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Sample records for single myosin filaments

  1. Native bare zone assemblage nucleates myosin filament assembly.

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    Niederman, R; Peters, L K

    1982-11-15

    Native myosin filaments from rabbit psoas muscle are always 1.5 micrometer long. The regulated assembly of these filaments is generally considered to occur by an initial antiparallel and subsequent parallel aggregation of identical myosin subunits. In this schema myosin filament length is controlled by either a self-assembly or a Vernier process. We present evidence which refines these ideas. Namely, that the intact myosin bare zone assemblage nucleates myosin filament assembly. This suggestion is based on the following experimental evidence. (1) A native bare zone assemblage about 0.3 micrometer long can be formed by dialysis of native myosin filaments to either a pH 8 or a 0.2 M-KCl solution. (2) Upon dialysis back to 0.1 M-KCl, bare zone assemblages and distal myosin molecules recombine to form 1.5 micrometer long bipolar filaments. (3) The bare zone assemblage can be separated from the distal myosin molecules by column chromatography in 0.2 M-KCl. Upon dialysis of the fractionated subsets back to 0.1 M-KCl, the bare zone assemblage retains its length of about 0.3 micrometer. However, the distal molecules reassemble to form filaments about 5 micrometers long. (4) Filaments are formed from mixes of the isolated subsets. The lengths of these filaments vary with the amount of distal myosin present. (5) When native filaments, isolated bare zone assemblages or distal myosin molecules are moved sequentially to 0.6 M-KCl and then to 0.1 M-KCl, the final filament lengths are all about 5 micrometers. The capacity of the bare zone assemblage to nucleate filament assembly may be due to the bare zone myosin molecules, the associated M band components or both.

  2. Transportation of Nanoscale Cargoes by Myosin Propelled Actin Filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persson, Malin; Gullberg, Maria; Tolf, Conny; Lindberg, A. Michael; Mansson, Alf; Kocer, Armagan

    2013-01-01

    Myosin II propelled actin filaments move ten times faster than kinesin driven microtubules and are thus attractive candidates as cargo-transporting shuttles in motor driven lab-on-a-chip devices. In addition, actomyosin-based transportation of nanoparticles is useful in various fundamental studies.

  3. The Intriguing Dual Lattices of the Myosin Filaments in Vertebrate Striated Muscles: Evolution and Advantage

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    Pradeep K. Luther

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Myosin filaments in vertebrate striated muscle have a long roughly cylindrical backbone with cross-bridge projections on the surfaces of both halves except for a short central bare zone. In the middle of this central region the filaments are cross-linked by the M-band which holds them in a well-defined hexagonal lattice in the muscle A-band. During muscular contraction the M-band-defined rotation of the myosin filaments around their long axes influences the interactions that the cross-bridges can make with the neighbouring actin filaments. We can visualise this filament rotation by electron microscopy of thin cross-sections in the bare-region immediately adjacent to the M-band where the filament profiles are distinctly triangular. In the muscles of teleost fishes, the thick filament triangular profiles have a single orientation giving what we call the simple lattice. In other vertebrates, for example all the tetrapods, the thick filaments have one of two orientations where the triangles point in opposite directions (they are rotated by 60° or 180° according to set rules. Such a distribution cannot be developed in an ordered fashion across a large 2D lattice, but there are small domains of superlattice such that the next-nearest neighbouring thick filaments often have the same orientation. We believe that this difference in the lattice forms can lead to different contractile behaviours. Here we provide a historical review, and when appropriate cite recent work related to the emergence of the simple and superlattice forms by examining the muscles of several species ranging back to primitive vertebrates and we discuss the functional differences that the two lattice forms may have.

  4. Mechanical coordination in motor ensembles revealed using engineered artificial myosin filaments

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    Hariadi, R. F.; Sommese, R. F.; Adhikari, A. S.; Taylor, R. E.; Sutton, S.; Spudich, J. A.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.

    2015-08-01

    The sarcomere of muscle is composed of tens of thousands of myosin motors that self-assemble into thick filaments and interact with surrounding actin-based thin filaments in a dense, near-crystalline hexagonal lattice. Together, these actin-myosin interactions enable large-scale movement and force generation, two primary attributes of muscle. Research on isolated fibres has provided considerable insight into the collective properties of muscle, but how actin-myosin interactions are coordinated in an ensemble remains poorly understood. Here, we show that artificial myosin filaments, engineered using a DNA nanotube scaffold, provide precise control over motor number, type and spacing. Using both dimeric myosin V- and myosin VI-labelled nanotubes, we find that neither myosin density nor spacing has a significant effect on the gliding speed of actin filaments. This observation supports a simple model of myosin ensembles as energy reservoirs that buffer individual stochastic events to bring about smooth, continuous motion. Furthermore, gliding speed increases with cross-bridge compliance, but is limited by Brownian effects. As a first step to reconstituting muscle motility, we demonstrate human β-cardiac myosin-driven gliding of actin filaments on DNA nanotubes.

  5. Coupling of two non-processive myosin 5c dimers enables processive stepping along actin filaments.

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    Gunther, Laura K; Furuta, Ken'ya; Bao, Jianjun; Urbanowski, Monica K; Kojima, Hiroaki; White, Howard D; Sakamoto, Takeshi

    2014-05-09

    Myosin 5c (Myo5c) is a low duty ratio, non-processive motor unable to move continuously along actin filaments though it is believed to participate in secretory vesicle trafficking in vertebrate cells. Here, we measured the ATPase kinetics of Myo5c dimers and tested the possibility that the coupling of two Myo5c molecules enables processive movement. Steady-state ATPase activity and ADP dissociation kinetics demonstrated that a dimer of Myo5c-HMM (double-headed heavy meromyosin 5c) has a 6-fold lower Km for actin filaments than Myo5c-S1 (single-headed myosin 5c subfragment-1), indicating that the two heads of Myo5c-HMM increase F-actin-binding affinity. Nanometer-precision tracking analyses showed that two Myo5c-HMM dimers linked with each other via a DNA scaffold and moved processively along actin filaments. Moreover, the distance between the Myo5c molecules on the DNA scaffold is an important factor for the processive movement. Individual Myo5c molecules in two-dimer complexes move stochastically in 30-36 nm steps. These results demonstrate that two dimers of Myo5c molecules on a DNA scaffold increased the probability of rebinding to F-actin and enabled processive steps along actin filaments, which could be used for collective cargo transport in cells.

  6. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minoda, Hiroki; Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri; Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru; Katayama, Eisaku; Wakabayashi, Takeyuki; Akimoto, Tsuyoshi; Sugi, Haruo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We succeeded in recording structural changes of hydrated myosin cross-bridges. → We succeeded in position-marking the cross-bridges with site-directed antibodies. → We recorded cross-bridge movement at different regions in individual cross-bridge. → The movement was smallest at the cross-bridge-subfragment two boundary. → The results provide evidence for the cross-bridge lever arm mechanism. -- Abstract: Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made.

  7. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber

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    Minoda, Hiroki [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganeishi, Tokyo184-8588 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganeishi, Tokyo184-8588 (Japan); Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Katayama, Eisaku [Graduate School of Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Takeyuki [Department of Biosciences, School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Utsunomiya, Tochigiken 320-8551 (Japan); Akimoto, Tsuyoshi [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Sugi, Haruo, E-mail: sugi@kyf.biglobe.ne.jp [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We succeeded in recording structural changes of hydrated myosin cross-bridges. {yields} We succeeded in position-marking the cross-bridges with site-directed antibodies. {yields} We recorded cross-bridge movement at different regions in individual cross-bridge. {yields} The movement was smallest at the cross-bridge-subfragment two boundary. {yields} The results provide evidence for the cross-bridge lever arm mechanism. -- Abstract: Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made.

  8. Dynamic light scattering study of the effect of Mg2+ and ATP on synthetic myosin filaments

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    Fujime, Satoru; Takayama, Sei-ichi

    1995-01-01

    The dynamic light scattering (DLS) method provides us with information about the apparent diffusion coefficient, Dapp, as well as the static scattering intensity, Is. For long but thin rods with length L and diameter d (i.e., KL >> 1 but Kd different from that of Is. By means of DLS were studied synthetic myosin filaments of vertebrate skeletal muscle in solution at pH 8.3. It appeared that Mg2+ ions induced lengthening and thickening of the filaments whereas ATP (and ADP) induced shortening (depolymerization) of the filaments. When ATP was added to the filament preparation in the presence of Mg2+ ions, thinning of the filaments (or splitting into subfilaments) occurred prior to shortening (depolymerization).

  9. Nucleotides increase the internal flexibility of filaments of dephosphorylated Acanthamoeba myosin II.

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    Redowicz, M J; Korn, E D; Rau, D C

    1996-05-24

    The actin-activated Mg(2+)-ATPase activity of Acanthamoeba myosin II minifilaments is dependent both on Mg2+ concentration and on the state of phosphorylation of three serine sites at the C-terminal end of the heavy chains. Previous electric birefringence experiments on minifilaments showed a large dependence of signal amplitude on the phosphorylation state and Mg2+ concentration, consistent with large changes in filament flexibility. These observations suggested that minifilament stiffness was important for function. We now report that the binding of nucleotides to dephosphorylated minifilaments at Mg2+ concentrations needed for optimal activity increases the flexibility by about 10-fold, as inferred from the birefringence signal amplitude increase. An increase in flexibility with nucleotide binding is not observed for dephosphorylated minifilaments at lower Mg2+ concentrations or for phosphorylated minifilaments at any Mg2+ concentrations examined. The relaxation times for minifilament rotations that are sensitive to the conformation myosin heads are also observed to depend on phosphorylation, Mg2+ concentration, and nucleotide binding. These latter experiments indicate that the actin-activated Mg2+ concentration, and nucleotide binding. These latter experiments indicate that the actin-activated Mg(2+)-ATPase activity of Acanthamoeba myosin II correlates with both changes in myosin head conformation and the ability of minifilaments to cycle between stiff and flexible conformations coupled to nucleotide binding and release.

  10. Single-molecule studies of unconventional motor protein myosin VI

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    Kim, HyeongJun

    Myosin VI is one of the myosin superfamily members that are actin-based molecular motors. It has received special attention due to its distinct features as compared to other myosins, such as its opposite directionality and a much larger step size than expected given the length of its "leg". This dissertation presents the author.s graduate work of several single-molecule studies on myosin VI. Special attention was paid to some of myosin VI.s tail domains that consist of proximal tail (PT), medial tail (MT), distal tail (DT) domains and cargo-binding domain (CBD). The functional form of myosin VI in cells is still under debate. Although full length myosin VI proteins in cytosolic extracts of cells were monomers from earlier studies, there are several reasons why it is now believed that myosin VI could exist as a dimer. If this is true and dimerization occurs, the next logical question would be which parts of myosin VI are dimerization regions? One model claimed that the CBD is the sole dimerization region. A competing model claimed that there must be another region that could be involved in dimerization, based on their observation that a construct without the CBD could still dimerize. Our single-molecule experiment with progressively truncated myosin VI constructs showed that the MT domain is a dimerization region, supporting the latter model. Additional single-molecule experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation done with our collaborators suggest that electrostatic salt bridges formed between positive and negative amino acid residues are mainly responsible for the MT domain dimerization. After resolving this, we are left with another important question which is how myosin VI can take such a large step. Recent crystal structure showed that one of the tail domains preceding the MT domain, called the PT domain, is a three-helix bundle. The most easily conceivable way might be an unfolding of the three-helix bundle upon dimerization, allowing the protein to

  11. Comparative single-molecule and ensemble myosin enzymology: sulfoindocyanine ATP and ADP derivatives.

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    Oiwa, K; Eccleston, J F; Anson, M; Kikumoto, M; Davis, C T; Reid, G P; Ferenczi, M A; Corrie, J E; Yamada, A; Nakayama, H; Trentham, D R

    2000-06-01

    Single-molecule and macroscopic reactions of fluorescent nucleotides with myosin have been compared. The single-molecule studies serve as paradigms for enzyme-catalyzed reactions and ligand-receptor interactions analyzed as individual stochastic processes. Fluorescent nucleotides, called Cy3-EDA-ATP and Cy5-EDA-ATP, were derived by coupling the dyes Cy3.29.OH and Cy5.29.OH (compounds XI and XIV, respectively, in, Bioconjug. Chem. 4:105-111)) with 2'(3')-O-[N-(2-aminoethyl)carbamoyl]ATP (EDA-ATP). The ATP(ADP) analogs were separated into their respective 2'- and 3'-O-isomers, the interconversion rate of which was 30[OH(-)] s(-1) (0.016 h(-1) at pH 7.1) at 22 degrees C. Macroscopic studies showed that 2'(3')-O-substituted nucleotides had properties similar to those of ATP and ADP in their interactions with myosin, actomyosin, and muscle fibers, although the ATP analogs did not relax muscle as well as ATP did. Significant differences in the fluorescence intensity of Cy3-nucleotide 2'- and 3'-O-isomers in free solution and when they interacted with myosin were evident. Single-molecule studies using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed that reciprocal mean lifetimes of the nucleotide analogs interacting with myosin filaments were one- to severalfold greater than predicted from macroscopic data. Kinetic and equilibrium data of nucleotide-(acto)myosin interactions derived from single-molecule microscopy now have a biochemical and physiological framework. This is important for single-molecule mechanical studies of motor proteins.

  12. Temperature-induced structural changes in the myosin thick filament of skinned rabbit psoas muscle.

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    Malinchik, S; Xu, S; Yu, L C

    1997-11-01

    By using synchrotron radiation and an imaging plate for recording diffraction patterns, we have obtained high-resolution x-ray patterns from relaxed rabbit psoas muscle at temperatures ranging from 1 degree C to 30 degrees C. This allowed us to obtain intensity profiles of the first six myosin layer lines and apply a model-building approach for structural analysis. At temperatures 20 degrees C and higher, the layer lines are sharp with clearly defined maxima. Modeling based on the data obtained at 20 degrees C reveals that the average center of the cross-bridges is at 135 A from the center of the thick filament and both of the myosin heads appear to wrap around the backbone. At 10 degrees C and lower, the layer lines become very weak and diffuse scattering increases considerably. At 4 degrees C, the peak of the first layer line shifts toward the meridian from 0.0047 to 0.0038 A(-1) and decreases in intensity approximately by a factor of four compared to that at 20 degrees C, although the intensities of higher-order layer lines remain approximately 10-15% of the first layer line. Our modeling suggests that as the temperature is lowered from 20 degrees C to 4 degrees C the center of cross-bridges extends radially away from the center of the filament (135 A to 175 A). Furthermore, the fraction of helically ordered cross-bridges decreases at least by a factor of two, while the isotropic disorder (the temperature factor) remains approximately unchanged. Our results on the order/disordering effects of temperature are in general agreement with earlier results of Wray [Wray, J. 1987. Structure of relaxed myosin filaments in relation to nucleotide state in vertebrate skeletal muscle. J. Muscle Res. Cell Motil. 8:62a (Abstr.)] and Lowy et al. (Lowy, J., D. Popp, and A. A. Stewart. 1991. X-ray studies of order-disorder transitions in the myosin heads of skinned rabbit psoas muscles. Biophys. J. 60:812-824). and support Poulsen and Lowy's hypothesis of coexistence of ordered

  13. Acute quadriplegic myopathy with loss of thick (myosin) filaments following heart transplantation.

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    Perea, M; Picón, M; Miró, O; Orús, J; Roig, E; Grau, J M

    2001-10-01

    Acute quadriplegic myopathy with loss of thick (myosin) filaments (AQM-LTF) is an acute toxic myopathy observed in critically ill patients and is characterized by proximal or diffuse weakness of extremities and difficulty in weaning from mechanical ventilation. In recent years, this myopathy has been described in transplanted patients, although only 5 cases have been reported following heart transplantation. We present 3 new cases and review the previous literature. We conclude that the clinical picture and outcome of AQM-LTF in heart-transplanted patients do not differ from those observed in other critically ill patients (transplanted and non-transplanted). Therefore, because AQM-LTF is often clinically suspected muscle biopsy should be quickly performed to confirm the diagnosis so that physical therapy may begin as soon as possible.

  14. Engineering Circular Gliding of Actin Filaments Along Myosin-Patterned DNA Nanotube Rings To Study Long-Term Actin-Myosin Behaviors.

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    Hariadi, Rizal F; Appukutty, Abhinav J; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2016-09-27

    Nature has evolved molecular motors that are critical in cellular processes occurring over broad time scales, ranging from seconds to years. Despite the importance of the long-term behavior of molecular machines, topics such as enzymatic lifetime are underexplored due to the lack of a suitable approach for monitoring motor activity over long time periods. Here, we developed an "O"-shaped Myosin Empowered Gliding Assay (OMEGA) that utilizes engineered micron-scale DNA nanotube rings with precise arrangements of myosin VI to trap gliding actin filaments. This circular gliding assay platform allows the same individual actin filament to glide over the same myosin ensemble (50-1000 motors per ring) multiple times. First, we systematically characterized the formation of DNA nanotubes rings with 4, 6, 8, and 10 helix circumferences. Individual actin filaments glide along the nanotube rings with high processivity for up to 12.8 revolutions or 11 min in run time. We then show actin gliding speed is robust to variation in motor number and independent of ring curvature within our sample space (ring diameter of 0.5-4 μm). As a model application of OMEGA, we then analyze motor-based mechanical influence on "stop-and-go" gliding behavior of actin filaments, revealing that the stop-to-go transition probability is dependent on motor flexibility. Our circular gliding assay may provide a closed-loop platform for monitoring long-term behavior of broad classes of molecular motors and enable characterization of motor robustness and long time scale nanomechanical processes.

  15. Calix[4]arene C-99 inhibits myosin ATPase activity and changes the organization of contractile filaments of myometrium

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    R. D. Labyntseva,

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calix[4]arenes are cup-like macrocyclic (polyphenolic compounds, they are regarded as promising molecular “platforms” for the design of new physiologically active compounds. We have earlier found that сalix[4]arenе C-99 inhibits the ATPase activity of actomyosin and myosin subfragment-1 of pig uterus іn vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of calix[4]arene C-99 with myosin from rat uterine myocytes. It was found that the ATPase activity of myosin prepared from pre-incubated with 100 mM of calix[4]arene C-99 myocytes was almost 50% lower than in control. Additionally, we have revealed the effect of calix[4]arene C-99 on the subcellular distribution of actin and myosin in uterus myocytes by the method of confocal microscopy. This effect can be caused by reorganization of the structure of the contractile smooth muscle cell proteins due to their interaction with calix[4]arene. The obtained results demonstrate the ability of calix[4]arene C-99 to penetrate into the uterus muscle cells and affect not only the myosin ATPase activity, but also the structure of the actin and myosin filaments in the myometrial cells. Demonstrated ability of calix[4]arene C-99 can be used for development of new pharmacological agents for efficient normalization of myometrial contractile hyperfunction.

  16. Myosin lever arm directs collective motion on cellular actin network.

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    Hariadi, Rizal F; Cale, Mario; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-03-18

    The molecular motor myosin teams up to drive muscle contraction, membrane traffic, and cell division in biological cells. Myosin function in cells emerges from the interaction of multiple motors tethered to a scaffold, with surrounding actin filaments organized into 3D networks. Despite the importance of myosin function, the influence of intermotor interactions on collective motion remains poorly understood. In this study, we used precisely engineered myosin assemblies to examine emergence in collective myosin movement. We report that tethering multiple myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, modifies their movement trajectories on keratocyte actin networks. Single myosin V and VI dimers display similar skewed trajectories, albeit in opposite directions, when traversing the keratocyte actin network. In contrast, tethering myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, progressively straightens the trajectories with increasing myosin number. Trajectory shape of multimotor scaffolds positively correlates with the stiffness of the myosin lever arm. Swapping the flexible myosin VI lever arm for the relatively rigid myosin V lever increases trajectory skewness, and vice versa. A simplified model of coupled motor movement demonstrates that the differences in flexural rigidity of the two myosin lever arms is sufficient to account for the differences in observed behavior of groups of myosin V and VI motors. In accordance with this model trajectory, shapes for scaffolds containing both myosin V and VI are dominated by the myosin with a stiffer lever arm. Our findings suggest that structural features unique to each myosin type may confer selective advantages in cellular functions.

  17. Myosin individualized: single nucleotide polymorphisms in energy transduction

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    Wieben Eric D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin performs ATP free energy transduction into mechanical work in the motor domain of the myosin heavy chain (MHC. Energy transduction is the definitive systemic feature of the myosin motor performed by coordinating in a time ordered sequence: ATP hydrolysis at the active site, actin affinity modulation at the actin binding site, and the lever-arm rotation of the power stroke. These functions are carried out by several conserved sub-domains within the motor domain. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affect the MHC sequence of many isoforms expressed in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and non-muscle tissue. The purpose of this work is to provide a rationale for using SNPs as a functional genomics tool to investigate structurefunction relationships in myosin. In particular, to discover SNP distribution over the conserved sub-domains and surmise what it implies about sub-domain stability and criticality in the energy transduction mechanism. Results An automated routine identifying human nonsynonymous SNP amino acid missense substitutions for any MHC gene mined the NCBI SNP data base. The routine tested 22 MHC genes coding muscle and non-muscle isoforms and identified 89 missense mutation positions in the motor domain with 10 already implicated in heart disease and another 8 lacking sequence homology with a skeletal MHC isoform for which a crystallographic model is available. The remaining 71 SNP substitutions were found to be distributed over MHC with 22 falling outside identified functional sub-domains and 49 in or very near to myosin sub-domains assigned specific crucial functions in energy transduction. The latter includes the active site, the actin binding site, the rigid lever-arm, and regions facilitating their communication. Most MHC isoforms contained SNPs somewhere in the motor domain. Conclusions Several functional-crucial sub-domains are infiltrated by a large number of SNP substitution sites suggesting these

  18. Distribution and evolution of stable single α-helices (SAH domains in myosin motor proteins.

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    Dominic Simm

    Full Text Available Stable single-alpha helices (SAHs are versatile structural elements in many prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins acting as semi-flexible linkers and constant force springs. This way SAH-domains function as part of the lever of many different myosins. Canonical myosin levers consist of one or several IQ-motifs to which light chains such as calmodulin bind. SAH-domains provide flexibility in length and stiffness to the myosin levers, and may be particularly suited for myosins working in crowded cellular environments. Although the function of the SAH-domains in human class-6 and class-10 myosins has well been characterised, the distribution of the SAH-domain in all myosin subfamilies and across the eukaryotic tree of life remained elusive. Here, we analysed the largest available myosin sequence dataset consisting of 7919 manually annotated myosin sequences from 938 species representing all major eukaryotic branches using the SAH-prediction algorithm of Waggawagga, a recently developed tool for the identification of SAH-domains. With this approach we identified SAH-domains in more than one third of the supposed 79 myosin subfamilies. Depending on the myosin class, the presence of SAH-domains can range from a few to almost all class members indicating complex patterns of independent and taxon-specific SAH-domain gain and loss.

  19. Heavy chain of Acanthamoeba myosine IB is a fusion of myosin-like and non-myosin-like sequences

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    Jung, G.; Korn, E.D.; Hammer, J.A. III

    1987-10-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii myosins IA and IB demonstrate the catalytic properties of a myosin and can support analogues of contractile and motile activity in vitro, but their single, low molecular weight heavy chains, roughly globular shapes, and inabilities to self-assemble into filaments make them structurally atypical myosins. The authors present the complete amino acid sequence of the 128-kDa myosin IB heavy chain, which they deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the gene and which reveals that the polypeptide is a fusion of myosin-like and non-myosin-like sequences. Specifically, the amino-terminal approx. 76 kDa of amino acid sequence is highly similar to the globular head sequences of conventional myosins. By contrast, the remaining approx. 51 kDa of sequence shows no similarity to any portion of conventional myosin sequences, contains regions that are rich in glycine, proline, and alanine residues, and lacks the distinctive sequence characteristics of an ..cap alpha..-helical, coiled-coil structure. They conclude, therefore, that the protein is composed of a myosin globular head fused not to the typical coiled-coil rod-like myosin tail structure but rather to an unusual carboxyl-terminal domain. These results support the conclusion that filamentous myosin is not required for force generation and provide a further perspective on the structural requirements for myosin function. Finally, they find a striking conservation of intron/exon structure between this gene and a vertebrate muscle myosin gene. They discuss this observation in relation to the evolutionary origin of the myosin IB gene and the antiquity of myosin gene intron/exon structure.

  20. Heavy chain of Acanthamoeba myosine IB is a fusion of myosin-like and non-myosin-like sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, G.; Korn, E.D.; Hammer, J.A. III

    1987-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii myosins IA and IB demonstrate the catalytic properties of a myosin and can support analogues of contractile and motile activity in vitro, but their single, low molecular weight heavy chains, roughly globular shapes, and inabilities to self-assemble into filaments make them structurally atypical myosins. The authors present the complete amino acid sequence of the 128-kDa myosin IB heavy chain, which they deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the gene and which reveals that the polypeptide is a fusion of myosin-like and non-myosin-like sequences. Specifically, the amino-terminal ∼ 76 kDa of amino acid sequence is highly similar to the globular head sequences of conventional myosins. By contrast, the remaining ∼ 51 kDa of sequence shows no similarity to any portion of conventional myosin sequences, contains regions that are rich in glycine, proline, and alanine residues, and lacks the distinctive sequence characteristics of an α-helical, coiled-coil structure. They conclude, therefore, that the protein is composed of a myosin globular head fused not to the typical coiled-coil rod-like myosin tail structure but rather to an unusual carboxyl-terminal domain. These results support the conclusion that filamentous myosin is not required for force generation and provide a further perspective on the structural requirements for myosin function. Finally, they find a striking conservation of intron/exon structure between this gene and a vertebrate muscle myosin gene. They discuss this observation in relation to the evolutionary origin of the myosin IB gene and the antiquity of myosin gene intron/exon structure

  1. Acceleration of the sliding movement of actin filaments with the use of a non-motile mutant myosin in in vitro motility assays driven by skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin.

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    Kohei Iwase

    Full Text Available We examined the movement of an actin filament sliding on a mixture of normal and genetically modified myosin molecules that were attached to a glass surface. For this purpose, we used a Dictyostelium G680V mutant myosin II whose release rates of Pi and ADP were highly suppressed relative to normal myosin, leading to a significantly extended life-time of the strongly bound state with actin and virtually no motility. When the mixing ratio of G680V mutant myosin II to skeletal muscle HMM (heavy myosin was 0.01%, the actin filaments moved intermittently. When they moved, their sliding velocities were about two-fold faster than the velocity of skeletal HMM alone. Furthermore, sliding movements were also faster when the actin filaments were allowed to slide on skeletal muscle HMM-coated glass surfaces in the motility buffer solution containing G680V HMM. In this case no intermittent movement was observed. When the actin filaments used were copolymerized with a fusion protein consisting of Dictyostelium actin and Dictyostelium G680V myosin II motor domain, similar faster sliding movements were observed on skeletal muscle HMM-coated surfaces. The filament sliding velocities were about two-fold greater than the velocities of normal actin filaments. We found that the velocity of actin filaments sliding on skeletal muscle myosin molecules increased in the presence of a non-motile G680V mutant myosin motor.

  2. Superhelical architecture of the myosin filament-linking protein myomesin with unusual elastic properties.

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    Nikos Pinotsis

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Active muscles generate substantial mechanical forces by the contraction/relaxation cycle, and, to maintain an ordered state, they require molecular structures of extraordinary stability. These forces are sensed and buffered by unusually long and elastic filament proteins with highly repetitive domain arrays. Members of the myomesin protein family function as molecular bridges that connect major filament systems in the central M-band of muscle sarcomeres, which is a central locus of passive stress sensing. To unravel the mechanism of molecular elasticity in such filament-connecting proteins, we have determined the overall architecture of the complete C-terminal immunoglobulin domain array of myomesin by X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, solution X-ray scattering, and atomic force microscopy. Our data reveal a dimeric tail-to-tail filament structure of about 360 Å in length, which is folded into an irregular superhelical coil arrangement of almost identical α-helix/domain modules. The myomesin filament can be stretched to about 2.5-fold its original length by reversible unfolding of these linkers, a mechanism that to our knowledge has not been observed previously. Our data explain how myomesin could act as a highly elastic ribbon to maintain the overall structural organization of the sarcomeric M-band. In general terms, our data demonstrate how repetitive domain modules such as those found in myomesin could generate highly elastic protein structures in highly organized cell systems such as muscle sarcomeres.

  3. Three mammalian tropomyosin isoforms have different regulatory effects on nonmuscle myosin-2B and filamentous β-actin in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathan-Chhatbar, Salma; Taft, Manuel H.; Reindl, Theresia; Hundt, Nikolas; Latham, Sharissa L.; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2018-01-01

    The metazoan actin cytoskeleton supports a wide range of contractile and transport processes. Recent studies have shown how the dynamic association with specific tropomyosin isoforms generates actin filament populations with distinct functional properties. However, critical details of the associated molecular interactions remain unclear. Here, we report the properties of actomyosin–tropomyosin complexes containing filamentous β-actin, nonmuscle myosin-2B (NM-2B) constructs, and either tropomyosin isoform Tpm1.8cy (b.–.b.d), Tpm1.12br (b.–.b.c), or Tpm3.1cy (b.–.a.d). Our results show the extent to which the association of filamentous β-actin with these different tropomyosin cofilaments affects the actin-mediated activation of NM-2B and the release of the ATP hydrolysis products ADP and phosphate from the active site. Phosphate release gates a transition from weak to strong F-actin–binding states. The release of ADP has the opposite effect. These changes in dominant rate-limiting steps have a direct effect on the duty ratio, the fraction of time that NM-2B spends in strongly F-actin–bound states during ATP turnover. The duty ratio is increased ∼3-fold in the presence of Tpm1.12 and 5-fold for both Tpm1.8 and Tpm3.1. The presence of Tpm1.12 extends the time required per ATP hydrolysis cycle 3.7-fold, whereas it is shortened by 27 and 63% in the presence of Tpm1.8 and Tpm3.1, respectively. The resulting Tpm isoform–specific changes in the frequency, duration, and efficiency of actomyosin interactions establish a molecular basis for the ability of these complexes to support cellular processes with widely divergent demands in regard to force production, capacity to move processively, and speed of movement. PMID:29191834

  4. Mechanosensing in myosin filament solves a 60 years old conflict in skeletal muscle modeling between high power output and slow rise in tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Marcucci

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Almost 60 years ago Andrew Huxley with his seminal paper [Huxley1957] laid the foundation of modern muscle modeling, linking chemical events to mechanical performance. He described mechanics and energetics of muscle contraction through the cyclical attachment and detachment of myosin motors to the actin filament with ad hoc assumptions on the dependence of the rate constants on the strain of the myosin motors. That relatively simple hypothesis is still present in recent models, even though with several modifications to adapt the model to the different experimental constraints which became subsequently available. However, already in that paper, one controversial aspect of the model became clear. Relatively high attachment and detachment rates of myosin to the actin filament were needed to simulate the high power output at intermediate velocity of contraction. However, these rates were incompatible with the relatively slow rise in tension after activation, despite the rise should be generated by the same rate functions. This discrepancy has not been fully solved till today, despite several hypotheses have been forwarded to reconcile the two aspects.Here, using a conventional muscle model, we show that the recently revealed mechanosensing mechanism of recruitment of myosin motors [Linarietal2015] can solve this long standing problem without any further ad-hoc hypotheses.

  5. Transition of Femtosecond-Filament-Solid Interactions from Single to Multiple Filament Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrodzki, P J; Burger, M; Jovanovic, I

    2017-10-06

    High-peak-power fs-laser filaments offer unique characteristics attractive to remote sensing via techniques such as remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (R-LIBS). The dynamics of several ablation mechanisms following the interaction between a filament and a solid determines the emission strength and reproducibility of target plasma, which is of relevance for R-LIBS applications. We investigate the space- and time-resolved dynamics of ionic and atomic emission from copper as well as the surrounding atmosphere in order to understand limitations of fs-filament-ablation for standoff energy delivery. Furthermore, we probe the shock front produced from filament-target interaction using time-resolved shadowgraphy and infer laser-material coupling efficiencies for both single and multiple filament regimes through analysis of shock expansion with the Sedov model for point detonation. The results provide insight into plasma structure for the range of peak powers up to 30 times the critical power for filamentation P cr . Despite the stochastic nucleation of multiple filaments at peak-powers greater than 16 P cr , emission of ionic and neutral species increases with pump beam intensity, and short-lived nitrogen emission originating from the ambient is consistently observed. Ultimately, results suggest favorable scaling of emission intensity from target species on the laser pump energy, furthering the prospects for use of filament-solid interactions for remote sensing.

  6. Biochemical kinetic characterization of the Acanthamoeba myosin-I ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostap, E M; Pollard, T D

    1996-03-01

    Acanthamoeba myosin-IA and myosin-IB are single-headed molecular motors that may play an important role in membrane-based motility. To better define the types of motility that myosin-IA and myosin IB can support, we determined the rate constants for key steps on the myosin-I ATPase pathway using fluorescence stopped-flow, cold-chase, and rapid-quench techniques. We determined the rate constants for ATP binding, ATP hydrolysis, actomyosin-I dissociation, phosphate release, and ADP release. We also determined equilibrium constants for myosin-I binding to actin filaments, ADP binding to actomyosin-I, and ATP hydrolysis. These rate constants define an ATPase mechanism in which (a) ATP rapidly dissociates actomyosin-I, (b) the predominant steady-state intermediates are in a rapid equilibrium between actin-bound and free states, (c) phosphate release is rate limiting and regulated by heavy-chain phosphorylation, and (d) ADP release is fast. Thus, during steady-state ATP hydrolysis, myosin-I is weakly bound to the actin filament like skeletal muscle myosin-II and unlike the microtubule-based motor kinesin. Therefore, for myosin-I to support processive motility or cortical contraction, multiple myosin-I molecules must be specifically localized to a small region on a membrane or in the actin-rich cell cortex. This conclusion has important implications for the regulation of myosin-I via localization through the unique myosin-I tails. This is the first complete transient kinetic characterization of a member of the myosin superfamily, other than myosin-II, providing the opportunity to obtain insights about the evolution of all myosin isoforms.

  7. Identification of Acan125 as a myosin-I-binding protein present with myosin-I on cellular organelles of Acanthamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, P; Zot, A S; Zot, H G

    1995-10-27

    We have discovered the first protein to bind to a non-filamentous myosin, aside from actin. This protein, Acan125, is a 125-kDa protein from Acanthamoeba that associates with the SH3 domain of Acanthamoeba myosin-IC and not the SH3 domain of human fodrin. Antibodies raised against Acan125 recognize a single protein of 125 kDa from a whole cell lysate of Acanthamoeba; antibodies to myosin-I (M1.7 and M1.8) do not recognize Acan125 on the same blot. Double labeling of Acanthamoeba show Acan125 and myosin-I to be present on the same intracellular organelle, most likely amoebastomes. Immunoprecipitation with either anti-myosin-I or anti-Acan125 antibodies coprecipitates both Acan125 and myosin-I from a lysate of Acanthamoeba, demonstrating that Acan125 interacts with native myosin-I.

  8. Regulation of myosin IIA and filamentous actin during insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stall, Richard; Ramos, Joseph; Kent Fulcher, F.; Patel, Yashomati M., E-mail: ympatel@uncg.edu

    2014-03-10

    Insulin stimulated glucose uptake requires the colocalization of myosin IIA (MyoIIA) and the insulin-responsive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) at the plasma membrane for proper GLUT4 fusion. MyoIIA facilitates filamentous actin (F-actin) reorganization in various cell types. In adipocytes F-actin reorganization is required for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. What is not known is whether MyoIIA interacts with F-actin to regulate insulin-induced GLUT4 fusion at the plasma membrane. To elucidate the relationship between MyoIIA and F-actin, we examined the colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the plasma membrane upon insulin stimulation as well as the regulation of this interaction. Our findings demonstrated that MyoIIA and F-actin colocalized at the site of GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane upon insulin stimulation. Furthermore, inhibition of MyoII with blebbistatin impaired F-actin localization at the plasma membrane. Next we examined the regulatory role of calcium in MyoIIA-F-actin colocalization. Reduced calcium or calmodulin levels decreased colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the plasma membrane. While calcium alone can translocate MyoIIA it did not stimulate F-actin accumulation at the plasma membrane. Taken together, we established that while MyoIIA activity is required for F-actin localization at the plasma membrane, it alone is insufficient to localize F-actin to the plasma membrane. - Highlights: • Insulin induces colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the cortex in adipocytes. • MyoIIA is necessary but not sufficient to localize F-actin at the cell cortex. • MyoIIA-F-actin colocalization is regulated by calcium and calmodulin.

  9. C0 and C1 N-terminal Ig domains of myosin binding protein C exert different effects on thin filament activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Samantha P; Belknap, Betty; Van Sciver, Robert E; White, Howard D; Galkin, Vitold E

    2016-02-09

    Mutations in genes encoding myosin, the molecular motor that powers cardiac muscle contraction, and its accessory protein, cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C), are the two most common causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recent studies established that the N-terminal domains (NTDs) of cMyBP-C (e.g., C0, C1, M, and C2) can bind to and activate or inhibit the thin filament (TF). However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which NTDs modulate interaction of myosin with the TF remains unknown and the contribution of each individual NTD to TF activation/inhibition is unclear. Here we used an integrated structure-function approach using cryoelectron microscopy, biochemical kinetics, and force measurements to reveal how the first two Ig-like domains of cMyPB-C (C0 and C1) interact with the TF. Results demonstrate that despite being structural homologs, C0 and C1 exhibit different patterns of binding on the surface of F-actin. Importantly, C1 but not C0 binds in a position to activate the TF by shifting tropomyosin (Tm) to the "open" structural state. We further show that C1 directly interacts with Tm and traps Tm in the open position on the surface of F-actin. Both C0 and C1 compete with myosin subfragment 1 for binding to F-actin and effectively inhibit actomyosin interactions when present at high ratios of NTDs to F-actin. Finally, we show that in contracting sarcomeres, the activating effect of C1 is apparent only once low levels of Ca(2+) have been achieved. We suggest that Ca(2+) modulates the interaction of cMyBP-C with the TF in the sarcomere.

  10. Tilting and Wobble of Myosin V by High-Speed Single-Molecule Polarized Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, John F.; Shroder, Deborah Y.; Nelson, Philip C.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2013-01-01

    Myosin V is biomolecular motor with two actin-binding domains (heads) that take multiple steps along actin by a hand-over-hand mechanism. We used high-speed polarized total internal reflection fluorescence (polTIRF) microscopy to study the structural dynamics of single myosin V molecules that had been labeled with bifunctional rhodamine linked to one of the calmodulins along the lever arm. With the use of time-correlated single-photon counting technology, the temporal resolution of the polTIRF microscope was improved ∼50-fold relative to earlier studies, and a maximum-likelihood, multitrace change-point algorithm was used to objectively determine the times when structural changes occurred. Short-lived substeps that displayed an abrupt increase in rotational mobility were detected during stepping, likely corresponding to random thermal fluctuations of the stepping head while it searched for its next actin-binding site. Thus, myosin V harnesses its fluctuating environment to extend its reach. Additional, less frequent angle changes, probably not directly associated with steps, were detected in both leading and trailing heads. The high-speed polTIRF method and change-point analysis may be applicable to single-molecule studies of other biological systems. PMID:23528086

  11. Robust mechanobiological behavior emerges in heterogeneous myosin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Paul F.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Ehrlicher, Allen J.; Weitz, David A.; Schunn, Christian; Cagan, Jonathan; LeDuc, Philip

    2017-09-01

    Biological complexity presents challenges for understanding natural phenomenon and engineering new technologies, particularly in systems with molecular heterogeneity. Such complexity is present in myosin motor protein systems, and computational modeling is essential for determining how collective myosin interactions produce emergent system behavior. We develop a computational approach for altering myosin isoform parameters and their collective organization, and support predictions with in vitro experiments of motility assays with α-actinins as molecular force sensors. The computational approach models variations in single myosin molecular structure, system organization, and force stimuli to predict system behavior for filament velocity, energy consumption, and robustness. Robustness is the range of forces where a filament is expected to have continuous velocity and depends on used myosin system energy. Myosin systems are shown to have highly nonlinear behavior across force conditions that may be exploited at a systems level by combining slow and fast myosin isoforms heterogeneously. Results suggest some heterogeneous systems have lower energy use near stall conditions and greater energy consumption when unloaded, therefore promoting robustness. These heterogeneous system capabilities are unique in comparison with homogenous systems and potentially advantageous for high performance bionanotechnologies. Findings open doors at the intersections of mechanics and biology, particularly for understanding and treating myosin-related diseases and developing approaches for motor molecule-based technologies.

  12. Comparative single-molecule and ensemble myosin enzymology: sulfoindocyanine ATP and ADP derivatives.

    OpenAIRE

    Oiwa, K; Eccleston, J F; Anson, M; Kikumoto, M; Davis, C T; Reid, G P; Ferenczi, M A; Corrie, J E; Yamada, A; Nakayama, H; Trentham, D R

    2000-01-01

    Single-molecule and macroscopic reactions of fluorescent nucleotides with myosin have been compared. The single-molecule studies serve as paradigms for enzyme-catalyzed reactions and ligand-receptor interactions analyzed as individual stochastic processes. Fluorescent nucleotides, called Cy3-EDA-ATP and Cy5-EDA-ATP, were derived by coupling the dyes Cy3.29.OH and Cy5.29.OH (compounds XI and XIV, respectively, in, Bioconjug. Chem. 4:105-111)) with 2'(3')-O-[N-(2-aminoethyl)carbamoyl]ATP (EDA-A...

  13. Lampreys have a single gene cluster for the fast skeletal myosin heavy chain gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ikeda

    Full Text Available Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod, a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans. We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5'-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny.

  14. Myosin content of single muscle fibers following short-term disuse and active recovery in young and old healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Lars G; Brocca, Lorenza; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Short-term disuse and subsequent recovery affect whole muscle and single myofiber contractile function in young and old. While the loss and recovery of single myofiber specific force (SF) following disuse and rehabilitation has been shown to correlate with alterations in myosin concentrations...

  15. In vitro actin motility velocity varies linearly with the number of myosin impellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Burghardt, T P

    2017-03-15

    Cardiac myosin is the motor powering the heart. It moves actin with 3 step-size varieties generated by torque from the myosin heavy chain lever-arm rotation under the influence of myosin essential light chain whose N-terminal extension binds actin. Proposed mechanisms adapting myosin mechanochemical characteristics on the fly sometimes involve modulation of step-size selection probability via motor strain sensitivity. Strain following the power stroke, hypothetically imposed by the finite actin detachment rate 1/t on , is shown to have no effect on unloaded velocity when multiple myosins are simultaneously strongly actin bound in an in vitro motility assay. Actin filaments slide ∼2 native step-sizes while more than 1 myosin strongly binds actin probably ruling out an actin detachment limited model for imposing strain. It suggests that single myosin estimates for t on are too large, not applicable to the ensemble situation, or both. Parallel motility data quantitation involving instantaneous particle velocities (frame velocity) and actin filament track averaged velocities (track velocity) give an estimate of the random walk step-size, δ. Comparing δ for slow and fast motility components suggests the higher speed component has cardiac myosin upshifting to longer steps. Variable step-size characteristics imply cardiac myosin maintains a velocity dynamic range not involving strain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamics of RecA filaments on single-stranded DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loenhout, M.T.J.; Van der Heijden, T.; Kanaar, R.; Wyman, C.; Dekker, C.

    2009-01-01

    RecA, the key protein in homologous recombination, performs its actions as a helical filament on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). ATP hydrolysis makes the RecA–ssDNA filament dynamic and is essential for successful recombination. RecA has been studied extensively by single-molecule techniques on

  17. Determining the impact of oxidation on the motility of single muscle-fibres expressing different myosin isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Li, M.; Baron, Caroline P.

    2013-01-01

    (motility speed) and force-generation capacity of specific MyHC isoforms. In the experimental procedure, single muscle fibres were split in different segments and each segment was exposed to a different concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Speed and force measurements were recorded and compared, to assess...... the effect of myosin oxidation on motility and force. The MyHC isoform expression in the single muscle fibre was subsequently determined on silver-stained gel SDS-PAGE. Preliminary results indicate a decrease of directionality and speed of the in-vitro motility as a result of an oxidative environment......, and the successful use of the assay in determining fibre-specific responses to oxidation. Subsequent analyses will focus on the location of protein modifications on the myosin molecule and on how these modifications induce changes in speed and force....

  18. Competition between Coiled-Coil Structures and the Impact on Myosin-10 Bundle Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavra, Kevin C; Xia, Youlin; Rock, Ronald S

    2016-06-07

    Coiled-coil fusions are a useful approach to enforce dimerization in protein engineering. However, the final structures of coiled-coil fusion proteins have received relatively little attention. Here, we determine the structural outcome of adjacent parallel and antiparallel coiled coils. The targets are coiled coils that stabilize myosin-10 in single-molecule biophysical studies. We reveal the solution structure of a short, antiparallel, myosin-10 coiled-coil fused to the parallel GCN4-p1 coiled coil. Surprisingly, this structure is a continuous, antiparallel coiled coil where GCN4-p1 pairs with myosin-10 rather than itself. We also show that longer myosin-10 segments in these parallel/antiparallel fusions are dynamic and do not fold cooperatively. Our data resolve conflicting results on myosin-10 selection of actin filament bundles, demonstrating the importance of understanding coiled-coil orientation and stability. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermal unfolding of Acanthamoeba myosin II and skeletal muscle myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolkiewski, M; Redowicz, M J; Korn, E D; Ginsburg, A

    1996-04-16

    Studies on the thermal unfolding of monomeric Acanthamoeba myosin II and other myosins, in particular skeletal muscle myosin, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) are reviewed. The unfolding transitions for intact myosin or its head fragment are irreversible, whereas those of the rod part and its fragments are completely reversible. Acanthamoeba myosin II unfolds with a high degree of cooperativity from ca. 40-45 degrees C at pH 7.5 in 0.6 M KCl, producing a single, sharp endotherm in DSC. In contrast, thermal transitions of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin occur over a broader temperature range (ca. 40-60 degrees C) under the same conditions. The DSC studies on the unfolding of the myosin rod and its fragments allow identification of cooperative domains, each of which unfolds according to a two-state mechanism. Also, DSC data show the effect of the nucleotide-induced conformational changes in the myosin head on the protein stability.

  20. A Nanodiamond-peptide Bioconjugate for Fluorescence and ODMR Microscopy of a Single Actin Filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genjo, Takuya; Sotoma, Shingo; Tanabe, Ryotaro; Igarashi, Ryuji; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the importance of conformational changes in actin filaments induced by mechanical stimulation of a cell has been increasingly recognized, especially in terms of mechanobiology. Despite its fundamental importance, however, long-term observation of a single actin filament by fluorescent microscopy has been difficult because of the low photostability of traditional fluorescent molecules. This paper reports a novel molecular labeling system for actin filaments using fluorescent nanodiamond (ND) particles harboring nitrogen-vacancy centers; ND has flexible chemical modifiability, extremely high photostability and biocompatibility, and provides a variety of physical information quantitatively via optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements. We performed the chemical surface modification of an ND with the actin filament-specific binding peptide Lifeact and observed colocalization of pure Lifeact-modified ND and actin filaments by the ODMR selective imaging protocol, suggesting the capability of long-term observation and quantitative analysis of a single molecule by using an ND particle.

  1. Human myosin VIIa is a very slow processive motor protein on various cellular actin structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Osamu; Komatsu, Satoshi; Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Mizutani, Takeomi; Watanabe, Tomonobu M; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2017-06-30

    Human myosin VIIa (MYO7A) is an actin-linked motor protein associated with human Usher syndrome (USH) type 1B, which causes human congenital hearing and visual loss. Although it has been thought that the role of human myosin VIIa is critical for USH1 protein tethering with actin and transportation along actin bundles in inner-ear hair cells, myosin VIIa's motor function remains unclear. Here, we studied the motor function of the tail-truncated human myosin VIIa dimer (HM7AΔTail/LZ) at the single-molecule level. We found that the HM7AΔTail/LZ moves processively on single actin filaments with a step size of 35 nm. Dwell-time distribution analysis indicated an average waiting time of 3.4 s, yielding ∼0.3 s -1 for the mechanical turnover rate; hence, the velocity of HM7AΔTail/LZ was extremely slow, at 11 nm·s -1 We also examined HM7AΔTail/LZ movement on various actin structures in demembranated cells. HM7AΔTail/LZ showed unidirectional movement on actin structures at cell edges, such as lamellipodia and filopodia. However, HM7AΔTail/LZ frequently missed steps on actin tracks and exhibited bidirectional movement at stress fibers, which was not observed with tail-truncated myosin Va. These results suggest that the movement of the human myosin VIIa motor protein is more efficient on lamellipodial and filopodial actin tracks than on stress fibers, which are composed of actin filaments with different polarity, and that the actin structures influence the characteristics of cargo transportation by human myosin VIIa. In conclusion, myosin VIIa movement appears to be suitable for translocating USH1 proteins on stereocilia actin bundles in inner-ear hair cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Comparative Biomechanics of Thick Filaments and Thin Filaments with Functional Consequences for Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The scaffold of striated muscle is predominantly comprised of myosin and actin polymers known as thick filaments and thin filaments, respectively. The roles these filaments play in muscle contraction are well known, but the extent to which variations in filament mechanical properties influence muscle function is not fully understood. Here we review information on the material properties of thick filaments, thin filaments, and their primary constituents; we also discuss ways in which mechanical properties of filaments impact muscle performance.

  3. Watching single molecules dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  4. Self-organization of single filaments and diffusive plasmas during a single pulse in dielectric-barrier discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Self-organization of filaments in dielectric-barrier discharges (DBDs) probably has many origins. However, the dominant cause is proposed to be the accumulation of charge on the surfaces of the bounding dielectrics that reinforces successive discharge pulses to occur at the same locations. A secondary cause is the electrostatic repulsion of individual plasma filaments. Self-organization typically develops over many discharge pulses. In this paper, we discuss the results of a computational investigation of plasma filaments in overvoltage DBDs that, under select conditions, display self-organized patterns (SOPs) of plasma density during a single discharge pulse. (Overvoltage refers to the rapid application of a voltage in excess of the quasi-dc breakdown voltage.) The origin of the SOPs is a synergistic relationship between the speed of the surface-ionization waves that propagate along each dielectric and the rate at which avalanche occurs across the gap. For our test conditions, SOPs were not observed at lower voltages and gradually formed at higher voltages. The same conditions that result in SOPs, i.e. the application of an overvoltage, also produce more diffuse discharges. A transition from a single narrow filament to a more diffuse structure was observed as overvoltage was approached. The sensitivity of SOPs to the orientation and permittivity of the bounding dielectrics is discussed. (paper)

  5. Human actin mutations associated with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies demonstrate distinct thin filament regulatory properties in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debold, Edward P; Saber, Walid; Cheema, Yaser; Bookwalter, Carol S; Trybus, Kathleen M; Warshaw, David M; Vanburen, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Two cardiomyopathic mutations were expressed in human cardiac actin, using a Baculovirus/insect cell system; E99K is associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy whereas R312H is associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. The hypothesis that the divergent phenotypes of these two cardiomyopathies are associated with fundamental differences in the molecular mechanics and thin filament regulation of the underlying actin mutation was tested using the in vitro motility and laser trap assays. In the presence of troponin (Tn) and tropomyosin (Tm), beta-cardiac myosin moved both E99K and R312H thin filaments at significantly (pATP concentration revealed similar ATP binding rates but slowed ADP release rates for the two actin mutants compared to WT. Single molecule laser trap experiments performed using both unregulated (i.e. actin) and regulated thin filaments in the absence of Ca(++) revealed that neither actin mutation significantly affected the myosin's unitary step size (d) or duration of strong actin binding (t(on)) at 20 microM ATP. However, the frequency of individual strong-binding events in the presence of Tn and Tm, was significantly lower for E99K than WT at comparable myosin surface concentrations. The cooperativity of a second myosin head binding to the thin filament was also impaired by E99K. In conclusion, E99K inhibits the activation of the thin filament by myosin strong-binding whereas R312H demonstrates enhanced calcium activation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Spontaneous detachment of the leading head contributes to myosin VI backward steps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keigo Ikezaki

    Full Text Available Myosin VI is an ATP driven molecular motor that normally takes forward and processive steps on actin filaments, but also on occasion stochastic backward steps. While a number of models have attempted to explain the backwards steps, none offer an acceptable mechanism for their existence. We therefore performed single molecule imaging of myosin VI and calculated the stepping rates of forward and backward steps at the single molecule level. The forward stepping rate was proportional to the ATP concentration, whereas the backward stepping rate was independent. Using these data, we proposed that spontaneous detachment of the leading head is uncoupled from ATP binding and is responsible for the backward steps of myosin VI.

  7. Protein-Nanocrystal Conjugates Support a Single Filament Polymerization Model in R1 Plasmid Segregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Charina L.; Claridge, Shelley A.; Garner, Ethan C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2008-07-15

    To ensure inheritance by daughter cells, many low-copy number bacterial plasmids, including the R1 drug-resistance plasmid, encode their own DNA segregation systems. The par operon of plasmid R1 directs construction of a simple spindle structure that converts free energy of polymerization of an actin-like protein, ParM, into work required to move sister plasmids to opposite poles of rod-shaped cells. The structures of individual components have been solved, but little is known about the ultrastructure of the R1 spindle. To determine the number of ParM filaments in a minimal R1 spindle, we used DNA-gold nanocrystal conjugates as mimics of the R1 plasmid. Wefound that each end of a single polar ParM filament binds to a single ParR/parC-gold complex, consistent with the idea that ParM filaments bind in the hollow core of the ParR/parC ring complex. Our results further suggest that multifilament spindles observed in vivo are associated with clusters of plasmidssegregating as a unit.

  8. CLIC5 stabilizes membrane-actin filament linkages at the base of hair cell stereocilia in a molecular complex with radixin, taperin, and myosin VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Felipe T; Andrade, Leonardo R; Tanda, Soichi; Grati, M'hamed; Plona, Kathleen L; Gagnon, Leona H; Johnson, Kenneth R; Kachar, Bechara; Berryman, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel 5 protein (CLIC5) was originally isolated from microvilli in complex with actin binding proteins including ezrin, a member of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) family of membrane-cytoskeletal linkers. CLIC5 concentrates at the base of hair cell stereocilia and is required for normal hearing and balance in mice, but its functional significance is poorly understood. This study investigated the role of CLIC5 in postnatal development and maintenance of hair bundles. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy of CLIC5-deficient jitterbug (jbg) mice revealed progressive fusion of stereocilia as early as postnatal day 10. Radixin (RDX), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Q (PTPRQ), and taperin (TPRN), deafness-associated proteins that also concentrate at the base of stereocilia, were mislocalized in fused stereocilia of jbg mice. TPRQ and RDX were dispersed even prior to stereocilia fusion. Biochemical assays showed interaction of CLIC5 with ERM proteins, TPRN, and possibly myosin VI (MYO6). In addition, CLIC5 and RDX failed to localize normally in fused stereocilia of MYO6 mutant mice. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which these proteins work together as a complex to stabilize linkages between the plasma membrane and subjacent actin cytoskeleton at the base of stereocilia. © Published 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  9. Grazing impacts of the invasive bivalve Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857 on single-celled, colonial and filamentous cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Gazulha

    Full Text Available Feeding behavior of the invasive bivalve Limnoperna fortunei in the presence of single-celled, colonial, and filamentous cyanobacteria was tested in laboratory experiments to evaluate the effects of size and shape on mussel feeding. The first hypothesis holds that golden mussel filters more efficiently smaller particles, such as single cells of Microcystis, which could be more easily assimilated by its filtering apparatus. The second hypothesis sustains that L. fortunei filters more efficiently rounded colonies, such as Microcystis, which would be more easily ingested than lengthy filamentous, such as Planktothrix. Filtration rates of golden mussel in the presence of single-celled, colonial and filamentous cyanobacteria were similar. Nevertheless, there was a great difference in the ingestion and pseudofeces production rates. Single cells were widely accepted as food, while filamentous and colonial cyanobacteria were massively expelled as pseudofeces. The results confirmed the first hypothesis that golden mussel prefers to ingest smaller particles. The second hypothesis was rejected since filamentous were preferentially ingested than colonial cyanobacteria. Golden mussel has the potential to remove toxic cells (Microcystis, however this potential would be reduced in cyanobacteria blooms, where colonial forms which are preferentially rejected by L. fortunei, are predominant. In this case, the presence of this invasive bivalve could also enhance the occurrence of blooms by rejecting colonial and filamentous cyanobacteria in pseudofeces.

  10. Single-filament kinetic studies provide novel insights into regulation of actin-based motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Shashank; Carlier, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Polarized assembly of actin filaments forms the basis of actin-based motility and is regulated both spatially and temporally. Cells use a variety of mechanisms by which intrinsically slower processes are accelerated, and faster ones decelerated, to match rates observed in vivo. Here we discuss how kinetic studies of individual reactions and cycles that drive actin remodeling have provided a mechanistic and quantitative understanding of such processes. We specifically consider key barbed-end regulators such as capping protein and formins as illustrative examples. We compare and contrast different kinetic approaches, such as the traditional pyrene-polymerization bulk assays, as well as more recently developed single-filament and single-molecule imaging approaches. Recent development of novel biophysical methods for sensing and applying forces will in future allow us to address the very important relationship between mechanical stimulus and kinetics of actin-based motility. © 2016 Shekhar and Carlier. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Diffusion of myosin light chain kinase on actin: A mechanism to enhance myosin phosphorylation rates in smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Feng; Brizendine, Richard K; Carter, Michael S; Alcala, Diego B; Brown, Avery E; Chattin, Amy M; Haldeman, Brian D; Walsh, Michael P; Facemyer, Kevin C; Baker, Josh E; Cremo, Christine R

    2015-10-01

    Smooth muscle myosin (SMM) light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates SMM, thereby activating the ATPase activity required for muscle contraction. The abundance of active MLCK, which is tightly associated with the contractile apparatus, is low relative to that of SMM. SMM phosphorylation is rapid despite the low ratio of MLCK to SMM, raising the question of how one MLCK rapidly phosphorylates many SMM molecules. We used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor single molecules of streptavidin-coated quantum dot-labeled MLCK interacting with purified actin, actin bundles, and stress fibers of smooth muscle cells. Surprisingly, MLCK and the N-terminal 75 residues of MLCK (N75) moved on actin bundles and stress fibers of smooth muscle cell cytoskeletons by a random one-dimensional (1-D) diffusion mechanism. Although diffusion of proteins along microtubules and oligonucleotides has been observed previously, this is the first characterization to our knowledge of a protein diffusing in a sustained manner along actin. By measuring the frequency of motion, we found that MLCK motion is permitted only if acto-myosin and MLCK-myosin interactions are weak. From these data, diffusion coefficients, and other kinetic and geometric considerations relating to the contractile apparatus, we suggest that 1-D diffusion of MLCK along actin (a) ensures that diffusion is not rate limiting for phosphorylation, (b) allows MLCK to locate to areas in which myosin is not yet phosphorylated, and (c) allows MLCK to avoid getting "stuck" on myosins that have already been phosphorylated. Diffusion of MLCK along actin filaments may be an important mechanism for enhancing the rate of SMM phosphorylation in smooth muscle. © 2015 Hong et al.

  12. Myosin VI deafness mutation prevents the initiation of processive runs on actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylypenko, Olena; Song, Lin; Shima, Ai; Yang, Zhaohui; Houdusse, Anne M; Sweeney, H Lee

    2015-03-17

    Mutations in the reverse-direction myosin, myosin VI, are associated with deafness in humans and mice. A myosin VI deafness mutation, D179Y, which is in the transducer of the motor, uncoupled the release of the ATP hydrolysis product, inorganic phosphate (Pi), from dependency on actin binding and destroyed the ability of single dimeric molecules to move processively on actin filaments. We observed that processive movement is rescued if ATP is added to the mutant dimer following binding of both heads to actin in the absence of ATP, demonstrating that the mutation selectively destroys the initiation of processive runs at physiological ATP levels. A drug (omecamtiv) that accelerates the actin-activated activity of cardiac myosin was able to rescue processivity of the D179Y mutant dimers at physiological ATP concentrations by slowing the actin-independent release of Pi. Thus, it may be possible to create myosin VI-specific drugs that rescue the function of deafness-causing mutations.

  13. Self-organization of myosin II in reconstituted actomyosin bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R; McCall, Patrick M; Thoresen, Todd; Balcioglu, Hayri E; Kasiewicz, Lisa; Gardel, Margaret L; O'Shaughnessy, Ben

    2012-09-19

    Cells assemble a variety of bundled actomyosin structures in the cytoskeleton for activities such as cell-shape regulation, force production, and cytokinesis. Although these linear structures exhibit varied architecture, two common organizational themes are a punctate distribution of myosin II and distinct patterns of actin polarity. The mechanisms that cells use to assemble and maintain these organizational features are poorly understood. To study these, we reconstituted actomyosin bundles in vitro that contained only actin filaments and myosin II. Upon addition of ATP, the bundles contracted and the uniformly distributed myosin spontaneously reorganized into discrete clusters. We developed a mathematical model in which the motion of myosin II filaments is governed by the polarities of the actin filaments with which they interact. The model showed that the assembly of myosins into clusters is driven by their tendency to migrate to locations with zero net actin filament polarity. With no fitting parameters, the predicted distribution of myosin cluster separations was in close agreement with our experiments, including a -3/2 power law decay for intermediate length scales. Thus, without an organizing template or accessory proteins, a minimal bundle of actin and myosin has the inherent capacity to self-organize into a heterogeneous banded structure. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Distinct functional interactions between actin isoforms and nonsarcomeric myosins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Müller

    Full Text Available Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments.

  15. Cargo recognition and cargo-mediated regulation of unconventional myosins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Li, Jianchao; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-10-21

    Organized motions are hallmarks of living organisms. Such motions range from collective cell movements during development and muscle contractions at the macroscopic scale all the way down to cellular cargo (e.g., various biomolecules and organelles) transportation and mechanoforce sensing at more microscopic scales. Energy required for these biological motions is almost invariably provided by cellular chemical fuels in the form of nucleotide triphosphate. Biological systems have designed a group of nanoscale engines, known as molecular motors, to convert cellular chemical fuels into mechanical energy. Molecular motors come in various forms including cytoskeleton motors (myosin, kinesin, and dynein), nucleic-acid-based motors, cellular membrane-based rotary motors, and so on. The main focus of this Account is one subfamily of actin filament-based motors called unconventional myosins (other than muscle myosin II, the remaining myosins are collectively referred to as unconventional myosins). In general, myosins can use ATP to fuel two types of mechanomotions: dynamic tethering actin filaments with various cellular compartments or structures and actin filament-based intracellular transport. In contrast to rich knowledge accumulated over many decades on ATP hydrolyzing motor heads and their interactions with actin filaments, how various myosins recognize their specific cargoes and whether and how cargoes can in return regulate functions of motors are less understood. Nonetheless, a series of biochemical and structural investigations in the past few years, including works from our own laboratory, begin to shed lights on these latter questions. Some myosins (e.g., myosin-VI) can function both as cellular transporters and as mechanical tethers. To function as a processive transporter, myosins need to form dimers or multimers. To be a mechanical tether, a monomeric myosin is sufficient. It has been shown for myosin-VI that its cellular cargo proteins can play critical roles

  16. Auxotonic to isometric contraction transitioning in a beating heart causes myosin step-size to down shift.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Burghardt

    Full Text Available Myosin motors in cardiac ventriculum convert ATP free energy to the work of moving blood volume under pressure. The actin bound motor cyclically rotates its lever-arm/light-chain complex linking motor generated torque to the myosin filament backbone and translating actin against resisting force. Previous research showed that the unloaded in vitro motor is described with high precision by single molecule mechanical characteristics including unitary step-sizes of approximately 3, 5, and 8 nm and their relative step-frequencies of approximately 13, 50, and 37%. The 3 and 8 nm unitary step-sizes are dependent on myosin essential light chain (ELC N-terminus actin binding. Step-size and step-frequency quantitation specifies in vitro motor function including duty-ratio, power, and strain sensitivity metrics. In vivo, motors integrated into the muscle sarcomere form the more complex and hierarchically functioning muscle machine. The goal of the research reported here is to measure single myosin step-size and step-frequency in vivo to assess how tissue integration impacts motor function. A photoactivatable GFP tags the ventriculum myosin lever-arm/light-chain complex in the beating heart of a live zebrafish embryo. Detected single GFP emission reports time-resolved myosin lever-arm orientation interpreted as step-size and step-frequency providing single myosin mechanical characteristics over the active cycle. Following step-frequency of cardiac ventriculum myosin transitioning from low to high force in relaxed to auxotonic to isometric contraction phases indicates that the imposition of resisting force during contraction causes the motor to down-shift to the 3 nm step-size accounting for >80% of all the steps in the near-isometric phase. At peak force, the ATP initiated actomyosin dissociation is the predominant strain inhibited transition in the native myosin contraction cycle. The proposed model for motor down-shifting and strain sensing involves ELC N

  17. Harmonic Force Spectroscopy measures load-dependent kinetics of individual human β-cardiac myosin molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Mortensen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Molecular motors are responsible for numerous cellular processes from cargo transport to heart contraction. Their interactions with other cellular components are often transient and exhibit kinetics that depend on load. Here, we measure such interactions using ‘harmonic force spectroscopy....... The protocol accumulates statistics fast enough to deliver single-molecule results from single-molecule experiments. We demonstrate the method’s performance by measuring the force-dependent kinetics of individual human b-cardiac myosin molecules interacting with an actin filament at physiological ATP...

  18. Alternative S2 Hinge Regions of the Myosin Rod Affect Myofibrillar Structure and Myosin Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Mark S.; Dambacher, Corey M.; Knowles, Aileen F.; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Swank, Douglas M.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.; (RPI); (IIT); (SDSU); (Vermont)

    2009-07-01

    The subfragment 2/light meromyosin 'hinge' region has been proposed to significantly contribute to muscle contraction force and/or speed. Transgenic replacement of the endogenous fast muscle isovariant hinge A (exon 15a) in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle with the slow muscle hinge B (exon 15b) allows examination of the structural and functional changes when only this region of the myosin molecule is different. Hinge B was previously shown to increase myosin rod length, increase A-band and sarcomere length, and decrease flight performance compared to hinge A. We applied additional measures to these transgenic lines to further evaluate the consequences of modifying this hinge region. Structurally, the longer A-band and sarcomere lengths found in the hinge B myofibrils appear to be due to the longitudinal addition of myosin heads. Functionally, hinge B, although a significant distance from the myosin catalytic domain, alters myosin kinetics in a manner consistent with this region increasing myosin rod length. These structural and functional changes combine to decrease whole fly wing-beat frequency and flight performance. Our results indicate that this hinge region plays an important role in determining myosin kinetics and in regulating thick and thin filament lengths as well as sarcomere length.

  19. Harmonic Force Spectroscopy Reveals a Force-Velocity Curve from a Single Human Beta Cardiac Myosin Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Vestergaard, Christian L.

    2014-01-01

    in thin filaments in the sarcomere, cycling between a strongly bound state (force producing state) and a weakly bound state (relaxed state). Huxley and Simmons have previously proposed that the transition from the strong to the weak interaction can be modulated by an external load, i.e., the transition...

  20. Deinococcus radiodurans RecA nucleoprotein filaments characterized at the single-molecule level with optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pobegalov, Georgii, E-mail: george.pobegalov@nanobio.spbstu.ru [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Cherevatenko, Galina; Alekseev, Aleksandr; Sabantsev, Anton; Kovaleva, Oksana; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Morozova, Natalia [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Baitin, Dmitrii [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Khodorkovskii, Mikhail [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-23

    Deinococcus radiodurans can survive extreme doses of ionizing radiation due to the very efficient DNA repair mechanisms that are able to cope even with hundreds of double-strand breaks. RecA, the critical protein of homologous recombination in bacteria, is one of the key components of the DNA-repair system. Repair of double-strand breaks requires RecA binding to DNA and assembly of the RecA nucleoprotein helical filaments. The Escherichia coli RecA protein (EcRecA) and its interactions with DNA have been extensively studied using various approaches including single-molecule techniques, while the D. radiodurans RecA (DrRecA) remains much less characterized. However, DrRecA shows some remarkable differences from E. coli homolog. Here we combine microfluidics and single-molecule DNA manipulation with optical tweezers to follow the binding of DrRecA to long double-stranded DNA molecules and probe the mechanical properties of DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments at physiological pH. Our data provide a direct comparison of DrRecA and EcRecA binding to double-stranded DNA under identical conditions. We report a significantly faster filaments assembly as well as lower values of persistence length and contour length for DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments compared to EcRecA. Our results support the existing model of DrRecA forming more frequent and less continuous filaments relative to those of EcRecA. - Highlights: • We investigate Deinococcus radiodurans RecA interactions with long double-stranded DNA at the single-molecule level. • At physiological pH D. radiodurans RecA forms nucleoprotein filaments significantly faster relative to Escherichia coli RecA. • D. radiodurans RecA-dsDNA nucleoprotein filaments are more flexible and slightly shorter compared to those of E. coli RecA.

  1. Arginylation of Myosin Heavy Chain Regulates Skeletal Muscle Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabelle S. Cornachione

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginylation is a posttranslational modification with an emerging global role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. To test the role of arginylation in the skeletal muscle, we generated a mouse model with Ate1 deletion driven by the skeletal muscle-specific creatine kinase (Ckmm promoter. Ckmm-Ate1 mice were viable and outwardly normal; however, their skeletal muscle strength was significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Mass spectrometry of isolated skeletal myofibrils showed a limited set of proteins, including myosin heavy chain, arginylated on specific sites. Atomic force microscopy measurements of contractile strength in individual myofibrils and isolated myosin filaments from these mice showed a significant reduction of contractile forces, which, in the case of myosin filaments, could be fully rescued by rearginylation with purified Ate1. Our results demonstrate that arginylation regulates force production in muscle and exerts a direct effect on muscle strength through arginylation of myosin.

  2. Stress generation by myosin minifilaments in actin bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasanayake, Nilushi L; Carlsson, Anders E

    2013-06-01

    Forces and stresses generated by the action of myosin minifilaments are analyzed in idealized computer-generated actin bundles, and compared to results for isotropic actin networks. The bundles are generated as random collections of actin filaments in two dimensions with constrained orientations, crosslinked and attached to two fixed walls. Myosin minifilaments are placed on actin filament pairs and allowed to move and deform the network so that it exerts forces on the walls. The vast majority of simulation runs end with contractile minifilament stress, because minifilaments rotate into energetically stable contractile configurations. This process is aided by the bending and stretching of actin filaments, which accomodate minifilament rotation. Stresses for bundles are greater than those for isotropic networks, and antiparallel filaments generate more tension than parallel filaments. The forces transmitted by the actin network to the walls of the simulation cell often exceed the tension in the minifilament itself.

  3. Phosphate and ADP Differently Inhibit Coordinated Smooth Muscle Myosin Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Lennart; Balassy, Zsombor; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Mackey, Michael C.; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments propelled in vitro by groups of skeletal muscle myosin motors exhibit distinct phases of active sliding or arrest, whose occurrence depends on actin length (L) within a range of up to 1.0 μm. Smooth muscle myosin filaments are exponentially distributed with ≈150 nm average length in vivo—suggesting relevance of the L-dependence of myosin group kinetics. Here, we found L-dependent actin arrest and sliding in in vitro motility assays of smooth muscle myosin. We perturbed individual myosin kinetics with varying, physiological concentrations of phosphate (Pi, release associated with main power stroke) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP, release associated with minor mechanical step). Adenosine triphosphate was kept constant at physiological concentration. Increasing [Pi] lowered the fraction of time for which actin was actively sliding, reflected in reduced average sliding velocity (ν) and motile fraction (fmot, fraction of time that filaments are moving); increasing [ADP] increased the fraction of time actively sliding and reduced the velocity while sliding, reflected in reduced ν and increased fmot. We introduced specific Pi and ADP effects on individual myosin kinetics into our recently developed mathematical model of actin propulsion by myosin groups. Simulations matched our experimental observations and described the inhibition of myosin group kinetics. At low [Pi] and [ADP], actin arrest and sliding were reflected by two distinct chemical states of the myosin group. Upon [Pi] increase, the probability of the active state decreased; upon [ADP] increase, the probability of the active state increased, but the active state became increasingly similar to the arrested state. PMID:25650929

  4. Dielectric barrier discharges: progress on plasma sources and on the understanding of regimes and single filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Ronny

    2017-05-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) are plasmas generated in configurations with an insulating (dielectric) material between the electrodes which is responsible for a self-pulsing operation. DBDs are a typical example of nonthermal atmospheric or normal pressure gas discharges. Initially used for the generation of ozone, they have opened up many other fields of application. Therefore DBDs are a relevant tool in current plasma technology as well as an object for fundamental studies. Another motivation for further research is the fact that so-called partial discharges in insulated high voltage systems are special types of DBDs. The breakdown processes, the formation of structures, and the role of surface processes are currently under investigation. This review is intended to give an update to the already existing literature on DBDs considering the research and development within the last two decades. The main principles and different modes of discharge generation are summarized. A collection of known as well as special electrode configurations and reactor designs will be presented. This shall demonstrate the different and broad possibilities, but also the similarities and common aspects of devices for different fields of applications explored within the last years. The main part is devoted to the progress on the investigation of different aspects of breakdown and plasma formation with the focus on single filaments or microdischarges. This includes a summary of the current knowledge on the electrical characterization of filamentary DBDs. In particular, the recent new insights on the elementary volume and surface memory mechanisms in these discharges will be discussed. An outlook for the forthcoming challenges on research and development will be given.

  5. Vimentin filament organization and stress sensing depend on its single cysteine residue and zinc binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Oeste, Clara L.; Martínez, Alma E.; Carrasco, M. Jesús; Garzón, Beatriz; Cañada, F. Javier

    2015-01-01

    The vimentin filament network plays a key role in cell architecture and signalling, as well as in epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Vimentin C328 is targeted by various oxidative modifications, but its role in vimentin organization is not known. Here we show that C328 is essential for vimentin network reorganization in response to oxidants and electrophiles, and is required for optimal vimentin performance in network expansion, lysosomal distribution and aggresome formation. C328 may fulfil these roles through interaction with zinc. In vitro, micromolar zinc protects vimentin from iodoacetamide modification and elicits vimentin polymerization into optically detectable structures; in cells, zinc closely associates with vimentin and its depletion causes reversible filament disassembly. Finally, zinc transport-deficient human fibroblasts show increased vimentin solubility and susceptibility to disruption, which are restored by zinc supplementation. These results unveil a critical role of C328 in vimentin organization and open new perspectives for the regulation of intermediate filaments by zinc. PMID:26031447

  6. Myosin II dynamics are regulated by tension in intercalating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Simoes, Sérgio de Matos; Röper, Jens-Christian; Eaton, Suzanne; Zallen, Jennifer A

    2009-11-01

    Axis elongation in Drosophila occurs through polarized cell rearrangements driven by actomyosin contractility. Myosin II promotes neighbor exchange through the contraction of single cell boundaries, while the contraction of myosin II structures spanning multiple pairs of cells leads to rosette formation. Here we show that multicellular actomyosin cables form at a higher frequency than expected by chance, indicating that cable assembly is an active process. Multicellular cables are sites of increased mechanical tension as measured by laser ablation. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments show that myosin II is stabilized at the cortex in regions of increased tension. Myosin II is recruited in response to an ectopic force and relieving tension leads to a rapid loss of myosin, indicating that tension is necessary and sufficient for cortical myosin localization. These results demonstrate that myosin II dynamics are regulated by tension in a positive feedback loop that leads to multicellular actomyosin cable formation and efficient tissue elongation.

  7. Insights into the genome of large sulfur bacteria revealed by analysis of single filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussmann, Marc; Hu, Fen Z.; Richter, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Marine sediments are frequently covered by mats of the filamentous Beggiatoa and other large nitrate-storing bacteria that oxidize hydrogen sulfide using either oxygen or nitrate, which they store in intracellular vacuoles. Despite their conspicuous metabolic properties and their biogeochemical...

  8. Sarcomere lattice geometry influences cooperative myosin binding in muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand C W Tanner

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In muscle, force emerges from myosin binding with actin (forming a cross-bridge. This actomyosin binding depends upon myofilament geometry, kinetics of thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and kinetics of cross-bridge cycling. Binding occurs within a compliant network of protein filaments where there is mechanical coupling between myosins along the thick-filament backbone and between actin monomers along the thin filament. Such mechanical coupling precludes using ordinary differential equation models when examining the effects of lattice geometry, kinetics, or compliance on force production. This study uses two stochastically driven, spatially explicit models to predict levels of cross-bridge binding, force, thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and ATP utilization. One model incorporates the 2-to-1 ratio of thin to thick filaments of vertebrate striated muscle (multi-filament model, while the other comprises only one thick and one thin filament (two-filament model. Simulations comparing these models show that the multi-filament predictions of force, fractional cross-bridge binding, and cross-bridge turnover are more consistent with published experimental values. Furthermore, the values predicted by the multi-filament model are greater than those values predicted by the two-filament model. These increases are larger than the relative increase of potential inter-filament interactions in the multi-filament model versus the two-filament model. This amplification of coordinated cross-bridge binding and cycling indicates a mechanism of cooperativity that depends on sarcomere lattice geometry, specifically the ratio and arrangement of myofilaments.

  9. Covalent cross-linking of single fibers from rabbit psoas increases oscillatory power

    OpenAIRE

    Tawada, K.; Kawai, M.

    1990-01-01

    Single fibers from chemically skinned rabbit psoas muscle were treated with 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethyl-amino)proyl]-carbodiimide (EDC) at 20 degrees C after rigor was induced. A 22-min treatment resulted in 18% covalent cross-linking between myosin heads and the thin filament as determined by stiffness measurements. This treatment also results in covalent cross-linking among rod portions of myosin molecules in the backbone of the thick filament. The fibers thus prepared are stable and do not disso...

  10. Single molecule fluorescence image patterns linked to dipole orientation and axial position: application to myosin cross-bridges in muscle fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Burghardt

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoactivatable fluorescent probes developed specifically for single molecule detection extend advantages of single molecule imaging to high probe density regions of cells and tissues. They perform in the native biomolecule environment and have been used to detect both probe position and orientation.Fluorescence emission from a single photoactivated probe captured in an oil immersion, high numerical aperture objective, produces a spatial pattern on the detector that is a linear combination of 6 independent and distinct spatial basis patterns with weighting coefficients specifying emission dipole orientation. Basis patterns are tabulated for single photoactivated probes labeling myosin cross-bridges in a permeabilized muscle fiber undergoing total internal reflection illumination. Emitter proximity to the glass/aqueous interface at the coverslip implies the dipole near-field and dipole power normalization are significant affecters of the basis patterns. Other characteristics of the basis patterns are contributed by field polarization rotation with transmission through the microscope optics and refraction by the filter set. Pattern recognition utilized the generalized linear model, maximum likelihood fitting, for Poisson distributed uncertainties. This fitting method is more appropriate for treating low signal level photon counting data than χ(2 minimization.Results indicate that emission dipole orientation is measurable from the intensity image except for the ambiguity under dipole inversion. The advantage over an alternative method comparing two measured polarized emission intensities using an analyzing polarizer is that information in the intensity spatial distribution provides more constraints on fitted parameters and a single image provides all the information needed. Axial distance dependence in the emission pattern is also exploited to measure relative probe position near focus. Single molecule images from axial scanning fitted

  11. p21-activated kinase has substrate specificity similar to Acanthamoeba myosin I heavy chain kinase and activates Acanthamoeba myosin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeska, H; Knaus, U G; Wang, Z Y; Bokoch, G M; Korn, E D

    1997-02-18

    Acanthamoeba class I myosins are unconventional, single-headed myosins that express actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase and in vitro motility activities only when a single serine or threonine in the heavy chain is phosphorylated by myosin I heavy chain kinase (MIHCK). Some other, but not most, class I myosins have the same consensus phosphorylation site sequence, and the two known class VI myosins have a phosphorylatable residue in the homologous position, where most myosins have an aspartate or glutamate residue. Recently, we found that the catalytic domain of Acanthamoeba MIHCK has extensive sequence similarity to the p21-activated kinase (PAK)/STE20 family of kinases from mammals and yeast, which are activated by small GTP-binding proteins. The physiological substrates of the PAK/STE20 kinases are not well characterized. In this paper we show that PAK1 has similar substrate specificity as MIHCK when assayed against synthetic substrates and that PAK1 phosphorylates the heavy chain (1 mol of P(i) per mol) and activates Acanthamoeba myosin I as MIHCK does. These results, together with the known involvement of Acanthamoeba myosin I, yeast myosin I, STE20, PAK, and small GTP-binding proteins in membrane- and cytoskeleton-associated morphogenetic transformations and activities, suggest that myosins may be physiological substrates for the PAK/STE20 family and thus mediators of these events.

  12. Filament Substructures and their Interrelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Martin, S. F.; Engvold, O.

    The main structural components of solar filaments, their spines, barbs, and legs at the extreme ends of the spine, are illustrated from recent high-resolution observations. The thread-like structures appear to be present in filaments everywhere and at all times. They are the fundamental elements of solar filaments. The interrelation of the spines, barbs and legs are discussed. From observations, we present a conceptual model of the magnetic field of a filament. We suggest that only a single physical model is needed to explain filaments in a continuous spectrum represented by active region filaments at one end and quiescent filaments at the other end.

  13. Characterization of the minimum domain required for targeting budding yeast myosin II to the site of cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolliday Nicola J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All eukaryotes with the exception of plants use an actomyosin ring to generate a constriction force at the site of cell division (cleavage furrow during mitosis and meiosis. The structure and filament forming abilities located in the C-terminal or tail region of one of the main components, myosin II, are important for localising the molecule to the contractile ring (CR during cytokinesis. However, it remains poorly understood how myosin II is recruited to the site of cell division and how this recruitment relates to myosin filament assembly. Significant conservation between species of the components involved in cytokinesis, including those of the CR, allows the use of easily genetically manipulated organisms, such as budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the study of cytokinesis. Budding yeast has a single myosin II protein, named Myo1. Unlike most other class II myosins, the tail of Myo1 has an irregular coiled coil. In this report we use molecular genetics, biochemistry and live cell imaging to characterize the minimum localisation domain (MLD of budding yeast Myo1. Results We show that the MLD is a small region in the centre of the tail of Myo1 and that it is both necessary and sufficient for localisation of Myo1 to the yeast bud neck, the pre-determined site of cell division. Hydrodynamic measurements of the MLD, purified from bacteria or yeast, show that it is likely to exist as a trimer. We also examine the importance of a small region of low coiled coil forming probability within the MLD, which we call the hinge region. Removal of the hinge region prevents contraction of the CR. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, we show that GFP-tagged MLD is slightly more dynamic than the GFP-tagged full length molecule but less dynamic than the GFP-tagged Myo1 construct lacking the hinge region. Conclusion Our results define the intrinsic determinant for the localization of budding yeast myosin II and show

  14. Mechanical properties of Bi,Pb(2223) single filaments and Ic(ε) behaviour in longitudinally strained tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passerini, Reynald; Dhalle, Marc; Seeber, Bernd; Fluekiger, Rene

    2002-01-01

    The Young's modulus and fracture stress of isolated Bi,Pb(2223) filaments were deduced from three-point bending tests performed at different stages of the tapes preparation. These results were introduced in the model describing the evolution of critical current of tapes submitted to a longitudinal strain in view to predict their irreversible strain limit ε irr . These calculated irreversible strain limits were compared to measured values, taken from a set of tapes made with different filling factors and composite matrices. This experiment shows that the predicted irreversible strain limits correspond to the measured ones. Presenting the I c behaviour of highly stressed tapes in a magnetic field, we discuss the evolution of the ratio I strong c0 /I c0 versus strain. This value, representative of the fraction of the critical current attributed to strongly connected grains, increases significantly during the crack formation regime at ε > ε irr . This indicates that mechanically weak links correspond to electromagnetically weak ones. This result is further confirmed by comparing the modulus of rupture obtained in single filaments extracted from tapes with different I c values

  15. Ca2+ improves organization of single-stranded DNA bases in human Rad51 filament, explaining stimulatory effect on gene recombination.

    KAUST Repository

    Fornander, Louise H

    2012-02-22

    Human RAD51 protein (HsRad51) catalyses the DNA strand exchange reaction for homologous recombination. To clarify the molecular mechanism of the reaction in vitro being more effective in the presence of Ca(2+) than of Mg(2+), we have investigated the effect of these ions on the structure of HsRad51 filament complexes with single- and double-stranded DNA, the reaction intermediates. Flow linear dichroism spectroscopy shows that the two ionic conditions induce significantly different structures in the HsRad51/single-stranded DNA complex, while the HsRad51/double-stranded DNA complex does not demonstrate this ionic dependence. In the HsRad51/single-stranded DNA filament, the primary intermediate of the strand exchange reaction, ATP/Ca(2+) induces an ordered conformation of DNA, with preferentially perpendicular orientation of nucleobases relative to the filament axis, while the presence of ATP/Mg(2+), ADP/Mg(2+) or ADP/Ca(2+) does not. A high strand exchange activity is observed for the filament formed with ATP/Ca(2+), whereas the other filaments exhibit lower activity. Molecular modelling suggests that the structural variation is caused by the divalent cation interfering with the L2 loop close to the DNA-binding site. It is proposed that the larger Ca(2+) stabilizes the loop conformation and thereby the protein-DNA interaction. A tight binding of DNA, with bases perpendicularly oriented, could facilitate strand exchange.

  16. Dynamic Regulation of Sarcomeric Actin Filaments in Striated Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2010-01-01

    In striated muscle, the actin cytoskeleton is differentiated into myofibrils. Actin and myosin filaments are organized in sarcomeres and specialized for producing contractile forces. Regular arrangement of actin filaments with uniform length and polarity is critical for the contractile function. However, the mechanisms of assembly and maintenance of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle are not completely understood. Live imaging of actin in striated muscle has revealed that actin sub...

  17. Functions of myosin motors tailored for parasitism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Christina; Graindorge, Arnault; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Myosin motors are one of the largest protein families in eukaryotes that exhibit divergent cellular functions. Their roles in protozoans, a diverse group of anciently diverged, single celled organisms with many prominent members known to be parasitic and to cause diseases in human and livestock......, are largely unknown. In the recent years many different approaches, among them whole genome sequencing, phylogenetic analyses and functional studies have increased our understanding on the distribution, protein architecture and function of unconventional myosin motors in protozoan parasites. In Apicomplexa...

  18. Myosin repertoire expansion coincides with eukaryotic diversification in the Mesoproterozoic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmar, Martin; Mühlhausen, Stefanie

    2017-09-04

    The last eukaryotic common ancestor already had an amazingly complex cell possessing genomic and cellular features such as spliceosomal introns, mitochondria, cilia-dependent motility, and a cytoskeleton together with several intracellular transport systems. In contrast to the microtubule-based dyneins and kinesins, the actin-filament associated myosins are considerably divergent in extant eukaryotes and a unifying picture of their evolution has not yet emerged. Here, we manually assembled and annotated 7852 myosins from 929 eukaryotes providing an unprecedented dense sequence and taxonomic sampling. For classification we complemented phylogenetic analyses with gene structure comparisons resulting in 79 distinct myosin classes. The intron pattern analysis and the taxonomic distribution of the classes suggest two myosins in the last eukaryotic common ancestor, a class-1 prototype and another myosin, which is most likely the ancestor of all other myosin classes. The sparse distribution of class-2 and class-4 myosins outside their major lineages contradicts their presence in the last eukaryotic common ancestor but instead strongly suggests early eukaryote-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer. By correlating the evolution of myosin diversity with the history of Earth we found that myosin innovation occurred in independent major "burst" events in the major eukaryotic lineages. Most myosin inventions happened in the Mesoproterozoic era. In the late Neoproterozoic era, a process of extensive independent myosin loss began simultaneously with further eukaryotic diversification. Since the Cambrian explosion, myosin repertoire expansion is driven by lineage- and species-specific gene and genome duplications leading to subfunctionalization and fine-tuning of myosin functions.

  19. Three-dimensional stochastic model of actin–myosin binding in the sarcomere lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijailovich, Srboljub M.; Kayser-Herold, Oliver; Stojanovic, Boban; Nedic, Djordje; Irving, Thomas C.; Geeves, MA (Harvard); (IIT); (U. Kent); (Kragujevac)

    2016-11-18

    The effect of molecule tethering in three-dimensional (3-D) space on bimolecular binding kinetics is rarely addressed and only occasionally incorporated into models of cell motility. The simplest system that can quantitatively determine this effect is the 3-D sarcomere lattice of the striated muscle, where tethered myosin in thick filaments can only bind to a relatively small number of available sites on the actin filament, positioned within a limited range of thermal movement of the myosin head. Here we implement spatially explicit actomyosin interactions into the multiscale Monte Carlo platform MUSICO, specifically defining how geometrical constraints on tethered myosins can modulate state transition rates in the actomyosin cycle. The simulations provide the distribution of myosin bound to sites on actin, ensure conservation of the number of interacting myosins and actin monomers, and most importantly, the departure in behavior of tethered myosin molecules from unconstrained myosin interactions with actin. In addition, MUSICO determines the number of cross-bridges in each actomyosin cycle state, the force and number of attached cross-bridges per myosin filament, the range of cross-bridge forces and accounts for energy consumption. At the macroscopic scale, MUSICO simulations show large differences in predicted force-velocity curves and in the response during early force recovery phase after a step change in length comparing to the two simplest mass action kinetic models. The origin of these differences is rooted in the different fluxes of myosin binding and corresponding instantaneous cross-bridge distributions and quantitatively reflects a major flaw of the mathematical description in all mass action kinetic models. Consequently, this new approach shows that accurate recapitulation of experimental data requires significantly different binding rates, number of actomyosin states, and cross-bridge elasticity than typically used in mass action kinetic models to

  20. Modeling Hand-Over-Hand and Inchworm Steps in Myosin VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Amanda; Lowe, Ian; Tehver, Riina

    Myosin VI is a molecular motor protein that moves along actin filaments to transport cargo within a cell. There is much experimental evidence that the myosin VI dimer moves ``hand-over-hand'' along actin; however, recent experiments suggest that the protein can also move via an ``inchworm'' mechanism. We created a mechanochemical kinetic model to predict myosin VI's behavior under different ATP, ADP, and force conditions, taking these alternative mechanisms into account. Our model's calculations agree well with experimental results and can also be used to predict myosin VI's behavior outside experimentally tested regimes, such as under forward force. We also predict an optimized motor function for the protein around physiological (-2 pN) load and anchoring under -3 pN load. By using our model to predict myosin VI's response to environmental change, we can gain insight into the behavior of a protein that can be difficult to observe experimentally.

  1. Cell-scale dynamic recycling and cortical flow of the actin–myosin cytoskeleton for rapid cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiko Yumura

    2012-11-01

    Actin and myosin II play major roles in cell migration. Whereas pseudopod extension by actin polymerization has been intensively researched, less attention has been paid to how the rest of the actin cytoskeleton such as the actin cortex contributes to cell migration. In this study, cortical actin and myosin II filaments were simultaneously observed in migrating Dictyostelium cells under total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The cortical actin and myosin II filaments remained stationary with respect to the substratum as the cells advanced. However, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments and direct observation of filaments showed that they rapidly turned over. When the cells were detached from the substratum, the actin and myosin filaments displayed a vigorous retrograde flow. Thus, when the cells migrate on the substratum, the cortical cytoskeleton firmly holds the substratum to generate the motive force instead. The present studies also demonstrate how myosin II localizes to the rear region of the migrating cells. The observed dynamic turnover of actin and myosin II filaments contributes to the recycling of their subunits across the whole cell and enables rapid reorganization of the cytoskeleton.

  2. Human Rad51 filaments on double- and single-stranded DNA : Correlating regular and irregular forms with recombination function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ristic, D.; Modesti, M.; Van der Heijden, T.; Van Noort, J.; Dekker, C.; Kanaar, R.; Wyman, C.

    Recombinase proteins assembled into helical filaments on DNA are believed to be the catalytic core of homologous recombination. The assembly, disassembly and dynamic rearrangements of this structure must drive the DNA strand exchange reactions of homologous recombination. The sensitivity of

  3. Head-head interactions of resting myosin crossbridges in intact frog skeletal muscles, revealed by synchrotron x-ray fiber diffraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanji Oshima

    Full Text Available The intensities of the myosin-based layer lines in the x-ray diffraction patterns from live resting frog skeletal muscles with full thick-thin filament overlap from which partial lattice sampling effects had been removed were analyzed to elucidate the configurations of myosin crossbridges around the thick filament backbone to nanometer resolution. The repeat of myosin binding protein C (C-protein molecules on the thick filaments was determined to be 45.33 nm, slightly longer than that of myosin crossbridges. With the inclusion of structural information for C-proteins and a pre-powerstroke head shape, modeling in terms of a mixed population of regular and perturbed regions of myosin crown repeats along the filament revealed that the myosin filament had azimuthal perturbations of crossbridges in addition to axial perturbations in the perturbed region, producing pseudo-six-fold rotational symmetry in the structure projected down the filament axis. Myosin crossbridges had a different organization about the filament axis in each of the regular and perturbed regions. In the regular region that lacks C-proteins, there were inter-molecular interactions between the myosin heads in axially adjacent crown levels. In the perturbed region that contains C-proteins, in addition to inter-molecular interactions between the myosin heads in the closest adjacent crown levels, there were also intra-molecular interactions between the paired heads on the same crown level. Common features of the interactions in both regions were interactions between a portion of the 50-kDa-domain and part of the converter domain of the myosin heads, similar to those found in the phosphorylation-regulated invertebrate myosin. These interactions are primarily electrostatic and the converter domain is responsible for the head-head interactions. Thus multiple head-head interactions of myosin crossbridges also characterize the switched-off state and have an important role in the regulation

  4. Single filament semiconductor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botez, D.

    1980-01-01

    A semiconductor laser comprising: a body of semiconductor material including a substrate having a surface and a pair of spaced, substantially parallel dove-tailed shaped grooves in said surface, said body having a pair of end surfaces between which said grooves extend, said end surfaces being reflective to light with at least one of said end surfaces being partially transparent to light a first epitaxial layer over said surface of the substrate and the surfaces of the grooves, said first epitaxial layer having a flat surface portion over the portion of the substrate surface between the grooves, a thin second epitaxial layer over said first epitaxial layer, a third epitaxial layer over said second epitaxial layer, said first and third epitaxial layers being of opposite conductivity types and the second epitaxial layer being the active recombination region of the laser with the light being generated therein in the vicinity of the portion which is over the flat surface portion of the first epitaxial layer, and a pair of contacts on said body with one contact being over said third epitaxial body and the other being on said substrate

  5. Myosin VIII regulates protonemal patterning and developmental timing in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Zon; Ritchie, Julie A; Pan, Ai-Hong; Quatrano, Ralph S; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2011-09-01

    Plants have two classes of myosins. While recent work has focused on class XI myosins showing that myosin XI is responsible for organelle motility and cytoplasmic streaming, much less is known about the role of myosin VIII in plant growth and development. We have used a combination of RNAi and insertional knockouts to probe myosin VIII function in the moss Physcomitrella patens. We isolated Δmyo8ABCDE plants demonstrating that myosin VIII is not required for plant viability. However, myosin VIII mutants are smaller than wild-type plants in part due to a defect in cell size. Additionally, Δmyo8ABCDE plants produce more side branches and form gametophores much earlier than wild-type plants. In the absence of nutrient media, Δmyo8ABCDE plants exhibit significant protonemal patterning defects, including highly curved protonemal filaments, morphologically defective side branches, as well as an increase in the number of branches. Exogenous auxin partially rescues protonemal defects in Δmyo8ABCDE plants grown in the absence of nutrients. This result, together with defects in protonemal branching, smaller caulonemal cells, and accelerated development in the Δmyo8ABCDE plants, suggests that myosin VIII is involved in hormone homeostasis in P. patens.

  6. Controllable molecular motors engineered from myosin and RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omabegho, Tosan; Gurel, Pinar S.; Cheng, Clarence Y.; Kim, Laura Y.; Ruijgrok, Paul V.; Das, Rhiju; Alushin, Gregory M.; Bryant, Zev

    2018-01-01

    Engineering biomolecular motors can provide direct tests of structure-function relationships and customized components for controlling molecular transport in artificial systems1 or in living cells2. Previously, synthetic nucleic acid motors3-5 and modified natural protein motors6-10 have been developed in separate complementary strategies to achieve tunable and controllable motor function. Integrating protein and nucleic-acid components to form engineered nucleoprotein motors may enable additional sophisticated functionalities. However, this potential has only begun to be explored in pioneering work harnessing DNA scaffolds to dictate the spacing, number and composition of tethered protein motors11-15. Here, we describe myosin motors that incorporate RNA lever arms, forming hybrid assemblies in which conformational changes in the protein motor domain are amplified and redirected by nucleic acid structures. The RNA lever arm geometry determines the speed and direction of motor transport and can be dynamically controlled using programmed transitions in the lever arm structure7,9. We have characterized the hybrid motors using in vitro motility assays, single-molecule tracking, cryo-electron microscopy and structural probing16. Our designs include nucleoprotein motors that reversibly change direction in response to oligonucleotides that drive strand-displacement17 reactions. In multimeric assemblies, the controllable motors walk processively along actin filaments at speeds of 10-20 nm s-1. Finally, to illustrate the potential for multiplexed addressable control, we demonstrate sequence-specific responses of RNA variants to oligonucleotide signals.

  7. Differential localization of Acanthamoeba myosin I isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Acanthamoeba myosins IA and IB were localized by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy in vegetative and phagocytosing cells and the total cell contents of myosins IA, IB, and IC were quantified by immunoprecipitation. The quantitative distributions of the three myosin I isoforms were then calculated from these data and the previously determined localization of myosin IC. Myosin IA occurs almost exclusively in the cytoplasm, where it accounts for approximately 50% of the total myosin I, in the cortex beneath phagocytic cups and in association with small cytoplasmic vesicles. Myosin IB is the predominant isoform associated with the plasma membrane, large vacuole membranes and phagocytic membranes and accounts for almost half of the total myosin I in the cytoplasm. Myosin IC accounts for a significant fraction of the total myosin I associated with the plasma membrane and large vacuole membranes and is the only myosin I isoform associated with the contractile vacuole membrane. These data suggest that myosin IA may function in cytoplasmic vesicle transport and myosin I-mediated cortical contraction, myosin IB in pseudopod extension and phagocytosis, and myosin IC in contractile vacuole function. In addition, endogenous and exogenously added myosins IA and IB appeared to be associated with the cytoplasmic surface of different subpopulations of purified plasma membranes implying that the different myosin I isoforms are targeted to specific membrane domains through a mechanism that involves more than the affinity of the myosins for anionic phospholipids. PMID:1447297

  8. Human Rad51 filaments on double- and single-stranded DNA: correlating regular and irregular forms with recombination function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Ristic (Dejan); M. Modesti (Mauro); T. van der Heijden (Thijn); J. Noort (John); C. Dekker (Cees); R. Kanaar (Roland); C. Wyman (Claire)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractRecombinase proteins assembled into helical filaments on DNA are believed to be the catalytic core of homologous recombination. The assembly, disassembly and dynamic rearrangements of this structure must drive the DNA strand exchange reactions of homologous recombination. The sensitivity

  9. Control of the initiation and termination of kinesin-1-driven transport by myosin-Ic and nonmuscle tropomyosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Betsy B; Holzbaur, Erika L F; Ostap, E Michael

    2015-02-16

    Intracellular transport is largely driven by processive microtubule- and actin-based molecular motors. Nonprocessive motors have also been localized to trafficking cargos, but their roles are not well understood. Myosin-Ic (Myo1c), a nonprocessive actin motor, functions in a variety of exocytic events, although the underlying mechanisms are not yet clear. To investigate the interplay between myosin-I and the canonical long-distance transport motor kinesin-1, we attached both motor types to lipid membrane-coated bead cargo, using an attachment strategy that allows motors to actively reorganize within the membrane in response to the local cytoskeletal environment. We compared the motility of kinesin-1-driven cargos in the absence and presence of Myo1c at engineered actin/microtubule intersections. We found that Myo1c significantly increases the frequency of kinesin-1-driven microtubule-based runs that begin at actin/microtubule intersections. Myo1c also regulates the termination of processive runs. Beads with both motors bound have a significantly higher probability of pausing at actin/microtubule intersections, remaining tethered for an average of 20 s, with some pauses lasting longer than 200 s. The actin-binding protein nonmuscle tropomyosin (Tm) provides spatially specific regulation of interactions between myosin motors and actin filaments in vivo; in the crossed-filament in vitro assay, we found that Tm2-actin abolishes Myo1c-specific effects on both run initiation and run termination. Together, these observations suggest Myo1c is important for the selective initiation and termination of kinesin-1-driven runs along microtubules at specific actin filament populations within the cell. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mathematical modeling of Myosin induced bistability of Lamellipodial fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, S; Manhart, A; Schmeiser, C

    2017-01-01

    For various cell types and for lamellipodial fragments on flat surfaces, externally induced and spontaneous transitions between symmetric nonmoving states and polarized migration have been observed. This behavior is indicative of bistability of the cytoskeleton dynamics. In this work, the Filament Based Lamellipodium Model (FBLM), a two-dimensional, anisotropic, two-phase continuum model for the dynamics of the actin filament network in lamellipodia, is extended by a new description of actin-myosin interaction. For appropriately chosen parameter values, the resulting model has bistable dynamics with stable states showing the qualitative features observed in experiments. This is demonstrated by numerical simulations and by an analysis of a strongly simplified version of the FBLM with rigid filaments and planar lamellipodia at the cell front and rear.

  11. Actin filaments as the fast pathways for calcium ions involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We investigated the polyelectrolyte properties of actin filaments which are in interaction with myosin motors, basic participants in mechano-electrical transduction in the stereocilia of the inner ear. Here, we elaborated a model in which actin filaments play the role of guides or pathways for localized flow of calcium ions.

  12. Electron tomography of cryofixed, isometrically contracting insect flight muscle reveals novel actin-myosin interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C; Tregear, Richard T; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E; Reedy, Michael K; Taylor, Kenneth A

    2010-09-09

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the "target zone", situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77°/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127° range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very different from

  13. Electron tomography of cryofixed, isometrically contracting insect flight muscle reveals novel actin-myosin interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenping Wu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ.We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the "target zone", situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77°/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127° range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening.We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  14. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A. (UPENN); (Duke); (MRCLMB); (FSU); (Jikei-Med)

    2010-10-22

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77{sup o}/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127{sup o} range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are

  15. A novel three-filament model of force generation in eccentric contraction of skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schappacher-Tilp, Gudrun; Leonard, Timothy; Desch, Gertrud; Herzog, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We propose and examine a three filament model of skeletal muscle force generation, thereby extending classical cross-bridge models by involving titin-actin interaction upon active force production. In regions with optimal actin-myosin overlap, the model does not alter energy and force predictions of cross-bridge models for isometric contractions. However, in contrast to cross-bridge models, the three filament model accurately predicts history-dependent force generation in half sarcomeres for eccentric and concentric contractions, and predicts the activation-dependent forces for stretches beyond actin-myosin filament overlap.

  16. A novel three-filament model of force generation in eccentric contraction of skeletal muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Schappacher-Tilp

    Full Text Available We propose and examine a three filament model of skeletal muscle force generation, thereby extending classical cross-bridge models by involving titin-actin interaction upon active force production. In regions with optimal actin-myosin overlap, the model does not alter energy and force predictions of cross-bridge models for isometric contractions. However, in contrast to cross-bridge models, the three filament model accurately predicts history-dependent force generation in half sarcomeres for eccentric and concentric contractions, and predicts the activation-dependent forces for stretches beyond actin-myosin filament overlap.

  17. Mutations in the SH1 helix alter the thermal properties of myosin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Kotomi; Koyama, Tsubasa; Inde, Shohei; Iwai, Sosuke; Chaen, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    The myosin II SH1 helix is a joint that links the converter subdomain to the rest of the myosin motor domain and possibly plays a key role in the arrangement of the converter/lever arm. Several point mutations within the SH1 helix in human myosin IIs have been shown to cause diseases. To reveal whether these SH1 helix mutations affect not only motile activities but also thermal properties of myosin II, here we introduced the E683K or R686C point mutation into the SH1 helix in Dictyostelium myosin II. Thermal inactivation as well as thermal aggregation rates of these mutant proteins demonstrated that these mutations decreased the thermal stability of myosin II. Temperature dependence of sliding velocities of actin filaments showed that these mutations also reduced the activation energy of a rate-limiting process involved in actin movement. Given that these mutations are likely to alter coupling between the subdomains, and thus their thermal fluctuations, we propose that the SH1 helix is a key structural element that determines the flexibility and thermal properties of the myosin motor. These characteristics of the SH1 helix may contribute to the pathogenesis of the human diseases caused by mutations within this structural element.

  18. Nonequilibrium dynamics of probe filaments in actin-myosin networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladrow, J.; Broedersz, C. P.; Schmidt, C. F.

    2017-08-01

    Active dynamic processes of cells are largely driven by the cytoskeleton, a complex and adaptable semiflexible polymer network, motorized by mechanoenzymes. Small dimensions, confined geometries, and hierarchical structures make it challenging to probe dynamics and mechanical response of such networks. Embedded semiflexible probe polymers can serve as nonperturbing multiscale probes to detect force distributions in active polymer networks. We show here that motor-induced forces transmitted to the probe polymers are reflected in nonequilibrium bending dynamics, which we analyze in terms of spatial eigenmodes of an elastic beam under steady-state conditions. We demonstrate how these active forces induce correlations among the mode amplitudes, which furthermore break time-reversal symmetry. This leads to a breaking of detailed balance in this mode space. We derive analytical predictions for the magnitude of resulting probability currents in mode space in the white-noise limit of motor activity. We relate the structure of these currents to the spatial profile of motor-induced forces along the probe polymers and provide a general relation for observable currents on two-dimensional hyperplanes.

  19. Dependence of single-shot pulse durations on near-infrared filamentation-guided breakdown in air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schmitt-Sody

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We present results of an experimental investigation of laser pulsewidth dependence of filamentation-guided high voltage breakdown in air. The experiments are conducted at laser peak power levels of 1 TW and pulse durations of 0.7 to 10 ps with a discharge gap separation of 10 cm. Synchronized electrical and optical diagnostic techniques were used to determine the pulsewidth dependence on the breakdown mechanism, threshold levels, time delays and associated jitter. The results indicate that longer pulses provide greater than 30% reduction in breakdown threshold voltage.

  20. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow: An Intricate Subfamily of Proteins

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    Maegen A. Ackermann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C consists of a family of thick filament associated proteins. Three isoforms of MyBP-C exist in striated muscles: cardiac, slow skeletal, and fast skeletal. To date, most studies have focused on the cardiac form, due to its direct involvement in the development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Here we focus on the slow skeletal form, discuss past and current literature, and present evidence to support that: (i MyBP-C slow comprises a subfamily of four proteins, resulting from complex alternative shuffling of the single MyBP-C slow gene, (ii the four MyBP-C slow isoforms are expressed in variable amounts in different skeletal muscles, (iii at least one MyBP-C slow isoform is preferentially found at the periphery of M-bands and (iv the MyBP-C slow subfamily may play important roles in the assembly and stabilization of sarcomeric M- and A-bands and regulate the contractile properties of the actomyosin filaments.

  1. MHC-IIB filament assembly and cellular localization are governed by the rod net charge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rosenberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Actin-dependent myosin II molecular motors form an integral part of the cell cytoskeleton. Myosin II molecules contain a long coiled-coil rod that mediates filament assembly required for myosin II to exert its full activity. The exact mechanisms orchestrating filament assembly are not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we examine mechanisms controlling filament assembly of non-muscle myosin IIB heavy chain (MHC-IIB. We show that in vitro the entire C-terminus region of net positive charge, found in myosin II rods, is important for self-assembly of MHC-IIB fragments. In contrast, no particular sequences in the rod region with net negative charge were identified as important for self-assembly, yet a minimal area from this region is necessary. Proper paracrystal formation by MHC-IIB fragments requires the 196aa charge periodicity along the entire coiled-coil region. In vivo, in contrast to self-assembly in vitro, negatively-charged regions of the coiled-coil were found to play an important role by controlling the intracellular localization of native MHC-IIB. The entire positively-charged region is also important for intracellular localization of native MHC-IIB. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A correct distribution of positive and negative charges along myosin II rod is a necessary component in proper filament assembly and intracellular localization of MHC-IIB.

  2. Myosin-Va and Dynamic Actin Oppose Microtubules to Drive Long-Range Organelle Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Richard D.; Robinson, Christopher; Briggs, Deborah A.; Tooth, David J.; Ramalho, Jose S.; Cantero, Marta; Montoliu, Lluis; Patel, Shyamal; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Hume, Alistair N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In animal cells, microtubule and actin tracks and their associated motors (dynein, kinesin, and myosin) are thought to regulate long- and short-range transport, respectively [1–8]. Consistent with this, microtubules extend from the perinuclear centrosome to the plasma membrane and allow bidirectional cargo transport over long distances (>1 μm). In contrast, actin often comprises a complex network of short randomly oriented filaments, suggesting that myosin motors move cargo short distances. These observations underpin the “highways and local roads” model for transport along microtubule and actin tracks [2]. The “cooperative capture” model exemplifies this view and suggests that melanosome distribution in melanocyte dendrites is maintained by long-range transport on microtubules followed by actin/myosin-Va-dependent tethering [5, 9]. In this study, we used cell normalization technology to quantitatively examine the contribution of microtubules and actin/myosin-Va to organelle distribution in melanocytes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that microtubules are essential for centripetal, but not centrifugal, transport. Instead, we find that microtubules retard a centrifugal transport process that is dependent on myosin-Va and a population of dynamic F-actin. Functional analysis of mutant proteins indicates that myosin-Va works as a transporter dispersing melanosomes along actin tracks whose +/barbed ends are oriented toward the plasma membrane. Overall, our data highlight the role of myosin-Va and actin in transport, and not tethering, and suggest a new model in which organelle distribution is determined by the balance between microtubule-dependent centripetal and myosin-Va/actin-dependent centrifugal transport. These observations appear to be consistent with evidence coming from other systems showing that actin/myosin networks can drive long-distance organelle transport and positioning [10, 11]. PMID:25065759

  3. Azidoblebbistatin, a photoreactive myosin inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Képiró, Miklós; Várkuti, Boglárka H.; Bodor, Andrea; Hegyi, György; Drahos, László; Kovács, Mihály; Málnási-Csizmadia, András

    2012-01-01

    Photoreactive compounds are important tools in life sciences that allow precisely timed covalent crosslinking of ligands and targets. Using a unique technique we have synthesized azidoblebbistatin, which is a derivative of blebbistatin, the most widely used myosin inhibitor. Without UV irradiation azidoblebbistatin exhibits identical inhibitory properties to those of blebbistatin. Using UV irradiation, azidoblebbistatin can be covalently crosslinked to myosin, which greatly enhances its in vitro and in vivo effectiveness. Photo-crosslinking also eliminates limitations associated with the relatively low myosin affinity and water solubility of blebbistatin. The wavelength used for photo-crosslinking is not toxic for cells and tissues, which confers a great advantage in in vivo tests. Because the crosslink results in an irreversible association of the inhibitor to myosin and the irradiation eliminates the residual activity of unbound inhibitor molecules, azidoblebbistatin has a great potential to become a highly effective tool in both structural studies of actomyosin contractility and the investigation of cellular and physiological functions of myosin II. We used azidoblebbistatin to identify previously unknown low-affinity targets of the inhibitor (EC50 ≥ 50 μM) in Dictyostelium discoideum, while the strongest interactant was found to be myosin II (EC50 = 5 μM). Our results demonstrate that azidoblebbistatin, and potentially other azidated drugs, can become highly useful tools for the identification of strong- and weak-binding cellular targets and the determination of the apparent binding affinities in in vivo conditions. PMID:22647605

  4. Why Orange Guaymas Basin Beggiatoa spp. Are Orange: Single-Filament-Genome-Enabled Identification of an Abundant Octaheme Cytochrome with Hydroxylamine Oxidase, Hydrazine Oxidase, and Nitrite Reductase Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Jennifer F.; Siebert, Jason R.; Staunton, Eric; Hegg, Eric L.; Matthysse, Ann G.; Teske, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Orange, white, and yellow vacuolated Beggiatoaceae filaments are visually dominant members of microbial mats found near sea floor hydrothermal vents and cold seeps, with orange filaments typically concentrated toward the mat centers. No marine vacuolate Beggiatoaceae are yet in pure culture, but evidence to date suggests they are nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. The nearly complete genome sequence of a single orange Beggiatoa (“Candidatus Maribeggiatoa”) filament from a microbial mat sample collected in 2008 at a hydrothermal site in Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico) was recently obtained. From this sequence, the gene encoding an abundant soluble orange-pigmented protein in Guaymas Basin mat samples (collected in 2009) was identified by microcapillary reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (μLC–MS-MS) of a pigmented band excised from a denaturing polyacrylamide gel. The predicted protein sequence is related to a large group of octaheme cytochromes whose few characterized representatives are hydroxylamine or hydrazine oxidases. The protein was partially purified and shown by in vitro assays to have hydroxylamine oxidase, hydrazine oxidase, and nitrite reductase activities. From what is known of Beggiatoaceae physiology, nitrite reduction is the most likely in vivo role of the octaheme protein, but future experiments are required to confirm this tentative conclusion. Thus, while present-day genomic and proteomic techniques have allowed precise identification of an abundant mat protein, and its potential activities could be assayed, proof of its physiological role remains elusive in the absence of a pure culture that can be genetically manipulated. PMID:23220958

  5. Filamentation and spatiotemporal distribution of extracellular polymeric substances: role on X.fastidiosa single cell adhesion and biofilm formation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M.; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K.; Monteiro, Moniellen P.; César, Carlos L.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms can be defined as a community of microorganisms attached to a surface, living embedded in a self- produced matrix of hydrated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which comprises most of the biofilm mass. We have recently used an extensive pool of microscopy techniques (confocal fluorescence, electron and scanning probe microscopies) at the micro and nanoscales in order to create a detailed temporal observation of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation, using both wild type strain and Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-modified cells of this citrus phytopathogen. We have identified three different EPS compositions, as well as their spatial and temporal distribution from single cell to mature biofilm formation stages. In the initial adhesion stage, soluble-EPS (S-EPS) accumulates at cell polar regions and forms a surface layer which facilitates irreversible cell attachment and cell cluster formation. These small clusters are subsequently connected by filamentous cells; further S-EPS surface coverage facilitates cell attachment and form filaments, leading to a floating framework of mature biofilms. The important role of EPS in X.fastidiosa biology was further investigated by imunolabelling experiments to detect the distribution of XadA1 adhesin, which is expressed in early stages of biofilm formation and released in outer membrane vesicles. This protein is located mainly in S-EPS covered areas, as well as on the filaments, indicating a molecular pathway to the enhanced cell attachment previously observed. These results suggest that S-EPS may thus represent an important target for disease control, slow plant colonization by the bacteria, keeping the plant more productive in the field.

  6. Why orange Guaymas Basin Beggiatoa spp. are orange: single-filament-genome-enabled identification of an abundant octaheme cytochrome with hydroxylamine oxidase, hydrazine oxidase, and nitrite reductase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Barbara J; Biddle, Jennifer F; Siebert, Jason R; Staunton, Eric; Hegg, Eric L; Matthysse, Ann G; Teske, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Orange, white, and yellow vacuolated Beggiatoaceae filaments are visually dominant members of microbial mats found near sea floor hydrothermal vents and cold seeps, with orange filaments typically concentrated toward the mat centers. No marine vacuolate Beggiatoaceae are yet in pure culture, but evidence to date suggests they are nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. The nearly complete genome sequence of a single orange Beggiatoa ("Candidatus Maribeggiatoa") filament from a microbial mat sample collected in 2008 at a hydrothermal site in Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico) was recently obtained. From this sequence, the gene encoding an abundant soluble orange-pigmented protein in Guaymas Basin mat samples (collected in 2009) was identified by microcapillary reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (μLC-MS-MS) of a pigmented band excised from a denaturing polyacrylamide gel. The predicted protein sequence is related to a large group of octaheme cytochromes whose few characterized representatives are hydroxylamine or hydrazine oxidases. The protein was partially purified and shown by in vitro assays to have hydroxylamine oxidase, hydrazine oxidase, and nitrite reductase activities. From what is known of Beggiatoaceae physiology, nitrite reduction is the most likely in vivo role of the octaheme protein, but future experiments are required to confirm this tentative conclusion. Thus, while present-day genomic and proteomic techniques have allowed precise identification of an abundant mat protein, and its potential activities could be assayed, proof of its physiological role remains elusive in the absence of a pure culture that can be genetically manipulated.

  7. Function of myosin during entry and egress of equid herpesvirus type 1 in primary murine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymerys, J; Słońska, A; Skwarska, J; Bańbura, M W

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a major pathogen of horses with a worldwide distribution, which can cause various clinical signs ranging from mild respiratory disease to neurological disorders. To initiate an effective infection, EHV-1 evolved a broad spectrum of mechanisms exploiting the host cell, including its actin filaments. An actin-myosin-driven transport has been described to precede cellular entry of different viruses. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the role of actin motor protein - myosin, during replication of two EHV-1 strains: Jan-E (wild-type EHV-1 strain isolated from aborted equine fetus) and Rac-H (attenuated strain highly adapted in cell cultures in vitro) in primary murine neurons. In order to investigate this, we used two inhibitors: blebbistatin (BLB; non-muscle myosin II inhibitor) and 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM; inhibitor of myosin ATPase). Our results demonstrated that limitation of Jan-E EHV-1 replication occurred in cells treated with myosin inhibitor, which confirmed the important role of actin motor proteins during the entry and egress of EHV-1 virions. Application of blebbistatin did not affect Rac-H EHV-1 replication, while BDM caused reduction of replication in murine neurons. Based on these results it can be assumed that EHV-1 virion movement was myosin-dependent.

  8. Effects of BTS (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide), an inhibitor for myosin-actin interaction, on myofibrillogenesis in skeletal muscle cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Maiko; Sato, Naruki; Obinata, Takashi

    2006-11-01

    Actin filaments align around myosin filaments in the correct polarity and in a hexagonal arrangement to form cross-striated structures. It has been postulated that this myosin-actin interaction is important in the initial phase of myofibrillogenesis. It was previously demonstrated that an inhibitor of actin-myosin interaction, BDM (2,3-butanedione monoxime), suppresses myofibril formation in muscle cells in culture. However, further study showed that BDM also exerts several additional effects on living cells. In this study, we further examined the role of actin-myosin interaction in myofibril assembly in primary cultures of chick embryonic skeletal muscle by applying a more specific inhibitor, BTS (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide), of myosin ATPase and actin-myosin interaction. The assembly of sarcomeric structures from myofibrillar proteins was examined by immunocytochemical methods with the application of BTS to myotubes just after fusion. Addition of BTS (10-50 microM) significantly suppressed the organization of actin and myosin into cross-striated structures. BTS also interfered in the organization of alpha-actinin, C-protein (or MyBP-C), and connectin (or titin) into ordered striated structures, though the sensitivity was less. Moreover, when myotubes cultured in the presence of BTS were transferred to a control medium, sarcomeric structures were formed in 2-3 days, indicating that the inhibitory effect of BTS on myotubes is reversible. These results show that actin-myosin interaction plays a critical role in the process of myofibrillogenesis.

  9. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. [The structure of thick filaments on longitudinal sections of rabbit psoas muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlubnaia, Z A; Latsabidze, I L; Lednev, V V

    1989-01-01

    By means of electron microscopy the longitudinal sections of chemically skinned fibres of rigorised rabbit psoas muscle have been examined at pH of rigorising solutions equal to 6, 7, 8 (I = 0.125) and ionic strengths equal to 0.04, 0.125, 0.34 (pH 7.0). It has been revealed that at pH 6.0 the bands of minor proteins localization in A-disks were seen very distinctly, while at pH 7.0 and I = 0.125 these bands can be revealed only by means of antibody labelling technique. At the ionic strength of 0.34 (pH 7.0) the periodicity of 14.3 nm in thick filaments was clearly observed, which was determined by packing of the myosin rods into the filament shaft and of the myosin heads (cross-bridges) on the filament surface. The number of cross-bridge rows in the filament equals 102. A new scheme of myosin cross-bridge distribution in thick filaments of rabbit psoas muscle has been suggested according to which two rows of cross-bridges at each end of a thick filament are absent. The filament length equals 1.64 +/- 0.01 micron. It has been shown that the length of thick filament as well as the structural organization of their end regions in rabbit psoas muscle and frog sartorius one are different.

  11. Mechanical properties of Bi,Pb(2223) single filaments and I sub c (epsilon) behaviour in longitudinally strained tapes

    CERN Document Server

    Passerini, R; Seeber, B; Flükiger, R

    2002-01-01

    The Young's modulus and fracture stress of isolated Bi,Pb(2223) filaments were deduced from three-point bending tests performed at different stages of the tapes preparation. These results were introduced in the model describing the evolution of critical current of tapes submitted to a longitudinal strain in view to predict their irreversible strain limit epsilon sub i sub r sub r. These calculated irreversible strain limits were compared to measured values, taken from a set of tapes made with different filling factors and composite matrices. This experiment shows that the predicted irreversible strain limits correspond to the measured ones. Presenting the I sub c behaviour of highly stressed tapes in a magnetic field, we discuss the evolution of the ratio I sup s sup t sup r sup o sup n sup g sub c sub 0 /I sub c sub 0 versus strain. This value, representative of the fraction of the critical current attributed to strongly connected grains, increases significantly during the crack formation regime at epsilon >...

  12. A Sensitive Method for Examining Whole Cell Biochemical Composition in Single Cells of Filamentous Fungi using Synchrotron FTIR Spectromicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantin,J.; Gough, K.; Julian, R.; Kaminskyj, S.

    2008-01-01

    Cell function is related to cell composition. The asexual state of filamentous fungi (molds and mildews) has two main life cycle stages: vegetative hyphae for substrate colonization and nutrient acquisition, and asexual spores for survival and dispersal. Hyphal composition changes over a few tens of microns during growth and maturation; spores are different from hyphae. Most biochemical analyses are restricted to studying a few components at high spatial resolution (e.g. histochemistry) or many compounds at low spatial resolution (e.g. GC-MS). Synchrotron FTIR spectromicroscopy can be used to study fungal cell biology by fingerprinting varieties of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids at about 6 microm spatial resolution. FTIR can distinguish fungal species and changes during hyphal growth, and reveals that even fungi grown under optimal vs mildly stressed conditions exhibit dramatic biochemical changes without obvious morphological effects. Here we compare hypha and spore composition of two fungi, Neurospora and Rhizopus. There are clear biochemical changes when Neurospora hyphae commit to spore development, during spore maturation and following germination, many of which are consistent with results from molecular genetics, but have not been shown before at high spatial resolution. Rhizopus spores develop within a fluid-containing sporangium that becomes dry at maturity. Rhizopus spores had similar protein content and significantly more carbohydrate than the sporangial fluid, both of which are novel findings.

  13. Quantification and localization of phosphorylated myosin I isoforms in Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, I C; Corigliano-Murphy, A; Korn, E D

    1995-08-01

    The actin-activated Mg(2+)-ATPase activities of the three myosin I isoforms in Acanthamoeba castellanii are significantly expressed only after phosphorylation of a single site in the myosin I heavy chain. Synthetic phosphorylated and unphosphorylated peptides corresponding to the phosphorylation site sequences, which differ for the three myosin I isoforms, were used to raise isoform-specific antibodies that recognized only the phosphorylated myosin I or the total myosin I isoform (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated), respectively. With these antisera, the amounts of total and phosphorylated isoform were quantified, the phosphomyosin I isoforms localized, and the compartmental distribution of the phosphomyosin isoforms determined. Myosin IA, which was almost entirely in the actin-rich cortex, was 70-100% phosphorylated and particularly enriched under phagocytic cups. Myosins IB and IC were predominantly associated with plasma membranes and large vacuole membranes, where they were only 10-20% phosphorylated, whereas cytoplasmic myosins IB and IC, like cytoplasmic myosin IA, were mostly phosphorylated (60-100%). Moreover, phosphomyosin IB was concentrated in actively motile regions of the plasma membrane. More than 20-fold more phosphomyosin IC and 10-fold more F-actin were associated with the membranes of contracting contractile vacuoles (CV) than of filling CVs. As the total amount of CV-associated myosin IC remained constant, it must be phosphorylated at the start of CV contraction. These data extend previous proposals for the specific functions of myosin I isozymes in Acanthamoeba (Baines, I.C., H. Brzeska, and E.D. Korn. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 119: 1193-1203): phosphomyosin IA in phagocytosis, phosphomyosin IB in phagocytosis and pinocytosis, and phosphomyosin IC in contraction of the CV.

  14. STEM Analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans muscle thick filaments: evidence for microdifferentiated substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, S. A.; Haner, M.; Ortiz, I.; Aebi, U.; Epstein, H. F.

    2001-01-01

    In the thick filaments of body muscle in Caenorhabditis elegans, myosin A and myosin B isoforms and a subpopulation of paramyosin, a homologue of myosin heavy chain rods, are organized about a tubular core. As determined by scanning transmission electron microscopy, the thick filaments show a continuous decrease in mass-per-length (MPL) from their central zones to their polar regions. This is consistent with previously reported morphological studies and suggests that both their content and structural organization are microdifferentiated as a function of position. The cores are composed of a second distinct subpopulation of paramyosin in association with the alpha, beta, and gamma-filagenins. MPL measurements suggest that cores are formed from seven subfilaments containing four strands of paramyosin molecules, rather than the two originally proposed. The periodic locations of the filagenins within different regions and the presence of a central zone where myosin A is located, implies that the cores are also microdifferentiated with respect to molecular content and structure. This differentiation may result from a novel "induced strain" assembly mechanism based upon the interaction of the filagenins, paramyosin and myosin A. The cores may then serve as "differentiated templates" for the assembly of myosin B and paramyosin in the tapering, microdifferentiated polar regions of the thick filaments.

  15. Kinetic signatures of myosin-5B, the motor involved in microvillus inclusion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissler, Sarah M; Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Sellers, James R

    2017-11-03

    Myosin-5B is a ubiquitous molecular motor that transports cargo vesicles of the endomembrane system in intracellular recycling pathways. Myosin-5B malfunction causes the congenital enteropathy microvillus inclusion disease, underlining its importance in cellular homeostasis. Here we describe the interaction of myosin-5B with F-actin, nucleotides, and the pyrazolopyrimidine compound myoVin-1. We show that single-headed myosin-5B is an intermediate duty ratio motor with a kinetic ATPase cycle that is rate-limited by the release of phosphate. The presence of a second head generates strain and gating in the myosin-5B dimer that alters the kinetic signature by reducing the actin-activated ADP release rate to become rate-limiting. This kinetic transition into a high-duty ratio motor is a prerequisite for the proposed transport function of myosin-5B in cellular recycling pathways. Moreover, we show that the small molecule compound myoVin-1 inhibits the enzymatic and functional activity of myosin-5B in vitro Partial inhibition of the actin-activated steady-state ATPase activity and sliding velocity suggests that caution should be used when probing the effect of myoVin-1 on myosin-5-dependent transport processes in cells.

  16. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Mediates Myosin-Dependent Collagen Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno M. Coelho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1 is a tyrosine kinase collagen adhesion receptor that mediates cell migration through association with non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA. Because DDR1 is implicated in cancer fibrosis, we hypothesized that DDR1 interacts with NMIIA to enable collagen compaction by traction forces. Mechanical splinting of rat dermal wounds increased DDR1 expression and collagen alignment. In periodontal ligament of DDR1 knockout mice, collagen mechanical reorganization was reduced >30%. Similarly, cultured cells with DDR1 knockdown or expressing kinase-deficient DDR1d showed 50% reduction of aligned collagen. Tractional remodeling of collagen was dependent on DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction of the DDR1 C-terminal kinase domain with NMIIA filaments. Collagen remodeling by traction forces, DDR1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and myosin light chain phosphorylation were increased on stiff versus soft substrates. Thus, DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction with NMIIA filaments enhance the collagen tractional remodeling that is important for collagen compaction in fibrosis.

  17. At the Start of the Sarcomere: A Previously Unrecognized Role for Myosin Chaperones and Associated Proteins during Early Myofibrillogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Layne Myhre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of striated muscle in vertebrates requires the assembly of contractile myofibrils, consisting of highly ordered bundles of protein filaments. Myofibril formation occurs by the stepwise addition of complex proteins, a process that is mediated by a variety of molecular chaperones and quality control factors. Most notably, myosin of the thick filament requires specialized chaperone activity during late myofibrillogenesis, including that of Hsp90 and its cofactor, Unc45b. Unc45b has been proposed to act exclusively as an adaptor molecule, stabilizing interactions between Hsp90 and myosin; however, recent discoveries in zebrafish and C. elegans suggest the possibility of an earlier role for Unc45b during myofibrillogenesis. This role may involve functional control of nonmuscle myosins during the earliest stages of myogenesis, when premyofibril scaffolds are first formed from dynamic cytoskeletal actin. This paper will outline several lines of evidence that converge to build a model for Unc45b activity during early myofibrillogenesis.

  18. Direct Observation of Phosphate Inhibiting the Force-Generating Capacity of a Miniensemble of Myosin Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debold, Edward P.; Walcott, Sam; Woodward, Mike; Turner, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated levels of phosphate (Pi) reduce isometric force, providing support for the notion that the release of Pi from myosin is closely associated with the generation of muscular force. Pi is thought to rebind to actomyosin in an ADP-bound state and reverse the force-generating steps, including the rotation of the lever arm (i.e., the powerstroke). Despite extensive study, this mechanism remains controversial, in part because it fails to explain the effects of Pi on isometric ATPase and unloaded shortening velocity. To gain new insight into this process, we determined the effect of Pi on the force-generating capacity of a small ensemble of myosin (∼12 myosin heads) using a three-bead laser trap assay. In the absence of Pi, myosin pulled the actin filament out of the laser trap an average distance of 54 ± 4 nm, translating into an average peak force of 1.2 pN. By contrast, in the presence of 30 mM Pi, myosin generated only enough force to displace the actin filament by 13 ± 1 nm, generating just 0.2 pN of force. The elevated Pi also caused a >65% reduction in binding-event lifetime, suggesting that Pi induces premature detachment from a strongly bound state. Definitive evidence of a Pi-induced powerstroke reversal was not observed, therefore we determined if a branched kinetic model in which Pi induces detachment from a strongly bound, postpowerstroke state could explain these observations. The model was able to accurately reproduce not only the data presented here, but also the effects of Pi on both isometric ATPase in muscle fibers and actin filament velocity in a motility assay. The ability of the model to capture the findings presented here as well as previous findings suggests that Pi-induced inhibition of force may proceed along a kinetic pathway different from that of force generation. PMID:24268149

  19. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkaiah eBetapudi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  20. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-07-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  1. Assembly of presynaptic filaments. Factors affecting the assembly of RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thresher, RJ; Christiansen, Gunna; Griffith, JD

    1988-01-01

    We have previously shown that the assembly of RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) facilitated by SSB protein occurs in three steps: (1) rapid binding of SSB protein to the ssDNA; (2) nucleation of RecA protein onto this template; and (3) co-operative polymerization of additional Rec...... assembled onto ssDNA at net rates that varied from 250 to 900 RecA protein monomers per minute, with the rate inversely related to the concentration of SSB protein. Combined sucrose sedimentation and electron microscope analysis established that SSB protein was displaced from the ssDNA during RecA protein...

  2. Antigen delivery by filamentous bacteriophage fd displaying an anti-DEC-205 single-chain variable fragment confers adjuvanticity by triggering a TLR9-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Rossella; D'Apice, Luciana; Trovato, Maria; Cuccaro, Fausta; Costa, Valerio; De Leo, Maria Giovanna; Marzullo, Vincenzo Manuel; Biondo, Carmelo; D'Auria, Sabato; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2015-07-01

    Filamentous bacteriophage fd particles delivering antigenic determinants via DEC-205 (fdsc-αDEC) represent a powerful delivery system that induces CD8(+) T-cell responses even when administered in the absence of adjuvants or maturation stimuli for dendritic cells. In order to investigate the mechanisms of this activity, RNA-Sequencing of fd-pulsed dendritic cells was performed. A significant differential expression of genes involved in innate immunity, co-stimulation and cytokine production was observed. In agreement with these findings, we demonstrate that induction of proinflammatory cytokines and type I interferon by fdsc-αDEC was MYD88 mediated and TLR9 dependent. We also found that fdsc-αDEC is delivered into LAMP-1-positive compartments and co-localizes with TLR9. Thus, phage particles containing a single-strand DNA genome rich in CpG motifs delivered via DEC-205 are able to intercept and trigger the active TLR9 innate immune receptor into late endosome/lysosomes and to enhance the immunogenicity of the displayed antigenic determinants. These findings make fd bacteriophage a valuable tool for immunization without administering exogenous adjuvants. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  3. Assembly of presynaptic filaments. Factors affecting the assembly of RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thresher, RJ; Christiansen, Gunna; Griffith, JD

    1988-01-01

    We have previously shown that the assembly of RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) facilitated by SSB protein occurs in three steps: (1) rapid binding of SSB protein to the ssDNA; (2) nucleation of RecA protein onto this template; and (3) co-operative polymerization of additional Rec......M in the presence of 12 mM-Mg2+), and relatively low concentrations of SSB protein (1 monomer per 18 nucleotides). Assembly was depressed threefold when SSB protein was added to one monomer per nine nucleotides. These effects appeared to be exerted at the nucleation step. Following nucleation, RecA protein...... assembled onto ssDNA at net rates that varied from 250 to 900 RecA protein monomers per minute, with the rate inversely related to the concentration of SSB protein. Combined sucrose sedimentation and electron microscope analysis established that SSB protein was displaced from the ssDNA during RecA protein...

  4. Evaluation of Acanthamoeba Myosin-IC as a Potential Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Reyes-Batlle, María; Piñero, José E.; Valladares, Basilio; Maciver, Sutherland K.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are facultative pathogens of humans, causing a sight-threatening keratitis and a fatal encephalitis. We have targeted myosin-IC by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing as a therapeutic approach, since it is known that the function of this protein is vital for the amoeba. In this work, specific siRNAs against the Acanthamoeba myosin-IC gene were developed. Treated and control amoebae were cultured in growth and encystment media to evaluate the induced effects after myosin-IC gene knockdown, as we have anticipated that cyst formation may be impaired. The effects of myosin-IC gene silencing were inhibition of cyst formation, inhibition of completion of cytokinesis, inhibition of osmoregulation under osmotic stress conditions, and death of the amoebae. The finding that myosin-IC silencing caused incompletion of cytokinesis is in agreement with earlier suggestions that the protein plays a role in cell locomotion, which is necessary to pull daughter cells apart after mitosis in a process known as “traction-mediated cytokinesis”. We conclude that myosin-IC is a very promising potential drug target for the development of much-needed antiamoebal drugs and that it should be further exploited for Acanthamoeba therapy. PMID:24468784

  5. Myosins 1 and 6, myosin light chain kinase, actin and microtubules cooperate during antibody-mediated internalisation and trafficking of membrane-expressed viral antigens in feline infectious peritonitis virus infected monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewerchin, Hannah L; Desmarets, Lowiese M; Noppe, Ytse; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-02-12

    Monocytes infected with feline infectious peritonitis virus, a coronavirus, express viral proteins in their plasma membranes. Upon binding of antibodies, these proteins are quickly internalised through a new clathrin- and caveolae-independent internalisation pathway. By doing so, the infected monocytes can escape antibody-dependent cell lysis. In the present study, we investigated which kinases and cytoskeletal proteins are of importance during internalisation and subsequent intracellular transport. The experiments showed that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin 1 are crucial for the initiation of the internalisation. With co-localisation stainings, it was found that MLCK and myosin 1 co-localise with antigens even before internalisation started. Myosin 6 co-localised with the internalising complexes during passage through the cortical actin, were it might play a role in moving or disintegrating actin filaments, to overcome the actin barrier. One minute after internalisation started, vesicles had passed the cortical actin, co-localised with microtubules and association with myosin 6 was lost. The vesicles were further transported over the microtubules and accumulated at the microtubule organising centre after 10 to 30 min. Intracellular trafficking over microtubules was mediated by MLCK, myosin 1 and a small actin tail. Since inhibiting MLCK with ML-7 was so efficient in blocking the internalisation pathway, this target can be used for the development of a new treatment for FIPV.

  6. Stabilization of the Central Part of Tropomyosin Molecule Alters the Ca2+-sensitivity of Actin-Myosin Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Shchepkin, D.V.; Matyushenko, A. M.; Kopylova, G. V.; Artemova, N. V.; Bershitsky, S. Y.; Tsaturyan, A. K.; Levitsky, D. I.

    2013-01-01

    We show that the mutations D137L and G126R, which stabilize the central part of the tropomyosin (Tm) molecule, increase both the maximal sliding velocity of the regulated actin filaments in the in vitro motility assay at high Са 2+ concentrations and the Са 2+-sensitivity of the actin-myosin interaction underlying this sliding. Based on an analysis of the recently published data on the structure of the actin–Tm–myosin complex, we suppose that the physiological effects of these mutations in Tm...

  7. Transient filament stretching rheometer II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The Lagrangian sspecification is used to simulate the transient stretching filament rheometer. Simulations are performed for dilute PIB-solutions modeled as a four mode Oldroyd-B fluid and a semidilute PIB-solution modeled as a non-linear single integral equation. The simulations are compared...

  8. Phosphorylated peptides occur in a non-helical portion of the tail of a catch muscle myosin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, L.; Elliott, B.W. Jr.; Cohen, C.

    1987-01-01

    Myosin from a molluscan catch muscle (the Anterior Byssus Retractor (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis) is unusual in being phosphorylated in the rod by an endogenous heavy-chain kinase. This phosphorylation enhances myosin solubility at low ionic strength and induces molecular folding of the myosin tail. Papain and chymotryptic cleavage of this myosin, phosphorylated with [γ- 32 P]ATP, indicates that the phosphorylated residues are associated with the carboxy-terminal end of the light meromyosin. Ion-exchange and reverse-phase HPLC of radiolabeled chymotryptic peptides allow the isolation of two different peptides with high specific activity. One of these peptides is rich in lysine and arginine residues, a finding consistent with the observation that basic residues often determine the substrate specificity of protein kinases. The second peptide contains proline residues. Taken together, these results suggest that, as in the case of Acanthamoeba myosin, phosphorylation occurs in a nonhelical portion of the rod that may also control solubility. Identification of the residues that are phosphorylated and their location in the rod may reveal how the phosphorylation-dependent changes observed in the myosin in vitro are related to changes in intermolecular interactions in the thick filaments in vivo

  9. THERMAL STABILITY OF SYNTHETIC PEPTIDES MIMICKING THE SEQUENCE OF THE REGION CONTAINING THE SKIP RESIDUES IN SQUID MYOSIN ROD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Ochiai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Myosin is the major protein in skeletal muscles including those of fish and shellfish. The characteristics of this protein are closely related to the biological function and the quality and physical properties of musclefood. In the myosin rod (the coiled-coil region of myosin, several amino acid residues, known as skip residues, seem to destabilize the ordered structure (heptad repeat. These residues might be responsible for reducing thermal stability. Attempts were thus made to examine the role of these residues in the rod of squid myosin, based on the thermodynamic properties of synthetic peptides which have been designed to mimic the partial sequence of myosin heavy chain from the squid Todarodes pacificus mantle muscle. Five peptides, namely, with the sequence of Trp1343 -Ala1372  having the skip residue Glu1357 at the center (Peptide WT, without the skip residue (Peptide Δ, with the replacements of the skip residue (Glu by Ile, Gln and Pro (Peptides E/I, E/Q, and E/P, respectively to modify the helix forming propensity, were synthesized. The results obtained showed that the stability of the peptides as measured by circular dichroism spectrometry was in the order of Peptide Δ > Peptide WT > Peptide E/Q > Peptide E/P > Peptide E/I. It is suggested that the presence of the skip residues dexterously tunes the stability or flexibility of the coiled-coil structure, thus possibly regulating thick filament formation and further gel formation ability of myosin.

  10. Phosphorylated peptides occur in a non-helical portion of the tail of a catch muscle myosin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellani, L.; Elliott, B.W. Jr.; Cohen, C.

    1987-05-01

    Myosin from a molluscan catch muscle (the Anterior Byssus Retractor (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis) is unusual in being phosphorylated in the rod by an endogenous heavy-chain kinase. This phosphorylation enhances myosin solubility at low ionic strength and induces molecular folding of the myosin tail. Papain and chymotryptic cleavage of this myosin, phosphorylated with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP, indicates that the phosphorylated residues are associated with the carboxy-terminal end of the light meromyosin. Ion-exchange and reverse-phase HPLC of radiolabeled chymotryptic peptides allow the isolation of two different peptides with high specific activity. One of these peptides is rich in lysine and arginine residues, a finding consistent with the observation that basic residues often determine the substrate specificity of protein kinases. The second peptide contains proline residues. Taken together, these results suggest that, as in the case of Acanthamoeba myosin, phosphorylation occurs in a nonhelical portion of the rod that may also control solubility. Identification of the residues that are phosphorylated and their location in the rod may reveal how the phosphorylation-dependent changes observed in the myosin in vitro are related to changes in intermolecular interactions in the thick filaments in vivo.

  11. Structural Characterization of the Binding of Myosin·ADP·Pi to Actin in Permeabilized Rabbit Psoas Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sengen; Gu, Jin; Belknap, Betty; White, Howard; Yu, Leepo C.

    2006-01-01

    When myosin is attached to actin in a muscle cell, various structures in the filaments are formed. The two strongly bound states (A·M·ADP and A·M) and the weakly bound A·M·ATP states are reasonably well understood. The orientation of the strongly bound myosin heads is uniform (“stereospecific” attachment), and the attached heads exhibit little spatial fluctuation. In the prehydrolysis weakly bound A·M·ATP state, the orientations of the attached myosin heads assume a wide range of azimuthal and axial angles, indicating considerable flexibility in the myosin head. The structure of the other weakly bound state, A·M·ADP·Pi, however, is poorly understood. This state is thought to be the critical pre-power-stroke state, poised to make the transition to the strongly binding, force-generating states, and hence it is of particular interest for understanding the mechanism of contraction. However, because of the low affinity between myosin and actin in the A·M·ADP·Pi state, the structure of this state has eluded determination both in isolated form and in muscle cells. With the knowledge recently gained in the structures of the weakly binding M·ATP, M·ADP·Pi states and the weakly attached A·M·ATP state in muscle fibers, it is now feasible to delineate the in vivo structure of the attached state of A·M·ADP·Pi. The series of experiments presented in this article were carried out under relaxing conditions at 25°C, where ∼95% of the myosin heads in the skinned rabbit psoas muscle contain the hydrolysis products. The affinity for actin is enhanced by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) or by lowering the ionic strength in the bathing solution. Solution kinetics and binding constants were determined in the presence and in the absence of PEG. When the binding between actin and myosin was increased, both the myosin layer lines and the actin layer lines increased in intensity, but the intensity profiles did not change. The configuration (mode) of attachment in

  12. Structural characterization of the binding of Myosin*ADP*Pi to actin in permeabilized rabbit psoas muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sengen; Gu, Jin; Belknap, Betty; White, Howard; Yu, Leepo C

    2006-11-01

    When myosin is attached to actin in a muscle cell, various structures in the filaments are formed. The two strongly bound states (A*M*ADP and A*M) and the weakly bound A*M*ATP states are reasonably well understood. The orientation of the strongly bound myosin heads is uniform ("stereospecific" attachment), and the attached heads exhibit little spatial fluctuation. In the prehydrolysis weakly bound A*M*ATP state, the orientations of the attached myosin heads assume a wide range of azimuthal and axial angles, indicating considerable flexibility in the myosin head. The structure of the other weakly bound state, A*M*ADP*P(i), however, is poorly understood. This state is thought to be the critical pre-power-stroke state, poised to make the transition to the strongly binding, force-generating states, and hence it is of particular interest for understanding the mechanism of contraction. However, because of the low affinity between myosin and actin in the A*M*ADP*P(i) state, the structure of this state has eluded determination both in isolated form and in muscle cells. With the knowledge recently gained in the structures of the weakly binding M*ATP, M*ADP*P(i) states and the weakly attached A*M*ATP state in muscle fibers, it is now feasible to delineate the in vivo structure of the attached state of A*M*ADP*P(i). The series of experiments presented in this article were carried out under relaxing conditions at 25 degrees C, where approximately 95% of the myosin heads in the skinned rabbit psoas muscle contain the hydrolysis products. The affinity for actin is enhanced by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) or by lowering the ionic strength in the bathing solution. Solution kinetics and binding constants were determined in the presence and in the absence of PEG. When the binding between actin and myosin was increased, both the myosin layer lines and the actin layer lines increased in intensity, but the intensity profiles did not change. The configuration (mode) of attachment in

  13. Structural Characterization of the Binding of Myosin*ADP*Pi to Actin in Permeabilized Rabbit Psoas Muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu,S.; Gu, J.; Belknap, B.; White, H.; Yu, L.

    2006-01-01

    When myosin is attached to actin in a muscle cell, various structures in the filaments are formed. The two strongly bound states (A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP and A{center_dot}M) and the weakly bound A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP states are reasonably well understood. The orientation of the strongly bound myosin heads is uniform ('stereospecific' attachment), and the attached heads exhibit little spatial fluctuation. In the prehydrolysis weakly bound A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP state, the orientations of the attached myosin heads assume a wide range of azimuthal and axial angles, indicating considerable flexibility in the myosin head. The structure of the other weakly bound state, A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i}, however, is poorly understood. This state is thought to be the critical pre-power-stroke state, poised to make the transition to the strongly binding, force-generating states, and hence it is of particular interest for understanding the mechanism of contraction. However, because of the low affinity between myosin and actin in the A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i} state, the structure of this state has eluded determination both in isolated form and in muscle cells. With the knowledge recently gained in the structures of the weakly binding M{center_dot}ATP, M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i} states and the weakly attached A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP state in muscle fibers, it is now feasible to delineate the in vivo structure of the attached state of A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i}. The series of experiments presented in this article were carried out under relaxing conditions at 25{sup o}C, where {approx}95% of the myosin heads in the skinned rabbit psoas muscle contain the hydrolysis products. The affinity for actin is enhanced by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) or by lowering the ionic strength in the bathing solution. Solution kinetics and binding constants were determined in the

  14. Orientation of spin-labeled light chain 2 of myosin heads in muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, T

    1990-07-20

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (e.p.r.) spectroscopy has been used to monitor the orientation of spin labels attached rigidly to a reactive SH residue on the light chain 2 (LC2) of myosin heads in muscle fibers. e.p.r. spectra from spin-labeled myosin subfragment-1 (S1), allowed to diffuse into unlabeled rigor (ATP-free) fibers, were roughly approximated by a narrow angular distribution of spin labels centered at 66 degrees relative to the fiber axis, indicating a uniform orientation of S1 bound to actin. On the other hand, spectra from spin-labeled heavy meromyosin (HMM) were roughly approximated by two narrow angular distributions centered at 42 degrees and 66 degrees, suggesting that the LC2 domains of the two HMM heads have different orientations. In contrast to S1 or HMM, the spectra from rigor fibers, in which LC2 of endogenous myosin heads was labeled, showed a random orientation which may be due to distortion imposed by the structure of the filament lattice and the mismatch of the helical periodicities of the thick and thin filaments. However, spectra from the fibers in the presence of ATP analog 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMPPNP) were approximated by two narrow angular distributions similar to those obtained with HMM. Thus, AMPPNP may cause the LC2 domain to be less flexible and/or the S2 portion to be more flexible, so as to release the distortion of the LC2 domain and make it return to its natural position. At high ionic strength, AMPPNP disoriented the spin labels as ATP did under relaxing conditions, suggesting that the myosin head is detached from and/or weakly (flexibly) attached to a thin filament.

  15. Myosin-driven transport network in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Elizabeth G; Peremyslov, Valera V; Turner, Hannah L; Makarova, Kira S; Iranzo, Jaime; Mekhedov, Sergei L; Koonin, Eugene V; Dolja, Valerian V

    2017-02-21

    We investigate the myosin XI-driven transport network in Arabidopsis using protein-protein interaction, subcellular localization, gene knockout, and bioinformatics analyses. The two major groups of nodes in this network are myosins XI and their membrane-anchored receptors (MyoB) that, together, drive endomembrane trafficking and cytoplasmic streaming in the plant cells. The network shows high node connectivity and is dominated by generalists, with a smaller fraction of more specialized myosins and receptors. We show that interaction with myosins and association with motile vesicles are common properties of the MyoB family receptors. We identify previously uncharacterized myosin-binding proteins, putative myosin adaptors that belong to two unrelated families, with four members each (MadA and MadB). Surprisingly, MadA1 localizes to the nucleus and is rapidly transported to the cytoplasm, suggesting the existence of myosin XI-driven nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In contrast, MadA2 and MadA3, as well as MadB1, partition between the cytosolic pools of motile endomembrane vesicles that colocalize with myosin XI-K and diffuse material that does not. Gene knockout analysis shows that MadB1-4 contribute to polarized root hair growth, phenocopying myosins, whereas MadA1-4 are redundant for this process. Phylogenetic analysis reveals congruent evolutionary histories of the myosin XI, MyoB, MadA, and MadB families. All these gene families emerged in green algae and show concurrent expansions via serial duplication in flowering plants. Thus, the myosin XI transport network increased in complexity and robustness concomitantly with the land colonization by flowering plants and, by inference, could have been a major contributor to this process.

  16. Immunocytochemical electron microscopic study and western blot analysis of myosin, paramyosin and miniparamyosin in the striated muscle of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and in obliquely striated and smooth muscles of the earthworm Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royuela, M; Fraile, B; Cervera, M; Paniagua, R

    1997-04-01

    Miniparamyosin is a paramyosin isoform (55-60 kDa) that has been isolated in insects (Drosophila) and immunolocalized in several species of arthropods, molluscs, annelids and nematodes. In this study, the presence and distribution of this protein, in comparison with that of paramyosin and myosin, has been examined in the striated muscle (tergal depressor of trochanter) of Drosophila melanogaster, and the obliquely striated muscle (body wall) and the smooth muscle (outer layer of the pseudoheart) of the earthworm Eisenia foetida by means of immunocytochemical electron microscopic study and Western blot analysis miniparamyosin paramyosin and myosin antibodies from Drosophila. In the striated muscle of D. melanogaster, the three proteins were immunolocalized along the length of the thick filaments (A-bands). The distribution of immunogold particles along these filaments was uniform. The relative proportions miniparamyosin/paramyosin/myosin (calculated by counting the number of immunogold particles) were: 1/10/68. In the obliquely striated muscle of E. foetida, immunoreactions to the three proteins were also found in the thick filaments, and the relative proportions miniparamyosin/paramyosin/myosin were 1/2.4/6.9. However, whereas the distribution of both myosin and miniparamyosin along the thick filament length was uniform, paramyosin immunolabelling was more abundant in the extremes of thick filaments (the outer zones of A-bands in the obliquely striated muscle), where the thick filaments become thinner than in the centre (the central zone of A-bands), where these filaments are thicker. The relative proportions of paramyosin in the outer and of paramyosin in the central zones of A-bands were 4/1. This irregular distribution of paramyosin along the thick filament length might be actual but it may also be explained by the fusiform shape of thick filaments in the earthworm: assuming that paramyosin is covered by myosin, paramyosin antigens would be more exposed in the

  17. Conformational changes of myosin by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju-Woon; Yook, Hong-Sun; Lee, Kyong-Haeng; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Woo-Jung; Byun, Myung-Woo E-mail: mwbyun@nanum.kaeri.re.kr

    2000-05-01

    Conformational and decompositional changes of bovine skeletal muscle myosin caused by gamma irradiation were studied for understanding the effects of irradiation treatment on myofibrillar proteins. Myosin solution and beef cuts were irradiated 0, 1, 3, 5 and 10 kGy. Competitive indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (Ci-ELISA) showed that subunits of myosin were structurally modified with different patterns. Binding abilities of anti-myosin whole molecule and anti heavy meromyosin S-1 IgG, which were produced from rabbits, with irradiated myosin decreased in the same tendency depending upon the dose. Anti-light meromyosin IgG appeared to have the highest binding ability at 3 kGy. Irradiated beef cuts ({>=}5 kGy) could be identified by Ci-ELISA. Myosin solution became increasingly turbid with increasing dose. Hydrophobicity of myosin solution also increased by irradiation. Electrophoretic patterns showed that the myosin heavy chain disappeared and new bands were generated at higher molecular weight ranges. (author)

  18. Nuclear Actin and Myosins in Adenovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsova, Beata; Serebryannyy, Leonid A.; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus serotypes have been shown to cause drastic changes in nuclear organization, including the transcription machinery, during infection. This ability of adenovirus to subvert transcription in the host cell facilitates viral replication. Because nuclear actin and nuclear myosin I, myosin V and myosin VI have been implicated as direct regulators of transcription and important factors in the replication of other viruses, we sought to determine how nuclear actin and myosins are involved in adenovirus infection. We first confirmed reorganization of the host’s transcription machinery to viral replication centers. We found that nuclear actin also reorganizes to sites of transcription through the intermediate but not the advanced late phase of viral infection. Furthermore, nuclear myosin I localized with nuclear actin and sites of transcription in viral replication centers. Intriguingly, nuclear myosins V and VI, which also reorganized to viral replication centers, exhibited different localization patterns, suggesting specialized roles for these nuclear myosins. Finally, we assessed the role of actin in adenovirus infection and found both cytoplasmic and nuclear actin likely play roles in adenovirus infection and replication. Together our data suggest the involvement of actin and multiple myosins in the nuclear replication and late viral gene expression of adenovirus. PMID:26226218

  19. Direct photoaffinity labeling by nucleotides of the apparent catalytic site on the heavy chains of smooth muscle and Acanthamoeba myosins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruta, H.; Korn, E.D.

    1981-01-10

    The heavy chains of Acanthamoeba myosins, IA, IB and II, turkey gizzard myosin, and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 were specifically labeled by radioactive ATP, ADP, and UTP, each of which is a substrate or product of myosin ATPase activity, when irradiated with uv light at 0/sup 0/C. With UTP, as much as 0.45 mol/mol of Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and 1 mol/mol of turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain was incorporated. Evidence that the ligands were associated with the catalytic site included the observations that reaction occurred only with nucleotides that are substrates or products of the ATPase activity; that the reaction was blocked by pyrophosphate which is an inhibitor of the ATPase activity; that ATP was bound as ADP; and that label was probably restricted to a single peptide following limited subtilisin proteolysis of labeled Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and extensive cleavage with CNBr and trypsin of labeled turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain.

  20. Direct photoaffinity labeling by nucleotides of the apparent catalytic site on the heavy chains of smooth muscle and Acanthamoeba myosins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruta, H.; Korn, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    The heavy chains of Acanthamoeba myosins, IA, IB and II, turkey gizzard myosin, and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 were specifically labeled by radioactive ATP, ADP, and UTP, each of which is a substrate or product of myosin ATPase activity, when irradiated with uv light at 0 0 C. With UTP, as much as 0.45 mol/mol of Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and 1 mol/mol of turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain was incorporated. Evidence that the ligands were associated with the catalytic site included the observations that reaction occurred only with nucleotides that are substrates or products of the ATPase activity; that the reaction was blocked by pyrophosphate which is an inhibitor of the ATPase activity; that ATP was bound as ADP; and that label was probably restricted to a single peptide following limited subtilisin proteolysis of labeled Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and extensive cleavage with CNBr and trypsin of labeled turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain

  1. Stabilization of the Central Part of Tropomyosin Molecule Alters the Ca2+-sensitivity of Actin-Myosin Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepkin, D V; Matyushenko, A M; Kopylova, G V; Artemova, N V; Bershitsky, S Y; Tsaturyan, A K; Levitsky, D I

    2013-07-01

    We show that the mutations D137L and G126R, which stabilize the central part of the tropomyosin (Tm) molecule, increase both the maximal sliding velocity of the regulated actin filaments in the in vitro motility assay at high Са(2+) concentrations and the Са(2+)-sensitivity of the actin-myosin interaction underlying this sliding. Based on an analysis of the recently published data on the structure of the actin-Tm-myosin complex, we suppose that the physiological effects of these mutations in Tm can be accounted for by their influence on the interactions between the central part of Tm and certain sites of the myosin head.

  2. Increased expression of Myosin binding protein H in the skeletal muscle of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

    KAUST Repository

    Conti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and fatal neurodegenerative disease of still unknown pathogenesis. Recent findings suggest that the skeletal muscle may play an active pathogenetic role. To investigate ALS\\'s pathogenesis and to seek diagnostic markers, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies with the differential expression proteomic approach. We studied skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy controls (CN), sporadic ALS (sALS), motor neuropathies (MN) and myopathies (M). Pre-eminently among several differentially expressed proteins, Myosin binding protein H (MyBP-H) expression in ALS samples was anomalously high. MyBP-H is a component of the thick filaments of the skeletal muscle and has strong affinity for myosin, but its function is still unclear. High MyBP-H expression level was associated with abnormal expression of Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2), LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) and cofilin2, that might affect the actin-myosin interaction. We propose that MyBP-H expression level serves, as a putative biomarker in the skeletal muscle, to discriminate ALS from motor neuropathies, and that it signals the onset of dysregulation in actin-myosin interaction; this in turn might contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Myosin-V opposes microtubule-based cargo transport and drives directional motility on cortical actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitein, Lukas C; van Bergeijk, Petra; Lipka, Joanna; Keijzer, Nanda; Wulf, Phebe S; Katrukha, Eugene A; Akhmanova, Anna; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2013-05-06

    Intracellular transport is driven by motor proteins that either use microtubules or actin filaments as their tracks, but the interplay between these transport pathways is poorly understood. Whereas many microtubule-based motors are known to drive long-range transport, several actin-based motors have been proposed to function predominantly in cargo tethering. How these opposing activities are integrated on cargoes that contain both types of motors is unknown. Here we use inducible intracellular transport assays to show that acute recruitment of myosin-V to kinesin-propelled cargo reduces their motility near the cell periphery and enhances their localization at the actin-rich cell cortex. Myosin-V arrests rapid microtubule-based transport without the need for regulated auto- or other inhibition of kinesin motors. In addition, myosin-V, despite being an ineffective long-range transporter, can drive slow, medium-range (1-5 μm), point-to-point transport in cortical cell regions. Altogether, these data support a model in which myosin-V establishes local cortical delivery of kinesin-bound cargos through a combination of tethering and active transport. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Head-neck domain of Arabidopsis myosin XI, MYA2, fused with GFP produces F-actin patterns that coincide with fast organelle streaming in different plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holweg Carola L

    2008-07-01

    organelles such as peroxisomes. Potential roles of MYA2 may also exist in the cell nucleus. Whether the low quality of the F-actin-labeling by MYA2-head6IQ compared to other F-actin-binding proteins (ABPs signifies a weak association of the myosin with actin filaments remains to be proven by other means than in vivo. Clues for the mode of contact between the myosin molecules and F-actin so far cannot be drawn from sequence-related data.

  5. Solar Features - Prominences and Filaments - Filaments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Filaments are formed in magnetic loops that hold relatively cool, dense gas suspended above the surface of the Sun (David Hathaway/NASA)

  6. Fine filament NbTi superconductive composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S.; Grabinsky, G.; Marancik, W.; Pattanayak, D.

    1986-01-01

    The large superconducting magnet for the high energy physics accelerator requires fine filament composite to minimize the field error due to the persistent current in the filaments. New concepts toward the fine filament composite and its cable fabrication are discussed. Two-stage cables of fine wire with intermediate number of filaments were introduced. The first stage was six wires cables around one and in the second stage this was used to produce a Rutherford cable. The advantage of this process is in the ease of billet fabrication since the number of filaments in a single wire is within the range of easy billet fabrication. The disadvantage is in the cable fabrication. One of the major concerns in the fabrication of fine NbTi filaments composite in a copper matrix is the intermetallic compound formation during the extrusion and heat treatment steps. The hard intermetallic particles degrade the uniformity of the filaments and reduce the critical current density. The process of using Nb barrier between the filaments and copper matrix in order to prevent this CuTi intermetallic particle formation is described

  7. Enhancement of Force Generated by Individual Myosin Heads in Skinned Rabbit Psoas Muscle Fibers at Low Ionic Strength

    OpenAIRE

    Sugi, Haruo; Abe, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Saeki, Yasutake; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2013-01-01

    Although evidence has been presented that, at low ionic strength, myosin heads in relaxed skeletal muscle fibers form linkages with actin filaments, the effect of low ionic strength on contraction characteristics of Ca(2+)-activated muscle fibers has not yet been studied in detail. To give information about the mechanism of muscle contraction, we have examined the effect of low ionic strength on the mechanical properties and the contraction characteristics of skinned rabbit psoas muscle fiber...

  8. Recombinant motor domain constructs of Chara corallina myosin display fast motility and high ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kohji; Kashiyama, Taku; Shimada, Kiyo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Awata, Jun ya; Hachikubo, You; Manstein, Dietmar J; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2003-12-26

    The mechanism and structural features that are responsible for the fast motility of Chara corallina myosin (CCM) have not been elucidated, so far. The low yields of native CCM that can be purified to homogeneity were the major reason for this. Here, we describe the expression of recombinant CCM motor domains, which support the fast movement of actin filaments in an in vitro motility assay. A CCM motor domain without light chain binding site moved actin filaments at a velocity of 8.8 microm/s at 30 degrees C and a CCM motor domain with an artificial lever arm consisting of two alpha-actinin repeats moved actin filaments at 16.2 microm/s. Both constructs displayed high actin-activated ATPase activities ( approximately 500 Pi/s/head), which is indicative of a very fast hydrolysis step. Our results provide an excellent system to dissect the specific structural and functional features that distinguish the myosin responsible for fast cytoplasmic streaming.

  9. Determination of carbon-to-nitrogen ratio in the filamentous and heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 with single-cell soft X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, T.; Yoshimura, M.; Azai, C.; Terauchi, K.; Ohta, T.

    2017-06-01

    Vegetative cells and heterocysts in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 were observed by soft X-ray microscopy. Carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio of each cell was estimated by the difference of the absorbance of the images below and above the nitrogen K-edge absorption. It was revealed that the C/N ratios in vegetative cells and heterocysts are 4.54 and 2.46, respectively.

  10. The Closed State of the Thin Filament Is Not Occupied in Fully Activated Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershitsky, Sergey Y; Koubassova, Natalia A; Ferenczi, Michael A; Kopylova, Galina V; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Tsaturyan, Andrey K

    2017-04-11

    Muscle contraction is powered by actin-myosin interaction controlled by Ca 2+ via the regulatory proteins troponin (Tn) and tropomyosin (Tpm), which are associated with actin filaments. Tpm forms coiled-coil dimers, which assemble into a helical strand that runs along the whole ∼1 μm length of a thin filament. In the absence of Ca 2+ , Tn that is tightly bound to Tpm binds actin and holds the Tpm strand in the blocked, or B, state, where Tpm shields actin from the binding of myosin heads. Ca 2+ binding to Tn releases the Tpm from actin so that it moves azimuthally around the filament axis to a closed, or C, state, where actin is partially available for weak binding of myosin heads. Upon transition of the weak actin-myosin bond into a strong, stereo-specific complex, the myosin heads push Tpm strand to the open, or O, state allowing myosin binding sites on several neighboring actin monomers to become open for myosin binding. We used low-angle x-ray diffraction at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility to check whether the O- to C-state transition in fully activated fibers of fast skeletal muscle of the rabbit occurs during transition from isometric contraction to shortening under low load. No decrease in the intensity of the second actin layer line at reciprocal radii in the range of 0.15-0.275 nm -1 was observed during shortening suggesting that an azimuthal Tpm movement from the O- to C-state does not occur, although during shortening muscle stiffness is reduced compared to the isometric state, and the intensities of other actin layer lines demonstrate a ∼2-fold decrease in the fraction of myosin heads strongly bound to actin. The data show that a small fraction of actin-bound myosin heads is sufficient for supporting the O-state and, therefore the C-state is not occupied in fully activated skeletal muscle that produces mechanical work at low load. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Automatic Detect and Trace of Solar Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng; Chen, P. F.; Tang, Yu-hua; Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang

    speeds in the northern and the southern hemispheres do not differ significantly in the Solar Cycle 23. We also processed a number of relatively high-resolution Hα images obtained by BBSO. It is found that in some cases, the filament axis has single chirality and the associated magnetic field also has single helicity, while its barbs in different parts of it have opposite barb chirality.

  12. Self-assembly of designed supramolecular magnetic filaments of different shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, E.V. [Ural Federal University, Lenin Av. 51, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Rozhkov, D.A., E-mail: d.a.rozhkov@gmail.com [Ural Federal University, Lenin Av. 51, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sanchez, P.A. [University of Vienna, Sensengasse 8, Vienna (Austria); Kantorovich, S.S. [Ural Federal University, Lenin Av. 51, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); University of Vienna, Sensengasse 8, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-06-01

    In the present work we study via molecular dynamics simulations filaments of ring and linear shape. Filaments are made of magnetic nanoparticles, possessing a point dipole in their centres. Particles in filaments are crosslinked in a particular way, so that the deviation of the neighbouring dipoles from the head-to-tail orientation is penalised by the bond. We show how the conformation of a single chain and ring filament changes on cooling for different lengths. We also study filament pairs, by fixing filaments at a certain distance and analysing the impact of inter-filament interaction on the equilibrium configurations. Our study opens a perspective to investigate the dispersions of filaments, both theoretically and numerically, by using effective potentials. - Highlights: • Single filament study. • Magnetic particles crosslinked in chains and rings. • Magnetic filament interactions.

  13. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  14. Proteomics of Filamentous Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passel, van M.W.J.; Schaap, P.J.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae traditionally have had an important role in providing enzymes and enzyme cocktails that are used in food industry. In recent years the genome sequences of many filamentous fungi have become available. This combined with

  15. Motility patterns of filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunker, Rita; Røy, Hans; Kamp, Anja

    2011-01-01

    The large sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp., live on the oxidation of sulfide with oxygen or nitrate, but avoid high concentrations of both sulfide and oxygen. As gliding filaments, they rely on reversals in the gliding direction to find their preferred environment, the oxygen–sulfide interface. We...... observed the chemotactic patterns of single filaments in a transparent agar medium and scored their reversals and the glided distances between reversals. Filaments within the preferred microenvironment glided distances shorter than their own length between reversals that anchored them in their position...... as a microbial mat. Filaments in the oxic region above the mat or in the sulfidic, anoxic region below the mat glided distances longer than the filament length between reversals. This reversal behavior resulted in a diffusion-like spreading of the filaments. A numerical model of such gliding filaments...

  16. An embryonic myosin converter domain influences Drosophila indirect flight muscle stretch activation, power generation and flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Newhard, Christopher S; Ramanath, Seemanti; Sheppard, Debra; Swank, Douglas M

    2014-01-15

    Stretch activation (SA) is critical to the flight ability of insects powered by asynchronous, indirect flight muscles (IFMs). An essential muscle protein component for SA and power generation is myosin. Which structural domains of myosin are significant for setting SA properties and power generation levels is poorly understood. We made use of the transgenic techniques and unique single muscle myosin heavy chain gene of Drosophila to test the influence of the myosin converter domain on IFM SA and power generation. Replacing the endogenous converter with an embryonic version decreased SA tension and the rate of SA tension generation. The alterations in SA properties and myosin kinetics from the converter exchange caused power generation to drop to 10% of control fiber power when the optimal conditions for control fibers - 1% muscle length (ML) amplitude and 150 Hz oscillation frequency - were applied to fibers expressing the embryonic converter (IFI-EC). Optimizing conditions for IFI-EC fiber power production, by doubling ML amplitude and decreasing oscillation frequency by 60%, improved power output to 60% of optimized control fiber power. IFI-EC flies altered their aerodynamic flight characteristics to better match optimal fiber power generation conditions as wing beat frequency decreased and wing stroke amplitude increased. This enabled flight in spite of the drastic changes to fiber mechanical performance.

  17. Evolution of Filament Barbs

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Rui; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin

    2010-01-01

    We present a selected few cases in which the sense of chirality of filament barbs changed within as short as hours. We investigate in detail a quiescent filament on 2003 September 10 and 11. Of its four barbs displaying such changes only one overlay a small polarity inversion line inside the EUV filament channel (EFC). No magnetic elements with magnitude above the noise level were detected at the endpoints of all barbs. In particular, a pair of barbs first approached toward and then departed ...

  18. Shaking the myosin family tree: biochemical kinetics defines four types of myosin motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemink, Marieke J; Geeves, Michael A

    2011-12-01

    Although all myosin motors follow the same basic cross-bridge cycle, they display a large variety in the rates of transition between different states in the cycle, allowing each myosin to be finely tuned for a specific task. Traditionally, myosins have been classified by sequence analysis into a large number of sub-families (∼35). Here we use a different method to classify the myosin family members which is based on biochemical and mechanical properties. The key properties that define the type of mechanical activity of the motor are duty ratio (defined as the fraction of the time myosin remains attached to actin during each cycle), thermodynamic coupling of actin and nucleotide binding to myosin and the degree of strain-sensitivity of the ADP release step. Based on these properties we propose to classify myosins into four different groups: (I) fast movers, (II) slow/efficient force holders, (III) strain sensors and (IV) gates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Penheiter, Alan R. [Molecular Medicine Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Burghardt, Thomas P., E-mail: burghardt@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Ajtai, Katalin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis-Menten V{sub max} and K{sub M} for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant

  20. Cell and molecular biology of the fastest myosins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi-Fujime, Sugie; Nakamura, Akio

    2009-01-01

    Chara myosin is a class XI plant myosin in green algae Chara corallina and responsible for fast cytoplasmic streaming. The Chara myosin exhibits the fastest sliding movement of F-actin at 60 mum/s as observed so far, 10-fold of the shortening speed of muscle. It has some distinct properties differing from those of muscle myosin. Although knowledge about Chara myosin is very limited at present, we have tried to elucidate functional bases of its characteristics by comparing with those of other myosins. In particular, we have built the putative atomic model of Chara myosin by using the homology-based modeling system and databases. Based on the putative structure of Chara myosin obtained, we have analyzed the relationship between structure and function of Chara myosin to understand its distinct properties from various aspects by referring to the accumulated knowledge on mechanochemical and structural properties of other classes of myosin, particularly animal and fungal myosin V. We will also discuss the functional significance of Chara myosin in a living cell.

  1. Preparation of human cardiac anti-myosin: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, H.; Souza, I.T.T.

    1990-01-01

    The present communication is a review of the physicochemical characterization and immunological properties of myosin isolated from the cardiac muscle, the production of monoclonal antibody anti-myosin, the radiolabeling of this antibody and its applications as radiopharmaceuticals to imaging myocardial infarcts. The classical example of radioimmunologic diagnosis of non malignant tissues is the detection of myocardial infarction by radiolabeled antibodies to myosin. (author)

  2. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, See Leang

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond Laser Filamentation gives a comprehensive review of the physics of propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses in optical media (principally air) and the applications and challenges of this new technique. This book presents the modern understanding of the physics of femtosecond laser pulse propagation, including unusual new effects such as the self-transformation of the pulse into a white light laser pulse, intensity clamping, the physics of multiple filamentation and competition, and how filaments’ ability to melt glass leads to wave guide writing. The potential applications of laser filamentation in atmospheric sensing and the generation of other electromagnetic pulses from the UV to the radio frequency are treated, together with possible future challenges in the excitation of super-excited states of molecules. Exciting new phenomena such as filament induced ultrafast birefringence and the excitation of molecular rotational wave packets and their multiple revivals in air (gases) will also ...

  3. Dynamics of contracting surfactant-covered filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pritish; Thete, Sumeet; Xu, Qi; Basaran, Osman

    2013-11-01

    When drops are produced from a nozzle, a thin liquid thread connects the primary drop that is about to form to the rest of the liquid in the nozzle. Often, the thread becomes disconnected from both the primary drop and the remnant liquid mass hanging from the nozzle and thereby gives rise to a free filament. Due to surface tension, the free filament then contracts or recoils. During recoil, the filament can either contract into a single satellite droplet or break up into several small satellites. Such satellite droplets are undesirable in applications where they can, for example, cause misting in a manufacturing environment and mar product quality in ink-jet printing. In many applications, the filaments are coated with a monolayer of surfactant. In this work, we study the dynamics of contraction of slender filaments of a Newtonian fluid that are covered with a monolayer of surfactant when the surrounding fluid is a passive gas. Taking advantage of the fact that the filaments are long and slender, we use a 1D-slender-jet approximation of the governing system of equations consisting of the Navier-Stokes system and the convection-diffusion equation for surfactant transport. We solve the 1D system of equations by a finite element based numerical method.

  4. Filament-filament switching can be regulated by separation between filaments together with cargo motor number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Erickson

    Full Text Available How intracellular transport controls the probability that cargos switch at intersections between filaments is not well understood. In one hypothesis some motors on the cargo attach to one filament while others attach to the intersecting filament, and the ensuing tug-of-war determines which filament is chosen. We investigate this hypothesis using 3D computer simulations, and discover that switching at intersections increases with the number of motors on the cargo, but is not strongly dependent on motor number when the filaments touch. Thus, simply controlling the number of active motors on the cargo cannot account for in vivo observations that found reduced switching with increasing motor number, suggesting additional mechanisms of regulation. We use simulations to show that one possible way to regulate switching is by simultaneously adjusting the separation between planes containing the crossing filaments and the total number of active motors on the cargo. Heretofore, the effect of filament-filament separation on switching has been unexplored. We find that the switching probability decreases with increasing filament separation. This effect is particularly strong for cargos with only a modest number of motors. As the filament separation increases past the maximum head-to-head distance of the motor, individual motors walking along a filament will be unable to reach the intersecting filament. Thus, any switching requires that other motors on the cargo attach to the intersecting filament and haul the cargo along it, while motor(s engaged on the original filament detach. Further, if the filament separation is large enough, the cargo can have difficulty proceeding along the initial filament because the engaged motors can walk underneath the intersecting filament, but the cargo itself cannot fit between the filaments. Thus, the cargo either detaches entirely from the original filament, or must dip to the side of the initial filament and then pass below

  5. Filament-filament switching can be regulated by separation between filaments together with cargo motor number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Robert P; Gross, Steven P; Yu, Clare C

    2013-01-01

    How intracellular transport controls the probability that cargos switch at intersections between filaments is not well understood. In one hypothesis some motors on the cargo attach to one filament while others attach to the intersecting filament, and the ensuing tug-of-war determines which filament is chosen. We investigate this hypothesis using 3D computer simulations, and discover that switching at intersections increases with the number of motors on the cargo, but is not strongly dependent on motor number when the filaments touch. Thus, simply controlling the number of active motors on the cargo cannot account for in vivo observations that found reduced switching with increasing motor number, suggesting additional mechanisms of regulation. We use simulations to show that one possible way to regulate switching is by simultaneously adjusting the separation between planes containing the crossing filaments and the total number of active motors on the cargo. Heretofore, the effect of filament-filament separation on switching has been unexplored. We find that the switching probability decreases with increasing filament separation. This effect is particularly strong for cargos with only a modest number of motors. As the filament separation increases past the maximum head-to-head distance of the motor, individual motors walking along a filament will be unable to reach the intersecting filament. Thus, any switching requires that other motors on the cargo attach to the intersecting filament and haul the cargo along it, while motor(s) engaged on the original filament detach. Further, if the filament separation is large enough, the cargo can have difficulty proceeding along the initial filament because the engaged motors can walk underneath the intersecting filament, but the cargo itself cannot fit between the filaments. Thus, the cargo either detaches entirely from the original filament, or must dip to the side of the initial filament and then pass below the crossing

  6. Myosin VI Must Dimerize and Deploy Its Unusual Lever Arm in Order to Perform Its Cellular Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisa Mukherjea

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is unclear whether the reverse-direction myosin (myosin VI functions as a monomer or dimer in cells and how it generates large movements on actin. We deleted a stable, single-α-helix (SAH domain that has been proposed to function as part of a lever arm to amplify movements without impact on in vitro movement or in vivo functions. A myosin VI construct that used this SAH domain as part of its lever arm was able to take large steps in vitro but did not rescue in vivo functions. It was necessary for myosin VI to internally dimerize, triggering unfolding of a three-helix bundle and calmodulin binding in order to step normally in vitro and rescue endocytosis and Golgi morphology in myosin VI-null fibroblasts. A model for myosin VI emerges in which cargo binding triggers dimerization and unfolds the three-helix bundle to create a lever arm essential for in vivo functions.

  7. Kinetic mechanism of myosinV-S1 using a new fluorescent ATP analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgacs, Eva; Cartwright, Suzanne; Kovács, Mihály; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Sellers, James R; Corrie, John E T; Webb, Martin R; White, Howard D

    2006-10-31

    We have used a new fluorescent ATP analogue, 3'-(7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carbonylamino)-3'-deoxyadenosine-5'-triphosphate (deac-aminoATP), to study the ATP hydrolysis mechanism of the single headed myosinV-S1. Our study demonstrates that deac-aminoATP is an excellent substrate for these studies. Although the deac-amino nucleotides have a low quantum yield in free solution, there is a very large increase in fluorescence emission ( approximately 20-fold) upon binding to the myosinV active site. The fluorescence emission intensity is independent of the hydrolysis state of the nucleotide bound to myosinV-S1. The very good signal-to-noise ratio that is obtained with deac-amino nucleotides makes them excellent substrates for studying expressed proteins that can only be isolated in small quantities. The combination of the fast rate of binding and the favorable signal-to-noise ratio also allows deac-nucleotides to be used in chase experiments to determine the kinetics of ADP and Pi dissociation from actomyosin-ADP-Pi. Although phosphate dissociation from actomyosinV-ADP-Pi does not itself produce a fluorescence signal, it produces a lag in the signal for deac-aminoADP dissociation. The lag provides direct evidence that the principal pathway of product dissociation from actomyosinV-ADP-Pi is an ordered mechanism in which phosphate precedes ADP. Although the mechanism of hydrolysis of deac-aminoATP by (acto)myosinV-S1 is qualitatively similar to the ATP hydrolysis mechanism, there are significant differences in some of the rate constants. Deac-aminoATP binds 3-fold faster to myosinV-S1, and the rate of deac-aminoADP dissociation from actomyosinV-S1 is 20-fold slower. Deac-aminoATP supports motility by myosinV-HMM on actin at a rate consistent with the slower rate of deac-aminoADP dissociation.

  8. Decidable and undecidable arithmetic functions in actin filament networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum is very sensitive to its environment, and reacts to stimuli with appropriate motions. Both the sensory and motor stages of these reactions are explained by hydrodynamic processes, based on fluid dynamics, with the participation of actin filament networks. This paper is devoted to actin filament networks as a computational medium. The point is that actin filaments, with contributions from many other proteins like myosin, are sensitive to extracellular stimuli (attractants as well as repellents), and appear and disappear at different places in the cell to change aspects of the cell structure—e.g. its shape. By assembling and disassembling actin filaments, some unicellular organisms, like Amoeba proteus, can move in response to various stimuli. As a result, these organisms can be considered a simple reversible logic gate—extracellular signals being its inputs and motions its outputs. In this way, we can implement various logic gates on amoeboid behaviours. These networks can embody arithmetic functions within p-adic valued logic. Furthermore, within these networks we can define the so-called diagonalization for deducing undecidable arithmetic functions.

  9. Kinetics of folding of the myosin rod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechet, J J; Nozais, M

    1997-02-15

    The kinetics of the unfolding and refolding of the myosin rod have been studied by fluorescence and circular dichroism techniques, at different concentrations of protein and guanidine hydrochloride. The unfolding of the myosin rod was fast and at least biphasic in 2-3 M denaturant, with an initial immediate phase followed by a slower low-amplitude first-order phase. The refolding of the rod in 0.4-2 M guanidine hydrochloride was also at least biphasic; an initial immediate phase preceded a slow second-order phase. At the final denaturant concentration of 0.8 M, the amplitude of the burst phase was weakly dependent on the protein concentration and the rate constant of the refolding slow phase was optimal. These data are incorporated into a folding mechanism with at least three states. The high rates of the first steps of unfolding and refolding may be relevant for the functioning of the native myosin molecule by allowing a transient separation of the two strands of the myosin tail.

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Myosin Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Elizabeth; Eftink, Maurice R.

    1985-01-01

    Students complete five experimental projects at the end of a senior-level biochemistry course which involves the isolation and characterization of myosin and its water-soluble subfragments. Procedures used and results obtained are provided for such projects as viscosity and ATPase measurements and gel electrophoresis experiments. (JN)

  11. A novel single-stranded RNA virus isolated from a phytopathogenic filamentous fungus, Rosellinia necatrix, with similarity to hypo-like viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eZhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Here we report a biological and molecular characterization of a novel positive-sense RNA virus isolated from a field isolate (NW10 of a filamentous phytopathogenic fungus, the white root rot fungus that is designated as Rosellinia necatrix fusarivirus 1 (RnFV1. A recently developed technology using zinc ions allowed us to transfer RnFV1 to two mycelially incompatible Rosellinia necatrix strains. A biological comparison of the virus-free and -recipient isogenic fungal strains suggested that RnFV1 infects latently and thus has no potential as a virocontrol agent. The virus has an undivided positive-sense RNA genome of 6286 nucleotides excluding a poly (A tail. The genome possesses two non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs: a large ORF1 that encodes polypeptides with RNA replication functions and a smaller ORF2 that encodes polypeptides of unknown function. A lack of coat protein genes was suggested by the failure of virus particles from infected mycelia. No evidence was obtained by Northern analysis or classical 5'-RACE for the presence of subgenomic RNA for the downstream ORF. Sequence similarities were found in amino-acid sequence between RnFV1 putative proteins and counterparts of a previously reported mycovirus, Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1. Interestingly, several related sequences were detected by BLAST searches of independent transcriptome assembly databases one of which probably represents an entire virus genome. Phylogenetic analysis based on the conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase showed that RnFV1, FgV1, and these similar sequences are grouped in a cluster distinct from distantly related hypoviruses. It is proposed that a new taxonomic family termed Fusariviridae be created to include RnFV1and FgV1.

  12. Unraveling Intermediate Filaments : The super resolution solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahidiazar, L.

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate Filaments (IFs) carry out major functions in cells. Several diseases have been associated with malfunctioning IFs in the cells and among them are certain sub types of cancer. To determine the structure and organization of IFs, we have used Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM)

  13. Evolution of filament barbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R.; Xu, Y.; Wang, H.

    We present a selected few cases in which the sense of chirality of filament barbs changed within periods as short as hours. We investigate in detail a quiescent filament on 2003 September 10 and 11. Of its four barbs displaying such changes, only one overlays a small polarity inversion line inside the EUV filament channel (EFC). No magnetic elements with magnitude above the noise level were detected at the endpoints of all barbs. In particular, a pair of barbs first approached toward, and then departed from, each other in Halpha , with the barb endpoints migrating as far as ˜ 10 arcsec. We conclude that the evolution of the barbs was driven by flux emergence and cancellation of small bipolar units at the EFC border.

  14. Dual-frequency terahertz emission from splitting filaments induced by lens tilting in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhelin; Chen, Yanping; Yang, Liu; Yuan, Xiaohui; Liu, Feng; Chen, Min; Xu, Jianqiu; Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Zhengming

    2014-01-01

    Dual-frequency terahertz radiation from air-plasma filaments produced with two-color lasers in air has been demonstrated experimentally. When a focusing lens is tilted for a few degrees, it is shown that the laser filament evolves from a single one to two sub-filaments. Two independent terahertz sources emitted from the sub-filaments with different frequencies and polarizations are identified, where the frequency of terahertz waves from the trailing sub-filament is higher than that from the leading sub-filament.

  15. Filaments in Lupus I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Rodon, J.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Plunkett, A.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanisms behind the formation of sub-stellar mass sources are key to determine the populations at the low-mass end of the stellar distribution. Here, we present mapping observations toward the Lupus I cloud in C18O(2-1) and 13CO(2-1) obtained with APEX. We have identified a few velocity-coherent filaments. Each contains several substellar mass sources that are also identified in the 1.1mm continuum data (see also SOLA catalogue presentation). We will discuss the velocity structure, fragmentation properties of the identified filaments, and the nature of the detected sources.

  16. A Kinase Anchoring Protein 9 Is a Novel Myosin VI Binding Partner That Links Myosin VI with the PKA Pathway in Myogenic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Karolczak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myosin VI (MVI is a unique motor protein moving towards the minus end of actin filaments unlike other known myosins. Its important role has recently been postulated for striated muscle and myogenic cells. Since MVI functions through interactions of C-terminal globular tail (GT domain with tissue specific partners, we performed a search for MVI partners in myoblasts and myotubes using affinity chromatography with GST-tagged MVI-GT domain as a bait. A kinase anchoring protein 9 (AKAP9, a regulator of PKA activity, was identified by means of mass spectrometry as a possible MVI interacting partner both in undifferentiated and differentiating myoblasts and in myotubes. Coimmunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assay confirmed that both proteins could interact. MVI and AKAP9 colocalized at Rab5 containing early endosomes. Similarly to MVI, the amount of AKAP9 decreased during myoblast differentiation. However, in MVI-depleted cells, both cAMP and PKA levels were increased and a change in the MVI motor-dependent AKAP9 distribution was observed. Moreover, we found that PKA phosphorylated MVI-GT domain, thus implying functional relevance of MVI-AKAP9 interaction. We postulate that this novel interaction linking MVI with the PKA pathway could be important for targeting AKAP9-PKA complex within cells and/or providing PKA to phosphorylate MVI tail domain.

  17. Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin on actin during thin filament activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, William; Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Raunser, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Our thesis is that thin filament function can only be fully understood and muscle regulation then elucidated if atomic structures of the thin filament are available to reveal the positions of tropomyosin on actin in all physiological states. After all, it is tropomyosin influenced by troponin that regulates myosin-crossbridge cycling on actin and therefore controls contraction in all muscles. In addition, we maintain that a complete appreciation of thin filament activation also requires that the mechanical properties of tropomyosin itself are recognized and then related to the effect of myosin-association on actin. Taking the Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin into account, coupled with our electron microscopy structures and computational chemistry, we propose a comprehensive mechanism for tropomyosin regulatory movement over the actin filament surface that explains the cooperative muscle activation process. In fact, well-known point mutations of critical amino acids on the actin-tropomyosin binding interface disrupt Gestalt-binding and are associated with a number of inherited myopathies. Moreover, dysregulation of tropomyosin may also be a factor that interferes with the gatekeeping operation of non-muscle tropomyosin in the controlling interactions of a wide variety of cellular actin-binding proteins. The clinical relevance of Gestalt-binding is discussed in articles by the Marston and the Gunning groups in this special journal issue devoted to the impact of tropomyosin on biological systems.

  18. Positrusion Filament Recycling System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TUI proposes a novel process to produce 3d printer feedstock filament out of scrap ABS on the ISS. Currently the plastic filament materials that most 3d printers use...

  19. Solar Features - Prominences and Filaments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Prominences and filaments are two manifestations of the same phenomenon. Both prominences and filaments are features formed above the chromosphere by cool dense...

  20. Myosin-V motility: these levers were made for walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyska, Matthew J; Mooseker, Mark S

    2003-09-01

    Myosin-Va, a processive actin-based motor thought to be involved in organelle transport, now stands ready to join myosin-II (from muscle) as one of the most highly characterized members of the myosin superfamily. Recent reports from the laboratories of Goldman and colleagues and Selvin and colleagues have provided unprecedented, high-resolution views of the structural changes that take place while this motor moves along its track. Taken together, the new results indicate that myosin-Va tilts its light chain binding domains to 'walk' along actin in a hand-over-hand fashion.

  1. MotAB-like machinery drives the movement of MreB filaments during bacterial gliding motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guo; Bandaria, Jigar N; Le Gall, Anne Valérie; Fan, Xue; Yildiz, Ahmet; Mignot, Tâm; Zusman, David R; Nan, Beiyan

    2018-03-06

    MreB is a bacterial actin that is important for cell shape and cell wall biosynthesis in many bacterial species. MreB also plays crucial roles in Myxococcus xanthus gliding motility, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we tracked the dynamics of single MreB particles in M. xanthus using single-particle tracking photoactivated localization microscopy. We found that a subpopulation of MreB particles moves rapidly along helical trajectories, similar to the movements of the MotAB-like gliding motors. The rapid MreB motion was stalled in the mutants that carried truncated gliding motors. Remarkably, M. xanthus MreB moves one to two orders of magnitude faster than its homologs that move along with the cell wall synthesis machinery in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli , and this rapid movement was not affected by the inhibitors of cell wall biosynthesis. Our results show that in M. xanthus , MreB provides a scaffold for the gliding motors while the gliding machinery drives the movement of MreB filaments, analogous to the interdependent movements of myosin motors and actin in eukaryotic cells.

  2. Programmable Active Matter: Dynamics of active filaments on patterned surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikrant; Todd, Daniel; Milas, Peker; Ruijgrok, Paul; Bryant, Zev; Ross, Jennifer

    Interfaces are ubiquitous in biology. For a sub-cellular component moving inside the cell, any change in its local environment across an interface whether chemical concentration, density, or any other physical variables can produce novel dynamics. Recent advances in bioengineering allow us to control motor proteins' velocities when prompted by an optical trigger. Using an optical diaphragm and a gear-shifting myosin XI construct containing a photoactive LOV domain, we can spatially pattern light to create interfaces across which speed of a gliding actin filament can differ by as much as a factor of two. We observe that when a gliding actin filament crosses an interface that has a discontinuous velocity jump, it buckles and changes its angle of orientation due to the velocity mismatch. Our preliminary data suggests that for small angels of incidence, the angle of emergence increases linearly. If we increase the angle of incidence further we observe that the angle of emergence saturates. For some actin filaments approaching the interface near-tangentially we observe total internal reflection as they fail to crossover the boundary. We have modeled our system using Cytosim software package and find excellent agreement with experimental data.

  3. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...... also shares in vivo properties of assembly and dynamics with IF proteins by forming stable filamentous structures that continuously incorporate subunits along their length and that grow in a nonpolar fashion. De novo assembly of crescentin is biphasic and involves a cell size-dependent mechanism...... a new function for MreB and providing a parallel to the role of actin in IF assembly and organization in metazoan cells. Additionally, analysis of an MreB localization mutant suggests that cell wall insertion during cell elongation normally occurs along two helices of opposite handedness, each...

  4. Filamentous Fungi Fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anders; Stocks, Stuart; Woodley, John

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi (including microorganisms such as Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae) represent an enormously important platform for industrial fermentation. Two particularly valuable features are the high yield coefficients and the ability to secrete products. However, the filamentous...... morphology, together with non-Newtonian rheological properties (shear thinning), result in poor oxygen transfer unless sufficient energy is provided to the fermentation. While genomic research may improve the organisms, there is no doubt that to enable further application in future it will be necessary...... to match such research with studies of oxygen transfer and energy supply to high viscosity fluids. Hence, the implementation of innovative solutions (some of which in principle are already possible) will be essential to ensure the further development of such fermentations....

  5. Alternative exon-encoding regions of Locusta migratoria muscle myosin modulate the pH dependence of ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Lu, Z; He, J; Chen, Q; Wang, X; Kang, L; Li, X-D

    2016-12-01

    Whereas the vertebrate muscle myosin heavy chains (MHCs) are encoded by a family of Mhc genes, most insects examined to date contain a single Mhc gene and produce all of the different MHC isoforms by alternative RNA splicing. Here, we found that the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, has one Mhc gene, which contains 41 exons, including five alternative exclusive exons and one differently included penultimate exon, and potentially encodes 360 MHC isoforms. From the adult L. migratoria, we identified 14 MHC isoforms (including two identical isoforms): four from flight muscle (the thorax dorsal longitudinal muscle), three from jump muscle (the hind leg extensor tibiae muscle) and seven from the abdominal intersegmental muscle. We purified myosins from flight muscle and jump muscle and characterized their motor activities. At neutral pH, the flight and the jump muscle myosins displayed similar levels of in vitro actin-gliding activity, whereas the former had a slightly higher actin-activated ATPase activity than the latter. Interestingly, the pH dependences of the actin-activated ATPase activity of these two myosins are different. Because the dominant MHC isoforms in these two muscles are identical except for the two alternative exon-encoding regions, we propose that these two alternative regions modulate the pH dependence of L. migratoria muscle myosin. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  6. Filament turnover tunes both force generation and dissipation to control long-range flows in a model actomyosin cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, William M; McCall, Patrick M; Gardel, Margaret L; Munro, Edwin M

    2017-12-01

    Actomyosin-based cortical flow is a fundamental engine for cellular morphogenesis. Cortical flows are generated by cross-linked networks of actin filaments and myosin motors, in which active stress produced by motor activity is opposed by passive resistance to network deformation. Continuous flow requires local remodeling through crosslink unbinding and and/or filament disassembly. But how local remodeling tunes stress production and dissipation, and how this in turn shapes long range flow, remains poorly understood. Here, we study a computational model for a cross-linked network with active motors based on minimal requirements for production and dissipation of contractile stress: Asymmetric filament compliance, spatial heterogeneity of motor activity, reversible cross-links and filament turnover. We characterize how the production and dissipation of network stress depend, individually, on cross-link dynamics and filament turnover, and how these dependencies combine to determine overall rates of cortical flow. Our analysis predicts that filament turnover is required to maintain active stress against external resistance and steady state flow in response to external stress. Steady state stress increases with filament lifetime up to a characteristic time τm, then decreases with lifetime above τm. Effective viscosity increases with filament lifetime up to a characteristic time τc, and then becomes independent of filament lifetime and sharply dependent on crosslink dynamics. These individual dependencies of active stress and effective viscosity define multiple regimes of steady state flow. In particular our model predicts that when filament lifetimes are shorter than both τc and τm, the dependencies of effective viscosity and steady state stress on filament turnover cancel one another, such that flow speed is insensitive to filament turnover, and shows a simple dependence on motor activity and crosslink dynamics. These results provide a framework for understanding

  7. Differential assembly of alpha- and gamma-filagenins into thick filaments in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F.; Ortiz, I.; Hutagalung, A.; Bauer, C. C.; Cook, R. G.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle thick filaments are highly organized supramolecular assemblies of myosin and associated proteins with lengths, diameters and flexural rigidities characteristic of their source. The cores of body wall muscle thick filaments of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are tubular structures of paramyosin sub-filaments coupled by filagenins and have been proposed to serve as templates for the assembly of native thick filaments. We have characterized alpha- and gamma-filagenins, two novel proteins of the cores with calculated molecular masses of 30,043 and 19,601 and isoelectric points of 10.52 and 11.49, respectively. Western blot and immunoelectron microscopy using affinity-purified antibodies confirmed that the two proteins are core components. Immunoelectron microscopy of the cores revealed that they assemble with different periodicities. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that alpha-filagenin is localized in the medial regions of the A-bands of body wall muscle cells whereas gamma-filagenin is localized in the flanking regions, and that alpha-filagenin is expressed in 1.5-twofold embryos while gamma-filagenin becomes detectable only in late vermiform embryos. The expression of both proteins continues throughout later stages of development. C. elegans body wall muscle thick filaments of these developmental stages have distinct lengths. Our results suggest that the differential assembly of alpha- and gamma-filagenins into thick filaments of distinct lengths may be developmentally regulated.

  8. DAAM is required for thin filament formation and Sarcomerogenesis during muscle development in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Molnár

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available During muscle development, myosin and actin containing filaments assemble into the highly organized sarcomeric structure critical for muscle function. Although sarcomerogenesis clearly involves the de novo formation of actin filaments, this process remained poorly understood. Here we show that mouse and Drosophila members of the DAAM formin family are sarcomere-associated actin assembly factors enriched at the Z-disc and M-band. Analysis of dDAAM mutants revealed a pivotal role in myofibrillogenesis of larval somatic muscles, indirect flight muscles and the heart. We found that loss of dDAAM function results in multiple defects in sarcomere development including thin and thick filament disorganization, Z-disc and M-band formation, and a near complete absence of the myofibrillar lattice. Collectively, our data suggest that dDAAM is required for the initial assembly of thin filaments, and subsequently it promotes filament elongation by assembling short actin polymers that anneal to the pointed end of the growing filaments, and by antagonizing the capping protein Tropomodulin.

  9. Rapid and precise determination of Sr and Nd isotopic ratios in geological samples from the same filament loading by thermal ionization mass spectrometry employing a single-step separation scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao-Feng; Li, Xian-Hua; Li, Qiu-Li; Guo, Jing-Hui; Li, Xiang-Hui; Yang, Yue-Heng

    2012-05-21

    Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) offers the excellent precision and accuracy of the Sr and Nd isotopic ratio analysis for geological samples, but this method is labour intensive, expensive and time-consuming. In this study, a new analytical protocol by TIMS is presented that aims at improving analytical efficiency and cutting down experimental cost. Using the single-step cation exchange resin technique, mixed Sr and rare earth elements (REEs) fractions were separated from matrix and evaporated to dryness. Afterwards, mixed Sr+REEs fractions were dissolved and loaded onto the same Re filament using 1 μL of 2 M HCl. Then, Sr and Nd were sequentially measured without venting using TIMS. In contrast to conventional TIMS methods, the merits of this analytical protocol are its cost- and time-saving adaptations. The applicability of our method is evaluated by replicated measurements of (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (143)Nd/(144)Nd for nine international silicate rock reference materials, spanning a wide range of bulk compositions. The typical internal precision in this study is ca. 0.001% (RSE) for (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (143)Nd/(144)Nd; the analytical results obtained for these standard rocks show a good agreement with reported values, indicating the effectiveness of the proposed method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Tension regulates myosin dynamics during Drosophila embryonic wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobb, Anna B; Zulueta-Coarasa, Teresa; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2017-02-15

    Embryos repair epithelial wounds rapidly in a process driven by collective cell movements. Upon wounding, actin and the molecular motor non-muscle myosin II are redistributed in the cells adjacent to the wound, forming a supracellular purse string around the lesion. Purse string contraction coordinates cell movements and drives rapid wound closure. By using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in Drosophila embryos, we found that myosin turns over as the purse string contracts. Myosin turnover at the purse string was slower than in other actomyosin networks that had a lower level of contractility. Mathematical modelling suggested that myosin assembly and disassembly rates were both reduced by tension at the wound edge. We used laser ablation to show that tension at the purse string increased as wound closure progressed, and that the increase in tension was associated with reduced myosin turnover. Reducing purse string tension by laser-mediated severing resulted in increased turnover and loss of myosin. Finally, myosin motor activity was necessary for its stabilization around the wound and for rapid wound closure. Our results indicate that mechanical forces regulate myosin dynamics during embryonic wound repair. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Myosin heavy chain-like localizes at cell contact sites during Drosophila myoblast fusion and interacts in vitro with Rolling pebbles 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonn, Bettina R.; Rudolf, Anja; Hornbruch-Freitag, Christina; Daum, Gabor; Kuckwa, Jessica; Kastl, Lena; Buttgereit, Detlev [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate, E-mail: renkawit@biologie.uni-marburg.de [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Besides representing the sarcomeric thick filaments, myosins are involved in many cellular transport and motility processes. Myosin heavy chains are grouped into 18 classes. Here we show that in Drosophila, the unconventional group XVIII myosin heavy chain-like (Mhcl) is transcribed in the mesoderm of embryos, most prominently in founder cells (FCs). An ectopically expressed GFP-tagged Mhcl localizes in the growing muscle at cell–cell contacts towards the attached fusion competent myoblast (FCM). We further show that Mhcl interacts in vitro with the essential fusion protein Rolling pebbles 7 (Rols7), which is part of a protein complex established at cell contact sites (Fusion-restricted Myogenic-Adhesive Structure or FuRMAS). Here, branched F-actin is likely needed to widen the fusion pore and to integrate the myoblast into the growing muscle. We show that the localization of Mhcl is dependent on the presence of Rols7, and we postulate that Mhcl acts at the FuRMAS as an actin motor protein. We further show that Mhcl deficient embryos develop a wild-type musculature. We thus propose that Mhcl functions redundantly to other myosin heavy chains in myoblasts. Lastly, we found that the protein is detectable adjacent to the sarcomeric Z-discs, suggesting an additional function in mature muscles. - Highlights: ► The class XVIII myosin encoding gene Mhcl is transcribed in the mesoderm. ► Mhcl localization at contact sites of fusing myoblasts depends on Rols7. ► Mhcl interacts in vitro with Rols7 which is essential for myogenesis. ► Functional redundancy with other myosins is likely as mutants show no muscle defects. ► Mhcl localizes adjacent to Z-discs of sarcomeres and might support muscle integrity.

  12. Filament wound structure and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritt, W.S.; Gerth, H.L.; Knight, C.E. Jr.; Pardue, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A filament wound spherical structure is described comprising a plurality of filament band sets disposed about the surface of a mandrel with each band of each set formed of a continuous filament circumferentially wound about the mandrel a selected number of circuits and with each circuit of filament being wound parallel to and contiguous with an immediate previously wound circuit. Each filament band in each band set is wound at the same helix angle from the axis of revolution of the mandrel and all of the bands of each set are uniformly distributed about the mandrel circumference. The pole-to-equator wall thickness taper associated with each band set, as several contiguous band sets are wound about the mandrel starting at the poles, is accumulative as the band sets are nested to provide a complete filament wound sphere of essentially uniform thickness

  13. Failure and nonfailure of fluid filaments in extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Kolte, Mette Irene; Renardy, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The phenomenon of ductile failure of Newtonian and viscoelastic fluid filaments without surface tension is studied by a 2D finite element method and by ID non-linear analysis. The viscoelastic fluids are described by single integral constitutive equations. The main conclusions are: (1) Newtonian...... fluid filaments do not exhibit ductile failure without surface tension; (2) some viscoelastic fluids form stable filaments while other fluids exhibit ductile failure as a result of an elastic instability; (3) for large Deborah numbers, the Considere condition may be used to predict the Hencky strain...

  14. Magnetic vortex filament flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Manuel; Cabrerizo, Jose L.; Fernandez, Manuel; Romero, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    We exhibit a variational approach to study the magnetic flow associated with a Killing magnetic field in dimension 3. In this context, the solutions of the Lorentz force equation are viewed as Kirchhoff elastic rods and conversely. This provides an amazing connection between two apparently unrelated physical models and, in particular, it ties the classical elastic theory with the Hall effect. Then, these magnetic flows can be regarded as vortex filament flows within the localized induction approximation. The Hasimoto transformation can be used to see the magnetic trajectories as solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation showing the solitonic nature of those

  15. Effects of proteolysis on the adenosinetriphosphatase activities of thymus myosin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, N.D.; Wagner, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    Limited proteolysis was used to identify regions on the heavy chains of calf thymus myosin which may be involved in ATP and actin binding. Assignments of the various proteolytic fragments to different parts of the myosin heavy chain were based on solubility, gel filtration, electron microscopy, and binding of 32 P-labeled regulatory light chains. Chymotrypsin rapidly cleaved within the head of thymus myosin to give a 70,000-dalton N-terminal fragment and a 140,000-dalton C-terminal fragment. These two fragments did not dissociate under nondenaturing conditions. Cleavage within the myosin tail to give heavy meromyosin occurred more slowly. Cleavage at the site 70,000 daltons from the N-terminus of the heavy chain caused about a 30-fold decrease in the actin concentration required to achieve half-maximal stimulation of the magnesium-adenosinetriphosphatase (Mg-ATPase) activity of unphosphorylated thymus myosin. The actin-activated ATPase activity of this digested myosin was only slightly affected by light chain phosphorylation. Actin inhibited the cleavage at this site by chymotrypsin. In the presence of ATP, chymotrypsin rapidly cleaved the thymus myosin heavy chain at an additional site about 4000 daltons from the N-terminus. Cleavage at this site caused a 2-fold increase in the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-ATPase activity and 3-fold decreases in the Ca 2+ - and Mg-ATPase activities of thymus myosin. Thus, cleavage at the N-terminus of thymus myosin was affected by ATP, and this cleavage altered ATPase activity. Papain cleaved the thymus myosin heavy chain about 94,000 daltons from the N-terminus to give subfragment 1. Although this subfragment 1 contained intact light chains, its actin-activated ATPase activity was not affected by light chain phosphorylation

  16. Bundling of elastic filaments induced by hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yi; Page, William; Poole, Robert J.; Lauga, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Peritrichous bacteria swim in viscous fluids by rotating multiple helical flagellar filaments. As the bacterium swims forward, all its flagella rotate in synchrony behind the cell in a tight helical bundle. When the bacterium changes its direction, the flagellar filaments unbundle and randomly reorient the cell for a short period of time before returning to their bundled state and resuming swimming. This rapid bundling and unbundling is, at its heart, a mechanical process whereby hydrodynamic interactions balance with elasticity to determine the time-varying deformation of the filaments. Inspired by this biophysical problem, we present in this paper what is perhaps the simplest model of bundling whereby two or more straight elastic filaments immersed in a viscous fluid rotate about their centerline, inducing rotational flows which tend to bend the filaments around each other. We derive an integrodifferential equation governing the shape of the filaments resulting from mechanical balance in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number. We show that such equation may be evaluated asymptotically analytically in the long-wavelength limit, leading to a local partial differential equation governed by a single dimensionless bundling number. A numerical study of the dynamics predicted by the model reveals the presence of two configuration instabilities with increasing bundling numbers: first to a crossing state where filaments touch at one point and then to a bundled state where filaments wrap along each other in a helical fashion. We also consider the case of multiple filaments and the unbundling dynamics. We next provide an intuitive physical model for the crossing instability and show that it may be used to predict analytically its threshold and adapted to address the transition to a bundling state. We then use a macroscale experimental implementation of the two-filament configuration in order to validate our theoretical predictions and obtain excellent agreement. This long

  17. Solar Filament Extraction and Characterizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Shih, F. Y.; Jing, J.; Wang, H.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to extract and characterize solar filaments from H-alpha full-disk images produced by Big Bear Solar Observatory. A cascading Hough Transform method is designed to identify solar disk center location and radius. Solar disks are segmented from the background, and unbalanced illumination on the surface of solar disks is removed using polynomial surface fitting. And then a localized adaptive thresholding is employed to extract solar filament candidates. After the removal of small solar filament candidates, the remaining larger candidates are used as the seeds of region growing. The procedure of region growing not only connects broken filaments but also generate complete shape for each filament. Mathematical morphology thinning is adopted to produce the skeleton of each filament, and graph theory is used to prune branches and barbs to get the main skeleton. The length and the location of the main skeleton is characterized. The proposed method can help scientists and researches study the evolution of solar filament, for instance, to detect solar filament eruption. The presented method has already been used by Space Weather Research Lab of New Jersey Institute of Technology (http://swrl.njit.edu) to generate the solar filament online catalog using H-alpha full-disk images of Global H-alpha Network (http://swrl.njit.edu/ghn_web/).

  18. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  19. Increased myocardial short-range forces in a rodent model of diabetes reflect elevated content of β myosin heavy chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Charles S; Mitov, Mihail I; Callahan, Leigh Ann; Campbell, Kenneth S

    2014-06-15

    Diastolic dysfunction is a clinically significant problem for patients with diabetes and often reflects increased ventricular stiffness. Attached cross-bridges contribute to myocardial stiffness and produce short-range forces, but it is not yet known whether these forces are altered in diabetes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that cross-bridge-based short-range forces are increased in the streptozotocin (STZ) induced rat model of type 1 diabetes. Chemically permeabilized myocardial preparations were obtained from 12week old rats that had been injected with STZ or vehicle 4weeks earlier, and activated in solutions with pCa (=-log10[Ca(2+)]) values ranging from 9.0 to 4.5. The short-range forces elicited by controlled length changes were ∼67% greater in the samples from the diabetic rats than in the control preparations. This change was mostly due to an increased elastic limit (the length change at the peak short-range force) as opposed to increased passive muscle stiffness. The STZ-induced increase in short-ranges forces is thus unlikely to reflect changes to titin and/or collagen filaments. Gel electrophoresis showed that STZ increased the relative expression of β myosin heavy chain. This molecular mechanism can explain the increased short-ranges forces observed in the diabetic tissue if β myosin molecules remain bound between the filaments for longer durations than α molecules during imposed movements. These results suggest that interventions that decrease myosin attachment times may be useful treatments for diastolic dysfunction associated with diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Zinc-induced cardiomyocyte relaxation in a rat model of hyperglycemia is independent of myosin isoform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ting

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been reported previously that diabetic cardiomyopathy can be inhibited or reverted with chronic zinc supplementation. In the current study, we hypothesized that total cardiac calcium and zinc content is altered in early onset diabetes mellitus characterized in part as hyperglycemia (HG and that exposure of zinc ion (Zn2+ to isolated cardiomyocytes would enhance contraction-relaxation function in HG more so than in nonHG controls. To better control for differential cardiac myosin isoform expression as occurs in rodents after β-islet cell necrosis, hypothyroidism was induced in 16 rats resulting in 100% β-myosin heavy chain expression in the heart. β-Islet cell necrosis was induced in half of the rats by streptozocin administration. After 6 wks of HG, both HG and nonHG controls rats demonstrated similar myofilament performance measured as thin filament calcium sensitivity, native thin filament velocity in the myosin motility assay and contractile velocity and power. Extracellular Zn2+ reduced cardiomyocyte contractile function in both groups, but enhanced relaxation function significantly in the HG group compared to controls. Most notably, a reduction in diastolic sarcomere length with increasing pacing frequencies, i.e., incomplete relaxation, was more pronounced in the HG compared to controls, but was normalized with extracellular Zn2+ application. This is a novel finding implicating that the detrimental effect of HG on cardiomyocyte Ca2+ regulation can be amelioration by Zn2+. Among the many post-translational modifications examined, only phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor (RyR at S-2808 was significantly higher in HG compared to nonHG. We did not find in our hypothyroid rats any differentiating effects of HG on myofibrillar protein phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine and advanced glycated end-products, which are often implicated as complicating factors in cardiac performance due to HG. Our

  1. The evolution of compositionally and functionally distinct actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter W; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Whitaker, Shane; Popp, David; Robinson, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    The actin filament is astonishingly well conserved across a diverse set of eukaryotic species. It has essentially remained unchanged in the billion years that separate yeast, Arabidopsis and man. In contrast, bacterial actin-like proteins have diverged to the extreme, and many of them are not readily identified from sequence-based homology searches. Here, we present phylogenetic analyses that point to an evolutionary drive to diversify actin filament composition across kingdoms. Bacteria use a one-filament-one-function system to create distinct filament systems within a single cell. In contrast, eukaryotic actin is a universal force provider in a wide range of processes. In plants, there has been an expansion of the number of closely related actin genes, whereas in fungi and metazoa diversification in tropomyosins has increased the compositional variety in actin filament systems. Both mechanisms dictate the subset of actin-binding proteins that interact with each filament type, leading to specialization in function. In this Hypothesis, we thus propose that different mechanisms were selected in bacteria, plants and metazoa, which achieved actin filament compositional variation leading to the expansion of their functional diversity. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Immunohistochemical localization of smooth muscle myosin in human spleen, lymph node, and other lymphoid tissues. Unique staining patterns in splenic white pulp and sinuses, lymphoid follicles, and certain vasculature, with ultrastructural correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkus, G. S.; Warhol, M. J.; O'Connor, E. M.; Etheridge, C. L.; Fujiwara, K.

    1986-01-01

    The anatomic distribution of smooth muscle myosin, a contractile protein, was determined in a variety of lymphoid tissues (spleen, lymph nodes, tonsils) with the use of highly specific rabbit antibodies to human uterine smooth muscle myosin and an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. In the spleen, in addition to the anticipated immunoreactivity in the walls of arteries, veins, splenic capsule, and trabeculas, other staining patterns were observed. Smooth muscle myosin-containing cells which comprised the adventitia of the trabecular arteries appeared continuous with myosin-containing reticular cells of the white pulp. The latter cells assumed a circumferential pattern within the periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths, then blended delicately with the red pulp at the marginal zone. Ultrastructurally, immunogold techniques demonstrated that smooth muscle myosin in these cells was localized to cytoplasmic filaments. Within the red pulp, a different and distinct staining pattern was observed for the splenic sinuses. Short, regular, orderly, and repetitive bands of immunoreactivity, aligned parallel to the long axis of the sinus, extended between contiguous ring fibers. By immunoelectron microscopy these structures corresponded to distinct bundles of filaments in the endothelial lining cells of the splenic sinuses. Factor VIII associated antigen was also identified in the splenic lining cells in cryostat and paraffin sections, and ultrastructurally. Within the red pulp of the spleen, the sheaths of sheathed capillaries also revealed strong immunoreactivity for smooth muscle myosin. Other sites of immunohistochemical localization of smooth muscle myosin included dendritic reticulum cells present in reactive follicles and in nodular non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Certain vascular structures, specifically sinus lining cells and Schweigger-Seidel capillary sheaths of the spleen and postcapillary venules of lymph nodes and tonsils, coexpressed smooth muscle myosin and Factor VIII

  3. Structural insight into the UNC-45–myosin complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fratev, Filip; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Pajeva, Ilza

    2013-01-01

    The UNC-45 chaperone protein interacts with and affects the folding, stability, and the ATPase activity of myosins. It plays a critical role in the cardiomyopathy development and in the breast cancer tumor growth. Here we propose the first structural model of the UNC-45–myosin complex using various...... is mainly stabilized by electrostatic interactions. Remarkably, the contact surface area is similar to that of the myosinactin complex. A significant interspecies difference in the myosin binding epitope is observed. Our results reveal the structural basis of MYH7 exons 15–16 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy...

  4. Aspergillus myosin-V supports polarized growth in the absence of microtubule-based transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, both microtubules and actin filaments are important for polarized growth at the hyphal tip. Less clear is how different microtubule-based and actin-based motors work together to support this growth. Here we examined the role of myosin-V (MYOV in hyphal growth. MYOV-depleted cells form elongated hyphae, but the rate of hyphal elongation is significantly reduced. In addition, although wild type cells without microtubules still undergo polarized growth, microtubule disassembly abolishes polarized growth in MYOV-depleted cells. Thus, MYOV is essential for polarized growth in the absence of microtubules. Moreover, while a triple kinesin null mutant lacking kinesin-1 (KINA and two kinesin-3s (UNCA and UNCB undergoes hyphal elongation and forms a colony, depleting MYOV in this triple mutant results in lethality due to a severe defect in polarized growth. These results argue that MYOV, through its ability to transport secretory cargo, can support a significant amount of polarized hyphal tip growth in the absence of any microtubule-based transport. Finally, our genetic analyses also indicate that KINA (kinesin-1 rather than UNCA (kinesin-3 is the major kinesin motor that supports polarized growth in the absence of MYOV.

  5. Entropic potential field formed for a linear-motor protein near a filament: Statistical-mechanical analyses using simple models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ken-ichi; Yoshidome, Takashi; Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2010-07-01

    We report a new progress in elucidating the mechanism of the unidirectional movement of a linear-motor protein (e.g., myosin) along a filament (e.g., F-actin). The basic concept emphasized here is that a potential field is entropically formed for the protein on the filament immersed in solvent due to the effect of the translational displacement of solvent molecules. The entropic potential field is strongly dependent on geometric features of the protein and the filament, their overall shapes as well as details of the polyatomic structures. The features and the corresponding field are judiciously adjusted by the binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to the protein, hydrolysis of ATP into adenosine diphosphate (ADP)+Pi, and release of Pi and ADP. As the first step, we propose the following physical picture: The potential field formed along the filament for the protein without the binding of ATP or ADP+Pi to it is largely different from that for the protein with the binding, and the directed movement is realized by repeated switches from one of the fields to the other. To illustrate the picture, we analyze the spatial distribution of the entropic potential between a large solute and a large body using the three-dimensional integral equation theory. The solute is modeled as a large hard sphere. Two model filaments are considered as the body: model 1 is a set of one-dimensionally connected large hard spheres and model 2 is a double helical structure formed by two sets of connected large hard spheres. The solute and the filament are immersed in small hard spheres forming the solvent. The major findings are as follows. The solute is strongly confined within a narrow space in contact with the filament. Within the space there are locations with sharply deep local potential minima along the filament, and the distance between two adjacent locations is equal to the diameter of the large spheres constituting the filament. The potential minima form a ringlike domain in model 1

  6. Anti-myosin humoral immune response following cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Scheerder, I K; de Buyzere, M L; Delanghe, J R; Clement, D L; Wieme, R J

    1989-01-01

    A sensitive and highly specific ELISA assay was developed to determine the anti-myosin humoral immune response (AMA) in various heart diseases: acute viral myocarditis, infective endocarditis, acute myocardial infarction, and valve and coronary bypass surgery. The mean study entry AMA titer of each patient group was already significantly increased compared with age matched controls. During further follow-up (90 d) all the groups except for endocarditis showed a significant increase of AMA titer compared with their entry titer. Anti-myosin antibody titer were higher after cardiac surgery than after myocardial infarction or inflammatory heart disease. These results suggest that anti-myosin immune response is not limited to infectious processes in which the pathogen induces antibodies which cross-react with heart constituents but is merely caused by direct cardiac injury. Myosin as a major compound of heart cellular proteins turned out to be a good candidate to trigger immune response after cardiac injury.

  7. Gene duplication and conversion events shaped three homologous, differentially expressed myosin regulatory light chain (MLC2) genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, L.; Overheul, G.J.; Derks, R.C.; Wieringa, B.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Wansink, D.G.

    2012-01-01

    Myosin II is a hexameric protein complex consisting of two myosin heavy chains, two myosin essential light chains and two myosin regulatory light chains. Multiple subunit isoforms exist, allowing great diversity in myosin II composition which likely impacts on its contractile properties. Little is

  8. Synthesis and functionalization of coiled carbon filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikita, Muneaki

    Coiled carbon filaments have one of the most attractive three-dimensional forms in carbon materials due to their helical morphologies. Because of their shape and carbon structure, they exhibit excellent mechanical and electrical properties such as superelasticity, low Young's modulus, relatively high electrical conductivity, and good electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption. Therefore, they are good candidates as fillers in composite materials for tactile sensor and electromagnetic interference shielding. In medical areas of interests, coiled carbon filaments can be used as micro and nano heaters or trigger for thermotherapy and biosensors using EM wave exposure because absorbed EM waves by coiled carbon filaments are converted into heat. Although various shapes of coiled carbon filaments have been discovered, optimum synthesis conditions and growth mechanisms of coiled carbon filaments are poorly understood. The study of growth kinetics is significant not only to analyze catalyst activity but also to establish the growth mechanisms of coiled carbon filaments. The establishment of growth mechanisms would be useful for determining optimum synthesis conditions and maximizing the quantity of carbon filaments synthesized for a given application. In the first study, tip grown single helical carbon filaments or carbon nanocoils (CNCs) were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition method using tin-iron-oxide (Sn-Fe-O) xerogel film catalyst. The Sn-Fe-O catalyst was prepared by a low-cost sol-gel method using stannous acetate and ferric acetate as precursors. The growth kinetics of CNCs were monitored by a thermogravimetric analyzer, and the experimental result was correlated using a one-dimensional kinetic model, corresponding to one-dimensional tip growth. In the second study, bidirectionally grown double helical filaments or carbon microcoils (CMCs) were synthesized using a chemical vapor deposition method. CMCs obtained at two reaction temperatures were compared. CMCs

  9. The tail domain of theAspergillus fumigatusclass V myosin MyoE orchestrates septal localization and hyphal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Hilary; Vargas-Muñiz, José M; Juvvadi, Praveen R; Richards, Amber D; Waitt, Greg; Soderblom, Erik J; Moseley, M Arthur; Steinbach, William J

    2018-02-07

    Myosins are critical motor proteins that contribute to the secretory pathway, polarized growth, and cytokinesis. The globular tail domains of class V myosins have been shown to be important for cargo binding and actin cable organization. Additionally, phosphorylation plays a role in class V myosin cargo choice. Our previous studies on the class V myosin MyoE in the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus confirmed its requirement for normal morphology and virulence. However, the domains and molecular mechanisms governing the functions of MyoE remain unknown. Here, by analyzing tail mutants, we demonstrate that the tail is required for radial growth, conidiation, septation frequency and MyoE's location at the septum. Furthermore, MyoE is phosphorylated at multiple residues in vivo ; however, alanine substitution mutants revealed that no single phosphorylated residue was critical. Importantly, in the absence of the phosphatase calcineurin, an additional residue was phosphorylated in its tail domain. Mutation of this tail residue led to mislocalization of MyoE from the septa. This work reveals the importance of the MyoE tail domain and its phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the growth and morphology of A. fumigatus . © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Colloidal transport by active filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Raj Kumar; Kumar, P B Sunil; Adhikari, R

    2017-01-14

    Enhanced colloidal transport beyond the limit imposed by diffusion is usually achieved through external fields. Here, we demonstrate the ballistic transport of a colloidal sphere using internal sources of energy provided by an attached active filament. The latter is modeled as a chain of chemo-mechanically active beads connected by potentials that enforce semi-flexibility and self-avoidance. The fluid flow produced by the active beads and the forces they mediate are explicitly taken into account in the overdamped equations of motion describing the colloid-filament assembly. The speed and efficiency of transport depend on the dynamical conformational states of the filament. We characterize these states using filament writhe as an order parameter and identify ones yielding maxima in speed and efficiency of transport. The transport mechanism reported here has a remarkable resemblance to the flagellar propulsion of microorganisms which suggests its utility in biomimetic systems.

  11. Colloidal transport by active filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Raj Kumar; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Adhikari, R.

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced colloidal transport beyond the limit imposed by diffusion is usually achieved through external fields. Here, we demonstrate the ballistic transport of a colloidal sphere using internal sources of energy provided by an attached active filament. The latter is modeled as a chain of chemo-mechanically active beads connected by potentials that enforce semi-flexibility and self-avoidance. The fluid flow produced by the active beads and the forces they mediate are explicitly taken into account in the overdamped equations of motion describing the colloid-filament assembly. The speed and efficiency of transport depend on the dynamical conformational states of the filament. We characterize these states using filament writhe as an order parameter and identify ones yielding maxima in speed and efficiency of transport. The transport mechanism reported here has a remarkable resemblance to the flagellar propulsion of microorganisms which suggests its utility in biomimetic systems.

  12. Constriction model of actomyosin ring for cytokinesis by fission yeast using a two-state sliding filament mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yong-Woon [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3255 (United States); Mascagni, Michael, E-mail: Mascagni@fsu.edu [Departments of Computer Science, Mathematics and Scientific Computing, and Graduate Program in Molecular Biophysics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4530 (United States)

    2014-09-28

    We developed a model describing the structure and contractile mechanism of the actomyosin ring in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The proposed ring includes actin, myosin, and α-actinin, and is organized into a structure similar to that of muscle sarcomeres. This structure justifies the use of the sliding-filament mechanism developed by Huxley and Hill, but it is probably less organized relative to that of muscle sarcomeres. Ring contraction tension was generated via the same fundamental mechanism used to generate muscle tension, but some physicochemical parameters were adjusted to be consistent with the proposed ring structure. Simulations allowed an estimate of ring constriction tension that reproduced the observed ring constriction velocity using a physiologically possible, self-consistent set of parameters. Proposed molecular-level properties responsible for the thousand-fold slower constriction velocity of the ring relative to that of muscle sarcomeres include fewer myosin molecules involved, a less organized contractile configuration, a low α-actinin concentration, and a high resistance membrane tension. Ring constriction velocity is demonstrated as an exponential function of time despite a near linear appearance. We proposed a hypothesis to explain why excess myosin heads inhibit constriction velocity rather than enhance it. The model revealed how myosin concentration and elastic resistance tension are balanced during cytokinesis in S. pombe.

  13. Enhancement of force generated by individual myosin heads in skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers at low ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugi, Haruo; Abe, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Saeki, Yasutake; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2013-01-01

    Although evidence has been presented that, at low ionic strength, myosin heads in relaxed skeletal muscle fibers form linkages with actin filaments, the effect of low ionic strength on contraction characteristics of Ca(2+)-activated muscle fibers has not yet been studied in detail. To give information about the mechanism of muscle contraction, we have examined the effect of low ionic strength on the mechanical properties and the contraction characteristics of skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in both relaxed and maximally Ca(2+)-activated states. By progressively decreasing KCl concentration from 125 mM to 0 mM (corresponding to a decrease in ionic strength μ from 170 mM to 50 mM), relaxed fibers showed changes in mechanical response to sinusoidal length changes and ramp stretches, which are consistent with the idea of actin-myosin linkage formation at low ionic strength. In maximally Ca(2+)-activated fibers, on the other hand, the maximum isometric force increased about twofold by reducing KCl concentration from 125 to 0 mM. Unexpectedly, determination of the force-velocity curves indicated that, the maximum unloaded shortening velocity Vmax, remained unchanged at low ionic strength. This finding indicates that the actin-myosin linkages, which has been detected in relaxed fibers at low ionic strength, are broken quickly on Ca(2+) activation, so that the linkages in relaxed fibers no longer provide any internal resistance against fiber shortening. The force-velocity curves, obtained at various levels of steady Ca(2+)-activated isometric force, were found to be identical if they are normalized with respect to the maximum isometric force. The MgATPase activity of muscle fibers during isometric force generation was found not to change appreciably at low ionic strength despite the two-fold increase in Ca(2+)-activated isometric force. These results can be explained in terms of enhancement of force generated by individual myosin heads, but not by any changes in

  14. Enhancement of force generated by individual myosin heads in skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers at low ionic strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruo Sugi

    Full Text Available Although evidence has been presented that, at low ionic strength, myosin heads in relaxed skeletal muscle fibers form linkages with actin filaments, the effect of low ionic strength on contraction characteristics of Ca(2+-activated muscle fibers has not yet been studied in detail. To give information about the mechanism of muscle contraction, we have examined the effect of low ionic strength on the mechanical properties and the contraction characteristics of skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in both relaxed and maximally Ca(2+-activated states. By progressively decreasing KCl concentration from 125 mM to 0 mM (corresponding to a decrease in ionic strength μ from 170 mM to 50 mM, relaxed fibers showed changes in mechanical response to sinusoidal length changes and ramp stretches, which are consistent with the idea of actin-myosin linkage formation at low ionic strength. In maximally Ca(2+-activated fibers, on the other hand, the maximum isometric force increased about twofold by reducing KCl concentration from 125 to 0 mM. Unexpectedly, determination of the force-velocity curves indicated that, the maximum unloaded shortening velocity Vmax, remained unchanged at low ionic strength. This finding indicates that the actin-myosin linkages, which has been detected in relaxed fibers at low ionic strength, are broken quickly on Ca(2+ activation, so that the linkages in relaxed fibers no longer provide any internal resistance against fiber shortening. The force-velocity curves, obtained at various levels of steady Ca(2+-activated isometric force, were found to be identical if they are normalized with respect to the maximum isometric force. The MgATPase activity of muscle fibers during isometric force generation was found not to change appreciably at low ionic strength despite the two-fold increase in Ca(2+-activated isometric force. These results can be explained in terms of enhancement of force generated by individual myosin heads, but not by any

  15. Stability of two-dimensional vorticity filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhmaidi, D.; Provenzale, A.; Lili, T.; Babiano, A.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the results of a numerical study on the stability of two-dimensional vorticity filaments around a circular vortex. We illustrate how the stability of the filaments depends on the balance between the strain associated with the far field of the vortex and the local vorticity of the filament, and we discuss an empirical criterion for filament stability

  16. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siccardi, Stefano, E-mail: ssiccardi@2ssas.it [The Unconventional Computing Centre, University of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom); Tuszynski, Jack A., E-mail: jackt@ualberta.ca [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Adamatzky, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.adamatzky@uwe.ac.uk [The Unconventional Computing Centre, University of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-08

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications. - Highlights: • We simulate interaction between voltage pulses using on actin filaments. • We use a coupled nonlinear transmission line model. • We design Boolean logical gates via interactions between the voltage pulses. • We construct one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses.

  17. A Role for Myosin Va in Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Adrian R; Sharma, Mayuri; Pesola, Jean M; Ericsson, Maria; Fernandez, Rosio; Coen, Donald M

    2018-03-15

    Herpesviruses replicate and package their genomes into capsids in replication compartments within the nuclear interior. Capsids then move to the inner nuclear membrane for envelopment and release into the cytoplasm in a process called nuclear egress. We previously found that nuclear F-actin is induced upon infection with the betaherpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and is important for nuclear egress and capsid localization away from replication compartment-like inclusions toward the nuclear rim. Despite these and related findings, it has not been shown that any specific motor protein is involved in herpesvirus nuclear egress. In this study, we have investigated whether the host motor protein, myosin Va, could be fulfilling this role. Using immunofluorescence microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation, we observed associations between a nuclear population of myosin Va and the viral major capsid protein, with both concentrating at the periphery of replication compartments. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that nearly 40% of assembled nuclear capsids associate with myosin Va. We also found that myosin Va and major capsid protein colocalize with nuclear F-actin. Importantly, antagonism of myosin Va with RNA interference or a dominant negative mutant revealed that myosin Va is important for the efficient production of infectious virus, capsid accumulation in the cytoplasm, and capsid localization away from replication compartment-like inclusions toward the nuclear rim. Our results lead us to suggest a working model whereby human cytomegalovirus capsids associate with myosin Va for movement from replication compartments to the nuclear periphery during nuclear egress. IMPORTANCE Little is known regarding how newly assembled and packaged herpesvirus capsids move from the nuclear interior to the periphery during nuclear egress. While it has been proposed that an actomyosin-based mechanism facilitates intranuclear movement of alphaherpesvirus capsids, a functional role for

  18. Oxidation of myosin by haem proteins generates myosin radicals and protein cross-links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lametsch, Marianne Lund; Luxford, Catherine; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2008-01-01

    as a result of the reaction with activated haem proteins (horseradish peroxidase/H2O2) and met-myoglobin/H2O2) has been investigated by EPR spectroscopy and amino-acid consumption, product formation has been characterized by HPLC, and changes in protein integrity have been determined by SDS/PAGE. Multiple...... of thiyl and tyrosyl radicals is consistent with the observed consumption of cysteine and tyrosine residues, the detection of di-tyrosine by HPLC and the detection of both reducible (disulfide bond) and non-reducible cross-links between myosin molecules by SDS/PAGE. The time course of radical formation...

  19. Interaction Between Troponin and Myosin Enhances Contractile Activity of Myosin in Cardiac Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Schoffstall, Brenda; LaBarbera, Vincent A.; Brunet, Nicolas M.; Gavino, Belinda J.; Herring, Lauren; Heshmati, Sara; Kraft, Brittany H.; Inchausti, Vanessa; Meyer, Nancy L.; Moonoo, Danamarie; Takeda, Aya K.; Chase, Prescott Bryant

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling in striated muscle cells is critically dependent upon thin filament proteins tropomyosin (Tm) and troponin (Tn) to regulate mechanical output. Using in vitro measurements of contractility, we demonstrate that even in the absence of actin and Tm, human cardiac Tn (cTn) enhances heavy meromyosin MgATPase activity by up to 2.5-fold in solution. In addition, cTn without Tm significantly increases, or superactivates sliding speed of filamentous actin (F-actin) in skeletal motility a...

  20. CARMA LARGE AREA STAR FORMATION SURVEY: OBSERVATIONAL ANALYSIS OF FILAMENTS IN THE SERPENS SOUTH MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-López, M.; Looney, L.; Lee, K.; Segura-Cox, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana—Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Arce, H. G.; Plunkett, A. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Mundy, L. G.; Storm, S.; Teuben, P. J.; Pound, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Isella, A.; Kauffmann, J. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tobin, J. J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Rosolowsky, E. [Departments of Physics and Statistics, University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Kwon, W. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747-AD Groningen (Netherlands); Ostriker, E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Tassis, K. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-710 03 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Shirley, Y. L., E-mail: manferna@gmail.com [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We present the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1 → 0) map of the Serpens South molecular cloud obtained as part of the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey. The observations cover 250 arcmin{sup 2} and fully sample structures from 3000 AU to 3 pc with a velocity resolution of 0.16 km s{sup –1}, and they can be used to constrain the origin and evolution of molecular cloud filaments. The spatial distribution of the N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission is characterized by long filaments that resemble those observed in the dust continuum emission by Herschel. However, the gas filaments are typically narrower such that, in some cases, two or three quasi-parallel N{sub 2}H{sup +} filaments comprise a single observed dust continuum filament. The difference between the dust and gas filament widths casts doubt on Herschel ability to resolve the Serpens South filaments. Some molecular filaments show velocity gradients along their major axis, and two are characterized by a steep velocity gradient in the direction perpendicular to the filament axis. The observed velocity gradient along one of these filaments was previously postulated as evidence for mass infall toward the central cluster, but these kind of gradients can be interpreted as projection of large-scale turbulence.

  1. Leukocytes Breach Endothelial Barriers by Insertion of Nuclear Lobes and Disassembly of Endothelial Actin Filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagi Barzilai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial cytoskeleton is a barrier for leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM. Mononuclear and polymorphonuclear leukocytes generate gaps of similar micron-scale size when squeezing through inflamed endothelial barriers in vitro and in vivo. To elucidate how leukocytes squeeze through these barriers, we co-tracked the endothelial actin filaments and leukocyte nuclei in real time. Nuclear squeezing involved either preexistent or de novo-generated lobes inserted into the leukocyte lamellipodia. Leukocyte nuclei reversibly bent the endothelial actin stress fibers. Surprisingly, formation of both paracellular gaps and transcellular pores by squeezing leukocytes did not require Rho kinase or myosin II-mediated endothelial contractility. Electron-microscopic analysis suggested that nuclear squeezing displaced without condensing the endothelial actin filaments. Blocking endothelial actin turnover abolished leukocyte nuclear squeezing, whereas increasing actin filament density did not. We propose that leukocyte nuclei must disassemble the thin endothelial actin filaments interlaced between endothelial stress fibers in order to complete TEM.

  2. Thin filament activation probed by fluorescence of N-((2-(iodoacetoxy)ethyl)-N-methyl)amino-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole-labeled troponin I incorporated into skinned fibers of rabbit psoas muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, B; Kraft, T; Yu, L C; Chalovich, J M

    1999-11-01

    A method is described for the exchange of native troponin of single rabbit psoas muscle fibers for externally applied troponin complexes without detectable impairment of functional properties of the skinned fibers. This approach is used to exchange native troponin for rabbit skeletal troponin with a fluorescent label (N-((2-(iodoacetoxy)ethyl)-N-methyl)amino-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole, IANBD) on Cys(133) of the troponin I subunit. IANBD-labeled troponin I has previously been used in solution studies as an indicator for the state of activation of reconstituted actin filaments (. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 77:7209-7213). In the skinned fibers, the fluorescence of this probe is unaffected when cross-bridges in their weak binding states attach to actin filaments but decreases either upon the addition of Ca(2+) or when cross-bridges in their strong binding states attach to actin. Maximum reduction is observed when Ca(2+) is raised to saturating concentrations. Additional attachment of cross-bridges in strong binding states gives no further reduction of fluorescence. Attachment of cross-bridges in strong binding states alone (low Ca(2+) concentration) gives only about half of the maximum reduction seen with the addition of calcium. This illustrates that fluorescence of IANBD-labeled troponin I can be used to evaluate thin filament activation, as previously introduced for solution studies. In addition, at nonsaturating Ca(2+) concentrations IANBD fluorescence can be used for straightforward classification of states of the myosin head as weak binding (nonactivating) and strong binding (activating), irrespective of ionic strength or other experimental conditions. Furthermore, the approach presented here not only can be used as a means of exchanging native skeletal troponin and its subunits for a variety of fluorescently labeled or mutant troponin subunits, but also allows the exchange of native skeletal troponin for cardiac troponin.

  3. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Actin and myosin contribute to mammalian mitochondrial DNA maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, A.; He, J.; Mao, C. C.; Bailey, L. J.; Di Re, M.; Sembongi, H.; Kazak, L.; Dzionek, K.; Holmes, J. B.; Cluett, T. J.; Harbour, M. E.; Fearnley, I. M.; Crouch, R. J.; Conti, M. A.; Adelstein, R. S.; Walker, J. E.; Holt, I. J.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA maintenance and segregation are dependent on the actin cytoskeleton in budding yeast. We found two cytoskeletal proteins among six proteins tightly associated with rat liver mitochondrial DNA: non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA and β-actin. In human cells, transient gene silencing of MYH9 (encoding non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA), or the closely related MYH10 gene (encoding non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIB), altered the topology and increased the copy number of mitochondrial DNA; and the latter effect was enhanced when both genes were targeted simultaneously. In contrast, genetic ablation of non-muscle myosin IIB was associated with a 60% decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, compared to control cells. Gene silencing of β-actin also affected mitochondrial DNA copy number and organization. Protease-protection experiments and iodixanol gradient analysis suggest some β-actin and non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA reside within human mitochondria and confirm that they are associated with mitochondrial DNA. Collectively, these results strongly implicate the actomyosin cytoskeleton in mammalian mitochondrial DNA maintenance. PMID:21398640

  5. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  6. Excessive Myosin Activity in Mbs Mutants Causes Photoreceptor Movement Out of the Drosophila Eye Disc Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Arnold; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2004-01-01

    Neuronal cells must extend a motile growth cone while maintaining the cell body in its original position. In migrating cells, myosin contraction provides the driving force that pulls the rear of the cell toward the leading edge. We have characterized the function of myosin light chain phosphatase, which down-regulates myosin activity, in Drosophila photoreceptor neurons. Mutations in the gene encoding the myosin binding subunit of this enzyme cause photoreceptors to drop out of the eye disc e...

  7. Unfolding/refolding studies of the myosin rod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozais, M; Bechet, J J

    1993-12-15

    The effect of guanidine hydrochloride on the gel-filtration chromatography, viscosity, far ultraviolet circular dichroism and fluorescence emission intensity of the myosin rod was studied under equilibrium conditions. The normalized transition curves for each of these methods were comparable with a midpoint at a guanidine hydrochloride concentration of 1.75-2 M. The curves were not, however, superposable, suggesting that the loss of helix content and the dissociation of the two chains of the myosin rod were not tightly linked. Furthermore, they were unexpectedly independent of the protein concentration over 0.05-20 microM. These phenomena are interpreted taking into account the large size of the molecule. A step-wise process is proposed as a model for the unfolding of the myosin rod.

  8. Beam distribution function after filamentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.; Decker, F.J.; Seeman, J.T.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the authors calculate the beam distribution function after filamentation (phase-mixing) of a focusing mismatch. This distribution is relevant when interpreting beam measurements and sources of emittance dilution in linear colliders. It is also important when considering methods of diluting the phase space density, which may be required for the machine protection system in future linear colliders, and it is important when studying effects of trapped ions which filament in the electron beam potential. Finally, the resulting distribution is compared with measured beam distributions from the SLAC linac.

  9. Catalytic strategy used by the myosin motor to hydrolyze ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-07-22

    Myosin is a molecular motor responsible for biological motions such as muscle contraction and intracellular cargo transport, for which it hydrolyzes adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Early steps of the mechanism by which myosin catalyzes ATP hydrolysis have been investigated, but still missing are the structure of the final ADP·inorganic phosphate (Pi) product and the complete pathway leading to it. Here, a comprehensive description of the catalytic strategy of myosin is formulated, based on combined quantum-classical molecular mechanics calculations. A full exploration of catalytic pathways was performed and a final product structure was found that is consistent with all experiments. Molecular movies of the relevant pathways show the different reorganizations of the H-bond network that lead to the final product, whose γ-phosphate is not in the previously reported HPγO4(2-) state, but in the H2PγO4(-) state. The simulations reveal that the catalytic strategy of myosin employs a three-pronged tactic: (i) Stabilization of the γ-phosphate of ATP in a dissociated metaphosphate (PγO3(-)) state. (ii) Polarization of the attacking water molecule, to abstract a proton from that water. (iii) Formation of multiple proton wires in the active site, for efficient transfer of the abstracted proton to various product precursors. The specific role played in this strategy by each of the three loops enclosing ATP is identified unambiguously. It explains how the precise timing of the ATPase activation during the force generating cycle is achieved in myosin. The catalytic strategy described here for myosin is likely to be very similar in most nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes.

  10. Myosin heavy chain expression in rabbit masseter muscle during postnatal development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredman, J. J.; Weijs, W. A.; Korfage, H. A.; Brugman, P.; Moorman, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MHC) during postnatal development was studied in the masseter muscle of the rabbit. Evidence is presented that in addition to adult fast and slow myosin, the rabbit masseter contains neonatal and 'cardiac' alpha-MHC. During postnatal growth myosin

  11. Filamentous bacteriophage fd as an antigen delivery system in vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisco, Antonella; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Peptides displayed on the surface of filamentous bacteriophage fd are able to induce humoral as well as cell-mediated immune responses, which makes phage particles an attractive antigen delivery system to design new vaccines. The immune response induced by phage-displayed peptides can be enhanced by targeting phage particles to the professional antigen presenting cells, utilizing a single-chain antibody fragment that binds dendritic cell receptor DEC-205. Here, we review recent advances in the use of filamentous phage fd as a platform for peptide vaccines, with a special focus on the use of phage fd as an antigen delivery platform for peptide vaccines in Alzheimer's Disease and cancer.

  12. Femtosecond filaments for rapid and flexible writing of Fiber-Bragg grating (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertorer, Erden; Haque, Moez; Li, Jianzhao; Herman, Peter R.

    2017-03-01

    Kerr-lens self-channelling of femtosecond laser light offers a novel high-aspect geometry for laser processing inside transparent materials. In glass materials, the laser filaments enable white-light continuum generation, scribing, nanochannel formation, and refractive index modification. In the present work, refractive index matching oils were applied around optical fiber to eliminate astigmatic aberration and thereby form highly symmetric and uniform filaments selectively in the cladding or core waveguide of standard single-mode optical fibre (SMF-28). Under tight focusing, long filaments exceeding 20 um length were formed with single pulses to sub-micron diameter. Arrays of 0.5 um spaced filaments are verified by formation of strong fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). Flexible positioning of the filament arrays within the fiber core offers wide scope for coupling to cladding and radiation modes and creating new types of in-fibre optical devices.

  13. Laser chirp effect on femtosecond laser filamentation generated for pulse compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Juyun; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Nam, Chang H

    2008-03-31

    The influence of laser chirp on the formation of femtosecond laser filamentation in Ar was investigated for the generation of few-cycle high-power laser pulses. The condition for the formation of a single filament has been carefully examined using 28-fs laser pulses with energy over 3 mJ. The filament formation and output spectrum changed very sensitively to the initial laser chirp and gas pressure. Much larger spectral broadening was obtained with positively chirped pulses, compared to the case of negatively chirped pulses that generated much longer filament, and compressed pulses of 5.5 fs with energy of 0.5 mJ were obtained from the filamentation of positively chirped 30-fs laser pulses in a single Ar cell.

  14. Magnetic helicity and active filament configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Zuccarello, F.; Poedts, S.; Soenen, A.; Zuccarello, F. P.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The role of magnetic helicity in active filament formation and destabilization is still under debate. Aims: Although active filaments usually show a sigmoid shape and a twisted configuration before and during their eruption, it is unclear which mechanism leads to these topologies. In order to provide an observational contribution to clarify these issues, we describe a filament evolution whose characteristics seem to be directly linked to the magnetic helicity transport in corona. Methods: We applied different methods to determine the helicity sign and the chirality of the filament magnetic field. We also computed the magnetic helicity transport rate at the filament footpoints. Results: All the observational signatures provided information on the positive helicity and sinistral chirality of the flux rope containing the filament material: its forward S shape, the orientation of its barbs, the bright and dark threads at 195 Å. Moreover, the magnetic helicity transport rate at the filament footpoints showed a clear accumulation of positive helicity. Conclusions: The study of this event showed a correspondence between several signatures of the sinistral chirality of the filament and several evidences of the positive magnetic helicity of the filament magnetic field. We also found that the magnetic helicity transported along the filament footpoints showed an increase just before the change of the filament shape observed in Hα images. We argued that the photospheric regions where the filament was rooted might be the preferential ways where the magnetic helicity was injected along the filament itself and where the conditions to trigger the eruption were yielded.

  15. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthu, Priya; Wang, Li; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Huang, Wenrui; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kawai, Masataka; Irving, Thomas C.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta (IIT); (Iowa); (Miami-MED)

    2012-04-02

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structural component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, but its function is poorly understood, especially the role of the cardiac specific N-terminal extension in modulating actomyosin interaction. Here, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the A57G (alanine to glycine) mutation in the cardiac ELC known to cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The function of the ELC N-terminal extension was investigated with the Tg-{Delta}43 mouse model, whose myocardium expresses a truncated ELC. Low-angle X-ray diffraction studies on papillary muscle fibers in rigor revealed a decreased interfilament spacing ({approx} 1.5 nm) and no alterations in cross-bridge mass distribution in Tg-A57G mice compared to Tg-WT, expressing the full-length nonmutated ELC. The truncation mutation showed a 1.3-fold increase in I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, indicating a shift of cross-bridge mass from the thick filament backbone toward the thin filaments. Mechanical studies demonstrated increased stiffness in Tg-A57G muscle fibers compared to Tg-WT or Tg-{Delta}43. The equilibrium constant for the cross-bridge force generation step was smallest in Tg-{Delta}43. These results support an important role for the N-terminal ELC extension in prepositioning the cross-bridge for optimal force production. Subtle changes in the ELC sequence were sufficient to alter cross-bridge properties and lead to pathological phenotypes.

  16. Self-Structured Conductive Filament Nanoheater for Chalcogenide Phase Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Byoung Kuk; Byun, Myunghwan; Kim, Seungjun; Lee, Keon Jae

    2015-06-23

    Ge2Sb2Te5-based phase-change memories (PCMs), which undergo fast and reversible switching between amorphous and crystalline structural transformation, are being utilized for nonvolatile data storage. However, a critical obstacle is the high programming current of the PCM cell, resulting from the limited pattern size of the optical lithography-based heater. Here, we suggest a facile and scalable strategy of utilizing self-structured conductive filament (CF) nanoheaters for Joule heating of chalcogenide materials. This CF nanoheater can replace the lithographical-patterned conventional resistor-type heater. The sub-10 nm contact area between the CF and the phase-change material achieves significant reduction of the reset current. In particular, the PCM cell with a single Ni filament nanoheater can be operated at an ultralow writing current of 20 μA. Finally, phase-transition behaviors through filament-type nanoheaters were directly observed by using transmission electron microscopy.

  17. Filament Winding. A Unified Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koussios, S.

    2004-01-01

    In this dissertation we have presented an overview and comprehensive treatment of several facets of the filament winding process. With the concepts of differential geometry and the theory of thin anisotropic shells of revolution, a parametric shape generator has been formulated for the design

  18. Towards filament free semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2000-01-01

    We outline physical models and simulations for suppression of self-focusing and filamentation in large aperture semiconductor lasers. The principal technical objective is to generate multi-watt CW or quasi-CW outputs with nearly diffraction limited beams, suitable for long distance free space...

  19. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The capillary thinning of filaments of a Newtonian polybutene fluid and a viscoelastic polyisobutylene solution are analyzed experimentally and by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially, a liquid sample is placed between two cylindrical plates. Then...

  20. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole

    1998-01-01

    The capillary thinning of a polymeric filament is analysed experimentally as well as by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially a liquid sample is kept between two cylindrical plates. Then the bottom plate is lowered under gravity to yield a given strain...

  1. Various Barbs in Solar Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Boris

    2017-07-01

    Interest to lateral details of the solar filament shape named barbs, motivated by their relationship to filament chirality and helicity, showed their different orientation relative to the expected direction of the magnetic field. While the majority of barbs are stretched along the field, some barbs seem to be transversal to it and are referred to as anomalous barbs. We analyse the deformation of helical field lines by a small parasitic polarity using a simple flux rope model with a force-free field. A rather small and distant source of parasitic polarity stretches the bottom parts of the helical lines in its direction creating a lateral extension of dips below the flux-rope axis. They can be considered as normal barbs of the filament. A stronger and closer source of parasitic polarity makes the flux-rope field lines to be convex below its axis and creates narrow and deep dips near its position. As a result, the narrow structure, with thin threads across it, is formed whose axis is nearly perpendicular to the field. The structure resembles an anomalous barb. Hence, the presence of anomalous barbs does not contradict the flux-rope structure of a filament.

  2. Towards filament free semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2000-01-01

    We outline physical models and simulations for suppression of self-focusing and filamentation in large aperture semiconductor lasers. The principal technical objective is to generate multi-watt CW or quasi-CW outputs with nearly diffraction limited beams, suitable for long distance free space...... propagation structures in lasers and amplifiers which suppress lateral reflections....

  3. Positrusion Filament Recycling System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TUI proposes a novel process to produce 3d printer feedstock filament out of scrap ABS on the ISS. Currently the plastic filament materials that most 3d printers use...

  4. Mouse nuclear myosin I knock-out shows interchangeability and redundancy of myosin isoforms in the cell nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Venit, Tomáš; Dzijak, Rastislav; Kalendová, Alžběta; Kahle, Michal; Rohožková, Jana; Schmidt, V.; Rülicke, T.; Rathkolb, B.; Hans, W.; Bohla, A.; Eickelberg, O.; Stoeger, T.; Wolf, E.; Yildirim, A.Ö.; Gailus-Durner, V.; Fuchs, H.; de Angelis, M.H.; Hozák, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), e61406 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020022; GA MŠk LH12143; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : nuclear myosin * myosin isoforms * cell nucleus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  5. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Huai Liang Xu; See Leang Chin

    2010-01-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence sp...

  6. Filament Winding Of Carbon/Carbon Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoy, Paul J.; Schmitigal, Wesley P.; Phillips, Wayne M.

    1991-01-01

    Improved method of winding carbon filaments for carbon/carbon composite structures less costly and labor-intensive, also produces more consistent results. Involves use of roller squeegee to ensure filaments continuously wet with resin during winding. Also involves control of spacing and resin contents of plies to obtain strong bonds between carbon filaments and carbon matrices. Lends itself to full automation and involves use of filaments and matrix-precursor resins in their simplest forms, thereby reducing costs.

  7. Solar Filaments as Tracers of Subsurface Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Filaments are clouds of relatively cool and dense gas in the solar atmosphere. ... First-tier filaments may be related to a peculiar feature of the solar dynamo. .... Still, an appeal to subsurface processes should be resisted, but surface motion models have been able to reproduce neither the pattern of filament field orientations ...

  8. Striation and convection in penumbral filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, H.C.; Scharmer, G.B.; Löfdahl, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Observations with the 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope of the flows seen in penumbral filaments are presented. Time sequences of bright filaments show overturning motions strikingly similar to those seen along the walls of small isolated structures in the active regions. The filaments show outward

  9. Solar Filaments as Tracers of Subsurface Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    according to which, probably all the magnetic flux that emerges into the photosphere is twisted. Twisted flux forms sunspots, active regions (ARs) and filaments. The twist accumulates in filaments and coronal arcades. Eventually the accumulated, highly twisted fields become unstable and erupt. From a study of filament ...

  10. Elasticity of a Filament with Kinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein

    2017-12-01

    Using the wormlike chain model, we analytically study the elasticity of a filament with kinks. We calculate the position probability density function and the force constant of a kinked filament with a general kink angle. Then, using the mathematical induction, we obtain the positional-orientational probability density function of a filament with regular kinks. For this filament, we compute the force constant in two different directions. In longitudinal direction of the filament, the force constant is proportional to the inverse of the number of the segments, i.e., 1 / m, while in transverse direction, it is proportional to 1/m^3.

  11. Thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA nanotube polymerization from single-filament measurements† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3sc53331j Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariadi, Rizal F.; Yurke, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    DNA nanotubes provide a programmable architecture for molecular self-assembly and can serve as model systems for one-dimensional biomolecular assemblies. While a variety of DNA nanotubes have been synthesized and employed as models for natural biopolymers, an extensive investigation of DNA nanotube kinetics and thermodynamics has been lacking. Using total internal reflection microscopy, DNA nanotube polymerization was monitored in real time at the single filament level over a wide range of free monomer concentrations and temperatures. The measured polymerization rates were subjected to a global nonlinear fit based on polymerization theory in order to simultaneously extract kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. For the DNA nanotubes used in this study, the association rate constant is (5.99 ± 0.15) × 105 M–1 s–1, the enthalpy is 87.9 ± 2.0 kcal mol–1, and the entropy is 0.252 ± 0.006 kcal mol–1 K–1. The qualitative and quantitative similarities between the kinetics of DNA nanotubes, actin filaments, and microtubules polymerization highlight the prospect of building complex dynamic systems from DNA molecules inspired by biological architecture. PMID:29308139

  12. UNUSUAL FILAMENTS INSIDE THE UMBRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleint, L. [High Altitude Observatory/NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Sainz Dalda, A., E-mail: kleintl@ucar.edu [Stanford-Lockheed Institute for Space Research, Stanford University, HEPL, 466 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    We analyze several unusual filamentary structures which appeared in the umbra of one of the sunspots in AR 11302. They do not resemble typical light bridges in morphology or in evolution. We analyze data from SDO/HMI to investigate their temporal evolution, Hinode/SP for photospheric inversions, IBIS for chromospheric imaging, and SDO/AIA for the overlying corona. Photospheric inversions reveal a horizontal, inverse Evershed flow along these structures, which we call umbral filaments. Chromospheric images show brightenings and energy dissipation, while coronal images indicate that bright coronal loops seem to end in these umbral filaments. These rapidly evolving features do not seem to be common, and are possibly related to the high flare-productivity of the active region. Their analysis could help to understand the complex evolution of active regions.

  13. Self-Elongation with Sequential Folding of a Filament of Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryojiro; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Katori, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    Under hard-agar and nutrient-rich conditions, a cell of Bacillus subtilis grows as a single filament owing to the failure of cell separation after each growth and division cycle. The self-elongating filament of cells shows sequential folding processes, and multifold structures extend over an agar plate. We report that the growth process from the exponential phase to the stationary phase is well described by the time evolution of fractal dimensions of the filament configuration. We propose a method of characterizing filament configurations using a set of lengths of multifold parts of a filament. Systems of differential equations are introduced to describe the folding processes that create multifold structures in the early stage of the growth process. We show that the fitting of experimental data to the solutions of equations is excellent, and the parameters involved in our model systems are determined.

  14. [Chitinolytic activity of filamentous fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubakov, A A; Kucheriavykh, P S

    2004-01-01

    The chitinolytic activity of nine species of filamentous fungi, classified with seven genera (specifically, Aspergillus, Penicillium, Trichoderma, Paecilomyces, Sporotrichum, Beaueria, and Mucor), was studied. When cultured in liquid medium containing 1% crystalline chitin, all fungi produced extracellular chitosans with activity varying from 0.2 U/mg protein (Sporotrichum olivaceum, Mucor sp., etc.) to 4.0-4.2 U/mg protein (Trichoderma lignorum, Aspergillus niger).

  15. Altered cell mechanics from the inside: dispersed single wall carbon nanotubes integrate with and restructure actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Brian D; Shams, Hengameh; Horst, Travis A; Basu, Saurav; Rape, Andrew D; Wang, Yu-Li; Rohde, Gustavo K; Mofrad, Mohammad R K; Islam, Mohammad F; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2012-05-23

    With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  16. Altered Cell Mechanics from the Inside: Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Integrate with and Restructure Actin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F. Islam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  17. Shared gene structures and clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons within the metazoan muscle myosin heavy chain genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kollmar

    Full Text Available Multicellular animals possess two to three different types of muscle tissues. Striated muscles have considerable ultrastructural similarity and contain a core set of proteins including the muscle myosin heavy chain (Mhc protein. The ATPase activity of this myosin motor protein largely dictates muscle performance at the molecular level. Two different solutions to adjusting myosin properties to different muscle subtypes have been identified so far: Vertebrates and nematodes contain many independent differentially expressed Mhc genes while arthropods have single Mhc genes with clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons (MXEs. The availability of hundreds of metazoan genomes now allowed us to study whether the ancient bilateria already contained MXEs, how MXE complexity subsequently evolved, and whether additional scenarios to control contractile properties in different muscles could be proposed, By reconstructing the Mhc genes from 116 metazoans we showed that all intron positions within the motor domain coding regions are conserved in all bilateria analysed. The last common ancestor of the bilateria already contained a cluster of MXEs coding for part of the loop-2 actin-binding sequence. Subsequently the protostomes and later the arthropods gained many further clusters while MXEs got completely lost independently in several branches (vertebrates and nematodes and species (for example the annelid Helobdella robusta and the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis. Several bilateria have been found to encode multiple Mhc genes that might all or in part contain clusters of MXEs. Notable examples are a cluster of six tandemly arrayed Mhc genes, of which two contain MXEs, in the owl limpet Lottia gigantea and four Mhc genes with three encoding MXEs in the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis. Our analysis showed that similar solutions to provide different myosin isoforms (multiple genes or clusters of MXEs or both have independently been developed

  18. Lighting the universe with filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Theuns, Tom

    2007-09-14

    The first stars in the universe form when chemically pristine gas heats as it falls into dark-matter potential wells, cools radiatively because of the formation of molecular hydrogen, and becomes self-gravitating. Using supercomputer simulations, we demonstrated that the stars' properties depend critically on the currently unknown nature of the dark matter. If the dark-matter particles have intrinsic velocities that wipe out small-scale structure, then the first stars form in filaments with lengths on the order of the free-streaming scale, which can be approximately 10(20) meters (approximately 3 kiloparsecs, corresponding to a baryonic mass of approximately 10(7) solar masses) for realistic "warm dark matter" candidates. Fragmentation of the filaments forms stars with a range of masses, which may explain the observed peculiar element abundance pattern of extremely metal-poor stars, whereas coalescence of fragments and stars during the filament's ultimate collapse may seed the supermassive black holes that lurk in the centers of most massive galaxies.

  19. Filamentous fungi: the indeterminate lifestyle and microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, D A; Paschke, M W

    2004-04-01

    The filamentous fungi have dynamic and variable hyphal structures within which cytoplasm can be moved, synthesized, and degraded, in response to changes in environmental conditions, resource availability, and resource distribution. Their study has gone through several phases. In the first phase, direct observation was emphasized without undue concern for interior structures or in the presence of cytoplasm. By the mid-1970s, single biochemical proxies (ergosterol, marker fatty acids, chitin derivatives, etc.) were being used increasingly. The use of these surrogate single measurements continues, in spite of their inability to provide information on the physical structure of the filamentous fungi. Molecular approaches also are being used, primarily through the use of bulk nucleic acid extraction and cloning. Because the sources of the nucleic acids used in such studies usually are not known, taxonomic and phylogenetic information derived by this approach cannot be linked to specific fungal structures. Recently, a greater emphasis has been placed on assessing physical aspects of indeterminate fungal growth, involving the assessment of cytoplasm-filled and evacuated (empty) hyphae. Both of these parameters are important for describing filamentous fungal growth and function. The use of phase contrast microscopy and varied general stains, as well as fluorogenic substrates with observation by epifluorescence microscopy, has made it possible to provide estimates of cytoplasm-filled hyphal lengths. Using this approach, it has been possible to evaluate the responses of the indeterminate fungal community to changes in environmental conditions, including soil management. It is now possible to obtain molecular information from individual bacteria and fungal structures (hyphae, spores, fruiting bodies) recovered from environments, making it possible to link individual fungal structures with their taxonomic and phylogenetic information. In addition, this information can be

  20. Cortical actin nodes: Their dynamics and recruitment of podosomal proteins as revealed by super-resolution and single-molecule microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Yuki M.; Tsunoyama, Taka A.; Hiramoto-Yamaki, Nao; Hirosawa, Koichiro M.; Shibata, Akihiro C. E.; Kondo, Kenichi; Tsurumune, Atsushi; Ishidate, Fumiyoshi; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2017-01-01

    Electron tomography of the plasma membrane (PM) identified several layers of cortical actin meshwork running parallel to the PM cytoplasmic surface throughout the PM. Here, cortical actin structures and dynamics were examined in living cells, using super-resolution microscopy, with (x,y)- and z-resolutions of ~140 and ~400 nm, respectively, and single-molecule imaging. The super-resolution microscopy identified sub-micron-sized actin clusters that appeared identical by both phalloidin post-fixation staining and Lifeact-mGFP expression followed by fixation, and therefore, these actin clusters were named “actin-pl-clusters”. In live cells, the actin-pl-clusters visualized by Lifeact-mGFP linked two or more actin filaments in the fine actin meshwork, acting as a node of the meshwork, and dynamically moved on/along the meshwork in a myosin II-dependent manner. Their formation depended on the Arp2/3 activities, suggesting that the movements could involve both the myosin motor activity and actin polymerization-depolymerization. The actin-pl-clusters differ from the actin nodes/asters found previously after latrunculin treatments, since myosin II and filamin A were not colocalized with the actin-pl-clusters, and the actin-pl-clusters were much smaller than the previously reported nodes/asters. The Lifeact linked to a fluorescently-labeled transmembrane peptide from syntaxin4 (Lifeact-TM) expressed in the PM exhibited temporary immobilization in the PM regions on which actin-pl-clusters and stress fibers were projected, showing that ≥66% of actin-pl-clusters and 89% of stress fibers were located in close proximity (within 3.5 nm) to the PM cytoplasmic surface. Podosome-associated cytoplasmic proteins, Tks4, Tks5, cortactin, and N-WASP, were transiently recruited to actin-pl-clusters, and thus, we propose that actin-pl-clusters also represent “actin podosome-like clusters”. PMID:29190677

  1. Oxygen vacancy chain and conductive filament formation in hafnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kan-Hao; Miao, Xiang-Shui

    2018-04-01

    The stability and aggregation mechanisms of oxygen vacancy chains are studied for hafnia using self-energy corrected density functional theory. While oxygen vacancies tend not to align along the c-axis of monoclinic HfO2, oxygen vacancy chains along a-axis and b-axis are energetically favorable, with cohesive energies of 0.05 eV and 0.03 eV per vacancy, respectively. Nevertheless, with an increase of the cross section area, intensive oxygen vacancy chains become much more stable in hafnia, which yields phase separation into Hf-clusters and HfO2. Compared with disperse single vacancy chains, intensive oxygen vacancy chains made of 4, 6, and 8 single vacancy chains are energetically more favorable by 0.17, 0.20, and 0.30 eV per oxygen vacancy, respectively. On the other hand, while a single oxygen vacancy chain exhibits a tiny electronic energy gap of around 0.5 eV, metallic conduction emerges for the intensive vacancy chain made of 8 single vacancy chains, which possesses a filament cross section area of ˜0.4 nm2. This sets a lower area limit for Hf-cluster filaments from metallic conduction point of view, but in real hafnia resistive RAM devices the cross section area of the filaments can generally be much larger (>5 nm2) for the sake of energy minimization. Our work sets up a bridge between oxygen vacancy ordering and phase separation in hafnia, and shows a clear trend of filament stabilization with larger dimensions. The results could explain the threshold switching phenomenon in hafnia when a small AFM tip was used as the top electrode, as well as the undesired multimode operation in resistive RAM cells with 3 nm-thick hafnia.

  2. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai Liang Xu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence spectra (fingerprints from the excited fragments, which can be used for the identification of various substances including chemical and biological species. On the other hand, along with the femtosecond laser filamentation, white-light supercontinuum emission in the infrared to UV range is generated, which can be used as an ideal light source for absorption Lidar. In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress concerning remote sensing of the atmosphere using femtosecond laser filamentation.

  3. Myosin Vs organize actin cables in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Libera; Chang, Fred; Martin, Sophie G

    2012-12-01

    Myosin V motors are believed to contribute to cell polarization by carrying cargoes along actin tracks. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Myosin Vs transport secretory vesicles along actin cables, which are dynamic actin bundles assembled by the formin For3 at cell poles. How these flexible structures are able to extend longitudinally in the cell through the dense cytoplasm is unknown. Here we show that in myosin V (myo52 myo51) null cells, actin cables are curled, bundled, and fail to extend into the cell interior. They also exhibit reduced retrograde flow, suggesting that formin-mediated actin assembly is impaired. Myo52 may contribute to actin cable organization by delivering actin regulators to cell poles, as myoV defects are partially suppressed by diverting cargoes toward cell tips onto microtubules with a kinesin 7-Myo52 tail chimera. In addition, Myo52 motor activity may pull on cables to provide the tension necessary for their extension and efficient assembly, as artificially tethering actin cables to the nuclear envelope via a Myo52 motor domain restores actin cable extension and retrograde flow in myoV mutants. Together these in vivo data reveal elements of a self-organizing system in which the motors shape their own tracks by transporting cargoes and exerting physical pulling forces.

  4. The role of actin and myosin during spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Kovacs, Tamas; Hu, Yan-Jun; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2011-08-01

    Spermatogenesis is a transitionary process in which the diploid spermatogonia transform into haploid mature spermatozoa. Actin and myosin have been implicated in various aspects during spermatogenesis. Actin is present in the form of monomer, oligomer and polymer within cells, the latter is called microfilament. There are five actin-containing structures during spermatogenesis, i.e., ectoplasmic specialization, acroplaxome, manchette in mammals, actin cones in Drosophila and acroframosome in Caridean shrimp. They are involved in the shaping and differentiating of spermatids. Along with spermatogenesis, the actin cytoskeletons show active remodeling in this process. Some actin binding or actin regulated proteins have been demonstrated to regulate dynamic changes of the actin-containing structures. Myosin, actin-dependent molecular motor, plays an important role during spermatogenesis, such as involving in acrosome biogenesis, vesicle transport, gene transcription and nuclear shaping. The actin cytoskeleton and actin binding/regulated proteins cooperate to facilitate spermatogenesis. In this review, we summarize the existing knowledge about the cytoskeletal structures consisting of actin, actin binding/regulated proteins and myosin during spermatogenesis.

  5. Tropomyosin isoforms bias actin track selection by vertebrate myosin Va

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sckolnick, Maria; Krementsova, Elena B.; Warshaw, David M.; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms decorate actin with distinct spatial and temporal localization patterns in cells and thus may function to sort actomyosin processes by modifying the actin track affinity for specific myosin isoforms. We examined the effect of three Tpm isoforms on the ability of myosin Va (myoVa) to engage with actin in vitro in the absence or presence of the cargo adapter melanophilin (Mlph), which links myoVa to Rab27a-melanosomes for in vivo transport. We show that both the myosin motor domain and the cargo adapter Mlph, which has an actin-binding domain that acts as a tether, are sensitive to the Tpm isoform. Actin–Tpm3.1 and actin–Tpm1.8 were equal or better tracks compared to bare actin for myoVa-HMM based on event frequency, run length, and speed. The full-length myoVa-Mlph complex showed high-frequency engagement with actin-Tpm3.1 but not with actin-Tpm1.8. Actin–Tpm4.2 excluded both myoVa-HMM and full-length myoVa-Mlph from productive interactions. Of importance, Tpm3.1 is enriched in the dendritic protrusions and cortical actin of melanocytes, where myoVa-Mlph engages in melanosome transport. These results support the hypothesis that Tpm isoforms constitute an “actin–Tpm code” that allows for spatial and temporal sorting of actomyosin function in the cell. PMID:27535431

  6. Bulkiness or aromatic nature of tyrosine-143 of actin is important for the weak binding between F-actin and myosin-ADP-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomibuchi, Yuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Uyeda, Taro Q.P. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Takeyuki, E-mail: tw007@nasu.bio.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Department of Judo Therapy, Faculty of Medical Technology, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The effect of mutation of Tyr143 that becomes more exposed on assembly was examined. •Mutation of tyrosine-143 of Dictyostelium actin changed actin polymerizability. •The bulkiness or aromatic nature of Tyr143 is important for the weak binding. •The weak interaction between myosin and actin strengthened by Tyr143Trp mutation. -- Abstract: Actin filaments (F-actin) interact with myosin and activate its ATPase to support force generation. By comparing crystal structures of G-actin and the quasi-atomic model of F-actin based on high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, the tyrosine-143 was found to be exposed more than 60 Å{sup 2} to the solvent in F-actin. Because tyrosine-143 flanks the hydrophobic cleft near the hydrophobic helix that binds to myosin, the mutant actins, of which the tyrosine-143 was replaced with tryptophan, phenylalanine, or isoleucine, were generated using the Dictyostelium expression system. It polymerized significantly poorly when induced by NaCl, but almost normally by KCl. In the presence of phalloidin and KCl, the extents of the polymerization of all the mutant actins were comparable to that of the wild-type actin so that the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity could be reliably compared. The affinity of skeletal heavy meromyosin to F-actin and the maximum ATPase activity (V{sub max}) were estimated by a double reciprocal plot. The Tyr143Trp-actin showed the higher affinity (smaller K{sub app}) than that of the wild-type actin, with the V{sub max} being almost unchanged. The K{sub app} and V{sub max} of the Tyr143Phe-actin were similar to those of the wild-type actin. However, the activation by Tyr143Ile-actin was much smaller than the wild-type actin and the accurate determination of K{sub app} was difficult. Comparison of the myosin ATPase activated by the various mutant actins at the same concentration of F-actin showed that the extent of activation correlates well with the solvent-accessible surface areas (ASA

  7. The Mysterious Case of the Missing Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections, or CMEs, are large solar eruptions that can have major debilitating impacts on society. Typically, these eruptions have the three following key structures: the leading edge, the empty chamber known as the cavity, and the filament which often is the brightest part of the CME. When we can see all three structures clearly with a coronagraph, it is called a classic three-part CME, also referred to as a 'lightbulb' CME. According to current knowledge, when a CME erupts, a filament should also erupt or lift off the Sun in order to have the bright center within the CME. However, we do not always see a filament erupt at the surface, and yet we still get a 'filament' within the coronagraph CME. To better understand what might be occurring with these missing filaments, we looked at three-part CMEs using the SOHO LASCO CME Catalog and filaments from the SDO AIA Filament Catalog in order to create a list of 50 CMEs without a listed filament erupting at the surface. For those CMEs without filaments in the list we closely inspected the AIA images for evidence of filament eruption. To ensure that there were no filaments past the limb of the Sun, we used data from the STEREO-A and STEREO-B spacecraft's to look at the Sun from other angles. We have found numerous events where no filament erupts from the surface, but we still see the classic three-part CME. We believe this may be due to an optical illusion occurring from the twisting of the flux rope.

  8. Prothrombotic skeletal muscle myosin directly enhances prothrombin activation by binding factors Xa and Va

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Hiroshi; Sinha, Ranjeet K.; Marchese, Patrizia; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; McCarty, Owen J. T.; Cohen, Mitchell J.

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that skeletal muscle myosins can directly influence blood coagulation and thrombosis, ex vivo studies of the effects of myosin on thrombogenesis in fresh human blood were conducted. Addition of myosin to blood augmented the thrombotic responses of human blood flowing over collagen-coated surfaces (300 s−1 shear rate). Perfusion of human blood over myosin-coated surfaces also caused fibrin and platelet deposition, evidencing myosin’s thrombogenicity. Myosin markedly enhanced thrombin generation in both platelet-rich plasma and platelet-poor plasma, indicating that myosin promoted thrombin generation in plasma primarily independent of platelets. In purified reaction mixtures composed only of factor Xa, factor Va, prothrombin, and calcium ions, myosin greatly enhanced prothrombinase activity. The Gla domain of factor Xa was not required for myosin’s prothrombinase enhancement. When binding of purified clotting factors to immobilized myosin was monitored using biolayer interferometry, factors Xa and Va each showed favorable binding interactions. Factor Va reduced by 100-fold the apparent Kd of myosin for factor Xa (Kd ∼0.48 nM), primarily by reducing koff, indicating formation of a stable ternary complex of myosin:Xa:Va. In studies to assess possible clinical relevance for this discovery, we found that antimyosin antibodies inhibited thrombin generation in acute trauma patient plasmas more than in control plasmas (P = .0004), implying myosin might contribute to acute trauma coagulopathy. We posit that myosin enhancement of thrombin generation could contribute either to promote hemostasis or to augment thrombosis risk with consequent implications for myosin’s possible contributions to pathophysiology in the setting of acute injuries. PMID:27421960

  9. Self-assembly of actin monomers into long filaments: Brownian dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kunkun; Shillcock, Julian; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2009-07-01

    Brownian dynamics simulations are used to study the dynamical process of self-assembly of actin monomers into long filaments containing up to 1000 actin protomers. In order to overcome the large separation of time scales between the diffusive motion of the free monomers and the relatively slow attachment and detachment processes at the two ends of the filaments, we introduce a novel rescaling procedure by which we speed all dynamical processes related to actin polymerization and depolymerization up by the same factor. In general, the actin protomers within a filament can attain three different states corresponding to a bound adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate with inorganic phosphate (ADP/P), and ADP molecule. The simplest situation that has been studied experimentally is provided by the polymerization of ADP-actin, for which all protomers are identical. This case is used to unravel certain relations between the filament's physical properties and the model parameters such as the attachment rate constant and the size of the capture zone, the detachment rate and the probability of the detached event, as well as the growth rate and waiting times between two successive attachment/detachment events. When a single filament is allowed to grow in a bath of constant concentration of free ADP-actin monomers, its growth rate increases linearly with the free monomer concentration in quantitative agreement with in vitro experiments. The results also show that the waiting time is governed by exponential distributions and that the two ends of a filament undergo biased random walks. The filament length fluctuations are described by a length diffusion constant that is found to attain a constant value at low ADP-actin concentration and to increase linearly with this concentration. It is straightforward to apply our simulation code to more complex processes such as polymerization of ATP-actin coupled to ATP hydrolysis, force generation by filaments, formation of

  10. Assembly of Superparamagnetic Filaments in External Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiachen; Song, Fan; Dobnikar, Jure

    2016-09-13

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of anchored magneto-elastic filaments in external magnetic field. The filaments are composed of a mixture of superparamagnetic and nonmagnetic colloidal beads interlinked with elastic springs. We explore the steady-state structures of filaments with various composition and bending rigidity subject to external magnetic field parallel to the surface. The interplay of elastic and induced magnetic interactions results in a rich phase behavior with morphologies reminiscent of macromolecular folding: bent filaments, loops, sheets, helicoids, and other collapsed structures. Our results provide new insights into the design of hierarchically assembled supramolecular structures with controlled response to external stimuli.

  11. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  12. Evolutionary traces decode molecular mechanism behind fast pace of myosin XI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamaladevi Divya P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoplasmic class XI myosins are the fastest processive motors known. This class functions in high-velocity cytoplasmic streaming in various plant cells from algae to angiosperms. The velocities at which they process are ten times faster than its closest class V homologues. Results To provide sequence determinants and structural rationale for the molecular mechanism of this fast pace myosin, we have compared the sequences from myosin class V and XI through Evolutionary Trace (ET analysis. The current study identifies class-specific residues of myosin XI spread over the actin binding site, ATP binding site and light chain binding neck region. Sequences for ET analysis were accumulated from six plant genomes, using literature based text search and sequence searches, followed by triple validation viz. CDD search, string-based searches and phylogenetic clustering. We have identified nine myosin XI genes in sorghum and seven in grape by sequence searches. Both the plants possess one gene product each belonging to myosin type VIII as well. During this process, we have re-defined the gene boundaries for three sorghum myosin XI genes using fgenesh program. Conclusion Molecular modelling and subsequent analysis of putative interactions involving these class-specific residues suggest a structural basis for the molecular mechanism behind high velocity of plant myosin XI. We propose a model of a more flexible switch I region that contributes to faster ADP release leading to high velocity movement of the algal myosin XI.

  13. The motility of Chara corallina myosin was inhibited reversibly by 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funaki, Keisuke; Nagata, Ayumi; Akimoto, Youka; Shimada, Kiyo; Ito, Kohji; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2004-09-01

    We studied the effects of 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) on the cytoplasmic streaming of Chara corallina and on the motility of myosin prepared from the same plant to examine whether this reagent really affects the plant class XI myosin. It was found that BDM inhibited both cytoplasmic streaming and the motility of myosin at a very similar concentration range (10-100 mM). BDM introduced directly into tonoplast-free cells also inhibited cytoplasmic streaming. These results suggested that effect of BDM on cytoplasmic streaming was exerted through myosin and not through ion channels at least in Chara corallina, though a very high concentration of BDM was required.

  14. The amino acid sequence of the light chain of Acanthamoeba myosin IC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z Y; Sakai, J; Matsudaira, P T; Baines, I C; Sellers, J R; Hammer, J A; Korn, E D

    1997-06-01

    The amino acid sequence of the light chain of Acanthamoeba myosin IC deduced from the cDNA sequence comprises 149 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 16,739. All but the 3 N-terminal residues were also determined by amino acid sequencing of the purified protein, which also showed the N-terminus to be blocked. Phylogenetic analysis shows Acanthamoeba myosin IC light chain to be more similar to the calmodulin subfamily of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins than to the myosin II essential light chain or regulatory light chain subfamilies. In pairwise comparisons, the myosin IC light chain sequence is most similar to sequences of calmodulins (approximately 50% identical) and a squid calcium-binding protein (approximately 43% identical); the sequence is approximately 37% identical to the calcium-binding essential light chain of Physarum myosin II and approximately 30% identical to the essential light chain of Acanthamoeba myosin II, and the essential light chain and regulatory light chain of Dictyostelium myosin II. The sequence predicts four helix-loop-helix domains with possible calcium-binding sites in domains I and III, suggesting that calcium may affect the activity of this unconventional myosin. This is the first report of the sequence of an unconventional myosin light chain other than calmodulin.

  15. Extracellular matrix-dependent myosin dynamics during G1-S phase cell cycle progression in hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Hansen, Linda K.

    2004-01-01

    Cell spreading and proliferation are tightly coupled in anchorage-dependent cells. While adhesion-dependent proliferation signals require an intact actin cytoskeleton, and some of these signals such as ERK activation have been characterized, the role of myosin in spreading and cell cycle progression under different extracellular matrix (ECM) conditions is not known. Studies presented here examine changes in myosin activity in freshly isolated hepatocytes under ECM conditions that promote either proliferation (high fibronectin density) or growth arrest (low fibronectin density). Three different measures were obtained and related to both spreading and cell cycle progression: myosin protein levels and association with cytoskeleton, myosin light chain phosphorylation, and its ATPase activity. During the first 48 h in culture, corresponding with transit through G1 phase, there was a six-fold increase in both myosin protein levels and myosin association with actin cytoskeleton. There was also a steady increase in myosin light chain phosphorylation and ATPase activity with spreading, which did not occur in non-spread, growth-arrested cells on low density of fibronectin. Myosin-inhibiting drugs blocked ERK activation, cyclin D1 expression, and S phase entry. Overexpression of the cell cycle protein cyclin D1 overcame both ECM-dependent and actomyosin-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that cyclin D1 is a key event downstream of myosin-dependent cell cycle regulation

  16. Subcutaneous implants of polypropylene filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, T C; Chartoff, R P; Cosgrove, S L; McCuskey, R S

    1976-11-01

    Extruded filaments of unmodified polypropylene (PP) with and without antioxidant were implanted subcutaneously in hamsters in order to determine their rate of degradation. Specimens were removed periodically during a 5 month test period and analyzed by infrared spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical testing. The analyses show that degradation beigns to occur after only a few days. Although the reaction sequence is not known, several factors suggest that the in vivo degradation process is similar to autoxidation which occurs in air or oxygen. The infrared data indicate that the hydroxyl content of the implants increases at a rate of 0.061 mg/g polypropylene per day during the initiation phase of the reaction. An induction time of 108 days was extablished. Carbonyl bonds appear after an implantation time of 50--90 days and increase therafter. Mechanical tests indicate a decrease in the dynamic loss tangent, tan delta, during the first month of implantation for unmodified polypropylene. No change in the infrared spectra or tan delta was observed, however, for implants containing an antioxidant. Thus, it is apparent that polypropylene filaments implanted subcutaneously in hamsters degrade by an oxidation process which is retarded effectively by using an antioxidant. While the findings reported are specific to subcutaneous polypropylene implants, they suggest that degradation of other systems may involve similar processes. This notion suggests directions for further research on increasing the in vivo stability of synthetic polymers. Long-term effects of polymer implantation upon tissue were not studied in this work.

  17. Filament poisoning at typical carbon nanotube deposition conditions by hot-filament CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the poisoning of tungsten filaments during the hot-filament chemical vapour deposition process at typical carbon nanotube (CNT) deposition conditions and filament temperatures ranging from 1400 to 2000 °C. The morphological...

  18. A Statistical Study of Solar Filament Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanche, Nicole; Aggarwal, Ashna; Reeves, Kathy; Kempton, Dustin James; Angryk, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013, McCauley et al. 2015) has shown a positive correlation (70-80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME’s). In this study, we attempt to use properties of the filament in order to predict whether or not a given filament will erupt. This prediction would help to better predict the occurrence of an oncoming CME. To track the evolution of a filament over time, a spatio-temporal algorithm that groups separate filament instances from the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) into filament tracks was developed. Filament features from the HEK metadata, such as length, chirality, and tilt are then combined with other physical features, such as the overlying decay index for two sets of filaments tracks - those that erupt and those that remain bound. Using statistical methods such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test and a Random Forest Classifier, we determine the effectiveness of the combined features in prediction. We conclude that there is significant overlap between the properties of filaments that erupt and those that do not, leading to predictions only ~5-10% above chance. However, the changes in features, such as a change in the filament's length over time, were determined to have the highest predictive power. We discuss the possible physical connections with the change in these features."This project has been supported by funding from the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the Division of Astronomical Sciences within the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences within the Directorate for Geosciences, under NSF award #1443061.”

  19. A First Approach to Filament Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P. E. S.; de Abreu, F. Vistulo; Simoes, R.; Dias, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive…

  20. Identification of myosin XI receptors in Arabidopsis defines a distinct class of transport vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peremyslov, Valera V; Morgun, Eva A; Kurth, Elizabeth G; Makarova, Kira S; Koonin, Eugene V; Dolja, Valerian V

    2013-08-01

    To characterize the mechanism through which myosin XI-K attaches to its principal endomembrane cargo, a yeast two-hybrid library of Arabidopsis thaliana cDNAs was screened using the myosin cargo binding domain as bait. This screen identified two previously uncharacterized transmembrane proteins (hereinafter myosin binding proteins or MyoB1/2) that share a myosin binding, conserved domain of unknown function 593 (DUF593). Additional screens revealed that MyoB1/2 also bind myosin XI-1, whereas myosin XI-I interacts with the distantly related MyoB7. The in vivo interactions of MyoB1/2 with myosin XI-K were confirmed by immunoprecipitation and colocalization analyses. In epidermal cells, the yellow fluorescent protein-tagged MyoB1/2 localize to vesicles that traffic in a myosin XI-dependent manner. Similar to myosin XI-K, MyoB1/2 accumulate in the tip-growing domain of elongating root hairs. Gene knockout analysis demonstrated that functional cooperation between myosin XI-K and MyoB proteins is required for proper plant development. Unexpectedly, the MyoB1-containing vesicles did not correspond to brefeldin A-sensitive Golgi and post-Golgi or prevacuolar compartments and did not colocalize with known exocytic or endosomal compartments. Phylogenomic analysis suggests that DUF593 emerged in primitive land plants and founded a multigene family that is conserved in all flowering plants. Collectively, these findings indicate that MyoB are membrane-anchored myosin receptors that define a distinct, plant-specific transport vesicle compartment.

  1. Myosin Va is developmentally regulated and expressed in the human cerebellum from birth to old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.R. Souza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Myosin Va functions as a processive, actin-based motor molecule highly enriched in the nervous system, which transports and/or tethers organelles, vesicles, and mRNA and protein translation machinery. Mutation of myosin Va leads to Griscelli disease that is associated with severe neurological deficits and a short life span. Despite playing a critical role in development, the expression of myosin Va in the central nervous system throughout the human life span has not been reported. To address this issue, the cerebellar expression of myosin Va from newborns to elderly humans was studied by immunohistochemistry using an affinity-purified anti-myosin Va antibody. Myosin Va was expressed at all ages from the 10th postnatal day to the 98th year of life, in molecular, Purkinje and granular cerebellar layers. Cerebellar myosin Va expression did not differ essentially in localization or intensity from childhood to old age, except during the postnatal developmental period. Structures resembling granules and climbing fibers in Purkinje cells were deeply stained. In dentate neurons, long processes were deeply stained by anti-myosin Va, as were punctate nuclear structures. During the first postnatal year, myosin Va was differentially expressed in the external granular layer (EGL. In the EGL, proliferating prospective granule cells were not stained by anti-myosin Va antibody. In contrast, premigratory granule cells in the EGL stained moderately. Granule cells exhibiting a migratory profile in the molecular layer were also moderately stained. In conclusion, neuronal myosin Va is developmentally regulated, and appears to be required for cerebellar function from early postnatal life to senescence.

  2. Myosin-1A Targets to Microvilli Using Multiple Membrane Binding Motifs in the Tail Homology 1 (TH1) Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerik, Jessica N.; Tyska, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most abundant components of the enterocyte brush border is the actin-based monomeric motor, myosin-1a (Myo1a). Within brush border microvilli, Myo1a carries out a number of critical functions at the interface between membrane and actin cytoskeleton. Proper physiological function of Myo1a depends on its ability to bind to microvillar membrane, an interaction mediated by a C-terminal tail homology 1 (TH1) domain. However, little is known about the mechanistic details of the Myo1a-TH1/membrane interaction. Structure-function analysis of Myo1a-TH1 targeting in epithelial cells revealed that an N-terminal motif conserved among class I myosins and a C-terminal motif unique to Myo1a-TH1 are both required for steady state microvillar enrichment. Purified Myo1a bound to liposomes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, with moderate affinity in a charge-dependent manner. Additionally, peptides of the N- and C-terminal regions required for targeting were able to compete with Myo1a for binding to highly charged liposomes in vitro. Single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed that these motifs are also necessary for slowing the membrane detachment rate in cells. Finally, Myo1a-TH1 co-localized with both lactadherin-C2 (a phosphatidylserine-binding protein) and PLCδ1-PH (a phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding protein) in microvilli, but only lactaderin-C2 expression reduced brush border targeting of Myo1a-TH1. Together, our results suggest that Myo1a targeting to microvilli is driven by membrane binding potential that is distributed throughout TH1 rather than localized to a single motif. These data highlight the diversity of mechanisms that enable different class I myosins to target membranes in distinct biological contexts. PMID:22367206

  3. Theory of Semiflexible Filaments and Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanlong Meng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We briefly review the recent developments in the theory of individual semiflexible filaments, and of a crosslinked network of such filaments, both permanent and transient. Starting from the free energy of an individual semiflexible chain, models on its force-extension relation and other mechanical properties such as Euler buckling are discussed. For a permanently crosslinked network of filaments, theories on how the network responds to deformation are provided, with a focus on continuum approaches. Characteristic features of filament networks, such as nonlinear stress-strain relation, negative normal stress, tensegrity, and marginal stability are discussed. In the new area of transient filament network, where the crosslinks can be dynamically broken and re-formed, we show some recent attempts for understanding the dynamics of the crosslinks, and the related rheological properties, such as stress relaxation, yield stress and plasticity.

  4. Epithelial Intermediate Filaments: Guardians against Microbial Infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Geisler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are abundant cytoskeletal components of epithelial tissues. They have been implicated in overall stress protection. A hitherto poorly investigated area of research is the function of intermediate filaments as a barrier to microbial infection. This review summarizes the accumulating knowledge about this interaction. It first emphasizes the unique spatial organization of the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton in different epithelial tissues to protect the organism against microbial insults. We then present examples of direct interaction between viral, bacterial, and parasitic proteins and the intermediate filament system and describe how this affects the microbe-host interaction by modulating the epithelial cytoskeleton, the progression of infection, and host response. These observations not only provide novel insights into the dynamics and function of intermediate filaments but also indicate future avenues to combat microbial infection.

  5. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  6. Kinetics of filamentous phage assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploss, Martin; Kuhn, Andreas

    2010-12-01

    Filamentous phages release their progeny particles by a secretory process without lysing the bacterial cell. By this process about 6 viral particles per min are secreted from each cell. We show here that when the major coat protein (gp8) is provided from a plasmid we observe a phage progeny production rate depending on the induction of gp8 by IPTG. We also show that a transfection of Escherichia coli lacking F-pili is observed using a mutant of M13 that carries an ampicillin resistance gene, and phage particles are secreted in the absence of an F-plasmid. Extruding phage was visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using gold-labeled antibodies to the major coat protein.

  7. Filamentous Growth in Eremothecium Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Therese

    , this thesis deals with some of the aspects of hyphal growth, which is an important virulence factor for pathogenic fungi infecting both humans and plants. Hyphal establishment through continuous polar growth is a complex process, requiring the careful coordination of a large subset of proteins involved...... in polarity establishment and maintenance, cytoskeleton dynamics and intracellular transport. The first part of this thesis addresses the A. gossypii Arf3 small GTPase and its GEF- and GAP regulators; Yel1 and Gts1, which has been implicated in polar growth in a wide range of organisms. We could demonstrate......-regulatory activity of AgGts1, the protein could have additional actin organizing properties. In the second and third part, this thesis addresses the use of A. gossypii and its relative E. cymbalariae as model organisms for filamentous growth. A series of assays analyzed the capability of Eremothecium genus fungi...

  8. Polar patterns of driven filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Volker; Weber, Christoph; Semmrich, Christine; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R

    2010-09-02

    The emergence of collective motion exhibited by systems ranging from flocks of animals to self-propelled microorganisms to the cytoskeleton is a ubiquitous and fascinating self-organization phenomenon. Similarities between these systems, such as the inherent polarity of the constituents, a density-dependent transition to ordered phases or the existence of very large density fluctuations, suggest universal principles underlying pattern formation. This idea is followed by theoretical models at all levels of description: micro- or mesoscopic models directly map local forces and interactions using only a few, preferably simple, interaction rules, and more macroscopic approaches in the hydrodynamic limit rely on the systems' generic symmetries. All these models characteristically have a broad parameter space with a manifold of possible patterns, most of which have not yet been experimentally verified. The complexity of interactions and the limited parameter control of existing experimental systems are major obstacles to our understanding of the underlying ordering principles. Here we demonstrate the emergence of collective motion in a high-density motility assay that consists of highly concentrated actin filaments propelled by immobilized molecular motors in a planar geometry. Above a critical density, the filaments self-organize to form coherently moving structures with persistent density modulations, such as clusters, swirls and interconnected bands. These polar nematic structures are long lived and can span length scales orders of magnitudes larger than their constituents. Our experimental approach, which offers control of all relevant system parameters, complemented by agent-based simulations, allows backtracking of the assembly and disassembly pathways to the underlying local interactions. We identify weak and local alignment interactions to be essential for the observed formation of patterns and their dynamics. The presented minimal polar-pattern-forming system

  9. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a comparative analysis of two filaments that showed a quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) were made to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17 - 20 (SOL2013-08-17) and September 29 (SOL2013-09-29). The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4×1021 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest a similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed three days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2×1020 Mx, about one order of magnitude lower than that of the first event. Two patches of parasitic polarity in the vicinity of the barb merged, then cancelled with nearby network fields. About 20 hours after the onset of the emergence, the filament erupted. Our findings imply that the location of emerging flux within the filament channel is probably crucial to filament evolution. If the flux emergence appears nearby the barbs, it is highly likely that the emerging flux and the filament magnetic fields will cancel, which may lead to the eruption of the filament. The comparison of the two events shows that the emergence of a small AR may still not be enough to disrupt the stability of a filament system, and the actual eruption only occurs after the flux cancellation sets in.

  10. Myosin VIIA mutation screening in 189 Usher syndrome type 1 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, M.D.; Kelley, P.M.; Overbeck, L.D. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    Usher syndrome type 1b (USH1B) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital profound hearing loss, vestibular abnormalities, and retinitis pigmentosa. The disorder has recently been shown to be caused by mutations in the myosin VIIa gene (MYO7A) located on 11q14. In the current study, a panel of 189 genetically independent Usher I cases were screened for the presence of mutations in the N-terminal coding portion of the motor domain of MYO7A by heteroduplex analysis of 14 exons. Twenty-three mutations were found segregating with the disease in 20 families. Of the 23 mutations, 13 were unique, and 2 of the 13 unique mutations (Arg212His and Arg212Cys) accounted for the greatest percentage of observed mutant alleles (8/23, 31%). Six of the 13 mutations caused premature stop codons, 6 caused changes in the amino acid sequence of the myosin VIIa protein, and 1 resulted in a splicing defect. Three patients were homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for mutant alleles; these three cases were Tyr333Stop/Tyr333Stop, Arg212His-Arg302His/Arg212His-Arg302His, and IVS13nt-8c{r_arrow}g/ G1u450Gln. All the other USH1B mutations observed were simple heterozygotes, and it is presumed that the mutation on the other allele is present in the unscreened regions of the gene. None of the mutations reported here were observed in 96 unrelated control samples, although several polymorphisms were detected. These results add three patients to a single case reported previously where mutations have been found in both alleles and raises the total number of unique mutations in MYO7A to 16. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Investigation of flexibility in Myosin V using a new 3D mechanical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghshenas-Jaryani, Mahdi

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents the development of a three dimensional rigid multibody model for the simulation and analysis of motor protein locomotion. The interesting aspect of this model is that it retains the mass properties, in contrast to the commonly used models which omit mass properties at the nano scale. The disproportionate size of the small mass of Myosin V relative to the large viscous friction forces requires a small integration step size that leads to a long simulation run time; however, the proposed model can be numerically integrated in a reasonable amount of time. This paper discusses modeling flexibility in the protein as an extension of the original rigid body model. Empirical studies have shown that Myosin V's neck domain can be considered as three pairs of tandem elements called IQ motifs which can bending at junctures between them. Therefore, each neck is modeled by three rigid bodies connected by ball-and-socket joints together, rather than single rigid body has been used in the previous works. Euler parameters are used to model the orientation of bodies in order to eliminate singularities in the description of orientation. In order to accomplish this, the equations of motion are reduced to minimal form using changing holonomic and non-holonomic constraints applied to the model which represent the normalization of the Euler parameters as well as contact and impact non-penetration conditions. The differences between the dynamic behavior of the new mechanical model, with flexible neck domains, and the original rigid body model are compared using simulation results.

  12. Reduction in beta-myosin heavy chains in stunned myocardium as assessed by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, S C; Pomblum, V J; Gams, E; Rupp, H; Schipke, J D

    2007-09-01

    Myosin plays a key role in the structure and function of cardiac muscle. Three myosin isoenzymes (V(1), V(2), and V(3)) with different ATPase activities have been identified in mammalian ventricles based on their heavy chain constituents. The relative amount of myosin isoenzymes changes under physiological and pathological conditions. Until now, myosin isoenzymes have frequently been determined using either tube gel (nondenaturing) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), or gradient or uniform sodium dodecyl sulfate (denaturing) PAGE. Both methods have disadvantages, e.g., a long running time. We developed, therefore, a uniform, nondenaturing PAGE with slab minigel format for analyzing the myosin isoenzymes in normoxic and stunned rabbit hearts. In normoxic hearts of adult rabbits, V(3) predominated over V(1) (46 vs 41%). In turn, in the stunned hearts, V(1) predominated over V(3) (70 vs 30%), and the heterodimeric V(2) was not anymore detectable. This alteration appears to result from a selective loss of myosin heavy chain (MHC)-beta. In parallel, the biochemical markers troponin I and creatine kinase were increased in the stunned hearts. We suggest that alterations of myosin isoenzymes in stunned myocardium can be monitored with native PAGE. The present analysis of myosin isoenzyme appears thus as a new tool for evaluating defects in MHC dimer formation in postischemic hearts.

  13. The splitted laser beam filamentation in interaction of laser and an exponential decay inhomogeneous underdense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Xiongping; Yi Lin; Xu Bin; Lu Jianduo

    2011-01-01

    The splitted beam filamentation in interaction of laser and an exponential decay inhomogeneous underdense plasma is investigated. Based on Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation and paraxial/nonparaxial ray theory, simulation results show that the steady beam width and single beam filamentation along the propagation distance in paraxial case is due to the influence of ponderomotive nonlinearity. In nonparaxial case, the influence of the off-axial of α 00 and α 02 (the departure of the beam from the Gaussian nature) and S 02 (the departure from the spherical nature) results in more complicated ponderomotive nonlinearity and changing of the channel density and refractive index, which led to the formation of two/three splitted beam filamentation and the self-distortion of beam width. In addition, influence of several parameters on two/three splitted beam filamentation is discussed.

  14. Nuclear myosin is ubiquitously expressed and evolutionary conserved in vertebrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kahle, Michal; Přidalová, Jarmila; Špaček, M.; Dzijak, Rastislav; Hozák, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 127, č. 2 (2007), s. 139-184 ISSN 0948-6143 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/04/0108; GA AV ČR IAA5039202; GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR GD204/05/H023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Nuclear myosin I * Transcription * Chromatin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.893, year: 2007

  15. Lifetime of titanium filament at constant current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, T.S.; Lanni, C.

    1981-01-01

    Titanium Sublimation Pump (TSP) represents the most efficient and the least expensive method to produce Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) in storage rings. In ISABELLE, a proton storage accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, for example, TSP provides a pumping speed for hydrogen of > 2 x 10 6 l/s. Due to the finite life of titanium filaments, new filaments have to be switched in before the end of filament burn out, to ensure smooth operation of the accelerator. Therefore, several operational modes that can be used to activate the TSP were studied. The constant current mode is a convenient way of maintaining constant evaporating rate by increasing the power input while the filament diameter decreases as titanium evaporates. The filaments used in this experiment were standard Varian 916-0024 filaments made of Ti 85%, Mo 15% alloy. During their lifetime at a constant current of 48 amperes, the evaporation rate rose to a maximum at about 10% of their life and then flattened out to a constant value, 0.25 g/hr. The maximum evaporation rate occurs coincidently with the recrystallization of 74% Ti 26% Mo 2 from microstructure crystalline at higher titanium concentration to macrostructure crystalline at lower titanium concentration. As the macrocrystal grows, the slip plane develops at the grain boundary resulting in high resistance at the slip plane which will eventually cause the filament burn out due to local heating

  16. Linear viscoelastic characterization from filament stretching rheometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Sara Lindeblad; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Hassager, Ole

    Traditionally, linear viscoelasticity is measured using small amplitude oscillatory shear flow. Due to experimental difficulties, shear flows are predominately confined to the linear and mildly nonlinear regime. On the other hand, extensional flows have proven more practical in measuring viscoela......Traditionally, linear viscoelasticity is measured using small amplitude oscillatory shear flow. Due to experimental difficulties, shear flows are predominately confined to the linear and mildly nonlinear regime. On the other hand, extensional flows have proven more practical in measuring...... viscoelasticity well into the nonlinear regime. Therefore at present, complete rheological characterization of a material requires two apparatuses: a shear and an extensional rheometer. This work is focused on developing a linear viscoelastic protocol for the filament stretching rheometer (FSR) in order...... to measure both linear and nonlinear dynamics on a single apparatus. With a software modification to the FSR motor control, we show that linear viscoelasticity can be measured via small amplitude squeeze flow (SASF). Squeeze flow is a combination of both shear and extensional flow applied by axially...

  17. Filaments in simulations of molecular cloud formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, Gilberto C.; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Morelia Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2014-08-20

    We report on the filaments that develop self-consistently in a new numerical simulation of cloud formation by colliding flows. As in previous studies, the forming cloud begins to undergo gravitational collapse because it rapidly acquires a mass much larger than the average Jeans mass. Thus, the collapse soon becomes nearly pressureless, proceeding along its shortest dimension first. This naturally produces filaments in the cloud and clumps within the filaments. The filaments are not in equilibrium at any time, but instead are long-lived flow features through which the gas flows from the cloud to the clumps. The filaments are long-lived because they accrete from their environment while simultaneously accreting onto the clumps within them; they are essentially the locus where the flow changes from accreting in two dimensions to accreting in one dimension. Moreover, the clumps also exhibit a hierarchical nature: the gas in a filament flows onto a main, central clump but other, smaller-scale clumps form along the infalling gas. Correspondingly, the velocity along the filament exhibits a hierarchy of jumps at the locations of the clumps. Two prominent filaments in the simulation have lengths ∼15 pc and masses ∼600 M {sub ☉} above density n ∼ 10{sup 3} cm{sup –3} (∼2 × 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} at n > 50 cm{sup –3}). The density profile exhibits a central flattened core of size ∼0.3 pc and an envelope that decays as r {sup –2.5} in reasonable agreement with observations. Accretion onto the filament reaches a maximum linear density rate of ∼30 M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} pc{sup –1}.

  18. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scannapieco, Evan [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253, but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  19. Morphological, histochemical, and myosin isoform analysis of the diaphragm of adult horses, Equus caballus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, M A; Schutt, W A; Hermanson, J W

    1994-03-01

    The horse provides an interesting model for study of the structure and function of the mammalian diaphragm. Multiple regions of diaphragm from seven adult horses were prepared for histochemistry, immunocytochemistry, myosin heavy chain electrophoresis, and native myosin electrophoresis. Two additional adults were dissected to demonstrate myofiber and central tendon morphology and stained for acetylcholinesterase to demonstrate motor endplates. All regions of the adult diaphragm were histochemically characterized by a preponderance of type I fibers with some type IIa fibers. Type IIb fibers were absent in all adult specimens. Myosin heavy chain electrophoresis supported the histochemical study: two isoform bands were present on SDS gels that comigrated at the same rate as rat type I and IIa myosin heavy chain isoforms. No isoform was determined to comigrate with rat type IIb heavy chain isoforms. Native myosin isoform analysis revealed two isoforms that comigrated with rat FM-4 and FM-3 (FM = fast myosin) and two isoforms that comigrated with rat SM-1 and SM-2 (SM = slow myosin) isoforms. In some samples, a third slow native myosin isoform was observed that comigrated at the same rate as the SM-3 of the equine biceps brachii muscle. This doublet (or "triplet") of slow isoforms is unique to some horse muscles compared with other adult animals studied. It is not known if these multiple slow native myosin isoforms confer some functional advantage to the equine muscles. The adult equine diaphragm also differs in its morphology by having a large central tendon compared to that in other mammals, and is predominantly slow in fiber type and myosin isoform composition.

  20. Current filamentation in high-current diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, A.V.; Kuksov, P.V.; Fanchenko, S.D.; Shuvaev, V.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental data are reported on the filamentation of a high-current relativistic electron beam in the Kal'mar-1 relativistic-electron-beam source. A possible mechanism for this filamentation is studied theoretically. It is shown that the experimental results on the number of filaments into which the relativistic electron beam breaks up can be explained on the basis of an azimuthal nonuniformity of the current. This nonuniformity develops in the plasma near the cathode as the result of a Rayleigh--Taylor electron instability

  1. Membrane Buckling Induced by Curved Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Martin; Crow, Daniel J. G.; Joanny, Jean-François

    2009-07-01

    We present a novel buckling instability relevant to membrane budding in eukaryotic cells. In this mechanism, curved filaments bind to a lipid bilayer without changing its intrinsic curvature. As more and more filaments adsorb, newly added ones are more and more strained, which destabilizes the flat membrane. We perform a linear stability analysis of filament-dressed membranes and find that the buckling threshold is within reasonable in vivo parameter values. We account for the formation of long tubes previously observed in cells and in purified systems. We study strongly deformed dressed membranes and their bifurcation diagram numerically. Our mechanism could be validated by a simple experiment.

  2. Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium is associated with a de novo mutation in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit S Budde

    Full Text Available Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium (NVM is the morphological hallmark of a rare familial or sporadic unclassified heart disease of heterogeneous origin. NVM results presumably from a congenital developmental error and has been traced back to single point mutations in various genes. The objective of this study was to determine the underlying genetic defect in a large German family suffering from NVM. Twenty four family members were clinically assessed using advanced imaging techniques. For molecular characterization, a genome-wide linkage analysis was undertaken and the disease locus was mapped to chromosome 14ptel-14q12. Subsequently, two genes of the disease interval, MYH6 and MYH7 (encoding the alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain, respectively were sequenced, leading to the identification of a previously unknown de novo missense mutation, c.842G>C, in the gene MYH7. The mutation affects a highly conserved amino acid in the myosin subfragment-1 (R281T. In silico simulations suggest that the mutation R281T prevents the formation of a salt bridge between residues R281 and D325, thereby destabilizing the myosin head. The mutation was exclusively present in morphologically affected family members. A few members of the family displayed NVM in combination with other heart defects, such as dislocation of the tricuspid valve (Ebstein's anomaly, EA and atrial septal defect (ASD. A high degree of clinical variability was observed, ranging from the absence of symptoms in childhood to cardiac death in the third decade of life. The data presented in this report provide first evidence that a mutation in a sarcomeric protein can cause noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium.

  3. Dwell time distributions of the molecular motor myosin V.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Bierbaum

    Full Text Available The dwell times between two successive steps of the two-headed molecular motor myosin V are governed by non-exponential distributions. These distributions have been determined experimentally for various control parameters such as nucleotide concentrations and external load force. First, we use a simplified network representation to determine the dwell time distributions of myosin V, with the associated dynamics described by a Markov process on networks with absorbing boundaries. Our approach provides a direct relation between the motor's chemical kinetics and its stepping properties. In the absence of an external load, the theoretical distributions quantitatively agree with experimental findings for various nucleotide concentrations. Second, using a more complex branched network, which includes ADP release from the leading head, we are able to elucidate the motor's gating effect. This effect is caused by an asymmetry in the chemical properties of the leading and the trailing head of the motor molecule. In the case of an external load acting on the motor, the corresponding dwell time distributions reveal details about the motor's backsteps.

  4. Novel Actin-like Filament Structure from Clostridium tetani*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, David; Narita, Akihiro; Lee, Lin Jie; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Xue, Bo; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K.; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Robinson, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic F-actin is constructed from two protofilaments that gently wind around each other to form a helical polymer. Several bacterial actin-like proteins (Alps) are also known to form F-actin-like helical arrangements from two protofilaments, yet with varied helical geometries. Here, we report a unique filament architecture of Alp12 from Clostridium tetani that is constructed from four protofilaments. Through fitting of an Alp12 monomer homology model into the electron microscopy data, the filament was determined to be constructed from two antiparallel strands, each composed of two parallel protofilaments. These four protofilaments form an open helical cylinder separated by a wide cleft. The molecular interactions within single protofilaments are similar to F-actin, yet interactions between protofilaments differ from those in F-actin. The filament structure and assembly and disassembly kinetics suggest Alp12 to be a dynamically unstable force-generating motor involved in segregating the pE88 plasmid, which encodes the lethal tetanus toxin, and thus a potential target for drug design. Alp12 can be repeatedly cycled between states of polymerization and dissociation, making it a novel candidate for incorporation into fuel-propelled nanobiopolymer machines. PMID:22514279

  5. Novel actin-like filament structure from Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, David; Narita, Akihiro; Lee, Lin Jie; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Xue, Bo; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Robinson, Robert C

    2012-06-15

    Eukaryotic F-actin is constructed from two protofilaments that gently wind around each other to form a helical polymer. Several bacterial actin-like proteins (Alps) are also known to form F-actin-like helical arrangements from two protofilaments, yet with varied helical geometries. Here, we report a unique filament architecture of Alp12 from Clostridium tetani that is constructed from four protofilaments. Through fitting of an Alp12 monomer homology model into the electron microscopy data, the filament was determined to be constructed from two antiparallel strands, each composed of two parallel protofilaments. These four protofilaments form an open helical cylinder separated by a wide cleft. The molecular interactions within single protofilaments are similar to F-actin, yet interactions between protofilaments differ from those in F-actin. The filament structure and assembly and disassembly kinetics suggest Alp12 to be a dynamically unstable force-generating motor involved in segregating the pE88 plasmid, which encodes the lethal tetanus toxin, and thus a potential target for drug design. Alp12 can be repeatedly cycled between states of polymerization and dissociation, making it a novel candidate for incorporation into fuel-propelled nanobiopolymer machines.

  6. Caldesmon inhibits the actin-myosin interaction by changing its spatial orientation and mobility during the ATPase activity cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Natalia; Pronina, Olga E; Dabrowska, Renata; Borovikov, Yurii S

    2007-06-01

    Orientation and mobility of acrylodan fluorescent probe specifically bound to caldesmon Cys580 incorporated into muscle ghost fibers decorated with myosin S1 and containing tropomyosin was studied in the presence or absence of MgADP, MgAMP-PNP, MgATPgammaS or MgATP. Modeling of various intermediate states of actomyosin has shown discrete changes in orientation and mobility of the dye dipoles which is the evidence for multistep changes in the structural changes of caldesmon during the ATPase hydrolysis cycle. It is suggested that S1 interaction with actin results in nucleotide-dependent displacement of the C-terminal part of caldesmon molecule and changes in its mobility. Thus inhibition of the actomyosin ATPase activity may be due to changes in caldesmon position on the thin filament and its interaction with actin. Our new findings described in the present paper as well as those published recently elsewhere might conciliate the two existing models of molecular mechanism of inhibition of the actomyosin ATPase by caldesmon.

  7. Two-step solar filament eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B.

    2018-04-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are closely related to eruptive filaments and usually are the continuation of the same eruptive process into the upper corona. There are failed filament eruptions when a filament decelerates and stops at some greater height in the corona. Sometimes the filament after several hours starts to rise again and develops into the successful eruption with a CME formation. We propose a simple model for the interpretation of such two-step eruptions in terms of equilibrium of a flux rope in a two-scale ambient magnetic field. The eruption is caused by a slow decrease of the holding magnetic field. The presence of two critical heights for the initiation of the flux-rope vertical instability allows the flux rope to stay after the first jump some time in a metastable equilibrium near the second critical height. If the decrease of the ambient field continues, the next eruption step follows.

  8. Intense EM filamentation in relativistic hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qiang-Lin [Department of Physics, Jinggangshan University, Ji' an, Jiangxi 343009 (China); Chen, Zhong-Ping [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Mahajan, Swadesh M., E-mail: mahajan@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Department of Physics, School of Natural Sciences, Shiv Nadar University, Uttar Pradesh 201314 (India)

    2017-03-03

    Highlights: • Breaking up of an intense EM pulse into filaments is a spectacular demonstration of the nonlinear wave-plasma interaction. • Filaments are spectacularly sharper, highly extended and longer lived at relativistic temperatures. • EM energy concentration can trigger new nonlinear phenomena with absolute consequences for high energy density matter. - Abstract: Through 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we demonstrate that the nature of filamentation of a high intensity electromagnetic (EM) pulse propagating in an underdense plasma, is profoundly affected at relativistically high temperatures. The “relativistic” filaments are sharper, are dramatically extended (along the direction of propagation), and live much longer than their lower temperature counterparts. The thermally boosted electron inertia is invoked to understand this very interesting and powerful phenomenon.

  9. Evaluation of various fabrication techniques for fabrication of fine filament NbTi superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanlan, R.M.; Royet, J.; Hannaford, R.

    1986-09-01

    The successful fabrication of a fine filament high current density NbTi superconductor can have a significant impact on the cost of the Superconducting Supercollider. Consequently, we have been exploring various approaches for fabricating this type of superconductor, in collaboration with several superconductor wire manufacturers. The techniques investigated include double conventional hot extrusion, large single stack conventional hot extrusion, large single stack conventional hot extrusion, and warm hydrostatic extrusion. The important conductor properties (critical current density, piece length, yield, and cost) will be compared for the various approaches. Finally, the feasibility of manufacturing production quantities of a fine filament conductor will be assessed

  10. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Middelveen MJ; Stricker RB

    2016-01-01

    Marianne J Middelveen, Raphael B Stricker International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they resu...

  11. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchel Alioscha-Perez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale. Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i first the input image is decomposed into a 'cartoon' part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii on the 'cartoon' image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in

  12. Can we determine the filament chirality by the filament footpoint location or the barb-bearing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang; Fang, Cheng; Chen, Peng-Fei; Cao, Wen-Da

    2016-01-01

    We attempt to propose a method for automatically detecting the solar filament chirality and barb bearing. We first introduce the concept of an unweighted undirected graph and adopt the Dijkstra shortest path algorithm to recognize the filament spine. Then, we use the polarity inversion line (PIL) shift method for measuring the polarities on both sides of the filament, and employ the connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculate the angle between each barb and the spine to determine the bearing of the barbs, i.e., left or right. We test the automatic detection method with Hα filtergrams from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) Hα archive and magnetograms observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Four filaments are automatically detected and illustrated to show the results. The barbs in different parts of a filament may have opposite bearings. The filaments in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere) mainly have left-bearing (right-bearing) barbs and positive (negative) magnetic helicity, respectively. The tested results demonstrate that our method is efficient and effective in detecting the bearing of filament barbs. It is demonstrated that the conventionally believed one-to-one correspondence between filament chirality and barb bearing is not valid. The correct detection of the filament axis chirality should be done by combining both imaging morphology and magnetic field observations.

  13. Can we determine the filament chirality by the filament footpoint location or the barb-bearing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang; Fang, Cheng; Chen, Peng-Fei; Cao, Wen-Da

    2016-01-01

    We attempt to propose a method for automatically detecting the solar filament chirality and barb bearing. We first introduce the concept of an unweighted undirected graph and adopt the Dijkstra shortest path algorithm to recognize the filament spine. Then, we use the polarity inversion line (PIL) shift method for measuring the polarities on both sides of the filament, and employ the connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculate the angle between each barb and the spine to determine the bearing of the barbs, i.e., left or right. We test the automatic detection method with Hα filtergrams from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) Hα archive and magnetograms observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Four filaments are automatically detected and illustrated to show the results. The barbs in different parts of a filament may have opposite bearings. The filaments in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere) mainly have left-bearing (right-bearing) barbs and positive (negative) magnetic helicity, respectively. The tested results demonstrate that our method is efficient and effective in detecting the bearing of filament barbs. It is demonstrated that the conventionally believed one-to-one correspondence between filament chirality and barb bearing is not valid. The correct detection of the filament axis chirality should be done by combining both imaging morphology and magnetic field observations. (paper)

  14. Evidence for Mixed Helicity in Erupting Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglach, K.; Wang, Y.-M.; Kliem, B.

    2009-09-01

    Erupting filaments are sometimes observed to undergo a rotation about the vertical direction as they rise. This rotation of the filament axis is generally interpreted as a conversion of twist into writhe in a kink-unstable magnetic flux rope. Consistent with this interpretation, the rotation is usually found to be clockwise (as viewed from above) if the post-eruption arcade has right-handed helicity, but counterclockwise if it has left-handed helicity. Here, we describe two non-active-region filament events recorded with the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in which the sense of rotation appears to be opposite to that expected from the helicity of the post-event arcade. Based on these observations, we suggest that the rotation of the filament axis is, in general, determined by the net helicity of the erupting system, and that the axially aligned core of the filament can have the opposite helicity sign to the surrounding field. In most cases, the surrounding field provides the main contribution to the net helicity. In the events reported here, however, the helicity associated with the filament "barbs" is opposite in sign to and dominates that of the overlying arcade.

  15. Prokaryotic cytoskeletons: protein filaments organizing small cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, James; Löwe, Jan

    2018-04-01

    Most, if not all, bacterial and archaeal cells contain at least one protein filament system. Although these filament systems in some cases form structures that are very similar to eukaryotic cytoskeletons, the term 'prokaryotic cytoskeletons' is used to refer to many different kinds of protein filaments. Cytoskeletons achieve their functions through polymerization of protein monomers and the resulting ability to access length scales larger than the size of the monomer. Prokaryotic cytoskeletons are involved in many fundamental aspects of prokaryotic cell biology and have important roles in cell shape determination, cell division and nonchromosomal DNA segregation. Some of the filament-forming proteins have been classified into a small number of conserved protein families, for example, the almost ubiquitous tubulin and actin superfamilies. To understand what makes filaments special and how the cytoskeletons they form enable cells to perform essential functions, the structure and function of cytoskeletal molecules and their filaments have been investigated in diverse bacteria and archaea. In this Review, we bring these data together to highlight the diverse ways that linear protein polymers can be used to organize other molecules and structures in bacteria and archaea.

  16. A Polymerization-Associated Structural Switch in FtsZ That Enables Treadmilling of Model Filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Wagstaff

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell division in many organisms involves a constricting cytokinetic ring that is orchestrated by the tubulin-like protein FtsZ. FtsZ forms dynamic filaments close to the membrane at the site of division that have recently been shown to treadmill around the division ring, guiding septal wall synthesis. Here, using X-ray crystallography of Staphylococcus aureus FtsZ (SaFtsZ, we reveal how an FtsZ can adopt two functionally distinct conformations, open and closed. The open form is found in SaFtsZ filaments formed in crystals and also in soluble filaments of Escherichia coli FtsZ as deduced by electron cryomicroscopy. The closed form is found within several crystal forms of two nonpolymerizing SaFtsZ mutants and corresponds to many previous FtsZ structures from other organisms. We argue that FtsZ’s conformational switch is polymerization-associated, driven by the formation of the longitudinal intersubunit interfaces along the filament. We show that such a switch provides explanations for both how treadmilling may occur within a single-stranded filament and why filament assembly is cooperative.

  17. Pharmacological activation of myosin II paralogs to correct cell mechanics defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surcel, Alexandra; Ng, Win Pin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ren, Yixin; Avery, Lindsay B; Krenc, Agata K; Meyers, David J; Rock, Ronald S; Anders, Robert A; Freel Meyers, Caren L; Robinson, Douglas N

    2015-02-03

    Current approaches to cancer treatment focus on targeting signal transduction pathways. Here, we develop an alternative system for targeting cell mechanics for the discovery of novel therapeutics. We designed a live-cell, high-throughput chemical screen to identify mechanical modulators. We characterized 4-hydroxyacetophenone (4-HAP), which enhances the cortical localization of the mechanoenzyme myosin II, independent of myosin heavy-chain phosphorylation, thus increasing cellular cortical tension. To shift cell mechanics, 4-HAP requires myosin II, including its full power stroke, specifically activating human myosin IIB (MYH10) and human myosin IIC (MYH14), but not human myosin IIA (MYH9). We further demonstrated that invasive pancreatic cancer cells are more deformable than normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells, a mechanical profile that was partially corrected with 4-HAP, which also decreased the invasion and migration of these cancer cells. Overall, 4-HAP modifies nonmuscle myosin II-based cell mechanics across phylogeny and disease states and provides proof of concept that cell mechanics offer a rich drug target space, allowing for possible corrective modulation of tumor cell behavior.

  18. NUCLEAR MYOSIN II REGULATES THE ASSEMBLY OF PREINITIATION COMPLEX FOR ICAM-1 GENE TRANSCRIPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingjie; Sarna, Sushil K.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Actin-myosin II motor converts chemical energy into force/motion in muscle and non-muscle cells. The phosphorylation of regulatory light chain (MLC20) is critical to the cytoplasmic functions of these motors. We do not know whether myosin II and actins in the nucleus function as motors to generate relative motion, such as that between RNA polymerase II holoenzyme and DNA, for assembly of the preinitiation complex. Methods The experiments were performed on primary cultures of human colonic circular smooth muscle cells (HCCSMCs) and rat colonic circular muscle strips. Results We show that myosin II and α- and β-actins are present in the nuclei of colonic smooth muscle cells. The nuclear myosin II is tethered to recognition sequence AGCTCC (−39/−34) in the ICAM-1 core promoter region. The actins are known to complex with RNA polymerase II and they are tethered to the nucleoskeleton. The dephosphorylation of MLC20 increases the transcription of ICAM-1, whereas its phosphorylation decreases it. Colonic inflammation suppresses nuclear MLCK, which increases the unphosphorylated form of nuclear MLC20, resulting in enhanced transcription of ICAM-1. Conclusions 1) Myosin II is a core transcription factor; 2) the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of nuclear MLC20 results in the sliding of myosin and actin molecules past each other producing relative motion between the DNA bound to the myosin II and RNA polymerase II holoenzyme bound to actins and nucleoskeleton. PMID:19328794

  19. Biophysically realistic filament bending dynamics in agent-based biological simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan B Alberts

    Full Text Available An appealing tool for study of the complex biological behaviors that can emerge from networks of simple molecular interactions is an agent-based, computational simulation that explicitly tracks small-scale local interactions--following thousands to millions of states through time. For many critical cell processes (e.g. cytokinetic furrow specification, nuclear centration, cytokinesis, the flexible nature of cytoskeletal filaments is likely to be critical. Any computer model that hopes to explain the complex emergent behaviors in these processes therefore needs to encode filament flexibility in a realistic manner. Here I present a numerically convenient and biophysically realistic method for modeling cytoskeletal filament flexibility in silico. Each cytoskeletal filament is represented by a series of rigid segments linked end-to-end in series with a variable attachment point for the translational elastic element. This connection scheme allows an empirically tuning, for a wide range of segment sizes, viscosities, and time-steps, that endows any filament species with the experimentally observed (or theoretically expected static force deflection, relaxation time-constant, and thermal writhing motions. I additionally employ a unique pair of elastic elements--one representing the axial and the other the bending rigidity- that formulate the restoring force in terms of single time-step constraint resolution. This method is highly local -adjacent rigid segments of a filament only interact with one another through constraint forces-and is thus well-suited to simulations in which arbitrary additional forces (e.g. those representing interactions of a filament with other bodies or cross-links / entanglements between filaments may be present. Implementation in code is straightforward; Java source code is available at www.celldynamics.org.

  20. Single--stranded DNA mycoplasmaviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maniloff, J.; Das, J.; Nowak, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Two general types of single--stranded DNA bacteriophases have been described, icosahedral virions (e.g., 0X174) and filamentous virions (e.g., M13). Mycoplasmavirus MVL51 appears to represent another type of single--stranded DNA phage, with a genome size close to that of 0X174 and a nonlytic mode of infection like that of filamentous phages. The bullet shaped MVL51 morphology is unlike that of other known phages.

  1. Local pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of the myosin 2A motor in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michelle A.; Billington, Neil; Wang, Aibing; Adelstein, Robert S.; Sellers, James R.; Fischer, Robert S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2017-01-01

    The role of nonmuscle myosin 2 (NM2) pulsatile dynamics in generating contractile forces required for developmental morphogenesis has been characterized, but whether these pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of all actomyosin networks is not known. Here we used live-cell fluorescence imaging to show that transient, local assembly of NM2A “pulses” occurs in the cortical cytoskeleton of single adherent cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and sarcoma origin, independent of developmental signaling cues and cell–cell or cell–ECM interactions. We show that pulses in the cortical cytoskeleton require Rho-associated kinase– or myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity, increases in cytosolic calcium, and NM2 ATPase activity. Surprisingly, we find that cortical cytoskeleton pulses specifically require the head domain of NM2A, as they do not occur with either NM2B or a 2B-head-2A-tail chimera. Our results thus suggest that pulsatile contractions in the cortical cytoskeleton are an intrinsic property of the NM2A motor that may mediate its role in homeostatic maintenance of tension in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells. PMID:27881665

  2. A Rapid Automated Protocol for Muscle Fiber Population Analysis in Rat Muscle Cross Sections Using Myosin Heavy Chain Immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmeister, Konstantin D; Gröger, Marion; Aman, Martin; Willensdorfer, Anna; Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Salminger, Stefan; Aszmann, Oskar C

    2017-03-28

    Quantification of muscle fiber populations provides a deeper insight into the effects of disease, trauma, and various other influences on skeletal muscle composition. Various time-consuming methods have traditionally been used to study fiber populations in many fields of research. However, recently developed immunohistochemical methods based on myosin heavy chain protein expression provide a quick alternative to identify multiple fiber types in a single section. Here, we present a rapid, reliable and reproducible protocol for improved staining quality, allowing automatic acquisition of whole cross sections and automatic quantification of fiber populations with ImageJ. For this purpose, embedded skeletal muscles are cut in cross sections, stained using myosin heavy chains antibodies with secondary fluorescent antibodies and DAPI for cell nuclei staining. Whole cross sections are then scanned automatically using a slide scanner to obtain high-resolution composite pictures of the entire specimen. Fiber population analyses are subsequently performed to quantify slow, intermediate and fast fibers using an automated macro for ImageJ. We have previously shown that this method can identify fiber populations reliably to a degree of ±4%. In addition, this method reduces inter-user variability and time per analyses significantly using the open source platform ImageJ.

  3. Myotube migration to cover and shape the testis of Drosophila depends on Heartless, Cadherin/Catenin, and myosin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Rothenbusch-Fender

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During Drosophila metamorphosis, nascent testis myotubes migrate from the prospective seminal vesicle of the genital disc onto pupal testes and then further to cover the testes with multinucleated smooth-like muscles. Here we show that DWnt2 is likely required for determination of testis-relevant myoblasts on the genital disc. Knock down of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR heartless by RNAi and a dominant-negative version revealed multiple functions of Heartless, namely regulation of the amount of myoblasts on the genital disc, connection of seminal vesicles and testes, and migration of muscles along the testes. Live imaging indicated that the downstream effector Stumps is required for migration of testis myotubes on the testis towards the apical tip. After myoblast fusion, myosin II is needed for migration of nascent testis myotubes, in which Thisbe-dependent fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling is activated. Cadherin-N is essential for connecting these single myofibers and for creating a firm testis muscle sheath that shapes and stabilizes the testis tubule. Based on these results, we propose a model for the migration of testis myotubes in which nascent testis myotubes migrate as a collective onto and along the testis, dependent on FGF-regulated expression of myosin II.

  4. Local pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of the myosin 2A motor in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michelle A; Billington, Neil; Wang, Aibing; Adelstein, Robert S; Sellers, James R; Fischer, Robert S; Waterman, Clare M

    2017-01-15

    The role of nonmuscle myosin 2 (NM2) pulsatile dynamics in generating contractile forces required for developmental morphogenesis has been characterized, but whether these pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of all actomyosin networks is not known. Here we used live-cell fluorescence imaging to show that transient, local assembly of NM2A "pulses" occurs in the cortical cytoskeleton of single adherent cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and sarcoma origin, independent of developmental signaling cues and cell-cell or cell-ECM interactions. We show that pulses in the cortical cytoskeleton require Rho-associated kinase- or myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity, increases in cytosolic calcium, and NM2 ATPase activity. Surprisingly, we find that cortical cytoskeleton pulses specifically require the head domain of NM2A, as they do not occur with either NM2B or a 2B-head-2A-tail chimera. Our results thus suggest that pulsatile contractions in the cortical cytoskeleton are an intrinsic property of the NM2A motor that may mediate its role in homeostatic maintenance of tension in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells. © 2017 Baird et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Methods for transforming and expression screening of filamentous fungal cells with a DNA library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Sarah; Lamsa, Michael; Cherry, Joel; Ward, Connie

    2015-06-02

    The present invention relates to methods for expression screening of filamentous fungal transformants, comprising: (a) isolating single colony transformants of a DNA library introduced into E. coli; (b) preparing DNA from each of the single colony E. coli transformants; (c) introducing a sample of each of the DNA preparations of step (b) into separate suspensions of protoplasts of a filamentous fungus to obtain transformants thereof, wherein each transformant contains one or more copies of an individual polynucleotide from the DNA library; (d) growing the individual filamentous fungal transformants of step (c) on selective growth medium, thereby permitting growth of the filamentous fungal transformants, while suppressing growth of untransformed filamentous fungi; and (e) measuring activity or a property of each polypeptide encoded by the individual polynucleotides. The present invention also relates to isolated polynucleotides encoding polypeptides of interest obtained by such methods, to nucleic acid constructs, expression vectors, and recombinant host cells comprising the isolated polynucleotides, and to methods of producing the polypeptides encoded by the isolated polynucleotides.

  6. Role of multiple filaments in self-accelerating actions of laser filamentation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuze; Nie, Jinsong; Sun, Ke

    2017-11-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of multiple filaments in self-accelerating actions by using corrected accelerating parabolic beams (CAPBs) are numerically investigated. By increasing the number of main lobes, the curved filaments can be elongated, leading to a longer displacement. The replenished energy originating from curved multiple filaments (MFs) that constructively interfere with the central one plays a crucial role in the phenomenon. At the bifurcation position, a beam pattern in which secondary lobes tightly follow the main lobes is formed, which is beneficial for the accelerating action of MFs. A new curved filament is generated due to the merging of side-curved MFs, and its accelerating strength decreases gradually with further propagation. Moreover, a special spatiotemporal profile that enhances the possibility of acceleration is also formed. The use of the accelerating beam with the appropriate amount of main lobes provides a new approach to elongate curved filaments.

  7. Filamentous Influenza Virus Enters Cells via Macropinocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Jeremy S.; Leser, George P.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus is pleiomorphic, producing both spherical (100-nm-diameter) and filamentous (100-nm by 20-μm) virions. While the spherical virions are known to enter host cells through exploitation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the entry pathway for filamentous virions has not been determined, though the existence of an alternative, non-clathrin-, non-caveolin-mediated entry pathway for influenza virus has been known for many years. In this study, we confirm recent results showing that influenza virus utilizes macropinocytosis as an alternate entry pathway. Furthermore, we find that filamentous influenza viruses use macropinocytosis as the primary entry mechanism. Virions enter cells as intact filaments within macropinosomes and are trafficked to the acidic late-endosomal compartment. Low pH triggers a conformational change in the M2 ion channel protein, altering membrane curvature and leading to a fragmentation of the filamentous virions. This fragmentation may enable more-efficient fusion between the viral and endosomal membranes. PMID:22875971

  8. Myosin-V Induces Cargo Immobilization and Clustering at the Axon Initial Segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne F. J. Janssen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The selective transport of different cargoes into axons and dendrites underlies the polarized organization of the neuron. Although it has become clear that the combined activity of different motors determines the destination and selectivity of transport, little is known about the mechanistic details of motor cooperation. For example, the exact role of myosin-V in opposing microtubule-based axon entries has remained unclear. Here we use two orthogonal chemically-induced heterodimerization systems to independently recruit different motors to cargoes. We find that recruiting myosin-V to kinesin-propelled cargoes at approximately equal numbers is sufficient to stall motility. Kinesin-driven cargoes entering the axon were arrested in the axon initial segment (AIS upon myosin-V recruitment and accumulated in distinct actin-rich hotspots. Importantly, unlike proposed previously, myosin-V did not return these cargoes to the cell body, suggesting that additional mechanism are required to establish cargo retrieval from the AIS.

  9. The class V myosin motor, myosin 5c, localizes to mature secretory vesicles and facilitates exocytosis in lacrimal acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchelletta, Ronald R; Jacobs, Damon T; Schechter, Joel E; Cheney, Richard E; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F

    2008-07-01

    We investigated the role of the actin-based myosin motor, myosin 5c (Myo5c) in vesicle transport in exocrine secretion. Lacrimal gland acinar cells (LGAC) are the major source for the regulated secretion of proteins from the lacrimal gland into the tear film. Confocal fluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy revealed that Myo5c was associated with secretory vesicles in primary rabbit LGAC. Upon stimulation of secretion with the muscarinic agonist, carbachol, Myo5c was also detected in association with actin-coated fusion intermediates. Adenovirus-mediated expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the tail domain of Myo5c (Ad-GFP-Myo5c-tail) showed that this protein was localized to secretory vesicles. Furthermore, its expression induced a significant (P < or = 0.05) decrease in carbachol-stimulated release of two secretory vesicle content markers, secretory component and syncollin-GFP. Adenovirus-mediated expression of GFP appended to the full-length Myo5c (Ad-GFP-Myo5c-full) was used in parallel with adenovirus-mediated expression of GFP-Myo5c-tail in LGAC to compare various parameters of secretory vesicles labeled with either GFP-labeled protein in resting and stimulated LGAC. These studies revealed that the carbachol-stimulated increase in secretory vesicle diameter associated with compound fusion of secretory vesicles that was also exhibited by vesicles labeled with GFP-Myo5c-full was impaired in vesicles labeled with GFP-Myo5c-tail. A significant decrease in GFP labeling of actin-coated fusion intermediates was also seen in carbachol-stimulated LGAC transduced with GFP-Myo5c-tail relative to LGAC transduced with GFP-Myo5c-full. These results suggest that Myo5c participates in apical exocytosis of secretory vesicles.

  10. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724-837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991-1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998-1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction.

  11. The significance of peroxisomes in secondary metabolite biosynthesis in filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartoszewska, Magdalena; Opalinski, Lukasz; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles characterized by a protein-rich matrix surrounded by a single membrane. In filamentous fungi, peroxisomes are crucial for the primary metabolism of several unusual carbon sources used for growth (e. g. fatty acids), but increasing evidence is presented that

  12. Compact 180-kV Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by femtosecond laser filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantchouk, L.; Point, G.; Brelet, Y.; Larour, J.; Carbonnel, J.; André, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Houard, A.

    2014-03-01

    We developed a compact Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by a single femtosecond laser beam undergoing filamentation. Voltage pulses of 180 kV could be generated with a subnanosecond jitter. The same laser beam was also used to initiate simultaneously guided discharges up to 21 cm long at the output of the generator.

  13. Heterologous expression of cellobiohydrolases in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoglowek, Marta; Lübeck, Peter S.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2015-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolases are among the most important enzymes functioning in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose, significantly contributing to the efficient biorefining of recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels and bio-based products. Filamentous fungi are recognized as both well...... into valuable products. However, due to low cellobiohydrolase activities, certain fungi might be deficient with regard to enzymes of value for cellulose conversion, and improving cellobiohydrolase expression in filamentous fungi has proven to be challenging. In this review, we examine the effects of altering...... promoters, signal peptides, culture conditions and host post-translational modifications. For heterologous cellobiohydrolase production in filamentous fungi to become an industrially feasible process, the construction of site-integrating plasmids, development of protease-deficient strains and glycosylation...

  14. Insight into the mechanism of fast movement of myosin from Chara corallina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Hiroki; Ooguchi, Masami; Ooi, Atsushi; Okagaki, Tsuyoshi; Higashi-Fujime, Sugie

    2007-02-01

    Chara myosin, two-headed plant myosin belonging to class XI, slides F-actin at maximally 60 microm s(-1). To elucidate the mechanism of this fast sliding, we extensively investigated its mechanochemical properties. The maximum actin activated ATPase activity, Vmax, was 21.3 s(-1) head(-1) in a solution, but when myosin was immobilized on the surface, its activity was 57.6 s(-1) head(-1) at 2 mg ml(-1) of F-actin. The sliding velocity and the actin activated ATPase activity were greatly inhibited by ADP, suggesting that ADP dissociation was the rate limiting step. With the extensive assay of motility by varying the surface density, the duty ratio of Chara myosin was found to be 0.49-0.44 from velocity measurements and 0.34 from the landing rate analysis. At the surface density of 10 molecules microm(-2), Chara myosin exhibited pivot movement under physiological conditions. Based on the results obtained, we will discuss the sliding mechanism of Chara myosin according to the working stroke model in terms of its physiological aspects. aspects. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  16. P-cadherin counteracts myosin II-B function: implications in melanoma progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Wever Olivier

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant transformation of melanocytes is frequently attended by a switch in cadherin expression profile as shown for E- and N-cadherin. For P-cadherin, downregulation in metastasizing melanoma has been demonstrated, and over-expression of P-cadherin in melanoma cell lines has been shown to inhibit invasion. The strong invasive and metastatic nature of cutaneous melanoma implies a deregulated interplay between intercellular adhesion and migration-related molecules Results In this study we performed a microarray analysis to compare the mRNA expression profile of an invasive BLM melanoma cell line (BLM LIE and the non-invasive P-cadherin over-expression variant (BLM P-cad. Results indicate that nonmuscle myosin II-B is downregulated in BLM P-cad. Moreover, myosin II-B plays a major role in melanoma migration and invasiveness by retracting the tail during the migratory cycle, as shown by the localization of myosin II-B stress fibers relative to Golgi and the higher levels of phosphorylated myosin light chain. Analysis of P-cadherin and myosin II-B in nodular melanoma sections and in a panel of melanoma cell lines further confirmed that there is an inverse relationship between both molecules. Conclusions Therefore, we conclude that P-cadherin counteracts the expression and function of myosin II-B, resulting in the suppression of the invasive and migratory behaviour of BLM melanoma cells

  17. Heterologous gene expression in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoyun; Schmitz, George; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are critical to production of many commercial enzymes and organic compounds. Fungal-based systems have several advantages over bacterial-based systems for protein production because high-level secretion of enzymes is a common trait of their decomposer lifestyle. Furthermore, in the large-scale production of recombinant proteins of eukaryotic origin, the filamentous fungi become the vehicle of choice due to critical processes shared in gene expression with other eukaryotic organisms. The complexity and relative dearth of understanding of the physiology of filamentous fungi, compared to bacteria, have hindered rapid development of these organisms as highly efficient factories for the production of heterologous proteins. In this review, we highlight several of the known benefits and challenges in using filamentous fungi (particularly Aspergillus spp., Trichoderma reesei, and Neurospora crassa) for the production of proteins, especially heterologous, nonfungal enzymes. We review various techniques commonly employed in recombinant protein production in the filamentous fungi, including transformation methods, selection of gene regulatory elements such as promoters, protein secretion factors such as the signal peptide, and optimization of coding sequence. We provide insights into current models of host genomic defenses such as repeat-induced point mutation and quelling. Furthermore, we examine the regulatory effects of transcript sequences, including introns and untranslated regions, pre-mRNA (messenger RNA) processing, transcript transport, and mRNA stability. We anticipate that this review will become a resource for researchers who aim at advancing the use of these fascinating organisms as protein production factories, for both academic and industrial purposes, and also for scientists with general interest in the biology of the filamentous fungi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Distribution of Myosin Attachment Times Predicted from Viscoelastic Mechanics of Striated Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley M. Palmer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that viscoelastic mechanics of striated muscle, measured as elastic and viscous moduli, emerge directly from the myosin crossbridge attachment time, tatt, also called time-on. The distribution of tatt was modeled using a gamma distribution with shape parameter, p, and scale parameter, β. At 5 mM MgATP, β was similar between mouse α-MyHC (16.0±3.7 ms and β-MyHC (17.9±2.0 ms, and p was higher (P<0.05 for β-MyHC (5.6±0.4 no units compared to α-MyHC (3.2±0.9. At 1 mM MgATP, p approached a value of 10 in both isoforms, but β rose only in the β-MyHC (34.8±5.8 ms. The estimated mean tatt (i.e., pβ product was longer in the β-MyHC compared to α-MyHC, and became prolonged in both isoforms as MgATP was reduced as expected. The application of our viscoelastic model to these isoforms and varying MgATP conditions suggest that tatt is better modeled as a gamma distribution due to its representing multiple temporal events occurring within tatt compared to a single exponential distribution which assumes only one temporal event within tatt.

  19. Structure of Flexible Filamentous Plant Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah C.; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Irving, Thomas C.; Havens, Wendy M.; Ghabrial, Said A.; Wall, Joseph S.; Stubbs, Gerald (IIT); (BU-M); (Vanderbilt); (Kentucky); (BNL)

    2008-10-23

    Flexible filamentous viruses make up a large fraction of the known plant viruses, but in comparison with those of other viruses, very little is known about their structures. We have used fiber diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy to determine the symmetry of a potyvirus, soybean mosaic virus; to confirm the symmetry of a potexvirus, potato virus X; and to determine the low-resolution structures of both viruses. We conclude that these viruses and, by implication, most or all flexible filamentous plant viruses share a common coat protein fold and helical symmetry, with slightly less than 9 subunits per helical turn.

  20. Interaction of Two Filaments in a Long Filament Channel Associated with Twin Coronal Mass Ejections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, 264209 Weihai (China); Zhang, Qingmin [Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yang, Kai, E-mail: ruishengzheng@sdu.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 210023 Nanjing (China)

    2017-02-20

    Using the high-quality observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory , we present the interaction of two filaments (F1 and F2) in a long filament channel associated with twin coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on 2016 January 26. Before the eruption, a sequence of rapid cancellation and emergence of the magnetic flux has been observed, which likely triggered the ascending of the west filament (F1). The east footpoints of rising F1 moved toward the east far end of the filament channel, accompanied by post-eruption loops and flare ribbons. This likely indicated a large-scale eruption involving the long filament channel, which resulted from the interaction between F1 and the east filament (F2). Some bright plasma flew over F2, and F2 stayed at rest during the eruption, likely due to the confinement of its overlying lower magnetic field. Interestingly, the impulsive F1 pushed its overlying magnetic arcades to form the first CME, and F1 finally evolved into the second CME after the collision with the nearby coronal hole. We suggest that the interaction of F1 and the overlying magnetic field of F2 led to the merging reconnection that forms a longer eruptive filament loop. Our results also provide a possible picture of the origin of twin CMEs and show that the large-scale magnetic topology of the coronal hole is important for the eventual propagation direction of CMEs.

  1. High-pressure effects on the molecular aggregation and physicochemical properties of myosin in relation to heat gelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Siwen; Yang, Huijuan; Wang, Huhu; Tendu, Alexander Atuya; Bai, Yun; Xu, Xinglian; Ma, Hanjun; Zhou, Guanghong

    2017-09-01

    Myosin was extracted from the M. psoas muscle of rabbits, and dissolved in 0.6M KCl buffer (pH6.5). Effects of high-pressure (HP, 100 to 300MPa, 9min, 25°C) treatment on myosin solubility, molecular traits (molecular weight and morphology), flow behavior and strength of heat-induced myosin gels were studied and compared with the untreated controls. Myosin subjected to 200MPa HP treatment had lower solubility than samples treated at other pressures (Pstrength enhancement was inferred. It is postulated that significant morphological changes in myosin accounted for changes in its functional properties, by the influence of HP treatment on protein-protein and/or protein-water interactions. There is a relationship between molecular morphology and the coalescing behavior of myosin, since significant changes of both attributes were observed at pressures ≥200MPa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High-resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shangwei; Su, Yingna; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng [Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan [5001 Riverwood Avenue, Sarasota, FL 34231 (United States); Sun, Xudong, E-mail: ynsu@pmo.ac.cn [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2017-07-20

    We investigate two sympathetic filament eruptions observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope on 2015 October 15. The full picture of the eruptions is obtained from the corresponding Solar Dynamics Observatory ( SDO )/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations. The two filaments start from active region NOAA 12434 in the north and end in one large quiescent filament channel in the south. The left filament erupts first, followed by the right filament eruption about 10 minutes later. Clear twist structure and rotating motion are observed in both filaments during the eruption. Both eruptions failed, since the filaments first rise up, then flow toward the south and merge into the southern large quiescent filament. We also observe repeated activations of mini filaments below the right filament after its eruption. Using magnetic field models constructed based on SDO /HMI magnetograms via the flux rope insertion method, we find that the left filament eruption is likely to be triggered by kink instability, while the weakening of overlying magnetic fields due to magnetic reconnection at an X-point between the two filament systems might play an important role in the onset of the right filament eruption.

  3. A semi-flexible model prediction for the polymerization force exerted by a living F-actin filament on a fixed wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierleoni, Carlo; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Ryckaert, Jean-Paul

    2015-10-01

    We consider a single living semi-flexible filament with persistence length ℓp in chemical equilibrium with a solution of free monomers at fixed monomer chemical potential μ1 and fixed temperature T. While one end of the filament is chemically active with single monomer (de)polymerization steps, the other end is grafted normally to a rigid wall to mimic a rigid network from which the filament under consideration emerges. A second rigid wall, parallel to the grafting wall, is fixed at distance L chain model with step size d and persistence length ℓp, hitting a hard wall. Explicit properties require the computation of the mean force f ¯ i ( L ) exerted by the wall at L and associated potential f ¯ i ( L ) = - d W i ( L ) / d L on a filament of fixed size i. By original Monte-Carlo calculations for few filament lengths in a wide range of compression, we justify the use of the weak bending universal expressions of Gholami et al. [Phys. Rev. E 74, 041803 (2006)] over the whole non-escaping filament regime. For a filament of size i with contour length Lc = (i - 1) d, this universal form is rapidly growing from zero (non-compression state) to the buckling value f b ( L c , ℓ p ) = /π 2 k B T ℓ p 4 Lc 2 over a compression range much narrower than the size d of a monomer. Employing this universal form for living filaments, we find that the average force exerted by a living filament on a wall at distance L is in practice L independent and very close to the value of the stalling force Fs H = ( k B T / d ) ln ( ρ ˆ 1 ) predicted by Hill, this expression being strictly valid in the rigid filament limit. The average filament force results from the product of the cumulative size fraction x = x ( L , ℓ p , ρ ˆ 1 ) , where the filament is in contact with the wall, times the buckling force on a filament of size Lc ≈ L, namely, Fs H = x f b ( L ; ℓ p ) . The observed L independence of Fs H implies that x ∝ L-2 for given ( ℓ p , ρ ˆ 1 ) and x ∝ ln ρ ˆ 1

  4. Undulatory locomotion of finite filaments: lessons from Caenorhabditis elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, R S; Kenneth, O; Sznitman, J; Leshansky, A M

    2013-01-01

    Undulatory swimming is a widespread propulsion strategy adopted by many small-scale organisms including various single-cell eukaryotes and nematodes. In this work, we report a comprehensive study of undulatory locomotion of a finite filament using (i) approximate resistive force theory (RFT) assuming a local nature of hydrodynamic interaction between the filament and the surrounding viscous liquid and (ii) particle-based numerical computations taking into account the intra-filament hydrodynamic interaction. Using the ubiquitous model of a propagating sinusoidal waveform, we identify the limit of applicability of the RFT and determine the optimal propulsion gait in terms of (i) swimming distance per period of undulation and (ii) hydrodynamic propulsion efficiency. The occurrence of the optimal swimming gait maximizing hydrodynamic efficiency at finite wavelength in particle-based computations diverges from the prediction of the RFT. To compare the model swimmer powered by sine wave undulations to biological undulatory swimmers, we apply the particle-based approach to study locomotion of the model organism nematode Caenorhabditis elegans using the swimming gait extracted from experiments. The analysis reveals that even though the amplitude and the wavenumber of undulations are similar to those determined for the best performing sinusoidal swimmer, C. elegans overperforms the latter in terms of both displacement and hydrodynamic efficiency. Further comparison with other undulatory microorganisms reveals that many adopt waveforms with characteristics similar to the optimal model swimmer, yet real swimmers still manage to beat the best performing sine-wave swimmer in terms of distance covered per period. Overall our results underline the importance of further waveform optimization, as periodic undulations adopted by C. elegans and other organisms deviate considerably from a simple sine wave. (paper)

  5. Myosin Va participates in acrosomal formation and nuclear morphogenesis during spermatogenesis of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis belongs to the Class Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura. The spermatozoon of this species is of aflagellated type, it has a spherical acrosome surrounded by the cup-shaped nucleus, which are unique to brachyurans. For the past several decades, studies on the spermatogenesis of the mitten crab mainly focus on the morphology. Compared with the extensive study of molecular mechanism of spermatogenesis in mammals, relatively less information is available in crustacean species. Myosin Va, a member of Class V myosin, has been implicated in acrosome biogenesis and vesicle transport during spermatogenesis in mammals. In the present study we demonstrate the expression and cellular localization of myosin Va during spermatogenesis in E. sinensis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Western blot demonstrated that myosin Va is expressed during spermatogenesis. Immunocytochemical and ultrastructural analyses showed that myosin Va mainly localizes in the cytoplasm in spermatocytes. At the early stage of spermiogenesis, myosin Va binds to the endoplasmic reticulum vesicle (EV and proacrosomal granule (PG. Subsequently, myosin Va localizes within the proacrosomal vesicle (PV formed by PG and EV fusion and locates in the membrane complex (MC at the mid spermatid stage. At the late spermatid stage, myosin Va is associated with the shaping nucleus and mitochondria. In mature spermatozoon, myosin Va predominates in acrosomal tubule (AT and nucleus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study demonstrates that myosin Va may be involved in acrosome biogenesis and nuclear morphogenesis during spermatogenesis in E. sinensis. Considering the distribution and molecular characteristics of myosin Va, we also propose a hypothesis of AT formation in this species. It is the first time to uncover the role of myosin Va in crustacean spermatogenesis.

  6. Genome-wide identification, splicing, and expression analysis of the myosin gene family in maize (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guifeng; Zhong, Mingyu; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Jushan; Tang, Yuanping; Wang, Gang; Song, Rentao

    2014-03-01

    The actin-based myosin system is essential for the organization and dynamics of the endomembrane system and transport network in plant cells. Plants harbour two unique myosin groups, class VIII and class XI, and the latter is structurally and functionally analogous to the animal and fungal class V myosin. Little is known about myosins in grass, even though grass includes several agronomically important cereal crops. Here, we identified 14 myosin genes from the genome of maize (Zea mays). The relatively larger sizes of maize myosin genes are due to their much longer introns, which are abundant in transposable elements. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that maize myosin genes could be classified into class VIII and class XI, with three and 11 members, respectively. Apart from subgroup XI-F, the remaining subgroups were duplicated at least in one analysed lineage, and the duplication events occurred more extensively in Arabidopsis than in maize. Only two pairs of maize myosins were generated from segmental duplication. Expression analysis revealed that most maize myosin genes were expressed universally, whereas a few members (XI-1, -6, and -11) showed an anther-specific pattern, and many underwent extensive alternative splicing. We also found a short transcript at the O1 locus, which conceptually encoded a headless myosin that most likely functions at the transcriptional level rather than via a dominant-negative mechanism at the translational level. Together, these data provide significant insights into the evolutionary and functional characterization of maize myosin genes that could transfer to the identification and application of homologous myosins of other grasses.

  7. Ecophysiology of an uncultivated lineage of Aigarchaeota from an oxic, hot spring filamentous 'streamer' community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Jacob P; Jay, Zackary J; Schmid, Markus C; Rusch, Douglas B; Romine, Margaret F; Jennings, Ryan de M; Kozubal, Mark A; Tringe, Susannah G; Wagner, Michael; Inskeep, William P

    2016-01-01

    The candidate archaeal phylum 'Aigarchaeota' contains microorganisms from terrestrial and subsurface geothermal ecosystems. The phylogeny and metabolic potential of Aigarchaeota has been deduced from several recent single-cell amplified genomes; however, a detailed description of their metabolic potential and in situ transcriptional activity is absent. Here, we report a comprehensive metatranscriptome-based reconstruction of the in situ metabolism of Aigarchaeota in an oxic, hot spring filamentous 'streamer' community. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that these newly discovered Aigarchaeota are filamentous, which is consistent with the presence and transcription of an actin-encoding gene. Aigarchaeota filaments are intricately associated with other community members, which include both bacteria (for example, filamentous Thermocrinis spp.) and archaea. Metabolic reconstruction of genomic and metatranscriptomic data suggests that this aigarchaeon is an aerobic, chemoorganoheterotroph with autotrophic potential. A heme copper oxidase complex was identified in the environmental genome assembly and highly transcribed in situ. Potential electron donors include acetate, fatty acids, amino acids, sugars and aromatic compounds, which may originate from extracellular polymeric substances produced by other microorganisms shown to exist in close proximity and/or autochthonous dissolved organic carbon (OC). Transcripts related to genes specific to each of these potential electron donors were identified, indicating that this aigarchaeon likely utilizes several OC substrates. Characterized members of this lineage cannot synthesize heme, and other cofactors and vitamins de novo, which suggests auxotrophy. We propose the name Candidatus 'Calditenuis aerorheumensis' for this aigarchaeon, which describes its filamentous morphology and its primary electron acceptor, oxygen.

  8. The length of cooperative units on the thin filament in rabbit psoas muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Fujita, Hideaki; Kawai, Masataka

    2002-11-01

    The length of cooperative units along the thin filament of rabbit psoas single muscle fibres was determined by reducing filament length by treatment with the thin filament severing protein, gelsolin, in the presence of Ca(2+) and 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM). The average time for 50 % reduction in isometric tension was 6.7 min at 22 degrees C. The pCa-tension relationship was measured at 22 degrees C, pH 7.00 and ionic strength 200 mM, and the data were fitted to the Hill equation to determine the half-saturation point (K) and the cooperativity (n). Our results demonstrate that the cooperativity does not change much when the remaining isometric tension was in the range 20-100 %. The cooperativity quickly diminished when the remaining tension was reduced to less than 20 %. Our results further demonstrate that the change in the pK value was minimal and averaged 0.075 (less Ca(2+) sensitive) as the thin filament length was reduced. We infer from the first observation that the thin filament cooperativity extends up to 0.2 microm, which includes the maximum of about four basic cooperative units consisting of seven actin molecules, one tropomyosin dimer and one troponin complex. We infer from the second observation that the Ca(2+) sensitivity is slightly reduced by removal of the cooperative interaction between neighbouring cooperative units.

  9. Picosecond laser filamentation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-02

    under the terms of the Creative CommonsAttribution 3.0 licence . Any further distribution of this workmustmaintain attribution to the author(s) and the...at the wavelength of 1.053 μm, in a 90 mmdiameter beam. The laser operates in the single-shot regime (one shot in ten minutes). Laser pulses can be...The operator T̂ accounts for the self-steepening and space– time focusing effects [34]. Linear dispersion of air is included in equation (5) via the

  10. Large-scale Motion of Solar Filaments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Large-scale Motion of Solar Filaments. Pavel Ambrož, Astronomical Institute of the Acad. Sci. of the Czech Republic, CZ-25165. Ondrejov, The Czech Republic. e-mail: pambroz@asu.cas.cz. Alfred Schroll, Kanzelhöehe Solar Observatory of the University of Graz, A-9521 Treffen,. Austria. e-mail: schroll@solobskh.ac.at.

  11. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living...

  12. Modelling the morphology of filamentous microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1996-01-01

    The rapid development in image analysis techniques has made it possible to study the growth kinetics of filamentous microorganisms in more detail than previously, However, owing to the many different processes that influence the morphology it is important to apply mathematical models to extract...

  13. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  14. The exo-metabolome in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Ulf; Andersen, Birgitte; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are a diverse group of eukaryotic microorganisms that have a significant impact on human life as spoilers of food and feed by degradation and toxin production. They are also most useful as a source of bulk and fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. This chapter focuses on the exo...

  15. Evolution of genetic systems in filamentous ascomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    A great variety of genetic systems exist in filamentous ascomycetes. The transmission of genetic material does not only occur by (sexual or asexual) reproduction, but it can also follow vegetative fusion of different strains. In this thesis the evolution of this variability is studied,

  16. Featured Image: A Filament Forms and Erupts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    This dynamic image of active region NOAA 12241 was captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in December 2014. Observations of this region from a number of observatories and instruments recently presented by Jincheng Wang (University of Chinese Academy of Sciences) and collaborators reveal details about the formation and eruption of a long solar filament. Wang and collaborators show that the right part of the filament formed by magnetic reconnection between two bundles of magnetic field lines, while the left part formed as a result of shearing motion. When these two parts interacted, the filament erupted. You can read more about the teams results in the article linked below. Also, check out this awesome video of the filament formation and eruption, again by SDO/AIA:http://cdn.iopscience.com/images/0004-637X/839/2/128/Full/apjaa6bf3f1_video.mp4CitationJincheng Wang et al 2017 ApJ 839 128. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa6bf3

  17. Large-scale Motion of Solar Filaments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    The 'seeing' dependent contrast of the Hα pictures is the source of uncertainties during the measurements on ... Results of measurements and conclusions. Heliographic position of the filaments is measured on the full disc Hα pictures taken ... consecutive magnetic synoptic charts. Two arrays of corresponding velocities are ...

  18. Mapping the filaments in NGC 1275

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Aracely Susan; Rich, Jeffrey; Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS)

    2018-01-01

    The giant elliptical brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at the centers of many massive clusters are often surrounded by drawn-out forms of gaseous material. It is believed that this gaseous material is gas condensing from the intracluster medium (ICM) in a “cooling flow,” and it can directly impact the growth of the BCG. The galaxy NGC 1275 is one of the closest giant elliptical BCGs and lies at the center of the Perseus cluster. NGC 1275 has large filaments that are thought to be associated with a cooling flow, but they may also be affected by its AGN. To investigate the relationship between the AGN and the cooling flow we have mapped the filaments around NGC 1275 with the Cosmic Web Imager, an image-slicing integral field spectrograph at Palomar Observatories. We employ standard emission-line ratio diagnostics to determine the source of ionizing radiation. We use our analysis to investigate whether the formation of the extended filaments is a result of gas from the ICM collapsing onto the galaxy as it cools or if it is possible that the filaments are a result of the cluster’s interaction with the outflow driven by the AGN.

  19. On viscoelastic instability in polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    1999-01-01

    The 3D Lagrangian Integral Method is used to simulate the effects of surface tension on the viscoelastic end-plate instability, occuring in the rapid extension of some polymeric filaments between parallel plates. It is shovn that the surface tension delays the onset of the instability. Furthermore...

  20. Myocardial infarction-induced N-terminal fragment of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) impairs myofilament function in human myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witayavanitkul, Namthip; Ait Mou, Younss; Kuster, Diederik W D; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Sarkey, Jason; Govindan, Suresh; Chen, Xin; Ge, Ying; Rajan, Sudarsan; Wieczorek, David F; Irving, Thomas; Westfall, Margaret V; de Tombe, Pieter P; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2014-03-28

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with depressed cardiac contractile function and progression to heart failure. Cardiac myosin-binding protein C, a cardiac-specific myofilament protein, is proteolyzed post-MI in humans, which results in an N-terminal fragment, C0-C1f. The presence of C0-C1f in cultured cardiomyocytes results in decreased Ca(2+) transients and cell shortening, abnormalities sufficient for the induction of heart failure in a mouse model. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigate the association between C0-C1f and altered contractility in human cardiac myofilaments in vitro. To accomplish this, we generated recombinant human C0-C1f (hC0C1f) and incorporated it into permeabilized human left ventricular myocardium. Mechanical properties were studied at short (2 μm) and long (2.3 μm) sarcomere length (SL). Our data demonstrate that the presence of hC0C1f in the sarcomere had the greatest effect at short, but not long, SL, decreasing maximal force and myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity. Moreover, hC0C1f led to increased cooperative activation, cross-bridge cycling kinetics, and tension cost, with greater effects at short SL. We further established that the effects of hC0C1f occur through direct interaction with actin and α-tropomyosin. Our data demonstrate that the presence of hC0C1f in the sarcomere is sufficient to induce depressed myofilament function and Ca(2+) sensitivity in otherwise healthy human donor myocardium. Decreased cardiac function post-MI may result, in part, from the ability of hC0C1f to bind actin and α-tropomyosin, suggesting that cleaved C0-C1f could act as a poison polypeptide and disrupt the interaction of native cardiac myosin-binding protein C with the thin filament.

  1. Exploration of flexible phenylpropylurea scaffold as novel cardiac myosin activators for the treatment of systolic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Manoj; Jalani, Hitesh B; Pillaiyar, Thanigaimalai; Sharma, Niti; Boggu, Pulla Reddy; Venkateswararao, Eeda; Lee, You-Jung; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Jung, Sang-Hun

    2017-07-07

    A series of flexible urea derivatives have been synthesized and demonstrated as selective cardiac myosin ATPase activator. Among them 1-phenethyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (1, cardiac myosin ATPase activation at 10 μM = 51.1%; FS = 18.90; EF = 12.15) and 1-benzyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (9, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 53.3%; FS = 30.04; EF = 18.27) showed significant activity in vitro and in vivo. The change of phenyl ring with tetrahydropyran-4-yl moiety viz., 1-(3-phenylpropyl)-3-((tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)methyl)urea (14, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 81.4%; FS = 20.50; EF = 13.10), and morpholine moiety viz., 1-(2-morpholinoethyl)-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (21, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 44.0%; FS = 24.79; EF = 15.65), proved to be efficient to activate the cardiac myosin. The potent compounds 1, 9, 14 and 21 were found to be selective for cardiac myosin over skeletal and smooth myosins. Thus, these urea derivatives are potent scaffold to develop as a newer cardiac myosin activator for the treatment of systolic heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Myosin isoenzyme distribution in overloaded human atrial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttrick, P M; Malhotra, A; Brodman, R; McDermott, L; Lam, L

    1986-09-01

    Using nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have identified two distinct myosin isoenzymes in human atrial tissue that correspond to the V1 and V3 isomyosins found in rat ventricular tissue. Normal left and right atrial appendages have approximately 50% V3. When the left atrium was exposed to hemodynamic overload secondary to mitral stenosis, the percent V3 increased to 77 +/- 10% (n = 10); exposure to hemodynamic overload secondary to mitral regurgitation caused an increase to 70 +/- 14% (n = 6). Changes in the isoenzyme pattern were seen in the right atria of patients with mitral stenosis and markedly elevated pulmonary arterial pressures compared with control subjects and patients with mitral stenosis without severe pulmonary hypertension. Several clinical variables were examined to determine which factors might influence isoenzyme expression. Age, sex, the presence of atrial fibrillation, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure did not predict the isoenzyme pattern. However, patients with mitral valvular disease and only slightly enlarged left atria tended to have a higher percent V3 than those with massively enlarged atria. These data confirm that human atrial tissue, like rat ventricular tissue, can alter its isomyosin composition in response to a hemodynamic load. The data further suggest that the isoenzyme shift is an early adaptation to the imposed load.

  3. Harmful impact of filamentous algae (Spirogyra sp.) on juvenile crayfish

    OpenAIRE

    Ulikowski Dariusz; Chybowski Łucjan; Traczuk Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of filamentous algae on the growth and survival of juvenile narrow-clawed crayfish, Astacus leptodactylus (Esch.), in rearing basins. Three stocking variants were used: A - basins with a layer of filamentous algae without imitation mineral substrate; B - basins with a layer of filamentous algae with imitation mineral substrate; C - basins without filamentous algae but with mineral substrate. The crayfish were reared from June 12 to October 10 ...

  4. Standing waves in a counter-rotating vortex filament pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Azpeitia, Carlos

    2018-03-01

    The distance among two counter-rotating vortex filaments satisfies a beam-type of equation according to the model derived in [15]. This equation has an explicit solution where two straight filaments travel with constant speed at a constant distance. The boundary condition of the filaments is 2π-periodic. Using the distance of the filaments as bifurcating parameter, an infinite number of branches of periodic standing waves bifurcate from this initial configuration with constant rational frequency along each branch.

  5. Graphene-based filament material for thermal ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewitt, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shick, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Siegfried, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-19

    The use of graphene oxide materials for thermal ionization mass spectrometry analysis of plutonium and uranium has been investigated. Filament made from graphene oxide slurries have been 3-D printed. A method for attaching these filaments to commercial thermal ionization post assemblies has been devised. Resistive heating of the graphene based filaments under high vacuum showed stable operation in excess of 4 hours. Plutonium ion production has been observed in an initial set of filaments spiked with the Pu 128 Certified Reference Material.

  6. Fabrication of Polylactide Nanocomposite Filament Using Melt Extrusion and Filament Characterization for 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shrenik Kumar

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) technology uses thermoplastic filament for layer by layer fabrication of objects. To make functional objects with desired properties, composite filaments are required in the FDM. In this thesis, less expensive mesoporous Nano carbon (NC) and carbon nanotube (CNT) infused in Polylactide (PLA) thermoplastic filaments were fabricated to improve the electrical properties and maintain sufficient strength for 3D printing. Solution blending was used for nanocomposite fabrication and melt extrusion was employed to make cylindrical filaments. Mechanical and electrical properties of 1 to 20 wt% of NC and 1 to 3 wt% of CNT filaments were investigated and significant improvement of conductivity (3.76 S/m) and sufficient yield strength (35MPa) were obtained. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images exhibited uniform dispersion of nanoparticles in polymer matrix and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results showed no significant changes in the glass transition temperature (Tg) for all the compositions. Perspective uses of this filament are for fabrication of electrical wires in 3D printed robots, drones, prosthetics, orthotics and others.

  7. Development of Nylon Based FDM Filament for Rapid Tooling Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Singh, S.

    2014-04-01

    There has been critical need for development of cost effective nylon based wire to be used as feed stock filament for fused deposition modelling (FDM) machine. But hitherto, very less work has been reported for development of alternate solution of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) based wire which is presently used in most of FDM machines. The present research work is focused on development of nylon based wire as an alternative of ABS wire (which is to be used as feedstock filament on FDM) without changing any hardware or software of machine. For the present study aluminium oxide (Al2O3) as additive in different proportion has been used with nylon fibre. Single screw extruder was used for wire preparation and wire thus produced was tested on FDM. Mechanical properties i.e. tensile strength and percentage elongation of finally developed wire have been optimized by Taguchi L9 technique. The work represented major development in reducing cost and time in rapid tooling applications.

  8. A penny-shaped crack in a filament-reinforced matrix. I - The filament model. II - The crack problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The study deals with the elastostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which is reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack. An elastic filament model is first developed, followed by consideration of the application of the model to the penny-shaped crack problem in which the filaments of finite length are asymmetrically distributed around the crack. Since the primary interest is in the application of the results to studies relating to the fracture of fiber or filament-reinforced composites and reinforced concrete, the main emphasis of the study is on the evaluation of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. Using the filament model developed, the elastostatic interaction problem between a penny-shaped crack and a slender inclusion or filament in an elastic matrix is formulated.

  9. Probing the flexibility of tropomyosin and its binding to filamentous actin using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Barua, Bipasha; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah E

    2013-10-15

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is a coiled-coil protein that binds to filamentous actin (F-actin) and regulates its interactions with actin-binding proteins like myosin by moving between three positions on F-actin (the blocked, closed, and open positions). To elucidate the molecular details of Tm flexibility in relation to its binding to F-actin, we conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations for both Tm alone and Tm-F-actin complex in the presence of explicit solvent (total simulation time >400 ns). Based on the simulations, we systematically analyzed the local flexibility of the Tm coiled coil using multiple parameters. We found a good correlation between the regions with high local flexibility and a number of destabilizing regions in Tm, including six clusters of core alanines. Despite the stabilization by F-actin binding, the distribution of local flexibility in Tm is largely unchanged in the absence and presence of F-actin. Our simulations showed variable fluctuations of individual Tm periods from the closed position toward the open position. In addition, we performed Tm-F-actin binding calculations based on the simulation trajectories, which support the importance of Tm flexibility to Tm-F-actin binding. We identified key residues of Tm involved in its dynamic interactions with F-actin, many of which have been found in recent mutational studies to be functionally important, and the rest of which will make promising targets for future mutational experiments. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Strain Mediated Adaptation Is Key for Myosin Mechanochemistry: Discovering General Rules for Motor Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biman Jana

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A structure-based model of myosin motor is built in the same spirit of our early work for kinesin-1 and Ncd towards physical understanding of its mechanochemical cycle. We find a structural adaptation of the motor head domain in post-powerstroke state that signals faster ADP release from it compared to the same from the motor head in the pre-powerstroke state. For dimeric myosin, an additional forward strain on the trailing head, originating from the postponed powerstroke state of the leading head in the waiting state of myosin, further increases the rate of ADP release. This coordination between the two heads is the essence of the processivity of the cycle. Our model provides a structural description of the powerstroke step of the cycle as an allosteric transition of the converter domain in response to the Pi release. Additionally, the variation in structural elements peripheral to catalytic motor domain is the deciding factor behind diverse directionalities of myosin motors (myosin V & VI. Finally, we observe that there are general rules for functional molecular motors across the different families. Allosteric structural adaptation of the catalytic motor head in different nucleotide states is crucial for mechanochemistry. Strain-mediated coordination between motor heads is essential for processivity and the variation of peripheral structural elements is essential for their diverse functionalities.

  11. Native myosin from adult rabbit skeletal muscle: isoenzymes and states of aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, J E; D'hahan, N; Taouil, K; Francin, M; Aguilar, A; Dalbiez, J P; Merah, Z; Grussaute, H; Hilbert, B; Ollagnon, F; Selva, G; Piot, F

    1998-04-21

    The globular heads of skeletal muscle myosin have been shown to exist as isoenzymes S1 (A1) and S1 (A2), and there are also isoforms of the heavy chains. Using capillary electrophoresis, we found two dominant isoenzymes of the whole native myosin molecule, in agreement with what has previously been found by various techniques for native and nondenatured myosin from adult rabbits. Findings about possible states of aggregation of myosin and its heads are contradictory. By analytical ultracentrifugation, we confirmed the existence of a tail-tail dimer. By laser light scattering, we found a head-head dimer in the presence of MgATP. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with analytical ultracentrifugation and laser light scattering led us to refine these results. We found tail-tail dimers in a conventional buffer. We found tail-tail and head-head dimers in the presence of 0.5 mM MgATP and pure head-head dimers in the presence of 6 mM MgATP. All the dimers were homodimers. Naming the dominant isoenzymes of myosin a and b, we observed tail-tail dimers with isoenzyme a (TaTa) and with isoenzyme b (TbTb) and also head-head dimers with isoenzyme a (HaHa) and with isoenzyme b (HbHb).

  12. Response of slow and fast muscle to hypothyroidism: maximal shortening velocity and myosin isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Herrick, R. E.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined both the shortening velocity and myosin isoform distribution of slow- (soleus) and fast-twitch (plantaris) skeletal muscles under hypothyroid conditions. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 7) or hypothyroid (n = 7). In both muscles, the relative contents of native slow myosin (SM) and type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) increased in response to the hypothyroid treatment. The effects were such that the hypothyroid soleus muscle expressed only the native SM and type I MHC isoforms while repressing native intermediate myosin and type IIA MHC. In the plantaris, the relative content of native SM and type I MHC isoforms increased from 5 to 13% and from 4 to 10% of the total myosin pool, respectively. Maximal shortening velocity of the soleus and plantaris as measured by the slack test decreased by 32 and 19%, respectively, in response to hypothyroidism. In contrast, maximal shortening velocity as estimated by force-velocity data decreased only in the soleus (-19%). No significant change was observed for the plantaris.

  13. [Myosin B ATPase activity of the intestinal smooth muscle in intestinal obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, H

    1983-06-01

    Intestinal smooth myosin B was prepared from muscle layers around the lesion in dogs with experimental colonic stenosis and in patients with congenital intestinal obstruction. Mg2+-ATPase activity of the myosin B was compared between the proximal dilated segment and distal segment to obstruction. Experimental colonic stenosis: In early period after surgery, proximal colons showed higher activity of myosin B ATPase than distal colons, decreasing to less than distal colon as time passed. Congenital intestinal obstruction: In three cases, whose atresia might have occurred at earlier period of gestation, proximal bowels showed less activity of myosin B ATPase than distal bowels. However, in two cases, whose atresia might have occurred at later period of gestation, and two cases with intestinal stenosis, proximal bowels indicated higher activity of myosin B ATPase than distal bowels. These data suggested that the contractibility of the proximal intestine was depending on the duration of obstruction, and it was depressed in the former patients and was accelerated in the latter patients. These results suggested that the extensive resection of dilated proximal bowel in the congenital atresia is not always necessary to obtain good postoperative intestinal dynamics at the operation of the atresial lesions which may be induced at later period of gestation. They also suggested that surgery for intestinal obstruction should be performed before the depression of intestinal contractibility to get good bowel function.

  14. Ultra-fast optical manipulation of single proteins binding to the actin cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Marco; Gardini, Lucia; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2014-02-01

    In the last decade, forces and mechanical stresses acting on biological systems are emerging as regulatory factors essential for cell life. Emerging evidences indicate that factors such as applied forces or the rigidity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) determine the shape and function of cells and organisms1. Classically, the regulation of biological systems is described through a series of biochemical signals and enzymatic reactions, which direct the processes and cell fate. However, mechanotransduction, i.e. the conversion of mechanical forces into biochemical and biomolecular signals, is at the basis of many biological processes fundamental for the development and differentiation of cells, for their correct function and for the development of pathologies. We recently developed an in vitro system that allows the investigation of force-dependence of the interaction of proteins binding the actin cytoskeleton, at the single molecule level. Our system displays a delay of only ~10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. Our assay allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds and conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  15. Fabrication of PLA Filaments and its Printable Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhou, Jianping; Ma, Yuming; Wang, Jie; Xu, Jie

    2017-12-01

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is a typical 3D printing technology and preparation of qualified filaments is the basis. In order to prepare polylactic acid (PLA) filaments suitable for personalized FDM 3D printing, this article investigated the effect of factors such as extrusion temperature and screw speed on the diameter, surface roughness and ultimate tensile stress of the obtained PLA filaments. The optimal process parameters for fabrication of qualified filaments were determined. Further, the printable performance of the obtained PLA filaments for 3D objects was preliminarily explored.

  16. The effects of polymer molecular weight on filament thinning and drop breakup in microchannels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arratia, P E; Cramer, L-A; Gollub, J P; Durian, D J

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the effects of fluid elasticity on the dynamics of filament thinning and drop breakup processes in a cross-slot microchannel. Elasticity effects are examined using dilute aqueous polymeric solutions of molecular weight (MW) ranging from 1.5x10 3 to 1.8x10 7 . Results for polymeric fluids are compared to those for a viscous Newtonian fluid. The shearing or continuous phase that induces breakup is mineral oil. All fluids possess similar shear-viscosity (∼0.2 Pa s) so that the viscosity ratio between the oil and aqueous phases is close to unity. Measurements of filament thickness as a function of time show different thinning behavior for the different aqueous fluids. For Newtonian fluids, the thinning process shows a single exponential decay of the filament thickness. For low MW fluids (10 3 , 10 4 and 10 5 ), the thinning process also shows a single exponential decay, but with a decay rate that is slower than for the Newtonian fluid. The decay time increases with polymer MW. For high MW (10 6 and 10 7 ) fluids, the initial exponential decay crosses over to a second exponential decay in which elastic stresses are important. We show that the decay rate of the filament thickness in this exponential decay regime can be used to measure the steady extensional viscosity of the fluids. At late times, all fluids cross over to an algebraic decay which is driven mainly by surface tension.

  17. A bioinformatic and computational study of myosin phosphatase subunit diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Rachael P; Fisher, Steven A

    2014-08-01

    Variability in myosin phosphatase (MP) subunits may provide specificity in signaling pathways that regulate muscle tone. We utilized public databases and computational algorithms to investigate the phylogenetic diversity of MP regulatory (PPP1R12A-C) and inhibitory (PPP1R14A-D) subunits. The comparison of exonic coding sequences and expression data confirmed or refuted the existence of isoforms and their tissue-specific expression in different model organisms. The comparison of intronic and exonic sequences identified potential expressional regulatory elements. As examples, smooth muscle MP regulatory subunit (PPP1R12A) is highly conserved through evolution. Its alternative exon E24 is present in fish through mammals with two invariant features: 1) a reading frame shift generating a premature termination codon and 2) a hexanucleotide sequence adjacent to the 3' splice site hypothesized to be a novel suppressor of exon splicing. A characteristic of the striated muscle MP regulatory subunit (PPP1R12B) locus is numerous and phylogenetically variable transcriptional start sites. In fish this locus only codes for the small (M21) subunit, suggesting the primordial function of this gene. Inhibitory subunits show little intragenic variability; their diversity is thought to have arisen by expansion and tissue-specific expression of different gene family members. We demonstrate differences in the regulatory landscape between smooth muscle enriched (PPP1R14A) and more ubiquitously expressed (PPP1R14B) family members and identify deeply conserved intronic sequence and predicted transcriptional cis-regulatory elements. This bioinformatic and computational study has uncovered a number of attributes of MP subunits that supports selection of ideal model organisms and testing of hypotheses regarding their physiological significance and regulated expression. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Phosphorylation Regulates Interaction of 210-kDa Myosin Light Chain Kinase N-terminal Domain with Actin Cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilitkevich, E L; Khapchaev, A Y; Kudryashov, D S; Nikashin, A V; Schavocky, J P; Lukas, T J; Watterson, D M; Shirinsky, V P

    2015-10-01

    High molecular weight myosin light chain kinase (MLCK210) is a multifunctional protein involved in myosin II activation and integration of cytoskeletal components in cells. MLCK210 possesses actin-binding regions both in the central part of the molecule and in its N-terminal tail domain. In HeLa cells, mitotic protein kinase Aurora B was suggested to phosphorylate MLCK210 N-terminal tail at serine residues (Dulyaninova, N. G., and Bresnick, A. R. (2004) Exp. Cell Res., 299, 303-314), but the functional significance of the phosphorylation was not established. We report here that in vitro, the N-terminal actin-binding domain of MLCK210 is located within residues 27-157 (N27-157, avian MLCK210 sequence) and is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and Aurora B at serine residues 140/149 leading to a decrease in N27-157 binding to actin. The same residues are phosphorylated in a PKA-dependent manner in transfected HeLa cells. Further, in transfected cells, phosphomimetic mutants of N27-157 showed reduced association with the detergent-stable cytoskeleton, whereas in vitro, the single S149D mutation reduced N27-157 association with F-actin to a similar extent as that achieved by N27-157 phosphorylation. Altogether, our results indicate that phosphorylation of MLCK210 at distinct serine residues, mainly at S149, attenuates the interaction of MLCK210 N-terminus with the actin cytoskeleton and might serve to regulate MLCK210 microfilament cross-linking activity in cells.

  19. Morphogenesis of filaments growing in flexible confinements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, R.; Wittel, F. K.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2014-07-01

    Space-saving design is a requirement that is encountered in biological systems and the development of modern technological devices alike. Many living organisms dynamically pack their polymer chains, filaments or membranes inside deformable vesicles or soft tissue-like cell walls, chorions and buds. Surprisingly little is known about morphogenesis due to growth in flexible confinements—perhaps owing to the daunting complexity lying in the nonlinear feedback between packed material and expandable cavity. Here we show by experiments and simulations how geometric and material properties lead to a plethora of morphologies when elastic filaments are growing far beyond the equilibrium size of a flexible thin sheet they are confined in. Depending on friction, sheet flexibility and thickness, we identify four distinct morphological phases emerging from bifurcation and present the corresponding phase diagram. Four order parameters quantifying the transitions between these phases are proposed.

  20. SWAYING THREADS OF A SOLAR FILAMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.; Engvold, O.; Langangen, Oe.; Rouppe van der Voort, L. H. M.; Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Oliver, R.

    2009-01-01

    From recent high-resolution observations obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope in La Palma, we detect swaying motions of individual filament threads in the plane of the sky. The oscillatory characters of these motions are comparable with oscillatory Doppler signals obtained from corresponding filament threads. Simultaneous recordings of motions in the line of sight and in the plane of the sky give information about the orientation of the oscillatory plane. These oscillations are interpreted in the context of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. Kink MHD waves supported by the thread body are proposed as an explanation of the observed thread oscillations. On the basis of this interpretation and by means of seismological arguments, we give an estimation of the thread Alfven speed and magnetic field strength by means of seismological arguments.

  1. Helicity and Filament Channels? The Straight Twist!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important and most puzzling features of the coronal magnetic field is that it appears to have smooth magnetic structure with little evidence for non-potentiality except at special locations, photospheric polarity inversions lines where the non-potentiality is observed as a filament channel. This characteristic feature of the closed-field corona is highly unexpected given that photospheric motions continuously tangle its magnetic field. Although reconnection can eliminate some of the injected structure, it cannot destroy the helicity, which should build up to produce observable complexity. We propose that an inverse cascade process transports the injected helicity from the interior of closed flux regions to their boundaries, polarity inversion lines, creating filament channels. We describe how the helicity is injected and transported and calculate the relevant rates. We argue that one process, helicity transport, can explain both the observed lack and presence of structure in the coronal magnetic field.

  2. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2016-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they result from proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in epithelial tissue. Culture, histopathological and molecular evidence of spirochetal infection associated with MD has been presented in several published studies using a variety of techniques. Spirochetes genetically identified as Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto predominate as the infective agent in most of the Morgellons skin specimens studied so far. Other species of Borrelia including Borrelia garinii , Borrelia miyamotoi , and Borrelia hermsii have also been detected in skin specimens taken from MD patients. The optimal treatment for MD remains to be determined.

  3. Statistical study of solar filaments since 1919

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboudarham, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Science board of Paris Observatory funded the data capture of tables associated with Meudon synoptic maps of Solar activity, which were published for observations ranging from 1919 to 1992. The EU HELIO project developed automatic recognition codes, especially concerning filaments based on observations between 1996 en 2014 (and soon, up to now). We plan to fill the gap between the two catalogues in the short term. But it is already possible to study filaments behavior over quite long periods of time. We present here the first series of results obtained from this analysis which give some clue about the way Solar activity behaves in various parts of the cycle, and about the way if depends on the hemisphere where activity occurs. This information could then be correlated with events catalogues (e.g. flares, CMEs, …) in order to link those phenomena with concrete Solar activity.

  4. Actin organization and dynamics in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berepiki, Adokiye; Lichius, Alexander; Read, Nick D

    2011-11-02

    Growth and morphogenesis of filamentous fungi is underpinned by dynamic reorganization and polarization of the actin cytoskeleton. Actin has crucial roles in exocytosis, endocytosis, organelle movement and cytokinesis in fungi, and these processes are coupled to the production of distinct higher-order structures (actin patches, cables and rings) that generate forces or serve as tracks for intracellular transport. New approaches for imaging actin in living cells are revealing important similarities and differences in actin architecture and organization within the fungal kingdom, and have yielded key insights into cell polarity, tip growth and long-distance intracellular transport. In this Review, we discuss the contribution that recent live-cell imaging and mutational studies have made to our understanding of the dynamics and regulation of actin in filamentous fungi.

  5. Laser filamentation mathematical methods and models

    CERN Document Server

    Lorin, Emmanuel; Moloney, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    This book is focused on the nonlinear theoretical and mathematical problems associated with ultrafast intense laser pulse propagation in gases and in particular, in air. With the aim of understanding the physics of filamentation in gases, solids, the atmosphere, and even biological tissue, specialists in nonlinear optics and filamentation from both physics and mathematics attempt to rigorously derive and analyze relevant non-perturbative models. Modern laser technology allows the generation of ultrafast (few cycle) laser pulses, with intensities exceeding the internal electric field in atoms and molecules (E=5x109 V/cm or intensity I = 3.5 x 1016 Watts/cm2 ). The interaction of such pulses with atoms and molecules leads to new, highly nonlinear nonperturbative regimes, where new physical phenomena, such as High Harmonic Generation (HHG), occur, and from which the shortest (attosecond - the natural time scale of the electron) pulses have been created. One of the major experimental discoveries in this nonlinear...

  6. FROM DUSTY FILAMENTS TO MASSIVE STARS: THE CASE OF NGC 7538 S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naranjo-Romero, Raul; Zapata, Luis A.; Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia 58090 (Mexico); Takahashi, Satoko [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Palau, Aina [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Schilke, Peter [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2012-09-20

    We report on high-sensitivity and high angular resolution archival Submillimeter Array observations of the large ({approx}15,000 AU) putative circumstellar disk associated with the O-type protostar NGC 7538 S. Observations of the continuum resolve this putative circumstellar disk into five compact sources, with sizes {approx}3000 AU and masses {approx}10 M{sub Sun }. This confirms the results of recent millimeter observations made with CARMA/BIMA toward this object. However, we find that most of these compact sources eject collimated bipolar outflows, revealed by our silicon monoxide (SiO J = 5-4) observations, and confirm that these sources have a (proto)stellar nature. All outflows are perpendicular to the large and rotating dusty structure. We propose therefore that, rather than being a single massive circumstellar disk, NGC 7538 S could instead be a large and massive contracting or rotating filament that is fragmenting at scales of 0.1-0.01 pc to form several B-type stars, via the standard process involving outflows and disks. As in recent high spatial resolution studies of dusty filaments, our observations also suggest that thermal pressure does not seem to be sufficient to support the filament, so that either additional support needs to be invoked or else the filament must be in the process of collapsing. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics numerical simulation of the formation of a molecular cloud by converging warm neutral medium flows produces contracting filaments whose dimensions and spacings between the stars forming within them, as well as their column densities, strongly resemble those observed in the filament reported here.

  7. Apoptotic-like programed cell death in fungi: the benefits in filamentous species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlezinger, Neta; Goldfinger, Nir; Sharon, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Studies conducted in the early 1990s showed for the first time that Saccharomyces cerevisiae can undergo cell death with hallmarks of animal apoptosis. These findings came as a surprise, since suicide machinery was unexpected in unicellular organisms. Today, apoptosis in yeast is well-documented. Apoptotic death of yeast cells has been described under various conditions and S. cerevisiae homologs of human apoptotic genes have been identified and characterized. These studies also revealed fundamental differences between yeast and animal apoptosis; in S. cerevisiae apoptosis is mainly associated with aging and stress adaptation, unlike animal apoptosis, which is essential for proper development. Further, many apoptosis regulatory genes are either missing, or highly divergent in S. cerevisiae. Therefore, in this review we will use the term apoptosis-like programed cell death (PCD) instead of apoptosis. Despite these significant differences, S. cerevisiae has been instrumental in promoting the study of heterologous apoptotic proteins, particularly from human. Work in fungi other than S. cerevisiae revealed differences in the manifestation of PCD in single cell (yeasts) and multicellular (filamentous) species. Such differences may reflect the higher complexity level of filamentous species, and hence the involvement of PCD in a wider range of processes and life styles. It is also expected that differences might be found in the apoptosis apparatus of yeast and filamentous species. In this review we focus on aspects of PCD that are unique or can be better studied in filamentous species. We will highlight the similarities and differences of the PCD machinery between yeast and filamentous species and show the value of using S. cerevisiae along with filamentous species to study apoptosis.

  8. CORONAL IMPLOSION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN THE WAKE OF A FILAMENT ERUPTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Rui; Wang Haimin

    2009-01-01

    We study the evolution of a group of TRACE 195 A coronal loops overlying a reverse S-shaped filament on 2001 June 15. These loops were initially pushed upward with the filament ascending and kinking slowly, but as soon as the filament rose explosively, they began to contract at a speed of ∼100 km s -1 , and sustained for at least 12 minutes, presumably due to the reduced magnetic pressure underneath with the filament escaping. Despite the contraction following the expansion, the loops of interest remained largely intact during the filament eruption, rather than formed via reconnection. These contracting loops naturally formed a shrinking trap, in which hot electrons of several keV, in an order of magnitude estimation, can be accelerated to nonthermal energies. A single hard X-ray (HXR) burst, with no corresponding rise in GOES soft X-ray (SXR) flux, was recorded by the Hard X-ray Telescope (HXT) on board Yohkoh, when the contracting loops expectedly approached the post-flare arcade originating from the filament eruption. HXT images reveal a coronal source distinctly above the top of the SXR arcade by ∼15''. The injecting electron population for the coronal source (thin target) is hardening by ∼1.5 powers relative to the footpoint emission (thick target), which is consistent with electron trapping in the weak diffusion limit. Although we cannot rule out additional reconnection, observational evidence suggests that the shrinking coronal trap may play a significant role in the observed nonthermal HXR emission during the flare decay phase.

  9. Laser induced white lighting of tungsten filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, W.; Tomala, R.; Lukaszewicz, M.

    2018-04-01

    The sustained bright white light emission of thin tungsten filament was induced under irradiation with focused beam of CW infrared laser diode. The broadband emission centered at 600 nm has demonstrated the threshold behavior on excitation power. Its intensity increased non-linearly with excitation power. The emission occurred only from the spot of focused beam of excitation laser diode. The white lighting was accompanied by efficient photocurrent flow and photoelectron emission which both increased non-linearly with laser irradiation power.

  10. Filamented plasmas in laser ablation of solids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davies, J.R.; Fajardo, M.; Kozlová, Michaela; Mocek, Tomáš; Polan, Jiří; Rus, Bedřich

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2009), 035013/1-035013/12 ISSN 0741-3335 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 12843 - TUIXS Grant - others:FCT(PT) POCI/FIS/59563/2004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : magneto-hydrodynamic modelling * perturbation * filaments * x-ray * plasma Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.409, year: 2009

  11. Subcycle engineering of laser filamentation in gas by harmonic seeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béjot, P.; Karras, G.; Billard, F.; Doussot, J.; Hertz, E.; Lavorel, B.; Faucher, O.

    2015-11-01

    Manipulating at will the propagation dynamics of high power laser pulses is a long-standing dream whose accomplishment would lead to the control of fascinating physical phenomena emerging from laser-matter interaction. The present work represents a significant step towards such a control by manipulating the nonlinear optical response of the gas medium. This is accomplished by shaping an intense laser pulse experiencing filamentation at the subcycle level with a relatively weak (≃1 % ) third-harmonic radiation. The control results from quantum interference between a single- and a two-color (mixing the fundamental frequency with its third-harmonic) ionization channel. This mechanism, which depends on the relative phase between the two electric fields, is responsible for wide refractive index modifications in relation with significant enhancement or suppression of the ionization rate. As a first application, we demonstrate the production and control of an axially modulated plasma channel.

  12. Multidimensional structure-function relationships in human β-cardiac myosin from population-scale genetic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homburger, J.R. (Julian R.); Green, E.M. (Eric M.); Caleshu, C. (Colleen); Sunitha, M.S. (Margaret S.); Taylor, R.E. (Rebecca E.); Ruppel, K.M. (Kathleen M.); Metpally, R.P.R. (Raghu Prasad Rao); S.D. Colan (Steven); M. Michels (Michelle); Day, S.M. (Sharlene M.); I. Olivotto (Iacopo); Bustamante, C.D. (Carlos D.); Dewey, F.E. (Frederick E.); Ho, C.Y. (Carolyn Y.); Spudich, J.A. (James A.); Ashley, E.A. (Euan A.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMyosin motors are the fundamental force-generating elements of muscle contraction. Variation in the human β-cardiac myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) can lead to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a heritable disease characterized by cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and sudden cardiac

  13. The local expression of adult chicken heart myosins during development. I. The three days embryonic chicken heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, E.; Moorman, A. F.; Los, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Immunofluorescence studies were performed on serial sections of three days embryonic chicken hearts using antibodies specific for adult atrial and ventricular myosin heavy chains respectively. The anti-ventricular myosin serum reacted with the entire myocardium showing a decreasing intensity going

  14. Effect of nucleotides on the orientation and mobility of myosin subfragment-1 in ghost muscle fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronina, O E; Wrzosek, A; Dabrowska, R; Borovikov, Yu S

    2005-10-01

    Using polarization fluorimetry, the orientation and mobility of 1,5-IAEDANS specifically bound to Cys707 of myosin subfragment-1 (S1) were studied in ghost muscle tropomyosin-containing fibers in the absence and in the presence of MgADP, MgAMP-PNP, MgATPgammaS, or MgATP. Modeling of various intermediate states was accompanied by discrete changes in actomyosin orientation and mobility of fluorescent dye dipoles. This suggests multistep changes in the structural state of the myosin head during the ATPase cycle. Maximal differences in the probe orientation by 4 degrees and its mobility by 30% were found between actomyosin states in the presence of MgADP and MgATP. It is suggested that interaction of S1 with F-actin induces nucleotide-dependent rotation of the whole motor domain of the myosin head or only the dye-binding site and also change in the head mobility.

  15. A first approach to filament dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, P E S; De Abreu, F Vistulo; Dias, R G [Department of Physics, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Simoes, R, E-mail: fva@ua.p [I3N-Institute for Nanostructures, Nanomodelling and Nanofabrication (Portugal)

    2010-11-15

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive equations governing the dynamics of an elastic lament suitable for a computer simulation implementation. The derivation starts from the relation between forces and potential energy in conservative systems in order to derive the equation of motion of any bead in the filament. Only two-dimensional movements are considered, but extensions to three dimensions can follow similar lines. Suggestions for computer implementations are provided in Matlab as well as an example of application related to the generation of musical sounds. This example allows a critical analysis of the numerical results obtained using a cross-disciplinary perspective. Since derivations start from basic physics equations, use simple calculus and computational implementations are straightforward, this paper proposes a different approach to introduce simple molecular dynamics simulations or animations of real systems in undergraduate elasticity or computer modelling courses.

  16. The Magnetic Structure of Filament Barbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jongchul; Moon, Yong-Jae; Park, Young-Deuk

    2005-06-01

    There is a controversy about how features protruding laterally from filaments, called barbs, are magnetically structured. On 2004 August 3, we observed a filament that had well-developed barbs. The observations were performed using the 10 inch refractor of the Big Bear Solar Observatory. A fast camera was employed to capture images at five different wavelengths of the Hα line and successively record them on the basis of frame selection. The terminating points of the barbs were clearly discernable in the Hα images without any ambiguity. The comparison of the Hα images with the magnetograms taken by SOHO MDI revealed that the termination occurred above the minor polarity inversion line dividing the magnetic elements of the major polarity and those of the minor polarity. There is also evidence that the flux cancellation proceeded on the polarity inversion line. Our results together with similar other recent observations support the idea that filament barbs are cool matter suspended in local dips of magnetic field lines, formed by magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere.

  17. Tracer filamentation at an unstable ocean front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yen Chia; Mahadevan, Amala; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Yecko, Philip

    2017-11-01

    A front, where two bodies of ocean water with different physical properties meet, can become unstable and lead to a flow with high strain rate and vorticity. Phytoplankton and other oceanic tracers are stirred into filaments by such flow fields, as can often be seen in satellite imagery. The stretching and folding of a tracer by a two-dimensional flow field has been well studied. In the ocean, however, the vertical shear of horizontal velocity is typically two orders of magnitude larger than the horizontal velocity gradient. Theoretical calculations show that vertical shear alters the way in which horizontal strain affects the tracer, resulting in thin, sloping structures in the tracer field. Using a non-hydrostatic ocean model of an unstable ocean front, we simulate tracer filamentation to identify the effect of vertical shear on the deformation of the tracer. In a complementary laboratory experiment, we generate a simple, vertically sheared strain flow and use dye and particle image velocimetry to quantify the filamentary structures in terms of the strain and shear. We identify how vertical shear alters the tracer filaments and infer how the evolution of tracers in the ocean will differ from the idealized two-dimensional paradigm. Support of NSF DMS-1418956 is acknowledged.

  18. A first approach to filament dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, P E S; De Abreu, F Vistulo; Dias, R G; Simoes, R

    2010-01-01

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive equations governing the dynamics of an elastic lament suitable for a computer simulation implementation. The derivation starts from the relation between forces and potential energy in conservative systems in order to derive the equation of motion of any bead in the filament. Only two-dimensional movements are considered, but extensions to three dimensions can follow similar lines. Suggestions for computer implementations are provided in Matlab as well as an example of application related to the generation of musical sounds. This example allows a critical analysis of the numerical results obtained using a cross-disciplinary perspective. Since derivations start from basic physics equations, use simple calculus and computational implementations are straightforward, this paper proposes a different approach to introduce simple molecular dynamics simulations or animations of real systems in undergraduate elasticity or computer modelling courses.

  19. Magnetization Modeling of Twisted Superconducting Filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Satiramatekul, T; Devred, Arnaud; Leroy, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new Finite Element numerical method to analyze the coupling between twisted filaments in a superconducting multifilament composite wire. To avoid the large number of elements required by a 3D code, the proposed method makes use of the energy balance principle in a 2D code. The relationship between superconductor critical current density and local magnetic flux density is implemented in the program for the Bean and modified Kim models. The modeled wire is made up of six filaments twisted together and embedded in a lowresistivity matrix. Computations of magnetization cycle and of the electric field pattern have been performed for various twist pitch values in the case of a pure copper matrix. The results confirm that the maximum magnetization depends on the matrix conductivity, the superconductor critical current density, the applied field frequency, and the filament twist pitch. The simulations also lead to a practical criterion for wire design that can be used to assess whether or not th...

  20. On the fragmentation of filaments in a molecular cloud simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chira, R.-A.; Kainulainen, J.; Ibáñez-Mejía, J. C.; Henning, Th.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    2018-03-01

    Context. The fragmentation of filaments in molecular clouds has attracted a lot of attention recently as there seems to be a close relation between the evolution of filaments and star formation. The study of the fragmentation process has been motivated by simple analytical models. However, only a few comprehensive studies have analysed the evolution of filaments using numerical simulations where the filaments form self-consistently as part of large-scale molecular cloud evolution. Aim. We address the early evolution of parsec-scale filaments that form within individual clouds. In particular, we focus on three questions: How do the line masses of filaments evolve? How and when do the filaments fragment? How does the fragmentation relate to the line masses of the filaments? Methods: We examine three simulated molecular clouds formed in kiloparsec-scale numerical simulations performed with the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamic code. The simulations model a self-gravitating, magnetised, stratified, supernova-driven interstellar medium, including photoelectric heating and radiative cooling. We follow the evolution of the clouds for 6 Myr from the time self-gravity starts to act. We identify filaments using the DisPerSe algorithm, and compare the results to other filament-finding algorithms. We determine the properties of the identified filaments and compare them with the predictions of analytic filament stability models. Results: The average line masses of the identified filaments, as well as the fraction of mass in filamentary structures, increases fairly continuously after the onset of self-gravity. The filaments show fragmentation starting relatively early: the first fragments appear when the line masses lie well below the critical line mass of Ostriker's isolated hydrostatic equilibrium solution ( 16 M⊙ pc-1), commonly used as a fragmentation criterion. The average line masses of filaments identified in three-dimensional volume density cubes

  1. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peremyslov, Valera V; Cole, Rex A; Fowler, John E; Dolja, Valerian V

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI), cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors) and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6-1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development.

  2. BMP-2 Overexpression Augments Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Motility by Upregulating Myosin Va via Erk Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The disruption of physiologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration initiates atherosclerosis development. The biochemical mechanisms leading to dysfunctional VSMC motility remain unknown. Recently, cytokine BMP-2 has been implicated in various vascular physiologic and pathologic processes. However, whether BMP-2 has any effect upon VSMC motility, or by what manner, has never been investigated. Methods. VSMCs were adenovirally transfected to genetically overexpress BMP-2. VSMC motility was detected by modified Boyden chamber assay, confocal time-lapse video assay, and a colony wounding assay. Gene chip array and RT-PCR were employed to identify genes potentially regulated by BMP-2. Western blot and real-time PCR detected the expression of myosin Va and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed myosin Va expression locale. Intracellular Ca2+ oscillations were recorded. Results. VSMC migration was augmented in VSMCs overexpressing BMP-2 in a dose-dependent manner. siRNA-mediated knockdown of myosin Va inhibited VSMC motility. Both myosin Va mRNA and protein expression significantly increased after BMP-2 administration and were inhibited by Erk1/2 inhibitor U0126. BMP-2 induced Ca2+ oscillations, generated largely by a “cytosolic oscillator”. Conclusion. BMP-2 significantly increased VSMCs migration and myosin Va expression, via the Erk signaling pathway and intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. We provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, and inhibition of BMP-2-induced myosin Va expression may represent a potential therapeutic strategy.

  3. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valera V Peremyslov

    Full Text Available Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI, cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6-1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development.

  4. Preparation of monoclonal antibodies against cardiac myosin and some radiolabelling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bapat, K.; Venkatesh, M.; Pillai, M.R.A.; Sarma, H.D.; Sainis, K.B.

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against myosin, a specific indicator of myocardial infarction and labelled with 125 I and 99m Tc. Human cardiac myosin was isolated from normal human heart and was used for raising the monoclonal antibodies by the hybridoma technique. Antibody producing clones were identified by ELISA and cloning was done by the limiting dilution technique. Of the 13 clones obtained, 4 were deemed suitable for further studies. The antibodies were grown in ascites, purified, isotyped and their cross reactions with other forms of myosin were estimated. All the clones showed negligible cross reaction with rabbit myosin, but reacted to different extents with bovine skeletal myosin. The most avid antibody Mab-4G4 was chosen for further labelling studies. Mab-4G4 was labelled with 125 I using different oxidising agents such as iodogen, chloramine-T and lactoperoxidase. Purified radioiodinated antibody with radiochemical purity >95% could be obtained by gel filtration. Immunoreactivity was retained as tested by binding to myosin immobilised on a solid support. Mab-4G4 was also labelled with 99m Tc using stannous tartrate as the reducing agent. Radiolabelling yield was ∼60%, the purity was >95% and the immunoreactivity was retained. Both the labelled preparations were tested for bio-distribution in normal and infarcted rats. The activity accumulation in the infarcted region was ∼ 1.5 and 3.5 times as that in normal heart muscle for 125 I and 99m Tc labelled Mab-4G4 respectively. The major problem with the iodinated antibody was the in vivo deiodination resulting in very high percentage of activity in the thyroid. Although the fraction of the total activity associated with the infarcted heart is not very impressive, the fact that the activities with the infarcted and normal hearths are significantly different is heartening. With further optimisation of labelling and use of F(ab)'2 fragments, better delineation of the infarct sites is aspired. (author)

  5. Radiation-induced myosin IIA expression stimulates collagen type I matrix reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockhuys, Stéphanie; Van Rompaye, Bart; De Rycke, Riet; Lambein, Kathleen; Claes, Kathleen; Bracke, Marc; De Wagter, Carlos; De Wever, Olivier

    2013-07-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) reorganization critically contributes to breast cancer (BC) progression and radiotherapy response. We investigated the molecular background and functional consequences of collagen type I (col-I) reorganization by irradiated breast cancer cells (BCC). Radiation-induced (RI) col-I reorganization was evaluated for MCF-7/6, MCF-7/AZ, T47D and SK-BR-3 BCC. Phase-contrast microscopy and a stressed matrix contraction assay were used for visualization and quantification of col-I reorganization. Cell-matrix interactions were assessed by the inhibition of β1 integrin (neutralizing antibody 'P5D2') or focal adhesion kinase (FAK; GSK22560098 small molecule kinase inhibitor). The role of the actomyosin cytoskeleton was explored by western blotting analysis of myosin II expression and activity; and by gene silencing of myosin IIA and pharmacological inhibition of the actomyosin system (blebbistatin, cytochalasin D). BCC death was evaluated by propidium iodide staining. We observed a radiation dose-dependent increase of col-I reorganization by BCC. β1 Integrin/FAK-mediated cell-matrix interactions are essential for RI col-I reorganization. Irradiated BCC are characterized by increased myosin IIA expression and myosin IIA-dependent col-I reorganization. Moreover, RI col-I reorganization by BCC is associated with decreased BCC death, as suggested by pharmacological targeting of the β1 integrin/FAK/myosin IIA pathway. Our data indicate the role of myosin IIA in col-I reorganization by irradiated BCC and reciprocal BCC death. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Bipolar Filaments Formed by Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 SSB/Recombination Protein (ICP8) Suggest a Mechanism for DNA Annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhov, A.M.; Simon, M.; Sen, A.; Yu, X.; Griffith, J. D.; Egelman, E. H.

    2009-02-20

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 encodes a multifunctional protein, ICP8, which serves both as a single-strand binding protein and as a recombinase, catalyzing reactions involved in replication and recombination of the viral genome. In the presence of divalent ions and at low temperature, previous electron microscopic studies showed that ICP8 will form long left-handed helical filaments. Here, electron microscopic image reconstruction reveals that the filaments are bipolar, with an asymmetric unit containing two subunits of ICP8 that constitute a symmetrical dimer. This organization of the filament has been confirmed using scanning transmission electron microscopy. The pitch of the filaments is {approx} 250 {angstrom}, with {approx} 6.2 dimers per turn. Docking of a crystal structure of ICP8 into the reconstructed filament shows that the C-terminal domain of ICP8, attached to the body of the subunit by a flexible linker containing {approx} 10 residues, is packed into a pocket in the body of a neighboring subunit in the crystal in a similar manner as in the filament. However, the interactions between the large N-terminal domains are quite different in the filament from that observed in the crystal. A previously proposed model for ICP8 binding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), based upon the crystal structure, leads to a model for a continuous strand of ssDNA near the filament axis. The bipolar nature of the ICP8 filaments means that a second strand of ssDNA would be running through this filament in the opposite orientation, and this provides a potential mechanism for how ICP8 anneals complementary ssDNA into double-stranded DNA, where each strand runs in opposite directions.

  7. Association analysis of genetic variants in the myosin IXB gene in acute pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rian M Nijmeijer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Impairment of the mucosal barrier plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. The myosin IXB (MYO9B gene and the two tight-junction adaptor genes, PARD3 and MAGI2, have been linked to gastrointestinal permeability. Common variants of these genes are associated with celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease, two other conditions in which intestinal permeability plays a role. We investigated genetic variation in MYO9B, PARD3 and MAGI2 for association with acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in MYO9B, two SNPs in PARD3, and three SNPs in MAGI2 were studied in a Dutch cohort of 387 patients with acute pancreatitis and over 800 controls, and in a German cohort of 235 patients and 250 controls. RESULTS: Association to MYO9B and PARD3 was observed in the Dutch cohort, but only one SNP in MYO9B and one in MAGI2 showed association in the German cohort (p < 0.05. Joint analysis of the combined cohorts showed that, after correcting for multiple testing, only two SNPs in MYO9B remained associated (rs7259292, p = 0.0031, odds ratio (OR 1.94, 95% confidence interval (95% CI 1.35-2.78; rs1545620, p = 0.0006, OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.16-1.53. SNP rs1545620 is a non-synonymous SNP previously suspected to impact on ulcerative colitis. None of the SNPs showed association to disease severity or etiology. CONCLUSION: Variants in MYO9B may be involved in acute pancreatitis, but we found no evidence for involvement of PARD3 or MAGI2.

  8. Phos-tag-based analysis of myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation in human uterine myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector N Aguilar

    Full Text Available The 'phosphate-binding tag' (phos-tag reagent enables separation of phospho-proteins during SDS-PAGE by impeding migration proportional to their phosphorylation stoichiometry. Western blotting can then be used to detect and quantify the bands corresponding to the phospho-states of a target protein. We present a method for quantification of data regarding phospho-states derived from phos-tag SDS-PAGE. The method incorporates corrections for lane-to-lane loading variability and for the effects of drug vehicles thus enabling the comparison of multiple treatments by using the untreated cellular set-point as a reference. This method is exemplified by quantifying the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC in cultured human uterine myocytes.We have evaluated and validated the concept that, when using an antibody (Ab against the total-protein, the sum of all phosphorylation states in a single lane represents a 'closed system' since all possible phospho-states and phosphoisotypes are detected. Using this approach, we demonstrate that oxytocin (OT and calpeptin (Calp induce RLC kinase (MLCK- and rho-kinase (ROK-dependent enhancements in phosphorylation of RLC at T18 and S19. Treatment of myocytes with a phorbol ester (PMA induced phosphorylation of S1-RLC, which caused a mobility shift in the phos-tag matrices distinct from phosphorylation at S19.We have presented a method for analysis of phospho-state data that facilitates quantitative comparison to a reference control without the use of a traditional 'loading' or 'reference' standard. This analysis is useful for assessing effects of putative agonists and antagonists where all phospho-states are represented in control and experimental samples. We also demonstrated that phosphorylation of RLC at S1 is inducible in intact uterine myocytes, though the signal in the resting samples was not sufficiently abundant to allow quantification by the approach used here.

  9. Stabilization of the ADP/Metaphosphate Intermediate during ATP Hydrolysis in Pre-power Stroke Myosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed recently that ATP hydrolysis in ATPase enzymes proceeds via an initial intermediate in which the dissociated γ-phosphate of ATP is bound in the protein as a metaphosphate (PγO3−). A combined quantum/classical analysis of this dissociated nucleotide state inside myosin provides a quantitative understanding of how the enzyme stabilizes this unusual metaphosphate. Indeed, in vacuum, the energy of the ADP3−·PγO3−·Mg2+ complex is much higher than that of the undissociated ATP4−. The protein brings it to a surprisingly low value. Energy decomposition reveals how much each interaction in the protein stabilizes the metaphosphate state; backbone peptides of the P-loop contribute 50% of the stabilization energy, and the side chain of Lys-185+ contributes 25%. This can be explained by the fact that these groups make strong favorable interactions with the α- and β-phosphates, thus favoring the charge distribution of the metaphosphate state over that of the ATP state. Further stabilization (16%) is achieved by a hydrogen bond between the backbone C=O of Ser-237 (on loop Switch-1) and a water molecule perfectly positioned to attack the PγO3− in the subsequent hydrolysis step. The planar and singly negative PγO3− is a much better target for the subsequent nucleophilic attack by a negatively charged OH− than the tetrahedral and doubly negative PγO42− group of ATP. Therefore, we argue that the present mechanism of metaphosphate stabilization is common to the large family of nucleotide-hydrolyzing enzymes. Methodologically, this work presents a computational approach that allows us to obtain a truly quantitative conception of enzymatic strategy. PMID:24165121

  10. Myosin heavy-chain isoforms in the flight and leg muscles of hummingbirds and zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Brandy P; Welch, Kenneth C

    2014-06-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform complement is intimately related to a muscle's contractile properties, yet relatively little is known about avian MHC isoforms or how they may vary with fiber type and/or the contractile properties of a muscle. The rapid shortening of muscles necessary to power flight at the high wingbeat frequencies of ruby-throated hummingbirds and zebra finches (25-60 Hz), along with the varied morphology and use of the hummingbird hindlimb, provides a unique opportunity to understand how contractile and morphological properties of avian muscle may be reflected in MHC expression. Isoforms of the hummingbird and zebra finch flight and hindlimb muscles were electrophoretically separated and compared with those of other avian species representing different contractile properties and fiber types. The flight muscles of the study species operate at drastically different contraction rates and are composed of different histochemically defined fiber types, yet each exhibited the same, single MHC isoform corresponding to the chicken adult fast isoform. Thus, despite quantitative differences in the contractile demands of flight muscles across species, this isoform appears necessary for meeting the performance demands of avian powered flight. Variation in flight muscle contractile performance across species may be due to differences in the structural composition of this conserved isoform and/or variation within other mechanically linked proteins. The leg muscles were more varied in their MHC isoform composition across both muscles and species. The disparity in hindlimb MHC expression between hummingbirds and the other species highlights previously observed differences in fiber type composition and thrust production during take-off. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  11. The Rho kinases I and II regulate different aspects of myosin II activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John R

    2005-01-01

    The homologous mammalian rho kinases (ROCK I and II) are assumed to be functionally redundant, based largely on kinase construct overexpression. As downstream effectors of Rho GTPases, their major substrates are myosin light chain and myosin phosphatase. Both kinases are implicated in microfilament...... bundle assembly and smooth muscle contractility. Here, analysis of fibroblast adhesion to fibronectin revealed that although ROCK II was more abundant, its activity was always lower than ROCK I. Specific reduction of ROCK I by siRNA resulted in loss of stress fibers and focal adhesions, despite...

  12. Mass spectrometry analyses of rat 2b myosin heavy chain isoform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žurmanová, Jitka; Maláčová, Daniela; Půta, F.; Novák, Petr; Říčný, Jan; Soukup, Tomáš

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 5 (2007), s. 659-662 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0327; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/06/1115; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:MYORES(XE) LSHG-CT-2004-511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : rat muscle myosin * myosin heavy chain 2b isoform * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.505, year: 2007

  13. Position detection and observation of a conducting filament hidden under a top electrode in a Ta₂O₅-based atomic switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Alpana; Wang, Qi; Itoh, Yaomi; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Boodhoo, Liam; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Aono, Masakazu

    2015-04-10

    Resistive random access memories (ReRAMs) are promising next-generation memory devices. Observation of the conductive filaments formed in ReRAMs is essential in understanding their operating mechanisms and their expected ultimate performance. Finding the position of the conductive filament is the key process in the preparation of samples for cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging. Here, we propose a method for locating the position of conductive filaments hidden under top electrodes. Atomic force microscopy imaging with a conductive tip detects the current flowing through a conductive filament from the bottom electrode, which reaches its maximum at a position that is above the conductive filament. This is achieved by properly biasing a top electrode, a bottom electrode and the conductive tip. This technique was applied to Cu/Ta2O5/Pt atomic switches, revealing the formation of a single Cu filament in a device, although the device had a large area of 5 × 5 μm(2). Change in filament size was clearly observed depending on the compliance current used in the set process. It was also found from the TEM observation that the cross-sectional shape of the formed filament varies considerably, which is attributable to different Cu nuclei growth mechanisms.

  14. Chirality of Intermediate Filaments and Magnetic Helicity of Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Chae, J.

    2009-05-01

    Filaments that form either between or around active regions (ARs) are called intermediate filaments. Even though there have been many theoretical studies, the origin of the chirality of filaments is still unknown. We investigated how intermediate filaments are related to their associated ARs, especially from the point of view of magnetic helicity and the orientation of polarity inversion lines (PILs). The chirality of filaments has been determined based on the orientations of barbs observed in the full-disk Hα images taken at Big Bear Solar Observatory during the rising phase of solar cycle 23. The sign of magnetic helicity of ARs has been determined using S/inverse-S shaped sigmoids from Yohkoh SXT images. As a result, we have found a good correlation between the chirality of filaments and the magnetic helicity sign of ARs. Among 45 filaments, 42 filaments have shown the same sign as helicity sign of nearby ARs. It has been also confirmed that the role of both the orientation and the relative direction of PILs to ARs in determining the chirality of filaments is not significant, against a theoretical prediction. These results suggest that the chirality of intermediate filaments may originate from magnetic helicity of their associated ARs.

  15. Measuring Filament Orientation: A New Quantitative, Local Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, C.-E.; Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P. A. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052 (Australia); Dawson, J. R. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Novak, G. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Fissel, L. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA, 22903 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The relative orientation between filamentary structures in molecular clouds and the ambient magnetic field provides insight into filament formation and stability. To calculate the relative orientation, a measurement of filament orientation is first required. We propose a new method to calculate the orientation of the one-pixel-wide filament skeleton that is output by filament identification algorithms such as filfinder. We derive the local filament orientation from the direction of the intensity gradient in the skeleton image using the Sobel filter and a few simple post-processing steps. We call this the “Sobel-gradient method.” The resulting filament orientation map can be compared quantitatively on a local scale with the magnetic field orientation map to then find the relative orientation of the filament with respect to the magnetic field at each point along the filament. It can also be used for constructing radial profiles for filament width fitting. The proposed method facilitates automation in analyses of filament skeletons, which is imperative in this era of “big data.”.

  16. Patterns of molecular motors that guide and sort filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Beat; Nédélec, François

    2012-11-21

    Molecular motors can be immobilized to transport filaments and loads that are attached to these filaments inside a nano-device. However, if motors are distributed uniformly over a flat surface, the motility is undirected, and the filaments move equally in all directions. For many applications it is important to control the direction in which the filaments move, and two strategies have been explored to achieve this: applying external forces and confining the filaments inside channels. In this article, we discuss a third strategy in which the topography of the sample remains flat, but the motors are distributed non-uniformly over the surface. Systems of filaments and patterned molecular motors were simulated using a stochastic engine that included Brownian motion and filament bending elasticity. Using an evolutionary algorithm, patterns were optimized for their capacity to precisely control the paths of the filaments. We identified patterns of motors that could either direct the filaments in a particular direction, or separate short and long filaments. These functionalities already exceed what has been achieved with confinement. The patterns are composed of one or two types of motors positioned in lines or along arcs and should be easy to manufacture. Finally, these patterns can be easily combined into larger designs, allowing one to precisely control the motion of microscopic objects inside a device.

  17. Isolation and characterization of flagellar filaments from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Yuichi

    2014-12-01

    Isolated flagellar filaments from the type strain of Bacillus cereus, ATCC 14579, were shown to consist of 34, 32 and 31 kDa proteins in similar proportions as judged by band intensities on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of these three proteins of strain ATCC 14579 were identical with the deduced sequences of three flagellin genes BC1657, BC1658 and BC1659 in the whole genome sequence. Strain ATCC 14579 was classified into serotype T2 by a flagellar serotyping scheme for B. cereus strains that are untypeable into known flagellar serotypes H1 to H23. Flagellar filaments from a reference strain of serotype T2 contained two protein bands at 34 and 32 kDa, but a single protein band at 39 kDa was detected in flagellar filaments of a reference strain of serotype H1. Two murine monoclonal antibodies, 1A5 and 2A5, which recognize both the 34 and 32 kDa flagellins and a single flagellin of 32 kDa, respectively, were specifically reactive with B. cereus strains ATCC 14579 and serotype T2 in whole-cell ELISA and bacterial motility inhibition tests. In immunoelectron microscopy with monoclonal antibodies 1A5 and 2A5, colloidal gold spheres were shown to localize almost evenly over the entire part of flagellar filaments. Since strain ATCC 14579, and presumably strain serotype T2, are unusual among B. cereus strains in possessing multiple genes that encode flagellin subunits, a possible unique mechanism may contribute to assembly of multiple flagellin subunits into the filament over its entire length.

  18. Mating system of the filamentous ascomycete, Glomerella cingulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisar, C R; TeBeest, D O

    1999-03-01

    Mating in heterothallic filamentous ascomycetes is typically controlled by a single mating-type locus with two alternate alleles or idiomorphs. In this study, five self-sterile strains of Glomerella cingulata from pecan were crossed in all possible combinations. Four of the five strains could be placed into two mating-type groups, but the fifth strain was sexually compatible with all of the other strains. Single ascospore progeny were isolated from each of the successful crosses, tested for self-fertility, and backcrossed with both parents. In addition, subsets of F1 isolates were crossed with all five of the original strains from pecan and in all possible combinations with each other. Results from the crosses showed that the ascospore progeny had stably inherited the mating pattern of one of the parental strains and that the mating type had segregated 1:1 among the F1 isolates. Furthermore, the five strains from pecan were sexually compatible with five additional heterothallic strains in all but one combination. Data from these experiments are consistent with a mating system composed of a single mating-type locus with multiple alternate alleles. We believe that this is the first report of this type of mating system for an ascomycete species.

  19. Mini-filaments - small-scale analogues of solar eruptive events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, Carsten; Tritschler, Alexandra

    2009-04-01

    Mini-filaments are a small-scale phenomenon of the solar chromosphere, which frequently occur across the entire disk (see e.g. Wang, Li, Denker, et al. 2000). They share a variety of characteristics with their larger-scale cousins and may serve as a proxy for more complex systems. They play an important role in the energy and mass supply to the corona. In the case of small-scale eruptive filaments, only a single, small-scale loop system is involved. Furthermore, they are supported by simple magnetic field configurations (see Livi, Wang & Martin 1985), either magnetic bipoles or well-defined multipoles, easing their theoretical description. Since mini-filaments are small (just a few tens of seconds of arc) but highly dynamic (eruptions can occur within just a few minutes), they are an ideal target for high-resolution two-dimensional spectroscopy. We present a preliminary analysis of two-dimensional Hα spectroscopic data accompanied by broad-band speckle-restored images to demonstrate that chromospheric small-scale phenomena can serve as building blocks for our understanding of solar eruptive events such as filament/prominence eruptions and even coronal mass ejections (CMEs).

  20. Solar Filament Longitudinal Oscillations along a Magnetic Field Tube with Two Dips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Yu-Hao; Zhang Li-Yue; Ouyang, Y.; Chen, P. F.; Fang, C., E-mail: chenpf@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2017-04-10

    Large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations of solar filaments have been observed and explored for more than ten years. Previous studies are mainly based on the one-dimensional rigid flux tube model with a single magnetic dip. However, it has been noted that there might be two magnetic dips, and hence two threads, along one magnetic field line. Following previous work, we intend to investigate the kinematics of the filament longitudinal oscillations when two threads are magnetically connected, which is done by solving one-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic equations with the numerical code MPI-AMRVAC. Two different types of perturbations are considered, and the difference from previous works resulting from the interaction of the two filament threads is investigated. We find that even with the inclusion of the thread–thread interaction, the oscillation period is modified weakly, by at most 20% compared to the traditional pendulum model with one thread. However, the damping timescale is significantly affected by the thread–thread interaction. Hence, we should take it into account when applying the consistent seismology to the filaments where two threads are magnetically connected.

  1. Fused filament 3D printing of ionic polymer-metal composites for soft robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, James D.; Leang, Kam K.

    2017-04-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are used to create three-dimensional structures with complex shapes and features from polymer and/or metal materials. For example, fused filament three-dimensional (3D) printing utilizes non-electroactive polymers, such as acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA), to build structures and components in a layer-by-layer fashion for a wide variety of applications. Presented here is a summary of recent work on a fused filament 3D-printing technique to create 3D ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) structures for applications in soft robotics. The 3D printing technique overcomes some of the limitations of existing manufacturing processes for creating IPMCs, such as limited shapes and sizes and time-consuming manufacturing steps. In the process described, first a precursor material (non-acid Nafion precursor resin) is extruded into a thermoplastic filament for 3D printing. Then, a custom-designed 3D printer is described that utilizes the precursor filament to manufacture custom-shaped structures. Finally, the 3D-printed samples are functionalized by hydrolyzing them in an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide and dimethyl sulfoxide, followed by application of platinum electrodes. Presented are example 3D-printed single and multi-degree-of-freedom IPMC actuators and characterization results, as well as example soft-robotic devices to demonstrate the potential of this process.

  2. Additive Manufacturing of Multifunctional Components Using High Density Carbon Nanotube Yarn Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, John M.; Sauti, Godfrey; Kim, Jae-Woo; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Working, Dennis C.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing allows for design freedom and part complexity not currently attainable using traditional manufacturing technologies. Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), for example, can yield novel component geometries and functionalities because the method provides a high level of control over material placement and processing conditions. This is achievable by extrusion of a preprocessed filament feedstock material along a predetermined path. However if fabrication of a multifunctional part relies only on conventional filament materials, it will require a different material for each unique functionality printed into the part. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an attractive material for many applications due to their high specific strength as well as good electrical and thermal conductivity. The presence of this set of properties in a single material presents an opportunity to use one material to achieve multifunctionality in an additively manufactured part. This paper describes a recently developed method for processing continuous CNT yarn filaments into three-dimensional articles, and summarizes the mechanical, electrical, and sensing performance of the components fabricated in this way.

  3. A CRISPR-Cas9 System for Genetic Engineering of Filamentous Fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina S Nødvig

    Full Text Available The number of fully sequenced fungal genomes is rapidly increasing. Since genetic tools are poorly developed for most filamentous fungi, it is currently difficult to employ genetic engineering for understanding the biology of these fungi and to fully exploit them industrially. For that reason there is a demand for developing versatile methods that can be used to genetically manipulate non-model filamentous fungi. To facilitate this, we have developed a CRISPR-Cas9 based system adapted for use in filamentous fungi. The system is simple and versatile, as RNA guided mutagenesis can be achieved by transforming a target fungus with a single plasmid. The system currently contains four CRISPR-Cas9 vectors, which are equipped with commonly used fungal markers allowing for selection in a broad range of fungi. Moreover, we have developed a script that allows identification of protospacers that target gene homologs in multiple species to facilitate introduction of common mutations in different filamentous fungi. With these tools we have performed RNA-guided mutagenesis in six species of which one has not previously been genetically engineered. Moreover, for a wild-type Aspergillus aculeatus strain, we have used our CRISPR Cas9 system to generate a strain that contains an AACU_pyrG marker and demonstrated that the resulting strain can be used for iterative gene targeting.

  4. Actin filaments growing against an elastic membrane: Effect of membrane tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Raj Kumar; Chatterjee, Sakuntala

    2018-03-01

    We study the force generation by a set of parallel actin filaments growing against an elastic membrane. The elastic membrane tries to stay flat and any deformation from this flat state, either caused by thermal fluctuations or due to protrusive polymerization force exerted by the filaments, costs energy. We study two lattice models to describe the membrane dynamics. In one case, the energy cost is assumed to be proportional to the absolute magnitude of the height gradient (gradient model) and in the other case it is proportional to the square of the height gradient (Gaussian model). For the gradient model we find that the membrane velocity is a nonmonotonic function of the elastic constant μ and reaches a peak at μ =μ* . For μ state and the membrane energy keeps increasing with time. For the Gaussian model, the system always reaches a steady state and the membrane velocity decreases monotonically with the elastic constant ν for all nonzero values of ν . Multiple filaments give rise to protrusions at different regions of the membrane and the elasticity of the membrane induces an effective attraction between the two protrusions in the Gaussian model which causes the protrusions to merge and a single wide protrusion is present in the system. In both the models, the relative time scale between the membrane and filament dynamics plays an important role in deciding whether the shape of elasticity-velocity curve is concave or convex. Our numerical simulations agree reasonably well with our analytical calculations.

  5. Agrobacterium-delivered virulence protein VirE2 is trafficked inside host cells via a myosin XI-K-powered ER/actin network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qinghua; Li, Xiaoyang; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Q

    2017-03-14

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall tumors on various plants by delivering transferred DNA (T-DNA) and virulence proteins into host plant cells. Under laboratory conditions, the bacterium is widely used as a vector to genetically modify a wide range of organisms, including plants, yeasts, fungi, and algae. Various studies suggest that T-DNA is protected inside host cells by VirE2, one of the virulence proteins. However, it is not clear how Agrobacterium -delivered factors are trafficked through the cytoplasm. In this study, we monitored the movement of Agrobacterium -delivered VirE2 inside plant cells by using a split-GFP approach in real time. Agrobacterium -delivered VirE2 trafficked via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and F-actin network inside plant cells. During this process, VirE2 was aggregated as filamentous structures and was present on the cytosolic side of the ER. VirE2 movement was powered by myosin XI-K. Thus, exogenously produced and delivered VirE2 protein can use the endogenous host ER/actin network for movement inside host cells. The A. tumefaciens pathogen hijacks the conserved host infrastructure for virulence trafficking. Well-conserved infrastructure may be useful for Agrobacterium to target a wide range of recipient cells and achieve a high efficiency of transformation.

  6. The myosin motor domain-containing chitin synthase PdChsVII is required for development, cell wall integrity and virulence in the citrus postharvest pathogen Penicillium digitatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandía, Mónica; Harries, Eleonora; Marcos, Jose F

    2014-06-01

    Chitin is an essential component of the fungal cell wall and a potential target in the development of new antifungal compounds, due to its presence in fungi and not in plants or vertebrates. Chitin synthase genes (chs) constitute a complex family in filamentous fungi and are involved in fungal development, morphogenesis, pathogenesis and virulence. In this study, additional chs genes in the citrus postharvest pathogen Penicillium digitatum have been identified. Comparative analyses included each PdChs in each one of the classes I to VII previously established, and support the grouping of these into three divisions. Disruption of the gene coding PdChsVII, which contains a short version of a myosin motor domain, has been achieved by using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and revealed its role in the life cycle of the fungus. Disruption strains were viable but showed reduced growth and conidia production. Moreover, Pdchs mutants developed morphological defects as balloon-like enlarged cells and increased chitin content, indicative of an altered cell wall structure. Gene disruption also increased susceptibility to antifungal compounds such as calcofluor white (CFW), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), hydroxide peroxide (H2O2) and commercial fungicides, but significantly no change was observed in the sensitivity to antifungal peptides. The PdchsVII mutants were able to infect citrus fruit and produced tissue maceration, although had reduced virulence and most importantly were greatly impaired in the production of visible mycelium and conidia on the fruit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, from chromospheric H alpha and coronal X-ray movies of the Sun's polar coronal holes, it was found that nearly all coronal jets (greater than 90%) are one or the other of two roughly equally common different kinds, different in how they erupt: standard jets and blowout jets (Yamauchi et al 2004, Apl, 605, 5ll: Moore et all 2010, Apj, 720, 757). Here, from inspection of SDO/AIA He II 304 A movies of 54 polar x-ray jets observed in Hinode/XRT movies, we report, as Moore et al (2010) anticipated, that (1) most standard x-ray jets (greater than 80%) show no ejected plasma that is cool enough (T is less than or approximately 10(exp 5K) to be seen in the He II 304 A movies; (2) nearly all blownout X-ray jets (greater than 90%) show obvious ejection of such cool plasma; (3) whereas when cool plasma is ejected in standard X-ray jets, it shows no lateral expansion, the cool plasma ejected in blowout X-ray jets shows strong lateral expansion; and (4) in many blowout X-ray jets, the cool plasma ejection displays the erupting-magnetic-rope form of clasic filament eruptions and is thereby seen to be a miniature filament eruption. The XRT movies also showed most blowout X-ray jets to be larger and brighter, and hence to apparently have more energy, than most standard X-ray jets. These observations (1) confirm the dichotomy of coronal jets, (2) agree with the Shibata model for standard jets, and (3) support the conclusion of Moore et al (2010) that in blowout jets the magnetic-arch base of the jet erupts in the manner of the much larger magnetic arcades in which the core field, the field rooted along the arcade's polarity inversion line, is sheared and twisted (sigmoid), often carries a cool-plasma filament, and erupts to blowout the arcade, producing a CME. From Hinode/SOT Ca II movies of the polar limb, Sterling et al (2010, ApJ, 714, L1) found that chromospheric Type-II spicules show a dichotomy of eruption dynamics similar to that found here for the cool

  8. The THMIS-MTR observation of a active region filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, W. G.; Tang, Y. H.; Fang, C.

    We present some THMIS-MTR observations of a active region filament on September 4, 2002. The full stokes parameters of the filament were obtained in Hα, CaII 8542 and FeI 6302. By use of the data with high spatial resolution(0.44" per pixel), we probed the fine structure of the filament and gave out the parameters at the barbs' endpoints, including intensity, velocity and longitudinal magnetic field. Comparing the quiescent filament which we have discussed before, we find that: 1)The velocities of the barbs' endpoints are much bigger in the active region filament, the values are more than one thousand meters per second. 2)The barbs' endpoints terminate at the low logitudinal magnetic field in the active region filament, too.

  9. A filament supported by different magnetic field configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y.; Schmieder, B.; Démoulin, P.; Wiegelmann, T.; Aulanier, G.; Török, T.; Bommier, V.

    2011-08-01

    A nonlinear force-free magnetic field extrapolation of vector magnetogram data obtained by THEMIS/MTR on 2005 May 27 suggests the simultaneous existence of different magnetic configurations within one active region filament: one part of the filament is supported by field line dips within a flux rope, while the other part is located in dips within an arcade structure. Although the axial field chirality (dextral) and the magnetic helicity (negative) are the same along the whole filament, the chiralities of the filament barbs at different sections are opposite, i.e., right-bearing in the flux rope part and left-bearing in the arcade part. This argues against past suggestions that different barb chiralities imply different signs of helicity of the underlying magnetic field. This new finding about the chirality of filaments will be useful to associate eruptive filaments and magnetic cloud using the helicity parameter in the Space Weather Science.

  10. Reduced filamentation in high power semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Peter M. W.; McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in fields ranging from material processing to medicine. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that high optical power densities cause damage to the laser facet and thus require large apertures. This, in turn, results in spatio......-temporal instabilities such as filamentation which degrades spatial coherence and brightness. We first evaluate performance of existing designs with a “top-hat” shaped transverse current density profile. The unstable nature of highly excited semiconductor material results in a run-away process where small modulations...

  11. The elastic modulus of isolated polytetrafluoroethylene filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Drawe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report vibrational Raman spectra of small extended perfluoro-n-alkanes (CnF2n+2 with n = 6, 8–10, 12–14 isolated in supersonic jet expansions and use wavenumbers of longitudinal acoustic vibrations to extrapolate the elastic modulus of cold, isolated polytetrafluoroethylene filaments. The derived value E = 209(10 GPa defines an upper limit for the elastic modulus of the perfectly crystalline, noninteracting polymer at low temperatures and serves as a benchmark for quantum chemical predictions.

  12. Filament winding cylinders. I - Process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Yong; Springer, George S.

    1990-01-01

    A model was developed which describes the filament winding process of composite cylinders. The model relates the significant process variables such as winding speed, fiber tension, and applied temperature to the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of the composite cylinder and the mandrel. Based on the model, a user friendly code was written which can be used to calculate (1) the temperature in the cylinder and the mandrel, (2) the degree of cure and viscosity in the cylinder, (3) the fiber tensions and fiber positions, (4) the stresses and strains in the cylinder and in the mandrel, and (5) the void diameters in the cylinder.

  13. Myosin VI regulates gene pairing and transcriptional pause release in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorca, Cornelia E; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Yoon Jung; Krause, Matthew R; Zenklusen, Daniel; Spilianakis, Charalampos G; Flavell, Richard A

    2015-03-31

    Naive CD4 T cells differentiate into several effector lineages, which generate a stronger and more rapid response to previously encountered immunological challenges. Although effector function is a key feature of adaptive immunity, the molecular basis of this process is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal regulation of cytokine gene expression in resting and restimulated effector T helper 1 (Th1) cells. We found that the Lymphotoxin (LT)/TNF alleles, which encode TNF-α, were closely juxtaposed shortly after T-cell receptor (TCR) engagement, when transcription factors are limiting. Allelic pairing required a nuclear myosin, myosin VI, which is rapidly recruited to the LT/TNF locus upon restimulation. Furthermore, transcription was paused at the TNF locus and other related genes in resting Th1 cells and released in a myosin VI-dependent manner following activation. We propose that homologous pairing and myosin VI-mediated transcriptional pause release account for the rapid and efficient expression of genes induced by an external stimulus.

  14. Brush border myosin Ia inactivation in gastric but not endometrial tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzolini, Rocco; Rodrigues, Paulo; Bazzocco, Sarah; Dopeso, Higinio; Ferreira, Ana M.; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; Andretta, Elena; Woerner, Stefan M.; Alazzouzi, Hafid; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Macaya, Irati; Suzuki, Hiromu; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago; Mooseker, Mark S.; Mariadason, John M.; Gebert, Johannes; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Reventos, Jaume; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Schwartz, Simo; Arango, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Brush border Myosin Ia (MYO1A) has been shown to be frequently mutated in colorectal tumors with microsatellite instability (MSI) and to have tumor suppressor activity in intestinal tumors. Here, we investigated the frequency of frameshift mutations in the A8 microsatellite in exon 28 of MYO1A in

  15. Expression of porcine myosin heavy chain 1 gene in Berkshire loins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression of porcine myosin heavy chain 1 gene in Berkshire loins with a high pH24 value. Jin Hun Kang, Woo Young Bang, Eun Jung Kwon, Yong Hwa Lee, Da Hye Park, Eun Seok Cho, Min Ji Kim, Jong-Soon Choi, Hwa Chun Park, Beom Young Park, Chul Wook Kim ...

  16. The local expression of adult chicken heart myosins during development. II. Ventricular conducting tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, E.; de Groot, I. J.; Geerts, W. J.; de Jong, F.; van Horssen, A. A.; Los, J. A.; Moorman, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    The development of the ventricular conducting tissue of the embryonic chicken heart has been studied using a previous finding that morphologically recognizable atrial conducting tissue coexpresses the atrial and the ventricular myosin isoforms. It is found that, by these criteria, at 9 days part of

  17. Multiple filamentation generated by focusing femtosecond laser with axicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Gao, Hui; Zeng, Bin; Xu, Shengqi; Liu, Weiwei; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan; Mu, Guoguang

    2012-03-01

    Multiple filamentation has been observed when focusing a femtosecond laser pulse into a methanol solution with an axicon. It is found that multiple long filaments are located on the central spot and ring structures of the quasi-Bessel beam created by the axicon. Since the quasi-Bessel profile is determined by the axicon properties, the axicon has been suggested as a simple optics to control multiple filaments. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  18. Observations of the Growth of an Active Region Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo

    2017-04-01

    We present observations of the growth of an active region filament caused by magnetic interactions among the filament and its adjacent superpenumbral filament (SF) and dark thread-like structures (T). Multistep reconnections are identified during the whole growing process. Magnetic flux convergence and cancellation occurring at the positive footpoint region of the filament is the first step reconnection, which resulted in the filament bifurcating into two sets of intertwined threads. One set anchored in situ, while the other set moved toward and interacted with the SF and part of T. This indicates the second step reconnection, which gave rise to the disappearance of the SF and the formation of a long thread-like structure that connects the far ends of the filament and T. The long thread-like structure further interacted with the T and then separated into two parts, representing the third step reconnection. Finally, another similar long thread-like structure, which intertwined with the fixed filament threads, appeared. Hαobservations show that this twisted structure is a longer sinistral filament. Based on the observed photospheric vector magnetograms, we performed a non-linear force-free field extrapolation to reconstruct the magnetic fields above the photosphere and found that the coronal magnetic field lines associated with the filament consists of two twisted flux ropes winding around each other. These results suggest that magnetic interactions among filaments and their adjacent SFs and T could lead to the growth of the filaments, and the filament is probably supported in a flux rope.

  19. Myosin heavy chain composition of single fibres from m. biceps brachii of male body builders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, H; Zhou, M.-Y.; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    expression of MHC isoforms within histochemical type II fibres of human skeletal muscle with body building. Furthermore, in human skeletal muscle differences in expression of MHC isoforms may not always be reflected in the traditional histochemical classification of types I, IIa, IIb and IIc fibres....

  20. An integrative approach for modeling and simulation of heterocyst pattern formation in cyanobacteria filaments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Torres-Sánchez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Heterocyst differentiation in cyanobacteria filaments is one of the simplest examples of cellular differentiation and pattern formation in multicellular organisms. Despite of the many experimental studies addressing the evolution and sustainment of heterocyst patterns and the knowledge of the genetic circuit underlying the behavior of single cyanobacterium under nitrogen deprivation, there is still a theoretical gap connecting these two macroscopic and microscopic processes. As an attempt to shed light on this issue, here we explore heterocyst differentiation under the paradigm of systems biology. This framework allows us to formulate the essential dynamical ingredients of the genetic circuit of a single cyanobacterium into a set of differential equations describing the time evolution of the concentrations of the relevant molecular products. As a result, we are able to study the behavior of a single cyanobacterium under different external conditions, emulating nitrogen deprivation, and simulate the dynamics of cyanobacteria filaments by coupling their respective genetic circuits via molecular diffusion. These two ingredients allow us to understand the principles by which heterocyst patterns can be generated and sustained. In particular, our results point out that, by including both diffusion and noisy external conditions in the computational model, it is possible to reproduce the main features of the formation and sustainment of heterocyst patterns in cyanobacteria filaments as observed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the validity and possible improvements of the model.

  1. An integrative approach for modeling and simulation of heterocyst pattern formation in cyanobacteria filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Falo, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Heterocyst differentiation in cyanobacteria filaments is one of the simplest examples of cellular differentiation and pattern formation in multicellular organisms. Despite of the many experimental studies addressing the evolution and sustainment of heterocyst patterns and the knowledge of the genetic circuit underlying the behavior of single cyanobacterium under nitrogen deprivation, there is still a theoretical gap connecting these two macroscopic and microscopic processes. As an attempt to shed light on this issue, here we explore heterocyst differentiation under the paradigm of systems biology. This framework allows us to formulate the essential dynamical ingredients of the genetic circuit of a single cyanobacterium into a set of differential equations describing the time evolution of the concentrations of the relevant molecular products. As a result, we are able to study the behavior of a single cyanobacterium under different external conditions, emulating nitrogen deprivation, and simulate the dynamics of cyanobacteria filaments by coupling their respective genetic circuits via molecular diffusion. These two ingredients allow us to understand the principles by which heterocyst patterns can be generated and sustained. In particular, our results point out that, by including both diffusion and noisy external conditions in the computational model, it is possible to reproduce the main features of the formation and sustainment of heterocyst patterns in cyanobacteria filaments as observed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the validity and possible improvements of the model.

  2. Localization and specificity of the phospholipid and actin binding sites on the tail of Acanthamoeba myosin IC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    We used bacterially expressed beta-galactosidase fusion proteins to localize the phospholipid binding domain of Acanthamoeba myosin IC to the region between amino acids 701 and 888 in the NH2-terminal half of the tail. Using a novel immobilized ligand lipid binding assay, we determined that myosin I can bind to several different acidic phospholipids, and that binding requires a minimum of 5 mol% acidic phospholipid in a neutral lipid background. The presence of di- and triglycerides and sterols in the lipid bilayer do not contribute to the affinity of myosin I for membranes. We confirm that the ATP-insensitive actin binding site is contained in the COOH-terminal 30 kD of the tail as previously shown for Acanthamoeba myosin IA. We conclude that the association of the myosin IC tail with acidic phospholipid head groups supplies much of the energy for binding myosin I to biological membranes, but probably not specificity for targeting myosin I isoforms to different cellular locations. PMID:1607386

  3. Filament-producing mutants of influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1 virus have higher neuraminidase activities than the spherical wild-type.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Seladi-Schulman

    Full Text Available Influenza virus exhibits two morphologies - spherical and filamentous. Strains that have been grown extensively in laboratory substrates are comprised predominantly of spherical virions while clinical or low passage isolates produce a mixture of spheres and filamentous virions of varying lengths. The filamentous morphology can be lost upon continued passage in embryonated chicken eggs, a common laboratory substrate for influenza viruses. The fact that the filamentous morphology is maintained in nature but lost in favor of a spherical morphology in ovo suggests that filaments confer a selective advantage within the infected host that is not necessary for growth in laboratory substrates. Indeed, we have recently shown that filament-producing variant viruses are selected upon passage of the spherical laboratory strain A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1 [PR8] in guinea pigs. Toward determining the nature of the selective advantage conferred by filaments, we sought to identify functional differences between spherical and filamentous particles. We compared the wild-type PR8 virus to two previously characterized recombinant PR8 viruses in which single point mutations within M1 confer a filamentous morphology. Our results indicate that these filamentous PR8 mutants have higher neuraminidase activities than the spherical PR8 virus. Conversely, no differences were observed in HAU:PFU or HAU:RNA ratios, binding avidity, sensitivity to immune serum in hemagglutination inhibition assays, or virion stability at elevated temperatures. Based on these results, we propose that the pleomorphic nature of influenza virus particles is important for the optimization of neuraminidase functions in vivo.

  4. Modeling Vertical Plasma Flows in Solar Filament Barbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Speeds of observed flows in quiescent solar filaments are typically much less than the local Alfvén speed. This is why the flows in filament barbs can be modeled by perturbing a local magnetostatic solution describing the balance between the Lorentz force, gravity, and gas pressure in a barb. Similarly, large-scale filament flows can be treated as adiabatically slow deformations of a force-free magnetic equilibrium that describes the global structure of a filament. This approach reconciles current theoretical models with the puzzling observational result that some of the flows appear to be neither aligned with the magnetic field nor controlled by gravity.

  5. Filament shape versus coronal potential magnetic field structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B.

    2016-01-01

    Solar filament shape in projection on disc depends on the structure of the coronal magnetic field. We calculate the position of polarity inversion lines (PILs) of coronal potential magnetic field at different heights above the photosphere, which compose the magnetic neutral surface, and compare with them the distribution of the filament material in Hα chromospheric images. We found that the most of the filament material is enclosed between two PILs, one at a lower height close to the chromosphere and one at a higher level, which can be considered as a height of the filament spine. Observations of the same filament on the limb by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft confirm that the height of the spine is really very close to the value obtained from the PIL and filament border matching. Such matching can be used for filament height estimations in on-disc observations. Filament barbs are housed within protruding sections of the low-level PIL. On the base of simple model, we show that the similarity of the neutral surfaces in potential and non-potential fields with the same sub-photospheric sources is the reason for the found tendency for the filament material to gather near the potential-field neutral surface.

  6. Statistical Study of the Magnetic Field Orientation in Solar Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Yoichiro; Sakurai, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    We have carried out a statistical study of the average orientation of the magnetic field in solar filaments with respect to their axes for more than 400 samples, based on data taken with daily full-Sun, full-Stokes spectropolarimetric observations using the He I 1083.0 nm line. The major part of the samples are the filaments in the quiet areas, but those in the active areas are included as well. The average orientation of the magnetic field in filaments shows a systematic property depending on the hemisphere; the direction of the magnetic field in filaments in the northern (southern) hemisphere mostly deviates clockwise (counterclockwise) from their axes, which run along the magnetic polarity inversion line. The deviation angles of the magnetic field from the axes are concentrated between 10° and 30°. This hemispheric pattern is consistent with that revealed for chirality of filament barbs, filament channels, and for other solar features found to possess chirality. For some filaments, it was confirmed that their magnetic field direction is locally parallel to their structure seen in Hα images. Our results for the first time confirmed this hemispheric pattern with the direct observation of the magnetic field in filaments. Interestingly, the filaments which show the opposite magnetic field deviation to the hemispheric pattern, are in many cases found above the polarity inversion line whose ambient photospheric magnetic field has the polarity alignment being opposite to that of active regions following the Hale–Nicholson law.

  7. Spatial evolution of laser filaments in turbulent air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Tao; Zhu, Shiping; Zhou, Shengling; He, Yan

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the spatial evolution properties of laser filament clusters in turbulent air were evaluated using numerical simulations. Various statistical parameters were calculated, such as the percolation probability, filling factor, and average cluster size. The results indicate that turbulence-induced multi-filamentation can be described as a new phase transition universality class. In addition, during this process, the relationship between the average cluster size and filling factor could be fit by a power function. Our results are valuable for applications involving filamentation that can be influenced by the geometrical features of multiple filaments.

  8. Numerical simulation of laser filamentation in underdense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Lichun; Chen Zhihua; Tu Qinfen

    2000-01-01

    Developing process of filamentation and effect of characteristic parameters in underdense plasma have been studied using numerical simulation method. Production and development of two-dimensional cylinder filamentation instability were presented clearly. The results indicate incidence laser intensity and plasma background density are important factors affecting convergent intensity. At the same time, it was showed that different laser wavelength or different electron background density could affect filamentation process. The results are consistent with theory and experiments of alien reports. It can provide reference for restraining filamentation

  9. MATERIAL SUPPLY AND MAGNETIC CONFIGURATION OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, P.; Fang, C.; Chen, P. F.; Yang, K.; Hao, Q. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Cao, Wenda, E-mail: fangc@nju.edu.cn [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

    2016-11-10

    It is important to study the fine structures of solar filaments with high-resolution observations, since it can help us understand the magnetic and thermal structures of the filaments and their dynamics. In this paper, we study a newly formed filament located inside the active region NOAA 11762, which was observed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory from 16:40:19 UT to 17:07:58 UT on 2013 June 5. As revealed by the H α filtergrams, cool material is seen to be injected into the filament spine with a speed of 5–10 km s{sup -1}. At the source of the injection, brightenings are identified in the chromosphere, which are accompanied by magnetic cancellation in the photosphere, implying the importance of magnetic reconnection in replenishing the filament with plasmas from the lower atmosphere. Counter-streamings are detected near one endpoint of the filament, with the plane-of-the-sky speed being 7–9 km s{sup -1} in the H α red-wing filtergrams and 9–25 km s{sup -1} in the blue-wing filtergrams. The observations are indicative that this active region filament is supported by a sheared arcade without magnetic dips, and the counter-streamings are due to unidirectional flows with alternative directions, rather than due to the longitudinal oscillations of filament threads as in many other filaments.

  10. Computational studies on scattering of radio frequency waves by density filaments in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, Zisis C.; Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Tigelis, Ioannis G.

    2017-10-01

    assumed to be cold. There are three primary objectives of these studies. The first objective is to validate the numerical simulations by comparing with the analytical results for the same plasma description—a step-function discontinuity in density. A detailed comparison of the Poynting flux shows that numerical simulations lead to the same results as those from the theoretical model. The second objective is to extend the simulations to take into account a smooth transition in density from the background plasma to the interior of the filament. The ensuing comparison shows that the deviations from the results of the theoretical model are quite small. The third objective is to consider the scattering process for situations well beyond a reasonable theoretical analysis. This includes scattering off multiple filaments with different densities and sizes. Simulations for these complex arrangements of filaments show that, in spite of the obvious limitations, the essential physics of RF scattering is captured by the analytical theory for a single filament.

  11. Electromechanical vortex filaments during cardiac fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, J.; Chebbok, M.; Richter, C.; Schröder-Schetelig, J.; Bittihn, P.; Stein, S.; Uzelac, I.; Fenton, F. H.; Hasenfuß, G.; Gilmour, R. F., Jr.; Luther, S.

    2018-03-01

    The self-organized dynamics of vortex-like rotating waves, which are also known as scroll waves, are the basis of the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns in many excitable chemical and biological systems. In the heart, filament-like phase singularities that are associated with three-dimensional scroll waves are considered to be the organizing centres of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms that underlie the onset, maintenance and control of electromechanical turbulence in the heart are inherently three-dimensional phenomena. However, it has not previously been possible to visualize the three-dimensional spatiotemporal dynamics of scroll waves inside cardiac tissues. Here we show that three-dimensional mechanical scroll waves and filament-like phase singularities can be observed deep inside the contracting heart wall using high-resolution four-dimensional ultrasound-based strain imaging. We found that mechanical phase singularities co-exist with electrical phase singularities during cardiac fibrillation. We investigated the dynamics of electrical and mechanical phase singularities by simultaneously measuring the membrane potential, intracellular calcium concentration and mechanical contractions of the heart. We show that cardiac fibrillation can be characterized using the three-dimensional spatiotemporal dynamics of mechanical phase singularities, which arise inside the fibrillating contracting ventricular wall. We demonstrate that electrical and mechanical phase singularities show complex interactions and we characterize their dynamics in terms of trajectories, topological charge and lifetime. We anticipate that our findings will provide novel perspectives for non-invasive diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications.

  12. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Middelveen MJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marianne J Middelveen, Raphael B Stricker International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: Morgellons disease (MD is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they result from proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in epithelial tissue. Culture, histopathological and molecular evidence of spirochetal infection associated with MD has been presented in several published studies using a variety of techniques. Spirochetes genetically identified as Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto predominate as the infective agent in most of the Morgellons skin specimens studied so far. Other species of Borrelia including Borrelia garinii, Borrelia miyamotoi, and Borrelia hermsii have also been detected in skin specimens taken from MD patients. The optimal treatment for MD remains to be determined. Keywords: Morgellons disease, dermatitis, Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, spirochetes

  13. Intermediate filament mechanics in vitro and in the cell: From coiled coils to filaments, fibers and networks

    OpenAIRE

    Köster, Sarah; Weitz, David; Goldman, Robert D.; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate filament proteins form filaments, fibers and networks both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of metazoan cells. Their general structural building plan accommodates highly varying amino acid sequences to yield extended dimeric α-helical coiled coils of highly conserved design. These “rod” particles are the basic building blocks of intrinsically flexible, filamentous structures that are able to resist high mechanical stresses, i.e. bending and stretching to a considerable degree, bo...

  14. Effects of a myosin-II inhibitor (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide, BTS) on contractile characteristics of intact fast-twitch mammalian muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinniger, G J; Bruton, J D; Westerblad, H; Ranatunga, K W

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the effects of N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide (BTS), a potent and specific inhibitor of fast muscle myosin-II, using small bundles of intact fibres or single fibres from rat foot muscle. BTS decreased tetanic tension reversibly in a concentration-dependent manner with half-maximal inhibition at approximately approximately 2 microM at 20 degrees C. The inhibition of tension with 10 microM BTS was marked at the three temperatures examined (10, 20 and 30 degrees C), but greatest at 10 degrees C. BTS decreased active muscle stiffness to a lesser extent than tetanic tension indicating that not all of the tension inhibition was due to a reduced number of attached cross-bridges. BTS-induced inhibition of active tension was not accompanied by any change in the free myoplasmic Ca2+ transients. The potency and specificity of BTS make it a very suitable myosin inhibitor for intact mammalian fast muscle and should be a useful tool for the examination of outstanding questions in muscle contraction.

  15. Isolation and characterization of flagellar filament from zoospores of Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraizumi, Mieko; Tagawa, Yuichi

    2014-09-17

    Highly motile zoospores from Dermatophilus congolensis bovine isolates from clinical dermatophilosis in Japan were obtained by culturing at 27°C in an ambient atmosphere on heart infusion agar supplemented with 5% defibrinated sheep blood for 72h or in heart infusion broth for 48h with gentle shaking. After vigorous mechanical agitation of the zoospore suspension, the flagellar filaments detached from motile zoospores and were isolated in the clear gelatinous part of the final pellet by differential centrifugation. Typical morphology of a flagellar filament, with a width of approximately 15nm, was observed in the isolated flagellar filament by electron microscopy. A single major protein (flagellin) band with an apparent molecular mass of 35kDa was detected in the flagellar filament of D. congolensis strain AM-1 and that of 33kDa was detected in strain IT-2 by SDS-PAGE. In immunoblot analysis of whole-cell proteins from seven isolates of D. congolensis, antiserum to strain AM-1 zoospores reacted with the 35-kDa antigen band of strain AM-1, but not with any antigen band of other strains in a similar molecular mass range. In contrast, antiserum to strain IT-2 zoospores reacted with antigen bands at 33kDa from six strains, except strain AM-1. Similar strain-specific reactions of these anti-zoospore sera with isolated flagellar filaments from strains AM-1 and IT-2 were confirmed by immunoblot, indicating the presence of antigenic variations of flagellins of D. congolensis zoospores. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Type I ELM filament heat fluxes on the KSTAR main chamber wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-K. Bae

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Heat loads deposited on the first wall by mitigated Type I ELMs are expected to be the dominant contributor to the total thermal plasma wall load of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER, particularly in the upper main chamber regions during the baseline H-mode magnetic equilibrium, due to the fast radial convective heat propagation of ELM filaments before complete loss to the divertor. Specific Type I ELMing H-mode discharges have been performed with a lower single null magnetic geometry, where the outboard separatrix position is slowly (∼7s scanned over a radial distance of 7cm, reducing the wall probe–separatrix distance to a minimum of ∼9cm, and allowing the ELM filament heat loss to the wall to be analyzed as a function of radial propagation distance. A fast reciprocating probe (FRP head is separately held at fixed position toroidally close and 4.7cm radially in front of the wall probe. This FRP monitors the ELM ion fluxes, allowing an average filament radial propagation speed, found to be independent of ELM energy, of 80–100ms−1 to be extracted. Radial dependence of the peak filament wall parallel heat flux is observed to be exponential, with the decay length of λq, ELM ∼25 ± 4mm and with the heat flux of q∥, ELM= 0.05MWm−2 at the wall, corresponding to q∥ ∼ 7.5MWm−2 at the second separatrix. Along with the measured radial propagation speed and the calculated radial profile of the magnetic connection lengths across the SOL, these data could be utilized to analyze filament energy loss model for the future machines.

  17. Radial motion of isolated blobs and ELM filaments in SOL plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Fundamenski, W.; Bian, N.H.

    2007-01-01

    Radial convection of localized plasma filaments is apparently what dominates the cross-field transport of particles and heat through the scrape-off layer of magnetically confined plasmas. Here we present a theoretical investigation of the motion of such field-aligned structures based on electrostatic interchange dynamics. A two-field interchange model is studied by means of numerical simulations on a bi-periodic domain perpendicular to the magnetic field. The simulations are initialized with a blob-like structure on top of a uniform background plasma with no flow. It is demonstrated that such plasma filaments develop dipolar vorticity and electrostatic potential fields, resulting in rapid radial acceleration and formation of a steep front and a trailing wake. While the dynamical evolution strongly depends on the amount of collisional diffusion and viscosity, the structure travels a radial distance many times its initial size in all parameter regimes in the absence of parallel motions. For small collisional dissipation the structure is unstable to fragmentation by secondary instabilities, resulting in complex waveforms from single-point recordings even for an isolated structure. The plasma filament eventually decelerates due to dispersion by the convective flows. When sheath dissipation is included in the simulations, the radial velocity of isolated filaments is found to be significantly reduced. The results are discussed in the context of convective transport in scrape-off layer plasmas, comprising both blob-like structures in low confinement modes and edge localized mode filaments in unstable high confinement regimes. The favorable comparison with experimental measurements strongly indicates that electrostatic interchange motions is the salient mechanism underlying cross-field transport at the boundary of magnetically con ed plasmas. (author)

  18. A catalytic oligomeric motor that walks along a filament track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mu-Jie; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-06-01

    Most biological motors in the cell execute chemically powered conformational changes as they walk on biopolymer filaments in order to carry out directed transport functions. Synthetic motors that operate in a similar manner are being studied since they have the potential to perform similar tasks in a variety of applications. In this paper, a synthetic nanomotor that moves along a filament track, without invoking motor conformational changes, is constructed and its properties are studied in detail. The motor is an oligomer comprising three linked beads with specific binding properties. The filament track is a stiff polymer chain, also described by a linear chain of linked coarse-grained molecular groups modeled as beads. Reactions on the filament that are catalyzed by a motor bead and use fuel in the environment, in conjunction within the binding affinities of the motor beads to the filament beads, lead to directed motion. The system operates out of equilibrium due to the state of the filament and supply of fuel. The motor, filament, and surrounding medium are all described at microscopic level that permits a full analysis of the motor motion. A stochastic model that captures the main trends seen in the simulations is also presented. The results of this study point to some of the key features that could be used to construct nanomotors that undergo biased walks powered by chemical reactions on filaments.

  19. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, Thomas C T; Liu, Lucie X; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2017-01-01

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes. (topical review)

  20. Application of digital holography to filament size analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semin, N.V.; Poelma, C.; Drost, S.; Westerweel, J.

    2010-01-01

    The potential of in-line digital holography to locate and measure the size and position of filaments, i.e. thin wire-like objects, distributed throughout a thick volume has been investigated. In this paper two approaches are introduced to study filaments of varying diameter. (1) It is shown

  1. Fully filamentized HTS coated conductor via striation and selective electroplating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Majkic, Goran [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Selvamanickam, Venkat, E-mail: selva@uh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Fully-filamentized coated conductor with 13-fold reduction in ac losses. ► Selective electroplating for filamentization of thick copper stabilizer. ► A twofold decrease in ac loss by filamentization of copper stabilizer. ► Absence of appreciable coupling loss contribution from electroplating. -- Abstract: A simple, cost-effective method involving top-down mechanical scribing, oxidation and bottom-up electroplating has been successfully developed to fabricate fully filamentized HTS coated conductors. The copper stabilizer layer is selectively electroplated on the superconducting filaments while the striations remain copper-free due to the formation of a resistive oxide layer in between filaments by oxidation of the striated grooves at elevated temperature in oxygen atmosphere. Magnetization AC loss measurements, performed in a frequency range of 45–500 Hz at 77 K, confirmed the expected N-fold reduction in AC loss of the filamentized tapes with no significant degradation in critical current beyond that due to the material removal from the striations (N – number of filaments). A considerable reduction in coupling AC loss was observed after high temperature annealing/oxidation of the striated tapes. Furthermore, a significant reduction in eddy current loss was achieved with selective copper electroplating, as evidenced by analyzing the field and frequency dependence of magnetization AC loss, as well as by comparing the AC loss performance of striated samples to that of non-striated samples after electroplating of copper stabilizer.

  2. Fully filamentized HTS coated conductor via striation and selective electroplating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Majkic, Goran; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fully-filamentized coated conductor with 13-fold reduction in ac losses. ► Selective electroplating for filamentization of thick copper stabilizer. ► A twofold decrease in ac loss by filamentization of copper stabilizer. ► Absence of appreciable coupling loss contribution from electroplating. -- Abstract: A simple, cost-effective method involving top-down mechanical scribing, oxidation and bottom-up electroplating has been successfully developed to fabricate fully filamentized HTS coated conductors. The copper stabilizer layer is selectively electroplated on the superconducting filaments while the striations remain copper-free due to the formation of a resistive oxide layer in between filaments by oxidation of the striated grooves at elevated temperature in oxygen atmosphere. Magnetization AC loss measurements, performed in a frequency range of 45–500 Hz at 77 K, confirmed the expected N-fold reduction in AC loss of the filamentized tapes with no significant degradation in critical current beyond that due to the material removal from the striations (N – number of filaments). A considerable reduction in coupling AC loss was observed after high temperature annealing/oxidation of the striated tapes. Furthermore, a significant reduction in eddy current loss was achieved with selective copper electroplating, as evidenced by analyzing the field and frequency dependence of magnetization AC loss, as well as by comparing the AC loss performance of striated samples to that of non-striated samples after electroplating of copper stabilizer

  3. Fossil evidence for spin alignment of SDSS galaxies in filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Bernard J.T.; Weygaert, Rien van de; Arag´on-Calvo, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    We search for and find fossil evidence that the distribution of the spin axes of galaxies in cosmic web filaments relative to their host filaments are not randomly distributed. This would indicate that the action of large scale tidal torques effected the alignments of galaxies located in cosmic

  4. Method for simultaneously coating a plurality of filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, P.A.; Pochan, P.D.; Siegal, M.P.; Dominguez, F.

    1995-07-11

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed for coating materials, and the products and compositions produced thereby. Substances, such as diamond or diamond-like carbon, are deposited onto materials, such as a filament or a plurality of filaments simultaneously, using one or more cylindrical, inductively coupled, resonator plasma reactors. 3 figs.

  5. Cellulase activity of filamentous fungi induced by rice husk | Oliveros ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cellulase activity of filamentous fungi induced by rice husk. DF Oliveros, N Guarnizo, EM Perea, WM Arango. Abstract. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of different filamentous fungi to degrade cellulose in rice husk pre-treated with steam explosion or alkaline hydrolysis. A preliminary test performed ...

  6. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  7. Design and Optimization of Filament Wound Composite Pressure Vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zu, L.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important issues for the design of filament-wound pressure vessels reflects on the determination of the most efficient meridian profiles and related fiber architectures, leading to optimal structural performance. To better understand the design and optimization of filament-wound

  8. THE APPARATUS FOR ALIGNMENT OF THE PHOTOMETRIC LAMP FILAMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Dlugunovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During photometric measurements involving the use of photometric lamps it is necessary that the filament of lamp takes a strictly predetermined position with respect to the photodetector and the optical axis of the photometric setup. The errors in positioning of alignment filament with respect to the optical axis of the measuring system lead to increase the uncertainty of measurement of the photometric characteristics of the light sources. A typical method for alignment of filament of photometric lamps is based on the use a diopter tubes (telescopes. Using this method, the mounting of filament to the required position is carried out by successive approximations, which requires special concentration and a lot of time. The aim of this work is to develop an apparatus for alignment which allows simultaneous alignment of the filament of lamps in two mutually perpendicular planes. The method and apparatus for alignment of the photometric lamp filament during measurements of the photometric characteristics of light sources based on two digital video cameras is described in this paper. The apparatus allows to simultaneously displaying the image of lamps filament on the computer screen in two mutually perpendicular planes. The apparatus eliminates a large number of functional units requiring elementwise alignment and reduces the time required to carry out the alignment. The apparatus also provides the imaging of lamps filament with opaque coated on the bulb. The apparatus is used at the National standard of light intensity and illuminance units of the Republic of Belarus. 

  9. Quantification of filamentation by uropathogenic Escherichia coli during experimental bladder cell infection by using semi-automated image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Kasper; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2015-01-01

    of bacterial pathogens and study the advantages of bacterial morphological plasticity, methods are needed to accurately quantify changes in bacterial cell shape. In this study, we present a method for quantification of bacterial filamentation based on automatic detection and measurement of bacterial units......Several rod-shaped pathogens including Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Klebsiella pneumonia are capable of adopting highly filamentous cell shapes under certain circumstances. This phenomenon occurs as a result of continued cell elongation during growth without the usual septation into single...... rod-shaped cells. Evidence has emerged over the past decade suggesting that this morphological transformation is controlled and reversible and provides selective advantages under certain growth conditions, such as during infection in humans. In order to identify the factors which induce filamentation...

  10. Sphaerotilus natans, a neutrophilic iron-related filamentous bacterium : mechanisms of uranium scavenging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seder-Colomina, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals and radionuclides are present in some ecosystems worldwide due to natural contaminations or anthropogenic activities. The use of microorganisms to restore those polluted ecosystems, a process known as bioremediation, is of increasing interest, especially under near-neutral pH conditions. Iron minerals encrusting neutrophilic iron-related bacteria, especially Bacterio-genic Iron Oxides (BIOS), have a poorly crystalline structure, which in addition to their large surface area and reactivity make them excellent scavengers for inorganic pollutants. In this PhD work we studied the different mechanisms of uranium scavenging by the neutrophilic bacterium Sphaerotilus natans, chosen as a model bacterium for iron-related sheath-forming filamentous microorganisms. S. natans can grow as single cells and filaments. The latter were used to investigate U(VI) bio-sorption and U(VI) sorption onto BIOS. In addition, uranium sorption onto the abiotic analogues of such iron minerals was assessed. In order to use S. natans filaments for U(VI) scavenging, it was necessary to identify factors inducing S. natans filamentation. The influence of oxygen was ascertained by using molecular biology techniques and our results revealed that while saturated oxygen conditions resulted in single cell growth, a moderate oxygen depletion to ∼ 3 mg O 2 .L -1 led to the desired filamentous growth of S. natans. BIOS attached to S. natans filaments as well as the abiotic analogues were analysed by XAS at Fe K-edge. Both materials were identified as amorphous iron(III) phosphates with a small component of Fe(II), with a high reactivity towards scavenging of inorganic pollutants. In addition, EXAFS at the U LIII-edge revealed a common structure for the O shells, while those for P, Fe and C were different for each sorbent. An integrated approach combining experimental techniques and speciation calculations made it possible to describe U(VI) adsorption isotherms by using a surface complexation

  11. Functional regions in the essential light chain of smooth muscle myosin as revealed by the mutagenesis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevillon-Chéruel, S; Janmot, C; Nozais, M; Lompré, A M; Béchet, J J

    2000-10-01

    The endogenous essential light chain (LC17) of myosin from intestine smooth muscle was replaced with mutated essential light chains prepared using recombinant techniques. Complete exchange was observed with histidine-tagged derivatives of LC17a, LC17b and E122A-LC17a (LC17a and LC17b are the usual constituants of smooth muscle myosin), with small changes in the ATPase activity of reconstituted myosins. Much less exchange was observed with the light-chain derivative lacking the last 12 amino acid residues, demonstrating the importance of this segment, which may act as one arm of a pair of pincers to bind the myosin heavy chain.

  12. Automated image analysis for quantification of filamentous bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, M.; Rosenvinge, F. S.; Spillum, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotics of the beta-lactam group are able to alter the shape of the bacterial cell wall, e.g. filamentation or a spheroplast formation. Early determination of antimicrobial susceptibility may be complicated by filamentation of bacteria as this can be falsely interpreted as growth...... displaying different resistant profiles and differences in filamentation kinetics were used to study a novel image analysis algorithm to quantify length of bacteria and bacterial filamentation. A total of 12 beta-lactam antibiotics or beta-lactam-beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations were analyzed...... in systems relying on colorimetry or turbidometry (such as Vitek-2, Phoenix, MicroScan WalkAway). The objective was to examine an automated image analysis algorithm for quantification of filamentous bacteria using the 3D digital microscopy imaging system, oCelloScope. Results: Three E. coli strains...

  13. Bursting of filaments in the plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratton, F.T.L.

    1976-01-01

    Photographs of the current sheath of (low energy) plasma focus show a disruption of the filaments. This phenomenon is interpreted as a vortex breakdown. Physical parameters which support this hypothesis are obtained from measurements, from the theoretical thickness of the current sheath given by Nardi and from some models of the plasma flow. The widening of a vortex due to axial velocity increase is analyzed by means of magnetohydrodynamic collinear models. The main results are: (1) the existence of a limit separating supercritical from subcritical regimes (their character changes with the ratio between kinetic and magnetic energy); (2) the existence of flow regimes where the vortex radius remains approximately constant for moderate increments of the external velocity; (3) the structure of the vortex may change substantially for a sufficiently large increment of the external velocity, even in subcritical states; (4) the possibility that a burst of the vortex may occur when the external velocity suffers a slowdown

  14. Methods for genetic transformation of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Tang, Yu; Lin, Jun; Cai, Weiwen

    2017-10-03

    Filamentous fungi have been of great interest because of their excellent ability as cell factories to manufacture useful products for human beings. The development of genetic transformation techniques is a precondition that enables scientists to target and modify genes efficiently and may reveal the function of target genes. The method to deliver foreign nucleic acid into cells is the sticking point for fungal genome modification. Up to date, there are some general methods of genetic transformation for fungi, including protoplast-mediated transformation, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, electroporation, biolistic method and shock-wave-mediated transformation. This article reviews basic protocols and principles of these transformation methods, as well as their advantages and disadvantages.

  15. Engineering of filamentous bacteriophage for protein sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasino, Michael

    Methods of high throughput, sensitive and cost effective quantification of proteins enables personalized medicine by allowing healthcare professionals to better monitor patient condition and response to treatment. My doctoral research has attempted to advance these methods through the use of filamentous bacteriophage (phage). These bacterial viruses are particularly amenable to both genetic and chemical engineering and can be produced efficiently in large amounts. Here, I discuss several strategies for modifying phage for use in protein sensing assays. These include the expression of bio-orthogonal conjugation handles on the phage coat, the incorporation of specific recognition sequences within the phage genome, and the creation of antibody-phage conjugates via a photo-crosslinking non-canonical amino acid. The physical and chemical characterization of these engineered phage and the results of their use in modified protein sensing assays will be presented.

  16. Filament wound data base development, revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, R. Scott; Braddock, William F.

    1985-01-01

    The objective was to update the present Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) baseline reentry aerodynamic data base and to develop a new reentry data base for the filament wound case SRB along with individual protuberance increments. Lockheed's procedures for performing these tasks are discussed. Free fall of the SRBs after separation from the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle is completely uncontrolled. However, the SRBs must decelerate to a velocity and attitude that is suitable for parachute deployment. To determine the SRB reentry trajectory parameters, including the rate of deceleration and attitude history during free-fall, engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center are using a six-degree-of-freedom computer program to predict dynamic behavior. Static stability aerodynamic coefficients are part of the information required for input into this computer program. Lockheed analyzed the existing reentry aerodynamic data tape (Data Tape 5) for the current steel case SRB. This analysis resulted in the development of Data Tape 7.

  17. Validation of the filament winding process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calius, Emilo P.; Springer, George S.; Wilson, Brian A.; Hanson, R. Scott

    1987-01-01

    Tests were performed toward validating the WIND model developed previously for simulating the filament winding of composite cylinders. In these tests two 24 in. long, 8 in. diam and 0.285 in. thick cylinders, made of IM-6G fibers and HBRF-55 resin, were wound at + or - 45 deg angle on steel mandrels. The temperatures on the inner and outer surfaces and inside the composite cylinders were recorded during oven cure. The temperatures inside the cylinders were also calculated by the WIND model. The measured and calculated temperatures were then compared. In addition, the degree of cure and resin viscosity distributions inside the cylinders were calculated for the conditions which existed in the tests.

  18. Natural Fiber Filament Wound Composites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ansari Suriyati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent development, natural fibers have attracted the interest of engineers, researchers, professionals and scientists all over the world as an alternative reinforcement for fiber reinforced polymer composites. This is due to its superior properties such as high specific strength, low weight, low cost, fairly good mechanical properties, non-abrasive, eco-friendly and bio-degradable characteristics. In this point of view, natural fiber-polymer composites (NFPCs are becoming increasingly utilized in a wide variety of applications because they represent an ecological and inexpensive alternative to conventional petroleum-derived materials. On the other hand, considerable amounts of organic waste and residue from the industrial and agricultural processes are still underutilized as low-value energy sources. This is a comprehensive review discussing about natural fiber reinforced composite produced by filament winding technique.

  19. A CRISPR-Cas9 System for Genetic Engineering of Filamentous Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nødvig, Christina Spuur; Nielsen, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Kogle, Martin Engelhard

    2015-01-01

    there is a demand for developing versatile methods that can be used to genetically manipulate non-model filamentous fungi. To facilitate this, we have developed a CRISPR-Cas9 based system adapted for use in filamentous fungi. The system is simple and versatile, as RNA guided mutagenesis can be achieved...... by transforming a target fungus with a single plasmid. The system currently contains four CRISPR- Cas9 vectors, which are equipped with commonly used fungal markers allowing for selection in a broad range of fungi. Moreover, we have developed a script that allows identification of protospacers that target gene...... used our CRISPR Cas9 system to generate a strain that contains an AACU_pyrG marker and demonstrated that the resulting strain can be used for iterative gene targeting....

  20. How clonal is clonal? Genome plasticity across multicellular segments of a "Candidatus Marithrix sp." filament from sulfidic, briny seafloor sediments in the Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Salman-Carvalho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Candidatus Marithrix is a recently described lineage within the group of large sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoaceae, Gammaproteobacteria. This group of bacteria comprises vacuolated, attached-living filaments that inhabit the sediment surface around vent and seep sites in the marine environment. A single filament is ca. 100 µm in diameter, several millimeters long, and consists of hundreds of clonal cells, which are considered highly polyploid. Based on these characteristics, Candidatus Marithrix was used as a model organism for the assessment of genomic plasticity along segments of a single filament using next generation sequencing to possibly identify hotspots of microevolution. Using six consecutive segments of a single filament sampled from a mud volcano in the Gulf of Mexico, we recovered ca. 90% of the Candidatus Marithrix genome in each segment. There was a high level of genome conservation along the filament with average nucleotide identities between 99.98-100%. Different approaches to assemble all reads into a complete consensus genome could not fill the gaps. Each of the six segment datasets encoded merely a few hundred unique nucleotides and 5 or less unique genes - the residual content was redundant in all datasets. Besides the overall high genomic identity, we identified a similar number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between the clonal segments, which are comparable to numbers reported for other clonal organisms. An increase of SNPs with greater distance of filament segments was not observed. The polyploidy of the cells was apparent when analyzing the heterogeneity of reads within a segment. Here, a strong increase in single nucleotide variants, or 'intrasegmental sequence heterogeneity' (ISH events, was observed. These sites may represent hotspots for genome plasticity, and possibly microevolution, since two thirds of these variants were not co-localized across the genome copies of the multicellular filament.

  1. HIERARCHICAL FRAGMENTATION OF THE ORION MOLECULAR FILAMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Su, Yu-Nung; Teixeira, Paula S.; Zapata, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a high angular resolution map of the 850 μm continuum emission of the Orion Molecular Cloud-3 (OMC 3) obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA); the map is a mosaic of 85 pointings covering an approximate area of 6.'5 × 2.'0 (0.88 × 0.27 pc). We detect 12 spatially resolved continuum sources, each with an H 2 mass between 0.3-5.7 M ☉ and a projected source size between 1400-8200 AU. All the detected sources are on the filamentary main ridge (n H 2 ≥10 6 cm –3 ), and analysis based on the Jeans theorem suggests that they are most likely gravitationally unstable. Comparison of multi-wavelength data sets indicates that of the continuum sources, 6/12 (50%) are associated with molecular outflows, 8/12 (67%) are associated with infrared sources, and 3/12 (25%) are associated with ionized jets. The evolutionary status of these sources ranges from prestellar cores to protostar phase, confirming that OMC-3 is an active region with ongoing embedded star formation. We detect quasi-periodical separations between the OMC-3 sources of ≈17''/0.035 pc. This spatial distribution is part of a large hierarchical structure that also includes fragmentation scales of giant molecular cloud (≈35 pc), large-scale clumps (≈1.3 pc), and small-scale clumps (≈0.3 pc), suggesting that hierarchical fragmentation operates within the Orion A molecular cloud. The fragmentation spacings are roughly consistent with the thermal fragmentation length in large-scale clumps, while for small-scale cores it is smaller than the local fragmentation length. These smaller spacings observed with the SMA can be explained by either a helical magnetic field, cloud rotation, or/and global filament collapse. Finally, possible evidence for sequential fragmentation is suggested in the northern part of the OMC-3 filament.

  2. RADIATION SPECTRAL SYNTHESIS OF RELATIVISTIC FILAMENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederiksen, Jacob Trier; Haugboelle, Troels; Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Nordlund, Ake

    2010-01-01

    Radiation from many astrophysical sources, e.g., gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei, is believed to arise from relativistically shocked collisionless plasmas. Such sources often exhibit highly transient spectra evolving rapidly compared with source lifetimes. Radiation emitted from these sources is typically associated with nonlinear plasma physics, complex field topologies, and non-thermal particle distributions. In such circumstances, a standard synchrotron paradigm may fail to produce accurate conclusions regarding the underlying physics. Simulating spectral emission and spectral evolution numerically in various relativistic shock scenarios is then the only viable method to determine the detailed physical origin of the emitted spectra. In this Letter, we present synthetic radiation spectra representing the early stage development of the filamentation (streaming) instability of an initially unmagnetized plasma, which is relevant for both collisionless shock formation and reconnection dynamics in relativistic astrophysical outflows as well as for laboratory astrophysics experiments. Results were obtained using a highly efficient in situ diagnostics method, based on detailed particle-in-cell modeling of collisionless plasmas. The synthetic spectra obtained here are compared with those predicted by a semi-analytical model for jitter radiation from the filamentation instability, the latter including self-consistent generated field topologies and particle distributions obtained from the simulations reported upon here. Spectra exhibit dependence on the presence-or the absence-of an inert plasma constituent, when comparing baryonic plasmas (i.e., containing protons) with pair plasmas. The results also illustrate that considerable care should be taken when using lower-dimensional models to obtain information about the astrophysical phenomena generating observed spectra.

  3. Heart failure induced by perinatal ablation of cardiac myosin light chain kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin F. K. Islam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Germline knockout mice are invaluable in understanding the function of the targeted genes. Sometimes, however, unexpected phenotypes are encountered, due in part to the activation of compensatory mechanisms. Germline ablation of cardiac myosin light chain kinase (cMLCK causes mild cardiac dysfunction with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas ablation in adult hearts results in acute heart failure with cardiomyocyte atrophy. We hypothesized that compensation after ablation of cMLCK is dependent on developmental staging and perinatal-onset of cMLCK ablation will result in more evident heart failure than germline ablation, but less profound when compared to adult-onset ablation.Methods and Results: The floxed-Mylk3 gene was ablated at the beginning of the perinatal stage using a single intra-peritoneal tamoxifen injection of 50 mg/kg into pregnant mice on the 19th day of gestation, this being the final day of gestation. The level of cMLCK protein level could no longer be detected 3 days after the injection, with these mice hereafter denoted as the perinatal Mylk3-KO. At postnatal day 19, shortly before weaning age, these mice showed reduced cardiac contractility with a fractional shortening 22.8 ± 1.0% (n = 7 as opposed to 31.4 ± 1.0% (n = 11 in controls. The ratio of the heart weight relative to body weight was significantly increased at 6.68 ± 0.28 mg/g (n = 12 relative to the two control groups, 5.90 ± 0.16 (flox/flox, n = 11 and 5.81 ± 0.33 (wild/wild/Cre, n = 5, accompanied by reduced body weight. Furthermore, their cardiomyocytes were elongated without thickening, with a long-axis of 101.8 ± 2.4 μm (n = 320 as opposed to 87.1 ± 1.6 μm (n = 360 in the controls. Conclusion: Perinatal ablation of cMLCK produces an increase of heart weight/body weight ratio, a reduction of contractility, and an increase in the expression of fetal genes. The perinatal Mylk3-KO cardiomyocytes were elongated in the absence of thickening, differing

  4. The pepsin digestibility of thermal gel products made from white croaker (Pennahia argentata) muscle in associating with myosin polymerization levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Nobuhiko; Wan, Jianrong; Watabe, Shugo

    2014-12-01

    Thermal gels were made from white croaker (Pennahia argentata) surimi at various polymerization levels of myosin heavy chains induced by suwari treatment at 38 °C for various time periods and subsequently heated at 85 °C for 20 min. Myosin heavy chain polymerization levels were also achieved in the presence of microbial transglutaminase (MTG) added at various concentrations in the surimi. The breaking strength and breaking strain rate were markedly increased during suwari treatment up to 60 min in accordance with the increased levels of myosin heavy chain polymerization. MTG enhanced myosin heavy chain polymerization during suwari treatment for 15 and 30 min, resulting in the increase of breaking strength. The solubilization in 8 M urea and pepsin digestibility of these gels as well as angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of their pepsin digests were decreased with the increased levels of myosin heavy chain polymerization. These results suggest that myosin heavy chain polymerization affects not only rheological properties of thermal gels but also their functional properties for human health. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Myosin VI as a transporter and an anchor: A model for kinetics of the motor under load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan, Peiying; Spudich, James; Dunn, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Myosin VI is an actin-based motor that is thought to function both as a transporter and an anchor in vivo. In an earlier study (Altman et al, Cell 2004), inhibition of myosin VI stepping kinetics by load applied using an optical trap was observed at saturating ATP and low ADP concentrations (ADP binding increases exponentially with load was proposed. This model predicts that myosin VI functions primarily as an anchor at loads greater than ˜0.5 pN under physiological nucleotide conditions, which is potentially inconsistent with its roles in vivo. Here we present myosin VI stepping data taken at a variety of applied loads and ADP concentrations, and show that the Altman model only holds at low ADP concentrations. At higher, physiologically relevant ADP concentrations under load we observe dwell times that are an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by the Altman model. We present a modified model in which applied load alters the equilibrium between two myosin VI states with different nucleotide affinities. This new kinetic scheme accurately describes myosin VI behavior at various nucleotide conditions under a large range of loads, and explains how the motor is able to carry out its roles in vivo, both as a force-generating transporter and as an anchor.

  6. Myosin Light Chain Kinase: A Potential Target for Treatment of Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjian Xiong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK induces contraction of the perijunctional apical actomyosin ring in response to phosphorylation of the myosin light chain. Abnormal expression of MLCK has been observed in respiratory diseases, pancreatitis, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. The signaling pathways involved in MLCK activation and triggering of endothelial barrier dysfunction are discussed in this review. The pharmacological effects of regulating MLCK expression by inhibitors such as ML-9, ML-7, microbial products, naturally occurring products, and microRNAs are also discussed. The influence of MLCK in inflammatory diseases starts with endothelial barrier dysfunction. The effectiveness of anti-MLCK treatment may depend on alleviation of that primary pathological mechanism. This review summarizes evidence for the potential benefits of anti-MLCK agents in the treatment of inflammatory disease and the importance of avoiding treatment-related side effects, as MLCK is widely expressed in many different tissues.

  7. Regional differences of energetics, mechanics, and kinetics of myosin cross-bridge in human ureter smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargiu, Romina; Perinu, Anna; Tintrup, Frank; Broccia, Francesca; Lisa, Antonello De

    2015-01-01

    This study provides information about baseline mechanical properties of the entire muscle and the molecular contractile mechanism in human ureter smooth muscle and proposed to investigate if changes in mechanical motor performance in different regions of isolated human ureter are attributable to differences in myosin crossbridge interactions. Classic mechanical, contraction and energetic parameters derived from the tension-velocity relationship were studied in ureteral smooth muscle strips oriented longitudinally and circularly from abdominal and pelvic human ureter parts. By applying of Huxley's mathematical model we calculated the total working crossbridge number per mm(2) (Ψ), elementary force per single crossbridge (Π0), duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment 1/f1 and detachment 1/g2 and peak mechanical efficiency (Eff.max). Abdominal longitudinal smooth muscle strips exhibited significantly higher maximum isometric tension and faster maximum unloaded shortening velocity compared to pelvic ones. Contractile differences were associated with significantly higher crossbridge number per mm(2). Abdominal longitudinal muscle strips showed a lower duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment and detachment and higher peak mechanical efficiency than pelvic ones. Such data suggest that the abdominal human ureter showed better mechanical motor performance mainly related to a higher crossbridge number and crossbridge kinetics differences. Such results were more evident in the longitudinal rather than in the circular layer.

  8. Photoaffinity labeling of myosin subfragment-one-with 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, R.

    1985-01-01

    The photoaffinity analogue 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate (Bz 2 ATP) contains the photoreactive benzophenone group esterified at the 2' or 3' hydroxyl groups of ribose. MgBz 2 ADP has a single binding site on skeletal myosin chymotryptic subfragment-one (SF 1 ) with a binding constant of 3.2 x 10 5 M -1 . Bz 2 ATP is also a substrate for the ATPase activity of SF 1 in the presence of different cations. The irradiation of SF 1 with [ 3 H]Bz 2 ATP photoinactivates the ATPase activity with concomitant incorporation of the analogue into the enzyme. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of photolabeled SF 1 after milk trypsin digestion shows that all three tryptic peptides, 25 K, 50K, and 20 K, and both light chains are labeled. The presence of ATP during irradiation reduces labeling of the 50 K peptide only indicating that the other peptides are non-specifically labeled. To reduce the non-specific labeling [ 3 H]Bz 2 ATP is trapped on SF 1 by cross-linking the two reactive thiols, SH 1 and SH 2 , by N,N'-p-phenylene dimaleimide or Co(II)/Co(III) phenanthroline complexes. The Co(II)/Co(III) phenanthroline modified [ 14 C]Bz 2 ATP-SF 1 , after proteolytic digestion, yields five labeled peptides which were purified by gel filtration and high performance liquid chromatography

  9. Sarcomeric Myosin Expression in the Tongue Body of Humans, Macaques and Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Rahnert, Jill A.; Sokoloff, Alan J.; Burkholder, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Expression of developmental and unconventional myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms in some adult head and neck muscles is thought to reflect specific contractile demands of muscle fibers active during kinematically complex movements. Mammalian tongue muscles are active during oromotor behaviors that encompass a wide range of tongue movement speeds and tongue shape changes (e.g. respiration, oral transport, swallowing, rejection), but the extent to which tongue muscles express developmental and ...

  10. Covalent immobilization of myosin for in-vitro motility of actin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The resulting volume of the flow cell was 50. µl (figure 1). 2.5 In-vitro motility assay. For in-vitro assay the flow cell was inclined at an angle of 30◦. Then 100 µl of 40. µg/ml myosin was infused from one side of the flow cell and kept for 2 h incubation on ice. After incubation 100 µl of AB/BSA [(25 mM imidazole hydrochloride,.

  11. Human Masseter Muscle Fibers From the Elderly Express Less Neonatal Myosin Than Those of Young Adults

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvetko, E.; Karen, Petr; Janáček, Jiří; Kubínová, Lucie; Plasencia, A.L.; Eržen, I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 295, č. 8 (2012), s. 1364-1372 ISSN 1932-8486 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA MŠk(CZ) MEB090910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : aging * confocal microscopy * myosin heavy chain * immunohistochemistry * muscle fiber types Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.343, year: 2012

  12. Lead reduces tension development and the myosin ATPase activity of the rat right ventricular myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Vassallo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb2+ poisoning causes hypertension, but little is known regarding its acute effects on cardiac contractility. To evaluate these effects, force was measured in right ventricular strips that were contracting isometrically in 45 male Wistar rats (250-300 g before and after the addition of increasing concentrations of lead acetate (3, 7, 10, 30, 70, 100, and 300 µM to the bath. Changes in rate of stimulation (0.1-1.5 Hz, relative potentiation after pauses of 15, 30, and 60 s, effect of Ca2+ concentration (0.62, 1.25, and 2.5 mM, and the effect of isoproterenol (20 ng/mL were determined before and after the addition of 100 µM Pb2+. Effects on contractile proteins were evaluated after caffeine treatment using tetanic stimulation (10 Hz and measuring the activity of the myosin ATPase. Pb2+ produced concentration-dependent force reduction, significant at concentrations greater than 30 µM. The force developed in response to increasing rates of stimulation became smaller at 0.5 and 0.8 Hz. Relative potentiation increased after 100 µM Pb2+ treatment. Extracellular Ca2+ increment and isoproterenol administration increased force development but after 100 µM Pb2+ treatment the force was significantly reduced suggesting an effect of the metal on the sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx. Concentration of 100 µM Pb2+ also reduced the peak and plateau force of tetanic contractions and reduced the activity of the myosin ATPase. Results showed that acute Pb2+ administration, although not affecting the sarcoplasmic reticulum activity, produces a concentration-dependent negative inotropic effect and reduces myosin ATPase activity. Results suggest that acute lead administration reduced myocardial contractility by reducing sarcolemmal calcium influx and the myosin ATPase activity. These results also suggest that lead exposure is hazardous and has toxicological consequences affecting cardiac muscle.

  13. Regulation of nonmuscle myosin II during 3-methylcholanthrene induced dedifferentiation of C2C12 myotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Sumit K.; Saha, Shekhar; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R.; Jana, Siddhartha S., E-mail: bcssj@iacs.res.in

    2014-08-01

    3-Methylcholanthrene (3MC) induces tumor formation at the site of injection in the hind leg of mice within 110 days. Recent reports reveal that the transformation of normal muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes for tumor formation, however the molecular mechanism behind this process is not well understood. Here, we show in an in vitro study that 3MC induces fragmentation of multinucleate myotubes into viable mononucleates. These mononucleates form colonies when they are seeded into soft agar, indicative of cellular transformation. Immunoblot analysis reveals that phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC{sub 20}) is 5.6±0.5 fold reduced in 3MC treated myotubes in comparison to vehicle treated myotubes during the fragmentation of myotubes. In contrast, levels of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myogenin and cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D, Cyclin E1 remain unchanged as assessed by real-time PCR array and reverse transcriptase PCR analysis, respectively. Interestingly, addition of the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7, enhances the fragmentation, whereas phosphatase inhibitor perturbs the 3MC induced fragmentation of myotubes. These results suggest that decrease in RLC{sub 20} phosphorylation may be associated with the fragmentation step of dedifferentiation. - Highlights: • 3-Methylcholanthrene induces fragmentation of C2C12-myotubes. • Dedifferentiation can be divided into two steps – fragmentation and proliferation. • Fragmentation is associated with rearrangement of nonmuscle myosin II. • Genes associated with differentiation and proliferation are not altered during fragmentation. • Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain is reduced during fragmentation.

  14. Regulation of nonmuscle myosin II during 3-methylcholanthrene induced dedifferentiation of C2C12 myotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Sumit K.; Saha, Shekhar; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R.; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2014-01-01

    3-Methylcholant