016), 1-11, č. článku 206004. ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic nanoparticles * single-particle anisotropy * dipolar energy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.649, year: 2016

  4. Automated single particle detection and tracking for large microscopy datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rhodri S; Yang, Lei; Dun, Alison; Smyth, Annya M; Duncan, Rory R; Rickman, Colin; Lu, Weiping

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in optical microscopy have enabled the acquisition of very large datasets from living cells with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Our ability to process these datasets now plays an essential role in order to understand many biological processes. In this paper, we present an automated particle detection algorithm capable of operating in low signal-to-noise fluorescence microscopy environments and handling large datasets. When combined with our particle linking framework, it can provide hitherto intractable quantitative measurements describing the dynamics of large cohorts of cellular components from organelles to single molecules. We begin with validating the performance of our method on synthetic image data, and then extend the validation to include experiment images with ground truth. Finally, we apply the algorithm to two single-particle-tracking photo-activated localization microscopy biological datasets, acquired from living primary cells with very high temporal rates. Our analysis of the dynamics of very large cohorts of 10 000 s of membrane-associated protein molecules show that they behave as if caged in nanodomains. We show that the robustness and efficiency of our method provides a tool for the examination of single-molecule behaviour with unprecedented spatial detail and high acquisition rates.

  5. Simulating Biomass Fast Pyrolysis at the Single Particle Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciesielski, Peter [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wiggins, Gavin [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Jakes, Joseph E. [U.S. Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

    2017-07-01

    Simulating fast pyrolysis at the scale of single particles allows for the investigation of the impacts of feedstock-specific parameters such as particle size, shape, and species of origin. For this reason particle-scale modeling has emerged as an important tool for understanding how variations in feedstock properties affect the outcomes of pyrolysis processes. The origins of feedstock properties are largely dictated by the composition and hierarchical structure of biomass, from the microstructural porosity to the external morphology of milled particles. These properties may be accounted for in simulations of fast pyrolysis by several different computational approaches depending on the level of structural and chemical complexity included in the model. The predictive utility of particle-scale simulations of fast pyrolysis can still be enhanced substantially by advancements in several areas. Most notably, considerable progress would be facilitated by the development of pyrolysis kinetic schemes that are decoupled from transport phenomena, predict product evolution from whole-biomass with increased chemical speciation, and are still tractable with present-day computational resources.

  6. A theorem on the single particle energy in a Fermi gas with interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, N.M.; Hove, Léon van

    1958-01-01

    This paper investigates single particle properties in a Fermi gas with interaction at the absolute zero of temperature. In such a system a single particle energy has only a meaning for particles of momentum k close to the Fermi momentum kF. These single particle states are metastable with a

  7. Drift correction of the dissolved signal in single particle ICPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Geert; Rauch, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented where drift, the random fluctuation of the signal intensity, is compensated for based on the estimation of the drift function by a moving average. It was shown using single particle ICPMS (spICPMS) measurements of 10 and 60 nm Au NPs that drift reduces accuracy of spICPMS analysis at the calibration stage and during calculations of the particle size distribution (PSD), but that the present method can again correct the average signal intensity as well as the signal distribution of particle-containing samples skewed by drift. Moreover, deconvolution, a method that models signal distributions of dissolved signals, fails in some cases when using standards and samples affected by drift, but the present method was shown to improve accuracy again. Relatively high particle signals have to be removed prior to drift correction in this procedure, which was done using a 3 × sigma method, and the signals are treated separately and added again. The method can also correct for flicker noise that increases when signal intensity is increased because of drift. The accuracy was improved in many cases when flicker correction was used, but when accurate results were obtained despite drift, the correction procedures did not reduce accuracy. The procedure may be useful to extract results from experimental runs that would otherwise have to be run again. Graphical Abstract A method is presented where a spICP-MS signal affected by drift (left) is corrected (right) by adjusting the local (moving) averages (green) and standard deviations (purple) to the respective values at a reference time (red). In combination with removing particle events (blue) in the case of calibration standards, this method is shown to obtain particle size distributions where that would otherwise be impossible, even when the deconvolution method is used to discriminate dissolved and particle signals.

  8. Measurements of soot formation and hydroxyl concentration in near critical equivalence ratio premixed ethylene flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inbody, Michael Andrew

    1993-01-01

    The testing and development of existing global and detailed chemical kinetic models for soot formation requires measurements of soot and radical concentrations in flames. A clearer understanding of soot particle inception relies upon the evaluation and refinement of these models in comparison with such measurements. We present measurements of soot formation and hydroxyl (OH) concentration in sequences of flat premixed atmospheric-pressure C2H4/O2/N2 flames and 80-torr C2H4/O2 flames for a unique range of equivalence ratios bracketting the critical equivalence ratio (phi(sub c)) and extending to more heavily sooting conditions. Soot volume fraction and number density profiles are measured using a laser scattering-extinction apparatus capable of resolving a 0.1 percent absorption. Hydroxyl number density profiles are measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) with broadband detection. Temperature profiles are obtained from Rayleigh scattering measurements. The relative volume fraction and number density profiles of the richer sooting flames exhibit the expected trends in soot formation. In near-phi(sub c) visibility sooting flames, particle scattering and extinction are not detected, but an LIF signal due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) can be detected upon excitation with an argon-ion laser. A linear correlation between the argon-ion LIF and the soot volume fraction implies a common mechanistic source for the growth of PAH's and soot particles. The peak OH number density in both the atmospheric and 80-torr flames declines with increasing equivalence ratio, but the profile shape remains unchanged in the transition to sooting, implying that the primary reaction pathways for OH remain unchanged over this transition. Chemical kinetic modeling is demonstrated by comparing predictions using two current reaction mechanisms with the atmospheric flame data. The measured and predicted OH number density profiles show good agreement. The predicted benzene

  9. In-situ measurements of the mixing state and optical properties of soot with implications for radiative forcing estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffet, Ryan C; Prather, Kimberly A

    2009-07-21

    Our ability to predict how global temperatures will change in the future is currently limited by the large uncertainties associated with aerosols. Soot aerosols represent a major research focus as they influence climate by absorbing incoming solar radiation resulting in a highly uncertain warming effect. The uncertainty stems from the fact that the actual amount soot warms our atmosphere strongly depends on the manner and degree in which it is mixed with other species, a property referred to as mixing state. In global models and inferences from atmospheric heating measurements, soot radiative forcing estimates currently differ by a factor of 6, ranging between 0.2-1.2 W/m(2), making soot second only to CO(2) in terms of global warming potential. This article reports coupled in situ measurements of the size-resolved mixing state, optical properties, and aging timescales for soot particles. Fresh fractal soot particles dominate the measured absorption during peak traffic periods (6-9 AM local time). Immediately after sunrise, soot particles begin to age by developing a coating of secondary species including sulfate, ammonium, organics, nitrate, and water. Based on these direct measurements, the core-shell arrangement results in a maximum absorption enhancement of 1.6x over fresh soot. These atmospheric observations help explain the larger values for soot forcing measured by others and will be used to obtain closure in optical property measurements to reduce one of the largest remaining uncertainties in climate change.

  10. Single-particle absorption spectroscopy by photothermal contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Nizzero, Sara; Hoggard, Anneli; Wang, Lin-Yung; Cai, Yi-Yu; Su, Man-Nung; Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan

    2015-05-13

    Removing effects of sample heterogeneity through single-molecule and single-particle techniques has advanced many fields. While background free luminescence and scattering spectroscopy is widely used, recording the absorption spectrum only is rather difficult. Here we present an approach capable of recording pure absorption spectra of individual nanostructures. We demonstrate the implementation of single-particle absorption spectroscopy on strongly scattering plasmonic nanoparticles by combining photothermal microscopy with a supercontinuum laser and an innovative calibration procedure that accounts for chromatic aberrations and wavelength-dependent excitation powers. Comparison of the absorption spectra to the scattering spectra of the same individual gold nanoparticles reveals the blueshift of the absorption spectra, as predicted by Mie theory but previously not detectable in extinction measurements that measure the sum of absorption and scattering. By covering a wavelength range of 300 nm, we are furthermore able to record absorption spectra of single gold nanorods with different aspect ratios. We find that the spectral shift between absorption and scattering for the longitudinal plasmon resonance decreases as a function of nanorod aspect ratio, which is in agreement with simulations.

  11. A computational study of ethylene–air sooting flames: Effects of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Selvaraj, Prabhu

    2015-11-05

    An updated reduced gas-phase kinetic mechanism was developed and integrated with aerosol models to predict soot formation characteristics in ethylene nonpremixed and premixed flames. A primary objective is to investigate the sensitivity of the soot formation to various chemical pathways for large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The gas-phase chemical mechanism adopted the KAUST-Aramco PAH Mech 1.0, which utilized the AramcoMech 1.3 for gas-phase reactions validated for up to C2 fuels. In addition, PAH species up to coronene (C24H12 or A7) were included to describe the detailed formation pathways of soot precursors. In this study, the detailed chemical mechanism was reduced from 397 to 99 species using directed relation graph with expert knowledge (DRG-X) and sensitivity analysis. The method of moments with interpolative closure (MOMIC) was employed for the soot aerosol model. Counterflow nonpremixed flames at low strain rate sooting conditions were considered, for which the sensitivity of soot formation characteristics to different nucleation pathways were investigated. Premixed flame experiment data at different equivalence ratios were also used for validation. The findings show that higher PAH concentrations result in a higher soot nucleation rate, and that the total soot volume and average size of the particles are predicted in good agreement with experimental results. Subsequently, the effects of different pathways, with respect to pyrene- or coronene-based nucleation models, on the net soot formation rate were analyzed. It was found that the nucleation processes (i.e., soot inception) are sensitive to the choice of PAH precursors, and consideration of higher PAH species beyond pyrene is critical for accurate prediction of the overall soot formation.

  12. A Progress Review on Soot Experiments and Modeling in the Engine Combustion Network (ECN)

    KAUST Repository

    Skeen, Scott A.

    2016-04-05

    The 4th Workshop of the Engine Combustion Network (ECN) was held September 5-6, 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. This manuscript presents a summary of the progress in experiments and modeling among ECN contributors leading to a better understanding of soot formation under the ECN “Spray A” configuration and some parametric variants. Relevant published and unpublished work from prior ECN workshops is reviewed. Experiments measuring soot particle size and morphology, soot volume fraction (fv), and transient soot mass have been conducted at various international institutions providing target data for improvements to computational models. Multiple modeling contributions using both the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) Equations approach and the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) approach have been submitted. Among these, various chemical mechanisms, soot models, and turbulence-chemistry interaction (TCI) methodologies have been considered.

  13. Volumetric particle image velocimetry with a single plenoptic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahringer, Timothy W.; Lynch, Kyle P.; Thurow, Brian S.

    2015-11-01

    A novel three-dimensional (3D), three-component (3C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique based on volume illumination and light field imaging with a single plenoptic camera is described. A plenoptic camera uses a densely packed microlens array mounted near a high resolution image sensor to sample the spatial and angular distribution of light collected by the camera. The multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) computed tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct a volumetric intensity field from individual snapshots and a cross-correlation algorithm is used to estimate the velocity field from a pair of reconstructed particle volumes. This work provides an introduction to the basic concepts of light field imaging with a plenoptic camera and describes the unique implementation of MART in the context of plenoptic image data for 3D/3C PIV measurements. Simulations of a plenoptic camera using geometric optics are used to generate synthetic plenoptic particle images, which are subsequently used to estimate the quality of particle volume reconstructions at various particle number densities. 3D reconstructions using this method produce reconstructed particles that are elongated by a factor of approximately 4 along the optical axis of the camera. A simulated 3D Gaussian vortex is used to test the capability of single camera plenoptic PIV to produce a 3D/3C vector field, where it was found that lateral displacements could be measured to approximately 0.2 voxel accuracy in the lateral direction and 1 voxel in the depth direction over a 300× 200× 200 voxel volume. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated experimentally using a home-built plenoptic camera based on a 16-megapixel interline CCD camera and a 289× 193 array of microlenses and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. 3D/3C measurements were performed in the wake of a low Reynolds number circular cylinder and compared with measurements made using a conventional 2D/2C PIV system. Overall, single camera

  14. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Sam; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for example, gasoline). In this process, metal deposition and intrusion is a major cause for irreversible catalyst deactivation and shifts in product distribution. We used x-ray nanotomography of industrial FCC particles at differing degrees of deactivation to quantify changes in single-particle macroporosity and pore connectivity, correlated to iron and nickel deposition. Our study reveals that these metals are incorporated almost exclusively in near-surface regions, severely limiting macropore accessibility as metal concentrations increase. Because macropore channels are “highways” of the pore network, blocking them prevents feedstock molecules from reaching the catalytically active domains. Consequently, metal deposition reduces conversion with time on stream because the internal pore volume, although itself unobstructed, becomes largely inaccessible. PMID:26601160

  15. Effects of Large Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons on the Soot Formation in Ethylene-Air Nonpremixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Prabhu, S.

    2015-03-30

    This study presents updated comprehensive gas-phase kinetic mechanism and aerosol models to predict soot formation characteristics in ethylene-air nonpremixed flames. A main objective is to investigate the sensitivity of the soot formation rate to various chemical pathways for large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In this study, the detailed chemical mechanism was reduced from 397 to 99 species using directed relation graph (DRG) and sensitivity analysis. The method of moments with interpolative closure (MOMIC) was employed for the soot aerosol model. Counterflow nonpremixed flames of pure ethylene at low strain rate sooting conditions are considered, for which the sensitivity of soot formation characteristics with respect to hetrogeneous nucleation is investigated. Results show that higher PAH concentrations result in higher soot nucleation rate, and that the average size of the particles are in good agreement with experimental results. It is found that the nucleation processes (i.e., soot inception) from higher PAH precursors, coronene in particular, is critical for accurate prediction of the overall soot formation.

  16. Cloud droplet activity changes of soot aerosol upon smog chamber ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittbom, C.; Eriksson, A. C.; Rissler, J.; Carlsson, J. E.; Roldin, P.; Nordin, E. Z.; Nilsson, P. T.; Swietlicki, E.; Pagels, J. H.; Svenningsson, B.

    2014-09-01

    Particles containing soot, or black carbon, are generally considered to contribute to global warming. However, large uncertainties remain in the net climate forcing resulting from anthropogenic emissions of black carbon (BC), to a large extent due to the fact that BC is co-emitted with gases and primary particles, both organic and inorganic, and subject to atmospheric ageing processes. In this study, diesel exhaust particles and particles from a flame soot generator spiked with light aromatic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors were processed by UV radiation in a 6 m3 Teflon chamber in the presence of NOx. The time-dependent changes of the soot nanoparticle properties were characterised using a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter, an Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer and a Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The results show that freshly emitted soot particles do not activate into cloud droplets at supersaturations ≤2%, i.e. the BC core coated with primary organic aerosol (POA) from the exhaust is limited in hygroscopicity. Before the onset of UV radiation it is unlikely that any substantial SOA formation is taking place. An immediate change in cloud-activation properties occurs at the onset of UV exposure. This change in hygroscopicity is likely attributed to SOA formed from intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) in the diesel engine exhaust. The change of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties at the onset of UV radiation implies that the lifetime of soot particles in the atmosphere is affected by the access to sunlight, which differs between latitudes. The ageing of soot particles progressively enhances their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei, due to changes in: (I) organic fraction of the particle, (II) chemical properties of this fraction (e.g. primary or secondary organic aerosol), (III) particle size, and (IV) particle morphology. Applying κ-Köhler theory, using a κSOA value of 0.13 (derived from independent input

  17. Crosslinked Functional Polymer Nanowire Formation Along Single Particle Tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, S.

    2006-01-01

    The use of high-energy charged particles has extended to many fields in recent years. In medicine, non-homogeneous energy deposition along an ion trajectory (ion track) plays a crucial role in cancer radiotherapy, allowing for high spatial selectivity in the distribution of the radiation dose. The direct observation and application of ion tracks in media have also attracted interest in materials science, where it is known as nuclear track fabrication. Since the discovery that high-energy particle leave latent tracks in inorganic and organic polymer materials, the technique has also been applied to the production of micro- and nano-sized pores in materials through chemical etching of the tracks. The clear correlation between the etched pore and the characteristics of the incident charged particle has been utilized for measurement of the velocity and mass of the incident particles, and such organic film detectors are widely used in dosimetry, and in particular for galactic cosmic rays in space. The scope of the present paper is the direct nano-structure formation based on crosslinking reactions induced in nano-scale ultra-small spaces of single particle tracks. We have developed the simple one-step formation processes of nanowires without using any chemical etching or refilling processes. The present technique is in striking contrast to the previous 'nuclear track' nanofabrication techniques. According to its high feasibility for the preparation of 1-D nanowires based on 'any' kinds of polymeric materials, the present paper demonstrates the formation of not only simple polymer nanowires but also ceramic and/or multi-segment multi-functional nanowires

  18. Effect of aging on morphology, hygroscopicity, and optical properties of soot aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalizov, A. F.; Xue, H.; Pagels, J.; McMurry, P. H.; Zhang, R.

    2009-12-01

    Soot from incomplete combustion represents one of the major forms of particulate matter pollution, profoundly impacting human health, air quality, and climate. The direct and indirect radiative effects of soot aerosol depend on particle composition and morphology, which may vary significantly when aerosol is subjected to atmospheric aging. We will present an overview of a comprehensive set of experimental measurements performed in our laboratory at Texas A&M to study the effect of internal mixing with atmospheric species on morphology, hygroscopicity, and optical properties of combustion soot. In our experiments, size-classified soot aerosol was exposed to 0.1 - 1000 ppb (part per billion) mixing ratios of sulfuric acid and dicarboxylic organic acids and resulting changes particle morphology and mixing state under dry and humid conditions were characterized through mass-mobility measurements by aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM) and tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA). Light absorption and scattering cross-sections for well-characterized fresh and coated soot aerosol were derived using a cavity ring-down spectrometer and an integrating nephelometer in order to assess the effect of atmospheric processing on the radiative properties of atmospheric soot. Internally mixed soot shows significant changes in particle morphology, increasing with the mass fraction of the coating material and relative humidity. Restructuring was the strongest for aggregates coated by sulfuric and glutaric acids whereas succinic acid coating did not result in observable morphology change. Sulfuric acid - coated particles experienced large hygroscopic growth at sub-saturated conditions and activated to cloud droplets at atmospherically relevant supersaturations. Furthermore, coating and subsequent hygroscopic growth considerably altered the optical properties of soot aerosol, increasing light scattering and absorption cross-sections. We found that irreversible restructuring of soot

  19. Inclusive photoproduction of single charged particles at high p T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Atkinson, M.; Baake, M.; Bagdasarian, L. S.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brook, N.; Charity, T.; Clegg, A. B.; Coyle, P.; Danaher, S.; Danagulian, S.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Diekmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Eades, J.; Ellison, R. J.; Flower, P. S.; Foster, J. M.; Galbraith, W.; Galumian, P. I.; Gapp, C.; Gebert, F.; Hallewell, G.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hickman, M. T.; Hoeger, C.; Holzkamp, S.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Ibbotson, M.; Jakob, H. P.; Joseph, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Kingler, J.; Koersgen, G.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; McCann, H.; McClatchey, R.; McManus, C.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J. A. G.; Morris, J. V.; Newton, D.; O'Connor, A.; Oedingen, R.; Oganesian, A. G.; Ottewell, P. J.; Paterson, C. N.; Paul, E.; Reid, D.; Rotscheidt, H.; Sharp, P. H.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Thacker, N. A.; Thompson, L.; Thompson, R. J.; Voigtlaender-Tetzner, A.; Waterhouse, J.; Weigend, A. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    1989-03-01

    Single charged-particle inclusive cross sections for photon, pion and kaon beams on hydrogen at the CERN-SPS are presented as functions of p T and x F . Data cover the range 0.01.6 GeV/c for the photon-induced data. Using the hadron-induced data to estimate the hadronic behaviour of the photon, the difference distributions and ratios of cross sections are a measure of the contribution of the point-like photon interactions. The data are compared with QCD calculations and show broadly similar features.

  20. Decay properties of high-lying single-particles modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S.; Galès, S.; Guillot, J.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Laurent, H.; Maison, J. M.; Vernotte, J.; Bordewijck, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Crawley, G. M.; Massolo, C. P.; Renteria, M.; Khendriche, A.

    1996-02-01

    The neutron decay of high-lying single-particle states in 64Ni, 90Zr, 120Sn and 208Pb excited by means of the (α, 3He) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy using the multidetector EDEN. The characteristics of this reaction are studied using inclusive spectra and angular correlation analysis. The structure located between 11 and 15 MeV in 91Zr, and between 8 and 12 MeV excitation energy in 209Pb display large departures from a pure statistical decay. The corresponding non-statistical branching ratios are compared with the results of two theoretical calculations.

  1. Real stabilization method for nuclear single-particle resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Zhou Shangui; Meng Jie; Zhao Enguang

    2008-01-01

    We develop the real stabilization method within the framework of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. With the self-consistent nuclear potentials from the RMF model, the real stabilization method is used to study single-particle resonant states in spherical nuclei. As examples, the energies, widths, and wave functions of low-lying neutron resonant states in 120 Sn are obtained. These results are compared with those from the scattering phase-shift method and the analytic continuation in the coupling constant approach and satisfactory agreements are found

  2. Single-particle cryo-EM at crystallographic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Until only a few years ago, single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) was usually not the first choice for many structural biologists due to its limited resolution in the range of nanometer to subnanometer. Now, this method rivals X-ray crystallography in terms of resolution and can be used to determine atomic structures of macromolecules that are either refractory to crystallization or difficult to crystallize in specific functional states. In this review, I discuss the recent breakthroughs in both hardware and software that transformed cryo-microscopy, enabling understanding of complex biomolecules and their functions at atomic level. PMID:25910205

  3. Coupled cluster approach to the single-particle Green's function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nooijen, M.; Snijders, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Diagrammatic and coupled cluster techniques are used to develop an approach to the single-particle Green's function G which concentrates on G directly rather than first approximating the irreducible self-energy and then solving Dyson's equation. As a consequence the ionization and attachment parts of the Green's function satisfy completely decoupled sets of equations. The proposed coupled cluster Green's function method (CCGF) is intimately connected to both coupled cluster linear response theory (CCLRT) and the normal coupled cluster method (NCCM). These relations are discussed in detail

  4. Understanding particle size and distance driven competition of interparticle interactions and effective single-particle anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacakova, B; Mantlikova, A; Niznansky, D; Kubickova, S; Vejpravova, J

    2016-05-25

    Magnetic response of single-domain nanoparticles (NPs) in concentrated systems is strongly affected by mutual interparticle interactions. However, particle proximity significantly influences single-particle effective anisotropy. To solve which of these two phenomena plays a dominant role in the magnetic response of real NP systems, systematic study on samples with well-defined parameters is required. In our work, we prepared a series of nanocomposites constituted of highly-crystalline and well-isolated CoFe2O4 NPs embedded in an amorphous SiO2 matrix using a single-molecule precursor method. This preparation method enabled us to reach a wide interval of particle size and concentration. We observed that the characteristic parameters of the single-domain state (coercivity, blocking temperature) and dipole-dipole interaction energy ([Formula: see text]) scaled with each other and increased with increasing [Formula: see text], where d XRD was the NP diameter and r was the interparticle distance. Our results are in excellent agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations of the particle growth. Moreover, we demonstrated that the contribution of [Formula: see text] acting as an additional energetic barrier to the superspin reversal or as an average static field did not sufficiently explain how the concentrated NP systems responded to an external magnetic field. Alternations in the blocking temperature and coercivity of our NP systems accounted for reformed relaxations of the NP superspins and modified effective anisotropy energy of the interacting NPs. Therefore, the concept of modified NP effective anisotropy explains the magnetic response of our concentrated NP systems better than the concept of the energy barrier influenced by interparticle interactions.

  5. Morphology and mixing state of individual freshly emitted wildfire carbonaceous particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    China, Swarup; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Gorkowski, Kyle; Aiken, Allison C; Dubey, Manvendra K

    2013-01-01

    Biomass burning is one of the largest sources of carbonaceous aerosols in the atmosphere, significantly affecting earth's radiation budget and climate. Tar balls, abundant in biomass burning smoke, absorb sunlight and have highly variable optical properties, typically not accounted for in climate models. Here we analyse single biomass burning particles from the Las Conchas fire (New Mexico, 2011) using electron microscopy. We show that the relative abundance of tar balls (80%) is 10 times greater than soot particles (8%). We also report two distinct types of tar balls; one less oxidized than the other. Furthermore, the mixing of soot particles with other material affects their optical, chemical and physical properties. We quantify the morphology of soot particles and classify them into four categories: ~50% are embedded (heavily coated), ~34% are partly coated, ~12% have inclusions and~4% are bare. Inclusion of these observations should improve climate model performances.

  6. Fragmentation and bond strength of airborne diesel soot agglomerates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messerer Armin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of diesel soot aerosol particles to break up into smaller units under mechanical stress was investigated by a direct impaction technique which measures the degree of fragmentation of individual agglomerates vs. impact energy. Diesel aerosol was generated by an idling diesel engine used for passenger vehicles. Both the aerosol emitted directly and aerosol that had undergone additional growth by Brownian coagulation ("aging" was investigated. Optionally a thermo-desoption technique at 280°C was used to remove all high-volatility and the majority of low-volatility HC adsorbates from the aerosol before aging. Results It was found that the primary soot agglomerates emitted directly from the engine could not be fragmented at all. Soot agglomerates permitted to grow additionally by Brownian coagulation of the primary emitted particles could be fragmented to a maximum of 75% and 60% respectively, depending on whether adsorbates were removed from their surface prior to aging or not. At most, these aged agglomerates could be broken down to roughly the size of the agglomerates from the primary emission. The energy required for a 50% fragmentation probability of all bonds within an agglomerate was reduced by roughly a factor of 2 when aging "dry" agglomerates. Average bond energies derived from the data were 0.52*10-16 and 1.2*10-16 J, respectively. This is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than estimates for pure van-der-Waals agglomerates, but agrees quite well with other observations. Conclusion Although direct conclusions regarding the behavior of inhaled diesel aerosol in contact with body fluids cannot be drawn from such measurements, the results imply that highly agglomerated soot aerosol particles are unlikely to break up into units smaller than roughly the size distribution emitted as tail pipe soot.

  7. Fragmentation and bond strength of airborne diesel soot agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenbacher, Sonja; Messerer, Armin; Kasper, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Background The potential of diesel soot aerosol particles to break up into smaller units under mechanical stress was investigated by a direct impaction technique which measures the degree of fragmentation of individual agglomerates vs. impact energy. Diesel aerosol was generated by an idling diesel engine used for passenger vehicles. Both the aerosol emitted directly and aerosol that had undergone additional growth by Brownian coagulation ("aging") was investigated. Optionally a thermo-desoption technique at 280°C was used to remove all high-volatility and the majority of low-volatility HC adsorbates from the aerosol before aging. Results It was found that the primary soot agglomerates emitted directly from the engine could not be fragmented at all. Soot agglomerates permitted to grow additionally by Brownian coagulation of the primary emitted particles could be fragmented to a maximum of 75% and 60% respectively, depending on whether adsorbates were removed from their surface prior to aging or not. At most, these aged agglomerates could be broken down to roughly the size of the agglomerates from the primary emission. The energy required for a 50% fragmentation probability of all bonds within an agglomerate was reduced by roughly a factor of 2 when aging "dry" agglomerates. Average bond energies derived from the data were 0.52*10-16 and 1.2*10-16 J, respectively. This is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than estimates for pure van-der-Waals agglomerates, but agrees quite well with other observations. Conclusion Although direct conclusions regarding the behavior of inhaled diesel aerosol in contact with body fluids cannot be drawn from such measurements, the results imply that highly agglomerated soot aerosol particles are unlikely to break up into units smaller than roughly the size distribution emitted as tail pipe soot. PMID:18533015

  8. Single Event Rates for Devices Sensitive to Particle Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, L. D.; Scheick, L. Z.; Banker, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    Single event rates (SER) can include contributions from low-energy particles such that the linear energy transfer (LET) is not constant. Previous work found that the environmental description that is most relevant to the low-energy contribution to the rate is a "stopping rate per unit volume" even when the physical mechanisms for a single-event effect do not require an ion to stop in some device region. Stopping rate tables are presented for four heavy-ion environments that are commonly used to assess device suitability for space applications. A conservative rate estimate utilizing limited test data is derived, and the example of SEGR rate in a power MOSFET is presented.

  9. Developing a predictive model for the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Violi, Angela [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Michelsen, Hope [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, Nils [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, Kevin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-07

    In order to provide the scientific foundation to enable technology breakthroughs in transportation fuel, it is important to develop a combustion modeling capability to optimize the operation and design of evolving fuels in advanced engines for transportation applications. The goal of this proposal is to develop a validated predictive model to describe the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles in premixed and diffusion flames. Atomistic studies in conjunction with state-of-the-art experiments are the distinguishing characteristics of this unique interdisciplinary effort. The modeling effort has been conducted at the University of Michigan by Prof. A. Violi. The experimental work has entailed a series of studies using different techniques to analyze gas-phase soot precursor chemistry and soot particle production in premixed and diffusion flames. Measurements have provided spatial distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other gas-phase species and size and composition of incipient soot nanoparticles for comparison with model results. The experimental team includes Dr. N. Hansen and H. Michelsen at Sandia National Labs' Combustion Research Facility, and Dr. K. Wilson as collaborator at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab's Advanced Light Source. Our results show that the chemical and physical properties of nanoparticles affect the coagulation behavior in soot formation, and our results on an experimentally validated, predictive model for the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles will not only enhance our understanding of soot formation since but will also allow the prediction of particle size distributions under combustion conditions. These results provide a novel description of soot formation based on physical and chemical properties of the particles for use in the next generation of soot models and an enhanced capability for facilitating the design of alternative fuels and the engines they will power.

  10. Oxygenated organic functional groups and their sources in single and submicron organic particles in MILAGRO 2006 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Liu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF were used to measure organic functional groups and elements of submicron particles collected during MILAGRO in March 2006 on three platforms: the Mexico City urban area (SIMAT, the high altitude site at 4010 m (Altzomoni, and the NCAR C130 aircraft. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS were applied to single particle organic functional group abundance analysis of particles simultaneously collected at SIMAT and C130. Correlations of elemental concentrations showed different groups of source-related elements at SIMAT, Altzomoni, and C130, suggesting different processes affecting the air masses sampled at the three platforms. Cluster analysis resulted in seven distinct clusters of FTIR spectra, with the last three clusters consisting of spectra collected almost exclusively on the C130 platform, reflecting the variety of sources contributing to C130 samples. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF of STXM-NEXAFS spectra identified three main factors representing soot, secondary, and biomass burning type spectra. PMF of FTIR spectra resulted in two fossil fuel combustion factors and one biomass burning factor, the former representative of source regions to the northeast and southwest of SIMAT. Alkane, carboxylic acid, amine, and alcohol functional groups were mainly associated with combustion related sources, while non-acid carbonyl groups were likely from biomass burning events. The majority of OM and O/C was attributed to combustion sources, although no distinction between direct emissions and atmospherically processed OM could be identified.

  11. Design of a Single-Layer Microchannel for Continuous Sheathless Single-Stream Particle Inertial Focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Tang, Fei; Li, Weihua; Wang, Xiaohao

    2018-02-06

    High-throughput, high-precision single-stream focusing of microparticles has a potentially wide range of applications in biochemical analysis and clinical diagnosis. In this work, we develop a sheathless three-dimensional (3D) particle-focusing method in a single-layer microchannel. This novel microchannel consists of periodic high-aspect-ratio curved channels and straight channels. The proposed method takes advantage of both the curved channels, which induce Dean flow to promote particle migration, and straight channels, which suppress the remaining stirring effects of Dean flow to stabilize the achieved particle focusing. The 3D particle focusing is demonstrated experimentally, and the mechanism is analyzed theoretically. The effects of flow rate, particle size, and cycle number on the focusing performance were also investigated. The experimental results demonstrate that polystyrene particles with diameters of 5-20 μm can be focused into a 3D single file within seven channel cycles, with the focusing accuracy up to 98.5% and focusing rate up to 98.97%. The focusing throughput could reach up to ∼10 5 counts/min. Furthermore, its applicability to biological cells is also demonstrated by 3D focusing of HeLa and melanoma cells and bovine blood cells in the proposed microchannel. The proposed sheathless passive focusing scheme, featuring a simple channel structure, small footprint (9 mm × 1.2 mm), compact layout, and uncomplicated fabrication procedure, holds great promise as an efficient 3D focusing unit for the development of next-generation on-chip flow cytometry.

  12. Conformational changes of a single magnetic particle string within gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hai-Ning; Groenewold, Jan; Picken, S J; Mendes, Eduardo

    2014-02-21

    Magnetorheological (MR) gels consist of micron sized magnetic particles inside a gel matrix. Before physical cross-linking, the suspension is subjected to a small magnetic field which creates a particle string structure. After cross-linking, the string is kept within the gel at room temperature. Under an external homogeneous magnetic field and mechanical deformation, the soft swollen gel matrix allows the string to largely rearrange at microscopic scales. With the help of two homemade magneto cells mounted on an optical microscope, we were able to follow the conformational change and instabilities of a single magnetic particle string under the combined influence of shear (or stretch) and the magnetic field. In the absence of mechanical deformation, an external magnetic field, applied in the perpendicular direction to the string, breaks it into small pieces generating periodic structures like sawteeth. When an external magnetic field is applied parallel to the pre-aligned string, it exhibits a length contraction. However, under shear strain perpendicular to the original pre-structured string (and magnetic field), the string breaks and short string segments tilt, making an angle with the original direction that is smaller than that of the applied shear (non-affine). The difference in tilt angle scales with the inverse length of the small segments L-1 and the magnetic flux density B, reflecting the ability of the gel matrix to expel solvents under local stress.

  13. High resolution single particle refinement in EMAN2.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James M; Chen, Muyuan; Baldwin, Philip R; Ludtke, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    EMAN2.1 is a complete image processing suite for quantitative analysis of grayscale images, with a primary focus on transmission electron microscopy, with complete workflows for performing high resolution single particle reconstruction, 2-D and 3-D heterogeneity analysis, random conical tilt reconstruction and subtomogram averaging, among other tasks. In this manuscript we provide the first detailed description of the high resolution single particle analysis pipeline and the philosophy behind its approach to the reconstruction problem. High resolution refinement is a fully automated process, and involves an advanced set of heuristics to select optimal algorithms for each specific refinement task. A gold standard FSC is produced automatically as part of refinement, providing a robust resolution estimate for the final map, and this is used to optimally filter the final CTF phase and amplitude corrected structure. Additional methods are in-place to reduce model bias during refinement, and to permit cross-validation using other computational methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Single-particle excitations in disordered Weyl fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pixley, J. H.; Chou, Yang-Zhi; Goswami, Pallab; Huse, David A.; Nandkishore, Rahul; Radzihovsky, Leo; Das Sarma, S.

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically study the single-particle Green function of a three-dimensional disordered Weyl semimetal using a combination of techniques. These include analytic T -matrix and renormalization group methods with complementary regimes of validity and an exact numerical approach based on the kernel polynomial technique. We show that at any nonzero disorder, Weyl excitations are not ballistic: They instead have a nonzero linewidth that for weak short-range disorder arises from nonperturbative resonant impurity scattering. Perturbative approaches find a quantum critical point between a semimetal and a metal at a finite disorder strength, but this transition is avoided due to nonperturbative effects. At moderate disorder strength and intermediate energies the avoided quantum critical point renormalizes the scaling of single-particle properties. In this regime we compute numerically the anomalous dimension of the fermion field and find η =0.13 ±0.04 , which agrees well with a renormalization group analysis (η =0.125 ). Our predictions can be directly tested by ARPES and STM measurements in samples dominated by neutral impurities.

  15. Dynamics of Single Chains of Suspended Ferrofluid Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutillas, S.; Liu, J.

    1999-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the dynamics of isolated chains made of super-paramagnetic particles under the influence of a magnetic field. The motivation of this work is to understand if the chain fluctuations exist and, if it does, how does the fluctuation affect chain aggregation. We find that single chains strongly fluctuate and that the characteristic frequency of their fluctuations is inversely proportional to the magnetic field strength. The higher the field the lower the characteristic frequency of the chain fluctuations. In the high magnetic field limit, chains behave like rigid rods without any internal motions. In this work, we used ferrofluid particles suspended in water. These particles do not have any intrinsic magnetization. Once a magnetic field is applied, a dipole moment is induced in each particle, proportional to the magnetic field. A dipolar magnetic interaction then occurs between particles. If dipole-dipole magnetic energy is higher than the thermal energy, the result is a structure change inside the dipolar fluid. The ratio of these two energies is expressed by a coupling constant lambda as: lambda = (pi(a(exp 3))(chi(exp 2))(mu(sub 0))(H(sub 0))(exp 2))/18kT Where a is the particle radius, mu(sub 0) is the vacuum magnetic permeability, H(sub 0) the applied magnetic field, k the Boltzmann constant and T the absolute temperature. If lambda > 1, magnetic particles form chains along the field direction. The lateral coalescence of several chains may form bigger aggregates especially if the particle volume fraction is high. While many studies and applications deal with the rheological properties and the structural changes of these dipolar fluids, this work focuses on the understanding of the chain dynamics. In order to probe the chain dynamics, we used dynamic light scattering (DLS) in self-beating mode as our experimental technique. The experimental geometry is such that the scattering plane is perpendicular to the magnetic field

  16. Variability in morphology, hygroscopicity, and optical properties of soot aerosols during atmospheric processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renyi; Khalizov, Alexei F.; Pagels, Joakim; Zhang, Dan; Xue, Huaxin; McMurry, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The atmospheric effects of soot aerosols include interference with radiative transfer, visibility impairment, and alteration of cloud formation and are highly sensitive to the manner by which soot is internally mixed with other aerosol constituents. We present experimental studies to show that soot particles acquire a large mass fraction of sulfuric acid during atmospheric aging, considerably altering their properties. Soot particles exposed to subsaturated sulfuric acid vapor exhibit a marked change in morphology, characterized by a decreased mobility-based diameter but an increased fractal dimension and effective density. These particles experience large hygroscopic size and mass growth at subsaturated conditions (Coating with sulfuric acid and subsequent hygroscopic growth enhance the optical properties of soot aerosols, increasing scattering by ≈10-fold and absorption by nearly 2-fold at 80% relative humidity relative to fresh particles. In addition, condensation of sulfuric acid is shown to occur at a similar rate on ambient aerosols of various types of a given mobility size, regardless of their chemical compositions and microphysical structures. Representing an important mechanism of atmospheric aging, internal mixing of soot with sulfuric acid has profound implications on visibility, human health, and direct and indirect climate forcing. PMID:18645179

  17. Emission, Structure and Optical Properties of Overfire Soot from Buoyant Turbulent Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koylu, Umit Ozgur

    The present study investigated soot and carbon monoxide emissions, and evaluated the optical properties of soot, in the overfire region of buoyant turbulent diffusion flames burning in still air. Soot and carbon monoxide emissions, and the corresponding correlation between these emissions, were studied experimentally. The optical properties of soot were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The experiments involved gas (acetylene, propylene, ethylene, propane, methane) and liquid (toluene, benzene, n-heptane, iso-propanol, ethanol, methanol) fuels. The investigation was limited to the fuel-lean (overfire) region of buoyant turbulent diffusion flames burning in still air. Measurements included flame heights, characteristic flame residence times, carbon monoxide and soot concentrations, mixture fractions, ex-situ soot structure parameters (primary particle sizes, number of primary particles in aggregates, fractal dimensions), and in-situ optical cross sections (differential scattering, total scattering, and absorption) of soot in the overfire region of buoyant turbulent diffusion flames, emphasizing conditions in the long residence time regime where these properties are independent of position in the overfire region and flame residence time. The predictions of optical cross sections for polydisperse aggregates were based on Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory for fractal aggregates; the predictions of this theory were evaluated by combining the TEM structure and the light scattering/extinction measurements. Carbon monoxide concentrations and mixture fractions were correlated in the overfire region of gas- and liquid -fueled turbulent diffusion flames. Soot volume fraction state relationships were observed for liquid fuels, supporting earlier observations for gas fuels. A strong correlation between carbon monoxide and soot concentrations was established in the fuel-lean region of both gas- and liquid-fueled turbulent diffusion flames. The structure and emission

  18. The Ice Nucleation Activity of Surface Modified Soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, Thomas; Witek, Lorenz; Felgitsch, Laura; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2017-04-01

    The ice nucleation efficiency of many important atmospheric particles remains poorly understood. Since soot is ubiquitous in the Earth's troposphere, they might have the potential to significantly impact the Earth's climate (Finlayson-Pitts and Pitts, 2000; Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998). Here we present the ice nucleation activity (INA) in immersion freezing mode of different types of soot. Therefor a CAST (combustion aerosol standard) generator was used to produce different kinds of soot samples. The CAST generator combusts a propane-air-mixture and deposits thereby produced soot on a polyvinyl fluoride filter. By varying the propane to air ratio, the amount of organic portion of the soot can be varied from black carbon (BC) with no organic content to brown carbon (BrC) with high organic content. To investigate the impact of functional sites of ice nuclei (IN), the soot samples were exposed to NO2 gas for a certain amount of time (30 to 360 minutes) to chemically modify the surface. Immersion freezing experiments were carried out in a unique reaction gadget. In this device a water-in-oil suspension (with the soot suspended in the aqueous phase) was cooled till the freezing point and was observed through a microscope (Pummer et al., 2012; Zolles et al., 2015) It was found that neither modified nor unmodified BC shows INA. On the contrary, unmodified BrC shows an INA at -32˚ C, which can be increased up to -20˚ C. The INA of BrC depends on the duration of NO2- exposure. To clarify the characteristics of the surface modifications, surface sensitive analysis like infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were carried out. Finlayson-Pitts, B. J. and Pitts, J. N. J.: Chemistry of the Upper and Lower Atmosphere, Elsevier, New York, 2000. Pummer, B. G., Bauer, H., Bernardi, J., Bleicher, S., and Grothe, H.: Suspendable macromolecules are responsible for ice nucleation activity of birch and conifer pollen, Atmos Chem Phys, 12, 2541-2550, 2012. Seinfeld, J

  19. Decay properties of high-lying single-particles modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumel, D. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Fortier, S. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Gales, S. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Guillot, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Langevin-Joliot, H. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Laurent, H. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 -Orsay (France); Maison, J.M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Vernotte, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Bordewijck, J. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, 9747 Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, S. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, 9747 Groningen (Netherlands); Krasznahorkay, A. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, 9747 Groningen (Netherlands); Crawley, G.M. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Massolo, C.P. [Universitad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Renteria, M. [Universitad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Khendriche, A. [University of Tizi-Ouzou, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    1996-03-18

    The neutron decay of high-lying single-particle states in {sup 64}Ni, {sup 90}Zr, {sup 120}Sn and {sup 208}Pb excited by means of the ({alpha},{sup 3}He) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy using the multidetector EDEN. The characteristics of this reaction are studied using inclusive spectra and angular correlation analysis. The structure located between 11 and 15 MeV in {sup 91}Zr, and between 8 and 12 MeV excitation energy in {sup 209}Pb display large departures from a pure statistical decay. The corresponding non-statistical branching ratios are compared with the results of two theoretical calculations. (orig.).

  20. Classification using diffraction patterns for single-particle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hongli; Zhang, Kaiming [Department of Biophysics, the Health Science Centre, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Meng, Xing, E-mail: xmeng101@gmail.com [Wadsworth Centre, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York 12201 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    An alternative method has been assessed; diffraction patterns derived from the single particle data set were used to perform the first round of classification in creating the initial averages for proteins data with symmetrical morphology. The test protein set was a collection of Caenorhabditis elegans small heat shock protein 17 obtained by Cryo EM, which has a tetrahedral (12-fold) symmetry. It is demonstrated that the initial classification on diffraction patterns is workable as well as the real-space classification that is based on the phase contrast. The test results show that the information from diffraction patterns has the enough details to make the initial model faithful. The potential advantage using the alternative method is twofold, the ability to handle the sets with poor signal/noise or/and that break the symmetry properties. - Highlights: • New classification method. • Create the accurate initial model. • Better in handling noisy data.

  1. Classification using diffraction patterns for single-particle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hongli; Zhang, Kaiming; Meng, Xing

    2016-01-01

    An alternative method has been assessed; diffraction patterns derived from the single particle data set were used to perform the first round of classification in creating the initial averages for proteins data with symmetrical morphology. The test protein set was a collection of Caenorhabditis elegans small heat shock protein 17 obtained by Cryo EM, which has a tetrahedral (12-fold) symmetry. It is demonstrated that the initial classification on diffraction patterns is workable as well as the real-space classification that is based on the phase contrast. The test results show that the information from diffraction patterns has the enough details to make the initial model faithful. The potential advantage using the alternative method is twofold, the ability to handle the sets with poor signal/noise or/and that break the symmetry properties. - Highlights: • New classification method. • Create the accurate initial model. • Better in handling noisy data.

  2. Single image defogging based on particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fan; Zhou, Cong; Liu, Li-jue; Tang, Jin

    2017-11-01

    Due to the lack of enough information to solve the equation of image degradation model, existing defogging methods generally introduce some parameters and set these values fixed. Inappropriate parameter setting leads to difficulty in obtaining the best defogging results for different input foggy images. Therefore, a single image defogging algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) is proposed in this letter to adaptively and automatically select optimal parameter values for image defogging algorithms. The proposed method is applied to two representative defogging algorithms by selecting the two main parameters and optimizing them using the PSO algorithm. Comparative study and qualitative evaluation demonstrate that the better quality results are obtained by using the proposed parameter selection method.

  3. Search for single photons from supersymmetric particle production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, E.; Ford, W.T.; Qi, N.; Read A.L. Jr.; Smith, J.G.; Camporesi, T.; De Sangro, R.; Marini, A.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Ronga, F.; Blume, H.T.; Hurst, R.B.; Venuti, J.P.; Wald, H.B.; Weinstein, R.; Band, H.R.; Gettner, M.W.; Goderre, G.P.; Meyer, O.A.; Moromisato, J.H.; Polvado, R.O.; Shambroom, W.D.; Sleeman, J.C.; von Goeler, E.; Ash, W.W.; Chadwick, G.B.; Clearwater, S.H.; Coombes, R.W.; Kaye, H.S.; Lau, K.H.; Leedy, R.E.; Lynch, H.L.; Messner, R.L.; Moss, L.J.; Muller, F.; Nelson, H.N.; Ritson, D.M.; Rosenberg, L.J.; Wiser, D.E.; Zdarko, R.W.; Groom, D.E.; Lee, H.Y.; Delfino, M.C.; Heltsley, B.K.; Johnson, J.R.; Lavine, T.L.; Maruyama, T.; Prepost, R.

    1985-03-18

    A search in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation for final states which contain only a single energetic photon has been performed at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV with the MAC detector at PEP. The upper limit on an anomalous signal has been interpreted in terms of mass limits for supersymmetric particles under the assumption of radiative pair paroduction of either supersymmetric photons or neutrinos. For the supersymmetric electron (e) this limit is m/sub e/>37 GeV/c/sup 2/ at the 90% confidence level if M/sub e//sub L/ = m/sub e//sub R/ and the supersymmetric photo (gamma-tilde) has m/sub gamma-tilde/ = 0.

  4. Investigation of optical properties of aging soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, F.; Thomson, K. A.; Smallwood, G. J.

    2011-08-01

    The optical properties of soot, in particular the propensity of soot to absorb and scatter light as a function of wavelength, are key parameters for the correct interpretation of soot optical diagnostics. An overview of the data available in the literature highlights the differences in the reported optical properties of aging soot. In many cases, the properties of mature soot are used when evaluating in-flame soot but this assumption might not be suitable for all conditions and should be checked. This need has been demonstrated by performed spectral resolved line-of-sight attenuation (Spec-LOSA) measurements on an ethylene/air premixed and non-premixed flame. Transmission electron microscopy of thermophoretically sampled soot was also performed to qualify the soot aging and to establish soot morphology in order to correct light extinction coefficients for the scattering contribution. The measured refractive index absorption function, E( m) λ , showed a very strong spectral dependence which also varied with height above the burner for both flames. However, above 700 nm, the slope of the refractive index function was near zero for both flames and all measurement heights. The upper visible and near infrared wavelengths are therefore recommended for soot optical measurements.

  5. Microphysical Properties of Single Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Grazia; Song, Young-Chul; Pereira, Kelly; Hamilton, Jacqueline; Topping, David; Reid, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) deriving from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can account for a substantial fraction of the overall atmospheric aerosol mass.[1] Therefore, the investigation of SOA microphysical properties is crucial to better comprehend their role in the atmospheric processes they are involved in. This works describes a single particle approach to accurately characterise the hygroscopic response, the optical properties and the gas-particle partitioning kinetics of water and semivolatile components for laboratory generated SOA. SOA was generated from the oxidation of different VOCs precursors (e.g. α-pinene, toluene) in a photo-chemical flow reactor, which consists of a temperature and relative humidity controlled 300 L polyvinyl fluoride bag. Known VOC, NOx and ozone concentrations are introduced in the chamber and UV irradiation is performed by means of a Hg pen-ray. SOA samples were collected with an electrical low pressure impactor, wrapped in aluminium foil and kept refrigerated at -20°C. SOA samples were extracted in a 1:1 water/methanol mixture. Single charged SOA particles were generated from the obtained solution using a microdispenser and confined within an electrodynamic balance (EDB), where they sit in a T (250-320 K) and RH (0-95%) controlled nitrogen flow. Suspended droplets are irradiated with a 532 nm laser and the evolving angularly resolved scattered light is used to keep track of changes in droplet size. One of the key features of this experimental approach is that very little SOA solution is required because of the small volumes needed to load the dispensers (evaporation kinetics experiments (CK-EDB) of suspended probe and sample droplets.[2] The variation of the refractive index of SOA droplets following to water or SVOCs evaporative loss was measured as a function of water activity by fitting the collected light scattering patterns with a generated Mie-Theory library of phase functions.[3] Long trapping

  6. Soot measurements for diesel and biodiesel spray combustion under high temperature highly diluted ambient conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ji

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel, namely fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and diesel fuel combustion in a constant volume chamber using a two-color technique. The KL factor is a parameter for soot concentration, where K is an absorption coefficient and proportional to the number density of soot particles, L is the geometric thickness of the flame along the optical detection axis, and KL factor is proportional to soot volume fraction. The main objective is to explore a combustion regime called high-temperature and highly-diluted combustion (HTHDC) and compare it with the conventional and low-temperature combustion (LTC) modes. The three different combustion regimes are implemented under different ambient temperatures (800 K, 1000 K, and 1400 K) and ambient oxygen concentrations (10%, 15%, and 21%). Results are presented in terms of soot temperature and KL factor images, time-resolved pixel-averaged soot temperature, KL factor, and spatially integrated KL factor over the soot area. The time-averaged results for these three regimes are compared for both diesel and biodiesel fuels. Results show complex combined effects of the ambient temperature and oxygen concentration, and that two-color temperature for the HTHDC mode at the 10% oxygen level can actually be lower than the conventional mode. Increasing ambient oxygen and temperature increases soot temperature. Diesel fuel results in higher soot temperature than biodiesel for all three regimes. Results also show that diesel and biodiesel fuels have very different burning and sooting behavior under the three different combustion regimes. For diesel fuel, the HTHDC regime offers better results in terms of lower soot than the conventional and LTC regimes, and the 10% O2, 1400 K ambient condition shows the lowest soot concentration while maintaining a moderate two-color temperature. For biodiesel, the 15% O2, 800 K ambient condition shows some advantages in terms of reducing soot

  7. Understanding and predicting soot generation in turbulent non-premixed jet flames.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hai (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA); Kook, Sanghoon; Doom, Jeffrey; Oefelein, Joseph Charles; Zhang, Jiayao; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Schefer, Robert W.; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2010-10-01

    This report documents the results of a project funded by DoD's Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) on the science behind development of predictive models for soot emission from gas turbine engines. Measurements of soot formation were performed in laminar flat premixed flames and turbulent non-premixed jet flames at 1 atm pressure and in turbulent liquid spray flames under representative conditions for takeoff in a gas turbine engine. The laminar flames and open jet flames used both ethylene and a prevaporized JP-8 surrogate fuel composed of n-dodecane and m-xylene. The pressurized turbulent jet flame measurements used the JP-8 surrogate fuel and compared its combustion and sooting characteristics to a world-average JP-8 fuel sample. The pressurized jet flame measurements demonstrated that the surrogate was representative of JP-8, with a somewhat higher tendency to soot formation. The premixed flame measurements revealed that flame temperature has a strong impact on the rate of soot nucleation and particle coagulation, but little sensitivity in the overall trends was found with different fuels. An extensive array of non-intrusive optical and laser-based measurements was performed in turbulent non-premixed jet flames established on specially designed piloted burners. Soot concentration data was collected throughout the flames, together with instantaneous images showing the relationship between soot and the OH radical and soot and PAH. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for ethylene combustion, including fuel-rich chemistry and benzene formation steps, was compiled, validated, and reduced. The reduced ethylene mechanism was incorporated into a high-fidelity LES code, together with a moment-based soot model and models for thermal radiation, to evaluate the ability of the chemistry and soot models to predict soot formation in the jet diffusion flame. The LES results highlight the importance of including an optically-thick radiation

  8. Analysis of turbulence and surface growth models on the estimation of soot level in ethylene non-premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunardi, Y.; Munawar, Edi; Rinaldi, Wahyu; Razali, Asbar; Iskandar, Elwina; Fairweather, M.

    2018-02-01

    Soot prediction in a combustion system has become a subject of attention, as many factors influence its accuracy. An accurate temperature prediction will likely yield better soot predictions, since the inception, growth and destruction of the soot are affected by the temperature. This paper reported the study on the influences of turbulence closure and surface growth models on the prediction of soot levels in turbulent flames. The results demonstrated that a substantial distinction was observed in terms of temperature predictions derived using the k-ɛ and the Reynolds stress models, for the two ethylene flames studied here amongst the four types of surface growth rate model investigated, the assumption of the soot surface growth rate proportional to the particle number density, but independent on the surface area of soot particles, f ( A s ) = ρ N s , yields in closest agreement with the radial data. Without any adjustment to the constants in the surface growth term, other approaches where the surface growth directly proportional to the surface area and square root of surface area, f ( A s ) = A s and f ( A s ) = √ A s , result in an under- prediction of soot volume fraction. These results suggest that predictions of soot volume fraction are sensitive to the modelling of surface growth.

  9. Soot Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, proplyene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, 02, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable, because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  10. Soot Oxidation in Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, propylene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2,C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962), because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  11. Damköhler number effects on soot formation and growth in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Damköhler number on turbulent nonpremixed sooting flames is investigated via large scale direct numerical simulation in three-dimensional n-heptane/air jet flames at a jet Reynolds number of 15,000 and at three different Damköhler numbers. A reduced chemical mechanism, which includes the soot precursor naphthalene, and a high-order method of moments are employed. At the highest Damköhler number, local extinction is negligible, while flames holes are observed in the two lowest Damköhler number cases. Compared to temperature and other species controlled by fuel oxidation chemistry, naphthalene is found to be affected more significantly by the Damköhler number. Consequently, the overall soot mass fraction decreases by more than one order of magnitude for a fourfold decrease of the Damköhler number. On the contrary, the overall number density of soot particles is approximately the same, but its distribution in mixture fraction space is different in the three cases. The total soot mass growth rate is found to be proportional to the Damköhler number. In the two lowest Da number cases, soot leakage across the flame is observed. Leveraging Lagrangian statistics, it is concluded that soot leakage is due to patches of soot that cross the stoichiometric surface through flame holes. These results show the leading order effects of turbulent mixing in controlling the dynamics of soot in turbulent flames. © 2014 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND THEIR GROWTH TO SOOT -A REVIEW OF CHEMICAL REACTION PATHWAYS. (R824970)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The generation by combustion processes of airborne species of current health concern such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot particles necessitates a detailed understanding of chemical reaction pathways responsible for their formation. The present review discus...

  13. Development of a novel heterogeneous flow reactor -- Soot formation and nanoparticle catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Joaquin

    The development of novel experimental approaches to investigate fundamental surface kinetics is presented. Specifically, fundamental soot formation and surface catalysis processes are examined in isolation from other competing processes. In terms of soot formation, two experimental techniques are presented: the Burner Stabilized Stagnation (BSS) flame configuration is extended to isolate the effect of the parent fuel structure on soot formation and the fundamental rate of surface oxidation for nascent soot is measured in a novel aerosol flow reactor. In terms of nanoparticles, the physical and chemical properties of freely suspended nanoparticles are investigated in a novel aerosol flow reactor for methane oxidation catalyzed by palladium. The role of parent fuel structure within soot formation is examined by following the time resolved formation nascent soot from the onset of nucleation to later growth stages for premixed BSS flames. Specifically, the evolution of the detailed particle size distribution function (PSDF) is compared for butanol, butane and C6 hydrocarbons in two separate studies where the C/O ratio and temperature are fixed. Under this constraint, the overall sooting process were comparable as evidenced by similar time resolved bimodal PSDF. However, the nucleation time and the persistence of nucleation with time is strongly dependent upon the structure of the parent fuel. For the C6 hydrocarbon fuels, the fastest onset of soot nucleation is observed in cyclohexane and benzene flames and this may be due to significant aromatic formation that is predicted in the pre-flame region. In addition, the evolution of the PSDF shows that nucleation ends sooner in cylclohexane and benzene flames and this may be due to relatively quick depletion of soot precursors such as acetylene and benzene. Interestingly,within the butanol fuels studied the effect of the branched chain in i-butanol and i-butane was more significant than the presence of fuel bound oxygen. A

  14. Mass spectra features of biomass burning boiler and coal burning boiler emitted particles by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiao; Li, Mei; Shi, Guoliang; Wang, Haiting; Ma, Xian; Wu, Jianhui; Shi, Xurong; Feng, Yinchang

    2017-11-15

    In this study, single particle mass spectra signatures of both coal burning boiler and biomass burning boiler emitted particles were studied. Particle samples were suspended in clean Resuspension Chamber, and analyzed by ELPI and SPAMS simultaneously. The size distribution of BBB (biomass burning boiler sample) and CBB (coal burning boiler sample) are different, as BBB peaks at smaller size, and CBB peaks at larger size. Mass spectra signatures of two samples were studied by analyzing the average mass spectrum of each particle cluster extracted by ART-2a in different size ranges. In conclusion, BBB sample mostly consists of OC and EC containing particles, and a small fraction of K-rich particles in the size range of 0.2-0.5μm. In 0.5-1.0μm, BBB sample consists of EC, OC, K-rich and Al_Silicate containing particles; CBB sample consists of EC, ECOC containing particles, while Al_Silicate (including Al_Ca_Ti_Silicate, Al_Ti_Silicate, Al_Silicate) containing particles got higher fractions as size increase. The similarity of single particle mass spectrum signatures between two samples were studied by analyzing the dot product, results indicated that part of the single particle mass spectra of two samples in the same size range are similar, which bring challenge to the future source apportionment activity by using single particle aerosol mass spectrometer. Results of this study will provide physicochemical information of important sources which contribute to particle pollution, and will support source apportionment activities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Development of high fidelity soot aerosol dynamics models using method of moments with interpolative closure

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, Subrata P.

    2014-01-28

    The method of moments with interpolative closure (MOMIC) for soot formation and growth provides a detailed modeling framework maintaining a good balance in generality, accuracy, robustness, and computational efficiency. This study presents several computational issues in the development and implementation of the MOMIC-based soot modeling for direct numerical simulations (DNS). The issues of concern include a wide dynamic range of numbers, choice of normalization, high effective Schmidt number of soot particles, and realizability of the soot particle size distribution function (PSDF). These problems are not unique to DNS, but they are often exacerbated by the high-order numerical schemes used in DNS. Four specific issues are discussed in this article: the treatment of soot diffusion, choice of interpolation scheme for MOMIC, an approach to deal with strongly oxidizing environments, and realizability of the PSDF. General, robust, and stable approaches are sought to address these issues, minimizing the use of ad hoc treatments such as clipping. The solutions proposed and demonstrated here are being applied to generate new physical insight into complex turbulence-chemistry-soot-radiation interactions in turbulent reacting flows using DNS. © 2014 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  16. Modelling maximum adsorption capacities of soot and soot-like materials for PAHs and PCBs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van P.C.M.; Jonker, M.T.O.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that not partitioning but adsorption is the main mechanism for sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds to soot and soot-like materials. For compounds that adsorb by van der Waals forces only, variation in soot-water distribution coefficients will result from differences

  17. Real-Time Measurement of Fluorescence Spectra From Single Airborne Biological Particles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Steven

    1999-01-01

    ... (total and spectrally dispersed) of individual airborne particles, and describe our present system, which can measure fluorescence spectra or single micrometer-sized bioaerosol particles with good signal-to-noise ratios...

  18. Universal large deviations for the tagged particle in single-file motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Chaitra; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Dhar, Abhishek

    2014-09-19

    We consider a gas of point particles moving in a one-dimensional channel with a hard-core interparticle interaction that prevents particle crossings--this is called single-file motion. Starting from equilibrium initial conditions we observe the motion of a tagged particle. It is well known that if the individual particle dynamics is diffusive, then the tagged particle motion is subdiffusive, while for ballistic particle dynamics, the tagged particle motion is diffusive. Here we compute the exact large deviation function for the tagged particle displacement and show that this is universal, independent of the individual dynamics.

  19. Single-particle characterization of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA: evidence for non-uniform mixing of high molecular weight organics and potassium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Y. Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA can be emitted from natural forest fires and human activities such as agricultural burning and domestic energy generation. BBOA is strongly associated with atmospheric brown carbon (BrC that absorbs near-ultraviolet and visible light, resulting in significant impacts on regional visibility degradation and radiative forcing. The mixing state of BBOA can play a critical role in the prediction of aerosol optical properties. In this work, single-particle measurements from a Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer coupled with a light scattering module (LS-SP-AMS were performed to examine the mixing state of BBOA, refractory black carbon (rBC, and potassium (K, a tracer for biomass burning aerosol in an air mass influenced by wildfire emissions transported from northern Québec to Toronto, representing aged biomass burning plumes. Cluster analysis of single-particle measurements identified five BBOA-related particle types. rBC accounted for 3–14 wt % of these particle types on average. Only one particle type exhibited a strong ion signal for K+, with mass spectra characterized by low molecular weight organic species. The remaining four particle types were classified based on the apparent molecular weight of the BBOA constituents. Two particle types were associated with low potassium content and significant amounts of high molecular weight (HMW organic compounds. Our observations indicate non-uniform mixing of particles within a biomass burning plume in terms of molecular weight and illustrate that HMW BBOA can be a key contributor to low-volatility BrC observed in BBOA particles. The average mass absorption efficiency of low-volatility BBOA is about 0.8–1.1 m2 g−1 based on a theoretical closure calculation. Our estimates indicate that low-volatility BBOA contributes ∼ 33–44 % of thermo-processed particle absorption at 405 nm; and almost all of the BBOA absorption was associated with low

  20. Smog chamber study on aging of combustion soot in isoprene/SO2/NOx system: Changes of mass, size, effective density, morphology and mixing state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kangwei; Chen, Linghong; Han, Ke; Lv, Biao; Bao, Kaiji; Wu, Xuecheng; Gao, Xiang; Cen, Kefa

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric soot aging process is always accompanied by secondary particle formation, which is a comprehensive environmental issue that deserves great attention. On one hand, aging of primary soot could change its own physicochemical properties; on the other hand, complex air pollution caused by pollutant emission from various sources (e.g., vehicle exhausts, coal-fired flue gases and biogenic VOCs emission) may contribute to secondary particle formation onto primary particle surface. In this study, aging of combustion soot in isoprene/SO2/NOx system was investigated under controlled laboratory conditions in several smog chamber experiments. During the evolution of soot, several physical properties such as mass, size, effective density, morphology and mixing state were determined simultaneously by an integrated aerosol analytical system of Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), Differential Mobility Analyzer-Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer-Condensation Particle Counter (DMA-APM-CPC) and Transmission Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy-dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (TEM/EDX) techniques. Here, based on the experimental results of soot aging under different gas-phase composition and relative humidity (RH), we firstly proposed possible aging pathways of soot in isoprene/SO2/NOx system. A synergetic effect was speculated to exist between SO2 and isoprene on soot aging process, which led to more secondary particle formation. At the same time, TEM/EDX analysis showed that a competitive mechanism between H2SO4(g) and isoprene oxidation vapor may exist: H2SO4(g) firstly condensed onto fresh soot, then an acceleration of isoprene oxidation products formed onto H2SO4 pre-coated soot. In isoprene/SO2/NOx system, high RH conditions could contribute to soot aging and new particle formation. The changes of effective density and dynamic shape factor of soot also indicated that high RH conditions could accelerate soot aging process, and led chain-like soot into more spherical

  1. The single-particle microbeam facility at CEA-Saclay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodja, H. [DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); CNRS, UMR9956, Laboratoire Pierre Suee, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)], E-mail: hicham.khodja@cea.fr; Hanot, M.; Carriere, M.; Hoarau, J. [DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); CNRS, UMR9956, Laboratoire Pierre Suee, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Angulo, J.F. [DSV, IRCM, SRO, Laboratoire de Genetique de la Radiosensibilite, F-92265 Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2009-06-15

    Low dose and non-targeted effect studies continue to attract the attention of a growing number of radiobiologists. Experimental setups based on light ion microbeams constitute a tool of choice for this kind of investigations. However, a careful attention must be given to experimental conditions, as setup-induced stress levels should be well below those induced by the irradiation itself. Here, we present the current status of the single-particle microbeam facility that has been developed these last years at the nuclear microprobe of Saclay. The driving idea was to build a facility in which local irradiation studies are performed in an environment close to cellular biology standards. This facility includes unique features, such as (i) a compact setup that allows easy access and vertical irradiation mode, (ii) a collimated beam that can be mechanically positioned under the desired cells at a very fast speed, avoiding the requirement of a focusing element and (iii) a controlled environment (temperature, CO{sub 2}, humidity) that allows performing of very long term experiments on cultured cells. Fluorescent techniques are implemented and permit in situ monitoring of cellular responses to irradiations. Several radiobiological studies are already underway and this will be illustrated with recent results regarding DNA damage and reactive oxygen species signaling time courses following targeted irradiations.

  2. Surface chemistry and morphology in single particle optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiz-Kanik, Fulya; Sevenler, Derin Deniz; Ünlü, Neşe Lortlar; Chiari, Marcella; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2017-05-01

    Biological nanoparticles such as viruses and exosomes are important biomarkers for a range of medical conditions, from infectious diseases to cancer. Biological sensors that detect whole viruses and exosomes with high specificity, yet without additional labeling, are promising because they reduce the complexity of sample preparation and may improve measurement quality by retaining information about nanoscale physical structure of the bio-nanoparticle (BNP). Towards this end, a variety of BNP biosensor technologies have been developed, several of which are capable of enumerating the precise number of detected viruses or exosomes and analyzing physical properties of each individual particle. Optical imaging techniques are promising candidates among broad range of label-free nanoparticle detectors. These imaging BNP sensors detect the binding of single nanoparticles on a flat surface functionalized with a specific capture molecule or an array of multiplexed capture probes. The functionalization step confers all molecular specificity for the sensor's target but can introduce an unforeseen problem; a rough and inhomogeneous surface coating can be a source of noise, as these sensors detect small local changes in optical refractive index. In this paper, we review several optical technologies for label-free BNP detectors with a focus on imaging systems. We compare the surface-imaging methods including dark-field, surface plasmon resonance imaging and interference reflectance imaging. We discuss the importance of ensuring consistently uniform and smooth surface coatings of capture molecules for these types of biosensors and finally summarize several methods that have been developed towards addressing this challenge.

  3. Effects of Structure and Hydrodynamics on the Sooting Behavior of Spherical Microgravity Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Urban, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent experimental, numerical and analytical work has shown that the stoichiometric mixture fraction (Z(sub st)) can have a profound effect on soot formation in diffusion flames. These findings were obtained at constant flame temperature (T(sub ad)), employing the approach described in Du and Axelbaum (1995, 1996). For example, a fuel mixture containing 1 mole of ethylene and 11.28 moles of nitrogen burning in pure oxygen ((Z(sub st)) = 0.78) has the same adiabatic flame temperature (2370 K) as that of pure ethylene burning in air ((Z(sub st)) = 0.064). An important finding of these works was that at sufficiently high (Z(sub st)), flames remain blue as strain rate approaches zero in counterflow flames, or as flame height and residence time approach infinity in coflowing flames. Lin and Faeth (1996a) coined the term permanently blue to describe such flames. Two theories have been proposed to explain the appearance of permanently-blue flames at high (Z(sub st)). They are based on (1) hydrodynamics and (2) flame structure. Previous experimental studies in normal gravity are not definitive as to which, if either, mechanism is dominant because both hydrodynamics and structure suppress soot formation at high (Z(sub st)) in coflowing and counterflowing diffusion flames. In counterflow flames with (Z(sub st)) 0.5, convection at the flame is toward the oxidizer, thus enhancing soot oxidization. Thus, in counterflow flames, hydrodynamics causes soot to be convected towards the oxidizer at high (Z(sub st)) which suppresses soot formation. Axelbaum and co-workers maintain that while the direction of convection can impact soot growth and oxidation, these processes alone cannot cause permanently-blue flames. Soot growth and oxidation are dependent on the existence of soot particles and the presence of soot is invariably accompanied by yellow luminosity. Soot-particle inception, on the other hand, arises from gas-phase reactions and its dependence on flow direction is weak

  4. Single-Particle Measurements of Midlatitude Black Carbon and Light-Scattering Aerosols from the Boundary Layer to the Lower Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, J. P.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Thomson, D. S.; Watts, L. A.; Wilson, J. C.; Reeves, J. M.; Darbeheshti, M.; Baumgardner, D. G.; Kok, G. L.; hide

    2006-01-01

    A single-particle soot photometer (SP2) was flown on a NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft in November 2004 from Houston, Texas. The SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence to detect individual black carbon (BC) particles in an air sample in the mass range of approx.3-300 fg (approx.0.15-0.7 microns volume equivalent diameter). Scattered light is used to size the remaining non-BC aerosols in the range of approx.0.17-0.7 microns diameter. We present profiles of both aerosol types from the boundary layer to the lower stratosphere from two midlatitude flights. Results for total aerosol amounts in the size range detected by the SP2 are in good agreement with typical particle spectrometer measurements in the same region. All ambient incandescing particles were identified as BC because their incandescence properties matched those of laboratory-generated BC aerosol. Approximately 40% of these BC particles showed evidence of internal mixing (e.g., coating). Throughout profiles between 5 and 18.7 km, BC particles were less than a few percent of total aerosol number, and black carbon aerosol (BCA) mass mixing ratio showed a constant gradient with altitude above 5 km. SP2 data was compared to results from the ECHAM4/MADE and LmDzT-INCA global aerosol models. The comparison will help resolve the important systematic differences in model aerosol processes that determine BCA loadings. Further intercomparisons of models and measurements as presented here will improve the accuracy of the radiative forcing contribution from BCA.

  5. Mathematical modelling of the combustion of a single wood particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porteiro, J.; Miguez, J.L.; Granada, E.; Moran, J.C. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Maquinas y Motores Termicos y Fluidos. Universidad de Vigo, Lagoas Marcosende 9 36200 Vigo (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    A mathematical model describing the thermal degradation of densified biomass particles is presented here. The model uses a novel discretisation scheme and combines intra-particle combustion processes with extra-particle transport processes, thereby including thermal and diffusional control mechanisms. The influence of structural changes on the physical-thermal properties of wood in its different stages is studied together with shrinkage of the particle during its degradation. The model is used to compare the predicted data with data on the mass loss dynamics and internal temperature of several particles from previous works and relevant literature, with good agreement. (author)

  6. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Single-Particle Subcellular Irradiations at the MIT Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-01-01

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube

  7. Morphological study of fluorescent carbon Nanoparticles (F-CNPs) from ground coffee waste soot oxidation by diluted acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, S.; Tjandra, S.; Joshua, J.; Wirjosentono, B.

    2018-02-01

    Coffee ground waste utilization for fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (F-CNPs) through soot oxidation with diluted HNO3 has been conducted. Soot was obtained through three different treatments to coffee ground waste; which was burned in furnaceat 550°C and 650°C and directly burned in a heat-proofcontainer. Then they were analyzed morphologically with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) instrument. Soot from direct burning indicated the optimum result where it has denser pores compared to other two soots. Soot obtained from direct burning was refluxed in diluted HNO3 for 12 hours to perform the oxidation. Yellowish brown supernatant was later observed which lead to green fluorescent under the UV light. F-CNPs characterization was done in Transmission Electron Microscopy, which showed that 7.4-23.4 nm of particle size were distributed.

  8. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  9. Soot in the atmosphere and snow surface of Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, S.G.; Clarke, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of snow collected near the south pole during January and February 1986 were analyzed for the presence of light-absorbing particles by passing the melted snow through a nuclepore filter. Transmission of light through the filter showed that snow far from the station contains the equivalent of 0.1-0.3 ng of carbon per gram of snow (ng/g). Samples of ambient air were filtered and found to contain about 1-2 ng of carbon per kilogram of air, giving a scavenging ratio of about 150. The snow downwind of the station exhibited a well-defined plume of soot due to the burning of diesel fuel, but even in the center of the plume 1 km downwind, the soot concentration was only 3 ng/g, too small to affect snow albedo significantly. Measurements of snow albedo near large inland stations are therefore probably representative of their surrounding regions

  10. Experimental Study on Effects of Particle Shape and Operating Conditions on Combustion Characteristics of Single Biomass Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momeni, M.; Yin, Chungen; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the ignition, devolatilization, and burnout of single biomass particles of various shapes and sizes under process conditions that are similar to those in an industrial combustor. A chargecoupled device (CCD) camera is used to record the whole...... combustion process. For the particles with similar volume (mass), cylindrical particles are found to lose mass faster than spherical particles and the burnout time is shortened by increasing the particle aspect ratio (surface area). The conversion times of cylindrical particles with almost the same surface...... area/volume ratio are very close to each other. The ignition, devolatilization, and burnout times of cylindrical particles are also affected by the oxidizer temperature and oxygen concentration, in which the oxygen concentration is found to have a more pronounced effect on the conversion times at lower...

  11. Single particle chemical composition and shape of fresh and aged Saharan dust in Morocco and at Cape Verde Islands during SAMUM I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandler, K.; Lieke, K.; Schütz, L.; Deutscher, C.; Ebert, M.; Jaenicke, R.; Müller-Ebert, D.; Weinbruch, S.

    2009-04-01

    The Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) is focussed to the understanding of the radiative effects of mineral dust. During the SAMUM 2006 field campaign at Tinfou, southern Morocco, chemical and mineralogical properties of fresh desert aerosols were measured. The winter campaign of Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment II was based in Praia, Island of Santiago, Cape Verde. This second field campaign was dedicated to the investigation of transported Saharan Mineral Dust. Aerosol particles between 100 nm and 500 μm (Morocco) respectively 50 μm (Cape Verde) in diameter were collected by nozzle and body impactors and in a sedimentation trap. The particles were investigated by electron microscopic single particle analysis and attached energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Chemical properties as well as size and shape for each particle were recorded. Three size regimes are identified in the aerosol at Tinfou: Smaller than 500 nm in diameter, the aerosol consists of sulfates and mineral dust. Larger than 500 nm up to 50 μm, mineral dust dominates, consisting mainly of silicates, and - to a lesser extent - carbonates and quartz. Larger than 50 μm, approximately half of the particles consist of quartz. Time series of the elemental composition show a moderate temporal variability of the major compounds. Calcium-dominated particles are enhanced during advection from a prominent dust source in Northern Africa (Chott El Djerid and surroundings). At Praia, the boundary layer aerosol consists of a superposition of mineral dust, marine aerosol and ammonium sulfate, soot, and other sulfates as well as mixtures thereof. During low-dust periods, the aerosol is dominated by sea salt. During dust events, mineral dust takes over the majority of the particle mass up to 90 %. Particles smaller 500 nm in diameter always show a significant abundance of ammonium sulfate. The particle aspect ratio was measured for all analyzed particles. Its size dependence reflects that of the chemical

  12. Raman Spectroscopy of Optically Trapped Single Biological Micro-Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Redding

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The combination of optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for the study, characterization, and identification of biological micro-particles. In essence, optical trapping helps to overcome the limitation imposed by the relative inefficiency of the Raman scattering process. This allows Raman spectroscopy to be applied to individual biological particles in air and in liquid, providing the potential for particle identification with high specificity, longitudinal studies of changes in particle composition, and characterization of the heterogeneity of individual particles in a population. In this review, we introduce the techniques used to integrate Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping in order to study individual biological particles in liquid and air. We then provide an overview of some of the most promising applications of this technique, highlighting the unique types of measurements enabled by the combination of Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping. Finally, we present a brief discussion of future research directions in the field.

  13. Aging induced changes on NEXAFS fingerprints in individual combustion particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zelenay

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles can significantly influence the Earth's climate by absorbing and scattering solar radiation as well as by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. However, despite their environmental (as well as economic and political importance, the way these properties are affected by atmospheric processing of the combustion exhaust gases is still a subject of discussion. In this work, individual soot particles emitted from two different vehicles, a EURO 2 transporter, a EURO 3 passenger car, and a wood stove were investigated on a single-particle basis. The emitted exhaust, including the particulate and the gas phase, was processed in a smog chamber with artificial solar radiation. Single particle specimens of both unprocessed and aged soot were characterized using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS and scanning electron microscopy. Comparison of NEXAFS spectra from the unprocessed particles and those resulting from exhaust photooxidation in the chamber revealed changes in the carbon functional group content. For the wood stove emissions, these changes were minor, related to the relatively mild oxidation conditions. For the EURO 2 transporter emissions, the most apparent change was that of carboxylic carbon from oxidized organic compounds condensing on the primary soot particles. For the EURO 3 car emissions oxidation of primary soot particles upon photochemical aging has likely contributed as well. Overall, the changes in the NEXAFS fingerprints were in qualitative agreement with data from an aerosol mass spectrometer. Furthermore, by taking full advantage of our in situ microreactor concept, we show that the soot particles from all three combustion sources changed their ability to take up water under humid conditions upon photochemical aging of the exhaust. Due to the selectivity and sensitivity of the NEXAFS technique for the water mass, also small amounts of water taken up into the internal voids of agglomerated

  14. Single particle dynamics and nonlinear resonances in circular accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to single particle dynamics in circular accelerators with an emphasis on nonlinear resonances. We begin with the Hamiltonian and the equations of motion in the neighborhood of the design orbit. In the linear theory this yields linear betatron oscillations about a closed orbit. It is useful then to introduce the action-angle variables of the linear problem. Next we discuss the nonlinear terms which are present in an actual accelerator, and in particular, we motivate the inclusion of sextupoles to cure chromatic effects. To study the effects of the nonlinear terms, we next discuss canonical perturbation theory which leads us to nonlinear resonances. After showing a few examples of perturbation theory, we abandon it when very close to a resonance. This leads to the study of an isolated resonance in one degree of freedom with a 'time'-dependent Hamiltonian. We see the familiar resonance structure in phase space which is simply closed islands when the nonlinear amplitude dependence of the frequency or 'tune' is included. To show the limits of the validity of the isolated resonance approximation, we discuss two criteria for the onset of chaotic motion. Finally, we study an isolated coupling resonance in two degrees of freedom with a 'time'-dependent Hamiltonian and calculate the two invariants in this case. This leads to a surface of section which is a 2-torus in 4-dimensional phase space. However, we show that it remains a 2-torus when projected into particular 3-dimensional subspaces, and thus can be viewed in perspective

  15. NASA: Black soot fuels global warming

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    New research from NASA's Goddard Space Center scientists suggests emissions of black soot have been altering the way sunlight reflects off Earth's snow. The research indicates the soot could be responsible for as much as 25 percent of global warming over the past century (assorted news items, 1 paragraph each).

  16. Considerations of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion in single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Koon-Sing; Lui, Kwok-On; Lee, Kin-Ho; Chan, Wing-Tat, E-mail: wtchan@hku.hk

    2013-11-01

    The intensity of individual gold nanoparticles with nominal diameters of 80, 100, 150, and 200 nm was measured using single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Since the particles are not perfectly monodisperse, a distribution of ICP-MS intensity was obtained for each nominal diameter. The distribution of particle mass was determined from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of the particles. The distribution of ICP-MS intensity and the distribution of particle mass for each nominal diameter were correlated to give a calibration curve. The calibration curves are linear, but the slope decreases as the nominal diameter increases. The reduced slope is probably due to a smaller degree of vaporization of the large particles. In addition to the degree of particle vaporization, the rate of analyte diffusion in the ICP is an important factor that determines the measured ICP-MS intensity. Simulated ICP-MS intensity versus particle size was calculated using a simple computer program that accounts for the vaporization rate of the gold nanoparticles and the diffusion rate and degree of ionization of the gold atoms. The curvature of the simulated calibration curves changes with sampling depth because the effects of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion on the ICP-MS intensity are dependent on the residence time of the particle in the ICP. Calibration curves of four hypothetical particles representing the four combinations of high and low boiling points (2000 and 4000 K) and high and low analyte diffusion rates (atomic masses of 10 and 200 Da) were calculated to further illustrate the relative effects of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion. The simulated calibration curves show that the sensitivity of single-particle ICP-MS is smaller than that of the ICP-MS measurement of continuous flow of standard solutions by a factor of 2 or more. Calibration using continuous flow of standard solution is semi-quantitative at best. An

  17. Measuring the temporal evolution of aerosol composition in a remote marine environment influenced by Saharan dust outflow using a new single particle mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Nicholas; Williams, Paul; Flynn, Michael; Taylor, Jonathan; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    Refractory material constitutes a significant fraction of the atmospheric aerosol burden and has a strong influence on climate through the direct radiative effect and aerosol-cloud interactions, particularly in cold and mixed phase clouds. Composition of refractory aerosols is traditionally measured using off-line analytical techniques such as filter analyses. However, when using off-line techniques the temporal evolution of the data set is lost, meaning the measurements are difficult to relate to atmospheric processes. Recently, single particle mass spectrometry (SPMS) has proven a useful tool for the on-line study of refractory aerosols with the ability to probe size resolved chemical composition with high temporal resolution on a particle by particle basis. A new Laser Ablation Aerosol Time-of-Flight (LAAP-TOF) SPMS instrument with a modified optical detection system was deployed for ground based measurements at Praia, Cape Verde during the Ice in Cloud - Dust (ICE-D) multi-platform campaign in August 2015. A primary aim of the project was to evaluate the impact of Saharan dust on ice nucleation in mixed phase clouds. The instrument was operated over a 16 day period in which several hundred thousand single particle mass spectra were obtained from air masses with back trajectories traversing the Mid-Atlantic, Sahara Desert and West Africa. The data presented indicate external mixtures of sea salt and silicate mineral dust internally mixed with secondary species that are consistent with long range transport to a remote marine environment. The composition and size distributions measured with the LAAP-TOF are compared with measurements from an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS), Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), and data from SEM-EDX analysis of filter samples. The particle number fraction identified as silicate mineral from the mass spectra correlates with a fraction of the incandescent particles measured with the SP2. We discuss the suitability of the modified

  18. Optical characterization of multi-scale morphologically complex heterogeneous media - Application to snow with soot impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaoyu; Haussener, Sophia

    2018-02-01

    A multi-scale methodology for the radiative transfer analysis of heterogeneous media composed of morphologically-complex components on two distinct scales is presented. The methodology incorporates the exact morphology at the various scales and utilizes volume-averaging approaches with the corresponding effective properties to couple the scales. At the continuum level, the volume-averaged coupled radiative transfer equations are solved utilizing (i) effective radiative transport properties obtained by direct Monte Carlo simulations at the pore level, and (ii) averaged bulk material properties obtained at particle level by Lorenz-Mie theory or discrete dipole approximation calculations. This model is applied to a soot-contaminated snow layer, and is experimentally validated with reflectance measurements of such layers. A quantitative and decoupled understanding of the morphological effect on the radiative transport is achieved, and a significant influence of the dual-scale morphology on the macroscopic optical behavior is observed. Our results show that with a small amount of soot particles, of the order of 1ppb in volume fraction, the reduction in reflectance of a snow layer with large ice grains can reach up to 77% (at a wavelength of 0.3 μm). Soot impurities modeled as compact agglomerates yield 2-3% lower reduction of the reflectance in a thick show layer compared to snow with soot impurities modeled as chain-like agglomerates. Soot impurities modeled as equivalent spherical particles underestimate the reflectance reduction by 2-8%. This study implies that the morphology of the heterogeneities in a media significantly affects the macroscopic optical behavior and, specifically for the soot-contaminated snow, indicates the non-negligible role of soot on the absorption behavior of snow layers. It can be equally used in technical applications for the assessment and optimization of optical performance in multi-scale media.

  19. Real time analysis of lead-containing atmospheric particles in Beijing during springtime by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Li, Mei; Huang, Zhengxu; Li, Lei; Gao, Wei; Nian, Huiqing; Zou, Lilin; Fu, Zhong; Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-07-01

    Using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS), the chemical composition and size distributions of lead (Pb)-containing particles with diameter from 0.1 μm to 2.0 μm in Beijing were analyzed in the spring of 2011 during clear, hazy, and dusty days. Based on mass spectral features of particles, cluster analysis was applied to Pb-containing particles, and six major classes were acquired consisting of K-rich, carboneous, Fe-rich, dust, Pb-rich, and Cl-rich particles. Pb-containing particles accounted for 4.2-5.3%, 21.8-22.7%, and 3.2% of total particle number during clear, hazy and dusty days, respectively. K-rich particles are a major contribution to Pb-containing particles, varying from 30.8% to 82.1% of total number of Pb-containing particles, lowest during dusty days and highest during hazy days. The results reflect that the chemical composition and amount of Pb-containing particles has been affected by meteorological conditions as well as the emissions of natural and anthropogenic sources. K-rich particles and carbonaceous particles could be mainly assigned to the emissions of coal combustion. Other classes of Pb-containing particles may be associated with metallurgical processes, coal combustion, dust, and waste incineration etc. In addition, Pb-containing particles during dusty days were first time studied by SPAMS. This method could provide a powerful tool for monitoring and controlling of Pb pollution in real time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Samanbir; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for

  1. Ice Formation of Coated Black Carbon Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B.; Kulkarni, G.; Beránek, J.; Zelenyuk, A.; Cziczo, D. J.; Thornton, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    The importance of black carbon particles as heterogeneous ice nuclei is currently in question. While pure black carbon is hydrophobic, atmospheric processing or aging by condensation or heterogeneous oxidation may alter the surface, physical and chemical properties, likely causing the particle surface and perhaps the particle bulk to become more hydrophilic. The impact of such atmospheric processing on the ice nucleating ability of soot remains poorly explored. In this laboratory study we simulated various atmospheric processing mechanisms and their effect on the ice formation of black carbon particles. Black carbon particles were generated by both dry powder dispersion of commercial carbon black and using a miniCAST soot generator. The particles were then coated with various atmospherically relevant coatings, including dicarboxylic acids of varying solubility. The ice-forming potential of the resulting particles was continuously determined at heterogeneous conditions in the PNNL Compact Ice Chamber. Single Particle Mass Spectrometer (SPLAT) was used to characterize the size, chemical composition, morphology, fractal dimension, and effective densities of individual particles with and without the coatings and to quantify the relationship between particle chemical and physical properties and their IN activity. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of typical lifetimes and processing history experienced by black carbon particles emitted into the upper troposphere.

  2. Diffusion air effects on the soot axial distribution concentration in a premixed acetylene/air flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fassani, Fabio Luis; Santos, Alex Alisson Bandeira; Goldstein Junior, Leonardo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia Termica e de Fluidos]. E-mails: fassani@fem.unicamp.br; absantos@fem.unicamp.br; leonardo@fem.unicamp.br; Ferrari, Carlos Alberto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Eletronica Quantica]. E-mail: ferrari@ifi.unicamp.br

    2000-07-01

    Soot particles are produced during the high temperature pyrolysis or combustion of hydrocarbons. The emission of soot from a combustor, or from a flame, is determined by the competition between soot formation and its oxidation. Several factors affect these processes, including the type of fuel, the air-to-fuel ratio, flame temperature, pressure, and flow pattern. In this paper, the influence of the induced air diffusion on the soot axial distribution concentration in a premixed acetylene/air flame was studied. The flame was generated in a vertical axis burner in which the fuel - oxidant mixture flow was surrounded by a nitrogen discharge coming from the annular region between the burner tube and an external concentric tube. The nitrogen flow provided a shield that protected the flame from the diffusion of external air, enabling its control. The burner was mounted on a step-motor driven, vertical translation table. The use of several air-to-fuel ratios made possible to establish the sooting characteristics of this flame, by measuring soot concentration along the flame height with a non-intrusive laser light absorption technique. (author)

  3. Optical measurements of soot size and number density in a complex flow, swirl-stabilized combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, G. S.; Wood, C. P.; Jackson, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    In-flame optical measurements of soot particulates in a turbulent, recirculating (i.e., complex flow) model laboratory combustor are described. A nonintrusive optical probe based on large angle (60 deg, 20 deg) intensity ratio scattering was used to yield a point measurement of particulate in the size range of 0.08 to 0.38 micrometers. The performance of the optical technique was evaluated, and an exploratory assessment of the spatial distribution of soot was conducted with attention to fuel molecular structure, fuel loading, and a smoke-suppressant additive (ferrocene). Isooctane and mixtures of isooctane with various ring and aromatic compounds blended to yield the smoke point of a JP-8 stock were prevaporized and introduced through a hollow cone nozzle. The addition of ring compounds to the base isooctane substantially changed the distribution of soot and increased the overall emission by 300%. The production of soot was substantially reduced by a decrease in fuel loading, and marginally reduced or not affected by the additive depending on fuel structure. The optical technique is a potentially powerful tool for providing the experimental evidence necessary to understand the processes of soot formation and burnout in complex flows typical of gas turbine combustors. However, scanning electron micrographs of extracted sample established that the technique is limited to the large particle wing of the soot size distribution, and optical and electronic processing can induce biasing and uncertainties which must be understood and controlled before the potential of the technique can be fulfilled.

  4. Simulation of an electrostatic soot-filter with continuous electrochemical conversion during the stages of development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muri, M.

    1996-04-01

    The dissertation describes the simulation of an electrostatic Diesel-Soot-Converter during its stages of development. This simulation is not only necessary for the interpretation of the experimental results, it also shows results for assumptions that cannot be received experimentally. The Diesel-Soot-Converter consists of a charging electrode, which charges the particles by a high-voltage and a ceramic monolith, where the particles are precipitated in the open channels because of an electric field created also by a high-voltage. Afterwards the particles are burned by a plasma. The filter-function of the Diesel-Soot-Converter was formulated and the efficiency for a vehicle was calculated. In the first part of the calculation the mass flow of a BMW 318tds and a BMW 325tds was determined for an US-FTP75-testcycle and for fuel load. In the second part the efficiency of different Diesel-Soot-Converter-types was calculated for the US-FTP75-testcycle and for full load. The use of the program with other testcycles is possible. The results of the calculations show the best configuration of the Diesel-Soot-Converter for the corresponding vehicle. Therefore with the help of this program time and money for the production of the ceramic can be saved. (author)

  5. Characterization of Air Plane Soot Surrogates using Raman spectroscopy and laser ablation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazallon, Bertrand; Ortega, Ismael Kenneth; Ikhenazene, Raouf; Pirim, Claire; Carpentier, Yvain; Irimiea, Cornelia; Focsa, Cristian; Ouf, François-Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Aviation alters the composition of the atmosphere globally and can thus drive climate change and ozone depletion [1]. Aircraft exhaust plumes contain species (gases and soot particles) produced by the combustion of kerosene with ambient air in the combustion chamber of the engine. Soot particles emitted by air-planes produce persistent contrails in the upper troposphere in ice-supersaturated air masses that contribute to cloudiness and impact the radiative properties of the atmosphere. These aerosol-cloud interactions represent one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global climate models [2]. Though the formation of atmospheric ice particles has been studied for many years [3], there are still numerous opened questions on nucleation properties of soot particles [4], as the ice nucleation experiments showed a large spread in results depending on the nucleation mode chosen and origin of the soot produced. The reasons behind these discrepancies reside in the different physico-chemical properties (composition, structure) of soot particles produced in different conditions, e.g., with respect to fuel or combustion techniques. In this work, we use Raman microscopy (514 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths) and ablation techniques (Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, and Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry) to characterize soot particle surrogates produced from a CAST generator (propane fuel, four different global equivalence ratios). They are produced as analogues of air-plane soot collected at different engine regimes (PowerJet SaM-146 turbofan) simulating a landing and take-off (LTO) cycle (MERMOSE project (http://mermose.onera.fr/)) [6]. The spectral parameters of the first-order Raman bands of these soot samples are analyzed using a de-convolution approach described by Sadezky et al. (2005) [5]. A systematic Raman analysis is carried out to select a number of parameters (laser wavelength, irradiance at sample, exposure time) that will alter the sample and the

  6. Factors Influencing the Ignition and Burnout of a Single Biomass Particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Yin, Chungen

    2011-01-01

    Ignition and burnout of a single biomass particle were studied numerically. A one-dimensional particle combustion model was developed which is capable to simulate all the intraparticle conversion processes (drying, recondensation, devolatilization, char gasification/oxidation and heat/mass/moment......Ignition and burnout of a single biomass particle were studied numerically. A one-dimensional particle combustion model was developed which is capable to simulate all the intraparticle conversion processes (drying, recondensation, devolatilization, char gasification/oxidation and heat...... concentration were not very significant. The influences of these factors on particle burnout were much more remarkable than ignition behaviour....

  7. Planck scale physics of the single-particle Schrödinger equation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    August 2002 physics pp. 375–383. Planck scale physics of the single-particle Schrödinger equation with gravitational self-interaction. VIKRAM SONI. National Physical Laboratory, K.S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110 016, India. Abstract. We consider the modification of a single-particle Schrödinger equation by the inclusion.

  8. Burnout of pulverized biomass particles in large scale boiler – Single particle model approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saastamoinen, Jaakko; Aho, Martti; Moilanen, Antero

    2010-01-01

    the particle combustion model is coupled with one-dimensional equation of motion of the particle, is applied for the calculation of the burnout in the boiler. The particle size of biomass can be much larger than that of coal to reach complete burnout due to lower density and greater reactivity. The burner...... location and the trajectories of the particles might be optimised to maximise the residence time and burnout....

  9. Synthetic fuel combustion: pollutant formation. Soot initiation mechanisms in burning aromatics. First quarterly report, 19 September-31 December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawlins, W. T.; Tanzawa, T.

    1981-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding the phenomenology of soot formation in the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels, relatively little attention has been focused upon aromatic fuels of the types commonly found in coal liquids. In particular, the effects of gas-phase free radicals, formed during combustion, on the kinetics of formation of incipient soot particles have not been characterized. Accordingly, an experimental investigation of the detailed kinetics of incipient soot formation in the combustion and pyrolysis of aromatic fuels of the benzene, anisole, phenol, and pyrrole families has been initiated in order to determine soot formation mechanisms and rate parameters. The experiments will be performed in a shock tube over the temperature range 1300 to 2500 K, using multiple ultraviolet, visible, and infrared diagnostics to monitor the kinetic behavior of free radicals (such as OH), incipient soot particles, and combustion products. Experiments will be conducted with artificially enhanced concentrations of free radicals such as OH and O to determine their effects on the kinetics of soot and soot precursors. The experimental work will be supported and directed by a parallel analytical effort using a detailed mechanistic model of the chemical kinetics and dynamics of the reacting systems. In this report, the design and configuration of the experimental apparatus are described, the details of the kinetic model are outlined, and possible reaction pathways are discussed.

  10. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity in Chemical Composition on Online Single-Particle Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Sea Spray Aerosol Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Camille M; Collins, Douglas B; Prather, Kimberly A

    2017-04-04

    Knowledge of the surface composition of sea spray aerosols (SSA) is critical for understanding and predicting climate-relevant impacts. Offline microscopy and spectroscopy studies have shown that dry supermicron SSA tend to be spatially heterogeneous particles with sodium- and chloride-rich cores surrounded by organic enriched surface layers containing minor inorganic seawater components such as magnesium and calcium. At the same time, single-particle mass spectrometry reveals several different mass spectral ion patterns, suggesting that there may be a number of chemically distinct particle types. This study investigates factors controlling single particle mass spectra of nascent supermicron SSA. Depth profiling experiments conducted on SSA generated by a fritted bubbler and total ion intensity analysis of SSA generated by a marine aerosol reference tank were compared with observations of ambient SSA observed at two coastal locations. Analysis of SSA produced by utilizing controlled laboratory methods reveals that single-particle mass spectra with weak sodium ion signals can be produced by the desorption of the surface of typical dry SSA particles composed of salt cores and organic-rich coatings. Thus, this lab-based study for the first time unifies findings from offline and online measurements as well as lab and field studies of the SSA particle-mixing state.

  11. Measurements of trace gases and particles in fresh and aged smoke from a chaparral fire in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. K. Akagi; J. S. Craven; J. W. Taylor; G. R. McMeeking; R. J. Yokelson; I. R. Burling; M. J. Alvarado; J. Seinfeld; H. Coe; Shawn Urbanski

    2010-01-01

    On November 17th 2009 we used a Twin Otter aircraft outfitted with an airborne Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (AFTIR), aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), single particle soot photometer (SP2), nephelometer, Licor CO2 analyzer, and a chemiluminescence ozone instrument to measure the initial emissions from a 100 hectare prescribed fire in chaparral fuels on the...

  12. Online single particle analysis of ice particle residuals from mountain-top mixed-phase clouds using laboratory derived particle type assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Susan; Schneider, Johannes; Klimach, Thomas; Mertes, Stephan; Schenk, Ludwig Paul; Kupiszewski, Piotr; Curtius, Joachim; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    In situ single particle analysis of ice particle residuals (IPRs) and out-of-cloud aerosol particles was conducted by means of laser ablation mass spectrometry during the intensive INUIT-JFJ/CLACE campaign at the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l.) in January-February 2013. During the 4-week campaign more than 70 000 out-of-cloud aerosol particles and 595 IPRs were analyzed covering a particle size diameter range from 100 nm to 3 µm. The IPRs were sampled during 273 h while the station was covered by mixed-phase clouds at ambient temperatures between -27 and -6 °C. The identification of particle types is based on laboratory studies of different types of biological, mineral and anthropogenic aerosol particles. The outcome of these laboratory studies was characteristic marker peaks for each investigated particle type. These marker peaks were applied to the field data. In the sampled IPRs we identified a larger number fraction of primary aerosol particles, like soil dust (13 ± 5 %) and minerals (11 ± 5 %), in comparison to out-of-cloud aerosol particles (2.4 ± 0.4 and 0.4 ± 0.1 %, respectively). Additionally, anthropogenic aerosol particles, such as particles from industrial emissions and lead-containing particles, were found to be more abundant in the IPRs than in the out-of-cloud aerosol. In the out-of-cloud aerosol we identified a large fraction of aged particles (31 ± 5 %), including organic material and secondary inorganics, whereas this particle type was much less abundant (2.7 ± 1.3 %) in the IPRs. In a selected subset of the data where a direct comparison between out-of-cloud aerosol particles and IPRs in air masses with similar origin was possible, a pronounced enhancement of biological particles was found in the IPRs.

  13. Fractal and Morphological Characteristics of Single Marble Particle Crushing in Uniaxial Compression Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Crushing of rock particles is a phenomenon commonly encountered in geotechnical engineering practice. It is however difficult to study the crushing of rock particles using classical theory because the physical structure of the particles is complex and irregular. This paper aims at evaluating fractal and morphological characteristics of single rock particle. A large number of particle crushing tests are conducted on single rock particle. The force-displacement curves and the particle size distributions (PSD of crushed particles are analysed based on particle crushing tests. Particle shape plays an important role in both the micro- and macroscale responses of a granular assembly. The PSD of an assortment of rocks are analysed by fractal methods, and the fractal dimension is obtained. A theoretical formula for particle crushing strength is derived, utilising the fractal model, and a simple method is proposed for predicting the probability of particle survival based on the Weibull statistics. Based on a few physical assumptions, simple equations are derived for determining particle crushing energy. The results of applying these equations are tested against the actual experimental data and prove to be very consistent. Fractal theory is therefore applicable for analysis of particle crushing.

  14. Compositional effects on PAH and soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of gasoline surrogate fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Sungwoo

    2017-02-05

    Gasoline surrogate fuels are widely used to understand the fundamental combustion properties of complex refinery gasoline fuels. In this study, the compositional effects on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and soot formation were investigated experimentally for gasoline surrogate mixtures comprising n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene in counterflow diffusion flames. A comprehensive kinetic model for the gasoline surrogate mixtures was developed to accurately predict the fuel oxidation along with the formation of PAHs and soot in flames. This combined model was first tested against ignition delay times and laminar burning velocities data. The proposed model for the formation and growth of PAHs up to coronene (C24H12) was based on previous studies and was tested against existing and present new experimental data. Additionally, in the accompanied soot model, PAHs with sizes larger than (including) pyrene were used for the inception of soot particles, followed by particle coagulations and PAH condensation/chemical reactions on soot surfaces. The major pathways for the formation of PAHs were also identified for the surrogate mixtures. The model accurately captures the synergistic PAH formation characteristics observed experimentally for n-heptane/toluene and iso-octane/toluene binary mixtures. Furthermore, the present experimental and modeling results also elucidated different trends in the formation of larger PAHs and soot between binary n-heptane/iso-octane and ternary n-heptane/iso-octane/toluene mixtures. Propargyl radicals (C3H3) were shown to be important in the formation and growth of PAHs for n-heptane/iso-octane mixtures when the iso-octane concentration increased; however, reactions involving benzyl radicals (C6H5CH2) played a significant role in the formation of PAHs for n-heptane/iso-octane/toluene mixtures. These results indicated that the formation of PAHs and subsequently soot was strongly affected by the composition of gasoline surrogate mixtures.

  15. Effect of strain rate on sooting limits in counterflow diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels: Sooting temperature index and sooting sensitivity index

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2014-05-01

    The effect of the strain rate on the sooting limits in counterflow diffusion flames was investigated in various gaseous hydrocarbon fuels by varying the nitrogen dilution in the fuel and oxidizer streams. The sooting limit was defined as the critical fuel and oxygen mole fraction at which soot started to appear in the elastic light scattering signal. The sooting region for normal alkane fuels at a specified strain rate, in terms of the fuel and oxygen mole fraction, expanded as the number of carbon atoms increased. The alkene fuels (ethylene, propene) tested had a higher propensity for sooting as compared with alkane fuels with the same carbon numbers (ethane, propane). Branched iso-butane had a higher propensity for sooting than did n-butane. An increase in the strain rate reduced the tendency for sooting in all the fuels tested. The sensitivity of the sooting limit to the strain rate was more pronounced for less sooting fuels. When plotted in terms of calculated flame temperature, the critical oxygen mole fraction exhibited an Arrhenius form under sooting limit conditions, which can be utilized to significantly reduce the effort required to determine sooting limits at different strain rates. We found that the limiting temperatures of soot formation flames are viable sooting metrics for quantitatively rating the sooting tendency of various fuels, based on comparisons with threshold soot index and normalized smoke point data. We also introduce a sooting temperature index and a sooting sensitivity index, two quantitative measures to describe sooting propensity and its dependence on strain rate. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  16. Effects of externally-through-internally-mixed soot inclusions within clouds and precipitation on global climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Mark Z

    2006-06-01

    This paper examines the incremental global climate response of black carbon (BC), the main component of soot, due to absorption and scattering by BC inclusions within cloud and precipitation particles. Modeled soot is emitted as an externally mixed aerosol particle. It evolves to an internal mixture through condensation, hydration, dissolution, dissociation, crystallization, aqueous chemistry, coagulation, and cloud processing. Size-resolved cloud liquid and ice particles grow by condensation onto size-resolved soot and other particles. Cloud particles grow to precipitation by coagulation and the Bergeron process. Cloud and precipitation particles also undergo freezing, melting, evaporation, sublimation, and coagulation with interstitial aerosol particles. Soot, which is tracked in cloud and precipitation particles of all sizes, is removed by rainout, washout, sedimentation, and dry deposition. Two methods of treating the optics of BC in size-resolved cloud liquid, ice and graupel are compared: the core-shell approximation (CSA) and the iterative dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA). The 10-year global near-surface incremental temperature response due to fossil fuel (ff), biofuel (bf), and biomass burning (bb) BC within clouds with the DEMA was slightly stronger than that with the CSA, but both enhancements were clouds may enhance the near-surface temperature response of ff+bf soot due to all processes (estimated as approximately 0.27 K), by climate impact of BC. BC cloud absorption was also found to increase water vapor, decrease precipitation, and decrease cloud fraction. The increase in water vapor at the expense of precipitation contributed to warming in addition to that of the cloud BC absorption itself. Aerosol-hydrometeor coagulation followed by hydrometeor evaporation may have caused almost twice the BC internal mixing as aerosol-aerosol coagulation.

  17. Single scattering from nonspherical Chebyshev particles: A compendium of calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiscombe, W. J.; Mugnai, A.

    1986-01-01

    A large set of exact calculations of the scattering from a class of nonspherical particles known as Chebyshev particles' has been performed. Phase function and degree of polarization in random orientation, and parallel and perpendicular intensities in fixed orientations, are plotted for a variety of particles shapes and sizes. The intention is to furnish a data base against which both experimental data, and the predictions of approximate methods, can be tested. The calculations are performed with the widely-used Extended Boundary Condition Method. An extensive discussion of this method is given, including much material that is not easily available elsewhere (especially the analysis of its convergence properties). An extensive review is also given of all extant methods for nonspherical scattering calculations, as well as of the available pool of experimental data.

  18. Response of microchannel plates in ionization mode to single particles and electromagnetic showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Brianza, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; Ciriolo, V.; del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Gotti, C.; Govoni, P.; Katcin, A. A.; Malberti, M.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pigazzini, S.; Preiato, F.; Prisekin, V. G.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.

    2018-01-01

    Hundreds of concurrent collisions per bunch crossing are expected at future hadron colliders. Precision timing calorimetry has been advocated as a way to mitigate the pileup effects and, thanks to their excellent time resolution, microchannel plates (MCPs) are good candidate detectors for this goal. We report on the response of MCPs, used as secondary emission detectors, to single relativistic particles and to electromagnetic showers. Several prototypes, with different geometries and characteristics, were exposed to particle beams at the INFN-LNF Beam Test Facility and at CERN. Their time resolution and efficiency are measured for single particles and as a function of the multiplicity of particles. Efficiencies between 50% and 90% to single relativistic particles are reached, and up to 100% in presence of a large number of particles. Time resolutions between 20 ps and 30 ps are obtained.

  19. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian Günther

    2015-01-01

    even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes......¨dinger equation with a source term originating from a localized particle that generates a wave while being simultaneously guided by it. We show that the ensuing particle-wave dynamics can capture some characteristics of quantum mechanics such as orbital quantization. However, the particle-wave dynamics can...... not reproduce quantum mechanics in general, and we show that the single-particle statistics for our model in a double-slit experiment with an additional splitter plate differs qualitatively from that of quantum mechanics....

  20. Magnetic tweezers for manipulation of magnetic particles in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, H.; Giesguth, M.; Dietz, K.-J.; Reiss, G.; Herth, S.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic tweezers gain increasing interest for applications in biology. Here, a setup of magnetic tweezers is introduced using micropatterned conducting lines on transparent glass slides. Magnetic particles of 1 μm diameter were injected in barley cell vacuoles using a microinject system under microscopic control. Time dependent tracking of the particles after application of a magnetic field was used to determine the viscosity of vacuolar sap in vivo relative to water and isolated vacuolar fluid. The viscosity of vacuolar sap in cells was about 2-fold higher than that of extracted vacuolar fluid and 5 times higher than that of water.

  1. Single particle behaviour in circulating fluidized bed combustors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus

    1994-01-01

    of fuel particles in a boiler. A cold pilot scale model of a circulating fluidized bed combustor was used. Here sand was recirculated by means of air. Pressure measurements along the riser determined suspension density. A radioactive tracking facility to determined the dynamic picture of the particle...... trajectories in the simulated boiler. In the splash zone, closest to the secondary air inlet an exponential decay in the solids suspension density with the riser height was observed. A transport zone was characterized by an exponential decay in the solids suspension but with a smaller decay constant...

  2. Single Gradientless Light Beam Drags Particles as Tractor Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Haifeng

    2011-01-01

    is the strong nonparaxiality of the light beam, which contributes to the pulling force owing to momentum conservation. The nonparaxiality of the Bessel beam can be manipulated to possess a dragging force along both the radial longitudinal directions, i.e., a "tractor beam" with stable trajectories is achieved......Usually a light beam pushes a particle when the photons act upon it. We investigate the optical forces by nonparaxial gradientless beams and find that the forces can drag suitable particles all the way towards the light source. The major criterion of realizing the backward dragging force...

  3. Simultaneous measurements of acetylene and soot during the pyrolysis of ethylene and benzene in a shock tube

    KAUST Repository

    KC, Utsav

    2016-10-12

    Acetylene is one of the most important precursors of soot and contributes to soot growth by the hydrogen-abstraction acetylene-addition (HACA) mechanism. In this work, we undertake time-resolved simultaneous measurements of acetylene and soot behind reflected shock waves at temperatures of 1600-2200. K and pressures of 3-5. bar. Acetylene mole fraction time-histories are measured from the absorption of a quantum-cascade laser operating around 13.6. μm. The soot volume fraction, particle size and number densities are calculated from the extinction and scattering of a cw Nd:Yag laser at 532. nm. Acetylene and soot are generated from the pyrolysis of 1% benzene in argon, 2.35% ethylene in argon, and binary mixtures of ethylene with propane/methane in argon. We note that acetylene time-histories exhibit a two-stage growth during the pyrolysis of benzene, which can be correlated to the initial rapid increase of soot volume fraction and a later plateauing. In comparison to ethylene pyrolysis, the pyrolysis of benzene results in larger values of the soot volume fraction, particle diameter and number density. We compare the measured data against the values simulated using the method-of-moments routine in Chemkin-Pro and a detailed PAH mechanism based on KM2 [1] and AramcoMech 1.3 [2]. Large discrepancies are observed between the measured and predicted values of the soot parameters. The data obtained from our experiments may assist future validation and development of soot mechanisms.

  4. Detection and characterization of chemical aerosol using laser-trapping single-particle Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalume, Aimable; Beresnev, Leonid A; Santarpia, Joshua; Pan, Yong-Le

    2017-08-10

    Detection and characterization of the presence of chemical agent aerosols in various complex atmospheric environments is an essential defense mission. Raman spectroscopy has the ability to identify chemical molecules, but there are limited numbers of photons detectable from single airborne aerosol particles as they are flowing through a detection system. In this paper, we report on a single-particle Raman spectrometer system that can measure strong spontaneous, stimulated, and resonance Raman spectral peaks from a single laser-trapped chemical aerosol particle, such as a droplet of the VX nerve agent chemical simulant diethyl phthalate. Using this system, time-resolved Raman spectra and elastic scattered intensities were recorded to monitor the chemical properties and size variation of the trapped particle. Such a system supplies a new approach for the detection and characterization of single airborne chemical aerosol particles.

  5. High rate discharge capability of single particle electrode of LiCoO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dokko, Kaoru [Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Nakata, Natsuko; Kanamura, Kiyoshi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-ohsawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    The electrochemical properties of a single particle of LiCoO{sub 2} (8 {mu}m in diameter) in an organic electrolyte were characterized using a microelectrode technique, and the high rate capability of commercially available micron-sized LiCoO{sub 2} was examined in this study. A Pt microfilament (10 {mu}m in diameter) was attached to the single LiCoO{sub 2} particle in the electrolyte during optical microscope observation, and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests were carried out. The discharge capacity of the single LiCoO{sub 2} particle (8 {mu}m diameter) was 0.157 nA h in the potential range of 3.0-4.2 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}, which was close to the theoretical capacity. The discharge rate capability of the single LiCoO{sub 2} particle was excellent, and the particle exhibited its full-discharge capacity up to a high rate of 30 C (5 nA). The discharge reaction of the single particle was not controlled by the solid-state diffusion of Li{sup +}, but by the charge transfer process at a rate lower than 30 C. The discharge capacity of the particle measured at a high rate of 300 C (50 nA) was 0.12 nA h, which was more than 75% of the full capacity of a single particle. (author)

  6. High rate discharge capability of single particle electrode of LiCoO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokko, Kaoru; Nakata, Natsuko; Kanamura, Kiyoshi

    The electrochemical properties of a single particle of LiCoO 2 (8 μm in diameter) in an organic electrolyte were characterized using a microelectrode technique, and the high rate capability of commercially available micron-sized LiCoO 2 was examined in this study. A Pt microfilament (10 μm in diameter) was attached to the single LiCoO 2 particle in the electrolyte during optical microscope observation, and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests were carried out. The discharge capacity of the single LiCoO 2 particle (8 μm diameter) was 0.157 nA h in the potential range of 3.0-4.2 V vs. Li/Li +, which was close to the theoretical capacity. The discharge rate capability of the single LiCoO 2 particle was excellent, and the particle exhibited its full-discharge capacity up to a high rate of 30 C (5 nA). The discharge reaction of the single particle was not controlled by the solid-state diffusion of Li +, but by the charge transfer process at a rate lower than 30 C. The discharge capacity of the particle measured at a high rate of 300 C (50 nA) was 0.12 nA h, which was more than 75% of the full capacity of a single particle.

  7. An investigation into the characterisation of the laser-induced incandescence method for the measurement of soot in practical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Grigorian, V.

    2002-01-01

    The thesis describes the characterisation and application of the laser induced incandescence technique for making soot measurements in practical devices. Laser induced incandescence is the phenomenon whereby particulates such a soot absorb laser radiation and are heated to a temperature much higher than the bath gas. The broadband incandescence signal from the hot particles can be detected and the signal is proportional to volume fraction. The technique was used ...

  8. Modelling and simulation of soot generation and transport

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiaoqin

    2016-01-01

    Soot released from fires not only causes danger to lives and property damage, but also effects fire spread by altering the radiation characteristics of fire effluents. In many situations, it is the soot concentration that controls the fire development. Therefore, soot modelling is of great importance in fire safety science. This necessitates the development of a global and general soot model within fire field models that can simulate the amount of soot generated and transported in large-scale...

  9. Electrically heated particulate matter filter soot control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.; Bhatia, Garima

    2016-03-15

    A regeneration system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A control module determines a current soot loading level of the PM filter and compares the current soot loading level to a predetermined soot loading level. The control module permits regeneration of the PM filter when the current soot loading level is less than the predetermined soot loading level.

  10. Modelling of flash pyrolysis of a single wood particle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, A.M.C.; Janse, A.M.C.; Westerhout, R.W.J.; Westerhout, R.W.J.; Prins, W.

    2000-01-01

    Reactors for flash pyrolysis of biomass are designed to maximize the yield of bio-oil, at the expense of the by-products gas and char. To understand which chemical and physical factors influence the yield to bio-oil, the flash pyrolysis of a cylindrical wood particle with a maximum diameter of 1000

  11. Single-sheet identification method of heavy charged particles using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The theoretical and experimental investigations of the penetration of charged particles in matter played a very important role in the development of modern physics. Solid state nuclear track detectors have become one of the most important tools for many branches of science and technology. An attempt has been made to ...

  12. Fluorescence preselection of bioaerosol for single-particle mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stowers, M.A.; Van Wuijckhuijse, A.L.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Kientz, C.E.; Ciach, T.

    2006-01-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested a system that preselects the biological fraction of airborne particles from the overall aerosol. The preselection is based on fluorescence emission excited by a continuous 266 nm laser beam. This beam is one of two cw beams used to measure the aerodynamic

  13. Characterizing uranium oxide reference particles for isotopic abundances and uranium mass by single particle isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraiem, M.; Richter, S.; Erdmann, N.; Kühn, H.; Hedberg, M.; Aregbe, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A method to quantify the U mass in single micron particles by ID-TIMS was developed. ► Well-characterized monodisperse U-oxide particles produced by an aerosol generator were used. ► A linear correlation between the mass of U and the volume of particle(s) was found. ► The method developed is suitable for determining the amount of U in a particulate reference material. - Abstract: Uranium and plutonium particulate test materials are becoming increasingly important as the reliability of measurement results has to be demonstrated to regulatory bodies responsible for maintaining effective nuclear safeguards. In order to address this issue, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in collaboration with the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) has initiated a study to investigate the feasibility of preparing and characterizing a uranium particle reference material for nuclear safeguards, which is finally certified for isotopic abundances and for the uranium mass per particle. Such control particles are specifically required to evaluate responses of instruments based on mass spectrometric detection (e.g. SIMS, TIMS, LA-ICPMS) and to help ensuring the reliability and comparability of measurement results worldwide. In this paper, a methodology is described which allows quantifying the uranium mass in single micron particles by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). This methodology is characterized by substantial improvements recently achieved at IRMM in terms of sensitivity and measurement accuracy in the field of uranium particle analysis by TIMS. The use of monodisperse uranium oxide particles prepared using an aerosol generation technique developed at ITU, which is capable of producing particles of well-characterized size and isotopic composition was exploited. The evidence of a straightforward correlation between the particle volume and the mass of uranium was demonstrated in this study

  14. Analysis of single particle diffusion with transient binding using particle filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jason; Fricks, John

    2016-07-21

    Diffusion with transient binding occurs in a variety of biophysical processes, including movement of transmembrane proteins, T cell adhesion, and caging in colloidal fluids. We model diffusion with transient binding as a Brownian particle undergoing Markovian switching between free diffusion when unbound and diffusion in a quadratic potential centered around a binding site when bound. Assuming the binding site is the last position of the particle in the unbound state and Gaussian observational error obscures the true position of the particle, we use particle filtering to predict when the particle is bound and to locate the binding sites. Maximum likelihood estimators of diffusion coefficients, state transition probabilities, and the spring constant in the bound state are computed with a stochastic Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Homogeneous vs heterogeneous polymerization catalysis revealed by single-particle fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, N Melody; Blum, Suzanne A

    2011-11-16

    A high-sensitivity and high-resolution single-particle fluorescence microscopy technique differentiated between homogeneous and heterogeneous metathesis polymerization catalysis by imaging the location of the early stages of polymerization. By imaging single polymers and single crystals of Grubbs II, polymerization catalysis was revealed to be solely homogeneous rather than heterogeneous or both.

  16. Low aspect ratio micropores for single-particle and single-cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Gaurav; Mulero, Rafael; Ali, Jamel; Darvish, Armin; Kim, Min Jun

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes microparticle and bacterial translocation studies using low aspect ratio solid-state micropores. Micropores, 5 μm in diameter, were fabricated in 200 nm thick free-standing silicon nitride membranes, resulting in pores with an extremely low aspect ratio, nominally 0.04. For microparticle translocation experiments, sulfonated polystyrene microparticles and magnetic microbeads in size range of 1-4 μm were used. Using the microparticle translocation characteristics, we find that particle translocations result in a change only in the pore's geometrical resistance while the access resistance remains constant. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of our micropore to probe high-resolution shape information of translocating analytes using concatenated magnetic microspheres. Distinct current drop peaks were observed for each microsphere of the multibead architecture. For bacterial translocation experiments, nonflagellated Escherichia coli (strain HCB 5) and wild type flagellated Salmonella typhimurium (strain SJW1103) were used. Distinct current signatures for the two bacteria were obtained and this difference in translocation behavior was attributed to different surface protein distributions on the bacteria. Our findings may help in developing low aspect ratio pores for high-resolution microparticle characterization and single-cell analysis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Detection and Sizing of Ti-Containing Particles in Recreational Waters Using Single Particle ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Arjun K; Reed, Robert B; Lee, Sungyun; Bi, Xiangyu; Hanigan, David; Yang, Yu; Ranville, James F; Herckes, Pierre; Westerhoff, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) was used to detect Ti-containing particles in heavily-used bathing areas of a river (Salt River) and five swimming pools. Ti-containing particle concentrations in swimming pools ranged from 2.8 × 10 3 to 4.4 × 10 3 particles/mL and were an order of magnitude lower than those detected in the Salt River. Measurements from the Salt River showed an 80% increase in Ti-containing particle concentration over baseline concentration during peak recreational activity (at 16:00 h) in the river. Cloud point extraction followed by transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed presence of aggregated TiO 2 particles in river samples, showing morphological similarity to particles present in an over-the-counter sunscreen product. The maximum particle mass concentration detected in a sample from the Salt River (659 ng/L) is only slightly lower than the predicted no effect concentration for TiO 2 to aquatic organisms (< 1 μg/L).

  18. CCN activation experiments with adipic acid: effect of particle phase and adipic acid coatings on soluble and insoluble particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Hings

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Slightly soluble atmospherically relevant organic compounds may influence particle CCN activity and therefore cloud formation. Adipic acid is a frequently employed surrogate for such slightly soluble organic materials. The 11 published experimental studies on the CCN activity of adipic acid particles are not consistent with each other nor do they, in most cases, agree with the Köhler theory. The CCN activity of adipic acid aerosol particles was studied over a significantly wider range of conditions than in any previous single study. The work spans the conditions of the previous studies and also provides alternate methods for producing "wet" (deliquesced solution droplets and dry adipic acid particles without the need to produce them by atomization of aqueous solutions. The experiments suggest that the scatter in the previously published CCN measurements is most likely due to the difficulty of producing uncontaminated adipic acid particles by atomization of solutions and possibly also due to uncertainties in the calibration of the instruments. The CCN activation of the small (dm<150 nm initially dry particles is subject to a deliquescence barrier, while for the larger particles the activation follows the Köhler curve. Wet adipic acid particles follow the Köhler curve over the full range of particle diameters studied. In addition, the effect of adipic acid coatings on the CCN activity of both soluble and insoluble particles has also been studied. When a water-soluble core is coated by adipic acid, the CCN-hindering effect of particle phase is eliminated. An adipic acid coating on hydrophobic soot yields a CCN active particle. If the soot particle is relatively small (dcore≤102 nm, the CCN activity of the coated particles approaches the deliquescence line of adipic acid, suggesting that the total size of the particle determines CCN activation and the soot core acts as a scaffold.

  19. CCN activation experiments with adipic acid: effect of particle phase and adipic acid coatings on soluble and insoluble particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hings, S. S.; Wrobel, W. C.; Cross, E. S.; Worsnop, D. R.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.

    2008-07-01

    Slightly soluble atmospherically relevant organic compounds may influence particle CCN activity and therefore cloud formation. Adipic acid is a frequently employed surrogate for such slightly soluble organic materials. The 11 published experimental studies on the CCN activity of adipic acid particles are not consistent with each other nor do they, in most cases, agree with the Köhler theory. The CCN activity of adipic acid aerosol particles was studied over a significantly wider range of conditions than in any previous single study. The work spans the conditions of the previous studies and also provides alternate methods for producing "wet" (deliquesced solution droplets) and dry adipic acid particles without the need to produce them by atomization of aqueous solutions. The experiments suggest that the scatter in the previously published CCN measurements is most likely due to the difficulty of producing uncontaminated adipic acid particles by atomization of solutions and possibly also due to uncertainties in the calibration of the instruments. The CCN activation of the small (dm<150 nm) initially dry particles is subject to a deliquescence barrier, while for the larger particles the activation follows the Köhler curve. Wet adipic acid particles follow the Köhler curve over the full range of particle diameters studied. In addition, the effect of adipic acid coatings on the CCN activity of both soluble and insoluble particles has also been studied. When a water-soluble core is coated by adipic acid, the CCN-hindering effect of particle phase is eliminated. An adipic acid coating on hydrophobic soot yields a CCN active particle. If the soot particle is relatively small (dcore≤102 nm), the CCN activity of the coated particles approaches the deliquescence line of adipic acid, suggesting that the total size of the particle determines CCN activation and the soot core acts as a scaffold.

  20. Non-thermal soot denuder, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a non-thermal soot denuder for measuring chemical components of the nucleation mode particulate matter emissions from gas turbine engines, in...

  1. Method for removing soot from exhaust gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suib, Steven L.; Dharmarathna, D. A. Saminda; Pahalagedara, Lakshitha R.

    2018-01-16

    A method for oxidizing soot from diesel exhaust gas from a diesel engine. The method involves providing a diesel particulate filter for receiving the diesel exhaust gas; coating a catalyst composition on the diesel particulate filter; and contacting the soot from the diesel exhaust gas with the catalyst coated diesel particulate filter at a temperature sufficient to oxidize the soot to carbon dioxide. The catalyst composition is a doped or undoped manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) material. A diesel exhaust gas treatment system that includes a diesel particulate filter for receiving diesel exhaust gas from a diesel engine and collecting soot; and a catalyst composition coated on the diesel particulate filter. The catalyst composition is a doped or undoped manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2).

  2. Atmospheric soot aerosol measurements in Moscow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopeikin, V.M.; Pekour, M.S. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    The results of regular soot concentration measurement in Moscow`s air for the period February 1989 - December 1995 are presented. The data obtained show that the level of soot contamination increased with the rate of approximately 0.42 mkg/m{sup 3} per year. 24-hour measurements of soot concentration and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) parameters were carried out during 3 campaigns: May-June 1990, February 1991 and October-November 1993. Direct comparisons of local soot concentration with ABL characteristics reveals certain relationships, but also shows that local contamination strongly depends on many other parameters, such as source productivity, chemical reactions, air mass pre-history and so on.

  3. Glass coated single grid for charged particle acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, B. A.; Nakanishi, S.

    1968-01-01

    Glass coating is used on a single grid accelerator system for ion thrusters. The uniformly thin, smooth, dense, impervious glass coating has a high dielectric strength and is firmly bonded to the accelerator grid.

  4. An instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spherical particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, L; Bao, N; Jiang, Y; Han, K; Zhou, J

    2016-01-01

    It universally exists in moving particular systems that particles can be electrified, in which the particles are chemically identical, just as toner particles, coal dust, and pharmaceutical powders. However, owing to the limit of experimental instruments, so far, there are yet no experiments to illustrate whether a particle can be electrified due to a single collision between two spherical particles, and there are also no experiments to measure the charge carried by a single particle due to a single collision between two particles. So we have developed an instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spheres. The instrument consists of two-sphere collision device, collision charge measurement apparatus, and particles' trajectory tracking system. By using this instrument, we can investigate the collision contact electrification due to a single collision between two spheres and simultaneously record the moving trajectories of spheres after the collision to calculate the rebound angles to identify the contribution of the triboelectrification due to the rubbing between the contact surfaces and the collision contact electrification due to the normal pressure between the contact surfaces.

  5. Comprehensive study of ignition and combustion of single wooden particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam; Yin, Chungen; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    How quickly large biomass particles can ignite and burn out when transported into a pulverized-fuel (pf) furnace and suddenly exposed to a hot gas flow containing oxygen is very important in biomass co-firing design and optimization. In this paper, the ignition and burnout of the largest possible...... for all the test conditions. As the particle is further heated up and the volume-weighted average temperature reaches the onset of rapid decomposition of hemicellulose and cellulose, a secondary homogeneous ignition occurs. The model-predicted ignition delays and burnout times show a good agreement...... with the experimental results. Homogeneous ignition delays are found to scale with specific surface areas while heterogeneous ignition delays show less dependency on the areas. The ignition and burnout are also affected by the process conditions, in which the oxygen concentration is found to have a more pronounced...

  6. A deep convolutional neural network approach to single-particle recognition in cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanan; Ouyang, Qi; Mao, Youdong

    2017-07-21

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has become a mainstream tool for the structural determination of biological macromolecular complexes. However, high-resolution cryo-EM reconstruction often requires hundreds of thousands of single-particle images. Particle extraction from experimental micrographs thus can be laborious and presents a major practical bottleneck in cryo-EM structural determination. Existing computational methods for particle picking often use low-resolution templates for particle matching, making them susceptible to reference-dependent bias. It is critical to develop a highly efficient template-free method for the automatic recognition of particle images from cryo-EM micrographs. We developed a deep learning-based algorithmic framework, DeepEM, for single-particle recognition from noisy cryo-EM micrographs, enabling automated particle picking, selection and verification in an integrated fashion. The kernel of DeepEM is built upon a convolutional neural network (CNN) composed of eight layers, which can be recursively trained to be highly "knowledgeable". Our approach exhibits an improved performance and accuracy when tested on the standard KLH dataset. Application of DeepEM to several challenging experimental cryo-EM datasets demonstrated its ability to avoid the selection of un-wanted particles and non-particles even when true particles contain fewer features. The DeepEM methodology, derived from a deep CNN, allows automated particle extraction from raw cryo-EM micrographs in the absence of a template. It demonstrates an improved performance, objectivity and accuracy. Application of this novel method is expected to free the labor involved in single-particle verification, significantly improving the efficiency of cryo-EM data processing.

  7. Visualization Techniques for Single Channel DPF Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, Heather E.; Maupin, Gary D.; Carlson, Shelley J.; Saenz, Natalio T.; Gallant, Thomas R.

    2007-04-01

    New techniques have been developed to visualize soot deposition in both traditional and new diesel particulate filter (DPF) substrate materials using a modified cyanoacrylate fuming technique. Loading experiments have been conducted on a variety of single channel DPF substrates to develop a deeper understanding of soot penetration, soot deposition characteristics, and to confirm modeling results. Early results indicate that stabilizing the soot layer using a vapor adhesive may allow analysis of the layer with new methods.

  8. Online single particle measurement of fireworks pollution during Chinese New Year in Nanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyan; Xu, Tingting; Lu, Xiaohui; Chen, Hong; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Xin; Mo, Zhaoyu; Chen, Zhiming; Liu, Huilin; Mao, Jingying; Liang, Guiyun

    2017-03-01

    Time-resolved single-particle measurements were conducted during Chinese New Year in Nanning, China. Firework displays resulted in a burst of SO 2 , coarse mode, and accumulation mode (100-500nm) particles. Through single particle mass spectrometry analysis, five different types of particles (fireworks-metal, ash, dust, organic carbon-sulfate (OC-sulfate), biomass burning) with different size distributions were identified as primary emissions from firework displays. The fireworks-related particles accounted for more than 70% of the total analyzed particles during severe firework detonations. The formation of secondary particulate sulfate and nitrate during firework events was investigated on single particle level. An increase of sulfite peak (80SO 3 - ) followed by an increase of sulfate peaks (97HSO 4 - +96SO 4 - ) in the mass spectra during firework displays indicated the aqueous uptake and oxidation of SO 2 on particles. High concentration of gaseous SO 2 , high relative humidity and high particle loading likely promoted SO 2 oxidation. Secondary nitrate formed through gas-phase oxidation of NO 2 to nitric acid, followed by the condensation into particles as ammonium nitrate. This study shows that under worm, humid conditions, both primary and secondary aerosols contribute to the particulate air pollution during firework displays. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Source characterization of urban particles from meat smoking activities in Chongqing, China using single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Wenger, John C; Yang, Fumo; Cao, Junji; Huang, Rujin; Shi, Guangming; Zhang, Shumin; Tian, Mi; Wang, Huanbo

    2017-09-01

    A Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed in the urban area of Chongqing to characterize the particles present during a severe particulate pollution event that occurred in winter 2014-2015. The measurements were made at a time when residents engaged in traditional outdoor meat smoking activities to preserve meat before the Chinese Spring Festival. The measurement period was predominantly characterized by stagnant weather conditions, highly elevated levels of PM 2.5 , and low visibility. Eleven major single particle types were identified, with over 92.5% of the particles attributed to biomass burning emissions. Most of the particle types showed appreciable signs of aging in the stagnant air conditions. To simulate the meat smoking activities, a series of controlled smoldering experiments was conducted using freshly cut pine and cypress branches, both with and without wood logs. SPAMS data obtained from these experiments revealed a number of biomass burning particle types, including an elemental and organic carbon (ECOC) type that proved to be the most suitable marker for meat smoking activities. The traditional activity of making preserved meat in southwestern China is shown here to be a major source of particulate pollution. Improved measures to reduce emissions from the smoking of meat should be introduced to improve air quality in regions where smoking meat activity prevails. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental study on effects of particle shape and operating conditions on combustion characteristics of single biomass particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam; Yin, Chungen; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the ignition, devolatilization, and burnout of single biomass particles of various shapes and sizes under process conditions that are similar to those in an industrial combustor. A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is used to record the whole...

  11. Sooting limit in counterflow diffusion flames of ethylene/propane fuels and implication to threshold soot index

    KAUST Repository

    Joo, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    Sooting limits in counterflow diffusion flames of propane/ethylene fuels have been studied experimentally using a light scattering technique, including the effects of dilution, fuel mixing, and strain rate. The results are discussed in view of the threshold soot index (TSI). In soot-formation (SF) flames, where the flame is located on the oxidizer side of the stagnation plane, the sooting limit depends critically on fuel type and subsequently on flame temperature. The sooting limit has a non-linear dependence on the fuel-mixing ratio, which is similar to the non-linear mixing rule for TSI observed experimentally in rich premixed flames, where soot oxidation is absent for both SF and rich premixed flames. In soot-formation-oxidation (SFO) flames, where the flame is located on the fuel side, the sooting limit depends critically on flame temperature, while it is relatively independent on fuel type. This result suggests a linear mixing rule for sooting limits in SFO flames, which is similar to the TSI behavior for coflow diffusion flames. Soot oxidation takes place for both types of flames. The aerodynamic strain effect on the sooting limits has also been studied and an appreciable influence has been observed. Under sooting conditions, soot volume fraction was measured using a light extinction technique. The soot loadings in SF flames of the mixture fuels demonstrated a synergistic effect, i.e., soot production increased for certain mixture fuels as compared to the respective singlecomponent fuels. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  12. Strong reduction of spectral heterogeneity in gold bipyramids for single-particle and single-molecule plasmon sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, S M E; Verheijen, M A; Prins, M W J; Zijlstra, P

    2016-01-15

    Single metal nanoparticles are attractive biomolecular sensors. Binding of analyte to a functional particle results in a plasmon shift that can be conveniently monitored in a far-field optical microscope. Heterogeneities in spectral properties of individual particles in an ensemble affect the reliability of a single-particle plasmon sensor, especially when plasmon shifts are monitored in real-time using a fixed irradiation wavelength. We compare the spectral heterogeneity of different plasmon sensor geometries (gold nanospheres, nanorods, and bipyramids) and correlate this to their size and aspect-ratio dispersion. We show that gold bipyramids exhibit a strongly reduced heterogeneity in aspect ratio and plasmon wavelength compared to commonly used gold nanorods. We show that this translates into a significantly improved homogeneity of the response to molecular binding without compromising single-molecule sensitivity.

  13. NATO Workshop on Soot in Combustion Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Prado, G

    1983-01-01

    Our interest in Mulhouse for carbon black and soot began some 30 years ago when J.B. Donnet developed the concept of surface chemistry of carbon and its involvement in interactions with gas, liquid and solid phases. In the late sixties, we began to study soot formation in pyrolytic systems and later on in flames. The idea of organ1z1ng a meeting on soot formation originated some four or five years ago, through discussions among Professor J.B. Howard, Dr. A. D'Alessio and ourselves. At that time the scientific community was becoming aware of the necessity to strictly control soot formation and emission. Being involved in the study of surface properties of carbon black as well as of formation of soot, we realized that the combustion community was not always fully aware of the progress made by the physical-chemists on carbon black. Reciprocally, the carbon specialists were often ignoring the research carried out on soot in flames. One objective of this workshop was to stimulate discussions between these two scie...

  14. Comparison of mineral dust and droplet residuals measured with two single particle aerosol mass spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonaschütz, Anna; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Zawadowicz, Maria; Hiranuma, Naruki; Hitzenberger, Regina; Cziczo, Daniel; DeMott, Paul; Möhler, Ottmar

    2017-04-01

    Single Particle mass spectrometers are used to gain information on the chemical composition of individual aerosol particles, aerosol mixing state, and other valuable aerosol characteristics. During the Mass Spectrometry Intercomparison at the Fifth Ice Nucleation (FIN-01) Workshop, the new LAAPTOF single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (AeroMegt GmbH) was conducting simultaneous measurements together with the PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry) instrument. The aerosol particles were sampled from the AIDA chamber during ice cloud expansion experiments. Samples of mineral dust and ice droplet residuals were measured simultaneously. In this work, three expansion experiments are chosen for a comparison between the two mass spectrometers. A fuzzy clustering routine is used to group the spectra. Cluster centers describing the ensemble of particles are compared. First results show that while differences in the peak heights are likely due to the use of an amplifier in PALMS, cluster centers are comparable.

  15. Optical trap for both transparent and absorbing particles in air using a single shaped laser beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Brandon; Pan, Yong-Le

    2015-06-15

    Optical trapping of airborne particles is emerging as an essential tool in applications ranging from online characterization of living cells and aerosols to particle transport and delivery. However, existing optical trapping techniques using a single laser beam can trap only transparent particles (via the radiative pressure force) or absorbing particles (via the photophoretic force), but not particles of either type-limiting the utility of trapping-enabled aerosol characterization techniques. Here, we present the first optical trapping technique capable of trapping both transparent and absorbing particles with arbitrary morphology using a single shaped laser beam. Such a general-purpose optical trapping mechanism could enable new applications such as trapping-enabled aerosol characterization with high specificity.

  16. Single-particle characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) ash particles using low- Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, HeeJin; Ro, Chul-Un

    Environmentally benign treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) ashes has been a worldwide issue since more countries are implementing incineration to reduce waste volume. A single-particle analytical technique, named low- Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low- Z particle EPMA) was applied to characterize MSW fly- and bottom-ash particle samples collected from two municipal incinerators in Korea. According to their chemical composition, many distinctive particle types were identified. For fly ash sample collected in one incinerator (sample S1), where lime slurry injection is used for acid-gas treatment, CaCO 3-containing particles (28.4%) are the most abundantly encountered, followed by carbonaceous (23.6%), SiO 2-containing (13.8%), NaCl-containing (13.1%), and iron-containing (10.5%) particles. For fly ash sample collected at the other incinerator (sample S2), NaCl-containing particles (40.4%) are the most abundantly encountered, followed by iron-containing (29.1%), carbonaceous (11.8%), CaCO 3-containing (2.2%), and SiO 2-containing (7.0%) particles. For bottom ash sample collected at one incinerator (sample S3), iron-containing particles (46.6%) are the most abundantly encountered, followed by CaCO 3-containing (17.3%), carbonaceous (16.6%), and Si and/or Al oxide-containing (15.8%) particles. For bottom ash sample collected in the other incinerator (sample S4), iron-containing particles (63.4%) are also the most abundantly encountered, followed by carbonaceous (14.0%), CaCO 3-containing (10.0%), and Si and/or Al oxide-containing (6.1%) particles. Chemical compositions of the two bottom ash samples are not much different compared to those of the two fly ash samples. It was demonstrated that the single-particle characterization using this low- Z particle EPMA technique provided detailed information on various types of chemical species in the MSW ash samples. In addition, the technique has advantage over conventional analytical techniques in the

  17. Practical Limitations of Aerosol Separation by a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer-Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radney, James G; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    A cavity ring-down spectrometer and condensation particle counter were used to investigate the limitations in the separation of singly and multiply charged aerosol particles by a tandem differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM). The impact of particle polydispersity and morphology was investigated using three materials: nearly-monodisperse polystyrene latex nanospheres (PSL); polydisperse, nearly-spherical ammonium sulfate (AS) and polydisperse lacey fractal soot agglomerates. PSL and AS particles were easily resolved as a function of charge. For fresh soot, the presence of multiply charged particles severely affects the isolation of the singly charged particles. In cases where the DMA-APM was unable to fully resolve the singly charged particles of interest, the peak mass deviated by up to 13 % leading to errors in the mass specific extinction cross section of over 100 %. For measurements of non-spherical particles, non-symmetrical distributions of concentration as a function of mass were a sign of the presence of multiply charged particles. Under these conditions, the effects of multiply charged particles can be reduced by using a second charge neutralizer after the DMA and prior to the APM. Dilution of the aerosol stream serves to decrease the total number concentration of particles and does not remove the contributions of multiply charged particles.

  18. Single crystal particles of a mesoporous mixed transition metal oxide with a wormhole structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B; Lu, D; Kondo, J N; Domen, K

    2001-10-21

    A new type of mesoporous mixed transition metal oxide of Nb and Ta (NbTa-TIT-1) has been prepared through a two-step calcination, which consists of single crystal particles with wormhole mesoporous structure.

  19. Optimal Estimation of Diffusion Coefficients from Noisy Time-Lapse-Recorded Single-Particle Trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian Lyngby

    2012-01-01

    Optimal Estimation of Diusion Coecients from Noisy Time-Lapse- Measurements of Single-Particle Trajectories Single-particle tracking techniques allow quantitative measurements of diusion at the single-molecule level. Recorded time-series are mostly short and contain considerable measurement noise....... The standard method for estimating diusion coecients from single-particle trajectories is based on leastsquares tting to the experimentally measured mean square displacements. This method is highly inecient, since it ignores the high correlations inherent in these. We derive the exact maximum likelihood...... parameter values. We extend the methods to particles diusing on a uctuating substrate, e.g., exible or semi exible polymers such as DNA, and show that uctuations induce an important bias in the estimates of diusion coecients if they are not accounted for. We apply the methods to obtain precise estimates...

  20. Single-particle colloid tracking in four dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Stephen M; Hong, Liang; Kim, Minsu; Granick, Steve

    2006-11-21

    Coating a close-packed fluorescent colloid monolayer with a nanometer-thick metal film followed by sonication in liquid produces modulated optical nanoprobes. The metal coating modulates the fluorescence as these structures rotate in suspension, enabling the use of these particles as probes to monitor both rotational and center-of-mass (translational) dynamics in complex environments. Here, we demonstrate methods to simultaneously measure two translational and two rotational degrees of freedom, with excellent agreement to theory. The capability to determine two angles of rotation opens several new avenues of future research.

  1. Single Particle energy levels in ODD-A Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasijo, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Singe particle energies for atomic nuclei with odd-A number of nucleons, i.e. nuclei possessing odd number of protons or odd number of neutrons, were calculated based on Nilsson's theory, and then the diagrams were made. the energy diagram is in the from of plot of energies as function of deformations, entities identifying the deviations from the spherical shape. The energy calculations were done using FORTRAN 77 language of PC (Personal Computer) version with Microsoft Fortran Power Station compiler, which was then combined with WORD version 6.0 and EXCEL version 5.0 of WINDOWS WORKGROUP to make the plot

  2. Single particle aerodynamic relaxation time analyzer. [for aerosol pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Kirsch, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    An instrument employing a laser Doppler velocimeter and a microphone to measure the phase lag of the motion of aerosol particulates relative to the motion of the fluid medium within an acoustic field is described. The relaxation times and aerodynamic diameters of the particles or droplets are determined in real time from the measured values of phase lag; thus, the size analysis is independent of the electrostatic charges and refractive indices of the particulates. The instrument is suitable for analyzing the aerodynamic size spectrum of atmospheric particulate pollutants with aerodynamic diameters ranging from 0.1 to 10.0 microns.

  3. A clustering approach to multireference alignment of single-particle projections in electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Sorzano, C.O.S.; Bilbao-Castro, J.R.; Shkolnisky, Y.; Alcorlo, M.; Melero, R.; Caffarena-Fernández, G.; Li, M.; Xu, G.; Marabini, R.; Carazo, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional analysis of projections of single particles acquired by an electron microscope is a useful tool to help identifying the different kinds of projections present in a dataset and their different projection directions. Such analysis is also useful to distinguish between different kinds of particles or different particle conformations. In this paper we introduce a new algorithm for performing two-dimensional multireference alignment and classification that is based on a Hierarchica...

  4. Combustion and Gasification Collection of Diesel Soot by Means of Microwave Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueshi YAO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The experiment of integrated purification of diesel soot was made by means of microwave heating. The experiment includes combustion and gasification collection. The catalytic effect of ceramic carrier was used in the combustion process. In order to improve the purification efficiency of PM2.5 particles, the surfactants were used in gasification collection. The model of computer control was set up so that the purification course could be controlled. The experimental principle was analyzed. Experiment result indicated that the diesel soot purifying efficiency is more than 90 %. The purification efficiency can be improved further by the optimization design of experimental device.

  5. The influence of transport phenomena on the fluidized bed combustion of a single carbon particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1990-01-01

    The burning rate and temperature of the carbon particles are known to affect the efficiency of a fluidized bed combustor, and also the emission levels of undesired noxious components. The main results of an extensive study on the fluidized bed combustion behaviour of a single carbon particle [1] are

  6. Efficiencies of dynamic Monte Carlo algorithms for off-lattice particle systems with a single impurity

    KAUST Repository

    Novotny, M.A.

    2010-02-01

    The efficiency of dynamic Monte Carlo algorithms for off-lattice systems composed of particles is studied for the case of a single impurity particle. The theoretical efficiencies of the rejection-free method and of the Monte Carlo with Absorbing Markov Chains method are given. Simulation results are presented to confirm the theoretical efficiencies. © 2010.

  7. Multi-Color Single Particle Tracking with Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Brewer, J. R.; Lagerholm, B. C.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have long promised to revolutionize fluorescence detection to include even applications requiring simultaneous multi-species detection at single molecule sensitivity. Despite the early promise, the unique optical properties of QDs have not yet been fully exploited in e. g...

  8. Role of single-particle and pair condensates in Bose systems with arbitrary intensity of interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Peletminskii

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study a superfluid Bose system with single-particle and pair condensates on the basis of a half-phenomenological theory of a Bose liquid not involving the weakness of interparticle interaction. The coupled equations describing the equilibrium state of such system are derived from the variational principle for entropy. These equations are analyzed at zero temperature both analytically and numerically. It is shown that the fraction of particles in the single-particle and pair condensates essentially depends on the total density of the system. At densities attainable in condensates of alkali-metal atoms, almost all particles are in the single-particle condensate. The pair condensate fraction grows with increasing total density and becomes dominant. It is shown that at density of liquid helium, the single-particle condensate fraction is less than 10% that agrees with experimental data on inelastic neutron scattering, Monte Carlo calculations and other theoretical predictions. The ground state energy, pressure, and compressibility are found for the system under consideration. The spectrum of single-particle excitations is also analyzed.

  9. 4-D single particle tracking of synthetic and proteinaceous microspheres reveals preferential movement of nuclear particles along chromatin - poor tracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacher, Christian P; Reichenzeller, Michaela; Athale, Chaitanya; Herrmann, Harald; Eils, Roland

    2004-11-23

    The dynamics of nuclear organization, nuclear bodies and RNPs in particular has been the focus of many studies. To understand their function, knowledge of their spatial nuclear position and temporal translocation is essential. Typically, such studies generate a wealth of data that require novel methods in image analysis and computational tools to quantitatively track particle movement on the background of moving cells and shape changing nuclei. We developed a novel 4-D image processing platform (TIKAL) for the work with laser scanning and wide field microscopes. TIKAL provides a registration software for correcting global movements and local deformations of cells as well as 2-D and 3-D tracking software. With this new tool, we studied the dynamics of two different types of nuclear particles, namely nuclear bodies made from GFP-NLS-vimentin and microinjected 0.1 mum - wide polystyrene beads, by live cell time-lapse microscopy combined with single particle tracking and mobility analysis. We now provide a tool for the automatic 3-D analysis of particle movement in parallel with the acquisition of chromatin density data. Kinetic analysis revealed 4 modes of movement: confined obstructed, normal diffusion and directed motion. Particle tracking on the background of stained chromatin revealed that particle movement is directly related to local reorganization of chromatin. Further a direct comparison of particle movement in the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm exhibited an entirely different kinetic behaviour of vimentin particles in both compartments. The kinetics of nuclear particles were slightly affected by depletion of ATP and significantly disturbed by disruption of actin and microtubule networks. Moreover, the hydration state of the nucleus had a strong impact on the mobility of nuclear bodies since both normal diffusion and directed motion were entirely abolished when cells were challenged with 0.6 M sorbitol. This effect correlated with the compaction of chromatin

  10. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    Enkephalin, an endogeneous substance in the human brain showing morphine-like biological functions, has been detected at the single molecule level based on the surface-enhanced Raman signal of the ring breathing mode of phenylalanine, which is one building block of the molecule. For enhancing...... the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  11. Biomass Gasification Behavior in an Entrained Flow Reactor: Gas Product Distribution and Soot Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Ke; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Lin, Weigang

    2012-01-01

    Biomass gasification and pyrolysis were studied in a laboratory-scale atmospheric pressure entrained flow reactor. Effects of operating parameters and biomass types on the syngas composition were investigated. In general, the carbon conversion during biomass gasification was higher than 90......% at the optimal conditions of 1400 °C with steam addition. The biomass carbon that was not converted to gas in the gasification process only appeared as soot particles in the syngas in all of the experiments, except for the two experiments performed at 1000 °C, where a very small amount of char was also left....... In comparison to pyrolysis, lower yields of soot, H2, and CO were produced during gasification. The yield of soot could be reduced by a longer residence time, larger feeder air flow, lower oxygen concentration, higher excess air ratio, higher steam/carbon ratio, and higher reactor temperature. Changes...

  12. Soot and Spectral Radiation Modeling for a High-Pressure Turbulent Spray Flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreryo-Fernandez, Sebastian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Paul, Chandan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sircar, Arpan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Imren, Abdurrahman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Haworth, Daniel C [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Roy, Somesh P [Marquette University (United States); Modest, Michael F [University of California Merced (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Simulations are performed of a transient high-pressure turbulent n-dodecane spray flame under engine-relevant conditions. An unsteady RANS formulation is used, with detailed chemistry, a semi-empirical two-equation soot model, and a particle-based transported composition probability density function (PDF) method to account for unresolved turbulent fluctuations in composition and temperature. Results from the PDF model are compared with those from a locally well-stirred reactor (WSR) model to quantify the effects of turbulence-chemistry-soot interactions. Computed liquid and vapor penetration versus time, ignition delay, and flame lift-off height are in good agreement with experiment, and relatively small differences are seen between the WSR and PDF models for these global quantities. Computed soot levels and spatial soot distributions from the WSR and PDF models show large differences, with PDF results being in better agreement with experimental measurements. An uncoupled photon Monte Carlo method with line-by-line spectral resolution is used to compute the spectral intensity distribution of the radiation leaving the flame. This provides new insight into the relative importance of molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation, and the importance of turbulent fluctuations on radiative heat transfer.

  13. Development and characterization of a single particle laser ablation mass spectrometer (SPLAM for organic aerosol studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gaie-Levrel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A single particle instrument was developed for real-time analysis of organic aerosol. This instrument, named Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry (SPLAM, samples particles using an aerodynamic lens system for which the theoretical performances were calculated. At the outlet of this system, particle detection and sizing are realized by using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Polystyrene Latex (PSL, sodium chloride (NaCl and dioctylphtalate (DOP particles were used to characterize and calibrate optical detection of SPLAM. The optical detection limit (DL and detection efficiency (DE were determined using size-selected DOP particles. The DE ranges from 0.1 to 90% for 100 and 350 nm DOP particles respectively and the SPLAM instrument is able to detect and size-resolve particles as small as 110–120 nm. During optical detection, particle scattered light from the two diode lasers, is detected by two photomultipliers and the detected signals are used to trigger UV excimer laser (λ = 248 nm used for one-step laser desorption ionization (LDI of individual aerosol particles. The formed ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles. The TOF-MS detection limit for gaseous aromatic compounds was determined to be 0.85 × 10−15 kg (∼4 × 103 molecules. DOP particles were also used to test the overall operation of the instrument. The analysis of a secondary organic aerosol, formed in a smog chamber by the ozonolysis of indene, is presented as a first application of the instrument. Single particle mass spectra were obtained with an effective hit rate of 8%. Some of these mass spectra were found to be very different from one particle to another possibly reflecting chemical differences within the investigated indene SOA particles. Our study shows that an exhaustive statistical analysis, over hundreds of particles

  14. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  15. Single particle studies of black liquor gasification under pressurized conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitty, K.; Backman, R.; Hupa, M.; Backman, P.; Ek, P.; Hulden, S.T.; Kullberg, M.; Sorvari, V.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide experimental data relevant to pressurized black liquor gasification concepts. Specifically, the following two goals will be achieved: Data on swelling, char yields and component release during pressurized pyrolysis of small samples of black liquor will be obtained. The reactivity and physical behavior of single black liquor droplets during simultaneous pyrolysis and gasification will be investigated. The structure and composition of black liquor char during formation and conversion will be studied. (orig.)

  16. Single-particle and collective states in transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhenry, I.; Suomijaervi, T.; Giai, N. van

    1993-01-01

    The possibility to excite collective states in transfer reactions induced by heavy ions is studied. Collective states are described within the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) and the collectivity is defined according to the number of configurations contributing to a given state. The particle transfer is described within the Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA). Calculations are performed for two different stripping reactions: 207 Pb( 20 Ne, 19 Ne) 208 Pb and 59 Co( 20 Ne, 19 F) 60 Ni at 48 MeV/nucleon for which experimental data are available. The calculation shows that a sizeable fraction of collective strength can be excited in these reactions. The comparison with experiment shows that this parameter-free calculation qualitatively explains the data. (author) 19 refs.; 10 figs

  17. Cantilever-based micro-particle filter with simultaneous single particle detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noeth, Nadine-Nicole; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Boisen, Anja

    2011-01-01

    -particles from a liquid. A hole-array is integrated into a micro-cantilever, which is inserted into a microfluidic channel perpendicular to the flow. A metal pad at the apex of the cantilever enables an optical read-out of the deflection of the cantilever. When a micro-particle is too large to pass a hole...... in the cantilever, clogging of the holes increases the flow resistance of the cantilever. This causes a bending of the device, which can be detected by the optical read-out system. By arranging an array of such cantilevers with different hole sizes, separation by size can be achieved. In this paper a proof...

  18. Single molecule experiments challenge the strict wave-particle dualism of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Karl Otto

    2010-01-21

    Single molecule techniques improve our understanding of the photon and light. If the single photon double slit experiment is performed at the "single photon limit" of a multi-atom light source, faint light pulses with more than one photon hamper the interpretation. Single molecules, quantum dots or defect centres in crystals should be used as light source. "Single photon detectors" do not meet their promise-only "photon number resolving single photon detectors" do so. Particularly, the accumulation time argument, the only safe basis for the postulate of a strictly particle like photon, has so far not yet been verified.

  19. Single Molecule Experiments Challenge the Strict Wave-Particle Dualism of Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Otto Greulich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Single molecule techniques improve our understanding of the photon and light. If the single photon double slit experiment is performed at the “single photon limit” of a multi-atom light source, faint light pulses with more than one photon hamper the interpretation. Single molecules, quantum dots or defect centres in crystals should be used as light source. “Single photon detectors” do not meet their promise―only “photon number resolving single photon detectors” do so. Particularly, the accumulation time argument, the only safe basis for the postulate of a strictly particle like photon, has so far not yet been verified.

  20. Single particle radiation between high spin states in /sup 147/Gd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borggreen, J.; Sletten, G.; Bjoernholm, S.; Pedersen, J.; Del Zoppo, A.; Radford, D.C.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Chowdhury, P.; Emling, H.; Frekers, D.

    1987-05-04

    Transitions above the T/sub 1/2/=550 ns, 8.59 MeV isomer in /sup 147/Gd have been studied using the (/sup 30/Si, 5n) reaction. Results from ..gamma gamma.. coincidence, angular distribution and recoil distance measurements are combined to establish a level scheme up to 16.9 MeV and I approx. = 79/2. Single particle configurations are assigned on the basis of the deformed independent particle model. The single particle nature of the highest spin states and the apparent lack of collectivity is discussed.

  1. Measurement of switching field reduction of single domain particles in a two-dimensional array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vértesy, G.; Pardavi-Horvath, M.

    2001-12-01

    The mechanism of switching of uniaxial, single domain, single crystalline epitaxial garnet particles on a two-dimensional square array was investigated, and the reason for the wide distribution of switching fields was studied. In spite that the particles were found very uniform, the existence of soft magnetic defects, not connected to visible crystalline or manufacturing defects of the material, was found to be responsible for the broad distribution of the switching field, Hc=280±85 Oe, as measured on a large number of individual particles. Very good quantitative correlation was found between the strength of the these defects and the switching field.

  2. [Analysis of Single Particle Aging and Mixing State at an Agriculture Site (Quzhou) in the North China Plain in Summer Using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zi-long; Zeng, Li-mm; Dong, I-Iua-Bin; Li, Mei; Zhu, Tong

    2016-04-15

    To characterize the size distribution and chemical ompsitins f abiet prtices t a agicuturesit intheNorh o Chinese Plain, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed from June 30 to July 8, 2013. A total of 230,152 particles in the size range of 0.2-2.0 pm were chemically analyzed with both positive and negative ion spectra. The results revealed that aerosol could he classified into eight dominant groups, including elemental carbon (EC, 55.5%), organic carbon (OC, 10.7%), alkalis (Na-K, 17.4%), other metals (1.7%), Fe-rich (6.3%), Pb-rich (3.1%), dust (4.8%), and other (0.8%). The observed eight types of particles contained secondary components such as 46NO2-, 62NO3-, 96SO3-, 96SO4-, 97HSO4-, showing that they probably went through different aging processes. The analysis of particle size distribution showed that 700-800 nm was the peak value of all particles, and that dust and Fe particles were mainly in the coarse size range. EC particles subtype group research revealed EC particles tended to be aging with the above mentioned secondary ions and eventually led to a particle type conversion from EC to the less aging ECN and the more serious aging ECS, the diurnal variation of which was obviously negatively correlated, and there was a possibility of forming OC/EC mixture with the adsorption of secondary organic matter on EC surface.

  3. Effect of particle shape and structure on the results of single-particle light-scattering size analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umhauer, H; Bottlinger, M

    1991-11-20

    To evaluate quantitatively the influence exerted by the shape and structure of nonspherical, nonideal particles on the results of single-particle scattered-light size analysis, measurements were conducted with individual particles of different materials (glass, limestone, and quartz). For this purpose, the particles were suspended in an electrodynamic balance and repeatedly passed through the analyzer's measuring volume with a continually changing random orientation. The scattered-light signal spectra thus obtained specify the probability with which a certain pulse height is induced when the particle passes once through the measuring volume at a given coincidental orientation. The spectra reflect the material-characteristic influence. They allow the loss of resolution of common scattered-light size analyses to be assessed and algorithms (matrices) to be compiled with which the shape and structure influence may be mathematically eliminated. Because a shape and structure independent size parameter is also determined from the individual particles, exact calibration curves can be derived in which the shape and structure influence are incorporated.

  4. Probing the Evaporation Dynamics of Mixed SOA/Squalane Particles Using Size-Resolved Composition and Single-Particle Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ellis Shipley; Saleh, Rawad; Donahue, Neil M

    2015-08-18

    An analysis of the formation and evaporation of mixed-particles containing squalane (a surrogate for hydrophobic primary organic aerosol, POA) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is presented. In these experiments, one material (D62-squalane or SOA from α-pinene + O3) was prepared first to serve as surface area for condensation of the other, forming the mixed-particles. The mixed-particles were then subjected to a heating-ramp from 22 to 44 °C. We were able to determine that (1) almost all of the SOA mass is comprised of material less volatile than D62-squalane; (2) AMS collection efficiency in these mixed-particle systems can be parametrized as a function of the relative mass fraction of the components; and (3) the vast majority of D62-squalane is able to evaporate from the mixed particles, and does so on the same time scale regardless of the order of preparation. We also performed two-population mixing experiments to directly test whether D62-squalane and SOA from α-pinene + O3 form a single solution or two separate phases. We find that these two OA types are immiscible, which informs our inference of the morphology of the mixed-particles. If the morphology is core-shell and dictated by the order of preparation, these data indicate that squalane is able to diffuse relatively quickly through the SOA shell, implying that there are no major diffusion limitations.

  5. Impact of morphology on the radiative properties of fractal soot aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doner, Nimeti; Liu, Fengshan

    2017-01-01

    The impact of morphology on the radiative properties of fractal soot aggregates was investigated using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The optical properties of four different types of aggregates of freshly emitted soot with a fractal dimension D f =1.65 and a fractal pre-factor k f =1.76 were calculated. The four types of aggregates investigated are formed by uniform primary particles in point-touch, by uniform but overlapping primary particles, by uniform but enlarged primary particles in point-touch, and formed by point-touch and polydisperse primary particles. The radiative properties of aggregates consisting of N=20, 56 and 103 primary particles were numerically evaluated for a given refractive index at 0.532 and 1.064 μm. The radiative properties of soot aggregates vary strongly with the volume equivalent radius a eff and wavelength. The accuracy of DDA was evaluated in the first and fourth cases against the generalized multi-sphere Mie (GMM) solution in terms of the vertical–vertical differential scattering cross section (C vv ). The model predicted the average relative deviations from the base case to be within 15–25% for C vv , depending on the number of particles for the aggregate. The scattering cross sections are only slightly affected by the overlapping but more significantly influenced by primary particle polydispersity. It was also found that the enlargement of primary particles by 20% has a strong effect on soot aggregate radiative properties. - Highlights: • The radiative properties of aggregates of N=20, 56 and 103 primary particles were investigated. • Four different cases, formed by point-touch, overlapping, aggregate expansion and polydispersion, were studied. • The effects of overlapping and aggregate expansion on morphology are found to be the same.

  6. Single-Particle Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Utilizing a Femtosecond Desorption and Ionization Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadowicz, Maria A; Abdelmonem, Ahmed; Mohr, Claudia; Saathoff, Harald; Froyd, Karl D; Murphy, Daniel M; Leisner, Thomas; Cziczo, Daniel J

    2015-12-15

    Single-particle time-of-flight mass spectrometry has now been used since the 1990s to determine particle-to-particle variability and internal mixing state. Instruments commonly use 193 nm excimer or 266 nm frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG lasers to ablate and ionize particles in a single step. We describe the use of a femtosecond laser system (800 nm wavelength, 100 fs pulse duration) in combination with an existing single-particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The goal of this project was to determine the suitability of a femtosecond laser for single-particle studies via direct comparison to the excimer laser (193 nm wavelength, ∼10 ns pulse duration) usually used with the instrument. Laser power, frequency, and polarization were varied to determine the effect on mass spectra. Atmospherically relevant materials that are often used in laboratory studies, ammonium nitrate and sodium chloride, were used for the aerosol. Detection of trace amounts of a heavy metal, lead, in an ammonium nitrate matrix was also investigated. The femtosecond ionization had a large air background not present with the 193 nm excimer and produced more multiply charged ions. Overall, we find that femtosecond laser ablation and ionization of aerosol particles is not radically different than that provided by a 193 nm excimer.

  7. The effect of transitional particles driven by single wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Yunqing; Xia Mengfen

    1987-05-01

    The unperturbed separatrix crossing driven by a single wave in a tokamak plasma is discussed. The separatrix crossing is followed by a mixing process, and a small-scale structure occurs in the distribution function in h-ψ plane. The separatrix crossing is a convective process in h-ψ plane, and there is a definite crossing channel. The convective flux and the net flux in h-direction are calculated. The separatrix crossing is accompanied by a radial flux, which is composed of a directional flux and a diffusion flux. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs

  8. Deflection of high energy channeled charged particles by elastically bent silicon single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, W.M.; Kim, I.J.; Pisharodoy, M.; Salman, S.M.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, G.H.; Wijayawardana, R.; Forster, J.S.; Mitchell, I.V.; Baker, S.I.; Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Toohig, T.E.; Avdeichikov, V.V.; Ellison, J.A.; Siffert, P.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment has been carried out to observe the deflection of charged particles by planar channeling in bent single crystals of silicon for protons with energy up to 180 GeV. Anomolous loss of particles from the center point of a three point bending apparatus was observed at high incident particle energy. This effect has been exploited to fashion a 'dechanneling spectrometer' to study dechanneling effects due to centripital displacement of channeled particle trajectories in a bent crystal. The bending losses generally conform to the predictions of calculations based on a classical model. (orig.)

  9. The on-line analysis of aerosol-delivered pharmaceuticals via single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrical, Bradley D; Balaxi, Maria; Fergenson, David

    2015-07-15

    The use of single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was evaluated for the analysis of inhaled pharmaceuticals to determine the mass distribution of the individual active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in both single ingredient and combination drug products. SPAMS is an analytical technique where the individual aerodynamic diameters and chemical compositions of many aerosol particles are determined in real-time. The analysis was performed using a Livermore Instruments SPAMS 3.0, which allowed the efficient analysis of aerosol particles with broad size distributions and can acquire data even under a very large particle load. Data similar to what would normally require roughly three days of experimentation and analysis was collected in a five minute period and analyzed automatically. The results were computed to be comparable to those returned by a typical Next Generation Impactor (NGI) particle size distribution experiment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Tagged particle in single-file diffusion with arbitrary initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cividini, J.; Kundu, A.

    2017-08-01

    We compute the full probability distribution of the positions of a tagged particle exactly for the given arbitrary initial positions of the particles, and for general single-particle propagators. We consider the thermodynamic limit of our exact expressions in quenched and annealed settings. For a particular class of single-particle propagators, the exact formula is expressed in a simple integral form in the quenched case whereas in the annealed case, it is expressed as a simple combination of Bessel functions. In particular, we focus on the step and the power-law initial configurations. In the former case, a drift is induced even when the one-particle propagators are symmetric. On the other hand, in the later case the scaling of the cumulants of the position of the tracer differs from the uniform case. We provide numerical verifications of our results.

  11. Silver nanoflowers for single-particle SERS with 10 pM sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shrawan; Muhammed Ajmal, C; Baik, Seunghyun; Kim, Jeongyong

    2017-11-17

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has received considerable attention as a noninvasive optical sensing technique with ultrahigh sensitivity. While numerous types of metallic particles have been actively investigated as SERS substrates, the development of new SERS agents with high sensitivity and their reliable characterization are still required. Here we report the preparation and characterization of flower-shaped silver (Ag) nanoparticles that exhibit high-sensitivity single-particle SERS performance. Ag nanoflowers (NFs) with bud sizes in the range 220-620 nm were synthesized by the wet synthesis method. The densely packed nanoscale petals with thicknesses in the range 9-22 nm exhibit a large number of hot spots that significantly enhance their plasmonic activity. A single Ag NF particle (530-620 nm) can detect as little as 10 -11 M 4-mercaptobenzoic acid, and thus provides a sensitivity three orders of SERS magnitude greater than that of a spherical Ag nanoparticle. The analytical enhancement factors for single Ag NF particles were found to be as high as 8.0 × 10 9 , providing unprecedented high SERS detectivity at the single particle level. Here we present an unambiguous and systematic assessment of the SERS performances of the Ag NFs and demonstrate that they provide highly sensitive sensing platforms by single SERS particle.

  12. Soot measurements by two angle scattering and extinction in an N 2 -diluted ethylene/air counterflow diffusion flame from 2 to 5 atm

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Hafiz M.F.

    2016-06-27

    The soot formed in an N-diluted ethylene/air counterflow diffusion flame at elevated pressure was investigated using two angle light scattering/extinction technique. To provide a well-controlled pressurized environment for the flame, a novel pressure vessel was built with the required optical access. The soot parameters were measured along the centerline of the counterflow flame. These properties included soot volume fraction (f ), primary particle diameter (d ), population averaged radius of gyration (R ) and number density of primary particles (n ). The Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory for Fractal Aggregates (RDG-FA) was used to retrieve these properties from scattering and extinction measurements. Soot volume fraction was measured via light extinction from 2 to 5atm while maintaining the same global strain rate at all pressures. Scattered light from soot particles was measured at 45° and 135° and primary particle diameter was calculated using scattering/extinction ratio and the radius of gyration was determined from the dissymmetry ratio. Soot volume fraction, primary particle diameter and radius of gyration all increased with pressure while the number density of primary particles decreased with increasing pressure.

  13. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single-particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Healy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single-particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been determined using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC, organic aerosol (OA, ammonium, nitrate, sulfate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, a thermal–optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC. ATOFMS-derived estimated mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67–0.78, and 10 discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorisation, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulfate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA / EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidised OA (OOA was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the range of primary and secondary organic aerosol mixing states in Paris. Examination of the

  14. Size-resolved measurement of the mixing state of soot in the megacity Beijing, China: diurnal cycle, aging and parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. F. Cheng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles are the most efficient light absorbing aerosol species in the atmosphere, playing an important role as a driver of global warming. Their climate effects strongly depend on their mixing state, which significantly changes their light absorbing capability and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity. Therefore, knowledge about the mixing state of soot and its aging mechanism becomes an important topic in the atmospheric sciences.

    The size-resolved (30–320 nm diameter mixing state of soot particles in polluted megacity air was measured at a suburban site (Yufa during the CAREBeijing 2006 campaign in Beijing, using a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA. Particles in this size range with non-volatile residuals at 300 °C were considered to be soot particles. On average, the number fraction of internally mixed soot in total soot particles (Fin, decreased from 0.80 to 0.57 when initial Dp increased from 30 to 320 nm. Further analysis reveals that: (1 Fin was well correlated with the aerosol hygroscopic mixing state measured by a CCN counter. More externally mixed soot particles were observed when particles showed more heterogeneous features with regard to hygroscopicity. (2 Fin had pronounced diurnal cycles. For particles in the accumulation mode (Dp at 100–320 nm, largest Fin were observed at noon time, with "apparent" turnover rates (kex → in up to 7.8% h−1. (3 Fin was subject to competing effects of both aging and emissions. While aging increases Fin by converting externally mixed soot particles into internally mixed ones, emissions tend to reduce Fin by emitting more fresh and externally mixed soot particles. Similar competing effects were also found with air mass age indicators. (4 Under the estimated emission

  15. Remote sensing of soot carbon – Part 2: Understanding the absorption Ångström exponent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Schuster

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, some authors have suggested that the absorption Ångström exponent (AAE can be used to deduce the component aerosol absorption optical depths (AAODs of carbonaceous aerosols in the AERONET database. This AAE approach presumes that AAE ≪ 1 for soot carbon, which contrasts the traditional small particle limit of AAE = 1 for soot carbon. Thus, we provide an overview of the AERONET retrieval, and we investigate how the microphysics of carbonaceous aerosols can be interpreted in the AERONET AAE product. We find that AAE ≪ 1 in the AERONET database requires large coarse mode fractions and/or imaginary refractive indices that increase with wavelength. Neither of these characteristics are consistent with the current definition of soot carbon, so we explore other possibilities for the cause of AAE ≪ 1. AAE is related to particle size, and coarse mode particles have a smaller AAE than fine mode particles for a given aerosol mixture of species. We also note that the mineral goethite has an imaginary refractive index that increases with wavelength, is very common in dust regions, and can easily contribute to AAE ≪ 1. We find that AAE ≪ 1 can not be caused by soot carbon, unless soot carbon has an imaginary refractive index that increases with wavelength throughout the visible and near-infrared spectrums. Finally, AAE is not a robust parameter for separating carbonaceous absorption from dust aerosol absorption in the AERONET database.

  16. Reservoir patterns of soot, organic particles, total carbon, soluble substances and aerosols (numbers and mass) in the droplet and interstitial phase of clouds; Reservoiraufteilung von Russ, organischen Bestandteilen, Gesamtkohlenstoff, loeslichen Substanzen und Aerosolpartikeln (Anzahl und Masse) in der Tropfen- und Zwischenraumphase von Wolken. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieprecht, W.; Acker, K.; Moeller, D.; Auel, R.; Hofmeister, J.; Kalass, D.

    2002-07-01

    The reservoir patterns of the constitutents of representative clouds over Germany were investigated for a better characterisation of their optical, microphysical and chemical properties. One of the key points of interest was the distribution of carbonaceous aerosol particles in the droplet and interstitial phase, which was to provide information on the role of absorbing (soot or BC) and organic carbon (OC) in cloud formation. Data about the effects of potential CCN on cloud characteristics and about the changes in aerosol particles induced by cloud processes are required as input for models of the chemical and climate effects of atmospheric aerosol. [German] Ziel des Projektes war eine moeglichst umfassende experimentelle Ermittlung der Reservoiraufteilung der Inhaltsstoffe repraesentativer Wolken ueber der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, um ihre optischen, mikrophysikalischen und chemischen Eigenschaften besser zu charakterisieren. Ein besonderer Schwerpunkt des Gesamtprojekts lag auf der Bestimmung der Verteilung kohlenstoffhaltiger Aerosolpartikel auf die Tropfen- und interstitielle Phase, um Aufschluesse ueber die Rolle von absorbierendem (Russ oder BC) und organischem Kohlenstoff (OC) bei der Wolkenbildung zu erhalten. Erkenntnisse sowohl ueber die Beeinflussung potentieller CCN auf Wolkeneigenschaften als auch ueber die Veraenderung der Aerosolpartikel durch Wolkenprozesse sind erforderlich als Eingangsdaten in entsprechende Modelle, um die chemischen und klimatischen Effekte des atmosphaerischen Aerosols zu bestimmen. (orig.)

  17. Mass Spectrometry of Single Particles Levitated in an Electrodynamic Balance: Applications to Laboratory Atmospheric Chemistry Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsall, A.; Krieger, U. K.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic changes to atmospheric aerosol particle composition (e.g., originating from evaporation/condensation, oxidative aging, or aqueous-phase chemical reactions) impact particle properties with importance for understanding particle effects on climate and human health. These changes can take place over the entire lifetime of an atmospheric particle, which can extend over multiple days. Previous laboratory studies of such processes have included analyzing single particles suspended in a levitation device, such as an electrodynamic balance (EDB), an optical levitator, or an acoustic trap, using optical detection techniques. However, studying chemically complex systems can require an analytical method, such as mass spectrometry, that provides more molecular specificity. Existing work coupling particle levitation with mass spectrometry is more limited and largely has consisted of acoustic levitation of millimeter-sized droplets.In this work an EDB has been coupled with a custom-built ionization source and commercial time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MS) as a platform for laboratory atmospheric chemistry research. Single charged particles (radius 10 μm) have been injected into an EDB, levitated for an arbitrarily long period of time, and then transferred to a vaporization-corona discharge ionization region for MS analysis. By analyzing a series of particles of identical composition, residing in the controlled environment of the EDB for varying times, we can trace the chemical evolution of a particle over hours or days, appropriate timescales for understanding transformations of atmospheric particles.To prove the concept of our EDB-MS system, we have studied the evaporation of particles consisting of polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules of mixed chain lengths, used as a benchmark system. Our system can quantify the composition of single particles (see Figure for sample spectrum of a single PEG-200 particle: PEG parent ions labeled with m/z, known PEG fragment ions

  18. Digital atom interferometer with single particle control on a discretized space-time geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Andreas; Alberti, Andrea; Alt, Wolfgang; Belmechri, Noomen; Hild, Sebastian; Karski, Michał; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2012-06-19

    Engineering quantum particle systems, such as quantum simulators and quantum cellular automata, relies on full coherent control of quantum paths at the single particle level. Here we present an atom interferometer operating with single trapped atoms, where single particle wave packets are controlled through spin-dependent potentials. The interferometer is constructed from a sequence of discrete operations based on a set of elementary building blocks, which permit composing arbitrary interferometer geometries in a digital manner. We use this modularity to devise a space-time analogue of the well-known spin echo technique, yielding insight into decoherence mechanisms. We also demonstrate mesoscopic delocalization of single atoms with a separation-to-localization ratio exceeding 500; this result suggests their utilization beyond quantum logic applications as nano-resolution quantum probes in precision measurements, being able to measure potential gradients with precision 5 x 10(-4) in units of gravitational acceleration g.

  19. Single particle transfer for quantitative analysis with total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Esaka, Konomi T.; Magara, Masaaki; Sakurai, Satoshi; Usuda, Shigekazu; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    The technique of single particle transfer was applied to quantitative analysis with total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry. The technique was evaluated by performing quantitative analysis of individual Cu particles with diameters between 3.9 and 13.2 μm. The direct quantitative analysis of the Cu particle transferred onto a Si carrier gave a discrepancy between measured and calculated Cu amounts due to the absorption effects of incident and fluorescent X-rays within the particle. By the correction for the absorption effects, the Cu amounts in individual particles could be determined with the deviation within 10.5%. When the Cu particles were dissolved with HNO 3 solution prior to the TXRF analysis, the deviation was improved to be within 3.8%. In this case, no correction for the absorption effects was needed for quantification

  20. Optical measurements of soot and temperature profiles in premixed propane-oxygen flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, V. J.; Pagni, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    Two laser diagnostic techniques were used to measure soot volume fractions, number densities and soot particle radii in premixed propane/oxygen flat flames. The two techniques used were two wavelength extinction, using 514.5 nm to 632.8 nm and 457.9 nm to 632.8 nm wavelength combinations, and extinction/scattering using 514.5 nm light. The flames were fuel-rich (equivalence ratios from 2.1 to 2.8) and had cold gas velocities varying from 3.4 to 5.5 cm/s. Measurements were made at various heights above the sintered-bronze, water-cooled flat flame burner with the equivalence ratio and cold gas velocity fixed. Also, measurements were made at a fixed height above the burner and fixed cold gas velocity while varying the equivalence ratio. Both laser techniques are based on the same underlying assumptions of particle size distribution and soot optical properties. Full Mie theory was used to determine the extinction coefficients K sub ext, and the scattering efficiencies, Q sub vv. Temperature measurements in the flames were made using infrared radiometry. Good agreement between the two techniques in terms of soot particle radii, number density and volume fraction was found for intensity ratios (I/I sub o) between 0.1 and 0.8. For intensity ratios higher or lower than this range, the differences in extinction coefficients at the wavelengths chosen for the two-wavelength method are too small to give accurate results for comparing particle radii and number densities. However, when comparing only soot volume fractions, the agreement between the two techniques continued to be good for intensity ratios up to 0.95.

  1. Single particle detection: Phase control in submicron Hall sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Shelly, Connor; Gallop, John; Kazakova, Olga

    2010-01-01

    We present a phase-sensitive ac-dc Hall magnetometry method which allows a clear and reliable separation of real and parasitic magnetic signals of a very small magnitude. High-sensitivity semiconductor-based Hall crosses are generally accepted as a preferential solution for non-invasive detection of superparamagnetic nanobeads used in molecular biology, nanomedicine, and nanochemistry. However, detection of such small beads is often hindered by inductive pick-up and other spurious signals. The present work demonstrates an unambiguous experimental route for detection of small magnetic moments and provides a simple theoretical background for it. The reliability of the method has been tested for a variety of InSb Hall sensors in the range 600 nm-5 μm. Complete characterization of empty devices, involving Hall coefficients and noise measurements, has been performed and detection of a single FePt bead with diameter of 140 nm and magnetic moment of μ≅10 8 μ B has been achieved with a 600 nm-wide sensor.

  2. A study of radiative properties of fractal soot aggregates using the superposition T-matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Liu; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Patrick Arnott, W.

    2008-01-01

    We employ the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method to perform extensive computations of scattering and absorption properties of soot aggregates with varying state of compactness and size. The fractal dimension, D f , is used to quantify the geometrical mass dispersion of the clusters. The optical properties of soot aggregates for a given fractal dimension are complex functions of the refractive index of the material m, the number of monomers N S , and the monomer radius a. It is shown that for smaller values of a, the absorption cross section tends to be relatively constant when D f f >2. However, a systematic reduction in light absorption with D f is observed for clusters with sufficiently large N S , m, and a. The scattering cross section and single-scattering albedo increase monotonically as fractals evolve from chain-like to more densely packed morphologies, which is a strong manifestation of the increasing importance of scattering interaction among spherules. Overall, the results for soot fractals differ profoundly from those calculated for the respective volume-equivalent soot spheres as well as for the respective external mixtures of soot monomers under the assumption that there are no electromagnetic interactions between the monomers. The climate-research implications of our results are discussed

  3. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Rosenlund Ahl, Sonja; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens T; Bohr, Tomas

    2015-07-01

    In a thought-provoking paper, Couder and Fort [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 154101 (2006)] describe a version of the famous double-slit experiment performed with droplets bouncing on a vertically vibrated fluid surface. In the experiment, an interference pattern in the single-particle statistics is found even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes place between different classical paths with precise amplitude and phase relations. In the double-slit experiment with walking droplets, these relations are lost since one of the paths is singled out by the droplet. To support our conclusions, we have carried out our own double-slit experiment, and our results, in particular the long and variable slit passage times of the droplets, cast strong doubt on the feasibility of the interference claimed by Couder and Fort. To understand theoretically the limitations of wave-driven particle systems as analogs to quantum mechanics, we introduce a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localized particle that generates a wave while being simultaneously guided by it. We show that the ensuing particle-wave dynamics can capture some characteristics of quantum mechanics such as orbital quantization. However, the particle-wave dynamics can not reproduce quantum mechanics in general, and we show that the single-particle statistics for our model in a double-slit experiment with an additional splitter plate differs qualitatively from that of quantum mechanics.

  4. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Rosenlund Ahl, Sonja; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens T.; Bohr, Tomas

    2015-07-01

    In a thought-provoking paper, Couder and Fort [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 154101 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.154101] describe a version of the famous double-slit experiment performed with droplets bouncing on a vertically vibrated fluid surface. In the experiment, an interference pattern in the single-particle statistics is found even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes place between different classical paths with precise amplitude and phase relations. In the double-slit experiment with walking droplets, these relations are lost since one of the paths is singled out by the droplet. To support our conclusions, we have carried out our own double-slit experiment, and our results, in particular the long and variable slit passage times of the droplets, cast strong doubt on the feasibility of the interference claimed by Couder and Fort. To understand theoretically the limitations of wave-driven particle systems as analogs to quantum mechanics, we introduce a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localized particle that generates a wave while being simultaneously guided by it. We show that the ensuing particle-wave dynamics can capture some characteristics of quantum mechanics such as orbital quantization. However, the particle-wave dynamics can not reproduce quantum mechanics in general, and we show that the single-particle statistics for our model in a double-slit experiment with an additional splitter plate differs qualitatively from that of quantum mechanics.

  5. Morphology of single inhalable particle inside public transit biodiesel fueled bus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandilya, Kaushik K; Kumar, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    In an urban-transit bus, fueled by biodiesel in Toledo, Ohio, single inhalable particle samples in October 2008 were collected and detected by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS). Particle size analysis found bimodal distribution at 0.2 and 0.5 microm. The particle morphology was characterized by 14 different shape clusters: square, pentagon, hexagon, heptagon, octagon, nonagon, decagon, agglomerate, sphere, triangle, oblong, strip, line or stick, and unknown, by quantitative order. The square particles were common in the samples. Round and triangle particles are more, and pentagon, hexagon, heptagon, octagon, nonagon, decagon, strip, line or sticks are less. Agglomerate particles were found in abundance. The surface of most particles was coarse with a fractal edge that can provide a suitable chemical reaction bed in the polluted atmospheric environment. The three sorts of surface patterns of squares were smooth, semi-smooth, and coarse. The three sorts of square surface patterns represented the morphological characteristics of single inhalable particles in the air inside the bus in Toledo. The size and shape distribution results were compared to those obtained for a bus using ultra low sulfur diesel.

  6. The Ångström Exponent and Turbidity of Soot Component in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: In this work, we extracted data from Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) using. FORTRAN program to model the effect of soot on optical depth, scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient, single scattering albedo, extinction coefficient and asymmetry parameter at spectral range of 0.25 to 1.00 μm ...

  7. The Ångström Exponent and Turbidity of Soot Component in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OPAC) using FORTRAN program to model the effect of soot on optical depth, scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient, single scattering albedo, extinction coefficient and asymmetry parameter at spectral range of 0.25 to 1.00 ƒÝm for eight ...

  8. Particulate matter emission modelling based on soot and SOF from direct injection diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, P.Q.; Hu, Z.Y.; Deng, K.Y.; Lu, J.X.; Lou, D.M.; Wan, G.

    2007-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emission is one of the major pollutants from diesel engines, and it is harmful for human health and influences the atmospheric visibility. In investigations for reducing PM emission, a simulation model for PM emission is a useful tool. In this paper, a phenomenological, composition based PM model of direct injection (DI) diesel engines has been proposed and formulated to simulate PM emission. The PM emission model is based on a quasi-dimensional multi-zone combustion model using the formation mechanisms of the two main compositions of PM: soot and soluble organic fraction (SOF). First, the quasi-dimensional multi-zone combustion model is given. Then, two models for soot and SOF emissions are established, respectively, and after that, the two models are integrated into a single PM emission model. The soot emission model is given by the difference between a primary formation model and an oxidation model of soot. The soot primary formation model is the Hiroyasu soot formation model, and the Nagle and Strickland-Constable model is adopted for soot oxidation. The SOF emission model is based on an unburned hydrocarbons (HC) emission model, and the HC emission model is given by the difference between a HC primary formation model and a HC oxidation model. The HC primary formation model considers fuel injected and mixed beyond the lean combustion limit during ignition delay and fuel effusing from the nozzle sac volume at low pressure and low velocity. In order to validate the PM emission model, experiments were performed on a six cylinder, turbocharged and intercooled DI diesel engine. The simulation results show good agreement with the experimental data, which indicates the validity of the PM emission model. The calculation results show that the distinctions between PM and soot formation rates are mainly in the early combustion stage. The SOF formation has an important influence on the PM formation at lower loads, and soot formation dominates the

  9. Efficient low-temperature soot combustion by bimetallic Ag-Cu/SBA-15 catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhaojun; Duan, Xinping; Hu, Menglin; Cao, Yanning; Ye, Linmin; Jiang, Lilong; Yuan, Youzhu

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effects of copper (Cu) additive on the catalytic performance of Ag/SBA-15 in complete soot combustion were investigated. The soot combustion performance of bimetallic Ag-Cu/SBA-15 catalysts was higher than that of monometallic Ag and Cu catalysts. The optimum catalytic performance was acquired with the 5Ag 1 -Cu 0.1 /SBA-15 catalyst, on which the soot combustion starts at T ig =225°C with a T 50 =285°C. The temperature for 50% of soot combustion was lower than that of conventional Ag-based catalysts to more than 50°C (Aneggi et al., 2009). Physicochemical characterizations of the catalysts indicated that addition of Cu into Ag could form smaller bimetallic Ag-Cu nanolloy particles, downsizing the mean particle size from 3.7nm in monometallic catalyst to 2.6nm in bimetallic Ag-Cu catalyst. Further experiments revealed that Ag and Cu species elicited synergistic effects, subsequently increasing the content of surface active oxygen species. As a result, the structure modifications of Ag by the addition of Cu strongly intensified the catalytic performance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Modelling and Simulation of Packed Bed Catalytic Converter for Oxidation of Soot in Diesel Powered Vehicles Flue Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nasikin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diesel vehicle is used in Indonesia in very big number. This vehicle exhausts pollutants especially diesel soot that can be reduces by using a catalytic converter to convert the soot to CO2. To obtain the optimal dimension of catalytic converter it is needed a model that can represent the profile of soot weight, temperature and pressure along the catalytic converter. In this study, a model is developed for packed bed catalytic converter in an adiabatic condition based on a kinetic study that has been  reported previously. Calculation of developed equations in this model uses Polymath 5.X solver with Range Kutta Method. The simulation result shows that temperature profile along catalytic converter increases with the decrease of soot weight,  while pressure profile decreases. The increase of soot weight in entering gas increases the needed converter length. On the other hand, the increase of catalyst diameter does not affect to soot weight along converter and temperature profile, but results a less pressure drop. For 2.500 c diesel engine, packed bed catalytic converter with ellipse's cross sectional of 14,5X7,5 cm diagonal and 0,8 cm catalyst particle diameter, needs 4,1 cm length.

  11. Single particle Green's functions calculation of the electrical conductivity of strong correlated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, W.A.

    A calculation of the electrical conductivity for Hubbard materials is presented which is valid when U/t >> 1 (U being the Coulomb repulsion and t the nearest neighbor hopping energy) for arbitrary electron concentration and temperature. The derivation emploies the single particle Green's functions with real and imaginary times instead of the usual two-particle real time Green's function. The result is compared with the experimental data available for some organic charge transfer salts [pt

  12. A new seniority scheme for non-degenerate single particle orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, T.; Arima, A.

    1978-01-01

    A new method is proposed in the treatment of the seniority scheme. The method enables one to evaluate analytically the contribution from J = 0 Cooper pairs in non-degenerate single-particle orbits to many-body matrix elements. It includes the SU(2) quasi-spin and the BCS approximation as two extreme limits. The effect of particle number conservation is properly taken into account. (Auth.)

  13. Centroids of effective interactions from measured single-particle energies: An application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    Centroids of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction for the mass region A=28--64 are extracted directly from experimental single-particle spectra, by comparing single-particle energies relative to different cores. Uncertainties in the centroids are estimated at approximately 100 keV, except in cases of exceptional fragmentation of the single-particle strength. The use of a large number of inert cores allows the dependence of the interaction on mass or model space to be investigated. The method permits accurate empirical modifications to be made to realistic interactions calculated from bare nucleon-nucleon potentials, which are known to possess defective centroids in many cases. In addition, the centroids can be used as input to the more sophisticated fitting procedures that are employed to produce matrix elements of the effective interaction

  14. Single Particle ICP-MS: Advances toward routine analysis of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño, Manuel D; Olesik, John W; Barber, Angela G; Challis, Katie; Ranville, James F

    2016-07-01

    From its early beginnings in characterizing aerosol particles to its recent applications for investigating natural waters and waste streams, single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) has proven to be a powerful technique for the detection and characterization of aqueous dispersions of metal-containing nanomaterials. Combining the high-throughput of an ensemble technique with the specificity of a single particle counting technique and the elemental specificity of ICP-MS, spICP-MS is capable of rapidly providing researchers with information pertaining to size, size distribution, particle number concentration, and major elemental composition with minimal sample perturbation. Recently, advances in data acquisition, signal processing, and the implementation of alternative mass analyzers (e.g., time-of-flight) has resulted in a wider breadth of particle analyses and made significant progress toward overcoming many of the challenges in the quantitative analysis of nanoparticles. This review provides an overview of spICP-MS development from a niche technique to application for routine analysis, a discussion of the key issues for quantitative analysis, and examples of its further advancement for analysis of increasingly complex environmental and biological samples. Graphical Abstract Single particle ICP-MS workflow for the analysis of suspended nanoparticles.

  15. Changes in radiative properties of soot contaminated maize canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, B.; Anda, A.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of particle (Black Carbon, BC) on certain radiative characteristics of maize plants was studied over 2011 growing season in a field experiment carried out in Keszthely Agrometeorological Research Station. As the main constituent of BC, the soot that is almost exclusively responsible for light absorption by particles in the atmosphere, thus changing the radiation balance of the Earth and contributing to global warming. Maize hybrid Perlona (FAO 340) with short-season was applied as test plant. Of the two water supply treatments, the rainfed variant was sown in field plots, while compensation evapotranspirometers of the Thornthwaite type were used for the "ad libitum" treatment. The BC applied as pollutant was coming from the Hankook Tyre Company (Dunaújváros, Hungary), where it is used to improve the wear resistance of the tyres. The black carbon was chemically "pure", i.e. it is free of other contaminants (heavy metals etc.), so the reproducibility of the experiment is not problematic, unlike that of tests on other atmospheric air pollutants. Road traffic was simulated by using frequent low particle rates (3 g m-2 week-1) with a motorised sprayer of SP 415 type, during the season. The leaf area index was measured each week on the same 12 sample plants in each treatment using an LI 3000A automatic planimeter (LI-COR, Lincoln, NE). The impact of black carbon on plant radiative properties were analysed in the field (about 0.3 ha/treatment). Pyranometers of the CMA-11 type (Kipp & Zonen, Vaisala) were installed on columns of adjustable height in the centre of the 0.3 ha plots designated for albedo measurements. Data were collected using a Logbox SD (Kipp & Zonen, Vaisala) datalogger in the form of 10-minute means of samples taken every 6 seconds. BC pollution had no effect on maize growth and development. Compared with soot contaminated and control plants, we concluded that the LAI was a few percent higher in polluted plants, but this increment was not

  16. Impact of KCl impregnation on single particle combustion of wood and torrefied wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Zhimin; Jian, Jie; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2017-01-01

    In this work, single particle combustion of raw and torrefied 4 mm wood particles with different potassium content obtained by KCl impregnation and washing was studied experimentally under a condition of 1225 °C, 3.1% O2 and 26.1% H2O. The ignition time and devolatilization time depended almost......, and unchanged by torrefaction. Compared to the raw wood particle, the char conversion time was increased by torrefaction, decreased by washing, and almost unchanged by KCl impregnation due to its promoting effect on both char yield and reactivity....

  17. A versatile optical microscope for time-dependent single-molecule and single-particle spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Yang, Haw

    2018-03-28

    This work reports the design and implementation of a multi-function optical microscope for time-dependent spectroscopy on single molecules and single nanoparticles. It integrates the now-routine single-object measurements into one standalone platform so that no reconfiguration is needed when switching between different types of sample or spectroscopy modes. The illumination modes include evanescent field through total internal reflection, dark-field illumination, and epi-excitation onto a diffraction-limited spot suitable for confocal detection. The detection modes include spectrally resolved line imaging, wide-field imaging with dual-color capability, and two-color single-element photon-counting detection. The switch between different spectroscopy and data acquisition modes is fully automated and executed through computer programming. The capability of this microscope is demonstrated through selected proof-of-principle experiments.

  18. A versatile optical microscope for time-dependent single-molecule and single-particle spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Yang, Haw

    2018-03-01

    This work reports the design and implementation of a multi-function optical microscope for time-dependent spectroscopy on single molecules and single nanoparticles. It integrates the now-routine single-object measurements into one standalone platform so that no reconfiguration is needed when switching between different types of sample or spectroscopy modes. The illumination modes include evanescent field through total internal reflection, dark-field illumination, and epi-excitation onto a diffraction-limited spot suitable for confocal detection. The detection modes include spectrally resolved line imaging, wide-field imaging with dual-color capability, and two-color single-element photon-counting detection. The switch between different spectroscopy and data acquisition modes is fully automated and executed through computer programming. The capability of this microscope is demonstrated through selected proof-of-principle experiments.

  19. Temperature, Oxygen, and Soot-Volume-Fraction Measurements in a Turbulent C2H4-Fueled Jet Flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearney, Sean P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Winters, Caroline [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farias, Paul Abraham [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grasser, Thomas W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hewson, John C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed set of measurements from a piloted, sooting, turbulent C 2 H 4 - fueled diffusion flame. Hybrid femtosecond/picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used to monitor temperature and oxygen, while laser-induced incandescence (LII) is applied for imaging of the soot volume fraction in the challenging jet-flame environment at Reynolds number, Re = 20,000. Single-laser shot results are used to map the mean and rms statistics, as well as probability densities. LII data from the soot-growth region of the flame are used to benchmark the soot source term for one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) modeling of this turbulent flame. The ODT code is then used to predict temperature and oxygen fluctuations higher in the soot oxidation region higher in the flame.

  20. Characterization of biomass combustion at high temperatures based on an upgraded single particle model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jun; Paul, Manosh C.; Younger, Paul L.; Watson, Ian; Hossain, Mamdud; Welch, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • High temperature rapid biomass combustion is studied based on single particle model. • Particle size changes in devolatilization and char oxidation models are addressed. • Time scales of various thermal sub-processes are compared and discussed. • Potential solutions are suggested to achieve better biomass co-firing performances. - Abstract: Biomass co-firing is becoming a promising solution to reduce CO 2 emissions, due to its renewability and carbon neutrality. Biomass normally has high moisture and volatile contents, complicating its combustion behavior, which is significantly different from that of coal. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) combustion model of a single biomass particle is employed to study high-temperature rapid biomass combustion. The two-competing-rate model and kinetics/diffusion model are used to model biomass devolatilization reaction and char burnout process, respectively, in which the apparent kinetics used for those two models were from high temperatures and high heating rates tests. The particle size changes during the devolatilization and char burnout are also considered. The mass loss properties and temperature profile during the biomass devolatilization and combustion processes are predicted; and the timescales of particle heating up, drying, devolatilization, and char burnout are compared and discussed. Finally, the results shed light on the effects of particle size on the combustion behavior of biomass particle

  1. Linkage between [|#11#|]morphology and optical properties of soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarnato, B.; Richard, D. T.; vahidinia, S.; Hillyard, P.; Strawa, A. W.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Preble, C.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    2011-12-01

    Black Carbon (BC) containing aerosols that are generally hydrophobic upon emission become increasingly mixed with other aerosol material through condensation and coagulation. In polluted urban air, BC becomes internally mixed with organics and sulfate on a time scale of about 12 hours. Recent studies have indicated that the photo-absorption by BC is enhanced as a consequence of the internal mixing of BC with these other aerosol materials. To estimate this absorption enhancement, we have undertaken laboratory studies involving the mixing of initially uncoated BC produced from the combustion of a methane diffusion flame with inorganic and organic compounds. Particle size distributions are used as a first indicator of coating. We use Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to characterize the fractal and shape factors of the generated uncoated and coated BC (see Fig.1 and Fig.2). We create modeled aggregates with the same characteristics as those analyzed at the SEM and we initialize a radiation transfer model (ddscatt) to estimate optical properties of uncoated and coated BC. We quantify absorption enhancement due to coating as a function of aggregate morphology. We use Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to determine the mixing state and to aid in distinguishing between absorption enhancement caused by fractal collapse and surface coating. This paper will show the relationships between soot morphology, coating and optical properties. SEM and TEM imaged of uncoated and coated soot a will be presented.

  2. Quantum chaos in nuclear single-particle motion and damping of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Santanu; Mukhopadhyay, Tapan

    1995-01-01

    The spectral statistics of single particle motion in deformed cavities with axial symmetry are presented. The single particle motion in the cavities considered are non-integrable and the systematics of the fluctuation measures of the spectra reveal a transition from regular to chaotic regime in the corresponding classical systems. Quantitative estimate of the degree of chaos enables us to introduce a correction factor to the one-body wall formula for the damping widths of isoscalar giant resonances. The damping widths calculated with this correction factor give much better agreement with experimental values than earlier calculations of one-body damping widths. (author). 21 refs., 5 figs

  3. The application of single particle hydrodynamics in continuum models of multiphase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Rand

    1988-01-01

    A review of the application of single particle hydrodynamics in models for the exchange of interphase momentum in continuum models of multiphase flow is presented. Considered are the equations of motion for a laminar, mechanical two phase flow. Inherent to this theory is a model for the interphase exchange of momentum due to drag between the dispersed particulate and continuous fluid phases. In addition, applications of two phase flow theory to de-mixing flows require the modeling of interphase momentum exchange due to lift forces. The applications of single particle analysis in deriving models for drag and lift are examined.

  4. Preparation of Disease-Related Protein Assemblies for Single Particle Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron Varano, A; Harafuji, Naoe; Dearnaley, William; Guay-Woodford, Lisa; Kelly, Deborah F

    2017-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is a rapidly growing area of structural biology that permits us to decode biological assemblies at the nanoscale. To examine biological materials for single particle EM analysis, purified assemblies must be obtained using biochemical separation techniques. Here, we describe effective methodologies for isolating histidine (his)-tagged protein assemblies from the nucleus of disease-relevant cell lines. We further demonstrate how isolated assemblies are visualized using single particle EM techniques and provide representative results for each step in the process.

  5. Single-particle characterization of the high-Arctic summertime aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sierau

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle mass-spectrometric measurements were carried out in the high Arctic north of 80° during summer 2008. The campaign took place onboard the icebreaker Oden and was part of the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS. The instrument deployed was an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS that provides information on the chemical composition of individual particles and their mixing state in real time. Aerosols were sampled in the marine boundary layer at stations in the open ocean, in the marginal ice zone, and in the pack ice region. The largest fraction of particles detected for subsequent analysis in the size range of the ATOFMS between approximately 200 and 3000 nm in diameter showed mass-spectrometric patterns, indicating an internal mixing state and a biomass burning and/or biofuel source. The majority of these particles were connected to an air mass layer of elevated particle concentration mixed into the surface mixed layer from the upper part of the marine boundary layer. The second largest fraction was represented by sea salt particles. The chemical analysis of the over-ice sea salt aerosol revealed tracer compounds that reflect chemical aging of the particles during their long-range advection from the marginal ice zone, or open waters south thereof prior to detection at the ship. From our findings we conclude that long-range transport of particles is one source of aerosols in the high Arctic. To assess the importance of long-range particle sources for aerosol–cloud interactions over the inner Arctic in comparison to local and regional biogenic primary aerosol sources, the chemical composition of the detected particles was analyzed for indicators of marine biological origin. Only a minor fraction showed chemical signatures of potentially ocean-derived primary particles of that kind. However, a chemical bias in the ATOFMS's detection capabilities observed during ASCOS might suggest the presence of a particle type of

  6. Building the Nanoplasmonics Toolbox Through Shape Modeling and Single Particle Optical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Emilie

    Interest in nanotechnology is driven by unprecedented properties tailorability, achievable by controlling particle structure and composition. Unlike bulk components, minute changes in size and shape affect the optical and electronic properties of nanoparticles. Characterization of such structure-function relationships and better understanding of structure control mechanisms is crucial to the development of applications such as plasmonic sensors and devices. The objective of the current research is thus twofold: to theoretically predict and understand how shape is controlled by synthesis conditions, and to experimentally unravel, through single particle studies, how shape, composition, size, and surrounding environment affect plasmonic properties in noble metal particles. Quantitative, predictive rules and fundamental knowledge obtained from this research contributes to the "nanoplasmonics toolbox", a library designed to provide scientists and engineers the tools to create and optimize novel nanotechnology applications. In this dissertation, single particle approaches are developed and used to unravel the effects of size, shape, substrate, aggregation state and surrounding environment on the optical response of metallic nanoparticles. Ag and Au nanocubes on different substrates are first presented, followed by the discussion of the concept of plasmon length, a universal parameter to describe plasmon energy for a variety of particle shapes and plasmon modes. Plasmonic sensing (both refractive index sensing and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy) and polarization effects are then studied at the single particle level. In the last two Chapters, analytical shape models based on the Wulff construction provide unique modeling tools for alloy and kinetically grown nanoparticles. The former reveals a size-dependence of the shape of small alloy particles (such as those used in catalysis) because of surface segregation, while the latter uniquely models the shape of many

  7. Single particle analysis with a 360/sup 0/ light scattering photometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholdi, M.F.

    1979-06-01

    Light scattering by single spherical homogeneous particles in the diameter range 1 to 20 ..mu..m and relative refractive index 1.20 is measured. Particle size of narrowly dispersed populations is determined and a multi-modal dispersion of five components is completely analyzed. A 360/sup 0/ light scattering photometer for analysis of single particles has been designed and developed. A fluid stream containing single particles intersects a focused laser beam at the primary focal point of an ellipsoidal reflector ring. The light scattered at angles theta = 2.5/sup 0/ to 177.5/sup 0/ at phi = 0/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ is reflected onto a circular array of photodiodes. The ellipsoidal reflector is situated in a chamber filled with fluid matching that of the stream to minimize refracting and reflecting interfaces. The detector array consists of 60 photodiodes each subtending 3/sup 0/ in scattering angle on 6/sup 0/ centers around 360/sup 0/. 32 measurements on individual particles can be acquired at rates of 500 particles per second. The intensity and angular distribution of light scattered by spherical particles are indicative of size and relative refractive index. Calculations, using Lorenz--Mie theory, of differential scattering patterns integrated over angle corresponding to the detector geometry determined the instrument response to particle size. From this the expected resolution and experimental procedures are determined.Ultimately, the photometer will be utilized for identification and discrimination of biological cells based on the sensitivity of light scattering to size, shape, refractive index differences, internal granularity, and other internal morphology. This study has demonstrated the utility of the photometer and indicates potential for application to light scattering studies of biological cells.

  8. Single Particle Laser Mass Spectrometry Applied to Differential Ice Nucleation Experiments at the AIDA Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallavardin, S. J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Lohmann, U.; Moehler, Ottmar; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Experiments conducted at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located in Karlsruhe, Germany permit investigation of particle properties that affect the nucleation of ice at temperature and water vapor conditions relevant to cloud microphysics and climate issues. Ice clouds were generated by heterogeneous nucleation of Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, and hematite and homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid. Ice crystals formed in the chamber were inertially separated from unactivated, or 'interstitial' aerosol particles with a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), then evaporated. The ice residue (i.e., the aerosol which initiated ice nucleation plus any material which was scavenged from the gas- and/or particle-phase), was chemically characterized at the single particle level using a laser ionization mass spectrometer. In this manner the species that first nucleated ice could be identified out of a mixed aerosol population in the chamber. Bare mineral dust particles were more effective ice nuclei (IN) than similar particles with a coating. Metallic particles from contamination in the chamber initiated ice nucleation before other species but there were few enough that they did not compromise the experiments. Nitrate, sulfate, and organics were often detected on particles and ice residue, evidently from scavenging of trace gas-phase species in the chamber. Hematite was a more effective ice nucleus than illite. Ice residue was frequently larger than unactivated test aerosol due to the formation of aggregates due to scavenging, condensation of contaminant gases, and the predominance of larger aerosol in nucleation

  9. Preliminary Understanding of Surface Plasmon-Enhanced Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy by Single Particle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Kangshu

    Monitoring chiral optical signals of biomolecules as their conformation changes is an important means to study their structures, properties, and functions. Most measurements, however, are ensemble measurements because chiral optical signals from a single biomolecule is often too weak to be detected. In this dissertation, I present my early attempts to study conformational changes of adsorbed proteins by taking advantage of the enhanced electromagnetic (EM) field around a well-designed plasmonic nanofeature. In particular, I discuss the detection of protein adsorption and denaturation on metallic nanoparticles using single particle scattering and CD spectroscopic imaging. Particles of two distinctively different sizes were compared and two different sample protein molecules were studied. A combination of experimental and computational tools was used to simulate and interpret the collected scattering and CD results. The first chapter provides a brief overview of the state-of-art research in CD spectroscopic studies at the single particle level. Three different means to make particles capable of chiral detection are discussed. Various applications beyond single particle imaging are presented to showcase the potential of the described research project, beyond our immediate goals. The second chapter describes my initial characterization of large, metallic, anisotropic nanorods and the establishment of experimental procedures used later for spectrum reconstruction, data visualization and analysis. The physical shape and structure of the particles were imaged by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the chemical composition by energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), and the optical properties by darkfield microscopy. An experimental protocol was developed to connect information collected from separate techniques for the same particle, with the aims of discovering any possible structural-property correlation. The reproducibility of the single particle imaging method was

  10. Single charging events on colloidal particles in a nonpolar liquid with surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuer, Caspar; Vandewiele, Stijn; Brans, Toon; Strubbe, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan; Beunis, Filip

    2018-01-01

    Electrical charging of colloidal particles in nonpolar liquids due to surfactant additives is investigated intensively, motivated by its importance in a variety of applications. Most methods rely on average electrophoretic mobility measurements of many particles, which provide only indirect information on the charging mechanism. In the present work, we present a method that allows us to obtain direct information on the charging mechanism, by measuring the charge fluctuations on individual particles with a precision higher than the elementary charge using optical trapping electrophoresis. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method by studying the influence of added surfactant OLOA 11000 on the charging of single colloidal PMMA particles in dodecane. The particle charge and the frequency of charging events are investigated both below and above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and with or without applying a DC offset voltage. It is found that at least two separate charging mechanisms are present below the critical micelle concentration. One mechanism is a process where the particle is stripped from negatively charged ionic molecules. An increase in the charging frequency with increased surfactant concentration suggests a second mechanism that involves single surfactant molecules. Above the CMC, neutral inverse micelles can also be involved in the charging process.

  11. Bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy 7. The single particle phase function hockey stick relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Bruce

    2012-11-01

    The measured volume-average single particle angular scattering functions of a large number of types of particle of interest for planetary regoliths in the visible-near-IR wavelength region can be represented to a reasonable approximation by two-parameter, double Henyey-Greenstein functions. When the two parameters of this function are plotted against one another they are found to be inversely correlated and lie within a restricted zone shaped like a hockey stick within the parameter space. The centroid of the zone is a curve that can be represented by a simple empirical equation. The wide variety of types of particles used to construct the plot implies that this equation may represent most of the particles found in regoliths. This means that when modeling the bidirectional reflectance of a regolith it may be possible to reduce the number of parameters necessary to specify the reflectance, and also to characterize the entire single particle phase function from observations at phase angles less than 90°. Even if the hockey stick relation has a finite width, rather than being a line, it restricts the parameter space that must be searched when fitting data. The curve should also be useful for forward modeling particle phase functions.

  12. DECAY MODES OF HIGH-LYING SINGLE-PARTICLE STATES IN PB-209

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEAUMEL, D; FORTIER, S; GALES, S; GUILLOT, J; LANGEVINJOLIOT, H; LAURENT, H; MAISON, JM; VERNOTTE, J; BORDEWIJK, JA; BRANDENBURG, S; KRASZNAHORKAY, A; CRAWLEY, GM; MASSOLO, CP; RENTERIA, M

    The neutron decay of high-lying single-particle states in Pb-209 excited by means of the (alpha, He-3) reaction has been investigated at 122 MeV incident energy using a multidetector array. The high-spin values of these states, inferred from previous inclusive experiments, are confirmed by the

  13. A new single-particle basis for nuclear many-body calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddu, G.

    2017-10-01

    Predominantly, harmonic oscillator single-particle wave functions are the preferred choice for a basis in ab initio nuclear many-body calculations. These wave-functions, although very convenient in order to evaluate the matrix elements of the interaction in the laboratory frame, have too fast a fall-off at large distances. In the past, as an alternative to the harmonic oscillator, other single-particle wave functions have been proposed. In this work, we propose a new single-particle basis, directly linked to nucleon-nucleon interaction. This new basis is orthonormal and complete, has the proper asymptotic behavior at large distances and does not contain the continuum which would pose severe convergence problems in nuclear many body calculations. We consider the newly proposed NNLO-opt nucleon-nucleon interaction, without any renormalization. We show that, unlike other bases, this single-particle representation has a computational cost similar to the harmonic oscillator basis with the same space truncation and it gives lower energies for 6He and 6Li.

  14. Summary report of the group on single-particle nonlinear dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axinescu, S.; Bartolini, R.; Bazzani, A.

    1996-10-01

    This report summarizes the research on single-particle nonlinear beam dynamics. It discusses the following topics: analytical and semi-analytical tools; early prediction of the dynamic aperture; how the results are commonly presented; Is the mechanism of the dynamic aperture understand; ripple effects; and beam-beam effects

  15. A new Insight Into Microscale Soil Organic Matter Dynamics - From Single Particles to Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, C. W.; Heister, K.; Hillion, F.; Herrmann, A. M.; Koegel-Knabner, I.

    2008-12-01

    Both mineral interactions and the spatial inaccessibility due to aggregation are key-factors affecting the stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM). Knowledge about the factors controlling the preservation of SOM and underlying stabilization mechanisms has improved significantly over the last years. Nevertheless, in situ processes remain almost unclear and are still challenging to evaluate. In the presented work, we studied the alteration of spatial distribution of fresh introduced OM over time on single particles and in intact soil aggregates. Single particles of a fine silt and clay mixture (resin embedded. Samples were then analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS50). We will demonstrate the spatial distribution of OM on single particles and in intact soil aggregates at the microscale by SEM and nanoSIMS. In addition, with the isotopic sensitivity of nanoSIMS, we are able to follow the fate of 13C and 15N, which is expected to be influenced by diffusion, sorption and microbial activity. From these results, we propose how OM in soil can be stabilized on single soil particles and at complex soil aggregates.

  16. Single-particle electron microscopy in the study of membrane protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zorzi, Rita; Mi, Wei; Liao, Maofu; Walz, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Single-particle electron microscopy (EM) provides the great advantage that protein structure can be studied without the need to grow crystals. However, due to technical limitations, this approach played only a minor role in the study of membrane protein structure. This situation has recently changed dramatically with the introduction of direct electron detection device cameras, which allow images of unprecedented quality to be recorded, also making software algorithms, such as three-dimensional classification and structure refinement, much more powerful. The enhanced potential of single-particle EM was impressively demonstrated by delivering the first long-sought atomic model of a member of the biomedically important transient receptor potential channel family. Structures of several more membrane proteins followed in short order. This review recounts the history of single-particle EM in the study of membrane proteins, describes the technical advances that now allow this approach to generate atomic models of membrane proteins and provides a brief overview of some of the membrane protein structures that have been studied by single-particle EM to date. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Single-particle thermal diffusion of charged colloids: Double-layer theory in a temperature gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhont, J.K.G.; Briels, Willem J.

    2008-01-01

    The double-layer contribution to the single-particle thermal diffusion coefficient of charged, spherical colloids with arbitrary double-layer thickness is calculated and compared to experiments. The calculation is based on an extension of the Debye-Hückel theory for the double-layer structure that

  18. Lagrangian single-particle turbulent statistics through the Hilbert-Huang transform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Y.; Biferale, L.; Calzavarini, E.; Sun, Chao; Toschi, F.

    2013-01-01

    The Hilbert-Huang transform is applied to analyze single-particle Lagrangian velocity data from numerical simulations of hydrodynamic turbulence. The velocity trajectory is described in terms of a set of intrinsic mode functions C i (t) and of their instantaneous frequency ω i (t) . On the basis of

  19. Insensitivity of single particle time domain measurements to laser velocimeter 'Doppler ambiguity.'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that single particle time domain measurements in high speed gas flows obtained by a laser velocimeter technique developed for use in wind tunnels are not affected by the so-called 'Doppler ambiguity.' A comparison of hot-wire anemometer and laser velocimeter measurements taken under similar flow conditions is used for the demonstration.

  20. Single particle electron microscopy in combination with mass spectrometry to investigate novel complexes of membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arteni, Ana A.; Nowaczyk, Marc; Lax, Julia; Rögner, Matthias; Boekema, Egbert J.; Kouril, R.; Rogner, M.

    2005-01-01

    Large data sets of molecular projections of the membrane proteins Photosystem I and Photosystem II from cyanobacteria were analyzed by single particle electron microscopy (EM). Analysis resulted in the averaging of 2D projections from the purified complexes but also in the simultaneous detection and

  1. Single-shot LIBS spectral quality for waste particles in open air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, H.; Bakker, M.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the ability of LIBS to produce quality spectra from small particles of concrete demolition waste using single-shot spectra collected in open air. The 2–8?mm materials are rounded river gravel, green glass shards, and plastic flakes. Considered are focal length, air, moisture,

  2. Deformed single-particle levels in the boson-fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.; Shao, B.

    1989-01-01

    Deformed single-particle levels are derived from a boson-fermion Hamiltonian in which the odd fermion occupies several j orbits. The geometric-oriented approach applied to 169 Tm clarified the role of algebraic interactions and provides an intuitive interpretation and guidance to numerical calculations in deformed nuclei

  3. Deformed single-particle levels in the boson-fermion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A.; Shao, B. (Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (US) Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (US))

    1989-11-13

    Deformed single-particle levels are derived from a boson-fermion Hamiltonian in which the odd fermion occupies several {ital j} orbits. The geometric-oriented approach applied to {sup 169}Tm clarified the role of algebraic interactions and provides an intuitive interpretation and guidance to numerical calculations in deformed nuclei.

  4. The online chemical analysis of single particles using aerosol beams and time of flight mass spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, O.; Weiss, M.; Verheijen, P.J.T.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Scarlett, B.

    This paper describes an on-line instrument, capable of measuring the size and chemical composition of single aerosol particles. Possible applications include monitoring aerosol reactors and studying atmospheric chemistry. The main conclusion is that a working prototype has been built and tested. It

  5. Quantification of dermal exposure to nanoparticles from solid nanocomposites by using single particle ICP-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackevica, Aiga; Olsson, Mikael Emil; Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2016-01-01

    was tested by surface wiping followed by analysis using single particle ICP-MS. The nanoparticles were extracted from the wipes by ultrasonication in deionized water, and this technique was tested to be around 60-100% effective for extracting the particles adsorbed to the wipes. The method was optimized......Engineered nanoparticles are used in various applications due to their unique properties, which has led to their widespread use in consumer products. Silver, titanium and copper-based nanoparticles are few of the most commonly used nanomaterials in consumer products, mainly due to their biocidal...... by spiking the wipes with known amounts of nanoparticles and treating them the same way as the experimental samples. Our preliminary results show that single particle ICP-MS has the potential for quantitatively measuring potential dermal exposure to nanoparticles, and when used in combination with other...

  6. Fluorescent detection of single tracks of alpha particles using lithium fluoride crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilski, P., E-mail: pawel.bilski@ifj.edu.pl; Marczewska, B.

    2017-02-01

    Lithium fluoride single crystals were successfully used for fluorescent imaging of single tracks of alpha particles. This was realized with a standard wide-field fluorescent microscope equipped with a 100× objective. Alpha particles create F{sub 2} and F{sub 3}{sup +} color centers in LiF crystals. The subsequent illumination with the blue light (wavelength around 445 nm), excites these centers and produces fluorescence with a broad band peaked at 670 nm. The observed tracks of alpha particles have diameter of about 500 nm. Focusing of the microscope at different depths in a LiF crystal, enables imaging changes of shape and position of tracks, allowing for visualization of their paths. These encouraging results are the first step towards practical application of LiF as fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

  7. Detection of single macromolecules using a cryogenic particle detector coupled to a biopolymer mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twerenbold, Damian; Vuilleumier, Jean-Luc; Gerber, Daniel; Tadsen, Almut; van den Brandt, Ben; Gillevet, Patrick M.

    1996-06-01

    Macromolecules with masses up to 50 kDa have been detected with a cryogenic particle detector in a MALDI time-of-flight biopolymer mass spectrometer. The cryogenic particle detector was a Sn/Sn-ox/Sn tunnel junction operated at a temperature of 0.4 K. A calibration with 6 keV single photons inferred that the delayed detector pulses corresponded to the absorption of the kinetic energy of a single macromolecule. Time-of-flight spectra of lysozyme proteins are presented. The mass resolution is 100 Da at 14 300 Da. The energy sensitive detection mechanism suggests that cryogenic particle detectors have a high and mass independent detection efficiency for macromolecules.

  8. Single-pixel interior filling function approach for detecting and correcting errors in particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, Stanislav; Figliozzi, Patrick; Lin, Binhua; Rice, Stuart A; Scherer, Norbert F; Dinner, Aaron R

    2017-01-10

    We present a general method for detecting and correcting biases in the outputs of particle-tracking experiments. Our approach is based on the histogram of estimated positions within pixels, which we term the single-pixel interior filling function (SPIFF). We use the deviation of the SPIFF from a uniform distribution to test the veracity of tracking analyses from different algorithms. Unbiased SPIFFs correspond to uniform pixel filling, whereas biased ones exhibit pixel locking, in which the estimated particle positions concentrate toward the centers of pixels. Although pixel locking is a well-known phenomenon, we go beyond existing methods to show how the SPIFF can be used to correct errors. The key is that the SPIFF aggregates statistical information from many single-particle images and localizations that are gathered over time or across an ensemble, and this information augments the single-particle data. We explicitly consider two cases that give rise to significant errors in estimated particle locations: undersampling the point spread function due to small emitter size and intensity overlap of proximal objects. In these situations, we show how errors in positions can be corrected essentially completely with little added computational cost. Additional situations and applications to experimental data are explored in SI Appendix In the presence of experimental-like shot noise, the precision of the SPIFF-based correction achieves (and can even exceed) the unbiased Cramér-Rao lower bound. We expect the SPIFF approach to be useful in a wide range of localization applications, including single-molecule imaging and particle tracking, in fields ranging from biology to materials science to astronomy.

  9. A clustering approach to multireference alignment of single-particle projections in electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorzano, C O S; Bilbao-Castro, J R; Shkolnisky, Y; Alcorlo, M; Melero, R; Caffarena-Fernández, G; Li, M; Xu, G; Marabini, R; Carazo, J M

    2010-08-01

    Two-dimensional analysis of projections of single-particles acquired by an electron microscope is a useful tool to help identifying the different kinds of projections present in a dataset and their different projection directions. Such analysis is also useful to distinguish between different kinds of particles or different particle conformations. In this paper we introduce a new algorithm for performing two-dimensional multireference alignment and classification that is based on a Hierarchical clustering approach using correntropy (instead of the more traditional correlation) and a modified criterion for the definition of the clusters specially suited for cases in which the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of the differences between classes is low. We show that our algorithm offers an improved sensitivity over current methods in use for distinguishing between different projection orientations and different particle conformations. This algorithm is publicly available t