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Sample records for single ordinary differential

  1. Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Pontryagin, Lev Semenovich

    1962-01-01

    Ordinary Differential Equations presents the study of the system of ordinary differential equations and its applications to engineering. The book is designed to serve as a first course in differential equations. Importance is given to the linear equation with constant coefficients; stability theory; use of matrices and linear algebra; and the introduction to the Lyapunov theory. Engineering problems such as the Watt regulator for a steam engine and the vacuum-tube circuit are also presented. Engineers, mathematicians, and engineering students will find the book invaluable.

  2. Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Features a balance between theory, proofs, and examples and provides applications across diverse fields of study Ordinary Differential Equations presents a thorough discussion of first-order differential equations and progresses to equations of higher order. The book transitions smoothly from first-order to higher-order equations, allowing readers to develop a complete understanding of the related theory. Featuring diverse and interesting applications from engineering, bioengineering, ecology, and biology, the book anticipates potential difficulties in understanding the various solution steps

  3. Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ince, Edward Lindsay

    1956-01-01

    The theory of ordinary differential equations in real and complex domains is here clearly explained and analyzed. Not only classical theory, but also the main developments of modern times are covered. Exhaustive sections on the existence and nature of solutions, continuous transformation groups, the algebraic theory of linear differential systems, and the solution of differential equations by contour integration are as valuable to the pure mathematician as the fine treatment of the equations of Legendre, Bessel, and Mathieu, the conditions for the oscillatory character of solutions of a diffe

  4. Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Richard K

    1982-01-01

    Ordinary Differential Equations is an outgrowth of courses taught for a number of years at Iowa State University in the mathematics and the electrical engineering departments. It is intended as a text for a first graduate course in differential equations for students in mathematics, engineering, and the sciences. Although differential equations is an old, traditional, and well-established subject, the diverse backgrounds and interests of the students in a typical modern-day course cause problems in the selection and method of presentation of material. In order to compensate for this diversity,

  5. Ordinary differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebl, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we provide an overview of the basic theory of ordinary differential equations (ODE). We give the basics of analytical methods for their solutions and also review numerical methods. The chapter should serve as a primer for the basic application of ODEs and systems of ODEs in practice. As an example, we work out the equations arising in Michaelis-Menten kinetics and give a short introduction to using Matlab for their numerical solution.

  6. Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, William

    1995-01-01

    Building on introductory calculus courses, this text provides a sound foundation in the underlying principles of ordinary differential equations. Important concepts, including uniqueness and existence theorems, are worked through in detail and the student is encouraged to develop much of the routine material themselves, thus helping to ensure a solid understanding of the fundamentals required.The wide use of exercises, problems and self-assessment questions helps to promote a deeper understanding of the material and it is developed in such a way that it lays the groundwork for further

  7. Symmetries of nonlinear ordinary differential equations: The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-10-21

    Oct 21, 2015 ... equation and showed that it admits sl(3, R) algebra and constructed a linearizing trans- formation from ... ers of ˙x to zero, one obtains a set of linear partial differential equations for the unknown functions ξ and η. ...... [11] N H Ibragimov, Elementary Lie group analysis and ordinary differential equations (John.

  8. Lectures on ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Hurewicz, Witold

    1958-01-01

    Hailed by The American Mathematical Monthly as ""a rigorous and lively introduction,"" this text explores a topic of perennial interest in mathematics. The author, a distinguished mathematician and formulator of the Hurewicz theorem, presents a clear and lucid treatment that emphasizes geometric methods. Topics include first-order scalar and vector equations, basic properties of linear vector equations, and two-dimensional nonlinear autonomous systems. Suitable for senior mathematics students, the text begins with an examination of differential equations of the first order in one unknown funct

  9. Solutions manual to accompany Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Features a balance between theory, proofs, and examples and provides applications across diverse fields of study Ordinary Differential Equations presents a thorough discussion of first-order differential equations and progresses to equations of higher order. The book transitions smoothly from first-order to higher-order equations, allowing readers to develop a complete understanding of the related theory. Featuring diverse and interesting applications from engineering, bioengineering, ecology, and biology, the book anticipates potential difficulties in understanding the various solution steps

  10. Ordinary differential equations introduction and qualitative theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cronin, Jane

    2007-01-01

    … a classic treatment of many of the topics an instructor would want in such a course, with particular emphasis on those aspects of the qualitative theory that are important for applications to mathematical biology. … A nice feature of this edition is an extended and unified treatment of the perturbation problem for periodic solutions. … a solid graduate-level introduction to ordinary differential equations, especially for applications. …-MAA Reviews, August 2010

  11. Numerical analysis of systems of ordinary and stochastic differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Artemiev, S S

    1997-01-01

    This text deals with numerical analysis of systems of both ordinary and stochastic differential equations. It covers numerical solution problems of the Cauchy problem for stiff ordinary differential equations (ODE) systems by Rosenbrock-type methods (RTMs).

  12. From ordinary to partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, Giampiero

    2017-01-01

    This book is addressed to mathematics and physics students who want to develop an interdisciplinary view of mathematics, from the age of Riemann, Poincaré and Darboux to basic tools of modern mathematics. It enables them to acquire the sensibility necessary for the formulation and solution of difficult problems, with an emphasis on concepts, rigour and creativity. It consists of eight self-contained parts: ordinary differential equations; linear elliptic equations; calculus of variations; linear and non-linear hyperbolic equations; parabolic equations; Fuchsian functions and non-linear equations; the functional equations of number theory; pseudo-differential operators and pseudo-differential equations. The author leads readers through the original papers and introduces new concepts, with a selection of topics and examples that are of high pedagogical value.

  13. A textbook on ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Shair

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a primer on the theory and applications of Ordinary Differential Equations. The style used is simple, yet thorough and rigorous. Each chapter ends with a broad set of exercises that range from the routine to the more challenging and thought-provoking. Solutions to selected exercises can be found at the end of the book. The book contains many interesting examples on topics such as electric circuits, the pendulum equation, the logistic equation, the Lotka-Volterra system, the Laplace Transform, etc., which introduce students to a number of interesting aspects of the theory and applications. The work is mainly intended for students of Mathematics, Physics, Engineering, Computer Science and other areas of the natural and social sciences that use ordinary differential equations, and who have a firm grasp of Calculus and a minimal understanding of the basic concepts used in Linear Algebra. It also studies a few more advanced topics, such as Stability Theory and Boundary Value Problems, whic...

  14. Ordinary differential equations principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nandakumaran, A K; George, Raju K

    2017-01-01

    Written in a clear, logical and concise manner, this comprehensive resource allows students to quickly understand the key principles, techniques and applications of ordinary differential equations. Important topics including first and second order linear equations, initial value problems and qualitative theory are presented in separate chapters. The concepts of two point boundary value problems, physical models and first order partial differential equations are discussed in detail. The text uses tools of calculus and real analysis to get solutions in explicit form. While discussing first order linear systems, linear algebra techniques are used. The real-life applications are interspersed throughout the book to invoke reader's interest. The methods and tricks to solve numerous mathematical problems with sufficient derivations and explanation are provided. The proofs of theorems are explained for the benefit of the readers.

  15. Ordinary differential equations a graduate text

    CERN Document Server

    Bhamra, K S

    2015-01-01

    ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS: A Graduate Text presents a systematic and comprehensive introduction to ODEs for graduate and postgraduate students. The systematic organized text on differential inequalities, Gronwall's inequality, Nagumo's theorems, Osgood's criteria and applications of different equations of first order is dealt with in a greater depth. The book discusses qualitative and quantitative aspects of the Strum - Liouville problems, Green's function, integral equations, Laplace transform and is supported by a number of worked-out examples in each lesson to make the concepts clear. A lot of stress on stability theory is laid down, especially on Lyapunov and Poincare stability theory. A numerous figures in various lessons (in particular lessons dealing with stability theory) have been added to clarify the key concepts in DE theory. Nonlinear oscillation in conservative systems and Hamiltonian systems highlights basic nature of the systems considered. Perturbation techniques lesson deals in fairly d...

  16. Ordinary differential equations and mechanical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Awrejcewicz, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This book applies a step-by-step treatment of the current state-of-the-art of ordinary differential equations used in modeling of engineering systems/processes and beyond. It covers systematically ordered problems, beginning with first and second order ODEs, linear and higher-order ODEs of polynomial form, theory and criteria of similarity, modeling approaches, phase plane and phase space concepts, stability optimization, and ending on chaos and synchronization. Presenting both an overview of the theory of the introductory differential equations in the context of applicability and a systematic treatment of modeling of numerous engineering and physical problems through linear and non-linear ODEs, the volume is self-contained, yet serves both scientific and engineering interests. The presentation relies on a general treatment, analytical and numerical methods, concrete examples, and engineering intuition. The scientific background used is well balanced between elementary and advanced level, making it as a uniqu...

  17. Ordinary differential equations basics and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Schaeffer, David G

    2016-01-01

    This book develops the theory of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), starting from an introductory level (with no prior experience in ODEs assumed) through to a graduate-level treatment of the qualitative theory, including bifurcation theory (but not chaos). While proofs are rigorous, the exposition is reader-friendly, aiming for the informality of face-to-face interactions. A unique feature of this book is the integration of rigorous theory with numerous applications of scientific interest. Besides providing motivation, this synthesis clarifies the theory and enhances scientific literacy. Other features include: (i) a wealth of exercises at various levels, along with commentary that explains why they matter; (ii) figures with consistent color conventions to identify nullclines, periodic orbits, stable and unstable manifolds; and (iii) a dedicated website with software templates, problem solutions, and other resources supporting the text. Given its many applications, the book may be used comfortably in sc...

  18. A textbook on ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Shair

    2014-01-01

    The book is a primer of the theory of Ordinary Differential Equations. Each chapter is completed by a broad set of exercises; the reader will also find a set of solutions of selected exercises. The book contains many interesting examples as well (like the equations for the electric circuits, the pendium equation, the logistic equation, the Lotka-Volterra system, and many other) which introduce the reader to some interesting aspects of the theory and its applications. The work is mainly addressed to students of Mathematics, Physics, Engineering, Statistics, Computer Sciences, with  knowledge of Calculus and Linear Algebra, and contains more advanced topics for further developments, such as Laplace transform; Stability theory and existence of solutions to Boundary Value problems. The authors are preparing a complete solutions manual, containing solutions to all the exercises published in the book. The manual will be available Summer 2014. Instructors who wish to adopt the book may request the manual by writing...

  19. Schwarz maps of algebraic linear ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria Malagón, Camilo

    2017-12-01

    A linear ordinary differential equation is called algebraic if all its solution are algebraic over its field of definition. In this paper we solve the problem of finding closed form solution to algebraic linear ordinary differential equations in terms of standard equations. Furthermore, we obtain a method to compute all algebraic linear ordinary differential equations with rational coefficients by studying their associated Schwarz map through the Picard-Vessiot Theory.

  20. Ordinary differential equations introduction to the theory of ordinary differential equations in the real domain

    CERN Document Server

    Kurzweil, J

    1986-01-01

    The author, Professor Kurzweil, is one of the world's top experts in the area of ordinary differential equations - a fact fully reflected in this book. Unlike many classical texts which concentrate primarily on methods of integration of differential equations, this book pursues a modern approach: the topic is discussed in full generality which, at the same time, permits us to gain a deep insight into the theory and to develop a fruitful intuition. The basic framework of the theory is expanded by considering further important topics like stability, dependence of a solution on a parameter, Car

  1. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, L

    1987-01-01

    Nearly 20 years ago we produced a treatise (of about the same length as this book) entitled Computing methods for scientists and engineers. It was stated that most computation is performed by workers whose mathematical training stopped somewhere short of the 'professional' level, and that some books are therefore needed which use quite simple mathematics but which nevertheless communicate the essence of the 'numerical sense' which is exhibited by the real computing experts and which is surely needed, at least to some extent, by all who use modern computers and modern numerical software. In that book we treated, at no great length, a variety of computational problems in which the material on ordinary differential equations occupied about 50 pages. At that time it was quite common to find books on numerical analysis, with a little on each topic ofthat field, whereas today we are more likely to see similarly-sized books on each major topic: for example on numerical linear algebra, numerical approximation, numeri...

  2. Monograph - The Numerical Integration of Ordinary Differential Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, T. E.

    The materials presented in this monograph are intended to be included in a course on ordinary differential equations at the upper division level in a college mathematics program. These materials provide an introduction to the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations, and they can be used to supplement a regular text on this…

  3. Dichotomies for generalized ordinary differential equations and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonotto, E. M.; Federson, M.; Santos, F. L.

    2018-03-01

    In this work we establish the theory of dichotomies for generalized ordinary differential equations, introducing the concepts of dichotomies for these equations, investigating their properties and proposing new results. We establish conditions for the existence of exponential dichotomies and bounded solutions. Using the correspondences between generalized ordinary differential equations and other equations, we translate our results to measure differential equations and impulsive differential equations. The fact that we work in the framework of generalized ordinary differential equations allows us to manage functions with many discontinuities and of unbounded variation.

  4. Symmetries of nonlinear ordinary differential equations: The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-10-21

    Oct 21, 2015 ... Abstract. Lie symmetry analysis is one of the powerful tools to analyse nonlinear ordinary dif- ferential equations. We review the effectiveness of this method in terms of various symmetries. We present the method of deriving Lie point symmetries, contact symmetries, hidden symmetries, nonlocal symmetries ...

  5. (Ln-bar, g)-spaces. Ordinary and tensor differentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoff, S.; Dimitrov, B.

    1998-01-01

    Different types of differentials as special cases of differential operators acting on tensor fields over (L n bar, g)-spaces are considered. The ordinary differential, the covariant differential as a special case of the covariant differential operator, and the Lie differential as a special case of the Lie differential operator are investigated. The tensor differential and its special types (Covariant tensor differential, and Lie tensor differential) are determined and their properties are discussed. Covariant symmetric and antisymmetric (external) tensor differentials, Lie symmetric, and Lie antisymmetric (external) tensor differentials are determined and considered over (L n bar, g)-spaces

  6. Artificial neural networks for solving ordinary and partial differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagaris, I E; Likas, A; Fotiadis, D I

    1998-01-01

    We present a method to solve initial and boundary value problems using artificial neural networks. A trial solution of the differential equation is written as a sum of two parts. The first part satisfies the initial/boundary conditions and contains no adjustable parameters. The second part is constructed so as not to affect the initial/boundary conditions. This part involves a feedforward neural network containing adjustable parameters (the weights). Hence by construction the initial/boundary conditions are satisfied and the network is trained to satisfy the differential equation. The applicability of this approach ranges from single ordinary differential equations (ODE's), to systems of coupled ODE's and also to partial differential equations (PDE's). In this article, we illustrate the method by solving a variety of model problems and present comparisons with solutions obtained using the Galekrkin finite element method for several cases of partial differential equations. With the advent of neuroprocessors and digital signal processors the method becomes particularly interesting due to the expected essential gains in the execution speed.

  7. Existence theorems for ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, Francis J

    2007-01-01

    Theorems stating the existence of an object-such as the solution to a problem or equation-are known as existence theorems. This text examines fundamental and general existence theorems, along with the Picard iterants, and applies them to properties of solutions and linear differential equations.The authors assume a basic knowledge of real function theory, and for certain specialized results, of elementary functions of a complex variable. They do not consider the elementary methods for solving certain special differential equations, nor advanced specialized topics; within these restrictions, th

  8. An introduction to ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Coddington, Earl A

    1989-01-01

    ""Written in an admirably cleancut and economical style."" - Mathematical Reviews. This concise text offers undergraduates in mathematics and science a thorough and systematic first course in elementary differential equations. Presuming a knowledge of basic calculus, the book first reviews the mathematical essentials required to master the materials to be presented. The next four chapters take up linear equations, those of the first order and those with constant coefficients, variable coefficients, and regular singular points. The last two chapters address the existence and uniqueness of solu

  9. Ordinary differential equations with applications in molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilea, M; Turnea, M; Rotariu, M

    2012-01-01

    Differential equations are of basic importance in molecular biology mathematics because many biological laws and relations appear mathematically in the form of a differential equation. In this article we presented some applications of mathematical models represented by ordinary differential equations in molecular biology. The vast majority of quantitative models in cell and molecular biology are formulated in terms of ordinary differential equations for the time evolution of concentrations of molecular species. Assuming that the diffusion in the cell is high enough to make the spatial distribution of molecules homogenous, these equations describe systems with many participating molecules of each kind. We propose an original mathematical model with small parameter for biological phospholipid pathway. All the equations system includes small parameter epsilon. The smallness of epsilon is relative to the size of the solution domain. If we reduce the size of the solution region the same small epsilon will result in a different condition number. It is clear that the solution for a smaller region is less difficult. We introduce the mathematical technique known as boundary function method for singular perturbation system. In this system, the small parameter is an asymptotic variable, different from the independent variable. In general, the solutions of such equations exhibit multiscale phenomena. Singularly perturbed problems form a special class of problems containing a small parameter which may tend to zero. Many molecular biology processes can be quantitatively characterized by ordinary differential equations. Mathematical cell biology is a very active and fast growing interdisciplinary area in which mathematical concepts, techniques, and models are applied to a variety of problems in developmental medicine and bioengineering. Among the different modeling approaches, ordinary differential equations (ODE) are particularly important and have led to significant advances

  10. Quantifying uncertainty, variability and likelihood for ordinary differential equation models

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Weisse, Andrea Y

    2010-10-28

    Abstract Background In many applications, ordinary differential equation (ODE) models are subject to uncertainty or variability in initial conditions and parameters. Both, uncertainty and variability can be quantified in terms of a probability density function on the state and parameter space. Results The partial differential equation that describes the evolution of this probability density function has a form that is particularly amenable to application of the well-known method of characteristics. The value of the density at some point in time is directly accessible by the solution of the original ODE extended by a single extra dimension (for the value of the density). This leads to simple methods for studying uncertainty, variability and likelihood, with significant advantages over more traditional Monte Carlo and related approaches especially when studying regions with low probability. Conclusions While such approaches based on the method of characteristics are common practice in other disciplines, their advantages for the study of biological systems have so far remained unrecognized. Several examples illustrate performance and accuracy of the approach and its limitations.

  11. To the boundary value problem of ordinary differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serikbai Aisagaliev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Method for solving of a boundary value problem for ordinary differential equations with boundary conditions at phase and integral constraints is proposed. The base of the method is an immersion principle based on the general solution of the first order Fredholm integral equation which allows to reduce the original boundary value problem to the special problem of the optimal equation.

  12. Numerical Integration of Stiff System of Ordinary Differential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this work is to develop, analyse and implement a K-step Implicit Rational Runge-Kutta schemes for Integration of Stiff system of Ordinary differential Equations. Its development adopted Taylor and Binomial series expansion Techniques to generate its parameters. The analysis of its basic properties adopted ...

  13. Generalized uniqueness theorem for ordinary differential equations in Banach spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ezzat R; Alhuthali, M Sh; Al-Ghanmi, M M

    2014-01-01

    We consider nonlinear ordinary differential equations in Banach spaces. Uniqueness criterion for the Cauchy problem is given when any of the standard dissipative-type conditions does apply. A similar scalar result has been studied by Majorana (1991). Useful examples of reflexive Banach spaces whose positive cones have empty interior has been given as well.

  14. Linearization of systems of four second-order ordinary differential ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we provide invariant linearizability criteria for a class of systems of four second-order ordinary differential equations in terms of a set of 30 constraint equations on the coefficients of all derivative terms. The linearization criteria are derived by the analytic continuation of the geometric approach of projection of ...

  15. A new numerical approximation of the fractal ordinary differential equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atangana, Abdon; Jain, Sonal

    2018-02-01

    The concept of fractal medium is present in several real-world problems, for instance, in the geological formation that constitutes the well-known subsurface water called aquifers. However, attention has not been quite devoted to modeling for instance, the flow of a fluid within these media. We deem it important to remind the reader that the concept of fractal derivative is not to represent the fractal sharps but to describe the movement of the fluid within these media. Since this class of ordinary differential equations is highly complex to solve analytically, we present a novel numerical scheme that allows to solve fractal ordinary differential equations. Error analysis of the method is also presented. Application of the method and numerical approximation are presented for fractal order differential equation. The stability and the convergence of the numerical schemes are investigated in detail. Also some exact solutions of fractal order differential equations are presented and finally some numerical simulations are presented.

  16. Stochastic symmetries of Wick type stochastic ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Gazanfer

    2015-04-01

    We consider Wick type stochastic ordinary differential equations with Gaussian white noise. We define the stochastic symmetry transformations and Lie equations in Kondratiev space (S)-1N. We derive the determining system of Wick type stochastic partial differential equations with Gaussian white noise. Stochastic symmetries for stochastic Bernoulli, Riccati and general stochastic linear equation in (S)-1N are obtained. A stochastic version of canonical variables is also introduced.

  17. Network Reconstruction From High-Dimensional Ordinary Differential Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shizhe; Shojaie, Ali; Witten, Daniela M

    2017-01-01

    We consider the task of learning a dynamical system from high-dimensional time-course data. For instance, we might wish to estimate a gene regulatory network from gene expression data measured at discrete time points. We model the dynamical system nonparametrically as a system of additive ordinary differential equations. Most existing methods for parameter estimation in ordinary differential equations estimate the derivatives from noisy observations. This is known to be challenging and inefficient. We propose a novel approach that does not involve derivative estimation. We show that the proposed method can consistently recover the true network structure even in high dimensions, and we demonstrate empirical improvement over competing approaches. Supplementary materials for this article are available online.

  18. Network Reconstruction From High-Dimensional Ordinary Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shizhe; Shojaie, Ali; Witten, Daniela M.

    2018-01-01

    We consider the task of learning a dynamical system from high-dimensional time-course data. For instance, we might wish to estimate a gene regulatory network from gene expression data measured at discrete time points. We model the dynamical system nonparametrically as a system of additive ordinary differential equations. Most existing methods for parameter estimation in ordinary differential equations estimate the derivatives from noisy observations. This is known to be challenging and inefficient. We propose a novel approach that does not involve derivative estimation. We show that the proposed method can consistently recover the true network structure even in high dimensions, and we demonstrate empirical improvement over competing approaches. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. PMID:29618851

  19. Symmetries, integrals and solutions of ordinary differential equations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ordinary differential equations of maximal symmetry. 119 where in the case of the intrinsically contact symmetries we present the transformations of the first derivatives to emphasize that they follow from the transformations engendered in the basic variables, x and y, h. : ¯y = ea. (. A0 + A1 ¯x + 1. 2 A2 ¯x2. ) s1. : ¯y = A0 + a + ...

  20. Numerical solution of highly oscillatory ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Linda R.; Jay, Laurent O.; Yen, Jeng

    One of the most difficult problems in the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and in differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) is the development of methods for dealing with highly oscillatory systems. These types of systems arise, for example, in vehicle simulation when modelling the suspension system or tyres, in models for contact and impact, in flexible body simulation from vibrations in the structural model, in molecular dynamics, in orbital mechanics, and in circuit simulation. Standard numerical methods can require a huge number of time-steps to track the oscillations, and even with small stepsizes they can alter the dynamics, unless the method is chosen very carefully.

  1. On The K-Pseudo Symmetric and Ordinary Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Łazarow E.; Turowska M.

    2016-01-01

    In 1972, S. Valenti introduced the definition of k-pseudo symmetric derivative and has shown that the set of all points of a continuous function, at which there exists a finite k-pseudo symmetric derivative but the finite ordinary derivative does not exist, is of Lebesgue measure zero. In 1993, L. Zajícek has shown that for a continuous function f, the set of all points, at which f is symmetrically differentiable but no differentiable, is σ-(1 - ε) symmetrically porous for every ε > 0. The qu...

  2. Design of TIR collimating lens for ordinary differential equation of extended light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Qianjing; Liu, Xiaoqin; Hou, Zaihong; Wu, Yi

    2017-10-01

    The source of LED has been widely used in our daily life. The intensity angle distribution of single LED is lambert distribution, which does not satisfy the requirement of people. Therefore, we need to distribute light and change the LED's intensity angle distribution. The most commonly method to change its intensity angle distribution is the free surface. Generally, using ordinary differential equations to calculate free surface can only be applied in a point source, but it will lead to a big error for the expand light. This paper proposes a LED collimating lens based on the ordinary differential equation, combined with the LED's light distribution curve, and adopt the method of calculating the center gravity of the extended light to get the normal vector. According to the law of Snell, the ordinary differential equations are constructed. Using the runge-kutta method for solution of ordinary differential equation solution, the curve point coordinates are gotten. Meanwhile, the edge point data of lens are imported into the optical simulation software TracePro. Based on 1mm×1mm single lambert body for light conditions, The degrees of collimating light can be close to +/-3. Furthermore, the energy utilization rate is higher than 85%. In this paper, the point light source is used to calculate partial differential equation method and compared with the simulation of the lens, which improve the effect of 1 degree of collimation.

  3. Algorithmic Verification of Linearizability for Ordinary Differential Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Lyakhov, Dmitry A.

    2017-07-19

    For a nonlinear ordinary differential equation solved with respect to the highest order derivative and rational in the other derivatives and in the independent variable, we devise two algorithms to check if the equation can be reduced to a linear one by a point transformation of the dependent and independent variables. The first algorithm is based on a construction of the Lie point symmetry algebra and on the computation of its derived algebra. The second algorithm exploits the differential Thomas decomposition and allows not only to test the linearizability, but also to generate a system of nonlinear partial differential equations that determines the point transformation and the coefficients of the linearized equation. The implementation of both algorithms is discussed and their application is illustrated using several examples.

  4. Reduction of exterior differential systems for ordinary variational problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morando, P; Sammarco, S

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the reduction of ordinary variational problems with Abelian and non-Abelian symmetry groups. It differs from the existing results on geometric reduction in the approach that is completely Lagrangian and based on exterior differential systems. In this setting, two procedures of reduction come out naturally: the first one is the Lagrangian analog of the Marsden–Weinstein reduction holding in the symplectic case and the other one, especially in the non-Abelian case, comes out naturally in our setting. (paper)

  5. The qualitative theory of ordinary differential equations an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Brauer, Fred

    1989-01-01

    ""This is a very good book ... with many well-chosen examples and illustrations."" - American Mathematical MonthlyThis highly regarded text presents a self-contained introduction to some important aspects of modern qualitative theory for ordinary differential equations. It is accessible to any student of physical sciences, mathematics or engineering who has a good knowledge of calculus and of the elements of linear algebra. In addition, algebraic results are stated as needed; the less familiar ones are proved either in the text or in appendixes.The topics covered in the first three chapters a

  6. Random ordinary differential equations and their numerical solution

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Xiaoying

    2017-01-01

    This book is intended to make recent results on the derivation of higher order numerical schemes for random ordinary differential equations (RODEs) available to a broader readership, and to familiarize readers with RODEs themselves as well as the closely associated theory of random dynamical systems. In addition, it demonstrates how RODEs are being used in the biological sciences, where non-Gaussian and bounded noise are often more realistic than the Gaussian white noise in stochastic differential equations (SODEs).   RODEs are used in many important applications and play a fundamental role in the theory of random dynamical systems.  They can be analyzed pathwise with deterministic calculus, but require further treatment beyond that of classical ODE theory due to the lack of smoothness in their time variable. Although classical numerical schemes for ODEs can be used pathwise for RODEs, they rarely attain their traditional order since the solutions of RODEs do not have sufficient smoothness to have Taylor ...

  7. On The K-Pseudo Symmetric and Ordinary Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łazarow E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1972, S. Valenti introduced the definition of k-pseudo symmetric derivative and has shown that the set of all points of a continuous function, at which there exists a finite k-pseudo symmetric derivative but the finite ordinary derivative does not exist, is of Lebesgue measure zero. In 1993, L. Zajícek has shown that for a continuous function f, the set of all points, at which f is symmetrically differentiable but no differentiable, is σ-(1 - ε symmetrically porous for every ε > 0. The question arises: can we transferred the Zajícek’s result to the case of the k-pseudo symmetric derivative?

  8. Cause and cure of sloppiness in ordinary differential equation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tönsing, Christian; Timmer, Jens; Kreutz, Clemens

    2014-08-01

    Data-based mathematical modeling of biochemical reaction networks, e.g., by nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) models, has been successfully applied. In this context, parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis is a major task in order to assess the quality of the description of the system by the model. Recently, a broadened eigenvalue spectrum of the Hessian matrix of the objective function covering orders of magnitudes was observed and has been termed as sloppiness. In this work, we investigate the origin of sloppiness from structures in the sensitivity matrix arising from the properties of the model topology and the experimental design. Furthermore, we present strategies using optimal experimental design methods in order to circumvent the sloppiness issue and present nonsloppy designs for a benchmark model.

  9. Nonlinear ordinary differential equations analytical approximation and numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Hermann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The book discusses the solutions to nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) using analytical and numerical approximation methods. Recently, analytical approximation methods have been largely used in solving linear and nonlinear lower-order ODEs. It also discusses using these methods to solve some strong nonlinear ODEs. There are two chapters devoted to solving nonlinear ODEs using numerical methods, as in practice high-dimensional systems of nonlinear ODEs that cannot be solved by analytical approximate methods are common. Moreover, it studies analytical and numerical techniques for the treatment of parameter-depending ODEs. The book explains various methods for solving nonlinear-oscillator and structural-system problems, including the energy balance method, harmonic balance method, amplitude frequency formulation, variational iteration method, homotopy perturbation method, iteration perturbation method, homotopy analysis method, simple and multiple shooting method, and the nonlinear stabilized march...

  10. Differential equation analysis in biomedical science and engineering ordinary differential equation applications with R

    CERN Document Server

    Schiesser, William E

    2014-01-01

    Features a solid foundation of mathematical and computational tools to formulate and solve real-world ODE problems across various fields With a step-by-step approach to solving ordinary differential equations (ODEs), Differential Equation Analysis in Biomedical Science and Engineering: Ordinary Differential Equation Applications with R successfully applies computational techniques for solving real-worldODE problems that are found in a variety of fields, including chemistry, physics, biology,and physiology. The book provides readers with the necessary knowledge to reproduce andextend the comp

  11. Numerical methods for the solution of ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Azeem, M

    1999-01-01

    The ode 113 code solves non-stiff differential equations and is a fully variable step, variable order, PECE implementation in terms of modified divided differences of Adams-Bashforth-Moulton family of formulas of order 1-12. The main objectives of this project were to modify PECE mode of ode 113 into PEC mode, study the variable step size and variable order strategy of both the modes and finally, develop the switching strategy between both PECE and PEC modes to minimize the cost of solving the ordinary differential equations. Using some test problems (including stiff, mild stiff and non-stiff), it was found that the PEC mode was more efficient for non-stiff problems at crude and intermediate tolerances and the PECE mode for all problems at the stringent tolerance. An automatic switching strategy was developed using the results observed from the step size and order plots of all the test problems for both the modes and gave the optimum results.

  12. Error estimation in the neural network solution of ordinary differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filici, Cristian

    2010-06-01

    In this article a method of error estimation for the neural approximation of the solution of an Ordinary Differential Equation is presented. Some examples of the application of the method support the theory presented. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Antiperiodic Boundary Value Problems for Second-Order Impulsive Ordinary Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider a second-order ordinary differential equation with antiperiodic boundary conditions and impulses. By using Schaefer's fixed-point theorem, some existence results are obtained.

  14. Numerical solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations in the frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, G.; Por, G.

    1997-01-01

    Numerical problems during the noise simulation in a nuclear power plant are discussed. The solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations are studied in the frequency domain. Numerical methods by the transfer function method are applied. It is shown that the correctness of the numerical methods is limited for ordinary differential equations in the frequency domain. To overcome the difficulties, step-size selection is suggested. (author)

  15. Polynomial mixture method of solving ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrir, Mohammad Shazri; Nallasamy, Kumaresan; Ratnavelu, Kuru; Kamali, M. Z. M.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a numerical solution of fuzzy quadratic Riccati differential equation is estimated using a proposed new approach that provides mixture of polynomials where iteratively the right mixture will be generated. This mixture provide a generalized formalism of traditional Neural Networks (NN). Previous works have shown reliable results using Runge-Kutta 4th order (RK4). This can be achieved by solving the 1st Order Non-linear Differential Equation (ODE) that is found commonly in Riccati differential equation. Research has shown improved results relatively to the RK4 method. It can be said that Polynomial Mixture Method (PMM) shows promising results with the advantage of continuous estimation and improved accuracy that can be produced over Mabood et al, RK-4, Multi-Agent NN and Neuro Method (NM).

  16. A perturbative solution to metadynamics ordinary differential equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Dama, James F.; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-12-01

    Metadynamics is a popular enhanced sampling scheme wherein by periodic application of a repulsive bias, one can surmount high free energy barriers and explore complex landscapes. Recently, metadynamics was shown to be mathematically well founded, in the sense that the biasing procedure is guaranteed to converge to the true free energy surface in the long time limit irrespective of the precise choice of biasing parameters. A differential equation governing the post-transient convergence behavior of metadynamics was also derived. In this short communication, we revisit this differential equation, expressing it in a convenient and elegant Riccati-like form. A perturbative solution scheme is then developed for solving this differential equation, which is valid for any generic biasing kernel. The solution clearly demonstrates the robustness of metadynamics to choice of biasing parameters and gives further confidence in the widely used method.

  17. Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of…

  18. The Numerical Solution of an Abelian Ordinary Differential Equation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we present a relatively new technique call theNew Hybrid of Adomian decomposition method (ADM) for solution of an Abelian Differential equation. The numerical results of the equation have been obtained in terms of convergent series with easily computable component. These methods are applied to solve ...

  19. Generation and Identification of Ordinary Differential Equations of Maximal Symmetry Algebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Ndogmo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective method for generating linear ordinary differential equations of maximal symmetry in their most general form is found, and an explicit expression for the point transformation reducing the equation to its canonical form is obtained. New expressions for the general solution are also found, as well as several identification and other results and a direct proof of the fact that a linear ordinary differential equation is iterative if and only if it is reducible to the canonical form by a point transformation. New classes of solvable equations parameterized by an arbitrary function are also found, together with simple algebraic expressions for the corresponding general solution.

  20. Numerical solution of stiff systems of ordinary differential equations with applications to electronic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    Systems of ordinary differential equations in which the magnitudes of the eigenvalues (or time constants) vary greatly are commonly called stiff. Such systems of equations arise in nuclear reactor kinetics, the flow of chemically reacting gas, dynamics, control theory, circuit analysis and other fields. The research reported develops an A-stable numerical integration technique for solving stiff systems of ordinary differential equations. The method, which is called the generalized trapezoidal rule, is a modification of the trapezoidal rule. However, the method is computationally more efficient than the trapezoidal rule when the solution of the almost-discontinuous segments is being calculated.

  1. Comparative numerical solutions of stiff Ordinary differential equations using magnus series expansion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SURE KÖME

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigated the effect of Magnus Series Expansion Method on homogeneous stiff ordinary differential equations with different stiffness ratios. A Magnus type integrator is used to obtain numerical solutions of two different examples of stiff problems and exact and approximate results are tabulated. Furthermore, absolute error graphics are demonstrated in detail.

  2. Third-order ordinary differential equations Y”' = f(x, y, y'', y′”) with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present here, in compact form, the necessary and sufficient conditions for linearization of third-order ordinary differential equations y ′′′ = f(x; y; y ′ ; y ′′ ) with maximal symmetry group via point transformation. A simple procedure to construct the point transformation using the isomorphism of the symmetry ...

  3. Exploring Students' Understanding of Ordinary Differential Equations Using Computer Algebraic System (CAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maat, Siti Mistima; Zakaria, Effandi

    2011-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are one of the important topics in engineering mathematics that lead to the understanding of technical concepts among students. This study was conducted to explore the students' understanding of ODEs when they solve ODE questions using a traditional method as well as a computer algebraic system, particularly…

  4. Solving Second-Order Ordinary Differential Equations without Using Complex Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kougias, Ioannis E.

    2009-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is a subject with a wide range of applications and the need of introducing it to students often arises in the last year of high school, as well as in the early stages of tertiary education. The usual methods of solving second-order ODEs with constant coefficients, among others, rely upon the use of complex…

  5. On periodic bounded and unbounded solutions of second order nonlinear ordinary differential equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lomtatidze, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2017), s. 241-263 ISSN 1072-947X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : nonlinear ordinary differential equations * periodic boundary value problem * solvability Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.290, year: 2016 https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/gmj.2017.24.issue-2/gmj-2017-0009/gmj-2017-0009. xml

  6. Lagrangian asymptotic behaviour of solutions of inhomogeneous systems of ordinary differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtsev, L D

    2006-01-01

    The problem under consideration concerns when a system of ordinary differential equations reducible to a weakly non-linear system has solutions with the same asymptotic behaviour as solutions of the corresponding homogeneous system. The existence and uniqueness of global solutions to the inhomogeneous system is established in the form of a solution to a homogeneous system of differential equations, in the case when asymptotic initial data is prescribed at the singular points of these systems.

  7. Numerical treatment of special second order ordinary differential equations: general and exponentially fitted methods

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, Elena

    2012-01-01

    2010 - 2011 The aim of this research is the construction and the analysis of new families of numerical methods for the integration of special second order Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs). The modeling of continuous time dynamical systems using second order ODEs is widely used in many elds of applications, as celestial mechanics, seismology, molecular dynamics, or in the semidiscretisation of partial differential equations (which leads to high dimensional systems and ...

  8. Low Dimensional Vessiot-Guldberg-Lie Algebras of Second-Order Ordinary Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutwig Campoamor-Stursberg

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A direct approach to non-linear second-order ordinary differential equations admitting a superposition principle is developed by means of Vessiot-Guldberg-Lie algebras of a dimension not exceeding three. This procedure allows us to describe generic types of second-order ordinary differential equations subjected to some constraints and admitting a given Lie algebra as Vessiot-Guldberg-Lie algebra. In particular, well-known types, such as the Milne-Pinney or Kummer-Schwarz equations, are recovered as special cases of this classification. The analogous problem for systems of second-order differential equations in the real plane is considered for a special case that enlarges the generalized Ermakov systems.

  9. An introduction to linear ordinary differential equations using the impulsive response method and factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a method for solving linear ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach for the case of constant coefficients is elementary, and only requires a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, the book avoids the use of distribution theory, as well as the other more advanced approaches: Laplace transform, linear systems, the general theory of linear equations with variable coefficients and variation of parameters. The case of variable coefficients is addressed using Mammana’s result for the factorization of a real linear ordinary differential operator into a product of first-order (complex) factors, as well as a recent generalization of this result to the case of complex-valued coefficients.

  10. Solving (2 + 1)-dimensional sine-Poisson equation by a modified variable separated ordinary differential equation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ka-Lin, Su; Yuan-Xi, Xie

    2010-01-01

    By introducing a more general auxiliary ordinary differential equation (ODE), a modified variable separated ordinary differential equation method is presented for solving the (2 + 1)-dimensional sine-Poisson equation. As a result, many explicit and exact solutions of the (2 + 1)-dimensional sine-Poisson equation are derived in a simple manner by this technique. (general)

  11. Linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. Revisiting the impulsive response method using factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-06-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of the other more advanced approaches: Laplace transform, linear systems, the general theory of linear equations with variable coefficients and the variation of constants method. The approach presented here can be used in a first course on differential equations for science and engineering majors.

  12. On periodic bounded and unbounded solutions of second order nonlinear ordinary differential equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lomtatidze, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2017), s. 241-263 ISSN 1072-947X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : nonlinear ordinary differential equations * periodic boundary value problem * solvability Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 0.290, year: 2016 https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/gmj.2017.24.issue-2/gmj-2017-0009/gmj-2017-0009. xml

  13. On one two-point BVP for the fourth order linear ordinary differential equation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mukhigulashvili, Sulkhan; Manjikashvili, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2017), s. 265-275 ISSN 1072-947X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : fourth order linear ordinary differential equations * two-point boundary value problems Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 0.290, year: 2016 https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/gmj.2017.24.issue-2/gmj-2016-0077/gmj-2016-0077. xml

  14. The relationship among the solutions of two auxiliary ordinary differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaoping; Liu Chunping

    2009-01-01

    In a recent article [Phys. Lett. A 356 (2006) 124], Sirendaoreji extended their auxiliary equation method by introducing a new auxiliary ordinary differential equation (NAODE) and its 14 solutions. Then the author studied some nonlinear evolution equations (NLEEs) and got more exact travelling wave solutions. In this paper, we will show that the 14 solutions of the NAODE are actually the same as the solutions obtained by original auxiliary equation method, and they are only different in the form.

  15. On global asymptotic stability of solutions of a system of ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonov, M. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    To investigate global asymptotic stability in general of an equilibrium position of an autonomous system of ordinary differential equations, considered by V.A. Pliss, a function different from the Lyapunov functions is applied. V.A. Pliss proved that for this system it is impossible to construct the Lyapunov function as a sum of a quadratic form and an integral of some nonlinear function defined by the right-hand side of the system.

  16. On one two-point BVP for the fourth order linear ordinary differential equation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mukhigulashvili, Sulkhan; Manjikashvili, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2017), s. 265-275 ISSN 1072-947X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : fourth order linear ordinary differential equations * two-point boundary value problems Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.290, year: 2016 https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/gmj.2017.24.issue-2/gmj-2016-0077/gmj-2016-0077. xml

  17. On nonlocal problems for ordinary differential equations and on a nonlocal parabolic transmission problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Denche

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we study nonlocal problems for ordinary differential equations with a discontinuous coefficient for the high order derivative. We establish sufficient conditions, known as regularity conditions, which guarantee the coerciveness for both the space variable and the spectral parameter, as well as guarantee the completeness of the system of root functions. The results obtained are then applied to the study of a nonlocal parabolic transmission problem.

  18. The Analytical Solution of Some Fractional Ordinary Differential Equations by the Sumudu Transform Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Bulut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the rudiments of fractional calculus and the consequent applications of the Sumudu transform on fractional derivatives. Once this connection is firmly established in the general setting, we turn to the application of the Sumudu transform method (STM to some interesting nonhomogeneous fractional ordinary differential equations (FODEs. Finally, we use the solutions to form two-dimensional (2D graphs, by using the symbolic algebra package Mathematica Program 7.

  19. A numerical method for singular boundary value problem of ordinary differential equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Qibing

    1992-12-01

    A numerical method, regularizing method, is suggested to treat the singular boundary problem of ordinary differential equation that is raised from controlled nuclear fusion science and other fields owing to their singular physical mechanism. This kind of singular boundary problem has been successfully solved by special treatment near the singular points and using difference method. This method overcomes difficulties in numerical calculation due to the singularity. The convergence results and numerical test are also given

  20. Approximating positive solutions of nonlinear first order ordinary quadratic differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapurao C. Dhage

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors prove the existence as well as approximations of the positive solutions for an initial value problem of first-order ordinary nonlinear quadratic differential equations. An algorithm for the solutions is developed and it is shown that the sequence of successive approximations converges monotonically to the positive solution of related quadratic differential equations under some suitable mixed hybrid conditions. We base our results on the Dhage iteration method embodied in a recent hybrid fixed-point theorem of Dhage (2014 in partially ordered normed linear spaces. An example is also provided to illustrate the abstract theory developed in the paper.

  1. Blow up of solutions to ordinary differential equations arising in nonlinear dispersive problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Dimova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We study a new class of ordinary differential equations with blow up solutions. Necessary and sufficient conditions for finite blow up time are proved. Based on the new differential equation, a revised version of the concavity method of Levine is proposed. As an application we investigate the non-existence of global solutions to the Cauchy problem of Klein-Gordon, and to the double dispersive equations. We obtain necessary and sufficient condition for finite time blow up with arbitrary positive energy. A very general sufficient condition for blow up is also given.

  2. Ordinary differential equations and Boolean networks in application to modelling of 6-mercaptopurine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrova, Anastasia I; Postnikov, Eugene B; Zyubin, Andrey Yu; Babak, Svetlana V

    2017-04-01

    We consider two approaches to modelling the cell metabolism of 6-mercaptopurine, one of the important chemotherapy drugs used for treating acute lymphocytic leukaemia: kinetic ordinary differential equations, and Boolean networks supplied with one controlling node, which takes continual values. We analyse their interplay with respect to taking into account ATP concentration as a key parameter of switching between different pathways. It is shown that the Boolean networks, which allow avoiding the complexity of general kinetic modelling, preserve the possibility of reproducing the principal switching mechanism.

  3. Conservation properties of numerical integration methods for systems of ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    If a system of ordinary differential equations represents a property conserving system that can be expressed linearly (e.g., conservation of mass), it is then desirable that the numerical integration method used conserve the same quantity. It is shown that both linear multistep methods and Runge-Kutta methods are 'conservative' and that Newton-type methods used to solve the implicit equations preserve the inherent conservation of the numerical method. It is further shown that a method used by several authors is not conservative.

  4. Collocation methods for the solution of eigenvalue problems for singular ordinary differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfried Auzinger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that eigenvalue problems for ordinary differential equations can be recast in a formulation suitable for the solution by polynomial collocation. It is shown that the well-posedness of the two formulations is equivalent in the regular as well as in the singular case. Thus, a collocation code equipped with asymptotically correct error estimation and adaptive mesh selection can be successfully applied to compute the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions efficiently and with reliable control of the accuracy. Numerical examples illustrate this claim.

  5. Linear or linearizable first-order delay ordinary differential equations and their Lie point symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnitsyn, Vladimir A.; Kozlov, Roman; Meleshko, Sergey V.; Winternitz, Pavel

    2018-05-01

    A recent article was devoted to an analysis of the symmetry properties of a class of first-order delay ordinary differential systems (DODSs). Here we concentrate on linear DODSs, which have infinite-dimensional Lie point symmetry groups due to the linear superposition principle. Their symmetry algebra always contains a two-dimensional subalgebra realized by linearly connected vector fields. We identify all classes of linear first-order DODSs that have additional symmetries, not due to linearity alone, and we present representatives of each class. These additional symmetries are then used to construct exact analytical particular solutions using symmetry reduction.

  6. Multi-off-grid methods in multi-step integration of ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudet, P. R.

    1974-01-01

    Description of methods of solving first- and second-order systems of differential equations in which all derivatives are evaluated at off-grid locations in order to circumvent the Dahlquist stability limitation on the order of on-grid methods. The proposed multi-off-grid methods require off-grid state predictors for the evaluation of the n derivatives at each step. Progressing forward in time, the off-grid states are predicted using a linear combination of back on-grid state values and off-grid derivative evaluations. A comparison is made between the proposed multi-off-grid methods and the corresponding Adams and Cowell on-grid integration techniques in integrating systems of ordinary differential equations, showing a significant reduction in the error at larger step sizes in the case of the multi-off-grid integrator.

  7. Particle Swarm Optimization Based on Local Attractors of Ordinary Differential Equation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyu Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle swarm optimization (PSO is inspired by sociological behavior. In this paper, we interpret PSO as a finite difference scheme for solving a system of stochastic ordinary differential equations (SODE. In this framework, the position points of the swarm converge to an equilibrium point of the SODE and the local attractors, which are easily defined by the present position points, also converge to the global attractor. Inspired by this observation, we propose a class of modified PSO iteration methods (MPSO based on local attractors of the SODE. The idea of MPSO is to choose the next update state near the present local attractor, rather than the present position point as in the original PSO, according to a given probability density function. In particular, the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization method turns out to be a special case of MPSO by taking a special probability density function. The MPSO methods with six different probability density functions are tested on a few benchmark problems. These MPSO methods behave differently for different problems. Thus, our framework not only gives an interpretation for the ordinary PSO but also, more importantly, provides a warehouse of PSO-like methods to choose from for solving different practical problems.

  8. A Fresh Look at Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as…

  9. Necessary and sufficient conditions for global-in-time existence of solutions of ordinary, stochastic, and parabolic differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for global-in-time existence of solutions of ordinary differential, stochastic differential, and parabolic equations. The conditions are formulated in terms of complete Riemannian metrics on extended phase spaces (conditions with two-sided estimates or in terms of derivatives of proper functions on extended phase spaces (conditions with one-sided estimates.

  10. Assessment of available integration algorithms for initial value ordinary differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, M.B.; Stewart, D.G.

    1979-11-01

    There exists an extremely large number of algorithms designed for the ordinary differential equation initial value problem. The integration is normally done by a finite sum at time intervals which are chosen dynamically to satisfy an imposed error tolerance. This report describes the basic logistics of the integration process, identifies common areas of difficulty, and establishes a comprehensive test profile for integration algorithms. A number of algorithms are described, and selected published subroutines are evaluated using the test profile. It concludes that an effective library for general use need have only two such routines. The two selected are versions of the well-known Gear and Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg algorithms. Full documentation and listings are included. (auth)

  11. Sparse Additive Ordinary Differential Equations for Dynamic Gene Regulatory Network Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hulin; Lu, Tao; Xue, Hongqi; Liang, Hua

    2014-04-02

    The gene regulation network (GRN) is a high-dimensional complex system, which can be represented by various mathematical or statistical models. The ordinary differential equation (ODE) model is one of the popular dynamic GRN models. High-dimensional linear ODE models have been proposed to identify GRNs, but with a limitation of the linear regulation effect assumption. In this article, we propose a sparse additive ODE (SA-ODE) model, coupled with ODE estimation methods and adaptive group LASSO techniques, to model dynamic GRNs that could flexibly deal with nonlinear regulation effects. The asymptotic properties of the proposed method are established and simulation studies are performed to validate the proposed approach. An application example for identifying the nonlinear dynamic GRN of T-cell activation is used to illustrate the usefulness of the proposed method.

  12. A HAM-based wavelet approach for nonlinear ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaochen; Liao, Shijun

    2017-07-01

    Based on the homotopy analysis method (HAM) and the generalized Coiflet-type orthogonal wavelet, a new analytic approximation approach for solving nonlinear boundary value problems (governed by nonlinear ordinary differential equations), namely the wavelet homotopy analysis method (wHAM), is proposed. The basic ideas of the wHAM are described using the one-dimensional Bratu's equation as an example. This method not only keeps the main advantages of the normal HAM, but also possesses some new properties and advantages. First of all, the wHAM possesses high computational efficiency. Besides, based on multi-resolution analysis, it provides us a convenient way to balance the accuracy and efficiency by simply adjusting the resolution level. Furthermore, different from the normal HAM, the wHAM provides us much larger freedom to choose the auxiliary linear operator. In addition, just like the normal HAM, iteration can greatly accelerate the computational efficiency of the wHAM without loss of accuracy.

  13. Numerical methods for ordinary differential equations in the 20th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, J. C.

    2000-12-01

    Numerical methods for the solution of initial value problems in ordinary differential equations made enormous progress during the 20th century for several reasons. The first reasons lie in the impetus that was given to the subject in the concluding years of the previous century by the seminal papers of Bashforth and Adams for linear multistep methods and Runge for Runge-Kutta methods. Other reasons, which of course apply to numerical analysis in general, are in the invention of electronic computers half way through the century and the needs in mathematical modelling of efficient numerical algorithms as an alternative to classical methods of applied mathematics. This survey paper follows many of the main strands in the developments of these methods, both for general problems, stiff systems, and for many of the special problem types that have been gaining in significance as the century draws to an end.

  14. Shooting method for third order simultaneous ordinary differential equations with application to magnetohydrodynamic boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.C.; Hazarika, G.C.

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm based on the shooting method has been developed for the solution of a two-point boundary value problem consisting of a system of third order simultaneous ordinary differential equations. The Falkner-Skan equations for electrically conducting viscous fluid with applied magnetic field has been solved by using this algorithm for various values of the wedge angle and magnetic parameters. The shooting method seems to be well convergent for a system as the results are in good agreement with those obtained by other methods. It is observed that both viscous boundary layer and magnetic boundary layer decrease while velocity as well as magnetic field increase with the increase of the wedge angle. (author). 6 tabs., 7 refs

  15. Solving ordinary differential equations by electrical analogy: a multidisciplinary teaching tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Perez, J. F.; Conesa, M.; Alhama, I.

    2016-11-01

    Ordinary differential equations are the mathematical formulation for a great variety of problems in science and engineering, and frequently, two different problems are equivalent from a mathematical point of view when they are formulated by the same equations. Students acquire the knowledge of how to solve these equations (at least some types of them) using protocols and strict algorithms of mathematical calculation without thinking about the meaning of the equation. The aim of this work is that students learn to design network models or circuits in this way; with simple knowledge of them, students can establish the association of electric circuits and differential equations and their equivalences, from a formal point of view, that allows them to associate knowledge of two disciplines and promote the use of this interdisciplinary approach to address complex problems. Therefore, they learn to use a multidisciplinary tool that allows them to solve these kinds of equations, even students of first course of engineering, whatever the order, grade or type of non-linearity. This methodology has been implemented in numerous final degree projects in engineering and science, e.g., chemical engineering, building engineering, industrial engineering, mechanical engineering, architecture, etc. Applications are presented to illustrate the subject of this manuscript.

  16. Stochastic differential equations in NONMEM: implementation, application, and comparison with ordinary differential equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Overgaard, Rune Viig; Agerso, H.

    2005-01-01

    of noise: a measurement and a system noise term. The measurement noise represents uncorrelated error due to, for example, assay error while the system noise accounts for structural misspecifications, approximations of the dynamical model, and true random physiological fluctuations. Since the system noise......Purpose. The objective of the present analysis was to explore the use of stochastic differential equations (SDEs) in population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling. Methods. The intra-individual variability in nonlinear mixed-effects models based on SDEs is decomposed into two types...... accounts for model misspecifications, the SDEs provide a diagnostic tool for model appropriateness. The focus of the article is on the implementation of the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) in NONMEM(R) for parameter estimation in SDE models. Results. Various applications of SDEs in population PK/PD modeling...

  17. Stochastic differential equations in NONMEM: implementation, application, and comparison with ordinary differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornøe, Christoffer W; Overgaard, Rune V; Agersø, Henrik; Nielsen, Henrik A; Madsen, Henrik; Jonsson, E Niclas

    2005-08-01

    The objective of the present analysis was to explore the use of stochastic differential equations (SDEs) in population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling. The intra-individual variability in nonlinear mixed-effects models based on SDEs is decomposed into two types of noise: a measurement and a system noise term. The measurement noise represents uncorrelated error due to, for example, assay error while the system noise accounts for structural misspecifications, approximations of the dynamical model, and true random physiological fluctuations. Since the system noise accounts for model misspecifications, the SDEs provide a diagnostic tool for model appropriateness. The focus of the article is on the implementation of the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) in NONMEM for parameter estimation in SDE models. Various applications of SDEs in population PK/PD modeling are illustrated through a systematic model development example using clinical PK data of the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist degarelix. The dynamic noise estimates were used to track variations in model parameters and systematically build an absorption model for subcutaneously administered degarelix. The EKF-based algorithm was successfully implemented in NONMEM for parameter estimation in population PK/PD models described by systems of SDEs. The example indicated that it was possible to pinpoint structural model deficiencies, and that valuable information may be obtained by tracking unexplained variations in parameters.

  18. Dimensional analysis to transform the differential equations in partial derivates in the theory of heat transmission into ordinary ones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Sanchidrian, C.

    1989-01-01

    The present paper applies dimensional analysis with spatial discrimination to transform the differential equations in partial derivatives developed in the theory of heat transmission into ordinary ones. The effectivity of the method is comparable to that methods based in transformations of uni or multiparametric groups, with the advantage of being more direct and simple. (Author)

  19. Penalized Nonlinear Least Squares Estimation of Time-Varying Parameters in Ordinary Differential Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Jiguo

    2012-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are widely used in biomedical research and other scientific areas to model complex dynamic systems. It is an important statistical problem to estimate parameters in ODEs from noisy observations. In this article we propose a method for estimating the time-varying coefficients in an ODE. Our method is a variation of the nonlinear least squares where penalized splines are used to model the functional parameters and the ODE solutions are approximated also using splines. We resort to the implicit function theorem to deal with the nonlinear least squares objective function that is only defined implicitly. The proposed penalized nonlinear least squares method is applied to estimate a HIV dynamic model from a real dataset. Monte Carlo simulations show that the new method can provide much more accurate estimates of functional parameters than the existing two-step local polynomial method which relies on estimation of the derivatives of the state function. Supplemental materials for the article are available online.

  20. Mathematical modeling based on ordinary differential equations: A promising approach to vaccinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Carla Rezende Barbosa; Fernandes, Guilherme Cortes; Dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Lobosco, Marcelo

    2017-02-01

    New contributions that aim to accelerate the development or to improve the efficacy and safety of vaccines arise from many different areas of research and technology. One of these areas is computational science, which traditionally participates in the initial steps, such as the pre-screening of active substances that have the potential to become a vaccine antigen. In this work, we present another promising way to use computational science in vaccinology: mathematical and computational models of important cell and protein dynamics of the immune system. A system of Ordinary Differential Equations represents different immune system populations, such as B cells and T cells, antigen presenting cells and antibodies. In this way, it is possible to simulate, in silico, the immune response to vaccines under development or under study. Distinct scenarios can be simulated by varying parameters of the mathematical model. As a proof of concept, we developed a model of the immune response to vaccination against the yellow fever. Our simulations have shown consistent results when compared with experimental data available in the literature. The model is generic enough to represent the action of other diseases or vaccines in the human immune system, such as dengue and Zika virus.

  1. ODEion--a software module for structural identification of ordinary differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennemark, Peter; Wedelin, Dag

    2014-02-01

    In the systems biology field, algorithms for structural identification of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) have mainly focused on fixed model spaces like S-systems and/or on methods that require sufficiently good data so that derivatives can be accurately estimated. There is therefore a lack of methods and software that can handle more general models and realistic data. We present ODEion, a software module for structural identification of ODEs. Main characteristic features of the software are: • The model space is defined by arbitrary user-defined functions that can be nonlinear in both variables and parameters, such as for example chemical rate reactions. • ODEion implements computationally efficient algorithms that have been shown to efficiently handle sparse and noisy data. It can run a range of realistic problems that previously required a supercomputer. • ODEion is easy to use and provides SBML output. We describe the mathematical problem, the ODEion system itself, and provide several examples of how the system can be used. Available at: http://www.odeidentification.org.

  2. A first course in ordinary differential equations analytical and numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Hermann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a modern introduction to analytical and numerical techniques for solving ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Contrary to the traditional format—the theorem-and-proof format—the book is focusing on analytical and numerical methods. The book supplies a variety of problems and examples, ranging from the elementary to the advanced level, to introduce and study the mathematics of ODEs. The analytical part of the book deals with solution techniques for scalar first-order and second-order linear ODEs, and systems of linear ODEs—with a special focus on the Laplace transform, operator techniques and power series solutions. In the numerical part, theoretical and practical aspects of Runge-Kutta methods for solving initial-value problems and shooting methods for linear two-point boundary-value problems are considered. The book is intended as a primary text for courses on the theory of ODEs and numerical treatment of ODEs for advanced undergraduate and early graduate students. It is assumed t...

  3. An analytical approximation scheme to two-point boundary value problems of ordinary differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisseau, Bruno; Forgacs, Peter; Giacomini, Hector

    2007-01-01

    A new (algebraic) approximation scheme to find global solutions of two-point boundary value problems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is presented. The method is applicable for both linear and nonlinear (coupled) ODEs whose solutions are analytic near one of the boundary points. It is based on replacing the original ODEs by a sequence of auxiliary first-order polynomial ODEs with constant coefficients. The coefficients in the auxiliary ODEs are uniquely determined from the local behaviour of the solution in the neighbourhood of one of the boundary points. The problem of obtaining the parameters of the global (connecting) solutions, analytic at one of the boundary points, reduces to find the appropriate zeros of algebraic equations. The power of the method is illustrated by computing the approximate values of the 'connecting parameters' for a number of nonlinear ODEs arising in various problems in field theory. We treat in particular the static and rotationally symmetric global vortex, the skyrmion, the Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen vortex, as well as the 't Hooft-Polyakov magnetic monopole. The total energy of the skyrmion and of the monopole is also computed by the new method. We also consider some ODEs coming from the exact renormalization group. The ground-state energy level of the anharmonic oscillator is also computed for arbitrary coupling strengths with good precision. (fast track communication)

  4. Exploring inductive linearization for pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic systems of nonlinear ordinary differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Chihiro; Duffull, Stephen B

    2018-02-01

    Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic systems are often expressed with nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). While there are numerous methods to solve such ODEs these methods generally rely on time-stepping solutions (e.g. Runge-Kutta) which need to be matched to the characteristics of the problem at hand. The primary aim of this study was to explore the performance of an inductive approximation which iteratively converts nonlinear ODEs to linear time-varying systems which can then be solved algebraically or numerically. The inductive approximation is applied to three examples, a simple nonlinear pharmacokinetic model with Michaelis-Menten elimination (E1), an integrated glucose-insulin model and an HIV viral load model with recursive feedback systems (E2 and E3, respectively). The secondary aim of this study was to explore the potential advantages of analytically solving linearized ODEs with two examples, again E3 with stiff differential equations and a turnover model of luteinizing hormone with a surge function (E4). The inductive linearization coupled with a matrix exponential solution provided accurate predictions for all examples with comparable solution time to the matched time-stepping solutions for nonlinear ODEs. The time-stepping solutions however did not perform well for E4, particularly when the surge was approximated by a square wave. In circumstances when either a linear ODE is particularly desirable or the uncertainty in matching the integrator to the ODE system is of potential risk, then the inductive approximation method coupled with an analytical integration method would be an appropriate alternative.

  5. High precision series solutions of differential equations: Ordinary and regular singular points of second order ODEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Amna; Olaussen, Kåre

    2012-10-01

    A subroutine for a very-high-precision numerical solution of a class of ordinary differential equations is provided. For a given evaluation point and equation parameters the memory requirement scales linearly with precision P, and the number of algebraic operations scales roughly linearly with P when P becomes sufficiently large. We discuss results from extensive tests of the code, and how one, for a given evaluation point and equation parameters, may estimate precision loss and computing time in advance. Program summary Program title: seriesSolveOde1 Catalogue identifier: AEMW_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 991 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 488116 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: PC's or higher performance computers. Operating system: Linux and MacOS RAM: Few to many megabytes (problem dependent). Classification: 2.7, 4.3 External routines: CLN — Class Library for Numbers [1] built with the GNU MP library [2], and GSL — GNU Scientific Library [3] (only for time measurements). Nature of problem: The differential equation -s2({d2}/{dz2}+{1-ν+-ν-}/{z}{d}/{dz}+{ν+ν-}/{z2})ψ(z)+{1}/{z} ∑n=0N vnznψ(z)=0, is solved numerically to very high precision. The evaluation point z and some or all of the equation parameters may be complex numbers; some or all of them may be represented exactly in terms of rational numbers. Solution method: The solution ψ(z), and optionally ψ'(z), is evaluated at the point z by executing the recursion A(z)={s-2}/{(m+1+ν-ν+)(m+1+ν-ν-)} ∑n=0N Vn(z)A(z), ψ(z)=ψ(z)+A(z), to sufficiently large m. Here ν is either ν+ or ν-, and Vn(z)=vnz. The recursion is initialized by A(z)=δzν,for n

  6. Customized Steady-State Constraints for Parameter Estimation in Non-Linear Ordinary Differential Equation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Marcus; Timmer, Jens; Kaschek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ordinary differential equation models have become a wide-spread approach to analyze dynamical systems and understand underlying mechanisms. Model parameters are often unknown and have to be estimated from experimental data, e.g., by maximum-likelihood estimation. In particular, models of biological systems contain a large number of parameters. To reduce the dimensionality of the parameter space, steady-state information is incorporated in the parameter estimation process. For non-linear models, analytical steady-state calculation typically leads to higher-order polynomial equations for which no closed-form solutions can be obtained. This can be circumvented by solving the steady-state equations for kinetic parameters, which results in a linear equation system with comparatively simple solutions. At the same time multiplicity of steady-state solutions is avoided, which otherwise is problematic for optimization. When solved for kinetic parameters, however, steady-state constraints tend to become negative for particular model specifications, thus, generating new types of optimization problems. Here, we present an algorithm based on graph theory that derives non-negative, analytical steady-state expressions by stepwise removal of cyclic dependencies between dynamical variables. The algorithm avoids multiple steady-state solutions by construction. We show that our method is applicable to most common classes of biochemical reaction networks containing inhibition terms, mass-action and Hill-type kinetic equations. Comparing the performance of parameter estimation for different analytical and numerical methods of incorporating steady-state information, we show that our approach is especially well-tailored to guarantee a high success rate of optimization.

  7. A fresh look at linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. Revisiting the impulsive response method using factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of the other more advanced approaches: Laplace transform, linear systems, the general theory of linear equations with variable coefficients and variation of parameters. The approach presented here can be used in a first course on differential equations for science and engineering majors.

  8. PSsolver: A Maple implementation to solve first order ordinary differential equations with Liouvillian solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellar, J.; Duarte, L. G. S.; da Mota, L. A. C. P.

    2012-10-01

    We present a set of software routines in Maple 14 for solving first order ordinary differential equations (FOODEs). The package implements the Prelle-Singer method in its original form together with its extension to include integrating factors in terms of elementary functions. The package also presents a theoretical extension to deal with all FOODEs presenting Liouvillian solutions. Applications to ODEs taken from standard references show that it solves ODEs which remain unsolved using Maple's standard ODE solution routines. New version program summary Program title: PSsolver Catalogue identifier: ADPR_v2_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADPR_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2302 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 31962 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Maple 14 (also tested using Maple 15 and 16). Computer: Intel Pentium Processor P6000, 1.86 GHz. Operating system: Windows 7. RAM: 4 GB DDR3 Memory Classification: 4.3. Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADPR_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 144 (2002) 46 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Symbolic solution of first order differential equations via the Prelle-Singer method. Solution method: The method of solution is based on the standard Prelle-Singer method, with extensions for the cases when the FOODE contains elementary functions. Additionally, an extension of our own which solves FOODEs with Liouvillian solutions is included. Reasons for new version: The program was not running anymore due to changes in the latest versions of Maple. Additionally, we corrected/changed some bugs/details that were hampering the smoother functioning of the routines. Summary

  9. FUNDAMENTAL FUNCTIONS OF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH CONSTANT COEFFICIENTS AND THEIR WAVELET APPROXIMATION SPECIFIC TO CONSTRUCTION PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akimov Pavel Alekseevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper covers the analytical construction of fundamental functions of ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients and their wavelet approximations specific to problems of the structural mechanics. The definition of the fundamental function of an ordinary linear differential equation (operator with constant coefficients is presented. A correct universal method of analytical construction of the fundamental function in the context of problems of structural analysis is described as well. Several basic elements of the multi-resolution wavelet analysis (basic definitions, wavelet transformations, the Haar wavelet etc. are considered. Fast algorithms of analysis and synthesis (direct and inverse wavelet transformations for the Haar basis and a corresponding algorithm of averaging are proposed. It is noteworthy that the algorithms of analysis and synthesis are the relevant constituents of all wavelet-based methods of structural analysis. Moreover, the effectiveness of these algorithms determines the global efficiency of respective methods. A few examples of fundamental functions of ordinary linear differential equations (the problem of analysis of beam, the problem of analysis of the beam resting on the elastic foundation are presented.

  10. Tailored parameter optimization methods for ordinary differential equation models with steady-state constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Anna; Raeth, Sebastian; Theis, Fabian J; Hausser, Angelika; Hasenauer, Jan

    2016-08-22

    Ordinary differential equation (ODE) models are widely used to describe (bio-)chemical and biological processes. To enhance the predictive power of these models, their unknown parameters are estimated from experimental data. These experimental data are mostly collected in perturbation experiments, in which the processes are pushed out of steady state by applying a stimulus. The information that the initial condition is a steady state of the unperturbed process provides valuable information, as it restricts the dynamics of the process and thereby the parameters. However, implementing steady-state constraints in the optimization often results in convergence problems. In this manuscript, we propose two new methods for solving optimization problems with steady-state constraints. The first method exploits ideas from optimization algorithms on manifolds and introduces a retraction operator, essentially reducing the dimension of the optimization problem. The second method is based on the continuous analogue of the optimization problem. This continuous analogue is an ODE whose equilibrium points are the optima of the constrained optimization problem. This equivalence enables the use of adaptive numerical methods for solving optimization problems with steady-state constraints. Both methods are tailored to the problem structure and exploit the local geometry of the steady-state manifold and its stability properties. A parameterization of the steady-state manifold is not required. The efficiency and reliability of the proposed methods is evaluated using one toy example and two applications. The first application example uses published data while the second uses a novel dataset for Raf/MEK/ERK signaling. The proposed methods demonstrated better convergence properties than state-of-the-art methods employed in systems and computational biology. Furthermore, the average computation time per converged start is significantly lower. In addition to the theoretical results, the

  11. Playing around resonance an invitation to the search of periodic solutions for second order ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Fonda, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date description of the methods needed to face the existence of solutions to some nonlinear boundary value problems. All important and interesting aspects of the theory of periodic solutions of ordinary differential equations related to the physical and mathematical question of resonance are treated. The author has chosen as a model example the periodic problem for a second order scalar differential equation. In a paedagogical style the author takes the reader step by step from the basics to the most advanced existence results in the field.

  12. The mixed BVP for second order nonlinear ordinary differential equation at resonance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mukhigulashvili, Sulkhan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 290, 2-3 (2017), s. 393-400 ISSN 0025-584X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : mixed problem at resonance * nonlinear ordinary differencial equation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016

  13. Model Selection and Risk Estimation with Applications to Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Frederik Vissing

    Broadly speaking, this thesis is devoted to model selection applied to ordinary dierential equations and risk estimation under model selection. A model selection framework was developed for modelling time course data by ordinary dierential equations. The framework is accompanied by the R software...... eective computational tools for estimating unknown structures in dynamical systems, such as gene regulatory networks, which may be used to predict downstream eects of interventions in the system. A recommended algorithm based on the computational tools is presented and thoroughly tested in various...... simulation studies and applications. The second part of the thesis also concerns model selection, but focuses on risk estimation, i.e., estimating the error of mean estimators involving model selection. An extension of Stein's unbiased risk estimate (SURE), which applies to a class of estimators with model...

  14. On the relationship between the transfer functions and the characteristic modes of a set ordinary first order differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupply, C.B.

    1964-08-01

    The report describes how the Transfer Functions of a system of ordinary differential equations can be derived in terms of the latent roots and vectors of the matrix of coefficient for the dependent variables of the system. It is shown that when the latent roots and vectors are known the formulation of the modes of the system and of its transfer functions is straight forward. The treatment itself is simple and starts almost from first principles. The report describes how to get a general set of differential equations into the correct form, the meaning of latent roots and vectors, how the transfer functions arise, the significance of complex latent roots and vectors and, finally, the modal significance of a system at its stability limit. Two simple fully worked examples are included. (author)

  15. Solution of linear ordinary differential equations by means of the method of variation of arbitrary constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlbro, Leif

    1997-01-01

    An alternative formula for the solution of linear differential equations of order n is suggested. When applicable, the suggested method requires fewer and simpler computations than the well-known method using Wronskians.......An alternative formula for the solution of linear differential equations of order n is suggested. When applicable, the suggested method requires fewer and simpler computations than the well-known method using Wronskians....

  16. Diagonally Implicit Runge-Kutta Methods for Ordinary Differential Equations. A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Christopher A.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    A review of diagonally implicit Runge-Kutta (DIRK) methods applied to rst-order ordinary di erential equations (ODEs) is undertaken. The goal of this review is to summarize the characteristics, assess the potential, and then design several nearly optimal, general purpose, DIRK-type methods. Over 20 important aspects of DIRKtype methods are reviewed. A design study is then conducted on DIRK-type methods having from two to seven implicit stages. From this, 15 schemes are selected for general purpose application. Testing of the 15 chosen methods is done on three singular perturbation problems. Based on the review of method characteristics, these methods focus on having a stage order of two, sti accuracy, L-stability, high quality embedded and dense-output methods, small magnitudes of the algebraic stability matrix eigenvalues, small values of aii, and small or vanishing values of the internal stability function for large eigenvalues of the Jacobian. Among the 15 new methods, ESDIRK4(3)6L[2]SA is recommended as a good default method for solving sti problems at moderate error tolerances.

  17. Singular Initial Value Problem for Certain Classes of Systems of Ordinary Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Diblík

    2013-01-01

    dimension of the set of initial data generating such solutions is estimated. An asymptotic behavior of solutions is determined as well and relevant asymptotic formulas are derived. The method of functions defined implicitly and the topological method (Ważewski's method are used in the proofs. The results generalize some previous ones on singular initial value problems for differential equations.

  18. Existence theory for functional initial value problems of ordinary differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapurao Dhage

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the existence of a solution of general nonlinear functional differential equations is proved under mixed generalized Lipschitz and Carath\\'eodory condition. An existence theorem for the extremal solutions is also proved under certain monotonicity and weaker continuity conditions. Examples are provided to illustrate the abstract theory developed in this paper.

  19. A Class of Numerical Methods for the Solution of Fourth-Order Ordinary Differential Equations in Polar Coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Talwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this piece of work using only three grid points, we propose two sets of numerical methods in a coupled manner for the solution of fourth-order ordinary differential equation uiv(x=f(x,u(x,u′(x,u′′(x,u′′′(x, a

  20. Invariants of a family of scalar second-order ordinary differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagderina, Yulia Yu

    2013-01-01

    The family of second-order equations with cubic nonlinearity in the first-order derivative is closed with respect to an arbitrary point change of variables. Algebraic and differential invariants for these equations which depend on the first-order derivatives are considered. We solve completely the equivalence problem for this family of equations in the generic case and also for degenerate types of these equations. Fifty equations having the Painlevé property, which have been classified by Painlevé and Gambier, belong to this remarkable family. Algebraic invariants of all these equations are calculated and constant invariants are listed in the paper. Invariant characterization of the fourth Painlevé equation is given. (paper)

  1. Clinical features and dynamic ordinary laboratory tests differentiating dengue fever from other febrile illnesses in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ho; Huang, Yi-Chuan; Kuo, Kuang-Che; Li, Chung-Chen

    2017-06-30

    Dengue fever is not easily to be diagnosed before presentation of the classic symptoms. The study aimed to investigate the clinical features and dynamic laboratory tests in pediatric patients to facilitate dengue diagnosis. This retrospective study examined the medical records of all pediatric patients who were clinically suspected to have dengue from June to December 2014. Laboratory-positive dengue cases were confirmed by detecting non-structural protein NS1, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of dengue virus, and dengue-specific IgM seroconversion. Of the 317 pediatric cases clinically suspected of dengue, 205 were laboratory-positive and 112 were laboratory-negative. In laboratory-positive cases, the most common clinical manifestation was skin rash in 156 (76.1%). Leukopenia occurred on days 1-5; thrombocytopenia, on days 2-7; prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), on days 1-4; and elevated transaminase levels, on days 3-11; and low CRP, on days 0-14. The specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of combining of rash, itching and petechiae increased up to 100%. The PPV of combining of leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated transaminase levels reached 100% on day 2 as well as days 6-8. Leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, elevated aPTT, elevated transaminase levels, and low CRP could be used to differentiate dengue fever from other febrile illnesses. During dengue epidemics, combinations of the symptoms and laboratory findings are helpful to physicians for accurate diagnosis of dengue fever. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Runge–Kutta type methods with special properties for the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalogiratou, Z.; Monovasilis, Th.; Psihoyios, G.; Simos, T.E.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we review single step methods of the Runge–Kutta type with special properties. Among them are methods specially tuned to integrate problems that exhibit a pronounced oscillatory character and such problems arise often in celestial mechanics and quantum mechanics. Symplectic methods, exponentially and trigonometrically fitted methods, minimum phase-lag and phase-fitted methods are presented. These are Runge–Kutta, Runge–Kutta–Nyström and Partitioned Runge–Kutta methods. The theory of constructing such methods is given as well as several specific methods. In order to present the performance of the methods we have tested 58 methods from all categories. We consider the two dimensional harmonic oscillator, the two body problem, the pendulum problem and the orbital problem studied by Stiefel and Bettis. Also we have tested the methods on the computation of the eigenvalues of the one dimensional time independent Schrödinger equation with the harmonic oscillator, the doubly anharmonic oscillator and the exponential potentials

  3. Numerical discretization-based estimation methods for ordinary differential equation models via penalized spline smoothing with applications in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hulin; Xue, Hongqi; Kumar, Arun

    2012-06-01

    Differential equations are extensively used for modeling dynamics of physical processes in many scientific fields such as engineering, physics, and biomedical sciences. Parameter estimation of differential equation models is a challenging problem because of high computational cost and high-dimensional parameter space. In this article, we propose a novel class of methods for estimating parameters in ordinary differential equation (ODE) models, which is motivated by HIV dynamics modeling. The new methods exploit the form of numerical discretization algorithms for an ODE solver to formulate estimating equations. First, a penalized-spline approach is employed to estimate the state variables and the estimated state variables are then plugged in a discretization formula of an ODE solver to obtain the ODE parameter estimates via a regression approach. We consider three different order of discretization methods, Euler's method, trapezoidal rule, and Runge-Kutta method. A higher-order numerical algorithm reduces numerical error in the approximation of the derivative, which produces a more accurate estimate, but its computational cost is higher. To balance the computational cost and estimation accuracy, we demonstrate, via simulation studies, that the trapezoidal discretization-based estimate is the best and is recommended for practical use. The asymptotic properties for the proposed numerical discretization-based estimators are established. Comparisons between the proposed methods and existing methods show a clear benefit of the proposed methods in regards to the trade-off between computational cost and estimation accuracy. We apply the proposed methods t an HIV study to further illustrate the usefulness of the proposed approaches. © 2012, The International Biometric Society.

  4. Exponential-fitted methods for integrating stiff systems of ordinary differential equations: Applications to homogeneous gas-phase chemical kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    Conventional algorithms for the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are based on the use of polynomial functions as interpolants. However, the exact solutions of stiff ODEs behave like decaying exponential functions, which are poorly approximated by polynomials. An obvious choice of interpolant are the exponential functions themselves, or their low-order diagonal Pade (rational function) approximants. A number of explicit, A-stable, integration algorithms were derived from the use of a three-parameter exponential function as interpolant, and their relationship to low-order, polynomial-based and rational-function-based implicit and explicit methods were shown by examining their low-order diagonal Pade approximants. A robust implicit formula was derived by exponential fitting the trapezoidal rule. Application of these algorithms to integration of the ODEs governing homogenous, gas-phase chemical kinetics was demonstrated in a developmental code CREK1D, which compares favorably with the Gear-Hindmarsh code LSODE in spite of the use of a primitive stepsize control strategy.

  5. The Euler’s Graphical User Interface Spreadsheet Calculator for Solving Ordinary Differential Equations by Visual Basic for Application Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaik Tay, Kim; Cheong, Tau Han; Foong Lee, Ming; Kek, Sie Long; Abdul-Kahar, Rosmila

    2017-08-01

    In the previous work on Euler’s spreadsheet calculator for solving an ordinary differential equation, the Visual Basic for Application (VBA) programming was used, however, a graphical user interface was not developed to capture users input. This weakness may make users confuse on the input and output since those input and output are displayed in the same worksheet. Besides, the existing Euler’s spreadsheet calculator is not interactive as there is no prompt message if there is a mistake in inputting the parameters. On top of that, there are no users’ instructions to guide users to input the derivative function. Hence, in this paper, we improved previous limitations by developing a user-friendly and interactive graphical user interface. This improvement is aimed to capture users’ input with users’ instructions and interactive prompt error messages by using VBA programming. This Euler’s graphical user interface spreadsheet calculator is not acted as a black box as users can click on any cells in the worksheet to see the formula used to implement the numerical scheme. In this way, it could enhance self-learning and life-long learning in implementing the numerical scheme in a spreadsheet and later in any programming language.

  6. Solving Initial Value Problems for Ordinary Differential Equations by two approaches: BDF and piecewise-linearized methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, J.; Hernández, V.; Arias, E.; Ruiz, P. A.

    2009-05-01

    Many scientific and engineering problems are described using Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), where the analytic solution is unknown. Much research has been done by the scientific community on developing numerical methods which can provide an approximate solution of the original ODE. In this work, two approaches have been considered based on BDF and Piecewise-linearized Methods. The approach based on BDF methods uses a Chord-Shamanskii iteration for computing the nonlinear system which is obtained when the BDF schema is used. Two approaches based on piecewise-linearized methods have also been considered. These approaches are based on a theorem proved in this paper which allows to compute the approximate solution at each time step by means of a block-oriented method based on diagonal Padé approximations. The difference between these implementations is in using or not using the scale and squaring technique. Five algorithms based on these approaches have been developed. MATLAB and Fortran versions of the above algorithms have been developed, comparing both precision and computational costs. BLAS and LAPACK libraries have been used in Fortran implementations. In order to compare in equality of conditions all implementations, algorithms with fixed step have been considered. Four of the five case studies analyzed come from biology and chemical kinetics stiff problems. Experimental results show the advantages of the proposed algorithms, especially when they are integrating stiff problems.

  7. Ordinary and extraordinary Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance in (Ga,Mn)As single electron transistor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Novák, Vít; Irvine, A.C.; Kaestner, B.; Shick, Alexander; Foxon, C. T.; Campion, R. P.; Williams, D.A.; Gallagher, B. L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 144, - (2007), s. 536-541 ISSN 0038-1098 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0575; GA ČR GA202/04/1519; GA MŠk LC510; GA ČR GEFON/06/E001; GA ČR GEFON/06/E002 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 015728 - NANOSPIN Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : ferromagnetic semiconductors * magnetoresistance * single-electron transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.535, year: 2007

  8. Hybrid modeling of the crosstalk between signaling and transcriptional networks using ordinary differential equations and multi-valued logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Faiz M; Schmitz, Ulf; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Engelmann, David; Pützer, Brigitte M; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio

    2014-01-01

    A decade of successful results indicates that systems biology is the appropriate approach to investigate the regulation of complex biochemical networks involving transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations. It becomes mandatory when dealing with highly interconnected biochemical networks, composed of hundreds of compounds, or when networks are enriched in non-linear motifs like feedback and feedforward loops. An emerging dilemma is to conciliate models of massive networks and the adequate description of non-linear dynamics in a suitable modeling framework. Boolean networks are an ideal representation of massive networks that are humble in terms of computational complexity and data demand. However, they are inappropriate when dealing with nested feedback/feedforward loops, structural motifs common in biochemical networks. On the other hand, models of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) cope well with these loops, but they require enormous amounts of quantitative data for a full characterization of the model. Here we propose hybrid models, composed of ODE and logical sub-modules, as a strategy to handle large scale, non-linear biochemical networks that include transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations. We illustrate the construction of this kind of models using as example a regulatory network centered on E2F1, a transcription factor involved in cancer. The hybrid modeling approach proposed is a good compromise between quantitative/qualitative accuracy and scalability when considering large biochemical networks with a small highly interconnected core, and module of transcriptionally regulated genes that are not part of critical regulatory loops. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics, Systems Biology & Clinical Implications. Guest Editor: Yudong Cai. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling the flux of metabolites in the juvenile hormone biosynthesis pathway using generalized additive models and ordinary differential equations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl O Martínez-Rincón

    Full Text Available Juvenile hormone (JH regulates development and reproductive maturation in insects. The corpora allata (CA from female adult mosquitoes synthesize fluctuating levels of JH, which have been linked to the ovarian development and are influenced by nutritional signals. The rate of JH biosynthesis is controlled by the rate of flux of isoprenoids in the pathway, which is the outcome of a complex interplay of changes in precursor pools and enzyme levels. A comprehensive study of the changes in enzymatic activities and precursor pool sizes have been previously reported for the mosquito Aedes aegypti JH biosynthesis pathway. In the present studies, we used two different quantitative approaches to describe and predict how changes in the individual metabolic reactions in the pathway affect JH synthesis. First, we constructed generalized additive models (GAMs that described the association between changes in specific metabolite concentrations with changes in enzymatic activities and substrate concentrations. Changes in substrate concentrations explained 50% or more of the model deviances in 7 of the 13 metabolic steps analyzed. Addition of information on enzymatic activities almost always improved the fitness of GAMs built solely based on substrate concentrations. GAMs were validated using experimental data that were not included when the model was built. In addition, a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE was developed to describe the instantaneous changes in metabolites as a function of the levels of enzymatic catalytic activities. The results demonstrated the ability of the models to predict changes in the flux of metabolites in the JH pathway, and can be used in the future to design and validate experimental manipulations of JH synthesis.

  10. The Schroedinger equation for central power law potentials and the classical theory of ordinary linear differential equations of the second order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, M.L.; Mignaco, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the rational power law potentials in the two-body radial Schrodinger equations admit a systematic treatment available from the classical theory of ordinary linear differential equations of the second order. The resulting potentials come into families evolved from equations having a fixed number of elementary regular singularities. As a consequence, relations are found and discussed among the several potentials in a family. (Author) [pt

  11. The Schroedinger equation for central power law potentials and the classical theory of ordinary linear differential equations of the second order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, M.L.; Mignaco, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the rational power law potentials in the two-body radial Schoedinger equation admit a systematic treatment available from the classical theory of ordinary linear differential equations of the second order. The admissible potentials come into families evolved from equations having a fixed number of elementary singularities. As a consequence, relations are found and discussed among the several potentials in a family. (Author) [pt

  12. Hochstadt-Lieberman Type Theorem for a Non-Symmetric System of First-Order Ordinary Differential Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trooshin, Igor; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2003-04-01

    We consider an eigenvalue problem for a nonsymmetric first order differential operator Au( x ; ) = ( {matrix { 0 & 1 ŗ1 & 0 ŗ} } ; ){{du} / {dx}}( x ; ) + Q( x ; )u( x ; ), 0 < x < 1 , where Q is a 2 × 2 matrix whose components are of C1 class on [0, 1]. Assuming that Q(x) is known in the half interval of (0, 1), we prove the uniqueness in an inverse eigenvalue problem of determining Q(x) from the spectra.

  13. EXTRA: a digital computer program for the solution of stiff sets of ordinary initial value, first order differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidell, J.

    1976-08-01

    EXTRA is a program written for the Winfrith KDF9 enabling the user to solve first order initial value differential equations. In this report general numerical integration methods are discussed with emphasis on their application to the solution of stiff sets of equations. A method of particular applicability to stiff sets of equations is described. This method is incorporated in the program EXTRA and full instructions for its use are given. A comparison with other methods of computation is included. (author)

  14. New methods for the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations and their application to the equations of motion of spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyukevich, A.; Ziolkovski, K.

    1975-01-01

    A number of hybrid methods for solving Cauchy problems are described on the basis of an evaluation of advantages of single and multiple-point numerical integration methods. The selection criterion is the principle of minimizing computer time. The methods discussed include the Nordsieck method, the Bulirsch-Stoer extrapolation method, and the method of recursive Taylor-Steffensen power series.

  15. Proceedings of the Dundee Conference (10th) Held in Dundee, Scotland on July 1988. Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    applied to 46 Nonlinear problems of analysis in integro -differcntial equations geometry and mechanics H Grabmilller M Atteia, D Bancel and I Gumowski 21...differential equations 172 Tian Jinghuang A survey of Hilbert’s sixteenth problem 178 J.F. Toland A homotopy invariant for dynamical systems with a first...numerical errors. A different functional, which appears to be more effective, was developed and implemented in [2] for a problem of gaseous combustion

  16. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 20 April at 10.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 12 May 2009 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2009 Programme for 2010 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2010 Modifications to the statutes of the association Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda...

  17. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 12 April at 14.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 20 April 2010 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2010 Programme for 2011 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2012 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly ma...

  18. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 12 April at 14.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 20 April 2010 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2010 Programme for 2011 Presentation and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2012 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly may r...

  19. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 20 April at 10.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 12 May 2009 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2009 Programme for 2010 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2010 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly may require t...

  20. Linear program differentiation for single-channel speech separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearlmutter, Barak A.; Olsson, Rasmus Kongsgaard

    2006-01-01

    Many apparently difficult problems can be solved by reduction to linear programming. Such problems are often subproblems within larger systems. When gradient optimisation of the entire larger system is desired, it is necessary to propagate gradients through the internally-invoked LP solver....... For instance, when an intermediate quantity z is the solution to a linear program involving constraint matrix A, a vector of sensitivities dE/dz will induce sensitivities dE/dA. Here we show how these can be efficiently calculated, when they exist. This allows algorithmic differentiation to be applied...... to algorithms that invoke linear programming solvers as subroutines, as is common when using sparse representations in signal processing. Here we apply it to gradient optimisation of over complete dictionaries for maximally sparse representations of a speech corpus. The dictionaries are employed in a single...

  1. Fitting Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equation Models with Random Effects and Unknown Initial Conditions Using the Stochastic Approximation Expectation-Maximization (SAEM) Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Lu, Zhaohua; Sherwood, Andrew; Zhu, Hongtu

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has evidenced the increased prevalence of irregularly spaced longitudinal data in social sciences. Clearly lacking, however, are modeling tools that allow researchers to fit dynamic models to irregularly spaced data, particularly data that show nonlinearity and heterogeneity in dynamical structures. We consider the issue of fitting multivariate nonlinear differential equation models with random effects and unknown initial conditions to irregularly spaced data. A stochastic approximation expectation-maximization algorithm is proposed and its performance is evaluated using a benchmark nonlinear dynamical systems model, namely, the Van der Pol oscillator equations. The empirical utility of the proposed technique is illustrated using a set of 24-h ambulatory cardiovascular data from 168 men and women. Pertinent methodological challenges and unresolved issues are discussed.

  2. Investigations of a compartmental model for leucine kinetics using non-linear mixed effects models with ordinary and stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Martin; Sunnåker, Mikael; Adiels, Martin; Jirstrand, Mats; Wennberg, Bernt

    2012-12-01

    Non-linear mixed effects (NLME) models represent a powerful tool to simultaneously analyse data from several individuals. In this study, a compartmental model of leucine kinetics is examined and extended with a stochastic differential equation to model non-steady-state concentrations of free leucine in the plasma. Data obtained from tracer/tracee experiments for a group of healthy control individuals and a group of individuals suffering from diabetes mellitus type 2 are analysed. We find that the interindividual variation of the model parameters is much smaller for the NLME models, compared to traditional estimates obtained from each individual separately. Using the mixed effects approach, the population parameters are estimated well also when only half of the data are used for each individual. For a typical individual, the amount of free leucine is predicted to vary with a standard deviation of 8.9% around a mean value during the experiment. Moreover, leucine degradation and protein uptake of leucine is smaller, proteolysis larger and the amount of free leucine in the body is much larger for the diabetic individuals than the control individuals. In conclusion, NLME models offers improved estimates for model parameters in complex models based on tracer/tracee data and may be a suitable tool to reduce data sampling in clinical studies.

  3. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration.

  4. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Stabilization/solidification; ordinary portland cement; ammonium dichromate; differential microcalorimetry; conductometry;. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. 1. Introduction. The stabilization/solidification process of the chromium wastes generated from steel production, chrome plating, pigments and leather ...

  5. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Lapidus, Leon

    1971-01-01

    In this book, we study theoretical and practical aspects of computing methods for mathematical modelling of nonlinear systems. A number of computing techniques are considered, such as methods of operator approximation with any given accuracy; operator interpolation techniques including a non-Lagrange interpolation; methods of system representation subject to constraints associated with concepts of causality, memory and stationarity; methods of system representation with an accuracy that is the best within a given class of models; methods of covariance matrix estimation;methods for low-rank mat

  6. Oscillatory bifurcation for semilinear ordinary differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsutaro Shibata

    2016-06-01

    \\] where $f(u = u + (1/2\\sin^k u$ ($k \\ge 2$ and $\\lambda > 0$ is a bifurcation parameter. It is known that $\\lambda$ is parameterized by the maximum norm $\\alpha = \\Vert u_\\lambda\\Vert_\\infty$ of the solution $u_\\lambda$ associated with $\\lambda$ and is written as $\\lambda = \\lambda(k,\\alpha$. When we focus on the asymptotic behavior of $\\lambda(k,\\alpha$ as $\\alpha \\to \\infty$, it is natural to expect that $\\lambda(k, \\alpha \\to \\pi^2/4$, and its convergence rate is common to $k$. Contrary to this expectation, we show that $\\lambda(2n_1+1,\\alpha$ tends to $\\pi^2/4$ faster than $\\lambda(2n_2,\\alpha$ as $\\alpha \\to \\infty$, where $n_1\\ge 1,\\ n_2 \\ge 1$ are arbitrary given integers.

  7. Symmetries of nonlinear ordinary differential equations: The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-10-21

    Oct 21, 2015 ... Lie point symmetries; -symmetries; Noether symmetries; contact symmetries; adjoint symmetries; nonlocal symmetries; hidden symmetries; ... 620 024, India; Centre for Nonlinear Science and Engineering, School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613 401, India ...

  8. Lie and Noether symmetries of systems of complex ordinary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Lie and Noether point symmetry analyses of a th-order system of complex ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with dependent variables are performed. ... Centre for Mathematics and Statistical Sciences, Lahore School of Economics, Lahore 53200, Pakistan; Differential Equations, Continuum Mechanics and ...

  9. Large negative differential conductance in single-molecule break junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrin, Mickael L.; Frisenda, Riccardo; Koole, Max; Seldenthuis, Johannes S.; Gil, Jose A. Celis; Valkenier, Hennie; Hummelen, Jan C.; Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C.; Thijssen, Joseph M.; Dulic, Diana; van der Zant, Herre S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular electronics aims at exploiting the internal structure and electronic orbitals of molecules to construct functional building blocks(1). To date, however, the overwhelming majority of experimentally realized single-molecule junctions can be described as single quantum dots, where transport

  10. Solar-Based Boost Differential Single Phase Inverter | Eya | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... current concurrently and finally, it is portable. This research also shows the disparity between the simulated results of open loop and closed loop of boost differential inverter systems. The dc power source is photovoltaic cell. The maximum power point tracker is in-cooperated in capturing the maximum power from the sun.

  11. A Study of Impulsive Multiterm Fractional Differential Equations with Single and Multiple Base Points and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the existence and uniqueness of solutions for initial value problems of nonlinear singular multiterm impulsive Caputo type fractional differential equations on the half line. Our study includes the cases for a single base point fractional differential equation as well as multiple base points fractional differential equation. The asymptotic behavior of solutions for the problems is also investigated. We demonstrate the utility of our work by applying the main results to fractional-order logistic models.

  12. Power decoupling method for single phase differential buck converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Wenli; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Xiaobin

    2015-01-01

    inverter to improve the dc link power quality, and an improved active power decoupling method is proposed to achieve ripple power reduction for both AC-DC and DC-AC conversions. The ripple energy storage is realized by the filter capacitors, which are connected between the output terminal and the negative...... generation technique is proposed to provide accurate ripple power compensation, and closed-loop controllers are also designed based on small signal models. The effectiveness of this power decoupling method is verified by detailed simulation studies as well as laboratory prototype experimental results....... dc bus. By properly controlling the differential mode voltage of the capacitors, it is possible to transfer desired energy between the DC port and AC port. The common mode voltage is controlled in such a way that the ripple power on the dc side will be reduced. Furthermore, an autonomous reference...

  13. New gaussian points for the solution of first order ordinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New gaussian points for the solution of first order ordinary differential equations. ... Science World Journal ... In this paper, a new set of Gaussian points has been proposed and used as collocation points for the construction of block numerical methods for the solution of first order IVP through transformation within the step ...

  14. Lie and Noether symmetries of systems of complex ordinary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Lie and Noether point symmetry analyses of a th-order system of complex ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with dependent variables are performed. The decomposition of complex symmetries of the given system of complex ODEs yields Lie- and Noether-like operators. The system of complex ODEs can be ...

  15. Single and Triple Differential Cross Sections for DoublePhotoionization of H-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Frank L.; Horner, Daniel A.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno,Thomas N.

    2007-02-15

    The hydride anion H- would not be bound in the absence ofelectron correlation. Electron correlation drives the doublephotoionization process and, thus should impact double photoionizationresults most strongly for H-. We present fully differential crosssections for the three-body breakup of H- by single photon absorption.The absolute triple-differential and single-differential cross sectionswere yielded by ab initio calculations making use of exterior complexscaling within a discrete variable representation partialwave basis.Results calculated at photon energies of 18eV and 30eV are compared withreported cross sections for helium calculated at 20eV above the doubleionization threshold. These comparisons show a clear signature of initialstate correlation that differentiate the He and H- cases.

  16. A unified active damping control for single-phase differential buck inverter with LCL-filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Wenli; Wang, Xiongfei; Zhang, Xiaobin

    2015-01-01

    and control of a grid-connected differential mode buck inverter with an LCL filter. A generalized small-signal model of the inverter is built first with the averaged switching model. It is shown that the LCL filter resonance merely occurs in the differential mode, while an LC filter resonance exists......The single-phase differential mode buck inverter is recently introduced with a differential mode for power transfer and a common mode for actively decoupling the second-order power oscillation. However, it is limited to islanded applications with an LC filter. This paper addresses the stability...... in the common mode, provided that the filter parameters of the two bridges are kept the same. A unified active damping control approach is then proposed for stabilizing the inverter and improving the transient performance under a wide range of grid impedance. Lastly, experimental tests are carried out...

  17. Single-cell entropy for accurate estimation of differentiation potency from a cell's transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Enver, Tariq

    2017-06-01

    The ability to quantify differentiation potential of single cells is a task of critical importance. Here we demonstrate, using over 7,000 single-cell RNA-Seq profiles, that differentiation potency of a single cell can be approximated by computing the signalling promiscuity, or entropy, of a cell's transcriptome in the context of an interaction network, without the need for feature selection. We show that signalling entropy provides a more accurate and robust potency estimate than other entropy-based measures, driven in part by a subtle positive correlation between the transcriptome and connectome. Signalling entropy identifies known cell subpopulations of varying potency and drug resistant cancer stem-cell phenotypes, including those derived from circulating tumour cells. It further reveals that expression heterogeneity within single-cell populations is regulated. In summary, signalling entropy allows in silico estimation of the differentiation potency and plasticity of single cells and bulk samples, providing a means to identify normal and cancer stem-cell phenotypes.

  18. Synergistic combinations of five single drugs from Centella asiatica for neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jinjin; Jiang, Hui; Ding, Xianting

    2017-01-01

    To identify alternatives of nerve growth factor, which could promote NF68 protein expression and contribute toward neuronal differentiation, five compounds namely: asiatic acid, madecassic, madecassoside, quercetin, and isoquercetin, obtained from Centella asiatica, were examined for their neuronal differentiation effects on PC12 cells. C. asiatica has been applied as an effective herbal medicine for the treatment of various diseases, including depression. According to a statistical design of experiments, both single compound and compound combinations were evaluated. A further statistical analysis indicated quantitative interactions between these five single compounds and led to the identification of the optimal drug combinations. Asiatic acid and madecassic appeared to show profound synergistic effects on neurofilaments expression in vitro. The optimized drug combinations were significantly more potent than single drugs and further investigation suggested that the optimal drug combination could be an analogue of nerve growth factor and could represent a potential treatment for neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Quantum States as Ordinary Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Wharton

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite various parallels between quantum states and ordinary information, quantum no-go-theorems have convinced many that there is no realistic framework that might underly quantum theory, no reality that quantum states can represent knowledge about. This paper develops the case that there is a plausible underlying reality: one actual spacetime-based history, although with behavior that appears strange when analyzed dynamically (one time-slice at a time. By using a simple model with no dynamical laws, it becomes evident that this behavior is actually quite natural when analyzed “all-at-once” (as in classical action principles. From this perspective, traditional quantum states would represent incomplete information about possible spacetime histories, conditional on the future measurement geometry. Without dynamical laws imposing additional restrictions, those histories can have a classical probability distribution, where exactly one history can be said to represent an underlying reality.

  20. Equivariant ordinary homology and cohomology

    CERN Document Server

    Costenoble, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Filling a gap in the literature, this book takes the reader to the frontiers of equivariant topology, the study of objects with specified symmetries. The discussion is motivated by reference to a list of instructive “toy” examples and calculations in what is a relatively unexplored field. The authors also provide a reading path for the first-time reader less interested in working through sophisticated machinery but still desiring a rigorous understanding of the main concepts. The subject’s classical counterparts, ordinary homology and cohomology, dating back to the work of Henri Poincaré in topology, are calculational and theoretical tools which are important in many parts of mathematics and theoretical physics, particularly in the study of manifolds. Similarly powerful tools have been lacking, however, in the context of equivariant topology. Aimed at advanced graduate students and researchers in algebraic topology and related fields, the book assumes knowledge of basic algebraic topology and group act...

  1. Bob Dylan, the Ordinary Star

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Bouquerel

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a study of Bob Dylan’s public image as a “star” performer and examines what Dylan represented for his audiences with respect to the challenges of 1960s counterculture. This study focuses primarily on the image of Dylan in D. A. Pennebaker’s documentary film Don’t Look Back, which portrays Dylan when the star is only 23. A study of Pennebaker’s film shows how the filmmaker captures the paradox of Dylan’s star popularity in his refusal to portray the star, not only as a personal struggle, but as a cultural contradiction. The author further identifies a formal link between Dylan’s portrayal of the ordinary star and the minimalist aesthetic of cinéma vérité.

  2. A NEW FRACTIONAL MODEL OF SINGLE DEGREE OF FREEDOM SYSTEM, BY USING GENERALIZED DIFFERENTIAL TRANSFORM METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASHEM SABERI NAJAFI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Generalized differential transform method (GDTM is a powerful method to solve the fractional differential equations. In this paper, a new fractional model for systems with single degree of freedom (SDOF is presented, by using the GDTM. The advantage of this method compared with some other numerical methods has been shown. The analysis of new approximations, damping and acceleration of systems are also described. Finally, by reducing damping and analysis of the errors, in one of the fractional cases, we have shown that in addition to having a suitable solution for the displacement close to the exact one, the system enjoys acceleration once crossing the equilibrium point.

  3. Studies of neutrino asymmetries generated by ordinary-sterile neutrino oscillations in the early Universe and implications for big bang nucleosynthesis bounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foot, R.; Volkas, R.R. [Research Centre for High Energy Physics, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, 3052 (Australia)

    1997-04-01

    Ordinary-sterile neutrino oscillations can generate a significant lepton number asymmetry in the early Universe. We study this phenomenon in detail. We show that the dynamics of ordinary-sterile neutrino oscillations in the early Universe can be approximately described by a single integrodifferential equation which we derive from both the density matrix and Hamiltonian formalisms. This equation reduces to a relatively simple ordinary first-order differential equation if the system is sufficiently smooth (static limit). We study the conditions for which the static limit is an acceptable approximation. We also study the effect of the thermal distribution of neutrino momenta on the generation of lepton number. We apply these results to show that it is possible to evade (by many orders of magnitude) the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) bounds on the mixing parameters {delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 0} describing ordinary-sterile neutrino oscillations. We show that the large angle or maximal vacuum oscillation solution to the solar neutrino problem does not significantly modify BBN for most of the parameter space of interest, provided that the {tau} and/or {mu} neutrinos have masses greater than about 1 eV. We also show that the large angle or maximal ordinary-sterile neutrino oscillation solution to the atmospheric neutrino anomaly does not significantly modify BBN for a range of parameters. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Differentiation of a bipotential glial progenitor cell in a single cell microculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, S; Raff, M C

    Although it is known that most cells of the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) are derived from the neuroepithelial cells of the neural tube, the factors determining whether an individual neuroepithelial cell develops into a particular type of neurone or glial cell remain unknown. A promising model for studying this problem is the bipotential glial progenitor cell in the developing rat optic nerve; this cell differentiates into a particular type of astrocyte (a type-2 astrocyte) if cultured in 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) and into an oligodendrocyte if cultured in serum-free medium. As the oligodendrocyte-type-2 astrocyte (0-2A) progenitor cell can differentiate along either glial pathway in neurone-free cultures, living axons clearly are not required for its differentiation, at least in vitro. However, the studies on 0-2A progenitor cells were carried out in bulk cultures of optic nerve, and so it was possible that other cell-cell interactions were required for differentiation in culture. We show here that 0-2A progenitor cells can differentiate into type-2 astrocytes or oligodendrocytes when grown as isolated cells in microculture, indicating that differentiation along either glial pathway in vitro does not require signals from other CNS cells, apart from the signals provided by components of the culture medium. We also show that single 0-2A progenitor cells can differentiate along either pathway without dividing, supporting our previous studies using 3H-thymidine and suggesting that DNA replication is not required for these cells to choose between the two differentiation programmes.

  5. A differential Michelson interferometer with orthogonal single frequency laser for nanometer displacement measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Wang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    A novel differential Michelson laser interferometer is proposed to eliminate the influence of environmental fluctuations for nanometer displacement measurement. This differential interferometer consists of two homodyne interferometers in which two orthogonal single frequency beams share common reference arm and partial measurement arm. By modulating the displacement of the common reference arm with a piezoelectric transducer, the common-mode displacement drift resulting from the environmental disturbances can be well suppressed and the measured displacement as differential-mode displacement signal is achieved. In addition, a phase difference compensation method is proposed for accurately determining the phase difference between interference signals by correcting the time interval according to the average speed in one cycle of interference signal. The nanometer displacement measurement experiments were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed interferometer and show that precision displacement measurement with standard deviation less than 1 nm has been achieved. (paper)

  6. Differential cross sections for single-electron capture in He{sup 2+}-D collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Dagnac, R. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France)]|[Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France)

    1995-06-14

    A translational energy spectroscopy technique was used to study single-electron capture into the He{sup +} (n = 2) and He{sup +} (n 3) states in He{sup 2+}-D collisions. Differential cross sections were determined at 4, 6 and 8 keV in the angular range 5`-1{sup o}30` (laboratory frame). As expected, single-electron capture into the n = 2 state was found to be the dominant process; total cross sections for capture into the He{sup +} (n = 3) state were compared to other experimental and theoretical results. (author).

  7. Single-shot quantitative phase microscopy with color-multiplexed differential phase contrast (cDPC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary F Phillips

    Full Text Available We present a new technique for quantitative phase and amplitude microscopy from a single color image with coded illumination. Our system consists of a commercial brightfield microscope with one hardware modification-an inexpensive 3D printed condenser insert. The method, color-multiplexed Differential Phase Contrast (cDPC, is a single-shot variant of Differential Phase Contrast (DPC, which recovers the phase of a sample from images with asymmetric illumination. We employ partially coherent illumination to achieve resolution corresponding to 2× the objective NA. Quantitative phase can then be used to synthesize DIC and phase contrast images or extract shape and density. We demonstrate amplitude and phase recovery at camera-limited frame rates (50 fps for various in vitro cell samples and c. elegans in a micro-fluidic channel.

  8. Differentiation of drug and non-drug Cannabis using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotherham, D; Harbison, S A

    2011-04-15

    Cannabis sativa is both an illegal drug and a legitimate crop. The differentiation of illegal drug Cannabis from non-drug forms of Cannabis is relevant in the context of the growth of fibre and seed oil varieties of Cannabis for commercial purposes. This differentiation is currently determined based on the levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in adult plants. DNA based methods have the potential to assay Cannabis material unsuitable for analysis using conventional means including seeds, pollen and severely degraded material. The purpose of this research was to develop a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay for the differentiation of "drug" and "non-drug"Cannabis plants. An assay was developed based on four polymorphisms within a 399 bp fragment of the tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase gene, utilising the snapshot multiplex kit. This SNP assay was tested on 94 Cannabis plants, which included 10 blind samples, and was able to differentiate between "drug" and "non-drug"Cannabis in all cases, while also differentiating between Cannabis and other species. Non-drug plants were found to be homozygous at the four sites assayed while drug Cannabis plants were either homozygous or heterozygous. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative single cell analysis of cell population dynamics during submandibular salivary gland development and differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Deirdre A.; Manhardt, Charles; Kamath, Vidya; Sui, Yunxia; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Can, Ali; Bello, Musodiq; Corwin, Alex; Dinn, Sean R.; Lazare, Michael; Gervais, Elise M.; Sequeira, Sharon J.; Peters, Sarah B.; Ginty, Fiona; Gerdes, Michael J.; Larsen, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    Summary Epithelial organ morphogenesis involves reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cell types to balance progenitor cell retention and expansion with cell differentiation for evolution of tissue architecture. Underlying submandibular salivary gland branching morphogenesis is the regulated proliferation and differentiation of perhaps several progenitor cell populations, which have not been characterized throughout development, and yet are critical for understanding organ development, regeneration, and disease. Here we applied a serial multiplexed fluorescent immunohistochemistry technology to map the progressive refinement of the epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations throughout development from embryonic day 14 through postnatal day 20. Using computational single cell analysis methods, we simultaneously mapped the evolving temporal and spatial location of epithelial cells expressing subsets of differentiation and progenitor markers throughout salivary gland development. We mapped epithelial cell differentiation markers, including aquaporin 5, PSP, SABPA, and mucin 10 (acinar cells); cytokeratin 7 (ductal cells); and smooth muscle α-actin (myoepithelial cells) and epithelial progenitor cell markers, cytokeratin 5 and c-kit. We used pairwise correlation and visual mapping of the cells in multiplexed images to quantify the number of single- and double-positive cells expressing these differentiation and progenitor markers at each developmental stage. We identified smooth muscle α-actin as a putative early myoepithelial progenitor marker that is expressed in cytokeratin 5-negative cells. Additionally, our results reveal dynamic expansion and redistributions of c-kit- and K5-positive progenitor cell populations throughout development and in postnatal glands. The data suggest that there are temporally and spatially discreet progenitor populations that contribute to salivary gland development and homeostasis. PMID:23789091

  10. Trilinear Higgs coupling determination via single-Higgs differential measurements at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltoni, Fabio; Pagani, Davide; Shivaji, Ambresh; Zhao, Xiaoran

    2017-12-01

    We study one-loop effects induced by an anomalous Higgs trilinear coupling on total and differential rates for the H→ 4ℓ decay and some of the main single-Higgs production channels at the LHC, namely, VBF, VH, t{\\bar{t}}H and tHj. Our results are based on a public code that calculates these effects by simply reweighting samples of Standard-Model-like events for a given production channel. For VH and t{\\bar{t}}H production, where differential effects are particularly relevant, we include Standard Model electroweak corrections, which have similar sizes but different kinematic dependences. Finally, we study the sensitivity of future LHC runs to determine the trilinear coupling via inclusive and differential measurements, considering also the case where the Higgs couplings to vector bosons and the top quark is affected by new physics. We find that the constraints on the couplings and the relevance of differential distributions critically depend on the expected experimental and theoretical uncertainties.

  11. Accounting for technical noise in differential expression analysis of single-cell RNA sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Cheng; Hu, Yu; Kelly, Derek; Kim, Junhyong; Li, Mingyao; Zhang, Nancy R

    2017-11-02

    Recent technological breakthroughs have made it possible to measure RNA expression at the single-cell level, thus paving the way for exploring expression heterogeneity among individual cells. Current single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) protocols are complex and introduce technical biases that vary across cells, which can bias downstream analysis without proper adjustment. To account for cell-to-cell technical differences, we propose a statistical framework, TASC (Toolkit for Analysis of Single Cell RNA-seq), an empirical Bayes approach to reliably model the cell-specific dropout rates and amplification bias by use of external RNA spike-ins. TASC incorporates the technical parameters, which reflect cell-to-cell batch effects, into a hierarchical mixture model to estimate the biological variance of a gene and detect differentially expressed genes. More importantly, TASC is able to adjust for covariates to further eliminate confounding that may originate from cell size and cell cycle differences. In simulation and real scRNA-seq data, TASC achieves accurate Type I error control and displays competitive sensitivity and improved robustness to batch effects in differential expression analysis, compared to existing methods. TASC is programmed to be computationally efficient, taking advantage of multi-threaded parallelization. We believe that TASC will provide a robust platform for researchers to leverage the power of scRNA-seq. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Design of a Negative Differential Resistance Circuit Element Using Single-Electron Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, D. C.; Heij, C. P.; Hadley, P.; Mooij, J. E.

    1998-03-01

    Electronic circuit elements displaying negative differential resistance (NDR), such as tunnel diodes, have a wide variety of device applications, including oscillators, amplifiers, logic, and memory. We present a two-terminal device using two single-electron transistors (SET's) that demonstrates an NDR profile tuneable with gate voltages. If the capacitive coupling between the SET's is sufficiently larger than the junction capacitances, the device exhibits multiply-peaked NDR, allowing its use as a multi-valued digital element. We will also report recent experimental progress in measurements of such a device, fabricated using standard Al tunnel junctions, but with an additional overlap capacitor to allow the required inter-SET coupling.

  13. Observation of negative differential resistance and single-electron tunneling in electromigrated break junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Yutaka; Ueda, Rieko; Kubota, Tohru; Kamikado, Toshiya; Yokoyama, Shiyoshi; Nagase, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    We observed a negative differential resistance (NDR) along with single-electron tunneling (SET) in the electron transport of electromigrated break junctions with metal-free tetraphenylporphyrin (H 2 BSTBPP) at a temperature of 11 K. The NDR strongly depended on the applied gate voltages, and appeared only in the electron tunneling region of the Coulomb diamond. We could explain the mechanism of this new type of electron transport by a model assuming a molecular Coulomb island and local density of states of the source and the drain electrodes

  14. Single-band negative differential resistance in metallic armchair MoS2 nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Cheng; Wang, Xue-Feng; Li, Yao-Sheng; Cheng, Xue-Mei; Yao, A-Long

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor armchair MoS 2 nanoribbons can be converted into conductors by edge functionalization of H atoms or OH groups. Those metallic nanoribbons exhibit I – V characteristics of a single half-filled band with strong negative differential resistance (NDR) under a voltage bias less than 1 V. This originates from the spatial separation between electrons in the conduction and valence bands. The NDR becomes spin dependent if the H atoms or OH groups are not uniformly adsorbed on the edge. Furthermore, the spin polarization can be greatly enhanced in heterojunctions of H- and OH-passivated nanoribbons. (paper)

  15. Power decoupling with autonomous reference generation for single-phase differential inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Wenli; Zhang, Xiaobin; Wang, Xiongfei

    2015-01-01

    The second-harmonic power ripple in single-phase inverter may introduce the issue of low reliability and low power density. In order to replace the bulky dc-link capacitor, an alternative approach is to use active power decoupling so that the ripple power can be diverted into other energy storages...... are used for realizing an improved power decoupling control, capacitor voltage and inductor current regulation. By substituting the corresponding parameter into unified model, the proposed control loop can be applied to different inverter types (Buck, Buck-Boost and Boost). Finally, detailed laboratory....... However, the performance of existing active power decoupling methods depends heavily on certain control references, which unfortunately are parameter dependent. In this paper an autonomous reference generation technique is proposed for single phase differential inverter without relying on the system...

  16. Parameter estimation in neuronal stochastic differential equation models from intracellular recordings of membrane potentials in single neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Samson, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    Dynamics of the membrane potential in a single neuron can be studied by estimating biophysical parameters from intracellular recordings. Diffusion processes, given as continuous solutions to stochastic differential equations, are widely applied as models for the neuronal membrane potential evolut...

  17. First-order partial differential equations in classical dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B. R.

    2009-12-01

    Carathèodory's classic work on the calculus of variations explores in depth the connection between ordinary differential equations and first-order partial differential equations. The n second-order ordinary differential equations of a classical dynamical system reduce to a single first-order differential equation in 2n independent variables. The general solution of first-order partial differential equations touches on many concepts central to graduate-level courses in analytical dynamics including the Hamiltonian, Lagrange and Poisson brackets, and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. For all but the simplest dynamical systems the solution requires one or more of these techniques. Three elementary dynamical problems (uniform acceleration, harmonic motion, and cyclotron motion) can be solved directly from the appropriate first-order partial differential equation without the use of advanced methods. The process offers an unusual perspective on classical dynamics, which is readily accessible to intermediate students who are not yet fully conversant with advanced approaches.

  18. An algorithm for solving initial value problems of third order ordinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. We propose an implicit multi-step method for the solution of initial value problems (IVPs) of third order ordinary differential equations (ODE) which does not require reducing the ODE to first order before solving. The development of the method is based on collocation of the differential system and interpolation of the ...

  19. Toward multi-differential cross sections: measuring two angularities on a single jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2014-09-01

    The analytic study of differential cross sections in QCD has typically focused on individual observables, such as mass or thrust, to great success. Here, we present a first study of double differential jet cross sections considering two recoil-free angularities measured on a single jet. By analyzing the phase space defined by the two angularities and using methods from soft-collinear effective theory, we prove that the double differential cross section factorizes at the boundaries of the phase space. We also show that the cross section in the bulk of the phase space cannot be factorized using only soft and collinear modes, excluding the possibility of a global factorization theorem in soft-collinear effective theory. Nevertheless, we are able to define a simple interpolation procedure that smoothly connects the factorization theorem at one boundary to the other. We present an explicit example of this at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy and show that the interpolation is unique up to α {/s 4} order in the exponent of the cross section, under reasonable assumptions. This is evidence that the interpolation is sufficiently robust to account for all logarithms in the bulk of phase space to the accuracy of the boundary factorization theorem. We compare our analytic calculation of the double differential cross section to Monte Carlo simulation and find qualitative agreement. Because our arguments rely on general structures of the phase space, we expect that much of our analysis would be relevant for the study of phenomenologically well-motivated observables, such as N -subjettiness, energy correlation functions, and planar flow.

  20. Imaging of single retinal ganglion cell with differential interference contrast microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Juyeong; Kim, Yu Jeong; Kim, Chul-Ki; Lee, Taik Jin; Seo, Mina; Lee, Seok; Woo, Deok Ha; Jun, Seong Chan; Park, Ki-Ho; Kim, Seok Hwan; Kim, Jae Hun

    2017-02-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy, characterized by the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Therefore, monitoring the change of number or morphology of RGC is essential for the early detection as well as investigation of pathophysiology of glaucoma. Since RGC layer is transparent and hyporeflective, the direct optical visualization of RGCs has not been successful so far. Therefore, glaucoma evaluation mostly depends on indirect diagnostic methods such as the evaluation of optic disc morphology or retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurement by optical coherence tomography. We have previously demonstrated single photoreceptor cell imaging with differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Herein, we successfully visualized single RGC using DIC microscopy. Since RGC layer is much less reflective than photoreceptor layer, various techniques including the control of light wavelength and bandwidth using a tunable band pass filter were adopted to reduce the chromatic aberration in z-axis for higher and clearer resolution. To verify that the imaged cells were the RGCs, the flat-mounted retina of Sprague-Dawley rat, in which the RGCs were retrogradely labeled with fluorescence, was observed by both fluorescence and DIC microscopies for direct comparison. We have confirmed that the cell images obtained by fluorescence microscopy were perfectly matched with cell images by DIC microscopy. As conclusion, we have visualized single RGC with DIC microscopy, and confirmed with fluorescence microscopy.

  1. Differentiation of Short Single-Stranded DNA Homopolymers in Solid-State Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venta, Kimberly; Shemer, Gabriel; Puster, Matthew; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A.; Balan, Adrian; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Shepard, Ken; Drndić, Marija

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, new techniques that monitor ionic current modulations as single molecules pass through a nanoscale pore have enabled numerous single-molecule studies. While biological nanopores have recently shown the ability to resolve single nucleotides within individual DNA molecules, similar developments with solid-state nanopores have lagged, due to challenges both in fabricating stable nanopores of similar dimensions as biological nanopores and in achieving sufficiently low-noise and high-bandwidth recordings. Here we show that small silicon nitride nanopores (0.8 to 2-nm-diameter in 5 to 8-nm-thick membranes) can resolve differences between ionic current signals produced by short (30 base) ssDNA homopolymers (poly(dA), poly(dC), poly(dT)), when combined with measurement electronics that allow a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 10 to be achieved at 1 MHz bandwidth. While identifying intramolecular DNA sequences with silicon nitride nanopores will require further improvements in nanopore sensitivity and noise levels, homopolymer differentiation represents an important milestone in the development of solid-state nanopores. PMID:23621759

  2. 22 CFR 17.6 - Ordinary and necessary living expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOREIGN SERVICE PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.6 Ordinary and necessary living expenses. An individual's ordinary and necessary living expenses include rent, mortgage payments, utilities, maintenance, food...

  3. Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphisms as a Method to Differentiate Algal Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Jernigan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformational polymorphism (CE-SSCP was explored as a fast and inexpensive method to differentiate both prokaryotic (blue-green and eukaryotic (green and brown algae. A selection of two blue-green algae (Nostoc muscorum and Anabaena inaequalis, five green algae (Chlorella vulgaris, Oedogonium foveolatum, Mougeotia sp., Scenedesmus quadricauda, and Ulothrix fimbriata, and one brown algae (Ectocarpus sp. were examined and CE-SSCP electropherogram “fingerprints” were compared to each other for two variable regions of either the 16S or 18S rDNA gene. The electropherogram patterns were remarkably stable and consistent for each particular species. The patterns were unique to each species, although some common features were observed between the different types of algae. CE-SSCP could be a useful method for monitoring changes in an algae species over time as potential shifts in species occurred.

  4. Analysis and differentiation of mineral dust by single particle laser mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallavardin, S. J.; Lohmann, U.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential of single particle laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for the analysis of atmospherically relevant mineral dusts. Samples of hematite, goethite, calcium carbonate, calcium sulfate, silica, quartz, montmorrillonite, kaolinite, illite, hectorite, wollastonite and nephelinsyenit were investigated in positive and negative ion mode with a monopolar time-of-flight mass spectrometer where the desorption/ionization step was performed with a 193 nm excimer laser (∼10 9 W/cm 2 ). Particle size ranged from 500 nm to 3 (micro)m. Positive mass spectra mainly provide elemental composition whereas negative ion spectra provide information on element speciation and of a structural nature. The iron oxide, calcium-rich and aluminosilicate nature of particles is established in positive ion mode. The differentiation of calcium materials strongly relies on the calcium counter-ions in negative mass spectra. Aluminosilicates can be differentiated in both positive and negative ion mode using the relative abundance of various aluminum and silicon ions

  5. Do Wage Subsidies Reduce Ordinary Employment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Rasmussen, Martin

    Applying administrative register data information for Danish firms in 1999, 2000, and 2001, this paper investigate how the employment of wage subsidized labour affects ordinary employment at the firm level. Descriptive statistics as well as econometric estimations are presented. Descriptive...... analysis shows that ordinary and subsidized employment is positively correlated, i.e. employment of subsidized labour does not reduce ordinary employment. But an underlying similar movement in production levels might cause the correlation. Simple inclusion of a production level proxy in OLS estimations...... does not sufficiently control for the underlying correlation, but additional control for the size of the change of production indicates that subsidized labour to some extent substitutes non-subsidized labour. But the substitution depends on the applied econometric specification, i.e. a cumulative logit...

  6. Basic method for reduction of error in ordinary approximations of the non-linear functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanullah

    2006-01-01

    In this research article certain conditions of the infinite ordered nonlinear function with some terms have been determined and defined. Ordinary method of approximation has been analyzed with an example. It has been shown that to decrease nonlinear error order of approximation needs to be increased. Consequently non-linearity of higher order involves in the differential equations and hence the problem of integration arises again. It has been proposed to fix the order of approximation and decrease the error. For the improvement of an ordinary approximation the basic principle underlying its improvement has been discussed. For the reduction of error of an ordinary approximation a general expression has been given in which the nonlinear error has been distributed uniformly. In the given example error of initial ordinary approximation has been decreased more than 63 % . (author)

  7. Processes of aesthetic transformation in ordinary landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Jonna Majgaard

    2004-01-01

    . These features determined the specific aesthetic and architectural identity of ordinary Danish, i.e. Nordic, landscapes. Contemporary cultural changes such as the aesthetification of everyday life and of ordinary landscape, i.e. farming landscape, are now manifest in the way the windbreaks are motivated...... with utilitarian aspects. This is seen both as an example of how transnational contemporary cultural changes have an impact on local Nordic farming landscapes and their aesthetic expression and as an example of how processes of transformation in aesthetic experience and interpretation have an impact on the general...

  8. Antisolar differential rotation with surface lithium enrichment on the single K-giant V1192 Orionis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kővári, Zs.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Carroll, T. A.; Oláh, K.; Kriskovics, L.; Kővári, E.; Kovács, O.; Vida, K.; Granzer, T.; Weber, M.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Stars with about 1-2 solar masses at the red giant branch (RGB) represent an intriguing period of stellar evolution, I.e. when the convective envelope interacts with the fast-rotating core. During these mixing episodes freshly synthesized lithium can come up to the stellar surface along with high angular momentum material. This high angular momentum may alter the surface rotation pattern. Aims: The single rapidly rotating K-giant V1192 Ori is revisited to determine its surface differential rotation, lithium abundance, and basic stellar properties such as a precise rotation period. The aim is to independently verify the antisolar differential rotation of the star and possibly find a connection to the surface lithium abundance. Methods: We applied time-series Doppler imaging to a new multi-epoch data set. Altogether we reconstructed 11 Doppler images from spectroscopic data collected with the STELLA robotic telescope between 2007-2016. We used our inversion code iMap to reconstruct all stellar surface maps. We extracted the differential rotation from these images by tracing systematic spot migration as a function of stellar latitude from consecutive image cross-correlations. Results: The position of V1192 Ori in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram suggests that the star is in the helium core-burning phase just leaving the RGB bump. We measure A(Li)NLTE = 1.27, I.e. a value close to the anticipated transition value of 1.5 from Li-normal to Li-rich giants. Doppler images reveal extended dark areas arranged quasi-evenly along an equatorial belt. No cool polar spot is found during the investigated epoch. Spot displacements clearly suggest antisolar surface differential rotation with α = - 0.11 ± 0.02 shear coefficient. Conclusions: The surface Li enrichment and the peculiar surface rotation pattern may indicate a common origin. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic observatory in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC.

  9. Ordinary violence and social change in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouje, J.; Bruijn, de M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Ordinary social violence, - i.e. recurrent mental or physical aggression occurring between closely related people - structures social relationships in Africa, and in the world. Studies of violence in Africa often refer to ethnic wars and explicit conflicts and do not enter the hidden domain of

  10. Developing Concepts of Ordinary and Extraordinary Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jonathan D.; Evans, E. Margaret; Brink, Kimberly A.; Wellman, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    We examine how understandings of ordinary and extraordinary communication develop. Three- to 10-year-old children and adults (N = 183) were given scenarios in which a protagonist wanted help from a human (their parent) or from God. Scenarios varied in whether protagonists expressed their desires aloud (by asking) or silently (by hoping), whether…

  11. Classification of six ordinary chondrites from Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, Arthur J.; Keil, Klaus

    1988-12-01

    Based on optical microscopy, modal and electron microprobe analyses, six ordinary chondrites from Texas were classified in compositional groups, petrologic types, and shock facies. These meteorites are Comanche (stone), L5c; Haskell, L5c; Deport (a), H4b; Naruna (a), H4b; Naruna (b), H4b; and Clarendon (b), H5d.

  12. The Ordinariness of Youth Linguascapes in Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovchin, Sender

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on varied offline and online contexts, this article indicates that youth linguistic diversity in contemporary Mongolia is better understood from the perspective of "the ordinariness of linguascapes." The notion of "linguascapes" is important in capturing the rising complexity of youth mixed language practices…

  13. Distinct gene expression signatures in human embryonic stem cells differentiated towards definitive endoderm at single-cell level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Karin; Strömbeck, Anna; Semb, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards therapeutically relevant cell types, including pancreatic beta-cells and hepatocytes, depends on molecular markers and assays that resolve the signature of individual cells. Pancreas and liver both have a common origin...... for the three activin A based protocols applied. Our data provide novel insights in DE gene expression at the cellular level of in vitro differentiated human embryonic stem cells, and illustrate the power of using single-cell gene expression profiling to study differentiation heterogeneity and to characterize...

  14. Lie algebras of conservation laws of variational ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorani, Emanuele; Spiro, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    We establish a new version of the first Noether Theorem, according to which the (equivalence classes of) first integrals of given Euler-Lagrange equations in one independent variable are in exact one-to-one correspondence with the (equivalence classes of) vector fields satisfying two simple geometric conditions, namely they simultaneously preserve the holonomy distribution of the jets space and the action from which the Euler-Lagrange equations are derived.

  15. Existence of periodic solutions for a semilinear ordinary differential equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Girg

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Dancer [3] found a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of periodic solutions to the equation $$ ddot x +g_1(dot x + g_0(x = f(t,.$$ His condition is based on a functional that depends on the solution to the above equation with $g_0=0$. However, that solution is not always explicitly known which makes the condition unverifiable in practical situations. As an alternative, we find computable bounds for the functional that provide a sufficient condition and a necessary condition for the existence of solutions.

  16. Stability and periodic solutions of ordinary and functional differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Burton, T A

    1985-01-01

    In this book, we study theoretical and practical aspects of computing methods for mathematical modelling of nonlinear systems. A number of computing techniques are considered, such as methods of operator approximation with any given accuracy; operator interpolation techniques including a non-Lagrange interpolation; methods of system representation subject to constraints associated with concepts of causality, memory and stationarity; methods of system representation with an accuracy that is the best within a given class of models; methods of covariance matrix estimation;methods for low-rank mat

  17. Bifurcation for non linear ordinary differential equations with singular perturbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safia Acher Spitalier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We study a family of singularly perturbed ODEs with one parameter and compare their solutions to the ones of the corresponding reduced equations. The interesting characteristic here is that the reduced equations have more than one solution for a given set of initial conditions. Then we consider how those solutions are organized for different values of the parameter. The bifurcation associated to this situation is studied using a minimal set of tools from non standard analysis.

  18. Some problems on ordinary differential equations in Banach spaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájek, Petr Pavel; Vivi, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 2 (2010), s. 245-255 ISSN 1578-7303 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190801; GA ČR GA201/07/0394 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Banach space * ODE * Peano's theorem Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.400, year: 2010 http://link.springer.com/article/10.5052%2FRACSAM.2010.16

  19. Symmetries, integrals and solutions of ordinary differential equations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. P G L Leach1 R R Warne1 N Caister1 V Naicker1 N Euler2. School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, P.O. Box X54001 Durban 4000, Republic of South Africa; School of Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, SE-971 87 Luleå, Sweden ...

  20. Linearization of systems of four second-order ordinary differential ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    found and proved to be cubically semi-linear in the dependent variables [3]. Separately, the geometric .... and all three parameters in (4) are complex functions of the real independent variable. Thus we obtain .... coupling as above but whose coefficients involve the dependent and independent variables, f1 − f1( f 2. 1 − f 2.

  1. Plasticity of marrow mesenchymal stem cells from human first-trimester fetus: from single-cell clone to neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihua; Shen, Wenzheng; Sun, Bingjie; Lv, Changrong; Dou, Zhongying

    2011-02-01

    Recent results have shown that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) from human first-trimester abortus (hfBMSCs) are closer to embryonic stem cells and perform greater telomerase activity and faster propagation than mid- and late-prophase fetal and adult BMSCs. However, no research has been done on the plasticity of hfBMSCs into neuronal cells using single-cell cloned strains without cell contamination. In this study, we isolated five single cells from hfBMSCs and obtained five single-cell cloned strains, and investigated their biological property and neuronal differentiation potential. We found that four of the five strains showed similar expression profile of surface antigen markers to hfBMSCs, and most of them differentiated into neuron-like cells expressing Nestin, Pax6, Sox1, β-III Tubulin, NF-L, and NSE under induction. One strain showed different expression profile of surface antigen markers from the four strains and hfBMSCs, and did not differentiate toward neuronal cells. We demonstrated for the first time that some of single-cell cloned strains from hfBMSCs can differentiate into nerve tissue-like cell clusters under induction in vitro, and that the plasticity of each single-cell cloned strain into neuronal cells is different.

  2. Total and single differential cross sections for the electron impact ionization of the ground state of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, T.S.C.; Choudhury, K.B.; Singh, M.B.; Deb, N.C.; Mukherjee, S.C.; Mazumdar, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Total cross sections (TCS) and single differential cross sections (SDCS) have been computed for the single ionization of the ground state of helium by electron impact in a distorted wave formalism which takes into account the effects of the initial and final channel distortions. The present TCS and SDCS results are in fair agreement with the measured values and other theoretical predictions for the incident electron energy E i > 150 eV. (orig.)

  3. Tunable magnetoresistance driven by magnetically sensitive negative differential resistance in an asymmetrically coupled single molecule junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Sharp, John; Persson, Mats; Fisher, Andrew J.; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.

    2014-03-01

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we study the effects of interactions between individual magnetic molecules that are separated from an underlying copper surface by a thin-insulating layer of copper nitride (Cu2N). For electrical transport through a junction containing an individual iron phthalocyanine (FePc) molecule on Cu2N, we observe two novel magnetoresistance behaviors that arise from negative differential resistance (NDR) that shifts by unexpectedly large amounts in a magnetic field. Because voltage is dropped asymmetrically in this double barrier junction, the FePc can become transiently charged when its states are aligned with the Fermi energy of the Cu, resulting in the observed NDR effect. Furthermore, the asymmetric coupling magnifies the observed voltage sensitivity of the magnetic field dependence of the NDR - which inherently is on the scale of the Zeeman energy - by almost two orders of magnitude. These findings represent a new basis for making magnetoresistance devices at the single molecule scale. Furthermore, the enhancement of the energy scales created by asymmetric coupling of the junction can be combined with other multi-step tunneling processes to allow for the investigation of other phenomena that normally would be difficult to observe.

  4. Fully differential single-photon double ionization of neon and argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Frank; Martin, Fernando; Rescigno, Thomas; McCurdy, C.

    2013-05-01

    Double photoionization of neon and argon differ significantly from helium in that three different final state couplings of the residual double ion (1 S , 1 D , and 3 P) are possible and greatly impact the observed angular distributions, but the multi-electron nature of such targets makes ab initio theoretical treatments of this correlated process a challenge. Triply differential cross sections (TDCS) have been calculated for single photon double ionization of these heavier rare gases at various photon energies by utilizing an expanded frozen-core treatment to represent the remaining N - 2 target electrons of the residual ion. The resulting angular distributions are compared with and show significant agreement with existing experimental data. Work supported by U. S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231, by the MICINN Projects No. FIS2010-15127, No. ACI2008-0777,No. CSD 2007-00010, and ERC Advanced Grant 290853.

  5. Single shot, double differential spectral measurements of inverse Compton scattering in the nonlinear regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sakai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inverse Compton scattering (ICS is a unique mechanism for producing fast pulses—picosecond and below—of bright photons, ranging from x to γ rays. These nominally narrow spectral bandwidth electromagnetic radiation pulses are efficiently produced in the interaction between intense, well-focused electron and laser beams. The spectral characteristics of such sources are affected by many experimental parameters, with intense laser effects often dominant. A laser field capable of inducing relativistic oscillatory motion may give rise to harmonic generation and, importantly for the present work, nonlinear redshifting, both of which dilute the spectral brightness of the radiation. As the applications enabled by this source often depend sensitively on its spectra, it is critical to resolve the details of the wavelength and angular distribution obtained from ICS collisions. With this motivation, we present an experimental study that greatly improves on previous spectral measurement methods based on x-ray K-edge filters, by implementing a multilayer bent-crystal x-ray spectrometer. In tandem with a collimating slit, this method reveals a projection of the double differential angular-wavelength spectrum of the ICS radiation in a single shot. The measurements enabled by this diagnostic illustrate the combined off-axis and nonlinear-field-induced redshifting in the ICS emission process. The spectra obtained illustrate in detail the strength of the normalized laser vector potential, and provide a nondestructive measure of the temporal and spatial electron-laser beam overlap.

  6. Single-cell qPCR facilitates the optimization of hematopoietic differentiation in hPSCs/OP9 coculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haide; Jiang, Mengmeng; Xiao, Lei; Huang, He

    2018-03-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs)/OP9 coculture system is a widely used hematopoietic differentiation approach. The limited understanding of this process leads to its low efficiency. Thus, we used single-cell qPCR to reveal the gene expression profiles of individual CD34+ cells from different stages of differentiation. According to the dynamic gene expression of hematopoietic transcription factors, we overexpressed specific hematopoietic transcription factors (Gata2, Lmo2, Etv2, ERG, and SCL) at an early stage of hematopoietic differentiation. After overexpression, we generated more CD34+ cells with normal expression level of CD43 and CD31, which are used to define various hematopoietic progenitors. Furthermore, these CD34+ cells possessed normal differentiation potency in colony-forming unit assays and normal gene expression profiles. In this study, we demonstrated that single-cell qPCR can provide guidance for optimization of hematopoietic differentiation and transient overexpression of selected hematopoietic transcription factors can enhance hematopoietic differentiation.

  7. Kramers-Moyal expansion for stochastic differential equations with single and multiple delays: Applications to financial physics and neurophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, T.D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a generalized Kramers-Moyal expansion for stochastic differential equations with single and multiple delays. In particular, we show that the delay Fokker-Planck equation derived earlier in the literature is a special case of the proposed Kramers-Moyal expansion. Applications for bond pricing and a self-inhibitory neuron model are discussed

  8. Processes of aesthetic transformation in ordinary landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Jonna Majgaard

    2004-01-01

    it was distributed systematically as an almost industrially produced landscape element. Windbreaks are now regarded as a traditional element in the Danish agricultural landscape. As a landscape element it is an international phenomenon known and used in Germany, France, England etc. Originally local farming...... practices, natural conditions, techniques and national legislation in the respective countries, formed the aesthetic expression. In this respect one could speak of the impact of northern nature on the aesthetic expression of the Danish windbreaks, as well as the impact from national phenomena....... These features determined the specific aesthetic and architectural identity of ordinary Danish, i.e. Nordic, landscapes. Contemporary cultural changes such as the aesthetification of everyday life and of ordinary landscape, i.e. farming landscape, are now manifest in the way the windbreaks are motivated...

  9. Non-diagonal processes of singlet and ordinary quark production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejlin, V.A.; Vereshkov, G.M.; Kuksa, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    Non-diagonal processes of singlet and ordinary quark production are analyzed in the model where the down singlet quark mixes with the ordinary ones. The possibility of experimental selection of h-quark effects is demonstrated

  10. 7 CFR 28.406 - Strict Good Ordinary Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strict Good Ordinary Color. 28.406 Section 28.406... for the Color Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.406 Strict Good Ordinary Color. Strict Good Ordinary Color is color which is within the range represented by a set of samples in the custody of the...

  11. 7 CFR 28.407 - Good Ordinary Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good Ordinary Color. 28.407 Section 28.407 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Color Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.407 Good Ordinary Color. Good Ordinary Color is color which is within the range...

  12. Porting Ordinary Applications to Blue Gene/Q Supercomputers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maheshwari, Ketan C.; Wozniak, Justin M.; Armstrong, Timothy; Katz, Daniel S.; Binkowski, T. Andrew; Zhong, Xiaoliang; Heinonen, Olle; Karpeyev, Dmitry; Wilde, Michael

    2015-08-31

    Efficiently porting ordinary applications to Blue Gene/Q supercomputers is a significant challenge. Codes are often originally developed without considering advanced architectures and related tool chains. Science needs frequently lead users to want to run large numbers of relatively small jobs (often called many-task computing, an ensemble, or a workflow), which can conflict with supercomputer configurations. In this paper, we discuss techniques developed to execute ordinary applications over leadership class supercomputers. We use the high-performance Swift parallel scripting framework and build two workflow execution techniques-sub-jobs and main-wrap. The sub-jobs technique, built on top of the IBM Blue Gene/Q resource manager Cobalt's sub-block jobs, lets users submit multiple, independent, repeated smaller jobs within a single larger resource block. The main-wrap technique is a scheme that enables C/C++ programs to be defined as functions that are wrapped by a high-performance Swift wrapper and that are invoked as a Swift script. We discuss the needs, benefits, technicalities, and current limitations of these techniques. We further discuss the real-world science enabled by these techniques and the results obtained.

  13. The ethics of an ordinary medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Some routinely applied hospital technologies may have unintended consequences for patients and their families. The neonatal cardiorespiratory monitor, a computer-like display used to show an infant's vital functions, is one such technology that may become part of a parent's day-to-day being with his or her hospitalized child. In this phenomenological study, I explored how the monitor may mediate parental sensibilities, reshaping the contact of parent and child. This exploration speaks to understanding the relational ethics of even the seemingly most ordinary of medical technologies in clinical contexts. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Early transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of CD8+ T cell differentiation revealed by single-cell RNA-seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaradov, Boyko; Arsenio, Janilyn; Widjaja, Christella E.; He, Zhaoren; Aigner, Stefan; Metz, Patrick J.; Yu, Bingfei; Wehrens, Ellen J.; Lopez, Justine; Kim, Stephanie H.; Zuniga, Elina I.; Goldrath, Ananda W.; Chang, John T.; Yeo, Gene W.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY During microbial infection, responding CD8+ T lymphocytes differentiate into heterogeneous subsets that together provide immediate and durable protection. To elucidate the dynamic transcriptional changes that underlie this process, we applied a single-cell RNA sequencing approach and analyzed individual CD8+ T lymphocytes sequentially throughout the course of a viral infection in vivo. Our analyses revealed a striking transcriptional divergence among cells that had undergone their first division and identified previously unknown molecular determinants controlling CD8+ T lymphocyte fate specification. These findings suggest a model of terminal effector cell differentiation initiated by an early burst of transcriptional activity and subsequently refined by epigenetic silencing of transcripts associated with memory lymphocytes, highlighting the power and necessity of single-cell approaches. PMID:28218746

  15. Oxygen isotope studies of ordinary chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.; Olsen, Edward J.; Goswami, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    Several stages in the evolution of ordinary chondritic meteorites are recorded in the oxygen isotopic composition of the meteorites and their separable components (chondrules, fragments, clasts, and matrix). The whole-rock isotopic compositions reflect the iron-group of the meteorite (H, L, or LL). Isotopic uniformity of H3 to H6 and L3 to L6 are consistent with closed-system metamorphism within each parent body. LL3 chondrites differ slightly from LL4 to LL6, implying a small degree of open-system aqueous alteration and carbon reduction. On the scale of individual chondrules, the meteorites are isotopically heterogeneous, allowing recognition of the solar-nebular processes of chondrule formation. Chondrules for all classes of ordinary chondrites are derived from a common population, which was separate from the population of chondrules in carbonaceous or enstatite chondrites. Chondrules define an isotopic mixing line dominated by exchange between (O - 16)-rich and (O - 16)-poor reservoirs. The oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrites serve as 'fingerprints' for identification of genetic association with other meteorite types (achondrites and iron) and for recognition of source materials in meteoritic breccias.

  16. Fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatched DNA by initial reaction rate of catalytic hairpin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxi; Li, Yixin; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Xinyi; Chen, Yang; Yang, Xiaoda; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2014-10-15

    The widely used catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) amplification strategy generally needs several hours to accomplish one measurement based on the prevailingly used maximum intensity detection mode, making it less practical for assays where high throughput or speed is desired. To make the best use of the kinetic specificity of toehold domain for circuit reaction initiation, we developed a mathematical model and proposed an initial reaction rate detection mode to quantitatively differentiate the single-base mismatch. Using the kinetic mode, assay time can be reduced substantially to 10 min for one measurement with the comparable sensitivity and single-base mismatch differentiating ability as were obtained by the maximum intensity detection mode. This initial reaction rate based approach not only provided a fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatch, but also helped in-depth understanding of the CHA system, which will be beneficial to the design of highly sensitive and specific toehold-mediated hybridization reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Single- and Multiple-Objective Optimization with Differential Evolution and Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2006-01-01

    Genetic and evolutionary algorithms have been applied to solve numerous problems in engineering design where they have been used primarily as optimization procedures. These methods have an advantage over conventional gradient-based search procedures became they are capable of finding global optima of multi-modal functions and searching design spaces with disjoint feasible regions. They are also robust in the presence of noisy data. Another desirable feature of these methods is that they can efficiently use distributed and parallel computing resources since multiple function evaluations (flow simulations in aerodynamics design) can be performed simultaneously and independently on ultiple processors. For these reasons genetic and evolutionary algorithms are being used more frequently in design optimization. Examples include airfoil and wing design and compressor and turbine airfoil design. They are also finding increasing use in multiple-objective and multidisciplinary optimization. This lecture will focus on an evolutionary method that is a relatively new member to the general class of evolutionary methods called differential evolution (DE). This method is easy to use and program and it requires relatively few user-specified constants. These constants are easily determined for a wide class of problems. Fine-tuning the constants will off course yield the solution to the optimization problem at hand more rapidly. DE can be efficiently implemented on parallel computers and can be used for continuous, discrete and mixed discrete/continuous optimization problems. It does not require the objective function to be continuous and is noise tolerant. DE and applications to single and multiple-objective optimization will be included in the presentation and lecture notes. A method for aerodynamic design optimization that is based on neural networks will also be included as a part of this lecture. The method offers advantages over traditional optimization methods. It is more

  18. Negative Differential Resistance due to Nonlinearities in Single and Stacked Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filatrella, Giovanni; Pierro, Vincenzo; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    2014-01-01

    Josephson junction systems with a negative differential resistance (NDR) play an essential role for applications. As a well-known example, long Josephson junctions of the BSCCO type have been considered as a source of terahertz radiation in recent experiments. Numerical results for the dynamics o...

  19. Visualization of multivalent histone modification in a single cell reveals highly concerted epigenetic changes on differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattori, Naoko; Niwa, Tohru; Kimura, Kana

    2013-01-01

    . Bivalent modification was clearly visualized by iChmo in wild-type embryonic stem cells (ESCs) known to have it, whereas rarely in Suz12 knockout ESCs and mouse embryonic fibroblasts known to have little of it. iChmo was applied to analysis of epigenetic and phenotypic changes of heterogeneous cell......Combinations of histone modifications have significant biological roles, such as maintenance of pluripotency and cancer development, but cannot be analyzed at the single cell level. Here, we visualized a combination of histone modifications by applying the in situ proximity ligation assay, which...... population, namely, ESCs at an early stage of differentiation, and this revealed that the bivalent modification disappeared in a highly concerted manner, whereas phenotypic differentiation proceeded with large variations among cells. Also, using this method, we were able to visualize a combination...

  20. Determination of nanogram quantities of osmium-labeled single stranded DNA by differential pulse stripping voltammetry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kizek, René; Havran, Luděk; Fojta, Miroslav; Paleček, Emil

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 55, 1/2 (2002), s. 199-121 ISSN 1567-5394 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV204/97/K084; GA ČR GA204/00/D049; GA AV ČR IAA4004108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : differential pulse stripping voltammetry * microdetermination of DNA * chemical modification of DNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.463, year: 2002

  1. A Risk Comparison of Ordinary Least Squares vs Ridge Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Dhillon, Paramveer S.; Foster, Dean P.; Kakade, Sham M.; Ungar, Lyle H.

    2011-01-01

    We compare the risk of ridge regression to a simple variant of ordinary least squares, in which one simply projects the data onto a finite dimensional subspace (as specified by a Principal Component Analysis) and then performs an ordinary (un-regularized) least squares regression in this subspace. This note shows that the risk of this ordinary least squares method is within a constant factor (namely 4) of the risk of ridge regression.

  2. Motor impulsivity differentiates between psychiatric inpatients with multiple versus single lifetime suicide attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colborn, Victoria A; LaCroix, Jessica M; Neely, Laura L; Tucker, Jennifer; Perera, Kanchana; Daruwala, Samantha E; Grammer, Geoffrey; Weaver, Jennifer; Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan

    2017-07-01

    A history of multiple suicide attempts conveys greater risk for suicide than a single attempt. Impulsivity may partially explain the association between multiple attempts and increased risk. We examined trait impulsivity, ability to engage in goal-directed behaviors, and impulse control among psychiatrically hospitalized United States military personnel and their dependents. Individuals with a history of multiple versus single attempts had significantly higher motor impulsivity, indicating spur of the moment action. Providers are encouraged to directly assess and treat motor impulsivity among suicidal individuals. Further research should explore whether motor impulsivity is a mechanism of change in psychosocial suicide prevention interventions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Total Mass of Ordinary Chondrite Matter Originally Present in the Solar System

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, J. Marvin

    2004-01-01

    Recently, I reported the discovery of a new fundamental relationship of the major elements (Fe, Mg, Si) of chondrites that admits the possibility that ordinary chondrite meteorites are derived from two components, a relatively oxidized and undifferentiated, primitive component and a somewhat differentiated, planetary component, with oxidation state like the highly reduced enstatite chondrites, which I suggested was identical to Mercury's complement of lost elements. Subsequently, on the basis...

  4. Dynamics of lineage commitment revealed by single-cell transcriptomics of differentiating embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semrau, Stefan; Goldmann, Johanna E; Soumillon, Magali; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Jaenisch, Rudolf; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression heterogeneity in the pluripotent state of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) has been increasingly well-characterized. In contrast, exit from pluripotency and lineage commitment have not been studied systematically at the single-cell level. Here we measure the gene expression

  5. SINGLE VERSUS MULTIPLE TRIAL VECTORS IN CLASSICAL DIFFERENTIAL EVOLUTION FOR OPTIMIZING THE QUANTIZATION TABLE IN JPEG BASELINE ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Vinoth Kumar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantization Table is responsible for compression / quality trade-off in baseline Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG algorithm and therefore it is viewed as an optimization problem. In the literature, it has been found that Classical Differential Evolution (CDE is a promising algorithm to generate the optimal quantization table. However, the searching capability of CDE could be limited due to generation of single trial vector in an iteration which in turn reduces the convergence speed. This paper studies the performance of CDE by employing multiple trial vectors in a single iteration. An extensive performance analysis has been made between CDE and CDE with multiple trial vectors in terms of Optimization process, accuracy, convergence speed and reliability. The analysis report reveals that CDE with multiple trial vectors improves the convergence speed of CDE and the same is confirmed using a statistical hypothesis test (t-test.

  6. Entropy: from black holes to ordinary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badiali, J P

    2006-01-01

    Several results of black holes thermodynamics can be considered as firmly founded and formulated in a very general manner. From this starting point, we analyse in which way these results may improve our understanding in the thermodynamics of ordinary systems for which a pre-relativistic description is sufficient. First, we introduce a spacetime model and an entropy related to a local definition of the order in this spacetime. We show that such an approach leads to the traditional thermodynamics provided an equilibrium condition is assumed. From this condition a relation time/temperature is introduced. We show that such a relation extensively used in the black hole theory has a very general and physical meaning here. Our dynamical approach of thermodynamic equilibrium allows us to establish a relation between action and entropy identical to the one existing in the case of black holes. Since this relation exists for systems with very different underlying physics, we may expect that it corresponds to a general result in thermodynamics; it suggests that a definition of entropy in terms of order in spacetime might be more general than the Boltzmann definition related to a counting of microstates. All these results based on the fact that the paths introduced in the path-integral formalism have a physical meaning give a new approach of statistical mechanics. Finally, we compare our approach to other works based on a similar starting point

  7. Single-strand-conformation polymorphism of ribosomal DNA for rapid species differentiation in genus Phytophthora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; Hong, Chuanxue; Richardson, Patricia A; Gallegly, Mannon E

    2003-08-01

    Single-strand-conformation polymorphism (SSCP) of ribosomal DNA of 29 species (282 isolates) of Phytophthora was characterized in this study. Phytophthora boehmeriae, Phytophthora botryosa, Phytophthora cactorum, Phytophthora cambivora, Phytophthora capsici, Phytophthora cinnamomi, Phytophthora colocasiae, Phytophthora fragariae, Phytophthora heveae, Phytophthora hibernalis, Phytophthora ilicis, Phytophthora infestans, Phytophthora katsurae, Phytophthora lateralis, Phytophthora meadii, Phytophthora medicaginis, Phytophthora megakarya, Phytophthora nicotianae, Phytophthora palmivora, Phytophthora phaseoli, Phytophthora pseudotsugae, Phytophthora sojae, Phytophthora syringae, and Phytophthora tropicalis each showed a unique SSCP pattern. Phytophthora citricola, Phytophthora citrophthora, Phytophthora cryptogea, Phytophthora drechsleri, and Phytophthora megasperma each had more than one distinct pattern. A single-stranded DNA ladder also was developed, which facilitates comparison of SSCP patterns within and between gels. With a single DNA fingerprint, 277 isolates of Phytophthora recovered from irrigation water and plant tissues in Virginia were all correctly identified into eight species at substantially reduced time, labor, and cost. The SSCP analysis presented in this work will aid in studies on taxonomy, genetics, and ecology of the genus Phytophthora.

  8. EFFECTOR OF TRANSCRIPTION2 is involved in xylem differentiation and includes a functional DNA single strand cutting domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Rumen; Tiedemann, Jens; Czihal, Andreas; Schallau, Anna; Diep, Le Hong; Mock, Hans-Peter; Claus, Bernhard; Tewes, Annegret; Bäumlein, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    EFFECTORS OF TRANSCRIPTION2 (ET) are plant-specific regulatory proteins characterized by the presence of two to five C-terminal DNA- and Zn-binding repeats, and a highly conserved cysteine pattern. We describe the structural characterization of the three member Arabidopsis thaliana ET gene family and reveal some allelic sequence polymorphisms. A mutation analysis showed that AtET2 affects the expression of various KNAT genes involved in the maintenance of the undifferentiated state of cambial meristem cells. It also plays a role in the regulation of GA5 (gibberellin 3-beta-dioxygenase) and the cell-cycle-related GASA4. A correlation was established between AtET2 expression and the cellular differentiation state. AtET-GFP fusion proteins shuttle between the cytoplasm and nucleus, with the AtET2 product prevented from entering the nucleus in non-differentiating cells. Within the nucleus, AtET2 probably acts via a single strand cutting domain. A more general regulatory role for ET factors is proposed, governing cell differentiation in cambial meristems, a crucial process for the development of plant vascular tissues.

  9. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals changes in cell cycle and differentiation programs upon aging of hematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Monika S.; Tirosh, Itay; Heckl, Dirk; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Dixit, Atray; Haas, Brian J.; Schneider, Rebekka K.; Wagers, Amy J.; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Both intrinsic cell state changes and variations in the composition of stem cell populations have been implicated as contributors to aging. We used single-cell RNA-seq to dissect variability in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell populations from young and old mice from two strains. We found that cell cycle dominates the variability within each population and that there is a lower frequency of cells in the G1 phase among old compared with young long-term HSCs, suggesting that they traverse through G1 faster. Moreover, transcriptional changes in HSCs during aging are inversely related to those upon HSC differentiation, such that old short-term (ST) HSCs resemble young long-term (LT-HSCs), suggesting that they exist in a less differentiated state. Our results indicate both compositional changes and intrinsic, population-wide changes with age and are consistent with a model where a relationship between cell cycle progression and self-renewal versus differentiation of HSCs is affected by aging and may contribute to the functional decline of old HSCs. PMID:26430063

  10. Simple Adaptive Single Differential Coherence Detection of BPSK Signals in IEEE 802.15.4 Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaoyuan; Wen, Hong; Wang, Longye; Xie, Ping; Song, Liang; Tang, Jie; Liao, Runfa

    2017-12-26

    In this paper, we propose an adaptive single differential coherent detection (SDCD) scheme for the binary phase shift keying (BPSK) signals in IEEE 802.15.4 Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). In particular, the residual carrier frequency offset effect (CFOE) for differential detection is adaptively estimated, with only linear operation, according to the changing channel conditions. It was found that the carrier frequency offset (CFO) and chip signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions do not need a priori knowledge. This partly benefits from that the combination of the trigonometric approximation sin - 1 ( x ) ≈ x and a useful assumption, namely, the asymptotic or high chip SNR, is considered for simplification of the full estimation scheme. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can achieve an accurate estimation and the detection performance can completely meet the requirement of the IEEE 802.15.4 standard, although with a little loss of reliability and robustness as compared with the conventional optimal single-symbol detector.

  11. Proximity-Based Differential Single-Cell Analysis of the Niche to Identify Stem/Progenitor Cell Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Lev; Goncalves, Kevin A; Kharchenko, Peter V; Turcotte, Raphael; Kfoury, Youmna; Mercier, Francois; Baryawno, Ninib; Severe, Nicolas; Bachand, Jacqueline; Spencer, Joel A; Papazian, Ani; Lee, Dongjun; Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Srour, Edward F; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Tate, Tiffany; Lo Celso, Cristina; Ono, Noriaki; Nutt, Stephen; Heino, Jyrki; Sipilä, Kalle; Shioda, Toshihiro; Osawa, Masatake; Lin, Charles P; Hu, Guo-Fu; Scadden, David T

    2016-10-06

    Physiological stem cell function is regulated by secreted factors produced by niche cells. In this study, we describe an unbiased approach based on the differential single-cell gene expression analysis of mesenchymal osteolineage cells close to, and further removed from, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to identify candidate niche factors. Mesenchymal cells displayed distinct molecular profiles based on their relative location. We functionally examined, among the genes that were preferentially expressed in proximal cells, three secreted or cell-surface molecules not previously connected to HSPC biology-the secreted RNase angiogenin, the cytokine IL18, and the adhesion molecule Embigin-and discovered that all of these factors are HSPC quiescence regulators. Therefore, our proximity-based differential single-cell approach reveals molecular heterogeneity within niche cells and can be used to identify novel extrinsic stem/progenitor cell regulators. Similar approaches could also be applied to other stem cell/niche pairs to advance the understanding of microenvironmental regulation of stem cell function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Proximity-based differential single cell analysis of the niche to identify stem/progenitor cell regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Lev; Goncalves, Kevin A; Kharchenko, Peter V; Turcotte, Raphael; Kfoury, Youmna; Mercier, Francois; Baryawno, Ninib; Severe, Nicolas; Bachand, Jacqueline; Spencer, Joel; Papazian, Ani; Lee, Dongjun; Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Srour, Edward F; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Tate, Tiffany; Celso, Cristina Lo; Ono, Noriaki; Nutt, Stephen; Heino, Jyrki; Sipilä, Kalle; Shioda, Toshihiro; Osawa, Masatake; Lin, Charles P; Hu, Guo-fu; Scadden, David T

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Physiological stem cell function is regulated by secreted factors produced by niche cells. In this study, we describe an unbiased approach based on differential single-cell gene expression analysis of mesenchymal osteolineage cells close to and further removed from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to identify candidate niche factors. Mesenchymal cells displayed distinct molecular profiles based on their relative location. Amongst the genes which were preferentially expressed in proximal cells, we functionally examined three secreted or cell surface molecules not previously connected to HSPC biology: the secreted RNase Angiogenin, the cytokine IL18 and the adhesion molecule Embigin and discovered that all of these factors are HSPC quiescence regulators. Our proximity-based differential single cell approach therefore reveals molecular heterogeneity within niche cells and can be used to identify novel extrinsic stem/progenitor cell regulators. Similar approaches could also be applied to other stem cell/niche pairs to advance understanding of microenvironmental regulation of stem cell function. PMID:27524439

  13. Introduction to partial differential equations with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zachmanoglou, E C

    1988-01-01

    This text explores the essentials of partial differential equations as applied to engineering and the physical sciences. Discusses ordinary differential equations, integral curves and surfaces of vector fields, the Cauchy-Kovalevsky theory, more. Problems and answers.

  14. Transmission of neutrons in serpentine mixed and ordinary concrete- a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravishankar, R.; Bhattacharyya, Sarmishtha; Bandyopadhyay, Tapas; Sarkar, P. K.

    2002-01-01

    In particle accelerator facilities, for radiation shielding, concrete is commonly used for its effectiveness in attenuating neutrons in addition to its good structural and mechanical properties. Neutron attenuation depends largely on the water content in the concrete. Serpentine mixed concrete is reported to retain better water content than ordinary concrete. Experiments have been carried out to compare neutron attenuation properties of Serpentine mixed concrete slabs and ordinary concrete slabs of different thickness. Transmission of neutrons from a 185 GBq Pu-Be neutron source has been studied using NE-213 liquid scintillator detector, along with the associated electronics to discriminate neutron from gamma using pulse shape discrimination techniques. The energy differential neutron spectra transmitted through the concrete slabs and the corresponding dose have been obtained by unfolding the pulse height spectra using the FERDOR-U computer code and proper response matrix data of the NE-213 detector. The neutron transmission factors through both Serpentine and Ordinary concrete slabs have been studied. The results show serpentine mixed concrete slabs can attenuate more neutrons of varying energies compared to ordinary concrete slabs of equal dimensions. From the trend, it has been found out, with the increase in slab thickness, the gain in neutron attenuation increases. This is due to increase in quantity of serpentine with the increase in thickness of concrete. A Monte Carlo simulation carried out, for theoretical analysis of the results, has been found to be in order

  15. Differential activation behavior of dermal dendritic cells underlies the strain-specific Th1 responses to single epicutaneous immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih-Hung; Chen, Jau-Shiuh; Chiu, Hsien-Ching; Hong, Chien-Hui; Liu, Ching-Yi; Ta, Yng-Cun; Wang, Li-Fang

    2016-12-01

    Epicutaneous immunization with allergens is an important sensitization route for atopic dermatitis. We recently showed in addition to the Th2 response following single epicutaneous immunization, a remarkable Th1 response is induced in B6 mice, but not in BALB/c mice, mimicking the immune response to allergens in human non-atopics and atopics. We investigated the underlying mechanisms driving this differential Th1 response between BALB/c and B6 mice. We characterized dermal dendritic cells by flow cytometric analysis. We measured the induced Th1/Th2 responses by measuring the IFN-γ/IL-13 contents of supernatants of antigen reactivation cultures of lymph node cells. We demonstrate that more dermal dendritic cells with higher activation status migrate into draining lymph nodes of B6 mice compared to BALB/c mice. Dermal dendritic cells of B6 mice have a greater ability to capture protein antigen than those of BALB/c mice. Moreover, increasing the activation status or amount of captured antigen in dermal dendritic cells induced a Th1 response in BALB/c mice. Further, differential activation behavior, but not antigen-capturing ability of dermal dendritic cells between BALB/c and B6 mice is dendritic cell-intrinsic. These results show that the differential activation behavior of dermal dendritic cells underlies the strain-specific Th1 responses following single epicutaneous immunization. Furthermore, our findings highlight the potential differences between human atopics and non-atopics and provide useful information for the prediction and prevention of atopic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sports for learners with physical disabilities in ordinary public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the Western Cape, learners with physical disabilities are accepted into ordinary schools (a school that is not a special school) as a part of the inclusive education initiative. This article reports on a survey designed to determine the types of sports that are available for learners with physical disabilities in ordinary public ...

  17. 7 CFR 28.426 - Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color. 28.426 Section 28.426 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Spotted Color. Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a set...

  18. Using frames to determine ordinary meaning in court cases: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The South African judicial system has a variety of ways to determine the ordinary meaning of words, ranging from preceding court cases and academic publications to expert witnesses. However, one of the main resources in the interpretation of ordinary words is a dictionary. Much has already been published on ...

  19. Single and Double differential Drell-Yan cross section measurements using the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Walia, Genius

    2017-01-01

    The neutral current Drell-Yan (DY) process, q$\\overline{q}$$\\to$Z/$\\gamma$$^*$$\\to$$\\mu^{+}$$\\mu^{-}$, is one of the best-studied benchmark physics processes at the LHC. The large production cross section and the experimentally clean final state allows excellent tests for perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). A thorough understanding of the transverse momentum(qT) spectra of the vector bosons at hadron colliders is essential for a future high precision measurement of the mass of the W boson. However the measurements at LHC are limited due to the resolution in the measurement of momenta of the daughter leptons, electron and muon, in particular. The phistar ($\\phi^{*}$) variable, which uses the angular correlation of the lepton pairs from Z decay to probe the transverse momenta the vector boson, has intrinsically better resolution and less sensitivity to experimental systematic uncertainties compared to qT. Results from differential cross-measurements as function of the phi* variable will be presented in ...

  20. Structural Differentiation between Layered Single (Ni) and Double Metal Hydroxides (Ni–Al LDHs) Using Wavelet Transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebecker, Matthew G. [University of Delaware, Delaware Environmental Institute; Sparks, Donald L. [University of Delaware, Delaware Environmental Institute

    2017-09-07

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) are anionic clays important in disciplines such as environmental chemistry, geochemistry, and materials science. Developments in signal processing of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data, such as wavelet transformation (WT), have been used to identify transition metals and Al present in the hydroxide sheets of LDHs. The WT plots of LDHs should be distinct from those of isostructural single metal hydroxides. However, no direct comparison of these minerals appears in the literature using WT. This work systematically analyzes a suite of Ni-rich mineral standards, including Ni–Al LDHs, single metal Ni hydroxides, and Ni-rich silicates using WT. The results illustrate that the WT plots for α-Ni(OH)2 and Ni–Al LDHs are often indistinguishable from each other, with similar two-component plots for the different mineral types. This demonstrates that the WT of the first metal shell often cannot be used to differentiate an LDH from a single metal hydroxide. Interlayer anions adsorbed to the hydroxide sheet of α-Ni(OH)2 affect the EXAFS spectra and are not visible in the FT but are clearly resolved and discrete in the WT.

  1. Solution of differential equations by application of transformation groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, C. N., Jr.; Gallaher, L. J.; Martin, R. H., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Report applies transformation groups to the solution of systems of ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations. Lies theorem finds an integrating factor for appropriate invariance group or groups can be found and can be extended to partial differential equations.

  2. Differential pulse amplitude modulation for multiple-input single-output OWVLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S. H.; Kwon, D. H.; Kim, S. J.; Son, Y. H.; Han, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are widely used for lighting due to their energy efficiency, eco-friendly, and small size than previously light sources such as incandescent, fluorescent bulbs and so on. Optical wireless visible light communication (OWVLC) based on LED merges lighting and communications in applications such as indoor lighting, traffic signals, vehicles, and underwater communications because LED can be easily modulated. However, physical bandwidth of LED is limited about several MHz by slow time constant of the phosphor and characteristics of device. Therefore, using the simplest modulation format which is non-return-zero on-off-keying (NRZ-OOK), the data rate reaches only to dozens Mbit/s. Thus, to improve the transmission capacity, optical filtering and pre-, post-equalizer are adapted. Also, high-speed wireless connectivity is implemented using spectrally efficient modulation methods: orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) or discrete multi-tone (DMT). However, these modulation methods need additional digital signal processing such as FFT and IFFT, thus complexity of transmitter and receiver is increasing. To reduce the complexity of transmitter and receiver, we proposed a novel modulation scheme which is named differential pulse amplitude modulation. The proposed modulation scheme transmits different NRZ-OOK signals with same amplitude and unit time delay using each LED chip, respectively. The `N' parallel signals from LEDs are overlapped and directly detected at optical receiver. Received signal is demodulated by power difference between unit time slots. The proposed scheme can overcome the bandwidth limitation of LEDs and data rate can be improved according to number of LEDs without complex digital signal processing.

  3. Single Particle Laser Mass Spectrometry Applied to Differential Ice Nucleation Experiments at the AIDA Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallavardin, S. J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Lohmann, U.; Moehler, Ottmar; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Experiments conducted at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located in Karlsruhe, Germany permit investigation of particle properties that affect the nucleation of ice at temperature and water vapor conditions relevant to cloud microphysics and climate issues. Ice clouds were generated by heterogeneous nucleation of Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, and hematite and homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid. Ice crystals formed in the chamber were inertially separated from unactivated, or 'interstitial' aerosol particles with a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), then evaporated. The ice residue (i.e., the aerosol which initiated ice nucleation plus any material which was scavenged from the gas- and/or particle-phase), was chemically characterized at the single particle level using a laser ionization mass spectrometer. In this manner the species that first nucleated ice could be identified out of a mixed aerosol population in the chamber. Bare mineral dust particles were more effective ice nuclei (IN) than similar particles with a coating. Metallic particles from contamination in the chamber initiated ice nucleation before other species but there were few enough that they did not compromise the experiments. Nitrate, sulfate, and organics were often detected on particles and ice residue, evidently from scavenging of trace gas-phase species in the chamber. Hematite was a more effective ice nucleus than illite. Ice residue was frequently larger than unactivated test aerosol due to the formation of aggregates due to scavenging, condensation of contaminant gases, and the predominance of larger aerosol in nucleation

  4. New Method for Differentiation of Granuloviruses (Betabaculoviruses Based on Multitemperature Single Stranded Conformational Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna Krejmer-Rabalska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Baculoviruses have been used as biopesticides for decades. Recently, due to the excessive use of chemical pesticides there is a need for finding new agents that may be useful in biological protection. Sometimes few isolates or species are discovered in one host. In the past few years, many new baculovirus species have been isolated from environmental samples, thoroughly characterized and thanks to next generation sequencing methods their genomes are being deposited in the GenBank database. Next generation sequencing (NGS methodology is the most certain way of detection, but it has many disadvantages. During our studies, we have developed a method based on Polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by Multitemperature Single Stranded Conformational Polymorphism (MSSCP which allows for distinguishing new granulovirus isolates in only a few hours and at low-cost. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis of betabaculoviruses, representative species have been chosen. The alignment of highly conserved genes—granulin and late expression factor-9, was performed and the degenerate primers were designed to amplify the most variable, short DNA fragments flanked with the most conserved sequences. Afterwards, products of PCR reaction were analysed by MSSCP technique. In our opinion, the proposed method may be used for screening of new isolates derived from environmental samples.

  5. A Simple Differential Mode EMI Suppressor for the LLCL-Filter-Based Single-Phase Grid-Tied Transformerless Inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Junhao; Wu, Weimin; He, Yuanbin

    2015-01-01

    The single-phase power converter topologies evolving of photovoltaic applications are still including passive filters, like the LCLor LLCL-filter. Compared with the LCL-filter, the total inductance of the LLCL-filter can be reduced a lot. However, due to the resonant inductor in series...... with the bypass capacitor, the differential mode (DM) electromagnetic interference (EMI) noise attenuation of an LLCL-filter-based grid-tied inverter declines. Conventionally, a capacitor was inserted in parallel with the LC resonant circuit branch of the LLCL-filter to suppress the DM EMI noise. In order...... to achieve a small value of capacitor as well as to minimize the additional reactive power, a novel simple DM EMI suppressor for the LLCL-filter-based system is proposed. The characters of two kinds of DM EMI suppressor are analyzed and compared in detail. Simulations and experiments on a 0.5-kW 110-V/50-Hz...

  6. The singly averaged differential equations of satellite motion for e greater than or equal to 0 and less than 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, S. S.; Khan, I.

    1976-01-01

    The singly-averaged differential equations of motion of a satellite are developed in terms of parameters valid for all eccentricities less than one. The perturbations included in the acceleration model are due to an aspherical central planet (zonal harmonics up to degree 20 and resonant harmonics up to degree and order 20), atmospheric drag for a time-varying atmosphere, third-body gravity (the sun and moon for an earth satellite), solar radiation pressure with shadowing, and impulsive maneuvers. Analytic averaging is used to remove short-period terms due to the aspherical central planet and third-body gravity. Numerical averaging is used to remove short-period terms due to atmospheric drag and solar radiation pressure.

  7. Single assay for simultaneous detection and differential identification of human and avian influenza virus types, subtypes, and emergent variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Metzgar

    Full Text Available For more than four decades the cause of most type A influenza virus infections of humans has been attributed to only two viral subtypes, A/H1N1 or A/H3N2. In contrast, avian and other vertebrate species are a reservoir of type A influenza virus genome diversity, hosting strains representing at least 120 of 144 combinations of 16 viral hemagglutinin and 9 viral neuraminidase subtypes. Viral genome segment reassortments and mutations emerging within this reservoir may spawn new influenza virus strains as imminent epidemic or pandemic threats to human health and poultry production. Traditional methods to detect and differentiate influenza virus subtypes are either time-consuming and labor-intensive (culture-based or remarkably insensitive (antibody-based. Molecular diagnostic assays based upon reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR have short assay cycle time, and high analytical sensitivity and specificity. However, none of these diagnostic tests determine viral gene nucleotide sequences to distinguish strains and variants of a detected pathogen from one specimen to the next. Decision-quality, strain- and variant-specific pathogen gene sequence information may be critical for public health, infection control, surveillance, epidemiology, or medical/veterinary treatment planning. The Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM-Flu is a robust, highly multiplexed and target gene sequencing-based alternative to both traditional culture- or biomarker-based diagnostic tests. RPM-Flu is a single, simultaneous differential diagnostic assay for all subtype combinations of type A influenza viruses and for 30 other viral and bacterial pathogens that may cause influenza-like illness. These other pathogen targets of RPM-Flu may co-infect and compound the morbidity and/or mortality of patients with influenza. The informative specificity of a single RPM-Flu test represents specimen-specific viral gene sequences as determinants of virus type, A

  8. Giant Pulse Studies of Ordinary and Recycled Pulsars with NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Natalia; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Gendreau, Keith C.; Enoto, Teruaki; Harding, Alice; Lommen, Andrea; Ray, Paul S.; Deneva, Julia; Kerr, Matthew; Ransom, Scott M.; NICER Team

    2018-01-01

    Radio Giant Pulses are one of the earliest discovered form of anomalous single pulse emission from pulsars. Known for their non-periodical occurrence, restriction to certain phase ranges, power-law intensity distributions, pulse widths ranging from microseconds to nanoseconds and very high brightness temperatures, they stand out as an individual form of pulsar radio emission.Discovered originally in the case of the Crab pulsar, several other pulsars have been observed to emit radio giant pulses, the most promising being the recycled pulsar PSR B1937+21 and also the Vela pulsar.Although radio giant pulses are apparently the result of a coherent emission mechanism, recent studies of the Crab pulsar led to the discovery of an additional incoherent component at optical wavelengths. No such component has been identified for recycled pulsars, or Vela yet.To provide constraints on possible emission regions in their magnetospheres and to search for differences between giant pulses from ordinary and recycled pulsars, we present the progress of the correlation study of PSR B1937+21 and the Vela pulsar carried out with NICER and several radio observatories.

  9. Unitary equivalence between ordinary intelligent states and generalized intelligent states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nha, Hyunchul

    2007-01-01

    Ordinary intelligent states (OISs) hold equality in the Heisenberg uncertainty relation involving two noncommuting observables (A,B), whereas generalized intelligent states (GISs) do so in the more generalized uncertainty relation, the Schroedinger-Robertson inequality. In general, OISs form a subset of GISs. However, if there exists a unitary evolution U that transforms the operators (A,B) to a new pair of operators in a rotation form, it is shown that an arbitrary GIS can be generated by applying the rotation operator U to a certain OIS. In this sense, the set of OISs is unitarily equivalent to the set of GISs. It is the case, for example, with the su(2) and the su(1,1) algebras which have been extensively studied, particularly in quantum optics. When these algebras are represented by two bosonic operators (nondegenerate case), or by a single bosonic operator (degenerate case), the rotation, or pseudorotation, operator U corresponds to phase shift, beam splitting, or parametric amplification, depending on two observables (A,B)

  10. Automatic differentiation bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, G.F. (comp.)

    1992-07-01

    This is a bibliography of work related to automatic differentiation. Automatic differentiation is a technique for the fast, accurate propagation of derivative values using the chain rule. It is neither symbolic nor numeric. Automatic differentiation is a fundamental tool for scientific computation, with applications in optimization, nonlinear equations, nonlinear least squares approximation, stiff ordinary differential equation, partial differential equations, continuation methods, and sensitivity analysis. This report is an updated version of the bibliography which originally appeared in Automatic Differentiation of Algorithms: Theory, Implementation, and Application.

  11. Single Particle Differentiation through 2D Optical Fiber Trapping and Back-Scattered Signal Statistical Analysis: An Exploratory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Joana S; Ribeiro, Rita S R; Cunha, João P S; Rosa, Carla C; Jorge, Pedro A S

    2018-02-27

    Recent trends on microbiology point out the urge to develop optical micro-tools with multifunctionalities such as simultaneous manipulation and sensing. Considering that miniaturization has been recognized as one of the most important paradigms of emerging sensing biotechnologies, optical fiber tools, including Optical Fiber Tweezers (OFTs), are suitable candidates for developing multifunctional small sensors for Medicine and Biology. OFTs are flexible and versatile optotools based on fibers with one extremity patterned to form a micro-lens. These are able to focus laser beams and exert forces onto microparticles strong enough (piconewtons) to trap and manipulate them. In this paper, through an exploratory analysis of a 45 features set, including time and frequency-domain parameters of the back-scattered signal of particles trapped by a polymeric lens, we created a novel single feature able to differentiate synthetic particles (PMMA and Polystyrene) from living yeasts cells. This single statistical feature can be useful for the development of label-free hybrid optical fiber sensors with applications in infectious diseases detection or cells sorting. It can also contribute, by revealing the most significant information that can be extracted from the scattered signal, to the development of a simpler method for particles characterization (in terms of composition, heterogeneity degree) than existent technologies.

  12. Differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography microscopy based on a single-optical-element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; Xie, Changqing

    2015-11-01

    Both digital in-line holography (DIH) and zone plate-based microscopy have received considerable interest as powerful imaging tools. However, the former suffers from a twin-image noise problem. The latter suffers from low efficiency and difficulty in fabrication. Here, we present an effective and efficient phase-contrast imaging approach, named differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography (DIC-DIH), by using a single optical element to split the incident light into a plane wave and a converging spherical wave and generate a two-dimensional (2D) DIC effect simultaneously. Specifically, to improve image contrast, we present a new single optical element, termed 2D DIC compound photon sieves, by combining two overlaid binary gratings and a compound photon sieve through two logical XOR operations. The proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can eliminate the twin-image noise problem and improve image contrast with high efficiency. Additionally, we present an example of the phase-contrast imaging nonuniform thick photoresist development process.

  13. Theorems on differential inequalities and periodic boundary value problem for second-order ordinary differential equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lomtatidze, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 1 (2016), s. 1-129 ISSN 1512-0015 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : periodic boundary value problem * positive solution * singular equation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://rmi.tsu.ge/jeomj/memoirs/vol67/abs67-1.htm

  14. Preventive effect of ordinary and hyperimmune bovine colostrums ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... In the present study, the anti-diabetic effect of ordinary and hyperimmune bovine colostrum were evaluated in .... first day was collected from cows at parturition, cooled to 4oC, and ... that received ordinary skim milk powder at the dose of 133.40 mg/kg·bw and served as diabetic control mice, group 3 and 4 ...

  15. A first course in differential equations, modeling, and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Carlos A

    2011-01-01

    IntroductionAn Introductory ExampleModelingDifferential EquationsForcing FunctionsBook ObjectivesObjects in a Gravitational FieldAn Example Antidifferentiation: Technique for Solving First-Order Ordinary Differential EquationsBack to Section 2-1Another ExampleSeparation of Variables: Technique for Solving First-Order Ordinary Differential Equations Back to Section 2-5Equations, Unknowns, and Degrees of FreedomClassical Solutions of Ordinary Linear Differential EquationsExamples of Differential EquationsDefinition of a Linear Differential EquationIntegrating Factor MethodCharacteristic Equation

  16. Selective Disparity of Ordinary Chondritic Precursors in Micrometeorite Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudraswami, N. G.; Fernandes, D.; Naik, A. K.; Shyam Prasad, M.; Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.; Taylor, S.

    2018-01-01

    All known extraterrestrial dust (micrometeoroids) entering the Earth’s atmosphere is anticipated to have a significant contribution from ordinary chondritic precursors, as seen in meteorites, but this is an apparent contradiction that needs to be addressed. Ordinary chondrites represent a minor contribution to the overall meteor influx compared to carbonaceous chondrites, which are largely dominated by CI and/or CM chondrites. However, the near-Earth asteroid population presents a scenario with sufficient scope for generation of dust-sized debris from ordinary chondritic sources. The bulk chemical composition of 3255 micrometeorites (MMs) collected from Antarctica and deep-sea sediments has shown Mg/Si largely dominated by carbonaceous chondrites, and less than 10% having ordinary chondritic precursors. The chemical ablation model is combined with different initial chondritic compositions (CI, CV, L, LL, H), and the results clearly indicate that high-density (≥2.8 g cm‑3) precursors, such as CV and ordinary chondrites in the size range 100–700 μm and zenith angle 0°–70°, ablate at much faster rates and lose their identity even before reaching the Earth’s surface and hence are under-represented in our collections. Moreover, their ability to survive as MMs remains grim for high-velocity micrometeoroids (>16 km s‑1). The elemental ratio for CV and ordinary chondrites are also similar to each other irrespective of the difference in the initial chemical composition. In conclusion, MMs belonging to ordinary chondritic precursors’ concentrations may not be insignificant in thermosphere, as they are found on Earth’s surface.

  17. Length distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous suspension measured by electrospray differential mobility analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Leonard F; Tsai, De-Hao; Fagan, Jeffery A; Bauer, Barry J; Zangmeister, Rebecca A; Tarlov, Michael J; Zachariah, Michael R

    2009-12-01

    The first characterization of the length distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) dispersed in a liquid by electrospray differential mobility analysis (ES-DMA) is presented. Although an understanding of geometric properties of SWCNTs, including length, diameter, aspect ratio, and chirality, is essential for commercial applications, rapid characterization of nanotube length distributions remains challenging. Here the use of ES-DMA to obtain length distributions of DNA-wrapped SWCNTs dispersed in aqueous solutions is demonstrated. Lengths measured by ES-DMA compare favorably with those obtained from multiangle light scattering, dynamic light scattering, field flow fractionation with UV/vis detection, and atomic force microscopy, validating ES-DMA as a technique to measure SWCNTs of <250 nm in length. The nanotubes are previously purified and dispersed by wrapping with oligomeric DNA in aqueous solution and centrifuging to remove bundles and amorphous carbon. These dispersions are particularly attractive due to their amenability to bulk processing, ease of storage, high concentration, compatibility with biological and high-throughput manufacturing environments, and for their potential applications ranging from electronics and hydrogen-storage vessels to anticancer agents.

  18. Evidence from the Semarkona ordinary chondrite for 26Al heating of small planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutcheon, I.D.

    1989-01-01

    We report the first observation of radiogenic 26 Mg in non-refractory meteoritic material, a plagio-clase-bearing, olivine-pyroxene clast chondrule in the Semarkona ordinary chondrite. The inferred initial abundance of 26 Al is sufficient to produce incipient melting in well insulated bodies of chondritic composition. We conclude that planetary accretion and differentiation must have begun on a timescale comparable to the half life of 26 Al and that, even if widespread melting did not occur, 26 Al heating played a significant role in thermal metamorphism on small planets. (author)

  19. Improved Power Decoupling Scheme for Single-Phase Grid-Connected Differential Inverter with Realistic Mismatch in Storage Capacitances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Wenli; Wang, Xiongfei; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2017-01-01

    the intention of this paper to quantify ac and dc imperfections experienced by the differential inverter when storage mismatch occurs. A simple improved scheme is then proposed for raising performance of the differential inverter (or the differential rectifier where desired). Simulation and experimental results...

  20. Classification of All Single Travelling Wave Solutions to Calogero-Degasperis-Focas Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chengshi

    2007-01-01

    Under the travelling wave transformation, Calogero-Degasperis-Focas equation is reduced to an ordinary differential equation. Using a symmetry group of one parameter, this ODE is reduced to a second-order linear inhomogeneous ODE. Furthermore, we apply the change of the variable and complete discrimination system for polynomial to solve the corresponding integrals and obtained the classification of all single travelling wave solutions to Calogero-Degasperis-Focas equation.

  1. Zoology of condensed matter: framids, ordinary stuff, extra-ordinary stuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolis, Alberto; Penco, Riccardo [Physics Department and Institute for Strings, Cosmology, and Astroparticle Physics,Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Piazza, Federico [Physics Department and Institute for Strings, Cosmology, and Astroparticle Physics,Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Paris Center for Cosmological Physics and Laboratoire APC,Université Paris 7, 75205 Paris (France); CPT, Aix Marseille Université,UMR 7332, 13288 Marseille (France); Rattazzi, Riccardo [Institut de Théorie des Phénomènes Physiques,EPFL Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-06-23

    We classify condensed matter systems in terms of the spacetime symmetries they spontaneously break. In particular, we characterize condensed matter itself as any state in a Poincaré-invariant theory that spontaneously breaks Lorentz boosts while preserving at large distances some form of spatial translations, time-translations, and possibly spatial rotations. Surprisingly, the simplest, most minimal system achieving this symmetry breaking pattern — the framid — does not seem to be realized in Nature. Instead, Nature usually adopts a more cumbersome strategy: that of introducing internal translational symmetries — and possibly rotational ones — and of spontaneously breaking them along with their space-time counterparts, while preserving unbroken diagonal subgroups. This symmetry breaking pattern describes the infrared dynamics of ordinary solids, fluids, superfluids, and — if they exist — supersolids. A third, “extra-ordinary”, possibility involves replacing these internal symmetries with other symmetries that do not commute with the Poincaré group, for instance the galileon symmetry, supersymmetry or gauge symmetries. Among these options, we pick the systems based on the galileon symmetry, the “galileids”, for a more detailed study. Despite some similarity, all different patterns produce truly distinct physical systems with different observable properties. For instance, the low-energy 2→2 scattering amplitudes for the Goldstone excitations in the cases of framids, solids and galileids scale respectively as E{sup 2}, E{sup 4}, and E{sup 6}. Similarly the energy momentum tensor in the ground state is “trivial' for framids (ρ+p=0), normal for solids (ρ+p>0) and even inhomogenous for galileids.

  2. Proteomic signatures and aberrations of mouse embryonic stem cells containing a single human chromosome 21 in neuronal differentiation: an in vitro model of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, M; Nishigaki, R; Wang, C C; Toda, T; Shirayoshi, Y; Inoue, T; Gojobori, T; Ikeo, K; Rogers, M S; Oshimura, M

    2004-01-01

    Neurodegeneration in fetal development of Down syndrome (DS) patients is proposed to result in apparent neuropathological abnormalities and to contribute to the phenotypic characteristics of mental retardation and premature development of Alzheimer disease. In order to identify the aberrant and specific genes involved in the early differentiation of DS neurons, we have utilized an in vitro neuronal differentiation system of mouse ES cells containing a single human chromosome 21 (TT2F/hChr21) with TT2F parental ES cells as a control. The paired protein extracts from TT2F and TT2F/hChr21 cells at several stages of neuronal differentiation were subjected to two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein separation followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry to identify the proteins differentially expressed between TT2F and TT2F/hChr21 cells. We provide here a novel set of specific gene products altered in early differentiating DS neuronal cells, which differs from that identified in adult or fetal brain with DS. The aberrant protein expression in early differentiating neurons, due to the hChr21 gene dosage effects or chromosomal imbalance, may affect neuronal outgrowth, proliferation and differentiation, producing developmental abnormalities in neural patterning, which eventually leads to formation of a suboptimal functioning neuronal network in DS.

  3. Cerebral peritumoral oedema study: Does a single dynamic MR sequence assessing perfusion and permeability can help to differentiate glioblastoma from metastasis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, Pierre; Saliou, Guillaume; Marco, Giovanni de; Monet, Pauline; Souraya, Stoquart-Elsankari; Bruniau, Alexis; Vallée, Jean Noel; Ducreux, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to differentiate glioblastoma from metastasis using a single dynamic MR sequence to assess perfusion and permeability parameters. 24 patients with glioblastoma or cerebral metastasis with peritumoral oedema were recruited and explored with a 3 T MR unit. Post processing used DPTools software. Regions of interest were drawn around contrast enhancement to assess relative cerebral blood volume and permeability parameters. Around the contrast enhancement Glioblastoma present high rCBV with modification of the permeability, metastasis present slight modified rCBV without modification of permeability. In conclusion, peritumoral T2 hypersignal exploration associating morphological MR and functional MR parameters can help to differentiate cerebral metastasis from glioblastoma.

  4. Introduction to differentiable manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Louis

    2009-01-01

    The first book to treat manifold theory at an introductory level, this text surveys basic concepts in the modern approach to differential geometry. The first six chapters define and illustrate differentiable manifolds, and the final four chapters investigate the roles of differential structures in a variety of situations.Starting with an introduction to differentiable manifolds and their tangent spaces, the text examines Euclidean spaces, their submanifolds, and abstract manifolds. Succeeding chapters explore the tangent bundle and vector fields and discuss their association with ordinary diff

  5. Stepping Outside The Ordinary Expectations of Schooling: Effect on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eric Wilmot

    Stepping outside the ordinary expectations of schooling: effect of school language on assessment of children's knowledge of mathematics in ... of questions regarding how children's learning could be affected if school language, the primary ... It is this difficulty that this study sought to unearth in order to bring to the fore the ...

  6. 24 April 2018: Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, 24 April 2018 from 14.00 to 16.00, Main Auditorium, Meyrin (500-1-001). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its management, and an opportunity to express your opinion, particularly by taking part in votes. Other items are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Ordinary members (MPE) of the SA can take part in all votes. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give their opinion, and how? The Ordinary General Assembly is also the opportunity for members of the SA to express themselves through the addition of discus...

  7. 24 April 2018: Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Thursday, 24 April 2018 from 14.00 to 16.00, Main Auditorium, Meyrin (500-1-001). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its management, and an opportunity to express your opinion, particularly by taking part in votes. Other items are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Ordinary members (MPE) of the SA can take part in all votes. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give their opinion, and how? The Ordinary General Assembly is also the opportunity for members of the SA to express themselves through the addition of disc...

  8. Generalized mechanics as a representation of the ordinary mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapecz, G.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that the generalized mechanics of one masspoint may be interpreted as a special representation of the ordinary mechanics of a system of masspoints. The hormorphism of both representations is shown in the case of two masspoints coupled by a harmonic force. The new representation is applied in the special relativic meachanics of mass-points. (author)

  9. Comparison of Ordinary Kriging and Multiple Indicator Kriging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael O. Mensah

    Al-Hassan, S. and Boamah, E. (2015), “Comparison of Ordinary Kriging and Multiple Indicator Kriging. Estimates of Asuadai Deposit at Adansi Gold ... Adubia, Abore, and a new deposit, Asuadai. The company now wants to evaluate the ... 2 shows the drill hole layout in plan. The holes were drilled on a grid of 25 m by 25 m ...

  10. Screening and classification of ordinary chondrites by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittarello, Lidia; Baert, Kitty; Debaille, Vinciane; Claeys, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Classification of ordinary chondrite meteorites generally implies (1) determining the chemical group by the composition in endmembers of olivine and pyroxene, and (2) identifying the petrologic group by microstructural features. The composition of olivine and pyroxene is commonly obtained by microprobe analyses or oil immersion of mineral separates. We propose Raman spectroscopy as an alternative technique to determine the endmember content of olivine and pyroxene in ordinary chondrites, by using the link between the wavelength shift of selected characteristic peaks in the spectra of olivine and pyroxene and the Mg/Fe ratio in these phases. The existing correlation curve has been recalculated from the Raman spectrum of reference minerals of known composition and further refined for the range of chondritic compositions. Although the technique is not as accurate as the microprobe for determining the composition of olivine and pyroxene, for most of the samples the chemical group can be easily determined by Raman spectroscopy. Blind tests with ordinary chondrites of different provenance, weathering, and shock stages have confirmed the potential of the method. Therefore, we suggest that a preliminary screening and the classification of most of the equilibrated ordinary chondrites can be carried out using an optical microscope equipped with a Raman spectrometer.

  11. Comparative study of the properties of ordinary portland cement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study explored metakaolin as alternative material to cement. It compares the properties of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) concrete and binary concrete containing metakaolin as partial replacement of OPC. Two set of concrete samples; one with 10% Metakaolin (MK) replacing OPC by weight, and the other without ...

  12. Learning to Compute: Computerization and Ordinary, Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    This study utilizes the basic framework of classical sociology as a foundation for examining the intersection of the structural history of the computer revolution with ordinary, everyday life. Just as the classical forefathers of modern sociology--Marx, Durkheim, and Weber--attempted to understand their eras of structural transformation, this…

  13. 29 CFR 785.35 - Home to work; ordinary situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... travel which is a normal incident of employment. This is true whether he works at a fixed location or at different job sites. Normal travel from home to work is not worktime. ... Principles Traveltime § 785.35 Home to work; ordinary situation. An employee who travels from home before his...

  14. "Solid All the Way Through": Margaret Mahy's Ordinary Witches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Alison

    2004-01-01

    In "The Haunting," "The Changeover," and "The Tricksters," Margaret Mahy fuses supernatural iconography of witchcraft and magic with images of ordinary and domestic adolescence. This article argues that Mahy's "fantastic realism" illuminates aspects of female teenage experience through a blend of myth, fairy tale, folklore and history, as well as…

  15. Indigenous plant-derived medicine used by ordinary community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Research on medical ethnobotany shows that ordinary community members in the rural areas have knowledge of self preventive care which is accomplished through administration of plant medicine to prevent the onset of disease and create a sense of well being. Several medicinal plants and traditional ...

  16. Stochastic Differential Equations in Banach Spaces : Decoupling, Delay Equations, and Approximations in Space and Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, S.G.

    2012-01-01

    The thesis deals with various aspects of the study of stochastic partial differential equations driven by Gaussian noise. The approach taken is functional analytic rather than probabilistic: the stochastic partial differential equation is interpreted as an ordinary stochastic differential equation

  17. Image charge effects in single-molecule junctions: Breaking of symmetries and negative-differential resistance in a benzene single-electron transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Flensberg, K.

    2011-01-01

    blockade regime. This results in the appearance of a so-called blocking state, which gives rise to negative-differential resistance (NDR). We show that the appearance of NDR and its magnitude in the symmetry-broken benzene SET depends in a complicated way on the interplay between the many-body matrix...

  18. No effect of traction in patients with low back pain: a single centre, single blind, randomized controlled trial of Intervertebral Differential Dynamics Therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, J.J.; Kleuver, M. de; Horsting, P.P.; Spruit-van Eijk, M.; Jacobs, W.C.; Limbeek, J. van

    2009-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) poses a significant problem to society. Although initial conservative therapy may be beneficial, persisting chronic LBP still frequently leads to expensive invasive intervention. A novel non-invasive therapy that focuses on discogenic LBP is Intervertebral Differential Dynamics

  19. Differentiation of real functions

    CERN Document Server

    Bruckner, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    Topics related to the differentiation of real functions have received considerable attention during the last few decades. This book provides an efficient account of the present state of the subject. Bruckner addresses in detail the problems that arise when dealing with the class \\Delta ' of derivatives, a class that is difficult to handle for a number of reasons. Several generalized forms of differentiation have assumed importance in the solution of various problems. Some generalized derivatives are excellent substitutes for the ordinary derivative when the latter is not known to exist; others are not. Bruckner studies generalized derivatives and indicates "geometric" conditions that determine whether or not a generalized derivative will be a good substitute for the ordinary derivative. There are a number of classes of functions closely linked to differentiation theory, and these are examined in some detail. The book unifies many important results from the literature as well as some results not previously pub...

  20. Development of an embryoid body-based screening strategy for assessing the hepatocyte differentiation potential of human embryonic stem cells following single-cell dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhough, Sebastian; Bradburn, Helen; Gardner, John; Hay, David C

    2013-02-01

    We have devised an embryoid body-based screening method for the selection of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines capable of forming functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) after single-cell dissociation. The screening method highlighted one cell line from a panel of five that produced albumin-positive cells during embryoid body (EB) formation. Cell lines that did not produce albumin-positive cells during EB formation were shown to respond less well to directed differentiation following single-cell replating. Additionally, the seeding density of the pluripotent populations prior to differentiation was shown to exert a significant effect on the hepatic function of the final population of cells. In summary, we have developed a simple procedure that facilitates the identification of human hESC lines that tolerate single-cell replating and are capable of differentiating to HLCs. Although the hepatic function of cells produced by this method is ∼10-fold lower than our current gold standard stem cell-derived models, we believe that these findings represent an incremental step toward producing HLCs at scale.

  1. The Comparative Analysis of Aversive and Ordinary Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, C. Marion, Jr.

    There is a vast amount of literature concerning the psychological and physiological effects of ordinary noise on the individual. However, few publications have addressed the analysis of aversive noise. This research analyzes three noises which produce the familiar goose flesh or chilling effect responsivity. These aversive sounds which are made by chalk squeaking on the chalkboard, fingernails on the chalkboard and rubbing styrofoam against a smooth surface are digitally compared to ordinary noise to show how these aversive sounds differ from sounds which are only annoying. This work, which uses Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis is a combination with cross correlation analysis and other innovative methods to produce comparative data on noises, illustrates subtle differences between ordinary and aversive noise which may be useful for future work in acoustics or experimental psychology. The literature review shows disagreement among the numerous works on the effects of ordinary noise on human subjects. One explanation for this difference is the failure to adequately measure and define the dynamic nature of the noise used. The existing literature also establishes that a mixture of tones plus random noise is more annoying (but not aversive) than either the random noise or the tones alone. This investigation shows that one property of aversive noises is the combination of randomness plus tones which vary rapidly with time. This paper utilizes a new digital technique which improves the FFT analyzer resolution by a factor of 25. The resulting +/-2 Hz accuracy facilitated the presentation of frequency variation as a function of time data. Other computer generated graphical data includes the percent harmonic deviation as a function of time, the rate of change of fundamental frequency, and the rate of change in harmonic deviation. From these dynamic data, average values are calculated which show the aversive noise to be consistently greater in mean frequency deviation

  2. The Bessel polynomials and their differential operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onyango Otieno, V.P.

    1987-10-01

    Differential operators associated with the ordinary and the generalized Bessel polynomials are defined. In each case the commutator bracket is constructed and shows that the differential operators associated with the Bessel polynomials and their generalized form are not commutative. Some applications of these operators to linear differential equations are also discussed. (author). 4 refs

  3. Types of work-related behavior and experiences and stress coping strategies among single mothers and mothers in relationships differentiating role of work satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napora, Elżbieta; Andruszkiewicz, Anna; Basińska, Małgorzata Anna

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study has been to describe functioning of single and mothers in relationships (married or in informal relationships) at work and verify if the declared degree of work satisfaction differentiates types of behavior at work and stress coping strategies in both groups of mothers. The study was conducted on equal samples of single mothers (N = 186) and mothers from 2-parent families (N = 186) using Latack Coping Scale that measures work-related stress coping strategies, the AVEM (Arbeitsbezogenes Verhaltens- und Erlebensmuster - Work-Related Behavior and Experience Pattern) questionnaire, and a survey. It showed similarity between the studied groups in terms of the measured variables. There were considerable differences between single and married mothers in terms of support seeking strategies. The interaction of work satisfaction and the type of motherhood significantly differentiates (p = 0.03) the avoidance strategy of resignation. That strategy of resignation was more frequently used by single mothers with lower work satisfaction, who were distinctly different from those whose work satisfaction was higher, and from the mothers in relationships (married or in informal relationships) (regardless of the level of their work satisfaction). Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2018;31(1):55-69. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  4. The Impact of Electronic Medical Records on Hospital-Acquired Adverse Safety Events: Differential Effects Between Single-Source and Multiple-Source Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jaeyong; Rask, Kimberly J; Becker, Edmund R

    The objective was to examine differential impacts between single-source and multiple-source electronic medical record (EMR) systems, as measured by number of vendor products, on hospital-acquired patient safety events. The data source was the 2009-2010 State Inpatient Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project for California, New York, and Florida, and the Information Technology Supplement to the American Hospital Association's Annual Survey. Multivariable regression analyses were conducted to estimate the differential impacts of EMRs between single-source and multiple-source EMR systems on hospital-acquired patient safety events. In all, 1.98% of adult surgery hospitalizations had at least 1 hospital-acquired patient safety event. Basic EMRs with a single vendor or self-developed EMR systems were associated with a significant decrease in patient safety events by 0.38 percentage point, or 19.2%, whereas basic EMRs with multiple vendors had an insignificant association. A single-source EMR system enhances the impact of EMRs on reducing patient safety events.

  5. In vivo single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy in the differentiation of high-grade gliomas and solitary metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, G.; Sun, B.; Wu, Z.; Guo, Q.; Guo, Y.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS) could be used to differentiate gliomas from metastases on the basis of differences in metabolite levels in the different involved regions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-two patients (age range from 32 to 62 years, with a median age of 46.7 years) with a solitary brain tumour (14 gliomas, eight metastases) underwent conventional, gadolinium-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted images, and 1HMRS before surgical resection. Spectra from the enhancing tumour, the peritumoural region, and normal brain were obtained from 1HMRS. A point resolved spectroscopy sequence was required for 1HMRS. The metabolites in the spectra include: N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (CHO), creatine compounds (CR), myo-inositol (MI), lactate (LAC), glutamate and glutamine (Glu-n). Relative concentrations of metabolites were related to the peak area, and expressed with reference to CR. Student's t-test was used to determine whether there was a statistically significant difference in relative metabolic ratios between high-grade gliomas and metastases. Meanwhile, 16 of all 22 patients were re-examined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 6 months of surgical resection. Recurrence was present in three patients (two gliomas, one metastasis). RESULTS: Of the 14 patients with gliomas, the peaks of NAA were reduced in three cases; the peaks of LAC, which were elevated, appeared as typical double-peaks in the peritumoural region in nine cases; the peaks of Glu-n, which were also elevated, had a zigzag appearance in seven cases. The peaks of MI were increased in the tumoural region in eight cases, and CHO levels were elevated in all 14 cases. Of the eight patients with metastases, Glu-n peaks in the tumoural region in three cases and CHO peaks in the tumoural region in four cases were elevated, respectively, while the peaks of CR were reduced in three cases, and the peaks of NAA were markedly reduced in four cases within

  6. Multiple and fast: The accretion of ordinary chondrite parent bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernazza, P.; Barge, P.; Zanda, B.; Hewins, R.; Binzel, R. P.; DeMeo, F. E.; Lockhart, M.; Hiroi, T.; Birlan, M.; Ricci, L.

    2014-01-01

    Although petrologic, chemical, and isotopic studies of ordinary chondrites and meteorites in general have largely helped establish a chronology of the earliest events of planetesimal formation and their evolution, there are several questions that cannot be resolved via laboratory measurements and/or experiments alone. Here, we propose the rationale for several new constraints on the formation and evolution of ordinary chondrite parent bodies (and, by extension, most planetesimals) from newly available spectral measurements and mineralogical analysis of main-belt S-type asteroids (83 objects) and unequilibrated ordinary chondrite meteorites (53 samples). Based on the latter, we suggest that spectral data may be used to distinguish whether an ordinary chondrite was formed near the surface or in the interior of its parent body. If these constraints are correct, the suggested implications include that: (1) large groups of compositionally similar asteroids are a natural outcome of planetesimal formation and, consequently, meteorites within a given class can originate from multiple parent bodies; (2) the surfaces of large (up to ∼200 km) S-type main-belt asteroids mostly expose the interiors of the primordial bodies, a likely consequence of impacts by small asteroids (D < 10 km) in the early solar system; (3) the duration of accretion of the H chondrite parent bodies was likely short (instantaneous or in less than ∼10 5 yr, but certainly not as long as 1 Myr); (4) LL-like bodies formed closer to the Sun than H-like bodies, a possible consequence of the radial mixing and size sorting of chondrules in the protoplanetary disk prior to accretion.

  7. Shock veins in the Sahara 02500 ordinary chondrite

    OpenAIRE

    Owocki, Krzysztof; Muszyński, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    A specimen of the Sahara 02500 ordinary chondrite contains shock-produced veins consisting of recrystallised fine- grained pyroxenes that include small droplets of Ni-rich metal. Non-melted olivines and pyroxenes show planar deformations filled by shock-melted and -polluted metal and troilite. Shock-melted feldspathic glass is present close to the shock veins. Geothermometric estimations indicate that the meteorite locally experienced moderate shock metamorphism with a minimum loc...

  8. Hypothesis Testing of Parameters for Ordinary Linear Circular Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Ghapor Hussin

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the hypothesis testing of parameters for ordinary linear circular regression model assuming the circular random error distributed as von Misses distribution. The main interests are in testing of the intercept and slope parameter of the regression line. As an illustration, this hypothesis testing will be used in analyzing the wind and wave direction data recorded by two different techniques which are HF radar system and anchored wave buoy.

  9. Ordinary or peculiar men? Comparing the customers of prostitutes with a nationally representative sample of men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monto, Martin A; Milrod, Christine

    2014-07-01

    Recent media attention implies that prostitution seeking is widespread, an "ordinary" aspect of masculine sexual behavior. Other accounts suggest that customers are "peculiar," characterized by distinct qualities, perversions, or psychological impairments. Using the nationally representative General Social Survey (GSS), this study demonstrates that prostitution seeking is relatively uncommon. Only about 14% of men in the United States report having ever paid for sex, and only 1% report having done so during the previous year. Furthermore, this study dissects whether customers are ordinary or peculiar by comparing a new sample of active customers who solicit sex on the Internet with an older sample of arrested customers, a sample of customers from the GSS, and a nationally representative sample of noncustomers. The customers of Internet sexual service providers differed greatly from men in general and also from other customers. The remaining samples of customers differed slightly from noncustomers in general. We argue for a balanced perspective that recognizes the significant variety among customers. There is no evidence of a peculiar quality that differentiates customers in general from men who have not paid for sex. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Single-Cell Gene Expression Analysis of a Human ESC Model of Pancreatic Endocrine Development Reveals Different Paths to β-Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Maja Borup Kjær; Azad, Ajuna; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Hess, Katja; Hansson, Mattias; Grapin-Botton, Anne; Honoré, Christian

    2017-10-10

    The production of insulin-producing β cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in vitro represents a promising strategy for a cell-based therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus. To explore the cellular heterogeneity and temporal progression of endocrine progenitors and their progeny, we performed single-cell qPCR on more than 500 cells across several stages of in vitro differentiation of hESCs and compared them with human islets. We reveal distinct subpopulations along the endocrine differentiation path and an early lineage bifurcation toward either polyhormonal cells or β-like cells. We uncover several similarities and differences with mouse development and reveal that cells can take multiple paths to the same differentiation state, a principle that could be relevant to other systems. Notably, activation of the key β-cell transcription factor NKX6.1 can be initiated before or after endocrine commitment. The single-cell temporal resolution we provide can be used to improve the production of functional β cells. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 76 FR 40451 - Agency Information Collection (Application for Ordinary Life Insurance) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Application for Ordinary Life Insurance) Activity Under OMB Review... INFORMATION: Titles a. Application for Ordinary Life Insurance, Replacement Insurance for Modified Life Reduced at Age 65, National Service Life Insurance, VA Form 29-8485. b. Application for Ordinary Life...

  12. Praying "Online": The Ordinary Theology of Prayer Intentions Posted on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ap Sion, Tania; Edwards, Owen

    2012-01-01

    Astley's construct of ordinary theology takes seriously listening to the religious expression and experience of ordinary people, both churched and unchurched. One method by which this has already been achieved is through the empirical analysis of the content of ordinary people's intercessory prayer requests left in hospitals and churches. Building…

  13. Differential manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Kosinski, Antoni A

    2007-01-01

    The concepts of differential topology form the center of many mathematical disciplines such as differential geometry and Lie group theory. Differential Manifolds presents to advanced undergraduates and graduate students the systematic study of the topological structure of smooth manifolds. Author Antoni A. Kosinski, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Rutgers University, offers an accessible approach to both the h-cobordism theorem and the classification of differential structures on spheres.""How useful it is,"" noted the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, ""to have a single, sho

  14. Poorly Differentiated Ovarian Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumor in a 16-Year-Old Single Woman: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abu-Zaid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor (SLCT of ovary is an exceedingly unusual neoplasm that belongs to a group of sex cord-stromal tumors of ovary and accounts for less than 0.5% of all primary ovarian neoplasms. Very few case reports have been documented in the literature so far. Herein, we report a case of primary poorly differentiated ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor (SLCT involving the left ovary in a 16-year-old single woman who presented with a 3-month history of a pelviabdominal mass, acne, hirsutism, and menstrual irregularities. In addition, a literature review on ovarian SLCTs is provided.

  15. Design and simulations of a spectral efficient optical code division multiple access scheme using alternated energy differentiation and single-user soft-decision demodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Garba, Aminata

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to optical Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) network transmission scheme using alternated amplitude sequences and energy differentiation at the transmitters to allow concurrent and secure transmission of several signals. The proposed system uses error control encoding and soft-decision demodulation to reduce the multi-user interference at the receivers. The design of the proposed alternated amplitude sequences, the OCDMA energy modulators and the soft decision, single-user demodulators are also presented. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme allows achieving spectral efficiencies higher than several reported results for optical CDMA and much higher than the Gaussian CDMA capacity limit.

  16. Vibration modes of a single plate with general boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phamová L.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with free flexural vibration modes and natural frequencies of a thin plate with general boundary conditions — a simply supported plate connected to its surroundings with torsional springs. Vibration modes were derived on the basis of the Rajalingham, Bhat and Xistris approach. This approach was originally used for a clamped thin plate, so its adaptation was needed. The plate vibration function was usually expressed as a single partial differential equation. This partial differential equation was transformed into two ordinary differential equations that can be solved in the simpler way. Theoretical background of the computations is briefly described. Vibration modes of the supported plate with torsional springs are presented graphically and numerically for three different values of stiffness of torsional springs.

  17. Relaxations in spin glasses: Similarities and differences from ordinary glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngai, K.L.; Rajagopal, A.K.; Huang, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Relaxation phenomena have become a major concern in the physics of spin glasses. There are certain resemblances of these relaxation properties to those of ordinary glasses. In this work, we compare the relaxation properties of spin glasses near the freezing temperature with those of glasses near the glass transition temperature. There are similarities between the two types of glasses. Moreover, the relaxation properties of many glasses and spin glasses are in conformity with two coupled ''universality'' relations predicted by a recent model of relaxations in condensed matter

  18. Representation invariant Geometrothermodynamics: Applications to ordinary thermodynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravetti, Alessandro; Lopez-Monsalvo, Cesar S.; Nettel, Francisco; Quevedo, Hernando

    2014-07-01

    In this work we employ a recently devised metric within the Geometrothermodynamics program to study ordinary thermodynamic systems. The new feature of this metric is that, in addition to Legendre symmetry, it exhibits invariance under a change of representation. This metric was derived in a previous work by the authors while addressing the problem of the conformal structure of the thermodynamic metrics for different representations. Here, we present a thorough analysis for the ideal gas, the van der Waals fluid, the one dimensional Ising model and some other systems of cosmological interest.

  19. Oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrules in Allende and ordinary chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Molini-Velsko, C.; Onuma, N.; Ikeda, Y.; Olsen, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    The ferromagnesian chondrules in Allende follow a trend in the oxygen three-isotope plot that diverges significantly from the 16-O mixing line defined by light and dark inclusions and the matrix of the meteorite. The trend probably results from isotopic exchange with an external gaseous reservoir during the process of chondrule formation sometime after the establishment of the isotopic compositions of the inclusions and matrix. The Allende chondrules approach, but do not reach, the isotopic compositions of chondrules in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites, implying exchange with a similar ambient gas, but isotopically different solid precursors for the two types of meteorite.

  20. A systematic investigation of differential effects of cell culture substrates on the extent of artifacts in single-molecule tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Zanetti-Domingues

    Full Text Available Single-molecule techniques are being increasingly applied to biomedical investigation, notwithstanding the numerous challenges they pose in terms of signal-to-noise ratio issues. Non-specific binding of probes to glass substrates, in particular, can produce experimental artifacts due to spurious molecules on glass, which can be particularly deleterious in live-cell tracking experiments. In order to resolve the issue of non-specific probe binding to substrates, we performed systematic testing of a range of available surface coatings, using three different proteins, and then extended our assessment to the ability of these coatings to foster cell growth and retain non-adhesive properties. Linear PEG, a passivating agent commonly used both in immobilized-molecule single-molecule techniques and in tissue engineering, is able to both successfully repel non-specific adhesion of fluorescent probes and to foster cell growth when functionalized with appropriate adhesive peptides. Linear PEG treatment results in a significant reduction of tracking artifacts in EGFR tracking with Affibody ligands on a cell line expressing EGFR-eGFP. The findings reported herein could be beneficial to a large number of experimental situations where single-molecule or single-particle precision is required.

  1. Diagnostic whole body scan (pre-therapy scan) in differentiated thyroid cancer: A single center community hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, P; Driscoll, H K; Venkatraman, P

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic whole body scan (pre-therapy scan) with either I-123 or I-131 (radioactive isotopes of iodine) is performed to assess the extent of thyroid cancer especially distant metastasis prior to administering the therapeutic dose of I-131. Our aim of the following study was to determine the utility of the diagnostic pre-therapy scan in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer. It was a case-control study carried out by retrospective chart review, of a randomly selected 100 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who had followed in our community hospital over the course of 1 year. We collected data on multiple variables in the subjects - including age, gender, pre-operative size of the nodules, diagnosis, stage of the malignancy, size of the tumor, multifocality, lymphovascular invasion, dose of radioiodine used for remnant ablation, recurrence rates and persistence rates. Continuous variables were compared using the independent sample Mann-Whitney U-test whereas the Chi-square test was used for nominal variables. The mean dose of radioactive iodine administered was 97.56 (±27.98) in the pre-therapy scan group and it was 97.23 (±32.40) in the control group. There was no difference between the two groups (P - 0.45). There was also no difference in the recurrence rates between the groups (P = 1.0). There was a trend toward a higher degree of persistent cancer in the group that had the pre-therapy scans (P - 0.086). Pre-therapy scan may not affect the dose of radio-iodine I-131 used for remnant ablation of differentiated thyroid cancer and does not influence the recurrence rates. This was especially true with respect to I-131 remnant ablation for low risk tumors.

  2. Influence of fly-ashes on properties of ordinary concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutkowska Gabriela

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Influence of fly-ashes on properties of ordinary concretes. Care of the environment in accordance with the principles of sustainable development introduces the possibility and need for waste recycling. The construction and building materials industry has the greatest potential for reuse of waste. The article presents the results of investigations of selected properties (consistency, water absorbability, compressive strength and tensile strength after 28 and 56 days of curing, depth of penetration of ordinary concretes and concretes containing fly-ashes - calcareous and siliceous ash − in their composition. To make the samples, the Portland cement CEM I 42.5 R and natural aggregate with graining of 0-16 mm were used. The concrete with siliceous and calcareous admixtures was made in three lots where the ash was added in the quantity of 15, 20 and 30% of the cement mass. After the tests, it was stated that the fly-ash admixture does not increase the air content in the mix, it increases the compressive strength in time and the siliceous ash improves the splitting tensile strength.

  3. Magnetic classification of stony meteorites: 2. Non-ordinary chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Pierre; Gattacceca, JéRôMe; Bonal, Lydie; Bourot-Denise, MichèLe; Chevrier, Vincent; Clerc, Jean-Pierre; Consolmagno, Guy; Folco, Luigi; Gounelle, Matthieu; Kohout, Tomas; Pesonen, Lauri; Quirico, Eric; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Skripnik, Anna

    2008-05-01

    A database of magnetic susceptibility (χ) measurements on different non-ordinary chondrites (C, E, R, and ungrouped) populations is presented and compared to our previous similar work on ordinary chondrites. It provides an exhaustive study of the amount of iron-nickel magnetic phases (essentially metal and magnetite) in these meteorites. In contrast with all the other classes, CM and CV show a wide range of magnetic mineral content, with a two orders of magnitude variation of χ. Whether this is due to primary parent body differences, metamorphism or alteration, remains unclear. C3-4 and C2 yield similar χ values to the ones shown by CK and CM, respectively. By order of increasing χ, the classes with well-grouped χ are: R Meteorite Hills (MET) 01149, and Northwest Africa (NWA) 521 (CK), Asuka (A)-88198, LaPaz Icefield (LAP) 031156, and Sahara 98248 (R). χ values can also be used to define affinities of ungrouped chondrites, and propose pairing, particularly in the case of CM and CV meteorites.

  4. Reflection and absorption of ordinary waves in an inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croci, R.

    1990-11-01

    This study treats the system of Vlasov and Maxwell equations for the Fourier transform in space and time of a plasma referred to Cartesian coordinates with the coordinate z parallel to the uniform equilibrium magnetic field with the equilibrium plasma density dependent on ηx, where η is a parameter. The k y component of the wave vector is taken equal to zero, whereas k z is different from zero. When the interaction of ordinary and extraordinary waves is neglected, the Fourier transform of the electric field of the ordinary waves obeys a homogeneous integral equation with principal part integrals, which is solved in the case of weak absorption and sufficiently small η (essentially smaller than vacuum wave vector), but without limitations on the ratio of the wavelength to the Larmor radius (the usual approximation being limited to wavelengths much smaller than the Larmor radius). The reflection and transmission coefficients and the total energy absorption are given in this approximation, whereas the energy conservation theorem for the reflection and transmission coefficients in an absorption-free plasma are derived for every value of η without explicit knowledge of the solutions. Finally, a general and compact equation for the eigenvalues which does not require complex analysis and knowledge of all solutions of the dispersion relation is given. (orig.)

  5. Secreted protein gene derived-single nucleotide polymorphisms (SP-SNPs) reveal population diversity and differentiation of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chongjing; Wan, Anmin; Wang, Meinan; Jiwan, Derick A; See, Deven R; Chen, Xianming

    2016-05-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is a powerful molecular marker technique that has been widely used in population genetics and molecular mapping studies for various organisms. However, the technique has not been used for studying Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), the wheat stripe rust pathogen. In this study, we developed over a hundred secreted protein gene-derived SNP (SP-SNP) markers and used 92 markers to study the population structure of Pst. From 352 isolates collected in the United States, we identified 242 multi-locus genotypes. The SP-SNP genotypes had a moderate, but significant correlation with the virulence phenotype data. Clustering of the multi-locus genotypes was consistent by various analyses, revealing distinct genetic groups. Analysis of molecular variance detected significant differences between the eastern and western US Pst populations. High heterozygosity was found in the US population with significant differences identified among epidemiological regions. Analysis of population differentiation revealed that populations between the eastern and western US were highly differentiated while moderate differentiation was found in populations within the western or eastern US. Isolates from the western US were more diverse than isolates from the eastern US. The information is useful for guiding the disease management in different epidemiological regions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. On the relation between elementary partial difference equations and partial differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, I.P.

    1998-01-01

    The nonstandard stroboscopy method links discrete-time ordinary difference equations of first-order and continuous-time, ordinary differential equations of first order. We extend this method to the second order, and also to an elementary, yet general class of partial difference/differential

  7. Differential single-top-quark cross sections in t channel at 8 and 13 TeV with the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Komm, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The production of single top quarks in high energy collision events is a unique process to investigate the strength and structure of electroweak interactions. This thesis encompasses first measurements of differential single-top-quark cross sections in t channel which have been performed using data collected at center-of-mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV with the CMS detector at CERN, Switzerland. The electroweak coupling structure of the standard model of particle physics predicts only left-handed top quarks or right-handed top antiquarks to participate in electroweak interactions, resulting in the production of highly polarized top quarks via t channel. The degree of polarization is studied by measuring the cross section as a function of the polarization angle, defined as the angle between the charged lepton from the top quark decay and a spectator quark which is produced in association with the top quark. The differential cross section as a function of the polarization angle is measured in 8 TeV d...

  8. Online differentiation of mineral phase in aerosol particles by ion formation mechanism using a LAAP-TOF single-particle mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Marsden

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineralogy of silicate mineral dust has a strong influence on climate and ecosystems due to variation in physiochemical properties that result from differences in composition and crystal structure (mineral phase. Traditional offline methods of analysing mineral phase are labour intensive and the temporal resolution of the data is much longer than many atmospheric processes. Single-particle mass spectrometry (SPMS is an established technique for the online size-resolved measurement of particle composition by laser desorption ionisation (LDI followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS. Although non-quantitative, the technique is able to identify the presence of silicate minerals in airborne dust particles from markers of alkali metals and silicate molecular ions in the mass spectra. However, the differentiation of mineral phase in silicate particles by traditional mass spectral peak area measurements is not possible. This is because instrument function and matrix effects in the ionisation process result in variations in instrument response that are greater than the differences in composition between common mineral phases.In this study, we introduce a novel technique that enables the differentiation of mineral phase in silicate mineral particles by ion formation mechanism measured from subtle changes in ion arrival times at the TOF-MS detector. Using a combination of peak area and peak centroid measurements, we show that the arrangement of the interstitial alkali metals in the crystal structure, an important property in silicate mineralogy, influences the ion arrival times of elemental and molecular ion species in the negative ion mass spectra. A classification scheme is presented that allowed for the differentiation of illite–smectite, kaolinite and feldspar minerals on a single-particle basis. Online analysis of mineral dust aerosol generated from clay mineral standards produced mineral fractions that are in agreement with bulk

  9. Online differentiation of mineral phase in aerosol particles by ion formation mechanism using a LAAP-TOF single-particle mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Nicholas A.; Flynn, Michael J.; Allan, James D.; Coe, Hugh

    2018-01-01

    Mineralogy of silicate mineral dust has a strong influence on climate and ecosystems due to variation in physiochemical properties that result from differences in composition and crystal structure (mineral phase). Traditional offline methods of analysing mineral phase are labour intensive and the temporal resolution of the data is much longer than many atmospheric processes. Single-particle mass spectrometry (SPMS) is an established technique for the online size-resolved measurement of particle composition by laser desorption ionisation (LDI) followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). Although non-quantitative, the technique is able to identify the presence of silicate minerals in airborne dust particles from markers of alkali metals and silicate molecular ions in the mass spectra. However, the differentiation of mineral phase in silicate particles by traditional mass spectral peak area measurements is not possible. This is because instrument function and matrix effects in the ionisation process result in variations in instrument response that are greater than the differences in composition between common mineral phases.In this study, we introduce a novel technique that enables the differentiation of mineral phase in silicate mineral particles by ion formation mechanism measured from subtle changes in ion arrival times at the TOF-MS detector. Using a combination of peak area and peak centroid measurements, we show that the arrangement of the interstitial alkali metals in the crystal structure, an important property in silicate mineralogy, influences the ion arrival times of elemental and molecular ion species in the negative ion mass spectra. A classification scheme is presented that allowed for the differentiation of illite-smectite, kaolinite and feldspar minerals on a single-particle basis. Online analysis of mineral dust aerosol generated from clay mineral standards produced mineral fractions that are in agreement with bulk measurements reported by

  10. Nonlinear differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics.

  11. Differential interaction kinetics of a bipolar structure-specific endonuclease with DNA flaps revealed by single-molecule imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Rezgui

    Full Text Available As DNA repair enzymes are essential for preserving genome integrity, understanding their substrate interaction dynamics and the regulation of their catalytic mechanisms is crucial. Using single-molecule imaging, we investigated the association and dissociation kinetics of the bipolar endonuclease NucS from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab on 5' and 3'-flap structures under various experimental conditions. We show that association of the PabNucS with ssDNA flaps is largely controlled by diffusion in the NucS-DNA energy landscape and does not require a free 5' or 3' extremity. On the other hand, NucS dissociation is independent of the flap length and thus independent of sliding on the single-stranded portion of the flapped DNA substrates. Our kinetic measurements have revealed previously unnoticed asymmetry in dissociation kinetics from these substrates that is markedly modulated by the replication clamp PCNA. We propose that the replication clamp PCNA enhances the cleavage specificity of NucS proteins by accelerating NucS loading at the ssDNA/dsDNA junctions and by minimizing the nuclease interaction time with its DNA substrate. Our data are also consistent with marked reorganization of ssDNA and nuclease domains occurring during NucS catalysis, and indicate that NucS binds its substrate directly at the ssDNA-dsDNA junction and then threads the ssDNA extremity into the catalytic site. The powerful techniques used here for probing the dynamics of DNA-enzyme binding at the single-molecule have provided new insight regarding substrate specificity of NucS nucleases.

  12. On the Inclusion of Difference Equation Problems and Z Transform Methods in Sophomore Differential Equation Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoye, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, I started covering difference equations and z transform methods in my introductory differential equations course. This allowed my students to extend the "classical" methods for (ordinary differential equation) ODE's to discrete time problems arising in many applications.

  13. Selected papers on analysis and differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Society, American Mathematical

    2010-01-01

    This volume contains translations of papers that originally appeared in the Japanese journal Sūgaku. These papers range over a variety of topics in ordinary and partial differential equations, and in analysis. Many of them are survey papers presenting new results obtained in the last few years. This volume is suitable for graduate students and research mathematicians interested in analysis and differential equations.

  14. Recombinant human TSH-aided radioiodine treatment of advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma: a single-centre study of 54 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarzab, Barbara; Handkiewicz-Junak, Daria; Roskosz, Jozef; Puch, Zbigniew; Wygoda, Zbigniew; Kukulska, Aleksandra; Jurecka-Lubieniecka, Beata; Hasse-Lazar, Kornelia; Turska, Maria; Zajusz, Aleksander

    2003-01-01

    In 54 consecutive patients who had retained bulky metastatic and/or locoregional lesions of DTC despite the exhaustion of other therapeutic options, we gave one to four courses of two consecutive daily intramuscular injections of rhTSH, 0.9 mg, followed by a therapeutic activity of 131 I per os on day 3. Fifty patients had received prior radioiodine treatment aided by l-thyroxine (T 4 ) withdrawal. We included in the study 23 patients who had received a trial of isotretinoin therapy for re-differentiation of confirmed de-differentiated metastases. In a blinded, within-patient comparison of post-therapy whole-body scans after the first rhTSH-aided and latest withdrawal-aided treatments in patients with functional metastases at baseline, 18 of 27 (67%) scan pairs were concordant, four (15%) were discordant in favour of the rhTSH-aided scan and five (19%) were discordant in favour of the withdrawal-aided scan. In total, 37 (74%) of 50 paired scans were concordant, eight (16%) favoured rhTSH and five (10%) favoured withdrawal. All differences appeared to be attributable to clinical causes, not to any difference between endogenous and exogenous TSH stimulation. Reflecting the biochemical activity of rhTSH and the release of thyroglobulin (Tg) due to tumour destruction, median serum Tg concentration rose approximately fourfold between baseline and day 6 of the rhTSH-aided treatment course. rhTSH was well tolerated, with mostly minor, transient toxicity, except for neck oedema in three patients with neck infiltrates and pathological spine fracture in one patient with a large vertebral metastasis. At 6 months, complete response occurred in one (2%), partial response in 12 (26%) and disease stabilisation in 19 (40%) of 47 evaluable patients. The rate of complete + partial response was 41% and that of disease stabilisation, 30%, in the 27 evaluable patients with functional metastases at baseline; the corresponding rates were 10% and 55% in the 20 evaluable patients with non

  15. Training-induced brain activation and functional connectivity differentiate multi-talker and single-talker speech training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhizhou; Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Wang, Suiping; Wong, Patrick C M

    2018-03-10

    In second language acquisition studies, the high talker variability training approach has been frequently used to train participants to learn new speech patterns. However, the neuroplasticity induced by training is poorly understood. In the present study, native English speakers were trained on non-native pitch patterns (linguistic tones from Mandarin Chinese) in multi-talker (N = 16) or single-talker (N = 16) training conditions. We focused on two aspects of multi-talker training, voice processing and lexical phonology accessing, and used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the brain activation and functional connectivity (FC) of two regions of interest in a tone identification task conducted before and after training, namely the anterior part of the right superior temporal gyrus (aRSTG) and the posterior left superior temporal gyrus (pLSTG). The results showed distinct patterns of associations between neural signals and learning success for multi-talker training. Specifically, post-training brain activation in the aRSTG and FC strength between the aRSTG and pLSTG were correlated with learning success in the multi-talker training group but not in the single-talker group. These results suggest that talker variability in the training procedure may enhance neural efficiency in these brain areas and strengthen the cooperation between them. Our findings highlight the brain processing of newly learned speech patterns is influenced by the given training approach. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Excision of reprogramming transgenes improves the differentiation potential of iPS cells generated with a single excisable vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Cesar A; Sommer, Andreia Gianotti; Longmire, Tyler A; Christodoulou, Constantina; Thomas, Dolly D; Gostissa, Monica; Alt, Fred W; Murphy, George J; Kotton, Darrell N; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo

    2010-01-01

    The residual presence of integrated transgenes following the derivation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is highly undesirable. Here we demonstrate efficient derivation of iPS cells free of exogenous reprogramming transgenes using an excisable polycistronic lentiviral vector. A novel version of this vector containing a reporter fluorochrome allows direct visualization of vector excision in living iPS cells in real time. We find that removal of the reprogramming vector markedly improves the developmental potential of iPS cells and significantly augments their capacity to undergo directed differentiation in vitro. We further propose that methods to efficiently excise reprogramming transgenes with minimal culture passaging, such as those demonstrated here, are critical since we find that iPS cells may acquire chromosomal abnormalities, such as trisomy of chromosome 8, similar to embryonic stem cells after expansion in culture. Our findings illustrate an efficient method for the generation of transgene-free iPS cells and emphasize the potential beneficial effects that may result from elimination of integrated reprogramming factors. In addition, our results underscore the consequences of long-term culture that will need to be taken into account for the clinical application of iPS cells.

  17. Study of single voxel {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of bone tumors: Differentiation of benign from malignant tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing; Cheng, Kebin [Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China); Ding, Yi [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China); Liang, Wei [Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China); Ding, Yi [Department of Pathology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China); Vanel, Daniel [Rizzoli Institute, Bologna (Italy); Cheng, Xiaoguang, E-mail: xiao65@263.net [Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical application of single voxel {sup 1}H MRS in the discrimination of benign and malignant bone tumors. Materials and methods: Eighty-three patients (64 male, 19 female), presenting with a bone tumor, were examined on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Using pathological results as a gold standard, there were 34 benign and 49 malignant tumors. After plain MRI scans, a 3D fast SPGR sequence was used for dynamic contrast-enhanced scanning. Dynamic images were transferred to the workstation, where the region of maximal enhancement was identified for prescription of the {sup 1}H MRS sequence. Single-voxel {sup 1}H MRS was then performed with the probe-p sequence, TR/TE = 1500/110 ms, VOI ranging from 14.4 mm × 7.3 mm × 20.2 mm to 27.9 mm × 25.5 mm × 20.1 mm, automatic shimming and water suppression, 15 min post-contrast. For control purposes, the 3rd lumbar spine vertebral body of six patients having lumbar disc herniation (LDH) without systemic disease was examined with {sup 1}H MRS of normal bone marrow. The static contrast enhancement scan was used for these LDH patients. Conversion of raw MR signal to an MR spectrum was performed using SAGE 7. Cho/Lip (choline/lipids) peak height ratios were calculated. ROC curve analysis was used to determine the cut-off of Cho/Lip ratio for discrimination. Results: For malignant tumors, one resonance at 3.30–3.19 ppm attributed to choline and another at 1.14–1.55 ppm attributed to lipid were detected. With normal bone marrow and most benign tumors, no choline signal was detected. Choline was only found in six benign lesions. With a threshold for Cho/Lip peak height ratio of 0.2, the area under ROC curve was 0.819. The corresponding sensitivity and specificity of {sup 1}H MRS were 76% and 88%. Conclusions: Single voxel {sup 1}H MRS can help in discriminating benign and malignant bone tumors.

  18. Globalization, Development and Ordinary Cities: A Review Essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Fraser

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available What are the underlying spatial assumptions about the world that renders some cities exemplars of modernity and innovation, while others are cast as being behind, and worse yet, forgotten places? This is a key question that has emerged in geography and sociology, and is addressed in Jennifer Robinson’s book Ordinary Cities: Between Modernity and Development. The purpose of this essay is two-fold in that it provides a review of Robinson’s book and it also uses her text as a vehicle to interrogate the geo-politics of urban theory development. In particular, scholars have voiced concern over the manner in which “world cities” and then “global cities” have the power/knowledge e?ect of reifying the idea that there is one “world system” that can be measured objectively.

  19. Shock veins in the Sahara 02500 ordinary chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owocki, Krzysztof; Muszyński, Andrzej

    2012-08-01

    A specimen of the Sahara 02500 ordinary chondrite contains shock-produced veins consisting of recrystallised fine-grained pyroxenes that include small droplets of Ni-rich metal. Non-melted olivines and pyroxenes show planar deformations filled by shock-melted and -polluted metal and troilite. Shock-melted feldspathic glass is present close to the shock veins. Geothermometric estimations indicate that the meteorite locally experienced moderate shock metamorphism with a minimum local peak temperature above 1400°C, resulting in partial melting of Ca-poor pyroxene and full melting of feldspars, metal and sulphides. The mineral assemblage in the shock veins suggests a pressure during melt recrystallisation below 10 GPa.

  20. Tracking, aiming, and hitting the UAV with ordinary assault rifle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racek, František; Baláž, Teodor; Krejčí, Jaroslav; Procházka, Stanislav; Macko, Martin

    2017-10-01

    The usage small-unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is significantly increasing nowadays. They are being used as a carrier of military spy and reconnaissance devices (taking photos, live video streaming and so on), or as a carrier of potentially dangerous cargo (intended for destruction and killing). Both ways of utilizing the UAV cause the necessity to disable it. From the military point of view, to disable the UAV means to bring it down by a weapon of an ordinary soldier that is the assault rifle. This task can be challenging for the soldier because he needs visually detect and identify the target, track the target visually and aim on the target. The final success of the soldier's mission depends not only on the said visual tasks, but also on the properties of the weapon and ammunition. The paper deals with possible methods of prediction of probability of hitting the UAV targets.

  1. Rapid Classification of Ordinary Chondrites Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M.; Welzenbach, L.

    2014-01-01

    Classification of ordinary chondrites is typically done through measurements of the composition of olivine and pyroxenes. Historically, this measurement has usually been performed via electron microprobe, oil immersion or other methods which can be costly through lost sample material during thin section preparation. Raman microscopy can perform the same measurements but considerably faster and with much less sample preparation allowing for faster classification. Raman spectroscopy can facilitate more rapid classification of large amounts of chondrites such as those retrieved from North Africa and potentially Antarctica, are present in large collections, or are submitted to a curation facility by the public. With development, this approach may provide a completely automated classification method of all chondrite types.

  2. Phonon hydrodynamics for nanoscale heat transport at ordinary temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yangyu; Wang, Moran

    2018-01-01

    The classical Fourier's law fails in extremely small and ultrafast heat conduction even at ordinary temperatures due to strong thermodynamic nonequilibrium effects. In this work, a macroscopic phonon hydrodynamic equation beyond Fourier's law with a relaxation term and nonlocal terms is derived through a perturbation expansion to the phonon Boltzmann equation around a four-moment nonequilibrium solution. The temperature jump and heat flux tangential retardant boundary conditions are developed based on the Maxwell model of the phonon-boundary interaction. Extensive steady-state and transient nanoscale heat transport cases are modeled by the phonon hydrodynamic model, which produces quantitative predictions in good agreement with available phonon Boltzmann equation solutions and experimental results. The phonon hydrodynamic model provides a simple and elegant mathematical description of non-Fourier heat conduction with a clear and intuitive physical picture. The present work will promote deeper understanding and macroscopic modeling of heat transport in extreme states.

  3. Ordinary multiplication of distributions. Application to control of economic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A. V.; Kormyshev, V. M.; Serova, N. B.; Fitina, L. N.; Kozhakhmetov, A. B.

    2017-11-01

    There exist many physical and economic models, which cannot be described in terms of usual functions. Such problems require application of the theory of distributions (generalized functions) (P. Antosik, J. Mikusinski, R. Sikorski, 1973; J. F. Colombeau, 1984; A.V. Kim, 2015, 1988; S.L. Sobolev, 1950; L Schwartz, 1950-1951). One of the first and the most important problems of the distribution theory consist in impossibility of defining a multiplication of distribution. The problem is so important that still is in the focus of researchers, because of various applications to nonlinear singular models. In the paper, an ordinary multiplication of generalized functions (distributions) is proposed. The obtained results are applied in a problem of control of economic processes.

  4. Soliton-like solutions to the ordinary Schroedinger equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamboni-Rached, Michel [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DMO/FEEC/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Eletrica e de Computacao. Dept. de Microondas e Optica; Recami, Erasmo, E-mail: recami@mi.infn.i [Universita Statale di Bergamo, Bergamo (Italy). Facolta di Ingegneria

    2011-07-01

    In recent times it has been paid attention to the fact that (linear) wave equations admit of soliton-like solutions, known as Localized Waves or Non-diffracting Waves, which propagate without distortion in one direction. Such Localized Solutions (existing also for K-G or Dirac equations) are a priori suitable, more than Gaussian's, for describing elementary particle motion. In this paper we show that, mutatis mutandis, Localized Solutions exist even for the ordinary Schroedinger equation within standard Quantum Mechanics; and we obtain both approximate and exact solutions, also setting forth for them particular examples. In the ideal case such solutions bear infinite energy, as well as plane or spherical waves: we show therefore how to obtain nite-energy solutions. At last, we briefly consider solutions for a particle moving in the presence of a potential. (author)

  5. Increased Allergic Immune Response to Sarcoptes scabiei Antigens in Crusted versus Ordinary Scabies▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Shelley F.; Pizzutto, Susan; Slender, Amy; Viberg, Linda; Holt, Deborah; Hales, Belinda J.; Kemp, David J.; Currie, Bart J.; Rolland, Jennifer M.; O'Hehir, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Scabies, a parasitic skin infestation by the burrowing “itch” mite Sarcoptes scabiei, causes significant health problems for children and adults worldwide. Crusted scabies is a particularly severe form of scabies in which mites multiply into the millions, causing extensive skin crusting. The symptoms and signs of scabies suggest host immunity to the scabies mite, but the specific resistant response in humans remains largely uncharacterized. We used 4 scabies mite recombinant proteins with sequence homology to extensively studied house dust mite allergens to investigate a differential immune response between ordinary scabies and the debilitating crusted form of the disease. Subjects with either disease form showed serum IgE against recombinant S. scabiei cysteine and serine proteases and apolipoprotein, whereas naive subjects showed minimal IgE reactivity. Significantly (P scabies than in those with ordinary scabies. Both subject groups showed strong proliferative responses (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) to the scabies antigens, but the crusted scabies group showed increased secretion of the Th2 cytokines interleukin 5 (IL-5) and IL-13 and decreased Th1 cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in response to the active cysteine protease. These data confirm that a nonprotective allergic response occurs in the crusted disease form and demonstrate that clinical severity is associated with differences in the type and magnitude of the antibody and cellular responses to scabies proteins. A quantitative IgE inhibition assay identified IgE immunoreactivity of scabies mite antigens distinct from that of house dust mite antigens, which is potentially important for specific scabies diagnosis and therapy. PMID:20631334

  6. Increased allergic immune response to Sarcoptes scabiei antigens in crusted versus ordinary scabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Shelley F; Pizzutto, Susan; Slender, Amy; Viberg, Linda; Holt, Deborah; Hales, Belinda J; Kemp, David J; Currie, Bart J; Rolland, Jennifer M; O'Hehir, Robyn

    2010-09-01

    Scabies, a parasitic skin infestation by the burrowing "itch" mite Sarcoptes scabiei, causes significant health problems for children and adults worldwide. Crusted scabies is a particularly severe form of scabies in which mites multiply into the millions, causing extensive skin crusting. The symptoms and signs of scabies suggest host immunity to the scabies mite, but the specific resistant response in humans remains largely uncharacterized. We used 4 scabies mite recombinant proteins with sequence homology to extensively studied house dust mite allergens to investigate a differential immune response between ordinary scabies and the debilitating crusted form of the disease. Subjects with either disease form showed serum IgE against recombinant S. scabiei cysteine and serine proteases and apolipoprotein, whereas naive subjects showed minimal IgE reactivity. Significantly (P scabies than in those with ordinary scabies. Both subject groups showed strong proliferative responses (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) to the scabies antigens, but the crusted scabies group showed increased secretion of the Th2 cytokines interleukin 5 (IL-5) and IL-13 and decreased Th1 cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in response to the active cysteine protease. These data confirm that a nonprotective allergic response occurs in the crusted disease form and demonstrate that clinical severity is associated with differences in the type and magnitude of the antibody and cellular responses to scabies proteins. A quantitative IgE inhibition assay identified IgE immunoreactivity of scabies mite antigens distinct from that of house dust mite antigens, which is potentially important for specific scabies diagnosis and therapy.

  7. Lectures on the practical solution of differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.

    1979-11-01

    This report comprises lectures on the practical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations given in the In-Hours Continuing Education Program for Scientific and Technical Personnel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  8. Magnetic Classification of Ordinary Chondrites: Falls Versus Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, P.; Sagnotti, L.; Consolmagno, G.; Folco, L.; Pesonen, L.; Terho, M.

    2001-12-01

    We have undertaken a magnetic susceptibility (K) survey of various meteorite collections in Italy and Vatican, using a large coil (8 cm) Kappabridge instrument. This original database, merged with previous data from Finnish and Czech collections [1], allows us to analyze about 650 different ordinary chondrites, equally distributed in 3 categories: falls, Antarctic and non-Antarctic finds (half from Sahara). For a large number of meteorites, especially falls, we measured numerous samples from various collections, allowing testing the homogeneity of K values. It appears that in the majority of falls logK values are reproducible within 0.1, even at the 1 cc levels. Finds are less homogeneous, together with some brecciated or veined falls, where one expects locally variable metal concentrations. When falls are taken separately from finds a very narrow range of logK values appear to characterize H, L and LL classes, with no overlap (excluding 8 percent of petrographically anomalous samples). On the other hand finds show a variable decrease of logK, correlated to weathering grade. Antarctic finds (mostly from Frontier Mountain) appear on average less affected by weathering although logK histogram is clearly shifted toward low values compared to finds. Interestingly the FRO histograms exhibit quite narrow peaks, while other finds show a larger spread. This can be tentatively explained by a predominance of a few individual showers as suggested by cosmogenic isotope features [2] . From our analysis of a large number of samples, it appears clearly that finds, even from Antarctic, have to be excluded for the purpose of defining mean magnetic properties of asteroids related to ordinary chondrites. Simple in-situ probes could be designed for future asteroid missions to identify meteorite type using our database. References: [1] Terho M. et al. (1993) Studia Geoph. Geod.. 37, 65-82 [2] Welten K.C. et al. (2001) Mete-oritics & Planet. Sci., 36, 301-318.

  9. Flexural, Torsional and Distortional Buckling of Single-Cell Thin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The longitudinal warping displacement functions U(x) were eliminated from the governing equations of equilibrium in different forms to obtain the following equations: two fully uncoupled ordinary differential equations in V1 and V2 representing flexural buckling about the two axis of symmetry; a fully separated ordinary ...

  10. Automatic detection and treatment of oscillatory and/or stiff ordinary differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gear, C. W.

    1980-06-01

    The next generation of ODE software can be expected to detect special problems and to adapt to their needs. The low-cost, automatic detection of oscillatory behavior, the determination of its period, and methods for its subsequent efficient integration are addressed here, along with stiffness detection. In the first phase, the method for oscillatory problems discussed examines the output of any integrator to determine if the output is nearly periodic. At the point this answer is positive, the second phase is entered and an automatic, nonstiff, multirevolutionary method is invoked. This requires the occasional solution of a nearly periodic initial-value problem over one period by a standard method and the re-determination of its period. Because the multirevolutionary method uses a very large step, the problem has a high probability of being stiff in this second phase. Hence, it is important to detect if stiffness is present so that an appropriate stiff, multirevolutionary method can be selected. 6 figures.

  11. A New Inverse Runge–Kutta Scheme for Stiff Ordinary Differential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of the form y'=f(x,y), a≤x≤b. Its derivation adopts Taylor and binomial series expansion , while it analysis of its stability uses the well known A-stability test model equation. Both theoretical and experimental results show that the scheme is A-stable. Numerical results compared favourably with existing Euler's method.

  12. Remark on zeros of solutions of second-order linear ordinary differential equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dosoudilová, M.; Lomtatidze, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2016), s. 571-577 ISSN 1072-947X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : second-order linear equation * zeros of solutions * periodic boundary value problem Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.290, year: 2016 https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/gmj.2016.23.issue-4/gmj-2016-0052/gmj-2016-0052. xml

  13. Localization of the eigenvalues of linear integral equations with applications to linear ordinary differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloss, J. M.; Kranzler, S. K.

    1972-01-01

    The equivalence of a considered integral equation form with an infinite system of linear equations is proved, and the localization of the eigenvalues of the infinite system is expressed. Error estimates are derived, and the problems of finding upper bounds and lower bounds for the eigenvalues are solved simultaneously.

  14. Lyapunov stability and its application to systems of ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    An outline and a brief introduction to some of the concepts and implications of Lyapunov stability theory are presented. Various aspects of the theory are illustrated by the inclusion of eight examples, including the Cartesian coordinate equations of the two-body problem, linear and nonlinear (Van der Pol's equation) oscillatory systems, and the linearized Kustaanheimo-Stiefel element equations for the unperturbed two-body problem.

  15. A new approach to non-local boundary value problems for ordinary differential systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rontó, András; Rontó, M.; Shchobak, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 250, č. 1 (2015), s. 689-700 ISSN 0096-3003 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : non-local problem * parametrisation * successive approximations Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.345, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0096300314015434

  16. Remark on periodic boundary-value problem for second-order linear ordinary differential equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dosoudilová, M.; Lomtatidze, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 2018, č. 13 (2018), s. 1-7 ISSN 1072-6691 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : second-order linear equation * periodic boundary value problem * unique solvability Subject RIV: BA - General Math ematics OBOR OECD: Applied math ematics Impact factor: 0.954, year: 2016 https://ejde. math .txstate.edu/Volumes/2018/13/abstr.html

  17. A multiple-scale power series method for solving nonlinear ordinary differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chein-Shan Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The power series solution is a cheap and effective method to solve nonlinear problems, like the Duffing-van der Pol oscillator, the Volterra population model and the nonlinear boundary value problems. A novel power series method by considering the multiple scales $R_k$ in the power term $(t/R_k^k$ is developed, which are derived explicitly to reduce the ill-conditioned behavior in the data interpolation. In the method a huge value times a tiny value is avoided, such that we can decrease the numerical instability and which is the main reason to cause the failure of the conventional power series method. The multiple scales derived from an integral can be used in the power series expansion, which provide very accurate numerical solutions of the problems considered in this paper.

  18. Adjoint Subspaces in Banach Spaces, with Applications to Ordinary Differential Subspaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coddington, Earl A.; Dijksma, Aalt

    1978-01-01

    Given two subspaces A0 ⊂ A1 ⊂ W = X ⊕ Y, where X, Y are Banach spaces, we show how to characterize, in terms of generalized boundary conditions, those adjoint pairs A, A* satisfying A0 ⊂ A ⊂ A1, A1* ⊂ A* ⊂ A0* ⊂ W+ = Y* ⊕ X*, where X*, Y* are the conjugate spaces of X, Y, respectively. The

  19. On optimal control of a sweeping process coupled with an ordinary differential equation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adam, Lukáš; Outrata, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 9 (2014), s. 2709-2738 ISSN 1531-3492 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/12/0671 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) SVV-2013-267315 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : optimal control * variational inequality * variational analysis * coderivative * solution map * queuing theory Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.768, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/MTR/adam-0434417.pdf

  20. Rigorous Integration of Non-Linear Ordinary Differential Equations in Chebyshev Basis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dzetkulič, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 1 (2015), s. 183-205 ISSN 1017-1398 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC10048; GA ČR GD201/09/H057 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Initial value problem * Rigorous integration * Taylor model * Chebyshev basis Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.366, year: 2015

  1. On a kind of symmetric weakly non-linear ordinary differential systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fečkan, M.; Rontó, András; Dilna, N.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 140, č. 2 (2016), s. 188-230 ISSN 0007-4497 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : symmetric solution * symmetry * periodic solution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.750, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0007449715000895

  2. Remark on periodic boundary-value problem for second-order linear ordinary differential equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dosoudilová, M.; Lomtatidze, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 2018, č. 13 (2018), s. 1-7 ISSN 1072-6691 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : second-order linear equation * periodic boundary value problem * unique solvability Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 0.954, year: 2016 https://ejde.math.txstate.edu/Volumes/2018/13/abstr.html

  3. Ordinary and partial differential equation routines in C, C++, Fortran, Java, Maple, and Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, HJ

    2003-01-01

    This book provides a set of ODE/PDE integration routines in the six most widely used computer languages, enabling scientists and engineers to apply ODE/PDE analysis toward solving complex problems. This text concisely reviews integration algorithms and then analyzes the widely used Runge-Kutta method. It first presents a complete code before discussing its components in detail, focusing on integration concepts such as error monitoring and control. The format allows readers to understand the basics of ODE/PDE integration, and then calculate sample numerical solutions within the targeted program

  4. On omega-limit sets of ordinary differential equations in Banach spaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájek, Petr Pavel; Vivi, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 371, č. 2 (2010), s. 793-812 ISSN 0022-247X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : omega-limit set * ODE in Banach space Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.174, year: 2010 http://www. science direct.com/ science /article/pii/S0022247X10004798

  5. On Solvability Theorems of Second-Order Ordinary Differential Equations with Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Sher Yeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available For each x0∈[0,2π and k∈N, we obtain some existence theorems of periodic solutions to the two-point boundary value problem u′′(x+k2u(x-x0+g(x,u(x-x0=h(x in (0,2π with u(0-u(2π=u′(0-u′(2π=0 when g:(0,2π×R→R is a Caratheodory function which grows linearly in u as u→∞, and h∈L1(0,2π may satisfy a generalized Landesman-Lazer condition (1+sign(β∫02πh(xv(xdx0gβ+(xvx1-βdx+∫v(x<0gβ-(xvx1-βdx for all v∈N(L\\{0}. Here N(L denotes the subspace of L1(0,2π spanned by sin⁡kx and cos⁡kx, -1<β≤0, gβ+(x=lim  infu→∞(gx,uu/u1-β, and gβ-(x=lim  infu→-∞(gx,uu/u1-β.

  6. Bethe ansatz and ordinary differential equation correspondence for degenerate Gaudin models

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Araby, Omar; Gritsev, Vladimir; Faribault, Alexandre

    2012-03-01

    In this work, we generalize the numerical approach to Gaudin models developed earlier by us [Faribault, El Araby, Sträter, and Gritsev, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.83.235124 83, 235124 (2011)] to degenerate systems, showing that their treatment is surprisingly convenient from a numerical point of view. In fact, high degeneracies not only reduce the number of relevant states in the Hilbert space by a non-negligible fraction, they also allow us to write the relevant equations in the form of sparse matrix equations. Moreover, we introduce an inversion method based on a basis of barycentric polynomials that leads to a more stable and efficient root extraction, which most importantly avoids the necessity of working with arbitrary precision. As an example, we show the results of our procedure applied to the Richardson model on a square lattice.

  7. Optimization of Nordsieck's Method for the Numerical Integration of Ordinary Differential Equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gmelig, R.H.J.; Traas, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Stability and accuracy of Nordsieck's integration method can be improved by choosing the zero-positions of the extraneous roots of the characteristic equation in a suitable way. Optimum zero-positions have been found by minimizing the lower bound of the interval of absolute stability and the

  8. Existence of solutions to second order ordinary differential equations having finite limits at +/- infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar Avramescu

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study the boundary-value problem $$ ddot{x}=f(t,x,dot{x}, quad x(-infty =x(+infty, quad dot{x}(-infty = dot{x}(+infty ,. $$ Under adequate hypotheses and using the Bohnenblust-Karlin fixed point theorem for multivalued mappings, we establish the existence of solutions.

  9. Differential responses to radiation and hyperthermia of cloned cell lines derived from a single human melanoma xenograft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rofstad, E.K.; Brustad, T.

    1984-01-01

    One uncloned and five cloned cell lines were derived from a single human melanoma xenograft. Cells from passages 7-12 were exposed to either radiation or hyperthermia (42.5 0 C, pH = 7.4) under aerobic conditions and the colony forming ability of the cells was assayed in soft agar. The five cloned lines showed individual and characteristic responses to radiation as well as to hyperthermia. The variation in the response to radiation was mainly reflected in the size of the shoulders of the survival curves rather than in the D 0 -values. The variation in the response to hyperthermia was mainly reflected in the terminal slopes of the survival curves. The survival curve of cells from the uncloned line, both when exposed to radiation and hyperthermia, was positioned in the midst of those of the cloned lines. The response of the cloned lines to radiation did not correlate with the response to hyperthermia, indicating that tumor cell subpopulations which are resistant to radiation may respond well to hyperthermia

  10. In situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry as a tool for the differentiation of inner tubes of double-wall carbon nanotubes and thin single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbác, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, Lothar

    2007-12-01

    In situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry has been used to distinguish between thin single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and the inner tubes of double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNT). The spectroelectrochemical method is based on the different change of the electronic structure of the inner tube in DWCNT and that of SWCNT during electrochemical charging, which is reflected in the Raman spectra. During electrochemical charging the inner tubes of DWCNT exhibit a delayed attenuation of the intensities of their Raman modes as referred to the behavior of SWCNT of similar diameter. The changes are pronounced for the radial breathing mode (RBM), and thus, these modes are diagnostic for the distinction of inner tubes of DWCNT from the thin SWCNT. The different sensitivities of inner and outer tubes to the applied electrochemical charging is a simple analytical tool for differentiation of SWCNT and DWCNT in a mixture. The significance of the proposed method is demonstrated on a commercial DWCNT sample.

  11. Differential modal delay measurements in a graded-index multimode fibre waveguide, using a single-mode fibre pro mode selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunak, H.R.D.; Soares, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    Differential model delay (DMD) measurements in graded-index multimode optical fibre waveguides, which are very promising for many types of communication system were carried out. These DMD measurements give a direct indication of the deviation of the refractive index profile, from the optimum value, at a given wavelength. For the first time, by using a single-mode fibre, a few guided modes in the graded-index fibre were selected, in two different ways: launching a few modes at the input end or selecting a few modes at the output end. By doing so important features of propagation in the fibre were revealed, especially the intermodal coupling that may exist. The importance of this determination of intermodal coupling or mode mixing, particularly when many fibres are joined together in a link, and the merits of DMD measurements in general and their importance for the production of high bandwidth graded-index fibres are discussed. (Author) [pt

  12. Dual CARS and SHG image acquisition scheme that combines single central fiber and multimode fiber bundle to collect and differentiate backward and forward generated photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Sheng; Chen, Xu; Xu, Xiaoyun; Wong, Kelvin K.; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2016-01-01

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging, backward and forward generated photons exhibit different image patterns and thus capture salient intrinsic information of tissues from different perspectives. However, they are often mixed in collection using traditional image acquisition methods and thus are hard to interpret. We developed a multimodal scheme using a single central fiber and multimode fiber bundle to simultaneously collect and differentiate images formed by these two types of photons and evaluated the scheme in an endomicroscopy prototype. The ratio of these photons collected was calculated for the characterization of tissue regions with strong or weak epi-photon generation while different image patterns of these photons at different tissue depths were revealed. This scheme provides a new approach to extract and integrate information captured by backward and forward generated photons in dual CARS/SHG imaging synergistically for biomedical applications. PMID:27375938

  13. Fast-electron impact ionization of molecular hydrogen: energy and angular distribution of double and single differential cross sections and Young-type interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Kasthurirangan, S.; Kelkar, A. H.; Stia, C. R.; Fojón, O. A.; Rivarola, R. D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2009-03-01

    We report the energy and angular distribution of absolute double differential cross sections (DDCSs) of ejected electrons in collisions of 8 keV projectile electrons with molecular hydrogen. The ejected electrons with energy between 1 eV and 400 eV and ejection angles between 30° and 150° are detected. The measured data are compared with the theoretical calculations based on two-effective centre (TEC) model. The first-order interference is derived from the energy distribution of DDCS and the resulting ratio spectra (H2 to 2H) exhibit oscillating behaviour. The signature of first-order interference is also demonstrated in the DDCS spectra as a function of the ejection angle. We have shown that the constructive interference prevails in soft- and binary-collision regions. The single differential cross sections (SDCS) are deduced by integrating the DDCS over the solid angle as well as ejection energy. We demonstrate that the SDCS and corresponding ratio spectra also preserve the signature of interference.

  14. Fast-electron impact ionization of molecular hydrogen: energy and angular distribution of double and single differential cross sections and Young-type interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, S; Kasthurirangan, S; Kelkar, A H; Tribedi, L C [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Stia, C R; Fojon, O A; Rivarola, R D [Instituto de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR) and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, IngenierIa y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Av Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina)], E-mail: lokesh@tifr.res.in

    2009-03-28

    We report the energy and angular distribution of absolute double differential cross sections (DDCSs) of ejected electrons in collisions of 8 keV projectile electrons with molecular hydrogen. The ejected electrons with energy between 1 eV and 400 eV and ejection angles between 30 deg. and 150 deg. are detected. The measured data are compared with the theoretical calculations based on two-effective centre (TEC) model. The first-order interference is derived from the energy distribution of DDCS and the resulting ratio spectra (H{sub 2} to 2H) exhibit oscillating behaviour. The signature of first-order interference is also demonstrated in the DDCS spectra as a function of the ejection angle. We have shown that the constructive interference prevails in soft- and binary-collision regions. The single differential cross sections (SDCS) are deduced by integrating the DDCS over the solid angle as well as ejection energy. We demonstrate that the SDCS and corresponding ratio spectra also preserve the signature of interference.

  15. Differential equations methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a variety of techniques for solving ordinary differential equations analytically and features a wealth of examples. Focusing on the modeling of real-world phenomena, it begins with a basic introduction to differential equations, followed by linear and nonlinear first order equations and a detailed treatment of the second order linear equations. After presenting solution methods for the Laplace transform and power series, it lastly presents systems of equations and offers an introduction to the stability theory. To help readers practice the theory covered, two types of exercises are provided: those that illustrate the general theory, and others designed to expand on the text material. Detailed solutions to all the exercises are included. The book is excellently suited for use as a textbook for an undergraduate class (of all disciplines) in ordinary differential equations. .

  16. Linear measure functional differential equations with infinite delay

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, G. (Giselle Antunes); Slavík, A.

    2014-01-01

    We use the theory of generalized linear ordinary differential equations in Banach spaces to study linear measure functional differential equations with infinite delay. We obtain new results concerning the existence, uniqueness, and continuous dependence of solutions. Even for equations with a finite delay, our results are stronger than the existing ones. Finally, we present an application to functional differential equations with impulses.

  17. Solving Differential Equations in R: Package deSolve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; Petzoldt, T.; Setzer, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the R package deSolve to solve initial value problems (IVP) written as ordinary differential equations (ODE), differential algebraic equations (DAE) of index 0 or 1 and partial differential equations (PDE), the latter solved using the method of lines approach. The

  18. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in differential diagnosis of single metastatic liver cancer and solitary necrotic nodule of the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS in the differential diagnosis of single metastatic hepatic carcinoma (MHC and solitary necrotic nodule of the liver (SNNL. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed for 12 patients with single MHC and 16 patients with SNNL who showed circular enhancement in arterial phase on CEUS. Age, size of lesion, and findings of two-dimensional gray-scale ultrasound and CEUS were compared between the two groups. The two-independent-samples t-test was used for comparison between groups, and the paired t-test was used for comparison within each group. ResultsThe MHC group had a significantly higher mean age than the SNNL group (60.2±11.3 years vs 41.0±9.1 years, t=4.970, P<0.001. The mean diameter of lesion was 2.86±1.22 cm in the MHC group and 2.97±0.96 cm in the SNNL group, and showed no significant difference between the two groups (t=-0.269, P=0.790. In the MHC group, the lesions had complex and uneven echoes and blurred boundaries, while in the SNNL group, most lesions were in the right lobe and were hypoechoic with clear boundaries. No blood flow signals were detected on CDFI in these two groups. Both groups had circular enhancement around the lesions in arterial phase on CEUS, and the mean thickness showed a significant difference between the MHC group and the SNNL group (5.00±1.69 mm vs 2.37±0.87 mm, t=5.374, P<0001. In the MHC group, the area in lesions without enhancement in delayed phase was significantly larger than that in arterial phase (t=-4.508, P=0001, while in the SNNL group, the area in lesions without enhancement showed no significant difference between delayed phase and arterial phase (t=-0.449, P=0.660. ConclusionThe thickness of circular enhancement in arterial phase on CEUS and the presence or absence of the enlargement in the area without enhancement contributes to the differential diagnosis of single MHC and SNNL.

  19. Role of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in diagnostic iodine-131 scintigraphy before initial radioiodine ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2005-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the incremental value of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) over planar radioiodine imaging before radioiodine ablation in the staging, management and stratification of risk of recurrence (ROR) in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. Totally, 83 patients (21 male, 62 female) aged 17–75 (mean 39.9) years with DTC were included consecutively in this prospective study. They underwent postthyroidectomy planar and SPECT/CT scans after oral administration of 37–114 MBq iodine-131 (I-131). The scans were interpreted as positive, negative or suspicious for tracer uptake in the thyroid bed, cervical lymph nodes and sites outside the neck. In each case, the findings on planar images were recorded first, without knowledge of SPECT/CT findings. Operative and pathological findings were used for postsurgical tumor–node–metastasis staging. The tumor staging was reassessed after each of these two scans. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography localized radioiodine uptake in the thyroid bed in 9/83 (10.8%) patients, neck nodes in 24/83 (28.9%) patients and distant metastases in 8/83 (9.6%) patients in addition to the planar study. Staging was changed in 8/83 (9.6%), ROR in 11/83 (13.2%) and management in 26/83 (31.3%) patients by the pretherapy SPECT/CT in comparison to planar imaging. SPECT/CT had incremental value in 32/83 patients (38.5%) over the planar scan. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography is feasible during a diagnostic I-131 scan with a low amount of radiotracer. It improved the interpretation of pretherapy I-131 scintigraphy and changed the staging and subsequent patient management

  20. A Single Transcriptome of a Green Toad (Bufo viridis Yields Candidate Genes for Sex Determination and -Differentiation and Non-Anonymous Population Genetic Markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn F Gerchen

    Full Text Available Large genome size, including immense repetitive and non-coding fractions, still present challenges for capacity, bioinformatics and thus affordability of whole genome sequencing in most amphibians. Here, we test the performance of a single transcriptome to understand whether it can provide a cost-efficient resource for species with large unknown genomes. Using RNA from six different tissues from a single Palearctic green toad (Bufo viridis specimen and Hiseq2000, we obtained 22,5 Mio reads and publish >100,000 unigene sequences. To evaluate efficacy and quality, we first use this data to identify green toad specific candidate genes, known from other vertebrates for their role in sex determination and differentiation. Of a list of 37 genes, the transcriptome yielded 32 (87%, many of which providing the first such data for this non-model anuran species. However, for many of these genes, only fragments could be retrieved. In order to allow also applications to population genetics, we further used the transcriptome for the targeted development of 21 non-anonymous microsatellites and tested them in genetic families and backcrosses. Eleven markers were specifically developed to be located on the B. viridis sex chromosomes; for eight markers we can indeed demonstrate sex-specific transmission in genetic families. Depending on phylogenetic distance, several markers, which are sex-linked in green toads, show high cross-amplification success across the anuran phylogeny, involving nine systematic anuran families. Our data support the view that single transcriptome sequencing (based on multiple tissues provides a reliable genomic resource and cost-efficient method for non-model amphibian species with large genome size and, despite limitations, should be considered as long as genome sequencing remains unaffordable for most species.

  1. Standing Concertation Committee - Ordinary Meeting on 15 January 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    This meeting was devoted to the main topics summarised below. Follow-up from the meetings of the Finance Committee and Council in December 2004 The Chairman welcomed two new SCC members representing the Staff Association: Véronique Paris and Gianni Deroma. Expressing their best wishes for the New Year, the members of the SCC took note of a report by the Chairman on the outcome of these Committee meetings and of the Director-General's staff meeting on 10 January 2005, and discussed a number of internal follow-up actions. Work planning of the SCC & TREF The SCC agreed its calendar of ordinary sessions and its draft work planning for the first half of 2005, subject to including a number of matters outstanding from 2004. The Committee discussed internal preparation for the next meeting of TREF on 4 & 5 April devoted to items concerning the current 5-Yearly Review. The SCC also took note of the provisional scheduling of TREF meetings from May to September, which will be settled by...

  2. Afterword: materialities, care, 'ordinary affects', power and politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Joanna

    2018-02-01

    In this paper I explore how the papers in this volume offer ways of thinking about materialities of care in terms of political ecologies, including hierarchies of value as well as assemblages, in which strategic agendas are made present in everyday practices, with profound and ordinary affects, as well as effects. I show how power can work through the association of multiple and heterogeneous materials and social processes to create 'thresholds', as spaces through which people must pass in order to be included as patients, and which circulate specific imaginaries over what counts as an appropriate need. I go on to suggest how some material practices are made mundane and immaterial, that is inconsequential, so that by drawing attention to their importance in how care is done (or not done) the papers help disrupt the commonplace production and reproduction of the 'neglected things' (Puig de la Bellacasa ) of healthcare environments, and by so doing help reimagine what is important for occasions to actually be caring. I then shift to thinking about a sensibility, one that is highly valued in this collection of articles, that helps illuminate different imaginaries of care to those that dominate healthcare environments, an approach that I have called elsewhere 'relational extension', and in the example I offer here show how shifts in extension as a form of motility disrupts stabilities and their reproduction, to accomplish different forms of world-making. © 2018 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  3. The changing symbology of the ordinary. An American visual approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Santamarina-Macho

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “the ordinary” has become an ever more usual reference in the analysis of certain architectonic and territorial situations; but also social ones, which seem to escape any order set by planning. Nonetheless, the word still carries a rather ambiguous meaning, because not only the term is in itself polysemic, but also because it can have several interpretations, sometimes in a contradictory way, depending on the area of study, the time or the place in which it is used. This text addresses some of these apparent contradictions through a selection of visual expressions that emerge from the reassessment of “the ordinary” within a particular context: America in the seventies. To illustrate our views, we will use the work of two renowned photographers: David Plowden and Stephen Shore. Architecture was the centre focus of their images, which are part of the broad tradition of depicting American everyday life. We will analyse and compare them with the purpose of identifying their frictions and, more importantly, the values that transformed each of them from the ordinary into a perfect tool to deal with the strange and unstable material situation lived in post-war America.

  4. On Public Influence on People's Interactions with Ordinary Biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zina Skandrani

    Full Text Available Besides direct impacts of urban biodiversity on local ecosystem services, the contact of city dwellers with urban nature in their everyday life could increase their awareness on conservation issues. In this paper, we focused on a particularly common animal urban species, the feral pigeon Columba livia. Through an observational approach, we examined behavioral interactions between city dwellers and this species in the Paris metropolis, France. We found that most people (mean: 81% do not interact with pigeons. Further, interactions (either positive or negative are context and age-dependent: children interact more than adults and the elderly, while people in tourist spots interact more than people in urban parks or in railway stations, a result that suggests that people interacting with pigeons are mostly tourists. We discuss these results in terms of public normative pressures on city dwellers' access to and reconnection with urban nature. We call for caution in how urban species are publically portrayed and managed, given the importance of interactions with ordinary biodiversity for the fate of nature conservation.

  5. Ordinary least squares regression is indicated for studies of allometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilmer, J T; Rodríguez, R L

    2017-01-01

    When it comes to fitting simple allometric slopes through measurement data, evolutionary biologists have been torn between regression methods. On the one hand, there is the ordinary least squares (OLS) regression, which is commonly used across many disciplines of biology to fit lines through data, but which has a reputation for underestimating slopes when measurement error is present. On the other hand, there is the reduced major axis (RMA) regression, which is often recommended as a substitute for OLS regression in studies of allometry, but which has several weaknesses of its own. Here, we review statistical theory as it applies to evolutionary biology and studies of allometry. We point out that the concerns that arise from measurement error for OLS regression are small and straightforward to deal with, whereas RMA has several key properties that make it unfit for use in the field of allometry. The recommended approach for researchers interested in allometry is to use OLS regression on measurements taken with low (but realistically achievable) measurement error. If measurement error is unavoidable and relatively large, it is preferable to correct for slope attenuation rather than to turn to RMA regression, or to take the expected amount of attenuation into account when interpreting the data. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  6. Iterative Splitting Methods for Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Geiser, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    Iterative Splitting Methods for Differential Equations explains how to solve evolution equations via novel iterative-based splitting methods that efficiently use computational and memory resources. It focuses on systems of parabolic and hyperbolic equations, including convection-diffusion-reaction equations, heat equations, and wave equations. In the theoretical part of the book, the author discusses the main theorems and results of the stability and consistency analysis for ordinary differential equations. He then presents extensions of the iterative splitting methods to partial differential

  7. Differential equations from the algebraic standpoint

    CERN Document Server

    Ritt, Joseph Fels

    1932-01-01

    This book can be viewed as a first attempt to systematically develop an algebraic theory of nonlinear differential equations, both ordinary and partial. The main goal of the author was to construct a theory of elimination, which "will reduce the existence problem for a finite or infinite system of algebraic differential equations to the application of the implicit function theorem taken with Cauchy's theorem in the ordinary case and Riquier's in the partial." In his 1934 review of the book, J. M. Thomas called it "concise, readable, original, precise, and stimulating", and his words still rema

  8. Elements of partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, Ian Naismith

    1957-01-01

    Geared toward students of applied rather than pure mathematics, this volume introduces elements of partial differential equations. Its focus is primarily upon finding solutions to particular equations rather than general theory.Topics include ordinary differential equations in more than two variables, partial differential equations of the first and second orders, Laplace's equation, the wave equation, and the diffusion equation. A helpful Appendix offers information on systems of surfaces, and solutions to the odd-numbered problems appear at the end of the book. Readers pursuing independent st

  9. 76 FR 24572 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for Ordinary Life Insurance) Activity: Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Application for Ordinary Life Insurance) Activity: Comment... Insurance, Replacement Insurance for Modified Life Reduced at Age 65, National Service Life Insurance, VA Form 29-8485. b. Application for Ordinary Life Insurance, Replacement Insurance for Modified Life...

  10. 7 CFR 28.416 - Strict Good Ordinary Light Spotted Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Light Spotted Cotton § 28.416 Strict Good Ordinary Light Spotted Color. Strict Good Ordinary Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or... Cotton Source: 57 FR 34498, Aug. 5, 1992, unless otherwise noted. ...

  11. 26 CFR 1.1244(a)-1 - Loss on small business stock treated as ordinary loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Loss on small business stock treated as ordinary... Losses § 1.1244(a)-1 Loss on small business stock treated as ordinary loss. (a) In general. Subject to... for a loss of section 1244 stock is permitted only to the following two classes of taxpayers: (1) An...

  12. 48 CFR 32.503-8 - Liquidation rates-ordinary method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... method. 32.503-8 Section 32.503-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... rates—ordinary method. The Government recoups progress payments through the deduction of liquidations... price of contract items delivered and accepted. The ordinary method is that the liquidation rate is the...

  13. First-episode psychosis patients recruited into treatment via early detection teams versus ordinary pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Jan Olav; Joa, Inge; Auestad, Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    To compare the 5-year course and outcome of first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients recruited via active outreach detection teams (DTs) versus ordinary referral channels (not-DT).......To compare the 5-year course and outcome of first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients recruited via active outreach detection teams (DTs) versus ordinary referral channels (not-DT)....

  14. Unconstrained snoring detection using a smartphone during ordinary sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hangsik; Cho, Jaegeol

    2014-08-15

    Snoring can be a representative symptom of a sleep disorder, and thus snoring detection is quite important to improving the quality of an individual's daily life. The purpose of this research is to develop an unconstrained snoring detection technique that can be integrated into a smartphone application. In contrast with previous studies, we developed a practical technique for snoring detection during ordinary sleep by using the built-in sound recording system of a smartphone, and the recording was carried out in a standard private bedroom. The experimental protocol was designed to include a variety of actions that frequently produce noise (including coughing, playing music, talking, rining an alarm, opening/closing doors, running a fan, playing the radio, and walking) in order to accurately recreate the actual circumstances during sleep. The sound data were recorded for 10 individuals during actual sleep. In total, 44 snoring data sets and 75 noise datasets were acquired. The algorithm uses formant analysis to examine sound features according to the frequency and magnitude. Then, a quadratic classifier is used to distinguish snoring from non-snoring noises. Ten-fold cross validation was used to evaluate the developed snoring detection methods, and validation was repeated 100 times randomly to improve statistical effectiveness. The overall results showed that the proposed method is competitive with those from previous research. The proposed method presented 95.07% accuracy, 98.58% sensitivity, 94.62% specificity, and 70.38% positive predictivity. Though there was a relatively high false positive rate, the results show the possibility for ubiquitous personal snoring detection through a smartphone application that takes into account data from normally occurring noises without training using preexisting data.

  15. Lie and Noether symmetries of systems of complex ordinary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... 1Centre for Mathematics and Statistical Sciences, Lahore School of Economics, Lahore 53200,. Pakistan. 2Differential Equations, Continuum Mechanics and Applications, School of Computational and Applied Mathematics, University of the Witwatersrand, Wits 2050, South Africa. ∗. Corresponding author.

  16. An extension of PPLS-DA for classification and comparison to ordinary PLS-DA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Telaar

    Full Text Available Classification studies are widely applied, e.g. in biomedical research to classify objects/patients into predefined groups. The goal is to find a classification function/rule which assigns each object/patient to a unique group with the greatest possible accuracy (classification error. Especially in gene expression experiments often a lot of variables (genes are measured for only few objects/patients. A suitable approach is the well-known method PLS-DA, which searches for a transformation to a lower dimensional space. Resulting new components are linear combinations of the original variables. An advancement of PLS-DA leads to PPLS-DA, introducing a so called 'power parameter', which is maximized towards the correlation between the components and the group-membership. We introduce an extension of PPLS-DA for optimizing this power parameter towards the final aim, namely towards a minimal classification error. We compare this new extension with the original PPLS-DA and also with the ordinary PLS-DA using simulated and experimental datasets. For the investigated data sets with weak linear dependency between features/variables, no improvement is shown for PPLS-DA and for the extensions compared to PLS-DA. A very weak linear dependency, a low proportion of differentially expressed genes for simulated data, does not lead to an improvement of PPLS-DA over PLS-DA, but our extension shows a lower prediction error. On the contrary, for the data set with strong between-feature collinearity and a low proportion of differentially expressed genes and a large total number of genes, the prediction error of PPLS-DA and the extensions is clearly lower than for PLS-DA. Moreover we compare these prediction results with results of support vector machines with linear kernel and linear discriminant analysis.

  17. Non-instantaneous impulses in differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Ravi; O'Regan, Donal

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is the first published book devoted to the theory of differential equations with non-instantaneous impulses. It aims to equip the reader with mathematical models and theory behind real life processes in physics, biology, population dynamics, ecology and pharmacokinetics. The authors examine a wide scope of differential equations with non-instantaneous impulses through three comprehensive chapters, providing an all-rounded and unique presentation on the topic, including: - Ordinary differential equations with non-instantaneous impulses (scalar and n-dimensional case) - Fractional differential equa tions with non-instantaneous impulses (with Caputo fractional derivatives of order q ϵ (0, 1)) - Ordinary differential equations with non-instantaneous impulses occurring at random moments (with exponential, Erlang, or Gamma distribution) Each chapter focuses on theory, proofs and examples, and contains numerous graphs to enrich the reader’s understanding. Additionally, a carefully selected bibliogr...

  18. Inclusive and Differential Cross-Section Measurements of $t$-channel single top-quark production at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Kathrin

    2015-03-30

    This thesis presents measurements of the $t$-channel single top-quark ($t$) and top-antiquark ($\\bar{t}$) total production cross sections $\\sigma$ in proton--proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV at the LHC. Differential cross sections for the $tq$ and $\\bar{t}q$ processes are measured as a function of the transverse momentum and the absolute value of the rapidity of $t$ and $\\bar{t}$, respectively, for the first time. The analyzed data set was recorded with the ATLAS detector and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.59~fb$^{-1}$. Selected events contain one charged lepton, large missing transverse momentum, and two or three jets. The cross sections are measured by performing a binned maximum-likelihood fit to the output distributions of neural networks. The resulting measurements are $\\sigma(tq)= 46\\pm 6\\; \\mathrm{pb}$, $\\sigma(\\bar{t}q)= 23 \\pm 4\\; \\mathrm{pb}$, and $\\sigma(tq + \\bar{t}q)= 68 \\pm 8\\; \\mathrm{pb}$, and the uncertainty on each measured cross section is dominated by systemati...

  19. A Single Amino Acid Difference between Mouse and Human 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein (FLAP) Explains the Speciation and Differential Pharmacology of Novel FLAP Inhibitors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevitt, Jonathan M.; Hack, Michael D.; Herman, Krystal; Chang, Leon; Keith, John M.; Mirzadegan, Tara; Rao, Navin L.; Lebsack, Alec D.; Milla, Marcos E.

    2016-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) plays a critical role in the metabolism of arachidonic acid to leukotriene A4, the precursor to the potent pro-inflammatory mediators leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4. Studies with small molecule inhibitors of FLAP have led to the discovery of a drug binding pocket on the protein surface, and several pharmaceutical companies have developed compounds and performed clinical trials. Crystallographic studies and mutational analyses have contributed to a general understanding of compound binding modes. During our own efforts, we identified two unique chemical series. One series demonstrated strong inhibition of human FLAP but differential pharmacology across species and was completely inactive in assays with mouse or rat FLAP. The other series was active across rodent FLAP, as well as human and dog FLAP. Comparison of rodent and human FLAP amino acid sequences together with an analysis of a published crystal structure led to the identification of amino acid residue 24 in the floor of the putative binding pocket as a likely candidate for the observed speciation. On that basis, we tested compounds for binding to human G24A and mouse A24G FLAP mutant variants and compared the data to that generated for wild type human and mouse FLAP. These studies confirmed that a single amino acid mutation was sufficient to reverse the speciation observed in wild type FLAP. In addition, a PK/PD method was established in canines to enable preclinical profiling of mouse-inactive compounds. PMID:27129215

  20. Single site-specific integration targeting coupled with embryonic stem cell differentiation provides a high-throughput alternative to in vivo enhancer analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Wilkinson

    2013-10-01

    Comprehensive analysis of cis-regulatory elements is key to understanding the dynamic gene regulatory networks that control embryonic development. While transgenic animals represent the gold standard assay, their generation is costly, entails significant animal usage, and in utero development complicates time-course studies. As an alternative, embryonic stem (ES cells can readily be differentiated in a process that correlates well with developing embryos. Here, we describe a highly effective platform for enhancer assays using an Hsp68/Venus reporter cassette that targets to the Hprt locus in mouse ES cells. This platform combines the flexibility of Gateway® cloning, live cell trackability of a fluorescent reporter, low background and the advantages of single copy insertion into a defined genomic locus. We demonstrate the successful recapitulation of tissue-specific enhancer activity for two cardiac and two haematopoietic enhancers. In addition, we used this assay to dissect the functionality of the highly conserved Ets/Ets/Gata motif in the Scl+19 enhancer, which revealed that the Gata motif is not required for initiation of enhancer activity. We further confirmed that Gata2 is not required for endothelial activity of the Scl+19 enhancer using Gata2−/− Scl+19 transgenic embryos. We have therefore established a valuable toolbox to study gene regulatory networks with broad applicability.

  1. Differential distributions for t-channel single top-quark production and decay at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Edmond L.; Gao, Jun; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2017-11-01

    We present a detailed phenomenological study of the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD corrections for t-channel single top (anti-)quark production and its semi-leptonic decay at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We find the NNLO corrections for the total inclusive rates at the LHC with different center of mass energies are generally smaller than the NLO corrections, indicative of improved convergence. However, they can be large for differential distributions, reaching a level of 10% or more in certain regions of the transverse momentum distributions of the top (anti-)quark and the pseudo-rapidity distributions of the leading jet in the event. In all cases the perturbative hard-scale uncertainties are greatly reduced after the NNLO corrections are included. We also show a comparison of the normalized parton-level distributions to recent data from the 8 TeV measurement of the ATLAS collaboration. The NNLO corrections tend to shift the theoretical predictions closer to the measured transverse momentum distribution of the top (anti)-quark. Importantly, for the LHC at 13 TeV, we present NNLO cross sections in a fiducial volume with decays of the top quark included.

  2. Tentacle Probes: differentiation of difficult single-nucleotide polymorphisms and deletions by presence or absence of a signal in real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, Brent C; Kulesh, David A; Norwood, David A; Wasieloski, Leonard P; Caplan, Michael R; West, Jay A A

    2007-12-01

    False-positive results are a common problem in real-time PCR identification of DNA sequences that differ from near neighbors by a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or deletion. Because of a lack of sufficient probe specificity, post-PCR analysis, such as a melting curve, is often required for mutation differentiation. Tentacle Probes, cooperative reagents with both a capture and a detection probe based on specific cell-targeting principles, were developed as a replacement for 2 chromosomal TaqMan-minor groove binder (MGB) assays previously developed for Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis detection. We compared TaqMan-MGB probes to Tentacle Probes for SNP and deletion detection based on the presence or absence of a growth curve. With the TaqMan-MGB Y. pestis yp48 assays, false-positive results for Yersinia pseudotuberculosis occurred at every concentration tested, and with the TaqMan-MGB B. anthracis gyrA assays, false-positive results occurred in 21 of 29 boil preps of environmental samples of near neighbors. With Tentacle Probes no false-positive results occurred. The high specificity exhibited by Tentacle Probes may eliminate melting curve analysis for SNP and deletion mutation detection, allowing the diagnostic use of previously difficult targets.

  3. Separation of noncommutative differential calculus on quantum Minkowski space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmaier, Fabian; Blohmann, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Noncommutative differential calculus on quantum Minkowski space is not separated with respect to the standard generators, in the sense that partial derivatives of functions of a single generator can depend on all other generators. It is shown that this problem can be overcome by a separation of variables. We study the action of the universal L-matrix, appearing in the coproduct of partial derivatives, on generators. Powers of the resulting quantum Minkowski algebra valued matrices are calculated. This leads to a nonlinear coordinate transformation which essentially separates the calculus. A compact formula for general derivatives is obtained in form of a chain rule with partial Jackson derivatives. It is applied to the massive quantum Klein-Gordon equation by reducing it to an ordinary q-difference equation. The rest state solution can be expressed in terms of a product of q-exponential functions in the separated variables

  4. Stanley Cavell, Classical Hollywood and the Constitution of the Ordinary (With Notes on Billy Wilder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Jukić

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available When in his Tanner lectures Stanley Cavell sets out to define Ordinary Language Philosophy or – rather – to explain how it demarcates philosophy as such, he takes up psychoanalytic literary criticism in order to articulate the terms of this task. Yet the constitution of the ordinary, in Cavell, is never quite accessed from within psychoanalysis-cum-literature alone; instead, it takes another relation, that of psychoanalysis and literature to classical Hollywood, for Cavell to address the ordinary in terms of its constitution. I propose to discuss this complex using two films by Billy Wilder as a passageway to Cavell’s analytic procedure.

  5. The crux of the method: assumptions in ordinary least squares and logistic regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Rebecca G

    2008-10-01

    Logistic regression has increasingly become the tool of choice when analyzing data with a binary dependent variable. While resources relating to the technique are widely available, clear discussions of why logistic regression should be used in place of ordinary least squares regression are difficult to find. The current paper compares and contrasts the assumptions of ordinary least squares with those of logistic regression and explains why logistic regression's looser assumptions make it adept at handling violations of the more important assumptions in ordinary least squares.

  6. Single neurons with both form/color differential responses and saccade-related responses in the nonretinotopic pulvinar of the behaving macaque monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevento, L A; Port, J D

    1995-01-01

    The nonretinotopic portion of the macaque pulvinar complex is interconnected with the occipitoparietal and occipitotemporal transcortical visual systems where information about the location and motion of a visual object or its form and color are modulated by eye movements and attention. We recorded from single cells in and about the border of the dorsal portion of the lateral pulvinar and the adjacent medial pulvinar of awake behaving Macaca mulatta in order to determine how the properties of these two functionally dichotomous cortical systems were represented. We found a class of pulvinar neurons that responded differentially to ten different patterns or broadband wavelengths (colors). Thirty-four percent of cells tested responded to the presentation of at least one of the pattern or color stimuli. These cells often discharged to several of the patterns or colors, but responded best to only one or two of them, and 86% were found to have statistically significant pattern and/or color preferences. Pattern/color preferential cells had an average latency of 79.1 +/- 46.0 ms (range 31-186 ms), responding well before most inferotemporal cortical cell responses. Visually guided and memory-guided saccade tasks showed that 58% of pattern/color preferential cells also had saccade-related properties, e.g. directional presaccadic and postsaccadic discharges, and inhibition of activity during the saccade. In the pulvinar, the mean presacadic response latency was earlier, and the mean postsaccadic response latency was later, than those reported for parietal cortex. We also discovered that the strength of response to patterns or colors changed depending upon the behavioral setting. In comparison to trials in which the monkey fixated dead ahead during passive presentations of pattern and color stimuli, 92% of the cells showed attenuated responses to the same passive presentation of patterns and colors during fixation when these trials were interleaved with trials which also

  7. Differential distribution of striatal [123I]β-CIT in Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy, evaluated with single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messa, C.; Volonte, M.A.; Fazio, F.; Zito, F.; Carpinelli, A.; D'Amico, A.; Rizzo, G.; Moresco, R.M.; Paulesu, E.; Franceschi, M.; Lucignani, G.

    1998-01-01

    Functional imaging of the presynaptic dopaminergic activity using single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and iodine-123 labelled 2-β-carboxymethoxy-3-β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ([ 123 I]β-CIT) is important for the assessment of disease severity and progression in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, its capability to discriminate between different extrapyramidal disorders has not yet been assessed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of differentiating patients with PD and with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) by means of this method. The distribution of [ 123 I]β-CIT in the basal ganglia was assessed in six normal subjects, 13 petients with PD and five patients with PSP in whom the disease was mild. SPET images were obtained 24±2 h after i.v. injection of the tracer using a brain-dedicated system (CERASPECT). MR and SPET images were co-registered in four normal subjects and used to define a standard set of 16 circular regions of interest (ROIs) on the slice showing the highest striatal activity. The basal ganglia ROIs corresponded to (1) the head of caudate, (2) a region of transition between the head of caudate and the anterior putamen, (3) the anterior putamen and (4) the posterior putamen. A ratio of specific to non-displaceable striatal uptake was calculated normalising the activity of the basal ganglia ROIs to that of the occipital cortex (V3''). ANOVA revealed a global reduction of V3'' in all ROIs of PD and PSP patients compared with normal controls (P 123 I]β-CIT distribution in discrete striatal areas provides information on the relative caudate-putamen damage, with different values being obtained in patients clinically diagnosed as having either PD or PSP. (orig.)

  8. δ-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase Single Nucleotide Polymorphism 2 and Peptide Transporter 2*2 Haplotype May Differentially Mediate Lead Exposure in Male Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Natali; Schaub, Tanner; Gutierrez, Marisela; Ortega, Alma X.

    2011-01-01

    Child low-level lead (Pb) exposure is an unresolved public health problem and an unaddressed child health disparity. Particularly in cases of low-level exposure, source removal can be impossible to accomplish, and the only practical strategy for reducing risk may be primary prevention. Genetic biomarkers of increased neurotoxic risk could help to identify small subgroups of children for early intervention. Previous studies have suggested that, by way of a distinct mechanism, δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase single nucleotide polymorphism 2 (ALAD2) and/or peptide transporter 2*2 haplotype (hPEPT2*2) increase Pb blood burden in children. Studies have not yet examined whether sex mediates the effects of genotype on blood Pb burden. Also, previous studies have not included blood iron (Fe) level in their analyses. Blood and cheek cell samples were obtained from 306 minority children, ages 5.1 to 12.9 years. 208Pb and 56Fe levels were determined with inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry. General linear model analyses were used to examine differences in Pb blood burden by genotype and sex while controlling for blood Fe level. The sample geometric mean Pb level was 2.75 µg/dl. Pb blood burden was differentially higher in ALAD2 heterozygous boys and hPEPT2*2 homozygous boys. These results suggest that the effect of ALAD2 and hPEPT2*2 on Pb blood burden may be sexually dimorphic. ALAD2 and hPEPT2*2 may be novel biomarkers of health and mental health risks in male children exposed to low levels of Pb. PMID:21327641

  9. Differential Effects of the Single-Family Room Neonatal Intensive Care Unit on 18- to 24-Month Bayley Scores of Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohr, Betty; McGowan, Elisabeth; McKinley, Leslie; Tucker, Richard; Keszler, Lenore; Alksninis, Barbara

    2017-06-01

    To determine the effects of human milk and social/environmental disparities on developmental outcomes of infants born preterm cared for in a single-family room (SFR) neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Outcomes were compared between infants weighing ?1250 g cared for in an open-bay NICU (1/2007-8/2009) (n?=?394) and an SFR NICU (1/2010-12/2011) (n?=?297). Human milk provision at 1 week, 4 weeks and discharge, and 4 week volume (mL/kg/day) were analyzed. At 18-24 months of age, the Bayley III was administered. Group differences were evaluated and multiple linear regression analyses were run. Infants cared for in the SFR NICU had higher Bayley III cognitive and language scores, higher rates of human milk provision at 1 and 4 weeks, and higher human milk volume at 4 weeks. In adjusted regression models, the SFR NICU was associated with a 2.55-point increase in Bayley cognitive scores and 3.70-point increase in language scores. Every 10?mL/kg/day increase of human milk at 4 weeks was independently associated with increases in Bayley cognitive, language, and motor scores (0.29, 0.34, and 0.24, respectively). Medicaid was associated with decreased cognitive (?4.11) and language (?3.26) scores, and low maternal education and non-white race with decreased language scores (?4.7 and ?5.8, respectively). Separate models by insurance status suggest there are differential benefits from SFR NICU and human milk between infants with Medicaid and private insurance. Infants born preterm cared for in the SFR NICU have higher Bayley language and cognitive scores and receive more human milk. Independent effects on outcomes were derived from SFR NICU, provision of human milk, and social and environmental factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Calculation of similarity solutions of partial differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.

    1980-08-01

    When a partial differential equation in two independent variables is invariant to a group G of stretching transformations, it has similarity solutions that can be found by solving an ordinary differential equation. Under broad conditions, this ordinary differential equation is also invariant to another stretching group G', related to G. The invariance of the ordinary differential equation to G' can be used to simplify its solution, particularly if it is of second order. Then a method of Lie's can be used to reduce it to a first-order equation, the study of which is greatly facilitated by analysis of its direction field. The method developed here is applied to three examples: Blasius's equation for boundary layer flow over a flat plate and two nonlinear diffusion equations, cc/sub t/ = c/sub zz/ and c/sub t/ = (cc/sub z/)/sub z/

  11. Comparison study of design rainfall mapping using ordinary kriging and kriging with external drift

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khuluse, S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available rainfall surface in a case where the number of sampled sites is small using inverse distance weighting, ordinary kriging and kriging with external drift methods. Does incorporating additional explanatory information, given a spatially sparse sample, lead...

  12. A unique type 3 ordinary chondrite containing graphite-magnetite aggregates - Allan Hills A77011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinley, S. G.; Scott, E. R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.

    1982-01-01

    ALHA 77011, which is the object of study in the present investigation, is a chondrite of the 1977 meteorite collection from Allan Hills, Antarctica. It contains an opaque and recrystallized silicate matrix (Huss matrix) and numerous aggregates consisting of micron- and submicron-sized graphite and magnetite. It is pointed out that no abundant graphite-magnetite aggregates could be observed in other type 3 ordinary chondrites, except for Sharps. Attention is given to the results of a modal analysis, relations between ALHA 77011 and other type 3 ordinary chondrites, and the association of graphite-magnetite and metallic Fe, Ni. The discovery of graphite-magnetite aggregates in type 3 ordinary chondrites is found to suggest that this material may have been an important component in the formation of ordinary chondrites.

  13. The oxygen isotopic composition of water extracted from unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, L.; Franchi, I.A.; Wright, I.P.; Pillinger, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of water extracted from the unequilibrated ordinary chondrites Semarkona and Bishunpur reveals differences in alteration mineralogy and levels of isotopic enrichment – reflecting key parameters in the alteration process.

  14. Review of Ordinary High Water Mark Indicators for Delineating Arid Streams in the Southwestern United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lichvar, Robert

    2004-01-01

    ...). Unlike wetlands, for which there are criteria for hydrology, soils, and vegetation specified in a national wetland delineation manual, there is no hydrologic definition of ordinary high water (OHW...

  15. On normalization of a class of polynomial Hamiltonians: from ordinary and inverse points of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwano, Y.; Chekanov, N.A.; Rostovtsev, V.A.; Vinitskij, S.I.

    1999-01-01

    The normalization of a class of polynomial Hamiltonians based on the symbolic computing is discussed from both the ordinary and the inverse direction points of view. The truncated three-particle Toda linear chain (3-TLC) and the regularized system of a planar hydrogen atom with the linear Stark effect (HLSE) are taken as examples to demonstrate the symbolic-computational approach to the ordinary and the inverse normalization problems

  16. Stochastic differential equations and numerical simulation for pedestrians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, J.C.

    1993-07-27

    The mathematical foundation of the Ito interpretation of stochastic ordinary and partial differential equations is briefly explained. This provides the basis for a review of simple difference approximations to stochastic differential equations. An example arising in the theory of optical switching is discussed.

  17. Reduced minimax filtering by means of differential-algebraic equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Mallet; S. Zhuk (Sergiy)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractA reduced minimax state estimation approach is proposed for high-dimensional models. It is based on the reduction of the ordinary differential equation with high state space dimension to the low-dimensional Differential-Algebraic Equation (DAE) and on the subsequent application of the

  18. Linear measure functional differential equations with infinite delay

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Monteiro, Giselle Antunes; Slavík, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 287, 11-12 (2014), s. 1363-1382 ISSN 0025-584X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : measure functional differential equations * generalized ordinary differential equations * Kurzweil-Stieltjes integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.683, year: 2014 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mana.201300048/abstract

  19. Fractal differential equations and fractal-time dynamical systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    equations. Hence the latter can be used to model fractal-time processes or sublinear dynamical systems. ... for the treatment of diffusion, heat conduction, waves, etc., on self-similar fractals [25–28]. Harmonic ... differential equations offer possibilities of modeling dynamical behaviours naturally for which ordinary differential ...

  20. Lie symmetries and differential galois groups of linear equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, W.R.; Put, M. van der

    2002-01-01

    For a linear ordinary differential equation the Lie algebra of its infinitesimal Lie symmetries is compared with its differential Galois group. For this purpose an algebraic formulation of Lie symmetries is developed. It turns out that there is no direct relation between the two above objects. In

  1. A Line-Tau Collocation Method for Partial Differential Equations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The method of lines is used to convert the partial differential equation (PDE) to a sequence of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) which is then solved by the tau collocation method to obtain an approximate continuous solution in the spatial variable x at a fixed t-level. The choice of the tau collocation method over the tau ...

  2. Differential equations inverse and direct problems

    CERN Document Server

    Favini, Angelo

    2006-01-01

    DEGENERATE FIRST ORDER IDENTIFICATION PROBLEMS IN BANACH SPACES A NONISOTHERMAL DYNAMICAL GINZBURG-LANDAU MODEL OF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY. EXISTENCE AND UNIQUENESS THEOREMSSOME GLOBAL IN TIME RESULTS FOR INTEGRODIFFERENTIAL PARABOLIC INVERSE PROBLEMSFOURTH ORDER ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL OPERATORS WITH GENERAL WENTZELL BOUNDARY CONDITIONSTUDY OF ELLIPTIC DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS IN UMD SPACESDEGENERATE INTEGRODIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS OF PARABOLIC TYPE EXPONENTIAL ATTRACTORS FOR SEMICONDUCTOR EQUATIONSCONVERGENCE TO STATIONARY STATES OF SOLUTIONS TO THE SEMILINEAR EQUATION OF VISCOELASTICITY ASYMPTOTIC BEHA

  3. Measurement of the Single Diffractive Differential Cross Section $d\\sigma/d\\tau$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV Using the D0 Forward Proton Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Arnab [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The analysis described in this dissertation uses the Forward Proton Detectors(FPD) installed at the DØ detector in Tevatron collider at Fermilab to measure the single diffractive differential cross section dσ/d|t| at √s = 1.96 TeV center of mass energy. The single diffractive events were selected using the DØ central detector and the Forward proton detectors and |t| of the forward protons are measured using the FPD system. The analysis presents the measurement of the differential cross section of the single di ractive events as a function of |t| in the range 0.2 < |t|< 1.3 GeV2. The differential cross section measurement is within the theoretical and experimental expectations. The total single diffractive cross section( σsd) in the region 0.0 < |t|< 1.3 GeV2 is found to be 9.682 0.048 (stat.) 1.219 (syst.) mb.

  4. Pathway and single gene analyses of inhibited Caco-2 differentiation by ascorbate-stabilized quercetin suggest enhancement of cellular processes associated with development of colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dihal, A.A.; Tilburgs, C.; Erk, M.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Stierum, R.H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim was to investigate mechanisms contributing to quercetin's previously described effects on cell-proliferation and -differentiation, which contradicted its proposed anticarcinogenic potency. In a 10-day experiment, 40 μM quercetin stabilized by 1 mM ascorbate reduced Caco-2 differentiation up

  5. Pathway and single gene analyses of inhibited Caco-2 differentiation by ascorbate-stabilized quercetin suggest enhancement of cellular processes associated with development of colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dihal, A.A.; Tilburgs, C.; Erk, van M.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Stierum, R.H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim was to investigate mechanisms contributing to quercetin's previously described effects on cell-proliferation and -differentiation, which contradicted its proposed anticarcinogenic potency. in a 10-day experiment, 40 mu M quercetin stabilized by I mM ascorbate reduced Caco-2 differentiation

  6. Solving Differential Equations Analytically. Elementary Differential Equations. Modules and Monographs in Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications Project. UMAP Unit 335.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldston, J. W.

    This unit introduces analytic solutions of ordinary differential equations. The objective is to enable the student to decide whether a given function solves a given differential equation. Examples of problems from biology and chemistry are covered. Problem sets, quizzes, and a model exam are included, and answers to all items are provided. The…

  7. A ring of commuting differential operators of rank 2 corresponding to a curve of genus 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, A E

    2004-01-01

    A method for the construction of commuting ordinary differential linear operators of rank 2 corresponding to a curve of genus 2 is put forward and an example of such operators with polynomial coefficients is indicated.

  8. Existence and attractivity results for nonlinear first order random differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapurao C. Dhage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the existence and attractivity results are proved for nonlinear first order ordinary random differential equations. Two examples are provided to demonstrate the realization of the abstract developed theory.

  9. Partial differential equations for scientists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Farlow, Stanley J

    1993-01-01

    Most physical phenomena, whether in the domain of fluid dynamics, electricity, magnetism, mechanics, optics, or heat flow, can be described in general by partial differential equations. Indeed, such equations are crucial to mathematical physics. Although simplifications can be made that reduce these equations to ordinary differential equations, nevertheless the complete description of physical systems resides in the general area of partial differential equations.This highly useful text shows the reader how to formulate a partial differential equation from the physical problem (constructing th

  10. Differential uptake and oxidative stress response in zebrafish fed a single dose of the principal copper and zinc enriched sub-cellular fractions of Gammarus pulex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Farhan R., E-mail: f.khan@nhm.ac.uk [Nutritional Sciences Division, King' s College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH (United Kingdom); Bury, Nicolas R.; Hogstrand, Christer [Nutritional Sciences Division, King' s College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    The sub-cellular compartmentalisation of trace metals and its effect on trophic transfer and toxicity in the aquatic food chain has been a subject of growing interest. In the present study, the crustacean Gammarus pulex was exposed to either 11 {mu}g Cu l{sup -1}, added solely as the enriched stable isotope {sup 65}Cu, or 660 {mu}g Zn l{sup -1}, radiolabeled with 2MBq {sup 65}Zn, for 16 days. Post-exposure the heat stable cytosol containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP) and a combined granular and exoskeletal (MRG + exo) fractions were isolated by differential centrifugation, incorporated into gelatin and fed to zebrafish as a single meal. Assimilation efficiency (AE) and intestinal lipid peroxidation, as malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured. There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) between the retention of the MTLP-Zn (39.0 {+-} 6.4%) and MRG + exo-Zn (17.2 {+-} 3.7%) and of this zinc retained by the zebrafish a significantly greater proportion of the MTLP-Zn feed had been transported away from the site of uptake. For {sup 65}Cu, although the results pointed towards greater bioavailability of the MTLP fraction compared to MRG + exo during the slow elimination phase (24-72 h) these results were not significant (p = 0.155). Neither zinc feed provoked a lipid peroxidation response in the intestinal tissue of zebrafish compared to control fish (gelatin fed), but both {sup 65}Cu labeled feeds did. The greater effect was exerted by the MRG + exo (2.96 {+-} 0.29 nmol MDA mg protein{sup -1}) feed which three-fold greater than control (p < 0.01) and almost twice the MDA concentration of the MTLP feed (1.76 {+-} 0.21 nmol MDA mg protein{sup -1}, p < 0.05). The oxidative stress response produced by Zn and Cu is in keeping with their respective redox potentials; Zn being oxidatively inert and Cu being redox active. These results are similar, in terms of bioavailability and stress response of each feed, to those in our previous study in which {sup 109}Cd labeled G

  11. Peyton’s four-step approach: differential effects of single instructional steps on procedural and memory performance – a clarification study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krautter M

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Markus Krautter,1 Ronja Dittrich,2 Annette Safi,2 Justine Krautter,1 Imad Maatouk,2 Andreas Moeltner,2 Wolfgang Herzog,2 Christoph Nikendei2 1Department of Nephrology, 2Department of General Internal and Psychosomatic Medicine, University of Heidelberg Medical Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Although Peyton’s four-step approach is a widely used method for skills-lab training in undergraduate medical education and has been shown to be more effective than standard instruction, it is unclear whether its superiority can be attributed to a specific single step. Purpose: We conducted a randomized controlled trial to investigate the differential learning outcomes of the separate steps of Peyton’s four-step approach. Methods: Volunteer medical students were randomly assigned to four different groups. Step-1 group received Peyton’s Step 1, Step-2 group received Peyton’s Steps 1 and 2, Step-3 group received Peyton’s Steps 1, 2, and 3, and Step-3mod group received Peyton’s Steps 1 and 2, followed by a repetition of Step 2. Following the training, the first independent performance of a central venous catheter (CVC insertion using a manikin was video-recorded and scored by independent video assessors using binary checklists. The day after the training, memory performance during delayed recall was assessed with an incidental free recall test. Results: A total of 97 participants agreed to participate in the trial. There were no statistically significant group differences with regard to age, sex, completed education in a medical profession, completed medical clerkships, preliminary memory tests, or self-efficacy ratings. Regarding checklist ratings, Step-2 group showed a superior first independent performance of CVC placement compared to Step-1 group (P<0.001, and Step-3 group showed a superior performance to Step-2 group (P<0.009, while Step-2 group and Step-3mod group did not differ (P=0.055. The findings were similar in the incidental

  12. Cellular network entropy as the energy potential in Waddington's differentiation landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Severini, Simone; Widschwendter, Martin; Enver, Tariq; Zhou, Joseph X.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation is a key cellular process in normal tissue development that is significantly altered in cancer. Although molecular signatures characterising pluripotency and multipotency exist, there is, as yet, no single quantitative mark of a cellular sample's position in the global differentiation hierarchy. Here we adopt a systems view and consider the sample's network entropy, a measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, computable from a sample's genome-wide expression profile. We demonstrate that network entropy provides a quantitative, in-silico, readout of the average undifferentiated state of the profiled cells, recapitulating the known hierarchy of pluripotent, multipotent and differentiated cell types. Network entropy further exhibits dynamic changes in time course differentiation data, and in line with a sample's differentiation stage. In disease, network entropy predicts a higher level of cellular plasticity in cancer stem cell populations compared to ordinary cancer cells. Importantly, network entropy also allows identification of key differentiation pathways. Our results are consistent with the view that pluripotency is a statistical property defined at the cellular population level, correlating with intra-sample heterogeneity, and driven by the degree of signaling promiscuity in cells. In summary, network entropy provides a quantitative measure of a cell's undifferentiated state, defining its elevation in Waddington's landscape. PMID:24154593

  13. An Ordinary Short Gamma-Ray Burst with Extraordinary Implications: Fermi -GBM Detection of GRB 170817A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, A.; Roberts, O. J.; Connaughton, V. [Science and Technology Institute, Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Veres, P.; Briggs, M. S.; Hamburg, R.; Preece, R. D.; Poolakkil, S. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Burns, E.; Racusin, J.; Canton, T. Dal [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kocevski, D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Hui, C. M.; Littenberg, T. [Astrophysics Office, ST12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kienlin, A. von [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Christensen, N.; Broida, J. [Physics and Astronomy, Carleton College, MN 55057 (United States); Siellez, K. [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Blackburn, L., E-mail: Adam.M.Goldstein@nasa.gov [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); and others

    2017-10-20

    On 2017 August 17 at 12:41:06 UTC the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detected and triggered on the short gamma-ray burst (GRB) 170817A. Approximately 1.7 s prior to this GRB, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory triggered on a binary compact merger candidate associated with the GRB. This is the first unambiguous coincident observation of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation from a single astrophysical source and marks the start of gravitational-wave multi-messenger astronomy. We report the GBM observations and analysis of this ordinary short GRB, which extraordinarily confirms that at least some short GRBs are produced by binary compact mergers.

  14. An Ordinary Short Gamma-Ray Burst with Extraordinary Implications: Fermi-GBM Detection of GRB 170817A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, A.; Veres, P.; Burns, E.; Briggs, M. S.; Hamburg, R.; Kocevski, D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Preece, R. D.; Poolakkil, S.; Roberts, O. J.; Hui, C. M.; Connaughton, V.; Racusin, J.; von Kienlin, A.; Dal Canton, T.; Christensen, N.; Littenberg, T.; Siellez, K.; Blackburn, L.; Broida, J.; Bissaldi, E.; Cleveland, W. H.; Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M.; Kippen, R. M.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Stanbro, M.

    2017-10-01

    On 2017 August 17 at 12:41:06 UTC the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detected and triggered on the short gamma-ray burst (GRB) 170817A. Approximately 1.7 s prior to this GRB, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory triggered on a binary compact merger candidate associated with the GRB. This is the first unambiguous coincident observation of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation from a single astrophysical source and marks the start of gravitational-wave multi-messenger astronomy. We report the GBM observations and analysis of this ordinary short GRB, which extraordinarily confirms that at least some short GRBs are produced by binary compact mergers.

  15. Effect of Functional Oligosaccharides and Ordinary Dietary Fiber on Intestinal Microbiota Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weiwei; Lu, Jing; Li, Boxing; Lin, Weishi; Zhang, Zheng; Wei, Xiao; Sun, Chengming; Chi, Mingguo; Bi, Wei; Yang, Bingjun; Jiang, Aimin; Yuan, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Functional oligosaccharides, known as prebiotics, and ordinary dietary fiber have important roles in modulating the structure of intestinal microbiota. To investigate their effects on the intestinal microecosystem, three kinds of diets containing different prebiotics were used to feed mice for 3 weeks, as follows: GI (galacto-oligosaccharides and inulin), PF (polydextrose and insoluble dietary fiber from bran), and a GI/PF mixture (GI and PF, 1:1), 16S rRNA gene sequencing and metabolic analysis of mice feces were then conducted. Compared to the control group, the different prebiotics diets had varying effects on the structure and diversity of intestinal microbiota. GI and PF supplementation led to significant changes in intestinal microbiota, including an increase of Bacteroides and a decrease of Alloprevotella in the GI-fed, but those changes were opposite in PF fed group. Intriguing, in the GI/PF mixture-fed group, intestinal microbiota had the similar structure as the control groups, and flora diversity was upregulated. Fecal metabolic profiling showed that the diversity of intestinal microbiota was helpful in maintaining the stability of fecal metabolites. Our results showed that a single type of oligosaccharides or dietary fiber caused the reduction of bacteria species, and selectively promoted the growth of Bacteroides or Alloprevotella bacteria, resulting in an increase in diamine oxidase (DAO) and/or trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) values which was detrimental to health. However, the flora diversity was improved and the DAO values was significantly decreased when the addition of nutritionally balanced GI/PF mixture. Thus, we suggested that maintaining microbiota diversity and the abundance of dominant bacteria in the intestine is extremely important for the health, and that the addition of a combination of oligosaccharides and dietary fiber helps maintain the health of the intestinal microecosystem.

  16. Introductory course on differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Gorain, Ganesh C

    2014-01-01

    Introductory Course on DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS provides an excellent exposition of the fundamentals of ordinary and partial differential equations and is ideally suited for a first course of undergraduate students of mathematics, physics and engineering. The aim of this book is to present the elementary theories of differential equations in the forms suitable for use of those students whose main interest in the subject are based on simple mathematical ideas. KEY FEATURES: Discusses the subject in a systematic manner without sacrificing mathematical rigour. A variety of exercises drill the students in problem solving in view of the mathematical theories explained in the book. Worked out examples illustrated according to the theories developed in the book with possible alternatives. Exhaustive collection of problems and the simplicity of presentation differentiate this book from several others. Material contained will help teachers as well as aspiring students of different competitive examinations.

  17. Transcriptional Profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Reveals the Impact of Variation of a Single Transcription Factor on Differential Gene Expression in 4NQO, Fermentable, and Nonfermentable Carbon Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Rong-Mullins

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular metabolism can change the potency of a chemical’s tumorigenicity. 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO is a tumorigenic drug widely used on animal models for cancer research. Polymorphisms of the transcription factor Yrr1 confer different levels of resistance to 4NQO in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To study how different Yrr1 alleles regulate gene expression leading to resistance, transcriptomes of three isogenic S. cerevisiae strains carrying different Yrr1 alleles were profiled via RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with sequencing (ChIP-Seq in the presence and absence of 4NQO. In response to 4NQO, all alleles of Yrr1 drove the expression of SNQ2 (a multidrug transporter, which was highest in the presence of 4NQO resistance-conferring alleles, and overexpression of SNQ2 alone was sufficient to overcome 4NQO-sensitive growth. Using shape metrics to refine the ChIP-Seq peaks, Yrr1 strongly associated with three loci including SNQ2. In addition to a known Yrr1 target SNG1, Yrr1 also bound upstream of RPL35B; however, overexpression of these genes did not confer 4NQO resistance. RNA-Seq data also implicated nucleotide synthesis pathways including the de novo purine pathway, and the ribonuclease reductase pathways were downregulated in response to 4NQO. Conversion of a 4NQO-sensitive allele to a 4NQO-resistant allele by a single point mutation mimicked the 4NQO-resistant allele in phenotype, and while the 4NQO resistant allele increased the expression of the ADE genes in the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway, the mutant Yrr1 increased expression of ADE genes even in the absence of 4NQO. These same ADE genes were only increased in the wild-type alleles in the presence of 4NQO, indicating that the point mutation activated Yrr1 to upregulate a pathway normally only activated in response to stress. The various Yrr1 alleles also influenced growth on different carbon sources by altering the function of the mitochondria

  18. Polyclonal activation of rat B cells. I. A single mitogenic signal can stimulate proliferation, but three signals are required for differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stunz, L.L.; Feldbush, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    A water-soluble, proteinaceous preparation derived from the cell walls of Salmonella typhimurium Re mutants has recently been tested in this laboratory for its ability to act as a mitogen for rat lymphocytes. This preparation (STM) has been found to be a potent simulator of B lymphocyte proliferation, as measured both by 3 H-TdR incorporation and by cell cycle analysis performed with flow cytofluorometry. STM stimulates approximately 50% of rat B cells to enter cycle. Previous investigations by others have shown that at least two sets of signals are required for B cell differentiation; (a) proliferation signals that may consist of both a stimulator of B cell conversion from G 0 to G 1 and growth factors, and (b) differentiation signals that probably include at least two B cell differentiation factors (BCDF). When STM was tested in a differentiation system it did not drive purified B cells to differentiate to PFC, either alone or when supplemented with a supernatant from concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells (CAS). However, when both CAS and dextran sulfate (DXS) were supplied to the STM-stimulated cells, a large number of PFC resulted. DXT does not act by stimulating an additional, CAS-responsive B cell subset, since it has only a marginal effect upon 3 H-TdR uptake and does not increase the number of B cells in cycle when used together with STM. The authors that the two agents may be acting sequentially: STM stimulates the B cells to proliferate, and DXS drives the proliferating cells to become responsive to CAS. This suggests that the signals for B cell differentiation must consist of at least three activities: a trigger to stimulate the cells to proliferate, a factor to drive the cells to a BCDF-responsive state, and a BCDF that can drive the cells to secrete antibody

  19. Communication: Surface-facilitated softening of ordinary and vapor-deposited glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeta, Ulyana; Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2017-08-01

    A common distinction between the ordinary glasses formed by melt cooling and the stable amorphous films formed by vapor deposition is the apparent mechanism of their devitrification. Using quasi-adiabatic, fast scanning calorimetry that is capable of heating rates in excess of 105 K s-1, we have investigated the softening kinetics of micrometer-scale, ordinary glass films of methylbenzene and 2-propanol. At the limit of high heating rates, the transformation mechanism of ordinary glasses is identical to that of their stable vapor-deposited counterparts. In both cases, softening is likely to begin at the sample surface and progress into its bulk via a transformation front. Furthermore, such a surface-facilitated mechanism complies with zero-order, Arrhenius rate law. The activation energy barriers for the softening transformation imply that the kinetics must be defined, at least in part, by the initial thermodynamic and structural state of the samples.

  20. Nanodiamonds and silicate minerals in ordinary chondrites as determined by micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Bhaskar J.; Parthasarathy, Gopalakrishnarao; Borah, Rashmi R.

    2017-06-01

    We present here the Raman spectroscopic study of silicate and carbonaceous minerals in three ordinary chondrites with the aim to improve our understanding the impact process including the peak metamorphic pressures present in carbon-bearing ordinary chondites. The characteristic Raman vibrational peaks of olivines, pyroxenes, and plagioclase have been determined on three ordinary chondrites from India, Dergaon (H5), Mahadevpur (H4/5), and Kamargaon (L6). The Raman spectra of these meteorite samples show the presence of nanodiamonds at 1334-1345 cm-1 and 1591-1619 cm-1. The full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of Raman peaks for Mahadevpur and Dergaon reflect the nature of shock metamorphism in these meteorites. The frequency shift in Raman spectra might be because of shock effects during the formation of the diamond/graphite grains.

  1. X-ray diffractometry of steam cured ordinary Portland and blast-furnace-slag cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarini, G.; Djanikian, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    This work studies some aspects of the phases produced by hydration of ordinary and blast-furnace-slag cements, at normal conditions and steam cured (60 and 95 0 C), using an X-ray diffraction technique. The blast-furnace-slag cement was a mixture of 50% of ordinary Portland cement and 50% of blast-furnace-slag (separately grinding). After curing the X-ray diffraction reveals that, in relation to ordinary Portland cement, the main phases in blast-furnace-slag cement are hydrated silicates and aluminates, hydro garnet, etringitte and mono sulphate. After steam curing the hydration of blast-furnace-slag cement proceeds. This is a result of the slag activation by the curing temperature. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. International Conference on Differential and Difference Equations with Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Došlá, Zuzana; Došlý, Ondrej; Kloeden, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at the community of mathematicians working on ordinary and partial differential equations, difference equations, and functional equations, this book contains selected papers based on the presentations at the International Conference on Differential and Difference Equations and Applications (ICDDEA) 2015, dedicated to the memory of Professor Georg Sell. Contributions include new trends in the field of differential and difference equations, applications of differential and difference equations, as well as high-level survey results. The main aim of this recurring conference series is to promote, encourage, cooperate, and bring together researchers in the fields of differential and difference equations. All areas of differential and difference equations are represented, with special emphasis on applications.

  3. Measurement of differential cross-sections of a single top quark produced in association with a $W$ boson at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; ATLAS Collaboration; Abbott, Brad; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Abidi, Syed Haider; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adelman, Jahred; Adersberger, Michael; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Afik, Yoav; Agheorghiesei, Catalin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akatsuka, Shunichi; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akilli, Ece; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albicocco, Pietro; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Alderweireldt, Sara; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amoroso, Simone; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Araujo Ferraz, Victor; Arce, Ayana; Ardell, Rose Elisabeth; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahmani, Marzieh; Bahrasemani, Sina; Baines, John; Bajic, Milena; Baker, Oliver Keith; Bakker, Pepijn Johannes; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Bandyopadhyay, Anjishnu; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barkeloo, Jason Tyler Colt; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bauer, Kevin Thomas; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Beck, Helge Christoph; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beermann, Thomas; Begalli, Marcia; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Bergsten, Laura Jean; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Betti, Alessandra; Bevan, Adrian John; Beyer, Julien-christopher; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bisanz, Tobias; Bittrich, Carsten; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blue, Andrew; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bolz, Arthur Eugen; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozson, Adam James; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Braren, Frued; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Briglin, Daniel Lawrence; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Bruno, Salvatore; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burch, Tyler James; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burger, Angela Maria; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Buschmann, Eric; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; C-Q, Changqiao; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cai, Huacheng; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carlson, Benjamin Taylor; Carminati, Leonardo; Carney, Rebecca; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrá, Sonia; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casha, Albert Francis; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castelijn, Remco; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Celebi, Emre; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Wing Sheung; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Cheng; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Jing; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgeniya; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Kingman; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chiu, Yu Him Justin; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Yun Sang; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chu, Ming Chung; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Felix; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Corradi, Massimo; Corrigan, Eric Edward; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Creager, Rachael; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czekierda, Sabina; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'eramo, Louis; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey; Daneri, Maria Florencia; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Daubney, Thomas; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davis, Douglas; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vasconcelos Corga, Kevin; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delporte, Charles; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Devesa, Maria Roberta; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Bello, Francesco Armando; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Petrillo, Karri Folan; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Dickinson, Jennet; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Díez Cornell, Sergio; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobre, Monica; Dodsworth, David; Doglioni, Caterina; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Dubinin, Filipp; Dubreuil, Arnaud; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducourthial, Audrey; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudder, Andreas Christian; Duffield, Emily Marie; Duflot, Laurent; Dührssen, Michael; Dulsen, Carsten; Dumancic, Mirta; Dumitriu, Ana Elena; Duncan, Anna Kathryn; Dunford, Monica; Duperrin, Arnaud; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Duvnjak, Damir; Dyndal, Mateusz; Dziedzic, Bartosz Sebastian; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; El Kosseifi, Rima; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Epland, Matthew Berg; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Estrada Pastor, Oscar; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Ezzi, Mohammed; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Fabiani, Veronica; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Minyu; Fenton, Michael James; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Flierl, Bernhard Matthias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Förster, Fabian Alexander; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Freund, Benjamin; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Ganguly, Sanmay; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; García Pascual, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gee, Norman; Geisen, Jannik; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Geß{}ner, Gregor; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiacomi, Nico; Giannetti, Paola; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugliarelli, Gilberto; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Gama, Rafael; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; Gonnella, Francesco; Gonski, Julia; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gottardo, Carlo Alberto; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Graham, Emily Charlotte; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Chloe; Gray, Heather; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Grummer, Aidan; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Gui, Bin; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Wen; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gurbuz, Saime; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutelman, Benjamin Jacque; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Guzik, Marcin Pawel; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Hageböck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Kunlin; Han, Liang; Han, Shuo; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handl, David Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, Ahmed; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havener, Laura Brittany; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heer, Sebastian; Heidegger, Kim Katrin; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Held, Alexander; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herde, Hannah; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herr, Holger; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Herwig, Theodor Christian; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Higashino, Satoshi; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hildebrand, Kevin; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hils, Maximilian; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hiti, Bojan; Hladik, Ondrej; Hlaluku, Dingane Reward; Hoad, Xanthe; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Holzbock, Michael; Homann, Michael; Honda, Shunsuke; Honda, Takuya; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hostiuc, Alexandru; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hoya, Joaquin; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hrdinka, Julia; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Huhtinen, Mika; Hunter, Robert Francis Holub; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Hyneman, Rachel; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Iltzsche, Franziska; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Isacson, Max Fredrik; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Paul; Jacobs, Ruth Magdalena; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Janus, Piotr Andrzej; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Javurkova, Martina; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jelinskas, Adomas; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Zihao; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, Christian; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Roger; Jones, Samuel David; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kay, Ellis; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kellermann, Edgar; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kendrick, James; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Kharlamova, Tatyana; Khodinov, Alexander; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kiehn, Moritz; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; Kirchmeier, David; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitali, Vincent; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, Thorwald; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klingl, Tobias; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klitzner, Felix Fidelio; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Köhler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Konya, Balazs; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kourlitis, Evangelos; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitrii; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Krauss, Dominik; Kremer, Jakub Andrzej; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Jiri; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Mark; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kulinich, Yakov Petrovich; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kupfer, Tobias; Kuprash, Oleg; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurth, Matthew Glenn; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; La Ruffa, Francesco; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lack, David Philip John; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Langenberg, Robert Johannes; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Lapertosa, Alessandro; Laplace, Sandrine; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Lau, Tak Shun; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Les, Robert; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Quanyin; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lie, Ki; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Chiao-ying; Lin, Kuan-yu; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linck, Rebecca Anne; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jesse; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo, Cheuk Yee; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Loebinger, Fred; Loesle, Alena; Loew, Kevin Michael; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopez, Jorge; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lu, Yun-Ju; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lutz, Margaret Susan; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyu, Feng; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Madysa, Nico; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magerl, Veronika; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majersky, Oliver; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Claire; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mankinen, Katja Hannele; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchese, Luigi; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin Tobon, Cesar Augusto; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Martensson, Mikael; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Christopher Blake; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Mason, Lara Hannan; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Maznas, Ioannis; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McNamara, Peter Charles; McNicol, Christopher John; McPherson, Robert; Meehan, Samuel; Megy, Theo Jean; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meideck, Thomas; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mellenthin, Johannes Donatus; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Melzer, Alexander; Menary, Stephen Burns; Meng, Lingxin; Meng, Xiangting; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Merlassino, Claudia; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Millar, Declan Andrew; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Minegishi, Yuji; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirto, Alessandro; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mizukami, Atsushi; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Mkrtchyan, Tigran; Mlynarikova, Michaela; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mogg, Philipp; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moschovakos, Paris; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Harry James; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Mwewa, Chilufya; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Michael Edward; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Newman, Paul; Ng, Tsz Yu; Ng, Sam Yanwing; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishu, Nishu; Nisius, Richard; Nitsche, Isabel; Nitta, Tatsumi; Nobe, Takuya; Noguchi, Yohei; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomura, Marcelo Ayumu; Nooney, Tamsin; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'connor, Kelsey; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olsson, Joakim; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oppen, Henrik; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orgill, Emily Claire; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganini, Michela; Paige, Frank; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panagoulias, Ilias; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasner, Jacob Martin; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Peri, Francesco; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Forrest Hays; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Pluth, Daniel; Podberezko, Pavel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggi, Riccardo; Poggioli, Luc; Pogrebnyak, Ivan; Pohl, David-leon; Pokharel, Ishan; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Ponomarenko, Daniil; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Portillo Quintero, Dilia María; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potti, Harish; Poulsen, Trine; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proklova, Nadezda; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puri, Akshat; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rashid, Tasneem; Raspopov, Sergii; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauch, Daniel; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravinovich, Ilia; Rawling, Jacob Henry; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reed, Robert; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reiss, Andreas; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resseguie, Elodie Deborah; Rettie, Sebastien; Reynolds, Elliot; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ripellino, Giulia; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Roberts, Rhys Thomas; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocco, Elena; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Bosca, Sergi; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Roloff, Jennifer; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Roy, Debarati; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Rüttinger, Elias Michael; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Masahiko; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sampsonidou, Despoina; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Pineda, Arturo Rodolfo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Christian Oliver; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sano, Yuta; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sasaki, Osamu; Sato, Koji; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Savic, Natascha; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Leigh; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schenck, Ferdinand; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schildgen, Lara Katharina; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; 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Shen, Yu-Ting; Sherafati, Nima; Sherman, Alexander David; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shipsey, Ian Peter Joseph; Shirabe, Shohei; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shlomi, Jonathan; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shope, David Richard; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sideras Haddad, Elias; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Siral, Ismet; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Nikita; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; 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Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Tahirovic, Elvedin; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takasugi, Eric Hayato; Takeda, Kosuke; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanioka, Ryo; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Alan James; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thais, Savannah Jennifer; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thiele, Fabian; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Tian, Yun; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Todt, Stefanie; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Tornambe, Peter; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Treado, Colleen Jennifer; Trefzger, Thomas; Tresoldi, Fabio; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsang, Ka Wa; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tulbure, Traian Tiberiu; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Turchikhin, Semen; Turgeman, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Uno, Kenta; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usui, Junya; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vadla, Knut Oddvar Hoie; Vaidya, Amal; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valente, Marco; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valéry, Lo\\"ic; Vallier, Alexis; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varni, Carlo; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vasquez, Gerardo; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Furelos, David; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Ambrosius Thomas; Vermeulen, Jos; Vetterli, Michel; Viaux Maira, Nicolas; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vishwakarma, Akanksha; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; von Buddenbrock, Stefan; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Peter; 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Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yigitbasi, Efe; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zacharis, Georgios; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zemaityte, Gabija; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dengfeng; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Liqing; Zhang, Matt; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Maosen; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, You; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zou, Rui; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    The differential cross-section for the production of a $W$ boson in association with a top quark is measured for several particle-level observables. The measurements are performed using 36.1 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2015 and 2016. Differential cross-sections are measured in a fiducial phase space defined by the presence of two charged leptons and exactly one jet matched to a $b$-hadron, and are normalised with the fiducial cross-section. Results are found to be in good agreement with predictions from several Monte Carlo event generators.

  4. Measurement of differential cross-sections of a single top quark produced in association with a W boson at √{s}={13}{ {TeV}} with ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

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A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Todt, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Treado, C. J.; Trefzger, T.; Tresoldi, F.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsang, K. W.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tulbure, T. T.; Tuna, A. N.; Turchikhin, S.; Turgeman, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Uno, K.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vadla, K. O. H.; Vaidya, A.; Valderanis, C.; ValdesSanturio, E.; Valente, M.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valéry, L.; Vallier, A.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; van der Graaf, H.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varni, C.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Furelos, D.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viaux Maira, N.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vishwakarma, A.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; von Buddenbrock, S. E.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakamiya, K.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, A. M.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, Q.; Wang, R.-J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, W.; Wang, Z.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, A. F.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. M.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weirich, M.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Weston, T. D.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A. S.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Whitmore, B. W.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkels, E.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wobisch, M.; Wolf, A.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolff, R.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, V. W. S.; Woods, N. L.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xi, Z.; Xia, L.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Xu, T.; Xu, W.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yajima, K.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamane, F.; Yamatani, M.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; YauWong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yigitbasi, E.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zacharis, G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zemaityte, G.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zou, R.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2018-03-01

    The differential cross-section for the production of a W boson in association with a top quark is measured for several particle-level observables. The measurements are performed using {36.1} {fb}^{-1} of pp collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2015 and 2016. Differential cross-sections are measured in a fiducial phase space defined by the presence of two charged leptons and exactly one jet matched to a b-hadron, and are normalised with the fiducial cross-section. Results are found to be in good agreement with predictions from several Monte Carlo event generators.

  5. Simultaneous determination of ordinary and extraordinary refractive index dispersions of nematic liquid crystals in the visible and near-infrared regions from an interference spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Ryotaro; Nishi, Koji; Kan, Takayuki; Kadowaki, Kazunori

    2016-10-01

    An improved interference method is proposed to determine ordinary and extraordinary refractive index dispersions of nematic liquid crystals (LCs). In this method, an LC cell coated with a thin metal layer is used as a Fabry-Perot interferometer, which shows us a sharp transmission fringe. To ensure high reliability, the wavelength dispersion of the refractive index of the metal is taken into account in fitting calculation. In spite of measuring ordinary and extraordinary components, the LC cell, polarizers, and other equipment are not rotated during the experiment. The index evaluation from a single spectrum avoids errors depending on the measurement position owing to non-uniformities of molecular orientation and cell thickness because we can obtain the two indices at exactly the same position. This system can adapt to a wide frequency range and does not require any specific wavelength light source or laser. We demonstrate the determination of ordinary and extraordinary refractive index dispersions of a nematic liquid crystal in the visible and near-infrared regions. Furthermore, we quantitatively reproduce the measured spectrum by calculation using the measured refractive indices.

  6. Test of numerical methods for the integration of kinetic equations in tropospheric chemistry; Confronto di metodi numerici per l'integrazione di sistemi di equazioni differenziali ordinarie di tipo STIFF inserite nel modello fotochimico Calgrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzini, R.; Passoni, L. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1999-07-01

    The integration of ordinary differential equations systems (ODEs) is of significant concern to tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry modelers. The solution of the ODEs requires a large computational effort because of their stiff nature; in a three-dimensional photochemical model the solution of the ODEs required at least 70% of the total CPU time. Several numerical integration techniques exist which attempt to provide accurate and computationally efficient solutions. In this work it is presented a comparison of some of the techniques in terms of solution accuracy and required computational time. It has been compared the Hybrid Solver (Young and Boris, 1977), the Quasi Steady-State Approximation method (Hesstvedt et al., 1978) and the Chemical Solver for Ordinary Differential Equations (Aro, 1996), by using the CALGRID photochemical model. The accuracy is evaluated by comparing the results of every method with the solutions obtained by the Livermore Solver for Ordinary Differential Equations (Hindmarsh, 1980). The comparison has been made varing the parameters of the error tolerances, and taking into account the trade-off between solution accuracy and computational efficiency. [Italian] L'integrazione di sistemi di equazioni differenziali ordinarie (ODEs), e' un problema significativo per i modellisti della chimica troposferica e stratosferica. A causa della loro natura stiff la soluzione degli ODEs richiese un notevole sforzo computazionale; in un modello fotochimico tridimensionale la soluzione degli ODEs richiede almeno il 70% del tempo totale di CPU. Esistono diverse tecniche di integrazione numerica che possono fornire soluzioni accurate e computazionalmente efficienti: in questo lavoro presentiamo un confronto fra alcune tecniche in termini di accuratezza della soluzione e tempo computazionale richiesto. Si sono confrontati il Solver Ibrido (Young and Boris, 1977), il metodo Quasi Steady-State Approximation (Hesstvedt et al., 1978) ed il Chemical

  7. Modified Differential Transform Method for Two Singular Boundary Values Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinwei Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the two singular boundary values problems of second order. Two singular points are both boundary values points of the differential equation. The numerical solutions are developed by modified differential transform method (DTM for expanded point. Linear and nonlinear models are solved by this method to get more reliable and efficient numerical results. It can also solve ordinary differential equations where the traditional one fails. Besides, we give the convergence of this new method.

  8. Influence of oak planting on microelement composition (on example of Mn) of ordinary chernozem

    OpenAIRE

    Y. O. Tagunova

    2011-01-01

    Changes of Mn content in the ordinary chernozem of the forb-fescue-stipa steppeunder the influence of oak afforestation within the Prisamar’ya Dniprovske region were studied. The increase of the Mn content in the soil under the artificial oak plantation was noted. The average gross content of Mn in the root layer of the chernozem improved by forest was 541.2 mg/kg and 139.2 mg/kg in the ordinary chernozem. Average content of potentially available metal (mobile forms) in the root layer is 0.5 ...

  9. Ridge regression estimator: combining unbiased and ordinary ridge regression methods of estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Damodar Gore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Statistical literature has several methods for coping with multicollinearity. This paper introduces a new shrinkage estimator, called modified unbiased ridge (MUR. This estimator is obtained from unbiased ridge regression (URR in the same way that ordinary ridge regression (ORR is obtained from ordinary least squares (OLS. Properties of MUR are derived. Results on its matrix mean squared error (MMSE are obtained. MUR is compared with ORR and URR in terms of MMSE. These results are illustrated with an example based on data generated by Hoerl and Kennard (1975.

  10. Current predictive models do not accurately differentiate between single and multi gland disease in primary hyperparathyroidism: a retrospective cohort study of two endocrine surgery units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edafe, O; Collins, E E; Ubhi, C S; Balasubramanian, S P

    2018-02-01

    Background Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) for primary hyperparathyroidism is dependent upon accurate prediction of single-gland disease on the basis of preoperative imaging and biochemistry. The aims of this study were to validate currently available predictive models of single-gland disease in two UK cohorts and to determine if these models can facilitate MIP. Methods This is a retrospectively cohort study of 624 patients who underwent parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism in two centres between July 2008 and December 2013. Two recognised models: CaPTHUS (preoperative calcium, parathyroid hormone, ultrasound, sestamibi, concordance imaging) and Wisconsin Index (preoperative calcium, parathyroid hormone) were validated for their ability to predict single-gland disease. Results The rates of single- and multi-gland disease were 491 (79.6%) and 126 (20.2%), respectively. Cure rates in centres 1 and 2 were 93.2% and 93.8%, respectively (P = 0.789). The positive predictive value (PPV) of CaPTHUS score . 3 in predicting single-gland disease was 84.6%, compared with 100% in the original report. CaPTHUS . 4 and 5 had a PPV of 85.1 and 87.1, respectively. There were no differences in Wisconsin Index (WIN) between patients with single- and multi-gland (P = 0.573). A WIN greater than 1600 and weight of excised gland greater than 1 g had a positive predictive value of 86.7% for single-gland disease. Conclusions The use of CaPTHUS and WIN indices without intraoperative adjuncts (such as IOPTH) had the potential to result in failure to cure in up to 15% (CaPTHUS) and 13% (WIN) of patients treated by MIP targeting a single enlarged gland.

  11. Differential resolvents of minimal order and weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Michael Nahay

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We will determine the number of powers of α that appear with nonzero coefficient in an α-power linear differential resolvent of smallest possible order of a univariate polynomial P(t whose coefficients lie in an ordinary differential field and whose distinct roots are differentially independent over constants. We will then give an upper bound on the weight of an α-resolvent of smallest possible weight. We will then compute the indicial equation, apparent singularities, and Wronskian of the Cockle α-resolvent of a trinomial and finish with a related determinantal formula.

  12. Assessment of modal-pushover-based scaling procedure for nonlinear response history analysis of ordinary standard bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, E.; Kwong, N.

    2012-01-01

    The earthquake engineering profession is increasingly utilizing nonlinear response history analyses (RHA) to evaluate seismic performance of existing structures and proposed designs of new structures. One of the main ingredients of nonlinear RHA is a set of ground motion records representing the expected hazard environment for the structure. When recorded motions do not exist (as is the case in the central United States) or when high-intensity records are needed (as is the case in San Francisco and Los Angeles), ground motions from other tectonically similar regions need to be selected and scaled. The modal-pushover-based scaling (MPS) procedure was recently developed to determine scale factors for a small number of records such that the scaled records provide accurate and efficient estimates of “true” median structural responses. The adjective “accurate” refers to the discrepancy between the benchmark responses and those computed from the MPS procedure. The adjective “efficient” refers to the record-to-record variability of responses. In this paper, the accuracy and efficiency of the MPS procedure are evaluated by applying it to four types of existing Ordinary Standard bridges typical of reinforced concrete bridge construction in California. These bridges are the single-bent overpass, multi-span bridge, curved bridge, and skew bridge. As compared with benchmark analyses of unscaled records using a larger catalog of ground motions, it is demonstrated that the MPS procedure provided an accurate estimate of the engineering demand parameters (EDPs) accompanied by significantly reduced record-to-record variability of the EDPs. Thus, it is a useful tool for scaling ground motions as input to nonlinear RHAs of Ordinary Standard bridges.

  13. Documentation for assessment of modal pushover-based scaling procedure for nonlinear response history analysis of "ordinary standard" bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; Kwong, Neal S.

    2010-01-01

    The earthquake engineering profession is increasingly utilizing nonlinear response history analyses (RHA) to evaluate seismic performance of existing structures and proposed designs of new structures. One of the main ingredients of nonlinear RHA is a set of ground-motion records representing the expected hazard environment for the structure. When recorded motions do not exist (as is the case for the central United States), or when high-intensity records are needed (as is the case for San Francisco and Los Angeles), ground motions from other tectonically similar regions need to be selected and scaled. The modal-pushover-based scaling (MPS) procedure recently was developed to determine scale factors for a small number of records, such that the scaled records provide accurate and efficient estimates of 'true' median structural responses. The adjective 'accurate' refers to the discrepancy between the benchmark responses and those computed from the MPS procedure. The adjective 'efficient' refers to the record-to-record variability of responses. Herein, the accuracy and efficiency of the MPS procedure are evaluated by applying it to four types of existing 'ordinary standard' bridges typical of reinforced-concrete bridge construction in California. These bridges are the single-bent overpass, multi span bridge, curved-bridge, and skew-bridge. As compared to benchmark analyses of unscaled records using a larger catalog of ground motions, it is demonstrated that the MPS procedure provided an accurate estimate of the engineering demand parameters (EDPs) accompanied by significantly reduced record-to-record variability of the responses. Thus, the MPS procedure is a useful tool for scaling ground motions as input to nonlinear RHAs of 'ordinary standard' bridges.

  14. Families of null surfaces in the Minkowski tri dimensional space-time and its associated differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva O, G.; Garcia G, P.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we describe the procedure to obtain all the family of third order ordinary differential equations connected by a contact transformation such that in their spaces of solutions is defined a conformal three dimensional Minkowski metric. (Author)

  15. Regulation of photosynthesis during heterocyst differentiation in Anabaena sp strain PCC 7120 investigated in vivo at single-cell level by chlorophyll fluorescence kinetic microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ferimazová, Naila; Felcmanová, Kristina; Šetlíková, Eva; Küpper, H.; Maldener, I.; Hauska, G.; Šedivá, Barbora; Prášil, Ondřej

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 1 (2013), s. 79-91 ISSN 0166-8595 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/1683; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Acclimation to abiotic stress * Heterocyst differentiation * Nitrogen fixation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.185, year: 2013

  16. Experimental study of chloride diffusivity in unsaturated ordinary Portland cement mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Ye, G.; Santhanam, M.

    2017-01-01

    Experiments are carried out to investigate the chloride diffusivity in partially saturated ordinary Portland cement mortars with water-to-cement (w/c) ratios of 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6. Based on resistivity measurement and Nernst-Einstein equation, the chloride diffusivities of cement mortars at various

  17. Ordinary Magic: Developing Services for Children with Severe Communication Difficulties by Engaging Multiple Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, Mandy

    2005-01-01

    "Not so ordinary," I am told; it is unusual for healthcare professionals to co-construct new practices by learning together with the people who use services. This paper describes action learning and research with NHS professionals and the parents of children with severe communication difficulties to develop a new practice framework for…

  18. Crowdsourcing ideas : Involving ordinary users in the ideation phase of new product development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schemmann, Brita; Herrmann, Andrea M.; Chappin, Maryse M H; Heimeriks, Gaston J.

    2016-01-01

    The different roles of users in new product development (NPD) have been extensively described. Currently online idea crowdsourcing, via long-term open idea calls, is increasingly being used by companies to collect new product ideas from ordinary users. Such open idea calls can result in thousands of

  19. Ordinary legal remedies according to provisions of legislation from 1853 and 1860

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulauzov Maša M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article sheds light on provisions of Codes of Civil Procedure of 1853 and 1860 concerning ordinary legal remedies. As this matter was codified for the first time, a necessity of amending and supplementing some provisions soon emerged. Those amendments and supplements, along with original provisions were examined in this paper. The author also deals with regulations on jurisdiction of Court of Appeal, Court of Cassation and Supreme court. Types and categories of ordinary legal remedies were scrutinized, as well as strict time limits within one should lodge an appeal and proper grounds for making an appeal. The author also responds to questions under which circumstances are ordinary legal remedies allowed, and what types of decisions a higher court can make after reviewing the correctness and reasonableness of a decision issued by a lower court. Shortly after enactment of the Code of 1853 it appeared that judicial procedure is too complicated, expensive and ineffective due to too many legal remedies and legal jurisdictions. That is the reason why the Supreme court as the highest court within the hierarchy of legal jurisdictions and as final court of appeal was abolished in 1860, when new Code of Civil Procedure had been passed. New codification envisaged Court of Appeal as second instance court and, at the same time, court of last resort. Regarding legal remedies, Code of 1860 introduced appeal as sole ordinary legal remedy.

  20. From Sharing to Experimenting: How Mobile Technologies Are Helping Ordinary Citizens Regain Their Positions as Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devisch, Oswald; Veestraeten, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Citizen science is a term used to describe the engagement of ordinary citizens in scientific tasks like observation, measurement, and computation. A series of technological innovations, such as the Internet, the upgrade of mobile phones from communication devices to networked mobile personal measurement devices, and the introduction of…

  1. 29th June 2017 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Thursday, 29 June 2017 from 15.30 to 17.30, Main Auditorium, Meyrin (500-1-001). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its management, and an opportunity to express your opinion, particularly by taking part in votes. Other items are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Ordinary members (MPE) of the SA can take part in all votes. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give their opinion, and how? The Ordinary General Assembly is also the opportunity for members of the SA to express themselves through the addition of disc...

  2. 75 FR 43840 - Inflation Adjustment of the Ordinary Maximum and Aggravated Maximum Civil Monetary Penalties for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... penalty is available only for a violation that results in death, serious illness, or severe injury to any... Civil Monetary Penalties for a Violation of the Hazardous Material Transportation Laws and Regulations.... SUMMARY: FRA is adjusting the ordinary maximum penalty and the aggravated maximum penalty that it will...

  3. Bootstrap Confidence Intervals for Ordinary Least Squares Factor Loadings and Correlations in Exploratory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangjian; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Luo, Shanhong

    2010-01-01

    This article is concerned with using the bootstrap to assign confidence intervals for rotated factor loadings and factor correlations in ordinary least squares exploratory factor analysis. Coverage performances of "SE"-based intervals, percentile intervals, bias-corrected percentile intervals, bias-corrected accelerated percentile…

  4. Characterization of an Ordinary Teaching Practice with the Help of the Theory of Didactic Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersant, Magali; Perrin-Glorian, Marie-Jeanne

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we use the theory of didactic situations to characterize a mathematics teaching practice, currently used in secondary schools in France, which we have called "interactive synthesis discussion." We have studied this practice in ordinary classes, i.e. classes where the researcher intervenes neither in the preparation nor in…

  5. The Ordinary Limit for Varieties over Z[x1, . . . , xr

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, J.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate for families of smooth projective varieties over a localized polynomial ring Z[x_1,...,x_r][D^{-1}] the conjugate filtration on De Rham cohomology tensored with Z/NZ. As N tends to infinity this leads to the concept of the ordinary limit, which seems to be the non-archimedean analogue

  6. Impact-induced frictional melting in ordinary chondrites: A mechanism for deformation, darkening, and vein formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bogert, C. H.; Schultz, P. H.; Spray, J. G.

    2003-10-01

    High speed friction experiments have been performed on the ordinary chondrites El Hammami (H5, S2) and Sahara 97001 (L6, S3) using an axial friction-welding apparatus. Each sample was subjected to a strain rate of 103 to 104 s-1, which generated 250 to 500 μm-deep darkened zones on each sample cube. Thin section analyses reveal that the darkened areas are composed of silicate glass and mineral fragments intermingled with dispersed submicron-size FeNi and FeS blebs. Fracturing of mineral grains and the formation of tiny metallic veins define the extent of deformation beyond the darkened shear zone. These features are not present in the original meteorites. The shear zones and tiny veins are quite similar to certain vein systems seen in naturally deformed ordinary chondrites. The experiments show that shock deformation is not required for the formation of melt veins and darkening in ordinary chondrites. Therefore, the presence of melt veins and darkening does not imply that an ordinary chondrite has undergone severe shock deformation. In fact, high strain rate deformation and frictional melting are especially important for the formation of veins at low shock pressures.

  7. Comparing the efficiency of Denture brush and Ordinary brush in complete Denture cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Fayaz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Please cite this article as: Fayaz A, Shakerian M, Ansari GH. Comparing the Efficiency of Denture brush and Ordinary brush in complete Denture cleaning. Novel Biomed 2013;1(2:62-65.Background & objective: Denture cleansing is a key element in retaining mucosa free of any inflammation. However, many denture users usually ignore this important factor. This investigation was designed to compare the efficacy of a denture brush and an ordinary brush in cleansing process of complete dentures.Materials & Methods: A group of 31 individuals aged 44-76 years were included in this study. Each patient was then instructed to use the denture brush for a period of 4 weeks while an ordinary brush was to be used for the following 4 weeks. Dentures were photographed and evaluated at every two week intervals using a computer photographic software assessment method. Pictures were compared using the image tool for plaque remaining on the denture surfaces. Student t-test was used to analyse data collected.Results: Comparison of the brush type efficacy at 2 and 4 weeks did not show any significant difference ( P>0.05 , however , clinical evaluation indicated that denture brush leaves much less plaque bio-film compare to the ordinary one, with mean plaque traced at 6.88 to 9.24 in 4 weeks.Conclusion: There were no significant differences found between the two brushes’ efficacy, with clinical evaluation significantly in favor of denture brush.

  8. Digital urbanisms : Exploring the spectacular, ordinary and contested facets of the media city

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuolteenaho, Jani; Leurs, K.H.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/343295334; Sumiala, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    This introductory review article develops an analytic-conceptual distinction between spectacular, ordinary and contested facets of the present-day digitized urban condition. We reject a scholarly techno-optimism versus techno-pessimism dichotomy and argue that this triadic conceptualization can pave

  9. 3D Laser Scanning Assisted by Ordinary Plane Mirror for Non-direct Viewing Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Fan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial 3D laser scanning is one of principal methods to get the geometric information of object surface,and the integrity of the scanned object is a basic requirement in data acquisition. In order to solve the missing point cloud problem due to the scanning dead angle caused by confined working space,this paper proposes a method using ordinary plane mirror to obtain laser scanning data for non-direct viewing area according to the plane mirror reflection principle,analyzes the influence mechanism of the ordinary plane mirror on the propagation path and distance of laser beam,deduces the coordinate equation of the object point corresponding to the image point reflected by ordinary plane mirror in laser scanning. Given the laser scanning characteristic,this paper introduces a mirror reflection system included target balls and ordinary plane mirror,and expounds the system construction,system calibration and constructing method of system coordinate system. The feasibility and precision of the method are verified by experiments.

  10. First-episode psychosis patients recruited into treatment via early detection teams versus ordinary pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Jan O; Friis, Svein; Joa, Inge

    2007-01-01

    Within an early detection sector, to compare the 1- and 2-year course and outcome of first-episode psychosis patients coming into the treatment system via active outreach detection teams (DTs) versus those achieving help via ordinary referral channels (not-DT)....

  11. Ordinary Level as Results Predictors of Students' Academic Performance in Chemistry in Nigerian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolawole, E. B.; Oginni, O. I.; Fayomi, E. O.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined ordinary level result as predictors of students' academic performance in chemistry in South-west Nigeria universities. It also examined the relationship between the academic performance of students in each level of the university examinations and their corresponding secondary school certificates examination. The sample of the…

  12. An Ordinary Level as Predictors of Students' Academic Performance in Chemistry in Nigerian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolawole, E. B.; Oginni, O. I.; Fayomi, E. O.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined an ordinary level as predictors of students' academic performance in chemistry in South-west Nigeria universities. It also revealed the relationship between the academic performance of students in each level of the university examinations and their corresponding secondary school certificates examination. The sample of the study…

  13. Spontaneous Up states in vitro: a single-metric index of the functional maturation and regional differentiation of the cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlos eRigas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the development and differentiation of the neocortex remains a central focus of neuroscience. While previous studies have examined isolated aspects of cellular and synaptic organization, an integrated functional index of the cortical microcircuit is still lacking. Here we aimed to provide such an index, in the form of spontaneously recurring periods of persistent network activity -or Up states- recorded in mouse cortical slices. These coordinated network dynamics emerge through the orchestrated regulation of multiple cellular and synaptic elements and represent the default activity of the cortical microcircuit. To explore whether spontaneous Up states can capture developmental changes in intracortical networks we obtained local field potential recordings throughout the mouse lifespan. Two independent and complementary methodologies revealed that Up state activity is systematically modified by age, with the largest changes occurring during early development and adolescence. To explore possible regional heterogeneities we also compared the development of Up states in two distinct cortical areas and show that primary somatosensory cortex develops at a faster pace than primary motor cortex. Our findings suggest that in vitro Up states can serve as a functional index of cortical development and differentiation and can provide a baseline for comparing experimental and/or genetic mouse models.

  14. The Relationship between Knowledge Management and Organizational Learning with the Effectiveness of Ordinary and Smart Secondary School Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khammar, Zahra; Heidarzadegan, Alireza; Balaghat, Seyed Reza; Salehi, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between knowledge management and organizational learning with the effectiveness of ordinary and smart high school principals in Zahedan Pre-province. The statistical community of this research is 1350 male and female teachers teaching in ordinary and smart students of high schools in that 300 ones…

  15. Influence of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on the Sulfate Attack upon Ordinary Portland Cement and Slag-Blended Mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qudoos, Abdul; Kim, Hong Gi; Ryou, Jae-Suk

    2018-02-28

    In this study, the effects of titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanoparticles on the sulfate attack resistance of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and slag-blended mortars were investigated. OPC and slag-blended mortars (OPC:Slag = 50:50) were made with water to binder ratio of 0.4 and a binder to sand ratio of 1:3. TiO₂ was added as an admixture as 0%, 3%, 6%, 9% and 12% of the binder weight. Mortar specimens were exposed to an accelerated sulfate attack environment. Expansion, changes in mass and surface microhardness were measured. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) tests were conducted. The formation of ettringite and gypsum crystals after the sulfate attack were detected. Both these products had caused crystallization pressure in the microstructure of mortars and deteriorated the mortars. Our results show that the addition of nano-TiO₂ accelerated expansion, variation in mass, loss of surface microhardness and widened cracks in OPC and slag-blended mortars. Nano-TiO₂ containing slag-blended mortars were more resistant to sulfate attack than nano-TiO₂ containing OPC mortars. Because nano-TiO₂ reduced the size of coarse pores, so it increased crystallization pressure due to the formation of ettringite and gypsum thus led to more damage under sulfate attack.

  16. Influence of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on the Sulfate Attack upon Ordinary Portland Cement and Slag-Blended Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atta-ur-Rehman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles on the sulfate attack resistance of ordinary Portland cement (OPC and slag-blended mortars were investigated. OPC and slag-blended mortars (OPC:Slag = 50:50 were made with water to binder ratio of 0.4 and a binder to sand ratio of 1:3. TiO2 was added as an admixture as 0%, 3%, 6%, 9% and 12% of the binder weight. Mortar specimens were exposed to an accelerated sulfate attack environment. Expansion, changes in mass and surface microhardness were measured. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC tests were conducted. The formation of ettringite and gypsum crystals after the sulfate attack were detected. Both these products had caused crystallization pressure in the microstructure of mortars and deteriorated the mortars. Our results show that the addition of nano-TiO2 accelerated expansion, variation in mass, loss of surface microhardness and widened cracks in OPC and slag-blended mortars. Nano-TiO2 containing slag-blended mortars were more resistant to sulfate attack than nano-TiO2 containing OPC mortars. Because nano-TiO2 reduced the size of coarse pores, so it increased crystallization pressure due to the formation of ettringite and gypsum thus led to more damage under sulfate attack.

  17. Fiducial, total and differential cross-section measurements oft-channel single top-quark production inppcollisions at 8 TeV using data collected by the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaboud, M; Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Abeloos, B; AbouZeid, O S; Abraham, N L; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adachi, S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Verzini, M J Alconada; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Ali, B; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allen, B W; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Alshehri, A A; Alstaty, M; Gonzalez, B Alvarez; Piqueras, D Álvarez; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Coutinho, Y Amaral; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Santos, S P Amor Dos; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antel, C; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antrim, D J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Bella, L Aperio; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Armitage, L J; Arnaez, O; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Artz, S; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Augsten, K; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Baca, M J; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Baines, J T; Bajic, M; Baker, O K; Baldin, E M; Balek, P; Balestri, T; Balli, F; Balunas, W K; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Barak, L; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Navarro, L Barranco; Barreiro, F; da Costa, J Barreiro Guimarães; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Basalaev, A; Bassalat, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Bauce, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, M; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bedognetti, M; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, J K; Bell, A S; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Belyaev, N L; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bender, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Noccioli, E Benhar; Benitez, J; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Beresford, L; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Kuutmann, E Bergeaas; Berger, N; Beringer, J; Berlendis, S; Bernard, N R; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertram, I A; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besjes, G J; Bylund, O Bessidskaia; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethani, A; Bethke, S; Bevan, A J; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biedermann, D; Bielski, R; Biesuz, N V; Biglietti, M; De Mendizabal, J Bilbao; Billoud, T R V; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biondi, S; Bisanz, T; Bjergaard, D M; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blue, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Blunier, S; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boehler, M; Boerner, D; Bogaerts, J A; Bogavac, D; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bokan, P; Bold, T; Boldyrev, A S; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Bortfeldt, J; Bortoletto, D; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Sola, J D Bossio; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Boutle, S K; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Madden, W D Breaden; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, L; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Britzger, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Broughton, J H; de Renstrom, P A Bruckman; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruni, L S; Brunt, B H; Bruschi, M; Bruscino, N; Bryant, P; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Buehrer, F; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Bullock, D; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgard, C D; Burger, A M; Burghgrave, B; Burka, K; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Burr, J T P; Busato, E; Büscher, D; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Butti, P; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Buzykaev, A R; Urbán, S Cabrera; Caforio, D; Cairo, V M; Cakir, O; Calace, N; Calafiura, P; Calandri, A; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Callea, G; Caloba, L P

    2017-01-01

    Detailed measurements of t -channel single top-quark production are presented. They use 20.2 fb[Formula: see text] of data collected by the ATLAS experiment in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the LHC. Total, fiducial and differential cross-sections are measured for both top-quark and top-antiquark production. The fiducial cross-section is measured with a precision of 5.8% (top quark) and 7.8% (top antiquark), respectively. The total cross-sections are measured to be [Formula: see text] for top-quark production and [Formula: see text] for top-antiquark production, in agreement with the Standard Model prediction. In addition, the ratio of top-quark to top-antiquark production cross-sections is determined to be [Formula: see text]. The differential cross-sections as a function of the transverse momentum and rapidity of both the top quark and the top antiquark are measured at both the parton and particle levels. The transverse momentum and rapidity differential cross-sections of the accompanying jet from the t -channel scattering are measured at particle level. All measurements are compared to various Monte Carlo predictions as well as to fixed-order QCD calculations where available.

  18. Development of allele-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism-based polymerase chain reaction markers in cytochrome oxidase I for the differentiation of Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Tock H; Song, B K; Chong, Y V

    2010-12-01

    Differentiation of Bactrocera papayae Drew & Hancock and Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock (Diptera: Tephritidae) based on morphological characters has often been problematical. We describe here a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to differentiate between these two species. For detection of SNPs, fragments derived from each species were amplified using two primer pairs, COIF/COIR and UEA7/UEA10, sequenced, and aligned to obtain a contiguous 1,517-bp segment. Two new sets of primers were designed based on the 11 SNPs identified in the region. Results of the SNP-PCR test using any one of these species-specific primer sets indicate that these two species could be differentiated on basis of presence or absence of a band in the gel profile. We also tested the SNP-PCR primers on Bactrocera umbrosa F., Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett, Bactrocera latifrons Hendel, and Bactrocera tau (Walker) but did not detect any band in the gel, indicating the likelihood of a false positive for B. papayae is nil. This SNP-PCR method is efficient and useful, especially for immature life stages or when only adult body parts of the two species are available for identification, as encountered often in quarantine work.

  19. Measurements of the differential cross section and charge asymmetry for inclusive pp →W (muupsilon) production with 8 TeV CMS data and CMS single muon trigger efficiency study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogul, Hasan

    This dissertation presents muon charge asymmetry, fiducial differential cross section and CMS single muon trigger efficiency measurements as a function of muon pseudorapidity for inclusive W→muupsilon events produced in proton-proton collisions at the LHC. The data were recorded by the CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 18.8 fb-1. Several comparisons are performed to cross-check the experimental results. Muon efficiency measurements are compared to estimated values from Monte Carlo simulations and reference values recommended by CMS physics object groups. The differential cross section and the charge asymmetry measurements are compared to theoretical predictions based on next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order QCD calculations with different PDF models. Inputs from the charge asymmetry and the differential cross section measurements for the determination of the next generation of PDF sets are expected to bring different predictions closer together and aid in reducing PDF uncertainties. The impact of the charge asymmetry on PDFs has been investigated by putting the asymmetry results into a QCD analysis at next-to-leading order and next-to-nextleading order with inclusive deep-inelastic scattering data from HERA. Significant improvement of the accuracy on the valence-quark distributions is observed. This measurement is recommended for more accurate constraints in future PDF determinations. More precise measurements of PDFs will improve LHC predictions.

  20. [Genetic Differentiation of Sockeye Salmon Oncorhynchus nerka from Kamchatka River Basin and the Lake-River Systems of the West Coast of the Bering Sea as Inferred from Data on Single Nucleotide Polymorphism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrustaleva, A M; Klovach, N V; Vedischeva, E V; Seeb, J E

    2015-10-01

    The variability of 45 single nucleotide polymorphism loci (SNP) was studied in sockeye salmon from the Kamchatka River basin and four lake-river systems of the west coast of the Bering Sea. Based on the genetic differentiation estimates for the largest sockeye salmon populations of Eastern Kamchatka and Chukotka, the examined samples were combined into two regional groups represented by the population of the Kamchatka River drainage, which included numerous local subpopulations and seasonal races, and the northern population grouping from the rivers of Olutorsko-Navarinsky raion, wherein the sockeye salmon from Maynypilginskaya Lake-River system was relatively isolated. Considerable divergence was observed between the island (Sarannoe Lake, Bering Island) and continental populations. Genetic heterogeneity was revealed and groups of early- and late-maturing individuals were isolated in the sample of late-run sockeye salmon from Kamchatka River. In Apuka River, subdivision of the spawning run into two genetically distinct spatial and temporal groupings was also observed. The results suggest that the differentiation of sockeye salmon samples by single nucleotide substitution frequencies was largely due to differences in the direction and strength of local selection at some loci in the population complexes and intrapopulation groupings from the examined river basins of Eastern Kamchatka, Chukotka, and Commander Islands.

  1. Adaptive super-twisting sliding mode control for a three-phase single-stage grid-connected differential boost inverter based photovoltaic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Akshaya K; Sahoo, N C

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents an adaptive super-twisting sliding mode control (STC) along with double-loop control for voltage tracking performance of three-phase differential boost inverter and DC-link capacitor voltage regulation in grid-connected PV system. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategies are demonstrated under realistic scenarios such as variations in solar insolation, load power demand, grid voltage, and transition from grid-connected to standalone mode etc. Additional supplementary power quality control functions such as harmonic compensation, and reactive power management are also investigated with the proposed control strategy. The results are compared with conventional proportional-integral controller, and PWM sliding mode controller. The system performance is evaluated in simulation and in real-time. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Numerical Aspects of Solving Differential Equations: Laboratory Approach for Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Ana

    1997-01-01

    Describes three labs designed to help students in a first course on ordinary differential equations with three of the most common numerical difficulties they might encounter when solving initial value problems with a numerical software package. The goal of these labs is to help students advance to independent work on common numerical anomalies.…

  3. Randomized and quantum algorithms for solving initial-value problems in ordinary differential equations of order k

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Goćwin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of initial-value problems is well studied for systems of equations of first order. In this paper, we study the \\(\\varepsilon\\-complexity for initial-value problems for scalar equations of higher order. We consider two models of computation, the randomized model and the quantum model. We construct almost optimal algorithms adjusted to scalar equations of higher order, without passing to systems of first order equations. The analysis of these algorithms allows us to establish upper complexity bounds. We also show (almost matching lower complexity bounds. The \\(\\varepsilon\\-complexity in the randomized and quantum setting depends on the regularity of the right-hand side function, but is independent of the order of equation. Comparing the obtained bounds with results known in the deterministic case, we see that randomized algorithms give us a speed-up by \\(1/2\\, and quantum algorithms by \\(1\\ in the exponent. Hence, the speed-up does not depend on the order of equation, and is the same as for the systems of equations of first order. We also include results of some numerical experiments which confirm theoretical results.

  4. 1979 SIGNUM meeting on numerical ordinary differential equations. [University Inn, Champaign, IL, April 3-5, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skeel, R. D. [ed.

    1979-04-01

    This report gives a summary of the papers presented at the meeting. It consists of all working papers distributed at the conference and all working papers received too late for distribution. In addition, abstracts and/or summaries are included where practical for those talks and workshop sessions that did not generate papers. This document should be a useful reference to very current research in ODEs. These papers are preliminary versions of papers that will be submitted for publication. One paper in this volume has been cited in ERA, and can be located by reference to the entry CONF-790403-- in the Report Number Index.

  5. Synchronisation, electronic circuit implementation, and fractional-order analysis of 5D ordinary differential equations with hidden hyperchaotic attractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhouchao; Rajagopal, Karthikeyan; Zhang, Wei; Kingni, Sifeu Takougang; Akgül, Akif

    2018-04-01

    Hidden hyperchaotic attractors can be generated with three positive Lyapunov exponents in the proposed 5D hyperchaotic Burke-Shaw system with only one stable equilibrium. To the best of our knowledge, this feature has rarely been previously reported in any other higher-dimensional systems. Unidirectional linear error feedback coupling scheme is used to achieve hyperchaos synchronisation, which will be estimated by using two indicators: the normalised average root-mean squared synchronisation error and the maximum cross-correlation coefficient. The 5D hyperchaotic system has been simulated using a specially designed electronic circuit and viewed on an oscilloscope, thereby confirming the results of the numerical integration. In addition, fractional-order hidden hyperchaotic system will be considered from the following three aspects: stability, bifurcation analysis and FPGA implementation. Such implementations in real time represent hidden hyperchaotic attractors with important consequences for engineering applications.

  6. Simultaneous ordinary and type A N-fold supersymmetries in Schrodinger, Pauli, and Dirac equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C.-L.; Tanaka, T.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate physical models which possess simultaneous ordinary and type A N-fold supersymmetries, which we call type A (N,1)-fold supersymmetry. Inequivalent type A (N,1)-fold supersymmetric models with real-valued potentials are completely classified. Among them, we find that a trigonometric Rosen-Morse type and its elliptic version are of physical interest. We investigate various aspects of these models, namely, dynamical breaking and interrelation between ordinary and N-fold supersymmetries, shape invariance, quasi-solvability, and an associated algebra which is composed of one bosonic and four fermionic operators and dubbed type A (N,1)-fold superalgebra. As realistic physical applications, we demonstrate how these systems can be embedded into Pauli and Dirac equations in external electromagnetic fields

  7. Conjecturing via analogical reasoning constructs ordinary students into like gifted student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supratman; Ratnaningsih, N.; Ryane, S.

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the development of knowledge of ordinary students to be like gifted students in the classroom based on Piaget's theory. In exposing it, students are given an open problem of classical analogy. Researchers explore students who conjecture via analogical reasoning in problem solving. Of the 32 students, through the method of think out loud and the interview was completed: 25 students conjecture via analogical reasoning. Of the 25 students, all of them have almost the same character in problem solving/knowledge construction. For that, a student is taken to analyze the thinking process while solving the problem/construction of knowledge based on Piaget's theory. Based on Piaget's theory in the development of the same knowledge, gifted students and ordinary students have similar structures in final equilibrium. They begin processing: assimilation and accommodation of problem, strategies, and relationships.

  8. Preliminary study for the personal handheld device based snoring detection in ordinary sleep situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hangsik; Choi, Wangrim; Kim, Yi-gon; Cho, Jaegeol

    2014-01-01

    Snoring is one of the representative phenomena of the sleep disorder and detection of snoring is quite important for improving quality of daily human life. The purpose of this research is to define the noises of the ordinary sleep situation and to find its characteristics as a preliminary research of snoring detection. Differently from previous snoring researches, we use a built-in sound recording system of Smartphone for practical use in ordinary sleep condition, and recording was carried out in a general private bedroom. Especially, we designed the experimental protocol, including the various noises could be frequently occurred during sleep such as cough, music, talking, alarm, door open/close, fan, radio and footstep to make closer to the actual sleep circumstance. The sound data set was recorded during actual sleep from 10 normal subjects. Totally 44 snoring data set and 75-noise dataset is acquired and analyzed.

  9. Heat generation and temperature-rise in ordinary concrete due to capture of thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, E.A.; Amin, E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is the evaluation of the heat generation and temperature-rise in local ordinary concrete as a biological shield due to capture of total thermal and reactor thermal neutrons. The total thermal neutron fluxes were measured and calculated. The channel number 2 of the ETRR-1 reactor was used in the measurements as a neutron source. Computer code ANISN (VAX version) and neutron multigroup cross-section library EURLiB-4 was used in the calculations. The heat generation and temperature-rise in local ordinary concrete were evaluated and calculated. The results were displayed in curves to show the distribution of thermal neutron fluxes and heat generation as well as temperature-rise with the shield thickness. The results showed that, the heat generation as well as the temperature-rise have their maximum values in the first layers of the shield thickness. 4 figs., 12 refs

  10. Prediction of the Spatial Distribution of Bovine Endemic Fluorosis Using Ordinary Kriging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the studies was to develop an alternative method which could overcome the lack of sampling to improve the efficiency of control efforts for bovine endemic fluorosis. The spatial distribution characteristics of the disease were analysed and a prediction model for the estimation of fluorosis distribution in some districts in northwest Liaoning province in China was established. The model used ordinary kriging, and was evaluated using cross-validation. Analysis showed that the distribution of the disease was spatial autocorrelation. The prediction error of the cross-validation (ME = -0.0092, PMSE = 0.627, AKSE = 0.597, and RMSP = 1.007 and comparison with the actual disease distribution indicated that the prediction map accurately distributed bovine endemic fluorosis. It is feasible to predict bovine endemic fluorosis in the area by using ordinary kriging and limited data.

  11. Resetting of circadian melatonin and cortisol rhythms in humans by ordinary room light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, D. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether a weak photic stimulus can reset the endogenous circadian rhythms of plasma melatonin and plasma cortisol in human subjects. A stimulus consisting of three cycles of 5 h exposures to ordinary room light (approximately 180 lux), centered 1.5 h after the endogenous temperature nadir, significantly phase-advanced the plasma melatonin rhythm in eight healthy young men compared with the phase delays observed in eight control subjects who underwent the same protocol but were exposed to darkness (p melatonin and plasma cortisol maintained stable temporal relationships with the endogenous core body temperature cycle, consistent with the conclusion that exposure to ordinary indoor room light had shifted a master circadian pacemaker.

  12. Single-cell transcriptomic reconstruction reveals cell cycle and multi-lineage differentiation defects in Bcl11a-deficient hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Jason C H; Yu, Yong; Burke, Shannon; Buettner, Florian; Wang, Cui; Kolodziejczyk, Aleksandra A; Teichmann, Sarah A; Lu, Liming; Liu, Pentao

    2015-09-21

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a rare cell type with the ability of long-term self-renewal and multipotency to reconstitute all blood lineages. HSCs are typically purified from the bone marrow using cell surface markers. Recent studies have identified significant cellular heterogeneities in the HSC compartment with subsets of HSCs displaying lineage bias. We previously discovered that the transcription factor Bcl11a has critical functions in the lymphoid development of the HSC compartment. In this report, we employ single-cell transcriptomic analysis to dissect the molecular heterogeneities in HSCs. We profile the transcriptomes of 180 highly purified HSCs (Bcl11a (+/+) and Bcl11a (-/-)). Detailed analysis of the RNA-seq data identifies cell cycle activity as the major source of transcriptomic variation in the HSC compartment, which allows reconstruction of HSC cell cycle progression in silico. Single-cell RNA-seq profiling of Bcl11a (-/-) HSCs reveals abnormal proliferative phenotypes. Analysis of lineage gene expression suggests that the Bcl11a (-/-) HSCs are constituted of two distinct myeloerythroid-restricted subpopulations. Remarkably, similar myeloid-restricted cells could also be detected in the wild-type HSC compartment, suggesting selective elimination of lymphoid-competent HSCs after Bcl11a deletion. These defects are experimentally validated in serial transplantation experiments where Bcl11a (-/-) HSCs are myeloerythroid-restricted and defective in self-renewal. Our study demonstrates the power of single-cell transcriptomics in dissecting cellular process and lineage heterogeneities in stem cell compartments, and further reveals the molecular and cellular defects in the Bcl11a-deficient HSC compartment.

  13. A Combined Cognitive Stimulation and Physical Exercise Programme (MINDVital) in Early Dementia: Differential Effects on Single- and Dual-Task Gait Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Laura; Lim, Wee Shiong; Chan, Mark; Ali, Noorhazlina; Chong, Mei Sian

    2016-01-01

    Gait disorders are common in early dementia, with particularly pronounced dual-task deficits, contributing to the increased fall risk and mobility decline associated with cognitive impairment. This study examines the effects of a combined cognitive stimulation and physical exercise programme (MINDVital) on gait performance under single- and dual-task conditions in older adults with mild dementia. Thirty-nine patients with early dementia participated in a multi-disciplinary rehabilitation programme comprising both physical exercise and cognitive stimulation. The programme was conducted in 8-week cycles with participants attending once weekly, and all participants completed 2 successive cycles. Cognitive, functional performance and behavioural symptoms were assessed at baseline and at the end of each 8-week cycle. Gait speed was examined under both single- (Timed Up and Go and 6-metre walk tests) and dual-task (animal category and serial counting) conditions. A random effects model was performed for the independent effect of MINDVital on the primary outcome variable of gait speed under dual-task conditions. The mean age of patients enroled in the rehabilitation programme was 79 ± 6.2 years; 25 (64.1%) had a diagnosis of Alzheimer's dementia, and 26 (66.7%) were receiving a cognitive enhancer therapy. There was a significant improvement in cognitive performance [random effects coefficient (standard error) = 0.90 (0.31), p = 0.003] and gait speed under both dual-task situations [animal category: random effects coefficient = 0.04 (0.02), p = 0.039; serial counting: random effects coefficient = 0.05 (0.02), p = 0.013], with reduced dual-task cost for gait speed [serial counting: random effects coefficient = -4.05 (2.35), p = 0.086] following successive MINDVital cycles. No significant improvement in single-task gait speed was observed. Improved cognitive performance over time was a significant determinant of changes in dual-task gait speed [random effects coefficients

  14. Probabilistic assessment of steel moment frames incremental collapse (ordinary, intermediate and special under earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Mehdizadeh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Building collapse is a level of the structure performance in which the amount of financial and life loss is maximized, so this event could be the worst incident in the construction. Regarding to the possibility of destructive earthquakes in different parts of the world, detailed assessment of the structure's collapse has been one of the major challenges of the structural engineering. In this regard, offering models based on laboratory studies, considering the effective parameters and appropriate earthquakes could be a step towards achieving this goal. In this research, a five-story steel structure with a system of ordinary, intermediate and special moment frame (low, intermediate and high ductility has been designed based on the local regulations. In this study, the effect of resistance and stiffness deterioration of the structural elements based on the results of the laboratory models have been considered and the ductility role in the collapse capacity of steel moment frames has been investigated as probabilistic matter. For this purpose, incremental dynamic analysis has been done under 50 pairs of earthquake records proposing FEMA P695 instruction and fragility curves of various performance levels are developed. Results showed higher collapse capacity of special moment steel frame than the intermediate and ordinary moment frames. In the 50 percent probability level, the collapse capacity of special moment frame increased 34 % compared to the intermediate moment frame and 66 % to the ordinary moment frame. Also, the results showed that for different collapse spectral accelerations, the use of special moment frame instead of intermediate and ordinary moment frames reduces the collapse probability to 30 and 50 % respectively.

  15. p-adic string theories provide lattice Discretization to the ordinary string worldsheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Debashis

    2006-10-13

    A class of models called p-adic strings is useful in understanding the tachyonic instability of string theory. These are found to be empirically related to the ordinary strings in the p-->1 limit. We propose that these models provide discretization for the string worldsheet and argue that the limit is naturally thought of as a continuum limit in the sense of the renormalization group.

  16. Comparison of Body Composition and Energy Intake of Young Female Ballet Dancers and Ordinary School Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalniņa Līga

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess body fat level, energy and nutrient intake of adolescent ballet dancers and to compare these results with those of adolescents from ordinary school. Participants included 39 ballet dancers and 70 adolescents from ordinary school. Body composition was measured using a multi-frequency 8-polar bioelectrical impedance leg-to-hand analyser (X-Scan Plus II, Korea. Dietary intakes were assessed using a three-day estimated food record. Nutritional intake was calculated using the Nutri Survey software. Ballet dancers were slightly shorter, lighter, with less fat and fat-free mass compared to girls from ordinary school. 51.3% (95% CI 35.59 to 66.97 of ballet dancers and 4% (95% CI; 0.27 to 11.15 of ordinary school girls had a body fat level of 12% or less. The recommended amount of 35–45 kcal energy to kg fat-free mass for aesthetic sports was not reached by 42.1% (95% CI 27.61 to 50.65% of ballet dancers. No statistically significant difference was found in percent body fat between ballet dancers who consumed energy less than the recommended amount compared to those who ate normally, but fatfree mass (p < 0.05 was lower in those who consumed 35–45 kcal energy to kg fat-free mass or less compared to those who ate more. The investigated groups had an inadequate intake of minerals and vitamins during the winter period.

  17. Experimental Space Weathering of Ordinary Chondrites by Nanopulse Laser: TEM Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S. K.; Hiroi, T.; Keller, L. P.; Pieters, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    A set of ordinary chondrite meteorites has been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser to simulate the effects of micrometeorite bombardment. Three meteorites, an H (Ehole), L (Chateau Renard - CR), and LL (Appley Bridge - AB) were lasered following the method of Sasaki et al [1]. Near IR spectra were taken before and after exposure to examine the optical changes induced and the samples were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) to understand the physical changes.

  18. Influence of Temperature on Workability and Compressive Strength of Ordinary Concrete with High Calcium Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gołaszewski Jacek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of fresh ordinary concrete are closely affected by temperature and time. The paper presents the study of consistency of fresh concrete mixtures made with Portland cement and cement with calcareous fly ash. Two types of admixtures were used. It was proven that the temperature has a clear effect on workability and compressive strength concrete. Influence on workability can be reduced by selecting the appropriate superplasticizer and cement.

  19. Review of Ordinary High Water Mark Indicators for Delineating Arid Streams in the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Pacific Ocean, but occasionally the cyclones recurve toward the northeast and make landfall, usually over Baja California or western mainland Mexico...D.R. Mabey (1966) Stratigraphy and structure, Death Valley, California . Professional Paper 494-A, U.S. Geological Survey. Kale, V.S. (2002) Fluvial...Mission Creek, east of Palm Spring, California , acquired during CRREL/NASA LIDAR research flights for indicators of “ordinary high water marks

  20. The total ordinary muon capture rates. Microscopic calculations for heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'min, V.A.; Tetereva, T.V.; Ovchinnikova, A.A.; Junker, K.

    2000-01-01

    The total ordinary muon capture (OMC) rates are calculated on the basis of the Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation for several spherical nuclei from 90 Zr to 208 Pb. It is shown that the total OMC rates calculated with the free value of axial-vector coupling constant g A agree well with the experimental data for medium-size nuclei and exceed considerably the experimental rates for heavy nuclei. The sensitivity of theoretical OMC rates to the nuclear residual interactions is discussed

  1. Ordinary kriging approach to predicting long-term particulate matter concentrations in seven major Korean cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Young Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Cohort studies of associations between air pollution and health have used exposure prediction approaches to estimate individual-level concentrations. A common prediction method used in Korean cohort studies is ordinary kriging. In this study, performance of ordinary kriging models for long-term particulate matter less than or equal to 10 μm in diameter (PM10 concentrations in seven major Korean cities was investigated with a focus on spatial prediction ability. Methods We obtained hourly PM10 data for 2010 at 226 urban-ambient monitoring sites in South Korea and computed annual average PM10 concentrations at each site. Given the annual averages, we developed ordinary kriging prediction models for each of the seven major cities and for the entire country by using an exponential covariance reference model and a maximum likelihood estimation method. For model evaluation, cross-validation was performed and mean square error and R-squared (R2 statistics were computed. Results Mean annual average PM10 concentrations in the seven major cities ranged between 45.5 and 66.0 μg/m3 (standard deviation=2.40 and 9.51 μg/m3, respectively. Cross-validated R2 values in Seoul and Busan were 0.31 and 0.23, respectively, whereas the other five cities had R2 values of zero. The national model produced a higher crossvalidated R2 (0.36 than those for the city-specific models. Conclusions In general, the ordinary kriging models performed poorly for the seven major cities and the entire country of South Korea, but the model performance was better in the national model. To improve model performance, future studies should examine different prediction approaches that incorporate PM10 source characteristics.

  2. Insight into the dynamics of low temperature dielectric relaxation of ordinary perovskite ferroelectrics

    OpenAIRE

    Levit Valenzuela, Rafael; Ochoa Guerrero, Diego A.; Martínez García, Julio Cesar; García García, José Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the dielectric response of ordinary ferroelectric materials exhibits a frequency-independent anomalous peak as a manifestation of the ferroelectric to paraelectric phase transition. A second anomaly in the permittivity has been reported in different ferroelectric perovskite-type systems at low temperatures, often at cryogenic temperatures. This anomaly manifests as a frequency-dependent local maximum, which exhibits similar characteristics to that observed in rel...

  3. Physiological effects of acute and ordinary bed rest conditions on endurance trained volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorbas, Y. G.; Ivanov, A. A.; Madvedev, S. N.; Kakurin, A. G.

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a comparative study of water balance and water protein composition of the blood during exposure to acute (abrupt restriction of motor activity) and ordinary rigorous bed rest of 7 days. The studies were performed on 30 long distance runners aged 22-25 years old who had a VO 2 max of 66 ml kg -1·min -1 on the average. The volunteers were divided into three equal groups: the volunteers in the 1st group were under a normal ambulatory life conditions (control subjects), the volunteers of the 2nd group subjected to an acute bed rest (abrupt restriction of motor activity) regime (acute bed rested subjects) and the volunteers of the 3rd group were submitted to ordinary and rigorous bed rest (rigorous bed rested subjects). All volunteers were on an average of 13.8 km/day before taking part in this investigation. The 2nd and 3rd groups of volunteers were kept under a rigorous bed rest regime for 7 days. During the prebed rest period and actual bed rest period plasma volume (PV), total protein and protein fractions (albumins and globulins) and hematocrit were measured. Exposure to acute bed rest conditions induced a significant increase in hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, protein fractions and marked decrease in (PV) and water balance which were significantly more pronounced than during exposure to ordinary rigorous bed rest. It was concluded that exposure to acute bed rest conditions induces significantly greater changes in water balance and water-protein concentration of the blood of endurance trained volunteers than exposure to ordinary rigorous bed rest conditions.

  4. Ordinary-derivative formulation of conformal totally symmetric arbitrary spin bosonic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Metsaev, R. R.

    2007-01-01

    Conformal totally symmetric arbitrary spin bosonic fields in flat space-time of even dimension greater than or equal to four are studied. Second-derivative (ordinary-derivative) formulation for such fields is developed. We obtain gauge invariant Lagrangian and the corresponding gauge transformations. Gauge symmetries are realized by involving the Stueckelberg and auxiliary fields. Realization of global conformal boost symmetries on conformal gauge fields is obtained. Modified de Donder gauge ...

  5. Tribocorrosion Study of Ordinary and Laser-Melted Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danillo P. Silva

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium alloys are used in biomedical implants, as well as in other applications, due to the excellent combination of corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. However, the tribocorrosion resistance of titanium alloy is normally not satisfactory. Therefore, surface modification is a way to improve this specific performance. In the present paper, laser surface-modified samples were tested in corrosion and pin-on-disk tribocorrosion testing in 0.90% NaCl under an average Hertzian pressure of 410 MPa against an alumina sphere. Laser-modified samples of Ti6Al4V were compared with ordinary Ti6Al4V alloy. Electrochemical impedance showed higher modulus for laser-treated samples than for ordinary Ti6Al4V ones. Moreover, atomic force microscopy revealed that laser-treated surfaces presented less wear than ordinary alloy for the initial exposure. For a further exposure to wear, i.e., when the wear depth is beyond the initial laser-affected layer, both materials showed similar corrosion behavior. Microstructure analysis and finite element method simulations revealed that the different behavior between the initial and the extensive rubbing was related to a fine martensite-rich external layer developed on the irradiated surface of the fusion zone.

  6. Sobolev gradients and differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, J W

    2010-01-01

    A Sobolev gradient of a real-valued functional on a Hilbert space is a gradient of that functional taken relative to an underlying Sobolev norm. This book shows how descent methods using such gradients allow a unified treatment of a wide variety of problems in differential equations. For discrete versions of partial differential equations, corresponding Sobolev gradients are seen to be vastly more efficient than ordinary gradients. In fact, descent methods with these gradients generally scale linearly with the number of grid points, in sharp contrast with the use of ordinary gradients. Aside from the first edition of this work, this is the only known account of Sobolev gradients in book form. Most of the applications in this book have emerged since the first edition was published some twelve years ago. What remains of the first edition has been extensively revised. There are a number of plots of results from calculations and a sample MatLab code is included for a simple problem. Those working through a fair p...

  7. Asymptotic behavior and stability of second order neutral delay differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, G.L.; van Gaans, O.W.; Verduyn Lunel, Sjoerd

    2014-01-01

    We study the asymptotic behavior of a class of second order neutral delay differential equations by both a spectral projection method and an ordinary differential equation method approach. We discuss the relation of these two methods and illustrate some features using examples. Furthermore, a fixed

  8. The Local Brewery: A Project for Use in Differential Equations Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, James K.; Povich, Timothy J.; Findlay, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe a modeling project designed for an ordinary differential equations (ODEs) course using first-order and systems of first-order differential equations to model the fermentation process in beer. The project aims to expose the students to the modeling process by creating and solving a mathematical model and effectively communicating their…

  9. Variations in the Solution of Linear First-Order Differential Equations. Classroom Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Brian; Osler, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    A special project which can be given to students of ordinary differential equations is described in detail. Students create new differential equations by changing the dependent variable in the familiar linear first-order equation (dv/dx)+p(x)v=q(x) by means of a substitution v=f(y). The student then creates a table of the new equations and…

  10. Production of two hemopoietic growth factors is differentially regulated in single T lymphocytes activated with an anti-T cell receptor antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelso, A; Owens, T

    1988-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure the production by single activated T lymphocytes of two hemopoietic growth factors, granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF) and multipotential CSF (multi-CSF or IL-3). When individual cells of the L3T4 (CD4)+ F23.1+ T cell clone E9.D4 were transferred...... by micromanipulation into wells coated with the monoclonal anti-T cell receptor antibody F23.1, up to 90% of cells produced CSF as detected by CSF-dependent hemopoietic cell lines. Production occurred in the absence of proliferation and did not require the addition of accessory cells or IL-2. Both the frequency of CSF...

  11. Symmetries of stochastic differential equations: A geometric approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vecchi, Francesco C., E-mail: francesco.devecchi@unimi.it; Ugolini, Stefania, E-mail: stefania.ugolini@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Saldini 50, Milano (Italy); Morando, Paola, E-mail: paola.morando@unimi.it [DISAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 2, Milano (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    A new notion of stochastic transformation is proposed and applied to the study of both weak and strong symmetries of stochastic differential equations (SDEs). The correspondence between an algebra of weak symmetries for a given SDE and an algebra of strong symmetries for a modified SDE is proved under suitable regularity assumptions. This general approach is applied to a stochastic version of a two dimensional symmetric ordinary differential equation and to the case of two dimensional Brownian motion.

  12. Analytical approach for the Floquet theory of delay differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmendinger, C; Wunderlin, A; Pelster, A

    1999-05-01

    We present an analytical approach to deal with nonlinear delay differential equations close to instabilities of time periodic reference states. To this end we start with approximately determining such reference states by extending the Poincaré-Lindstedt and the Shohat expansions, which were originally developed for ordinary differential equations. Then we systematically elaborate a linear stability analysis around a time periodic reference state. This allows us to approximately calculate the Floquet eigenvalues and their corresponding eigensolutions by using matrix valued continued fractions.

  13. Comment on "Numerical methods for stochastic differential equations".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrage, Kevin; Burrage, Pamela; Higham, Desmond J; Kloeden, Peter E; Platen, Eckhard

    2006-12-01

    Wilkie [Phys. Rev. E 70, 017701 (2004)] used a heuristic approach to derive Runge-Kutta-based numerical methods for stochastic differential equations based on methods used for solving ordinary differential equations. The aim was to follow solution paths with high order. We point out that this approach is invalid in the general case and does not lead to high order methods. We warn readers against the inappropriate use of deterministic calculus in a stochastic setting.

  14. Surveys in differential-algebraic equations III

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, Timo

    2015-01-01

    The present volume comprises survey articles on various fields of Differential-Algebraic Equations (DAEs), which have widespread applications in controlled dynamical systems, especially in mechanical and electrical engineering and a strong relation to (ordinary) differential equations. The individual chapters provide reviews, presentations of the current state of research and new concepts in - Flexibility of DAE formulations - Reachability analysis and deterministic global optimization - Numerical linear algebra methods - Boundary value problems The results are presented in an accessible style, making this book suitable not only for active researchers but also for graduate students (with a good knowledge of the basic principles of DAEs) for self-study.

  15. Surveys in differential-algebraic equations II

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, Timo

    2015-01-01

    The present volume comprises survey articles on various fields of Differential-Algebraic Equations (DAEs), which have widespread applications in controlled dynamical systems, especially in mechanical and electrical engineering and a strong relation to (ordinary) differential equations. The individual chapters provide reviews, presentations of the current state of research and new concepts in - Observers for DAEs - DAEs in chemical processes - Optimal control of DAEs - DAEs from a functional-analytic viewpoint - Algebraic methods for DAEs The results are presented in an accessible style, making this book suitable not only for active researchers but also for graduate students (with a good knowledge of the basic principles of DAEs) for self-study.

  16. Surveys in differential-algebraic equations IV

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, Timo

    2017-01-01

    The present volume comprises survey articles on various fields of Differential-Algebraic Equations (DAEs) which have widespread applications in controlled dynamical systems, especially in mechanical and electrical engineering and a strong relation to (ordinary) differential equations. The individual chapters provide reviews, presentations of the current state of research and new concepts in - History of DAEs - DAE aspects of mechanical multibody systems - Model reduction of DAEs - Observability for DAEs - Numerical Analysis for DAEs The results are presented in an accessible style, making this book suitable not only for active researchers but also for graduate students (with a good knowledge of the basic principles of DAEs) for self-study.

  17. Differential effects of dietary protein sources on postprandial low-grade inflammation after a single high fat meal in obese non-diabetic subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzig Karl-Heinz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a state of chronic low-grade inflammation. Chronic low-grade inflammation is associated with the pathophysiology of both type-2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. Prevention or reduction of chronic low-grade inflammation may be advantageous in relation to obesity related co-morbidity. In this study we investigated the acute effect of dietary protein sources on postprandial low-grade inflammatory markers after a high-fat meal in obese non-diabetic subjects. Methods We conducted a randomized, acute clinical intervention study in a crossover design. We supplemented a fat rich mixed meal with one of four dietary proteins - cod protein, whey isolate, gluten or casein. 11 obese non-diabetic subjects (age: 40-68, BMI: 30.3-42.0 kg/m2 participated and blood samples were drawn in the 4 h postprandial period. Adiponectin was estimated by ELISA methods and cytokines were analyzed by multiplex assay. Results MCP-1 and CCL5/RANTES displayed significant postprandial dynamics. CCL5/RANTES initially increased after all meals, but overall CCL5/RANTES incremental area under the curve (iAUC was significantly lower after the whey meal compared with the cod and casein meals (P = 0.0053. MCP-1 was initially suppressed after all protein meals. However, the iAUC was significantly higher after whey meal compared to the cod and gluten meals (P = 0.04. Conclusion We have demonstrated acute differential effects on postprandial low grade inflammation of four dietary proteins in obese non-diabetic subjects. CCL5/RANTES initially increased after all meals but the smallest overall postprandial increase was observed after the whey meal. MCP-1 was initially suppressed after all 4 protein meals and the whey meal caused the smallest overall postprandial suppression. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00863564

  18. Implementing Families of Implicit Chebyshev Methods with Exact Coefficients for the Numerical Integration of First- and Second-Order Differential Equations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Jason

    2002-01-01

    A method is presented for the generation of exact numerical coefficients found in two families of implicit Chebyshev methods for the numerical integration of first- and second-order ordinary differential equations...

  19. Modified Chebyshev Collocation Method for Solving Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ziaul Arif

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents derivation of alternative numerical scheme for solving differential equations, which is modified Chebyshev (Vieta-Lucas Polynomial collocation differentiation matrices. The Scheme of modified Chebyshev (Vieta-Lucas Polynomial collocation method is applied to both Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs and Partial Differential Equations (PDEs cases. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is compared with finite difference method and the exact solution of the example. It is shown that modified Chebyshev collocation method more effective and accurate than FDM for some example given.

  20. Production of two hemopoietic growth factors is differentially regulated in single T lymphocytes activated with an anti-T cell receptor antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelso, A; Owens, T

    1988-01-01

    by micromanipulation into wells coated with the monoclonal anti-T cell receptor antibody F23.1, up to 90% of cells produced CSF as detected by CSF-dependent hemopoietic cell lines. Production occurred in the absence of proliferation and did not require the addition of accessory cells or IL-2. Both the frequency of CSF......A method has been developed to measure the production by single activated T lymphocytes of two hemopoietic growth factors, granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF) and multipotential CSF (multi-CSF or IL-3). When individual cells of the L3T4 (CD4)+ F23.1+ T cell clone E9.D4 were transferred......-producing cells and the average production per positive cell depended on the density of the immobilized stimulating ligand, indicating that the response of each cell is not an all-or-none phenomenon but varies with the strength of stimulation. Individual cells of the clone varied over a 100-fold range...