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Sample records for single mri image

  1. Single element ultrasonic imaging of limb geometry: an in-vivo study with comparison to MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Fincke, Jonathan R.; Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Despite advancements in medical imaging, current prosthetic fitting methods remain subjective, operator dependent, and non-repeatable. The standard plaster casting method relies on prosthetist experience and tactile feel of the limb to design the prosthetic socket. Often times, many fitting iterations are required to achieve an acceptable fit. Use of improper socket fittings can lead to painful pathologies including neuromas, inflammation, soft tissue calcification, and pressure sores, often forcing the wearer to into a wheelchair and reducing mobility and quality of life. Computer software along with MRI/CT imaging has already been explored to aid the socket design process. In this paper, we explore the use of ultrasound instead of MRI/CT to accurately obtain the underlying limb geometry to assist the prosthetic socket design process. Using a single element ultrasound system, multiple subjects' proximal limbs were imaged using 1, 2.25, and 5 MHz single element transducers. Each ultrasound transducer was calibrated to ensure acoustic exposure within the limits defined by the FDA. To validate image quality, each patient was also imaged in an MRI. Fiducial markers visible in both MRI and ultrasound were used to compare the same limb cross-sectional image for each patient. After applying a migration algorithm, B-mode ultrasound cross-sections showed sufficiently high image resolution to characterize the skin and bone boundaries along with the underlying tissue structures.

  2. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  4. All-in-one interictal presurgical imaging in patients with epilepsy: single-session EEG/PET/(f)MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grouiller, Frederic; Delattre, Benedicte M.A.; Lazeyras, Francois; Ratib, Osman; Vargas, Maria I.; Garibotto, Valentina; Pittau, Francesca; Spinelli, Laurent; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliemoz, Serge; Heinzer, Susanne; Iannotti, Giannina R.

    2015-01-01

    In patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, resection of the epileptic focus can lead to freedom from seizures or significant improvement in well-selected candidates. Localization of the epileptic focus with multimodal concordance is crucial for a good postoperative outcome. Beyond the detection of epileptogenic lesions on structural MRI and focal hypometabolism on FDG PET, EEG-based Electric Source Imaging (ESI) and simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) are increasingly applied for mapping epileptic activity. We here report presurgical multimodal interictal imaging using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for single-session FDG PET, MRI, EEG-fMRI and ESI. This quadrimodal imaging procedure was performed in a single session in 12 patients using a high-density (256 electrodes) MR-compatible EEG system and a hybrid PET/MR scanner. EEG was used to exclude subclinical seizures during uptake of the PET tracer, to compute ESI on interictal epileptiform discharges and to guide fMRI analysis for mapping haemodynamic changes correlated with interictal epileptiform activity. The whole multimodal recording was performed in less than 2 hours with good patient comfort and data quality. Clinically contributory examinations with at least two modalities were obtained in nine patients and with all modalities in five patients. This single-session quadrimodal imaging procedure provided reliable and contributory interictal clinical data. This procedure avoids multiple scanning sessions and is associated with less radiation exposure than PET-CT. Moreover, it guarantees the same medication level and medical condition for all modalities. The procedure improves workflow and could reduce the duration and cost of presurgical epilepsy evaluations. (orig.)

  5. All-in-one interictal presurgical imaging in patients with epilepsy: single-session EEG/PET/(f)MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grouiller, Frédéric; Delattre, Bénédicte M A; Pittau, Francesca; Heinzer, Susanne; Lazeyras, François; Spinelli, Laurent; Iannotti, Giannina R; Seeck, Margitta; Ratib, Osman; Vargas, Maria I; Garibotto, Valentina; Vulliemoz, Serge

    2015-06-01

    In patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, resection of the epileptic focus can lead to freedom from seizures or significant improvement in well-selected candidates. Localization of the epileptic focus with multimodal concordance is crucial for a good postoperative outcome. Beyond the detection of epileptogenic lesions on structural MRI and focal hypometabolism on FDG PET, EEG-based Electric Source Imaging (ESI) and simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) are increasingly applied for mapping epileptic activity. We here report presurgical multimodal interictal imaging using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for single-session FDG PET, MRI, EEG-fMRI and ESI. This quadrimodal imaging procedure was performed in a single session in 12 patients using a high-density (256 electrodes) MR-compatible EEG system and a hybrid PET/MR scanner. EEG was used to exclude subclinical seizures during uptake of the PET tracer, to compute ESI on interictal epileptiform discharges and to guide fMRI analysis for mapping haemodynamic changes correlated with interictal epileptiform activity. The whole multimodal recording was performed in less than 2 hours with good patient comfort and data quality. Clinically contributory examinations with at least two modalities were obtained in nine patients and with all modalities in five patients. This single-session quadrimodal imaging procedure provided reliable and contributory interictal clinical data. This procedure avoids multiple scanning sessions and is associated with less radiation exposure than PET-CT. Moreover, it guarantees the same medication level and medical condition for all modalities. The procedure improves workflow and could reduce the duration and cost of presurgical epilepsy evaluations.

  6. All-in-one interictal presurgical imaging in patients with epilepsy: single-session EEG/PET/(f)MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grouiller, Frederic; Delattre, Benedicte M.A.; Lazeyras, Francois; Ratib, Osman; Vargas, Maria I.; Garibotto, Valentina [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Pittau, Francesca; Spinelli, Laurent; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliemoz, Serge [Geneva University Hospital, EEG and Epilepsy Unit, Department of Neurology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Heinzer, Susanne [Philips AG Healthcare, Zuerich (Switzerland); Iannotti, Giannina R. [Geneva University Hospital, Functional Brain Mapping Laboratory, Department of Fundamental Neurosciences, Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2015-04-17

    In patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, resection of the epileptic focus can lead to freedom from seizures or significant improvement in well-selected candidates. Localization of the epileptic focus with multimodal concordance is crucial for a good postoperative outcome. Beyond the detection of epileptogenic lesions on structural MRI and focal hypometabolism on FDG PET, EEG-based Electric Source Imaging (ESI) and simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) are increasingly applied for mapping epileptic activity. We here report presurgical multimodal interictal imaging using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for single-session FDG PET, MRI, EEG-fMRI and ESI. This quadrimodal imaging procedure was performed in a single session in 12 patients using a high-density (256 electrodes) MR-compatible EEG system and a hybrid PET/MR scanner. EEG was used to exclude subclinical seizures during uptake of the PET tracer, to compute ESI on interictal epileptiform discharges and to guide fMRI analysis for mapping haemodynamic changes correlated with interictal epileptiform activity. The whole multimodal recording was performed in less than 2 hours with good patient comfort and data quality. Clinically contributory examinations with at least two modalities were obtained in nine patients and with all modalities in five patients. This single-session quadrimodal imaging procedure provided reliable and contributory interictal clinical data. This procedure avoids multiple scanning sessions and is associated with less radiation exposure than PET-CT. Moreover, it guarantees the same medication level and medical condition for all modalities. The procedure improves workflow and could reduce the duration and cost of presurgical epilepsy evaluations. (orig.)

  7. Single photon emission photography/magnetic resonance imaging (SPECT/MRI) visualization for frontal-lobe-damaged regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokking, Rik; Zuiderveld, Karel J.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Viergever, Max A.

    1994-09-01

    We present multi-modality visualization strategies to convey information contained in registered Single Photon Emission Photography (SPECT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the brain. Multi-modality visualization provides a means to retrieve valuable information from the data which might otherwise remain obscured. Here we use MRI as an anatomical framework for functional information acquired with SPECT. This is part of clinical research studying the change of functionality caused by a frontal lobe damaged region. A number of known and newly developed techniques for the integrated visualization of SPECT and MR images will be discussed.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  10. Single breath-hold diffusion-weighted MRI of the liver with parallel imaging: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oner, A.Y.; Celik, H.; Oktar, S.O.; Tali, T.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate prospectively the improvement in the signal:noise ratio (SNR), with the use of parallel technique in single breath-hold diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the liver and its affect on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements. Materials and methods: This study was approved by our institutional review board. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Fifteen patients underwent single breath-hold DWI of the liver with and without parallel imaging technique. SNR and ADC values were measured over a lesion-free right hepatic lobe by two radiologists in both series. When a focal hepatic lesion was present the contrast:noise ratio (CNR) and ADC were also measured. Paired Student's t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean SNR values of the liver were 20.82 ± 7.54 and 15.83 ± 5.95 for DWI with and without parallel imaging, respectively. SNR values measured in DWI using parallel imaging were found to be significantly higher (p -3 mm 2 /s and 1.56 ± 0.28 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s for DWI with and without parallel imaging, respectively. No significant difference was found between the two sequences for hepatic ADC measurement (p > 0.05). Overall lesion CNR was found to be higher in DWI with parallel imaging. Conclusion: Parallel imaging is useful in improving SNR of single breath-hold DWI of the liver without compromising ADC measurements

  11. Constrained MRI Impedance Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Plewes, Donald

    2002-01-01

    An approach for imaging electric tissue properties in vivo is proposed. The technique relies upon the integration of MRI data with electrical potential measurements made over the surface of the patient...

  12. Fast single image super-resolution using estimated low-frequency k-space data in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianhua; Mou, Zhiying; Qin, Binjie; Li, Wanqing; Yang, Feng; Robini, Marc; Zhu, Yuemin

    2017-07-01

    Single image super-resolution (SR) is highly desired in many fields but obtaining it is often technically limited in practice. The purpose of this study was to propose a simple, rapid and robust single image SR method in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI). The idea is based on the mathematical formulation of the intrinsic link in k-space between a given (modulus) low-resolution (LR) image and the desired SR image. The method consists of two steps: 1) estimating the low-frequency k-space data of the desired SR image from a single LR image; 2) reconstructing the SR image using the estimated low-frequency and zero-filled high-frequency k-space data. The method was evaluated on digital phantom images, physical phantom MR images and real brain MR images, and compared with existing SR methods. The proposed SR method exhibited a good robustness by reaching a clearly higher PSNR (25.77dB) and SSIM (0.991) averaged over different noise levels in comparison with existing edge-guided nonlinear interpolation (EGNI) (PSNR=23.78dB, SSIM=0.983), zero-filling (ZF) (PSNR=24.09dB, SSIM=0.985) and total variation (TV) (PSNR=24.54dB, SSIM=0.987) methods while presenting the same order of computation time as the ZF method but being much faster than the EGNI or TV method. The average PSNR or SSIM over different slice images of the proposed method (PSNR=26.33 dB or SSIM=0.955) was also higher than the EGNI (PSNR=25.07dB or SSIM=0.952), ZF (PSNR=24.97dB or SSIM=0.950) and TV (PSNR=25.70dB or SSIM=0.953) methods, demonstrating its good robustness to variation in anatomical structure of the images. Meanwhile, the proposed method always produced less ringing artifacts than the ZF method, gave a clearer image than the EGNI method, and did not exhibit any blocking effect presented in the TV method. In addition, the proposed method yielded the highest spatial consistency in the inter-slice dimension among the four methods. This study proposed a fast, robust and efficient single image SR

  13. Single-Step Assembly of Multi-Modal Imaging Nanocarriers: MRI and Long-Wavelength Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, Nathalie M.; Gindy, Marian E.; Calero-DdelC, Victoria L.; Wolfson, Theodore; Pagels, Robert F.; Adler, Derek; Gao, Dayuan; Li, Shike; Wang, Ruobing; Zevon, Margot; Yao, Nan; Pacheco, Carlos; Therien, Michael J.; Rinaldi, Carlos; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    MRI and NIR-active, multi-modal Composite NanoCarriers (CNCs) are prepared using a simple, one-step process, Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP). The FNP process allows for the independent control of the hydrodynamic diameter, co-core excipient and NIR dye loading, and iron oxide-based nanocrystal (IONC) content of the CNCs. In the controlled precipitation process, 10 nm IONCs are encapsulated into poly(ethylene glycol) stabilized CNCs to make biocompatible T2 contrast agents. By adjusting the formulation, CNC size is tuned between 80 and 360 nm. Holding the CNC size constant at an intensity weighted average diameter of 99 ± 3 nm (PDI width 28 nm), the particle relaxivity varies linearly with encapsulated IONC content ranging from 66 to 533 mM-1s-1 for CNCs formulated with 4 to 16 wt% IONC. To demonstrate the use of CNCs as in vivo MRI contrast agents, CNCs are surface functionalized with liver targeting hydroxyl groups. The CNCs enable the detection of 0.8 mm3 non-small cell lung cancer metastases in mice livers via MRI. Incorporating the hydrophobic, NIR dye PZn3 into CNCs enables complementary visualization with long-wavelength fluorescence at 800 nm. In vivo imaging demonstrates the ability of CNCs to act both as MRI and fluorescent imaging agents. PMID:25925128

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... UltrasoundCT Head ScanElectrocardiogram (EKG or ECG)Pap Smear (Pap Test) Home Tests and Procedures Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ... SafetyRead Article >>Imaging and Medical Radiation SafetyPap Smear (Pap Test)Read Article >>Pap Smear (Pap Test)Preconception Carrier ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  17. Clinical utility of simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MRI as a single-step imaging modality in the staging of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yeh, Chih-Hua; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Ng, Shu-Hang; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Yu; Yen-Ming, Tsang; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Huang, Bing-Shen; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Chang, Kai-Ping; Wang, Hung-Ming; Liao, Chun-Ta

    2018-03-03

    Both head and neck magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) play a crucial role in the staging of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In this study, we sought to prospectively investigate the clinical utility of simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MRI for primary staging of NPC patients. We examined 113 patients with histologically confirmed NPC who underwent pretreatment, simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI and PET/CT for primary tumor staging. The images obtained with the different imaging modalities were interpreted independently and compared with each other. PET/MRI increased the accuracy of head and neck MRI for assessment of primary tumor extent in four patients via addition of FDG uptake information to increase the conspicuity of morphologically subtle lesions. PET/MR images were more discernible than PET/CT images for mapping tumor extension, especially intracranial invasion. Regarding the N staging assessment, the sensitivity of PET/MRI (99.5%) was higher than that of head and neck MRI (94.2%) and PET/CT (90.9%). PET/MRI was particularly useful for distinguishing retropharyngeal nodal metastasis from adjacent nasopharyngeal tumors. For distant metastasis evaluation, PET/MRI exhibited a similar sensitivity (90% vs. 86.7% vs. 83.3%), but higher positive predictive value (93.1% vs. 78.8% vs. 83.3%) than whole-body MRI and PET/CT, respectively. For tumor staging of NPC, simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI was more accurate than head and neck MRI and PET/CT, and may serve as a single-step staging modality.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  19. MRI: Imaging of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, W. W. M; Lee, J. S. W.; Ho, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The study is to determine the optimal MRI bowel preparation regime for visualization of the stomach anatomy, Eight healthy volunteers were asked to take water, 75% barium and blueberry juice. The image quality and tolerance of different stomach distension regime were evaluated. Blueberry juice gave the best distension, but the signal intensity was not very homogeneous. Taking into account the image quality, tolerability and adverse effects, it is concluded that water is the most desirable oral contrast for MR stomach imaging

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. MRI can help physicians evaluate the structures of the brain and can also provide functional information ... than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. MRI enables the ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... MRI. For more information, consult your radiologist. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. MRI can help physicians evaluate the structures of ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  12. Liver MRI at 3.0 tesla: comparison of image quality and lesion detectability between single-source conventional and dual-source parallel radiofrequency transmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jiyoung; Kim, Young Kon; Park, Min Jung; Lee, Mi Hee; Kim, Seong Hyun; Lee, Won Jae; Choi, Dongil

    2012-01-01

    To prospectively and intraindividually compare liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using single-source and dual-source parallel radiofrequency (RF) transmissions at 3.0-T for image quality, lesion detectability, and lesion contrast. Ninety-nine patients with 139 liver lesions underwent liver MRI at 3.0-T. Two radiologists performed a consensus review of T2-weighted images (T2WI), heavily T2WI (HT2WI), gadoxetic acid-enhanced hepatobiliary images, and diffusion-weighted imaging using single-source and dual-source RF transmissions with regard to image quality and lesion detectability. Contrast ratios between liver lesions and liver parenchyma were also calculated. Image quality was better with dual-source than with single-source at T2WI and HT2WI (P 0.05). Dual-source RF transmission provides a better image quality with T2WI and HT2WI than with single-source. However, 2 techniques showed similar lesion detectability.

  13. Optimization of single injection liver arterial phase gadolinium enhanced MRI using bolus track real-time imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Puneet; Kalb, Bobby; Kitajima, Hiroumi D; Salman, Khalil N; Burrow, Bobbie; Ray, Gaye L; Martin, Diego R

    2011-01-01

    To measure contrast agent enhancement kinetics in the liver and to further evaluate and develop an optimized gadolinium enhanced MRI using a single injection real-time bolus-tracking method for reproducible imaging of the transient arterial-phase. A total of 18 subjects with hypervascular liver lesions were imaged with four dimensional (4D) perfusion scans to measure time-to-peak (TTP) delays of arterial (aorta-celiac axis), liver parenchyma, liver lesion, portal, and hepatic veins. Time delays were calculated from the TTP-aorta signal, and then related to the gradient echo (GRE) k-space acquisition design, to determine optimized timing for real-time bolus-track triggering methodology. As another measure of significance, 200 clinical patients were imaged with 3D-GRE using either a fixed time-interval or by individualized arterial bolus real-time triggering. Bolus TTP-aorta was calculated and arterial-phase acquisitions were compared for accuracy and reproducibility using specific vascular enhancement indicators. The mean bolus transit-time to peak-lesion contrast was 8.1 ± 2.7 seconds following arterial detection, compared to 32.1 ± 5.4 seconds from contrast injection, representing a 62.1% reduction in the time-variability among subjects (N = 18). The real-time bolus-triggered technique more consistently captured the targeted arterial phase (94%), compared to the fixed timing technique (73%), representing an expected improvement of timing accuracy in 28% of patients (P = 0.0001389). Our results show detailed timing window analysis required for optimized arterial real-time bolus-triggering acquisition of transient arterial phase features of liver lesions, with optimized arterial triggering expected to improve reproducibility in a significant number of patients. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a contrast ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... six weeks) before being safe for MRI examinations. Examples include but are not limited to: artificial heart ... the area to be imaged. Furthermore, the examination takes longer than other imaging modalities (typically x-ray ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ... vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a contrast ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... let the radiologist know about them. Parents or family members who accompany patients into the scanning room ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ... Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  9. Imaging of striatal dopamine transporters in rat brain with single pinhole SPECT and co-aligned MRI is highly reproducible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booij, Jan; Bruin, Kora de; Win, Maartje M.L. de; Lavini, Cristina Mphil; Heeten, Gerard J. den; Habraken, Jan

    2003-01-01

    A recently developed pinhole high-resolution SPECT system was used to measure striatal to non-specific binding ratios in rats (n = 9), after injection of the dopamine transporter ligand 123 I-FP-CIT, and to assess its test/retest reproducibility. For co-alignment purposes, the rat brain was imaged on a 1.5 Tesla clinical MRI scanner using a specially developed surface coil. The SPECT images showed clear striatal uptake. On the MR images, cerebral and extra-cerebral structures could be easily delineated. The mean striatal to non-specific [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding ratios of the test/retest studies were 1.7 ± 0.2 and 1.6 ± 0.2, respectively. The test/retest variability was approximately 9%. We conclude that the assessment of striatal [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding ratios in rats is highly reproducible

  10. Non-Stationary Rician Noise Estimation in Parallel MRI Using a Single Image: A Variance-Stabilizing Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieciak, Tomasz; Aja-Fernandez, Santiago; Vegas-Sanchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo

    2017-10-01

    Parallel magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) techniques have gained a great importance both in research and clinical communities recently since they considerably accelerate the image acquisition process. However, the image reconstruction algorithms needed to correct the subsampling artifacts affect the nature of noise, i.e., it becomes non-stationary. Some methods have been proposed in the literature dealing with the non-stationary noise in pMRI. However, their performance depends on information not usually available such as multiple acquisitions, receiver noise matrices, sensitivity coil profiles, reconstruction coefficients, or even biophysical models of the data. Besides, some methods show an undesirable granular pattern on the estimates as a side effect of local estimation. Finally, some methods make strong assumptions that just hold in the case of high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which limits their usability in real scenarios. We propose a new automatic noise estimation technique for non-stationary Rician noise that overcomes the aforementioned drawbacks. Its effectiveness is due to the derivation of a variance-stabilizing transformation designed to deal with any SNR. The method was compared to the main state-of-the-art methods in synthetic and real scenarios. Numerical results confirm the robustness of the method and its better performance for the whole range of SNRs.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ... imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI generally is not ...

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    Full Text Available ... Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with MRI than with other ... than one in 20 require medication. It is normal for the area of your body being imaged ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... On very rare occasions, a few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ...

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... be immediately available, as is often necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe ...

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    Full Text Available ... the 1980s with no reports of any ill effects on pregnant women or their unborn babies. However, ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open ...

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    Full Text Available ... it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should ... a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the ...

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    Full Text Available ... period is necessary. You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On ... that time the imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform than other imaging modalities. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, ... risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of another imaging procedure. ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Examples include but are not limited to: artificial heart valves implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or ... imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI generally is not ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

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    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ... will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who ...

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    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used ...

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    Full Text Available ... exam time. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most MRI exams ... uncomfortable to remain still during MR imaging. Others experience a sense of being closed-in (claustrophobia) while ...

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ...

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    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test ... causes of epilepsy (seizure) hemorrhage in selected trauma patients certain chronic conditions, such as multiple sclerosis disorders ...

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging ... their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary according to the type of body ...

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    Full Text Available ... MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in ... is because traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and ...

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    Full Text Available ... during an MRI scan, but this is rare. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using open MRI. For more information, consult your radiologist. The computer workstation that processes ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... others nearby harm. These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and hearing aids, all of which can ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ...

  19. Single echo acquisition MRI using RF encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven M; McDougall, Mary Preston

    2009-11-01

    Encoding of spatial information in magnetic resonance imaging is conventionally accomplished by using magnetic field gradients. During gradient encoding, the position in k-space is determined by a time-integral of the gradient field, resulting in a limitation in imaging speed due to either gradient power or secondary effects such as peripheral nerve stimulation. Partial encoding of spatial information through the sensitivity patterns of an array of coils, known as parallel imaging, is widely used to accelerate the imaging, and is complementary to gradient encoding. This paper describes the one-dimensional limit of parallel imaging in which all spatial localization in one dimension is performed through encoding by the radiofrequency (RF) coil. Using a one-dimensional array of long and narrow parallel elements to localize the image information in one direction, an entire image is obtained from a single line of k-space, avoiding rapid or repeated manipulation of gradients. The technique, called single echo acquisition (SEA) imaging, is described, along with the need for a phase compensation gradient pulse to counteract the phase variation contained in the RF coil pattern which would otherwise cause signal cancellation in each imaging voxel. Image reconstruction and resolution enhancement methods compatible with the speed of the technique are discussed. MR movies at frame rates of 125 frames per second are demonstrated, illustrating the ability to monitor the evolution of transverse magnetization to steady state during an MR experiment as well as demonstrating the ability to image rapid motion. Because this technique, like all RF encoding approaches, relies on the inherent spatially varying pattern of the coil and is not a time-integral, it should enable new applications for MRI that were previously inaccessible due to speed constraints, and should be of interest as an approach to extending the limits of detection in MR imaging.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... images obtained using techniques that time the imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI generally is not recommended for patients who have been acutely injured; however, this decision is based on clinical judgment. This is because traction devices ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. top of page What are the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able to ...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  6. MRI imaging in pediatric appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Riley

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old male presents with two days of abdominal pain and emesis. Computed tomography was concerning for obstruction or reactive ileus with an apparent transition point in the right lower quadrant, possibly due to Crohn's. Magnetic resonance imaging was concerning for perforated appendicitis. As demonstrated by this case MRI can be as sensitive as CT in detecting pediatric appendicitis [2]. We recommend using MRI instead of CT to diagnose appendicitis to avoid ionizing radiation and increased cancer risk in the pediatric population. Keywords: Computer tomography, Magnetic resonance imaging, Pediatric appendicitis

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... provides detailed images of blood vessels in the brain—often without the need for contrast material. See the MRA page for more information. MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... types of clips used for brain aneurysms some types of metal coils placed within blood vessels nearly all cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers You ... called MR angiography (MRA) provides detailed images of blood vessels in the ... the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most strokes, ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific exam and with the imaging facility. Unless you are told otherwise, you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive ...

  17. Clinical single-shot diffusion-weighted MRI of the human brain on a short-bore medium-field imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Remonda, L.; Schneider, J.; Goenner, F.; Schroth, G.; Heid, O.

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) is becoming important for assessment of acute stroke. Until recently single-shot DWI required expensive technology such as echo-planar imaging (EPI) available only at some research sites. A new medium-field (1.0 T) short-bore MR imager has been developed with which DWI data sets can be acquired. We prospectively studied 169 patients on this 1.0 T commercial system. After conventional imaging, DWI was performed with a single-shot multi-slice sequence with b values 0 an 900 s/mm 2 , and with the gradients switched in three directions. The apparent diffusion coefficients were calculated with online calculation software. There were 50 patients with totally normal MRI, and 17 had strokes, these strokes were detected as areas of high signal on the images at a maximal b value. There was a drop in the ADC in ischaemic regions: in subacute infarcts, the values were between 0.41 and 0.531 x 10 - 3 mm 2 /s. In old infarcts the ADC was 1.15 x 10 - 3 mm 2 /s. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) gave low signal whereas areas in the brain had more intermediate intensities (CSF: 3.00; deep white matter: 0.75, cortical grey matter: 0.80, basal ganglia (thalamus): 0.70 and cerebellar white matter: 0.65 x 10 - 3 mm 2 /s). Anisotropy was detected as areas of restricted diffusion along the tracts. These preliminary data show that DWI can be aquired successfully on a medium-field short-bore system. This should allow the technique to be implemented at more sites, therefore facilitating the diagnosis of acute stroke and rendering early intervention feasible. (orig.)

  18. On the characterization of single-event related brain activity from functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Khoram, Nafiseh

    2014-08-01

    We propose an efficient numerical technique for calibrating the mathematical model that describes the singleevent related brain response when fMRI measurements are given. This method employs a regularized Newton technique in conjunction with a Kalman filtering procedure. We have applied this method to estimate the biophysiological parameters of the Balloon model that describes the hemodynamic brain responses. Illustrative results obtained with both synthetic and real fMRI measurements are presented. © 2014 IEEE.

  19. Radiolabeled cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD)-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual-modality agents for imaging of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shengming; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Bin; Hong, Ruoyu; Chen, Qing; Dong, Jiajia; Chen, Yinyiin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wu, Yiwei

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) modified with a novel cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptide were made and radiolabeled as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual-modality agents for imaging of breast cancer. The probe was tested both in vitro and in vivo to determine its receptor targeting efficacy and feasibility for SPECT and MRI. The radiochemical syntheses of 125I-cRGD-USPIO were accomplished with a radiochemical purity of 96.05 ± 0.33 %. High radiochemical stability was found in fresh human serum and in phosphate-buffered saline. The average hydrodynamic size of 125I-cRGD-USPIO determined by dynamic light scattering was 51.3 nm. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the radiolabeled nanoparticles to tumor cells. Preliminary biodistribution studies of 125I-radiolabeled cRGD-USPIO in Bcap37-bearing nude mice showed that it had long circulation half-life, high tumor uptake, and high initial blood retention with moderate liver uptake. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the radiolabeled nanoparticles in mice model were visualized by SPECT and MRI collected at different time points. Our results strongly indicated that the 125I-cRGD-USPIO could be used as a promising bifunctional radiotracer for early clinical tumor detection with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution by SPECT and MRI.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & ... Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing that doctors use to see the body's organs ...

  1. MRI methods for pulmonary ventilation and perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, G.; Bauman, G.

    2016-01-01

    Separate assessment of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and pulmonary circulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases. Due to the global character of the information obtained clinical lung function tests are often not sufficiently specific in the differential diagnosis or have a limited sensitivity in the detection of early pathological changes. The standard procedures of pulmonary imaging are computed tomography (CT) for depiction of the morphology as well as perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for functional assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases, O 2 -enhanced MRI, MRI with fluorinated gases and Fourier decomposition MRI (FD-MRI) are available for assessment of pulmonary ventilation. For assessment of pulmonary perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and FD-MRI can be used. Imaging provides a more precise insight into the pathophysiology of pulmonary function on a regional level. The advantages of MRI are a lack of ionizing radiation, which allows a protective acquisition of dynamic data as well as the high number of available contrasts and therefore accessible lung function parameters. Sufficient clinical data exist only for certain applications of DCE-MRI. For the other techniques, only feasibility studies and case series of different sizes are available. The clinical applicability of hyperpolarized gases is limited for technical reasons. The clinical application of the techniques described, except for DCE-MRI, should be restricted to scientific studies. (orig.) [de

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  4. Imaging features of primary Sarcomas of the great vessels in CT, MRI and PET/CT: a single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falck, Christian von; Meyer, Bernhard; Fegbeutel, Christine; Länger, Florian; Bengel, Frank; Wacker, Frank; Rodt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the imaging features of primary sarcomas of the great vessels in CT, MRI and 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Thirteen patients with a primary sarcoma of the great vessels were retrospectively evaluated. All available images studies including F-18 FDG PET(/CT) (n = 4), MDCT (n = 12) and MRI (n = 6) were evaluated and indicative image features of this rare tumor entity were identified. The median interval between the first imaging study and the final diagnosis was 11 weeks (0–12 weeks). The most frequently observed imaging findings suggestive of malignant disease in patients with sarcomas of the pulmonary arteries were a large filling defect with vascular distension, unilaterality and a lack of improvement despite effective anticoagulation. In patients with aortic sarcomas we most frequently observed a pedunculated appearance and an atypical location of the filling defect. The F-18 FDG PET(/CT) examinations demonstrated an unequivocal hypermetabolism of the lesion in all cases (4/4). MRI proved lesion vascularization in 5/6 cases. Intravascular unilateral or atypically located filling defects of the great vessels with vascular distension, a pedunculated shape and lack of improvement despite effective anticoagulation are suspicious for primary sarcoma on MDCT or MRI. MR perfusion techniques can add information on the nature of the lesion but the findings may be subtle and equivocal. F-18 FDG PET/CT may have a potential role in these patients and may be considered as part of the imaging workup

  5. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ... passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ... Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  12. Imaging speech production using fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracco, Vincent L; Tremblay, Pascale; Pike, Bruce

    2005-05-15

    Human speech is a well-learned, sensorimotor, and ecological behavior ideal for the study of neural processes and brain-behavior relations. With the advent of modern neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the potential for investigating neural mechanisms of speech motor control, speech motor disorders, and speech motor development has increased. However, a practical issue has limited the application of fMRI to issues in spoken language production and other related behaviors (singing, swallowing). Producing these behaviors during volume acquisition introduces motion-induced signal changes that confound the activation signals of interest. A number of approaches, ranging from signal processing to using silent or covert speech, have attempted to remove or prevent the effects of motion-induced artefact. However, these approaches are flawed for a variety of reasons. An alternative approach, that has only recently been applied to study single-word production, uses pauses in volume acquisition during the production of natural speech motion. Here we present some representative data illustrating the problems associated with motion artefacts and some qualitative results acquired from subjects producing short sentences and orofacial nonspeech movements in the scanner. Using pauses or silent intervals in volume acquisition and block designs, results from individual subjects result in robust activation without motion-induced signal artefact. This approach is an efficient method for studying the neural basis of spoken language production and the effects of speech and language disorders using fMRI.

  13. Single-photon imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Seitz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of images is a central capability in almost all scientific and technological domains. In particular, the acquisition of electromagnetic radiation, in the form of visible light, UV, infrared, X-ray, etc. is of enormous practical importance. The ultimate sensitivity in electronic imaging is the detection of individual photons. With this book, the first comprehensive review of all aspects of single-photon electronic imaging has been created. Topics include theoretical basics, semiconductor fabrication, single-photon detection principles, imager design and applications of different spectral domains. Today, the solid-state fabrication capabilities for several types of image sensors has advanced to a point, where uncoooled single-photon electronic imaging will soon become a consumer product. This book is giving a specialist´s view from different domains to the forthcoming “single-photon imaging” revolution. The various aspects of single-photon imaging are treated by internati...

  14. Multimodal MRI in the characterization of glial neoplasms: the combined role of single-voxel MR spectroscopy, diffusion imaging and echo-planar perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zonari, Paolo; Baraldi, Patrizia; Crisi, Girolamo

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) provide useful data for tumor evaluation. To assess the contribution of these multimodal techniques in grading glial neoplasms, we compared the value of DWI, PWI and MRS in the evaluation of histologically proven high- and low-grade gliomas in a population of 105 patients. Independently for each modality, the following variables were used to compare the tumors: minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and maximum relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) normalized values between tumor and healthy tissue, maximum Cho/Cr ratio and minimum NAA/Cr ratio in tumor, and scored lactate and lipid values in tumor. The Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests were employed to compare DWI, PWI and MRS between tumor types. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine which parameters best increased the diagnostic accuracy in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. ROC curves were determined for parameters with high sensitivity and specificity to identify threshold values to separate high- from low-grade lesions. Statistically significant differences were found for rCBV tumor/normal tissue ratio, and NAA/Cr ratio in tumor and Cho/Cr ratio in tumor between low- and high-grade tumors. The best performing single parameter for group classification was the normalized rCBV value; including all parameters, statistical significance was reached by rCBV tumor/normal tissue ratio, NAA/Cr tumor ratio and lactate. From the ROC curves, a high probability for a neoplasm to be a high-grade lesion was associated with a rCBV tumor/normal tissue ratio of >1.16 and NAA/Cr tumor ratio of <0.44. Combining PWI and MRS with conventional MR imaging increases the accuracy of the attribution of malignancy to glial neoplasms. The best performing parameter was found to be the perfusion level. (orig.)

  15. Multimodal MRI in the characterization of glial neoplasms: the combined role of single-voxel MR spectroscopy, diffusion imaging and echo-planar perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonari, Paolo [Ospedale ' ' B. Ramazzini' ' , AUSL Modena, Neuroradiologia, Dipartimento Integrato di Neuroscienze, Carpi, Modena (Italy); Baraldi, Patrizia [Universita degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Fisiologia, Modena (Italy); Crisi, Girolamo [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Dipartimento ad Attivita Integrata di Neuroscienze, Parma (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) provide useful data for tumor evaluation. To assess the contribution of these multimodal techniques in grading glial neoplasms, we compared the value of DWI, PWI and MRS in the evaluation of histologically proven high- and low-grade gliomas in a population of 105 patients. Independently for each modality, the following variables were used to compare the tumors: minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and maximum relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) normalized values between tumor and healthy tissue, maximum Cho/Cr ratio and minimum NAA/Cr ratio in tumor, and scored lactate and lipid values in tumor. The Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests were employed to compare DWI, PWI and MRS between tumor types. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine which parameters best increased the diagnostic accuracy in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. ROC curves were determined for parameters with high sensitivity and specificity to identify threshold values to separate high- from low-grade lesions. Statistically significant differences were found for rCBV tumor/normal tissue ratio, and NAA/Cr ratio in tumor and Cho/Cr ratio in tumor between low- and high-grade tumors. The best performing single parameter for group classification was the normalized rCBV value; including all parameters, statistical significance was reached by rCBV tumor/normal tissue ratio, NAA/Cr tumor ratio and lactate. From the ROC curves, a high probability for a neoplasm to be a high-grade lesion was associated with a rCBV tumor/normal tissue ratio of >1.16 and NAA/Cr tumor ratio of <0.44. Combining PWI and MRS with conventional MR imaging increases the accuracy of the attribution of malignancy to glial neoplasms. The best performing parameter was found to be the perfusion level. (orig.)

  16. MRI Reporter Genes for Noninvasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most important imaging technologies used in clinical diagnosis. Reporter genes for MRI can be applied to accurately track the delivery of cell in cell therapy, evaluate the therapy effect of gene delivery, and monitor tissue/cell-specific microenvironments. Commonly used reporter genes for MRI usually include genes encoding the enzyme (e.g., tyrosinase and β-galactosidase, the receptor on the cells (e.g., transferrin receptor, and endogenous reporter genes (e.g., ferritin reporter gene. However, low sensitivity limits the application of MRI and reporter gene-based multimodal imaging strategies are common including optical imaging and radionuclide imaging. These can significantly improve diagnostic efficiency and accelerate the development of new therapies.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... additional information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam and may add approximately 15 minutes to the total exam time. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most MRI ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... can help physicians evaluate the structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in ...

  19. [Basics of MRI technique and MRI image interpretation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, H; Rand, T; Trattnig, S; Kramer, J

    1994-09-01

    Today magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important routine diagnostic tool in orthopaedics. It is based on the nuclear magnetic resonance phenomenon: "free" hydrogen atoms (mainly from water) become field-parallel in a strong outer magnetic field. They reach a higher energy level by application of an additional electromagnetic field. After shutdown of this outer field the atoms send out electromagnetic waves (radiowaves), representing the MR signal. Different amounts of "free" water result in various image characteristics. Typically, a higher tissue water content is represented by high MR signals, e.g. in blastomas, inflammations and degenerative changes. Waterless structures such as calcified or fibrous tissues, tendons and ligaments show low MR signals. Fatty structures have high signals; proteins dissolved in "free" water change the water signal dramatically. Besides these basic parameters, para-, ferro- and super-paramagnetic materials--ether naturally present in the human body, such as methemoglobin, or artificially introduced, such as MR contrast media--and flow are responsible for different grey shades in MRI. MRI is not associated with ionizing radiation and allows imaging in all planes without changing the patient's position. Disadvantages of MRI are high costs and low availability. Future technical developments will result in shorter imaging times and broadening of the application spectrum, leading towards "MR fluoroscopy" and MR interventions.

  20. Functional MRI using regularized parallel imaging acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Fu-Nien; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Belliveau, John W; Wald, Lawrence L; Kwong, Kenneth K

    2005-08-01

    Parallel MRI techniques reconstruct full-FOV images from undersampled k-space data by using the uncorrelated information from RF array coil elements. One disadvantage of parallel MRI is that the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is degraded because of the reduced data samples and the spatially correlated nature of multiple RF receivers. Regularization has been proposed to mitigate the SNR loss originating due to the latter reason. Since it is necessary to utilize static prior to regularization, the dynamic contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in parallel MRI will be affected. In this paper we investigate the CNR of regularized sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acquisitions. We propose to implement regularized parallel MRI acquisitions in functional MRI (fMRI) experiments by incorporating the prior from combined segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition into SENSE reconstructions. We investigated the impact of regularization on the CNR by performing parametric simulations at various BOLD contrasts, acceleration rates, and sizes of the active brain areas. As quantified by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the simulations suggest that the detection power of SENSE fMRI can be improved by regularized reconstructions, compared to unregularized reconstructions. Human motor and visual fMRI data acquired at different field strengths and array coils also demonstrate that regularized SENSE improves the detection of functionally active brain regions. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

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    Full Text Available ... the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ... or electronic devices they may have. top of page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI ...

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive ... physicians with expertise in several radiologic areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org ...

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    Full Text Available ... It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid ... early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might ...

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    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. Unless you ... has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific ...

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... ionizing radiation. MRI can help physicians evaluate the structures of the brain and can also provide functional ...

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    Full Text Available ... you should let the radiologist know about them. Parents or family members who accompany patients into the ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as ...

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    Full Text Available ... Unless you are told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear ... your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

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    Full Text Available ... will hear and feel loud tapping or thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses ... use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made by the MRI machine. You may be ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid spaces within the brain (ventricles) causes of epilepsy (seizure) ... MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... centers provide earplugs, while others use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made by the ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should always ... metal objects. In general, metal objects used in orthopedic surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... after contrast medium is given. However, both the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the European Society ...

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    Full Text Available ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ... to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... designed so that the magnet does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger ... their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary according to the type of body ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  10. 4D flow imaging with MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, Zoran; Allen, Bradley D.; Garcia, Julio; Jarvis, Kelly B.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important tool for the clinical evaluation of patients with cardiovascular disease. Since its introduction in the late 1980s, 2-dimensional phase contrast MRI (2D PC-MRI) has become a routine part of standard-of-care cardiac MRI for the assessment of regional blood flow in the heart and great vessels. More recently, time-resolved PC-MRI with velocity encoding along all three flow directions and three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage (also termed ‘4D flow MRI’) has been developed and applied for the evaluation of cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the human body. 4D flow MRI allows for the comprehensive evaluation of complex blood flow patterns by 3D blood flow visualization and flexible retrospective quantification of flow parameters. Recent technical developments, including the utilization of advanced parallel imaging techniques such as k-t GRAPPA, have resulted in reasonable overall scan times, e.g., 8-12 minutes for 4D flow MRI of the aorta and 10-20 minutes for whole heart coverage. As a result, the application of 4D flow MRI in a clinical setting has become more feasible, as documented by an increased number of recent reports on the utility of the technique for the assessment of cardiac and vascular hemodynamics in patient studies. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential of 4D flow MRI to provide an improved assessment of hemodynamics which might aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to describe the methods used for 4D flow MRI acquisition, post-processing and data analysis. In addition, the article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D flow MRI and includes a review of applications in the heart, thoracic aorta and hepatic system. PMID:24834414

  11. Multimodality imaging: transfer and fusion of SPECT and MRI data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knesaurek, K.

    1994-01-01

    Image fusion is a technique which offers the best of both worlds. It unites the two basic types of medical images: functional body images(PET or SPECT scans), which provide physiological information, and structural images (CT or MRI), which provide an anatomic map of the body. Control-point based registration technique was developed and used. Tc-99m point sources were used as external markers in SPECT studies while, for MRI and CT imaging only anatomic landmarks were used as a control points. The MRI images were acquired on GE Signa 1.2 system and CT data on a GE 9800 scanner. SPECT studies were performed 1h after intravenous injection of the 740 MBq of the Tc-99m-HMPAO on the triple-headed TRIONIX gamma camera. B-spline and bilinear interpolation were used for the rotation, scaling and translation of the images. In the process of creation of a single composite image, in order to retain information from the individual images, MRI (or CT) image was scaled to one color range and a SPECT image to another. In some situations the MRI image was kept black-and-white while the SPECT image was pasted on top of it in 'opaque' mode. Most errors which propagate through the matching process are due to sample size, imperfection of the acquisition system, noise and interpolations used. Accuracy of the registration was investigated by SPECT-CT study performed on a phantom study. The results has shown that accuracy of the matching process is better, or at worse, equal to 2 mm. (author)

  12. Neuroimaging of language processes: fMRI of silent and overt lexical processing and the promise of multiple process imaging in single brain studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borowsky, R.; Owen, W.J.; Wile, T.L.; Friesen, C.K.; Martin, J.L.; Sarty, G.E.

    2005-01-01

    To implement and evaluate a multiple-process functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm designed to effectively and efficiently activate several language-related regions for use with neurosurgical patients. Both overt and covert response conditions were examined. The fMRI experiments compared the traditional silent word-generation condition versus an overt one as they engage frontal language regions (Experiment 1) and silent versus overt semantic association conditions as they engage multiple language processing regions (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1 the overt condition yielded greater magnitude of activation, but not volume of activation, in the left inferior frontal and insular cortices than did the silent condition for most, but not all, participants. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the activation of multiple established language processing regions (ie, orthographic, phonological and semantic) can be achieved in a significant number of participants, particularly under overt semantic association conditions and that such activation varies in predictable ways. The traditional silent response condition cannot be considered as equivalent to the overt response condition during word generation or semantic association. The multiple-process imaging method introduced here was sensitive to processing robust orthographic, phonological, and semantic regions, particularly under the overt response condition. (author)

  13. Neuroimaging of language processes: fMRI of silent and overt lexical processing and the promise of multiple process imaging in single brain studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowsky, R. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Psychology, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Owen, W.J. [Univ. of Northern British Columbia, Dept. of Psychology, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); Wile, T.L. [Nova Scotia Rehabilitation Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Friesen, C.K. [North Dakota State Univ., Dept. of Psychology, Fargo, North Dakota (United States); Martin, J.L. [Univ. of Alberta, Faculty of Rehabilitation, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Sarty, G.E. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Psychology, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)]. E-mail: gordon.sarty@usask.ca

    2005-10-15

    To implement and evaluate a multiple-process functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm designed to effectively and efficiently activate several language-related regions for use with neurosurgical patients. Both overt and covert response conditions were examined. The fMRI experiments compared the traditional silent word-generation condition versus an overt one as they engage frontal language regions (Experiment 1) and silent versus overt semantic association conditions as they engage multiple language processing regions (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1 the overt condition yielded greater magnitude of activation, but not volume of activation, in the left inferior frontal and insular cortices than did the silent condition for most, but not all, participants. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the activation of multiple established language processing regions (ie, orthographic, phonological and semantic) can be achieved in a significant number of participants, particularly under overt semantic association conditions and that such activation varies in predictable ways. The traditional silent response condition cannot be considered as equivalent to the overt response condition during word generation or semantic association. The multiple-process imaging method introduced here was sensitive to processing robust orthographic, phonological, and semantic regions, particularly under the overt response condition. (author)

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have any devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. ... is loose-fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with ...

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    Full Text Available ... exam time. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most MRI exams ... areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo. ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does ... time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

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    ... Pens, paper clips, keys, coins Hair barrettes, hairpins Shoes, belt buckles, safety pins Any article of clothing that has metallic ... circumstance is to pump breast milk before the study, to be used until injected contrast material ... MRI safety information on this page was developed in cooperation ...

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    Full Text Available ... have allergies of any kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an MRI exam contains a metal ... in patients with iodine contrast allergy. It is far less common for a patient ...

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  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... imaging modalities. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

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  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

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  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ... effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained ... and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and ...

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... It is normal for the area of your body being imaged to feel slightly warm, but ... still while the images are being obtained, which is typically only a ...

  9. Towards molecular imaging by means of MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norek, M.

    2008-01-01

    The work presented in the thesis is focused on the design of highly efficient contrast agents for molecular imaging by means of MRI based on the detailed physical characterization of the given material. Specifically, attention is paid on the development of contrast agents for magnetic fields higher

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

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    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine What's in this article? ...

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    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related ...

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    Full Text Available ... you, notify the radiologist or technologist. It is important that you remain perfectly still while the images are being obtained, which is typically only a few seconds to a few minutes at a time. You will know when images are being recorded ...

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... the body and determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... patients who have been acutely injured; however, this decision is based on clinical judgment. This is because traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and as ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... of the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses ... medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... for scanning patients since the 1980s with no reports of any ill effects on pregnant women or ... will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary according to the type of body ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary according to the ... body. The images can then be studied from different angles by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... gadolinium contrast, it may still be possible to use it after appropriate pre-medication. Patient consent will ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the following implants cannot be scanned and ... it difficult to lie still during imaging. A person who is very large may not fit into ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and ... sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and ... most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... remain still during MR imaging. Others experience a sense of being closed-in (claustrophobia) while in the ... of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic taste in their mouth after ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table that slides into ... severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie still during imaging. A person who is very ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of your body being imaged to feel slightly warm, but if it bothers you, notify the radiologist ... If you do not require sedation, no recovery period is necessary. You may resume your usual activities ...

  13. Preclinical MRI experience in imaging angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeman, M

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a range of non-invasive measures for visualization of tumor angiogenesis in the clinic as well as in experimental tumor models. MRI methods were developed for assessment of spatial and temporal changes in perfusion, blood volume fraction, vascular permeability, vascular function, vascular maturation, vessel diameter and tortuosity. Molecular targeted contrast agents were used for mapping specific markers of neovasculature. These approaches were applied for analysis of a number of regulatory mechanisms controlling tumor angiogenesis and for preclinical evaluation of tumor response to antiangiogenic agents.

  14. MRI imaging of tuberculum sellae meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchiki, Megumi; Hosoya, Takaaki; Watanabe, Nami; Nagahata, Morio; Yamaguchi, Koichi [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-02-01

    We reviewed three MRI cases of suprasellar meningioma in comparison with the other sella region tumors. T1-weighted images of pre- and post contrast enhancement could clearly delineate the optic chiasm, optic nerve and pituitary gland. MRI findings of tuberculum sellae meningioma were characterized as follows. The pituitary gland was easily identified and compressed postero-inferiorly in the sella. The pituitary stalk was backward compressed by the tumor. The optic chiasm was compressed posteriorly or postero-superiorly by the tumor. It was important for its differential diagnosis to identify the displacement direction of the structures in and around the sella. (author).

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information, consult your radiologist. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate room from the scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results with you. Follow-up examinations may be necessary. Your doctor will ... exam is requested. Sometimes a follow-up exam is done because a potential ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... they may move during the scan, possibly causing blindness. Dyes used in tattoos may contain iron and ...

  18. Imaging gait analysis: An fMRI dual task study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürki, Céline N; Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Reinhardt, Julia; Stippich, Christoph; Kressig, Reto W; Blatow, Maria

    2017-08-01

    In geriatric clinical diagnostics, gait analysis with cognitive-motor dual tasking is used to predict fall risk and cognitive decline. To date, the neural correlates of cognitive-motor dual tasking processes are not fully understood. To investigate these underlying neural mechanisms, we designed an fMRI paradigm to reproduce the gait analysis. We tested the fMRI paradigm's feasibility in a substudy with fifteen young adults and assessed 31 healthy older adults in the main study. First, gait speed and variability were quantified using the GAITRite © electronic walkway. Then, participants lying in the MRI-scanner were stepping on pedals of an MRI-compatible stepping device used to imitate gait during functional imaging. In each session, participants performed cognitive and motor single tasks as well as cognitive-motor dual tasks. Behavioral results showed that the parameters of both gait analyses, GAITRite © and fMRI, were significantly positively correlated. FMRI results revealed significantly reduced brain activation during dual task compared to single task conditions. Functional ROI analysis showed that activation in the superior parietal lobe (SPL) decreased less from single to dual task condition than activation in primary motor cortex and in supplementary motor areas. Moreover, SPL activation was increased during dual tasks in subjects exhibiting lower stepping speed and lower executive control. We were able to simulate walking during functional imaging with valid results that reproduce those from the GAITRite © gait analysis. On the neural level, SPL seems to play a crucial role in cognitive-motor dual tasking and to be linked to divided attention processes, particularly when motor activity is involved.

  19. Imaging of abdominal tumours: CT or MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Oeystein E.

    2009-01-01

    The scope of this review is to discuss a theoretical approach to imaging policy, particularly in the perspective of radiation risk reduction. Decisions are ideally driven by empirical evidence about efficacy and risk, e.g., in classical hierarchical efficacy model. As a result of the paucity of empirical evidence (inevitable because of rapid technological development), a pragmatic model is needed. This should avoid overemphasis of factors that currently seem to hamper change, namely personal preference, local expertise, infrastructure, availability. Extrapolation of current general knowledge about CT and MRI demonstrates how a pragmatic approach can be applied in the real world with intermediate goals such as (1) channeling patients from CT to MRI, and (2) reducing CT-delivered radiation. Increased utilisation of MRI in body imaging requires optimisation of scan protocols and equipment, and, being a very operator-dependent modality, the active involvement of the radiologist. In CT dose reduction the main challenge is to benchmark the minimum radiation-dose requirement, and therefore the minimum required image quality that is diagnostically acceptable. As this will ultimately depend on pre-test likelihoods in institutional populations, it is difficult to issue general guidance, and local assessment remains a cornerstone in this effort. (orig.)

  20. Advanced MRI increases the diagnostic accuracy of recurrent glioblastoma: Single institution thresholds and validation of MR spectroscopy and diffusion weighted MR imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kazda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The accurate identification of glioblastoma progression remains an unmet clinical need. The aim of this prospective single-institutional study is to determine and validate thresholds for the main metabolite concentrations obtained by MR spectroscopy (MRS and the values of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC to enable distinguishing tumor recurrence from pseudoprogression. Thirty-nine patients after the standard treatment of a glioblastoma underwent advanced imaging by MRS and ADC at the time of suspected recurrence — median time to progression was 6.7 months. The highest significant sensitivity and specificity to call the glioblastoma recurrence was observed for the total choline (tCho to total N-acetylaspartate (tNAA concentration ratio with the threshold ≥1.3 (sensitivity 100.0% and specificity 94.7%. The ADCmean value higher than 1313 × 10−6 mm2/s was associated with the pseudoprogression (sensitivity 98.3%, specificity 100.0%. The combination of MRS focused on the tCho/tNAA concentration ratio and the ADCmean value represents imaging methods applicable to early non-invasive differentiation between a glioblastoma recurrence and a pseudoprogression. However, the institutional definition and validation of thresholds for differential diagnostics is needed for the elimination of setup errors before implementation of these multimodal imaging techniques into clinical practice, as well as into clinical trials.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schalke, B.C.G.; Rohkamm, R.; Kaiser, W.

    1990-01-01

    In the last few years imaging procedures became also important in the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. We examined more than 150 patients with different neuromuscular diseases with MRI. Conventional diagnostic procedures like EMG, muscle biopsy can not be replaced by imaging procedures. MRI gives the chance to get additional diagnostic informations. It is possible to determine exact distribution and intensity of pathological changes in the muscle. Inflammatory muscle diseases can be differrentiated by T1/T2 values from atrophic/dystrophic diseases. The resolving power is very high and allows the exact detection of affected areas even in a single muscle. This can help to reduce false negative muscle biopsies. This is very useful in children and young adults. MRI can be used for the early detection of genetic myopathies and neuropathies. MRI allows to examine all muscles, including the heart, bone artefacts are absent. Heart muscle involvement in neuromuscular diseases can directly be shown by this method without any risk for the patient. In addition P-spectroscopy can be done for better understanding of pathogenesis, especially if the exact distribution of pathological changes is known. (author)

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as mirror and portrait: MRI configurations between science and the arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    The essay examines the configuration of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the scientific laboratory and in selected artworks. By drawing upon fieldwork undertaken in MRI labs and artists' ateliers, I argue that MRI has a "look" in the same way that the portrait has—that is, it has the capacity of being performative, thus resisting its being regarded as a transparent window onto the self. As will be shown, the look of MRI is acoustic more than visual, for it is based on the aural components of the examination, rather than on MRI images alone.

  3. Photo-magnetic imaging: resolving optical contrast at MRI resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yuting; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L; Gulsen, Gultekin; Gao Hao

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely photo-magnetic imaging (PMI). PMI uses a laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of the optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite-element-based algorithm with an iterative approach, is presented in this paper. The quantitative accuracy of PMI is investigated for various inclusion sizes, depths and absorption values. Then, a comparison between conventional diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and PMI is carried out to illustrate the superior performance of PMI. An example is presented showing that two 2 mm diameter inclusions embedded 4.5 mm deep and located side by side in a 25 mm diameter circular geometry medium are recovered as a single 6 mm diameter object with DOT. However, these two objects are not only effectively resolved with PMI, but their true concentrations are also recovered successfully. (paper)

  4. High temporal resolution functional MRI using parallel echo volumar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabrait, C.; Ciuciu, P.; Ribes, A.; Poupon, C.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.; LeBihan, D.; Lethimonnier, F.; Le Roux, P.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To combine parallel imaging with 3D single-shot acquisition (echo volumar imaging, EVI) in order to acquire high temporal resolution volumar functional MRI (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods: An improved EVI sequence was associated with parallel acquisition and field of view reduction in order to acquire a large brain volume in 200 msec. Temporal stability and functional sensitivity were increased through optimization of all imaging parameters and Tikhonov regularization of parallel reconstruction. Two human volunteers were scanned with parallel EVI in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system, while submitted to a slow event-related auditory paradigm. Results: Thanks to parallel acquisition, the EVI volumes display a low level of geometric distortions and signal losses. After removal of low-frequency drifts and physiological artifacts,activations were detected in the temporal lobes of both volunteers and voxel-wise hemodynamic response functions (HRF) could be computed. On these HRF different habituation behaviors in response to sentence repetition could be identified. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of high temporal resolution 3D fMRI with parallel EVI. Combined with advanced estimation tools,this acquisition method should prove useful to measure neural activity timing differences or study the nonlinearities and non-stationarities of the BOLD response. (authors)

  5. PET/MRI for Oncologic Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rausch, Ivo; Rischka, Lucas; Ladefoged, Claes N

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare attenuation-correction (AC) approaches for PET/MRI in clinical neurooncology.Methods:Forty-nine PET/MRI brain scans were included: brain tumor studies using18F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine (18F-FET) (n= 31) and68Ga-DOTANOC (n= 7) and studies of healthy subjects using18...... by Siemens Healthcare). As a reference, AC maps were derived from patient-specific CT images (CTref). PET data were reconstructed using standard settings after AC with all 4 AC methods. We report changes in diagnosis for all brain tumor patients and the following relative differences values (RDs...... of the whole brain and 10 anatomic regions segmented on MR images.Results:For brain tumor imaging (A and B), the standard PET-based diagnosis was not affected by any of the 3 MR-AC methods. For A, the average RDs of SUVmeanwere -10%, -4%, and -3% and of the VOIs 1%, 2%, and 7% for DIXON, UTE, and BD...

  6. Advanced imaging techniques in pediatric body MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtier, Jesse [UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rao, Anil G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology, Charleston, SC (United States); Anupindi, Sudha A. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    While there are many challenges specific to pediatric abdomino-pelvic MRI, many recent advances are addressing these challenges. It is therefore essential for radiologists to be familiar with the latest advances in MR imaging. Laudable efforts have also recently been implemented in many centers to improve the overall experience of pediatric patients, including the use of dedicated radiology child life specialists, MRI video goggles, and improved MR suite environments. These efforts have allowed a larger number of children to be scanned while awake, with fewer studies being done under sedation or anesthesia; this has resulted in additional challenges from patient motion and difficulties with breath-holding and tolerating longer scan times. In this review, we highlight common challenges faced in imaging the pediatric abdomen and pelvis and discuss the application of the newest techniques to address these challenges. Additionally, we highlight the newest advances in quantified imaging techniques, specifically in MR liver iron quantification. The techniques described in this review are all commercially available and can be readily implemented. (orig.)

  7. Guidelines for imaging retinoblastoma: imaging principles and MRI standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graaf, Pim de; Rodjan, Firazia; Castelijns, Jonas A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goericke, Sophia [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Galluzzi, Paolo [Azienda Ospedaliera e Universitaria Senese, Policlinico ' ' Le Scotte' ' , Unit of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Neuroradiology, Siena (Italy); Maeder, Philippe [CHUV, Service de Radiodiagnostic et Radiologie Interventionelle, Lausanne (Switzerland); Brisse, Herve J. [Institut Curie, Departement d' Imagerie, Paris (France)

    2012-01-15

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor in children. The diagnosis is usually established by the ophthalmologist on the basis of fundoscopy and US. Together with US, high-resolution MRI has emerged as an important imaging modality for pretreatment assessment, i.e. for diagnostic confirmation, detection of local tumor extent, detection of associated developmental malformation of the brain and detection of associated intracranial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (trilateral retinoblastoma). Minimum requirements for pretreatment diagnostic evaluation of retinoblastoma or mimicking lesions are presented, based on consensus among members of the European Retinoblastoma Imaging Collaboration (ERIC). The most appropriate techniques for imaging in a child with leukocoria are reviewed. CT is no longer recommended. Implementation of a standardized MRI protocol for retinoblastoma in clinical practice may benefit children worldwide, especially those with hereditary retinoblastoma, since a decreased use of CT reduces the exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  8. Hemorrhage detection in MRI brain images using images features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Luminita; Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Stratulat (Visan), Mirela

    2013-11-01

    The abnormalities appear frequently on Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of brain in elderly patients presenting either stroke or cognitive impairment. Detection of brain hemorrhage lesions in MRI is an important but very time-consuming task. This research aims to develop a method to extract brain tissue features from T2-weighted MR images of the brain using a selection of the most valuable texture features in order to discriminate between normal and affected areas of the brain. Due to textural similarity between normal and affected areas in brain MR images these operation are very challenging. A trauma may cause microstructural changes, which are not necessarily perceptible by visual inspection, but they could be detected by using a texture analysis. The proposed analysis is developed in five steps: i) in the pre-processing step: the de-noising operation is performed using the Daubechies wavelets; ii) the original images were transformed in image features using the first order descriptors; iii) the regions of interest (ROIs) were cropped from images feature following up the axial symmetry properties with respect to the mid - sagittal plan; iv) the variation in the measurement of features was quantified using the two descriptors of the co-occurrence matrix, namely energy and homogeneity; v) finally, the meaningful of the image features is analyzed by using the t-test method. P-value has been applied to the pair of features in order to measure they efficacy.

  9. Electromagnetic considerations for RF current density imaging [MRI technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, G C; Joy, M G; Armstrong, R L; Henkelman, R M

    1995-01-01

    Radio frequency current density imaging (RF-CDI) is a recent MRI technique that can image a Larmor frequency current density component parallel to B(0). Because the feasibility of the technique was demonstrated only for homogeneous media, the authors' goal here is to clarify the electromagnetic assumptions and field theory to allow imaging RF currents in heterogeneous media. The complete RF field and current density imaging problem is posed. General solutions are given for measuring lab frame magnetic fields from the rotating frame magnetic field measurements. For the general case of elliptically polarized fields, in which current and magnetic field components are not in phase, one can obtain a modified single rotation approximation. Sufficient information exists to image the amplitude and phase of the RF current density parallel to B(0) if the partial derivative in the B(0) direction of the RF magnetic field (amplitude and phase) parallel to B(0) is much smaller than the corresponding current density component. The heterogeneous extension was verified by imaging conduction and displacement currents in a phantom containing saline and pure water compartments. Finally, the issues required to image eddy currents are presented. Eddy currents within a sample will distort both the transmitter coil reference system, and create measurable rotating frame magnetic fields. However, a three-dimensional electro-magnetic analysis will be required to determine how the reference system distortion affects computed eddy current images.

  10. Optimized workflow and imaging protocols for whole-body oncologic PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Shirou; Hara, Takamitsu; Nanbu, Takeyuki; Suenaga, Hiroki; Sugawara, Shigeyasu; Kuroiwa, Daichi; Sekino, Hirofumi; Miyajima, Masayuki; Kubo, Hitoshi; Oriuchi, Noboru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Although PET/MRI has the advantages of a simultaneous acquisition of PET and MRI, high soft-tissue contrast of the MRI images, and reduction of radiation exposure, its low profitability and long acquisition time are significant problems in clinical settings. Thus, MRI protocols that meet oncological purposes need to be used in order to reduce examination time while securing detectability. Currently, half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin echo and 3D-T1 volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination may be the most commonly used sequences for whole-body imaging due to their shorter acquisition time and higher diagnostic accuracy. Although there have been several reports that adding diffusion weighted image (DWI) to PET/MRI protocol has had no effect on tumor detection to date, in cases of liver, kidney, bladder, and prostate cancer, the use of DWI may be beneficial in detecting lesions. Another possible option is to scan each region with different MRI sequences instead of scanning the whole body using one sequence continuously. We herein report a workflow and imaging protocols for whole-body oncologic PET/MRI using an integrated system in the clinical routine, designed for the detection, for example by cancer screening, of metastatic lesions, in order to help future users optimize their workflow and imaging protocols.

  11. [CT and MRI imaging in tumoral angiogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bazelaire, C; Calmon, R; Chapellier, M; Pluvinage, A; Frija, J; de Kerviler, E

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process of activating dormant endothelial cells to form new vessels, after stimulation and it is essential in tumor growth. In many types of cancer, angiogenesis results from the activation of oncogenes that stimulate the production of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). However, these newly formed vessels have a great number of abnormalities: increased density of fragile and hyper-permeable microvessels, arterial-venous shunts, caliber abnormalities and flow instabilities susceptible to flow direction inversion according to interstitial pressure. Anti-angiogenic treatments inhibit VEGF activity, perceived as structural and functional normalization of the microvascular pattern, such as reduced density of microvessels and restored morphology of the remaining ones. Conventional imaging techniques are not sensible to these changes, at best they show tumor size stabilization, hence the need of new techniques. Microvascularization imaging can be achieved by detecting functional disturbances to blood flow and not by showing the microvasculature per se. These techniques are based in quantifying the enhancement in tumor due to the passage of contrast agent after injection or protons labeled by a magnetic field. Through these measurements, one can derive interstitial and blood volumes as well as the tissue perfusion and capillary wall permeability. Microvascular imaging has greatly benefited from the improvements seen in CT and MRI equipment allowing large volume coverage with high spatial and temporal resolutions as from the evolutions in the methods to calculate, present and compare maps of the microcirculation and it's heterogeneity. However, software to analyze microvascularization are still rare, limiting the technique's application and validation in large scale. Nevertheless, imaging of the microcirculation is useful throughout the care of the oncological patient: it can reinforce the suspicious nature of a lesion, suggest anti

  12. Imaging tools to study pharmacology: functional MRI on small rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth eJonckers

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI is an excellent tool to study the effect of pharmacological modulations on brain function in a non-invasive and longitudinal manner. We introduce several blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD fMRI techniques, including resting state (rsfMRI, stimulus-evoked (st-fMRI, and pharmacological MRI (phMRI. Respectively, these techniques permit the assessment of functional connectivity during rest as well as brain activation triggered by sensory stimulation and/or a pharmacological challenge. The first part of this review describes the physiological basis of BOLD fMRI and the hemodynamic response on which the MRI contrast is based. Specific emphasis goes to possible effects of anaesthesia and the animal’s physiological conditions on neural activity and the hemodynamic response. The second part of this review describes applications of the aforementioned techniques in pharmacologically-induced, as well as in traumatic and transgenic disease models and illustrates how multiple fMRI methods can be applied successfully to evaluate different aspects of a specific disorder. For example, fMRI techniques can be used to pinpoint the neural substrate of a disease beyond previously defined hypothesis-driven regions-of-interest (ROIs. In addition, fMRI techniques allow one to dissect how specific modifications (e.g. treatment, lesion etc. modulate the functioning of specific brain areas (st-fMRI, phMRI and how functional connectivity (rsfMRI between several brain regions is affected, both in acute and extended time frames. Furthermore, fMRI techniques can be used to assess/explore the efficacy of novel treatments in depth, both in fundamental research as well as in preclinical settings. In conclusion, by describing several exemplary studies, we aim to highlight the advantages of functional MRI in exploring the acute and long-term effects of pharmacological substances and/or pathology on brain functioning along with

  13. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Usman; Mallia, Andrew; Stirling, James; Joemon, John; MacKewn, Jane; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging. PMID:26854157

  14. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Bashir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging.

  15. Acceleration of single pixel imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, K.

    2018-01-01

    A method for single pixel imaging (SPI) is introduced. The method is proposed to accelerate optical measurement. The method is also useful for high-definition imaging. The processing procedure of the method is described and some features of the based on the proposed method is described.

  16. Clinically relevant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Shoulder pain is the most common and well-documented site of musculoskeletal pain in elite swimmers. Structural abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of elite swimmers' symptomatic shoulders are common. Little has been documented about the association between MRI findings in the ...

  17. Muscle contraction analysis with MRI image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horio, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Imura, Masataka; Oshiro, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    The MRI measurement has been widely used from the advantage such as no radiation exposure and high resolution. In various measurement objects, the muscle is used for a research and clinical practice. But it was difficult to judge static state of a muscle contraction. In this study, we focused on a proton density change by the blood vessel pressure at the time of the muscle contraction, and aimed the judgments of muscle contraction from variance of the signal intensity. First, the background was removed from the measured images. Second, each signal divided into the low signal side and the high signal side, and variance values (σ H , σ L ) and the ratio (μ) were calculated. Finally, Relax and strain state ware judged from the ratio (μ). As a Result, in relax state, ratio (μ r ) was 0.9823±0.06133. And in strain state, ratio (μ s ) was 0.7547±0.10824. Therefore, a significant difference was obtained in relax state and strain state. Therefore, the strain state judgment of the muscle was possible by this study's method. (author)

  18. EPOXI MARS OBS - MRI CALIBRATED IMAGES V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains calibrated 750-nm filter images of Mars acquired by the Deep Impact Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI) for the EPOCh project during the second...

  19. EPOXI INFLIGHT CALIBRATIONS - MRI RAW IMAGES V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains raw calibration images acquired by the Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI) from 04 October 2007 through 28 November 2010 during the EPOCh,...

  20. EPOXI EARTH OBS - MRI CALIBRATED IMAGES V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains calibrated, 750-nm filter images of Earth acquired by the Deep Impact Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI) during the EPOCh and Cruise 2 phases...

  1. EPOXI MARS OBS - MRI RAW IMAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains raw 750-nm filter images of Mars acquired by the Deep Impact Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI) for the EPOCh project during the second...

  2. EPOXI MARS OBS - MRI CALIBRATED IMAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains calibrated 750-nm filter images of Mars acquired by the Deep Impact Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI) for the EPOCh project during the...

  3. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... markedly broadened the range of applications in respect to the clinically used systems. CEST agents represent innovative frequency-encoding probes that yield negative contrast in the MR images upon transfer of saturated magnetization from the agent to the “bulk” water signal. Interesting developments have...

  4. Brain MRI tumor image fusion combined with Shearlet and wavelet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changjiang; Fang, Mingchao

    2017-11-01

    In order to extract the effective information in different modalities of the tumor region in brain Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images, we propose a brain MRI tumor image fusion method combined with Shearlet and wavelet transform. First, the source images are transformed into Shearlet domain and wavelet domain. Second, the low frequency component of Shearlet domain is fused by Laplace pyramid decomposition. Then the low-frequency fusion image is obtained through inverse Shearlet transform. Third, the high frequency subimages in wavelet domain are fused. Then the high-frequency fusion image is obtained through inverse wavelet transform. Finally, the low-frequency fusion image and high-frequency fusion image are summated to get the final fusion image. Through experiments conducted on 10 brain MRI tumor images, the result shown that the proposed fusion algorithm has the best fusion effect in the evaluation indexes of spatial frequency, edge strength and average gradient. The main spatial frequency of 10 images is 29.22, and the mean edge strength and average gradient is 103.77 and 10.42. Compared with different fusion methods, we find that the proposed method effectively fuses the information of multimodal brain MRI tumor images and improves the clarity of the tumor area well.

  5. Image processing techniques for quantification and assessment of brain MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijf, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used technique to acquire digital images of the human brain. A variety of acquisition protocols is available to generate images in vivo and noninvasively, giving great opportunities to study the anatomy and physiology of the human brain. In my thesis,

  6. Labeling of mesenchymal stem cells for MRI with single-cell sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza de Schellenberger A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Angela Ariza de Schellenberger,1 Harald Kratz,1 Tracy D Farr,2,3 Norbert Löwa,4 Ralf Hauptmann,1 Susanne Wagner,1 Matthias Taupitz,1 Jörg Schnorr,1 Eyk A Schellenberger1 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Experimental Neurology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Medical School, Nottingham, UK; 4Department of Biomagnetic Signals, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Berlin, Berlin, Germany Abstract: Sensitive cell detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an important tool for the development of cell therapies. However, clinically approved contrast agents that allow single-cell detection are currently not available. Therefore, we compared very small iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP and new multicore carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (multicore particles, MCP designed by our department for magnetic particle imaging (MPI with discontinued Resovist® regarding their suitability for detection of single mesenchymal stem cells (MSC by MRI. We achieved an average intracellular nanoparticle (NP load of >10 pg Fe per cell without the use of transfection agents. NP loading did not lead to significantly different results in proliferation, colony formation, and multilineage in vitro differentiation assays in comparison to controls. MRI allowed single-cell detection using VSOP, MCP, and Resovist® in conjunction with high-resolution T2*-weighted imaging at 7 T with postprocessing of phase images in agarose cell phantoms and in vivo after delivery of 2,000 NP-labeled MSC into mouse brains via the left carotid artery. With optimized labeling conditions, a detection rate of ~45% was achieved; however, the experiments were limited by nonhomogeneous NP loading of the MSC population. Attempts should be made to achieve better cell separation for homogeneous NP loading and to thus improve NP

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause a problem near a strong magnetic field. Electronic devices aren't permitted in the MRI room. ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise, and will ...

  8. CT and MRI techniques for imaging around orthopedic hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Thuy Duong; Skornitzke, Stephan; Weber, Marc-Andre; Sutter, Reto

    2018-01-01

    Orthopedic hardware impairs image quality in cross-sectional imaging. With an increasing number of orthopedic implants in an aging population, the need to mitigate metal artifacts in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is becoming increasingly relevant. This review provides an overview of the major artifacts in CT and MRI and state-of-the-art solutions to improve image quality. All steps of image acquisition from device selection, scan preparations and parameters to image post-processing influence the magnitude of metal artifacts. Technological advances like dual-energy CT with the possibility of virtual monochromatic imaging (VMI) and new materials offer opportunities to further reduce artifacts in CT and MRI. Dedicated metal artifact reduction sequences contain algorithms to reduce artifacts and improve imaging of surrounding tissue and are essential tools in orthopedic imaging to detect postoperative complications in early stages.

  9. Fusion of PET and MRI for Hybrid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Young-Bo; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    Recently, the development of the fusion PET-MRI system has been actively studied to meet the increasing demand for integrated molecular and anatomical imaging. MRI can provide detailed anatomical information on the brain, such as the locations of gray and white matter, blood vessels, axonal tracts with high resolution, while PET can measure molecular and genetic information, such as glucose metabolism, neurotransmitter-neuroreceptor binding and affinity, protein-protein interactions, and gene trafficking among biological tissues. State-of-the-art MRI systems, such as the 7.0 T whole-body MRI, now can visualize super-fine structures including neuronal bundles in the pons, fine blood vessels (such as lenticulostriate arteries) without invasive contrast agents, in vivo hippocampal substructures, and substantia nigra with excellent image contrast. High-resolution PET, known as High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), is a brain-dedicated system capable of imaging minute changes of chemicals, such as neurotransmitters and -receptors, with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The synergistic power of the two, i.e., ultra high-resolution anatomical information offered by a 7.0 T MRI system combined with the high-sensitivity molecular information offered by HRRT-PET, will significantly elevate the level of our current understanding of the human brain, one of the most delicate, complex, and mysterious biological organs. This chapter introduces MRI, PET, and PET-MRI fusion system, and its algorithms are discussed in detail.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of an intraventricular hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Ryungchan; Higashi, Tooru; Ito, Shotaro; Kadoya, Satoru; Takarada, Akira; Sato, Shuji; Kurauchi, Manabu.

    1987-08-01

    The utility of MRI was investigated in 10 patients with intraventricular hemorrhage. MRI was found to be, in many respects, superior to CT: 1) MRI is able to detect to some extent the aging of an intraventricular hematoma. 2) It can determine the character of intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid, whether it is normal, bloody, or hyperprotein. 3) It can detect the cause of hemorrhage in the case of arterio-venous malformation. 4) MRI permits the detection of the penetration course and the location of a ventricular hematoma. 5) It can clearly detect periventricular lesions of early-stage hydrocephalus, accompanied by increased intracranial pressure and followed by intraventricular hemorrhage, by imaging the periventricular high-signal-intensity area. 6) MRI can clearly diagnose complications of intracranial lesions. For instance, it can distinguish subdural fluid collection from chronic subdural hematoma and can detect whether a cerebral infarction is new or old. On the other hand, MRI also has some disadvantages: 1) The imaging time is long, and clinical application is difficult, in serious and/or infant cases. 2) It is impossible to use MRI in some patients who have magnetic material in their bodies. 3) The spatial-image resolution is not good.

  11. Safety recommendations in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaou, K.I.; Plataniotis, T.N; Syrgiamiotis, G.V.; Dousi, M.; Panou, T.; Georgiadis, K.; Bougias, C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In order to discuss the long-term biological effects of MRI in the radiological department, all the components of the acquisition process must be considered. Those elements include: the main magnetic field, time varying magnetic fields and radio-frequency fields (RF). Also must be referred other types of hazards obtained by the utilization of contrast materials as gadolinium or pregnancy. The primary concern with the static magnetic field is the possibility of potential biological effects. The majority of studies show no effects on cell growth and morphology at field strengths below 2T. Data accumulated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety, the World Health Organization, and the US State Department, show no evidence of leukemia or other carcinogenesis. The secondary concern of the effects of the main magnetic field is the hazards associated with the sitting of MR systems. The static magnetic field has no respect for the confines of conventional walls, floors or ceilings. Some reversible effects have been noted on Electrocardiogram gating (ECG) at these field strengths. An increase in the amplitude of the T-wave can be noted on an ECG due to the magnetohydrodynamic effect. This is produced when a conductive fluid, such as blood, moves across a magnetic field. Some reversible biological effects including fatigue, headaches, hypotension and accounts of irritability have been observed on human subjects exposed to 2T and above. As yet, there are no known biological effects of MRI on fetuses. Also MR facilities have established individual guidelines for pregnant employees in the MR environment. Ferromagnetic metal objects can become airborne as projectiles in the presence of a strong static magnetic field. Metallic implants pose serious effects which include torque, heating and artifacts on MR images.There have been a large number of studies performed on the biological effects from Time-varying magnetic field (TVMF), since they exist around power

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of congenital cardiovascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakibara, Makoto; Kobayashi, Shirou; Imai, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Shigeru; Masuda, Yoshiaki; Inagaki, Yoshiaki; Morita, Huminori; Uematsu, Sadao; Arimizu, Noboru

    1986-01-01

    In order to determine the value of MRI in diagnosing congenital cardiovascular malformations, MR Images were obtained in 25 adult patients with congenital cardiovascular malformations. Gated MRI detected all of 13 atrial septal defects, and all of 4 ventricular septal defects, but ungated MRI detected none of 3 atrial septal defects. Other congenital cardiovascular malformations (2 with Ebstein's disease, 1 with Fallot's pentalogy, and 1 with Pulmonary stenosis) were well visualized. Vascular malformations (1 with Patent ducts arteriosus, 1 with Supravalvelar aortic stenosis, 1 with Coarctation of Aorta, 1 with Right Aortic Arch) were well visualized in all of 7 patients by ungated MRI. MRI was a valuable noninvasive method of diagnosing congenital heart disease. (author)

  13. Fusion of MRI and PET images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathe, Bhakti Y.; Kamathe, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of image fusion is to combine the information from multiple images of the same scene. The result of image fusion is a new image which is suitable for human and machine perception. Different methods of image fusion are described. Based on wavelet multi-scale decomposition fusion algorithm of functional images and anatomical images is studied. The method of fusion rule selection is explained in detail. Different image fusion metrics such as entropy, cross entropy, SSIM are explained. (author)

  14. Is the Number of Different MRI Findings More Strongly Associated with Low Back Pain Than Single MRI Findings?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Mark J; Kjaer, Per; Kent, Peter

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis using 2 different data sets OBJECTIVE.: To investigate if the number of different MRI findings present is more strongly associated with low back pain (LBP) than single MRI findings. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Most previous studies have....... The outcome for the cross-sectional study was presence of LBP during the last year. The outcome for the longitudinal study was days to recurrence of activity limiting LBP. In both data sets we created an aggregate score of the number of different MRI findings present in each individual and assessed...... investigated the associations between single MRI findings and back pain rather than investigating combinations of MRI findings. If different individuals have different pathoanatomic sources contributing to their pain, then combinations of MRI findings may be more strongly associated with LBP. METHODS...

  15. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as a Potential Biomarker for Parkinson's Disease (PD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuite, Paul

    2017-06-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to serve as a biomarker for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the type or types of biomarker it could provide remain to be determined. At this time there is not sufficient sensitivity or specificity for MRI to serve as an early diagnostic biomarker, i.e., it is unproven in its ability to determine if a single individual is normal, has mild PD, or has some other forms of degenerative parkinsonism. However there is accumulating evidence that MRI may be useful in staging and monitoring disease progression (staging biomarker), and also possibly as a means to monitor pathophysiological aspects of disease and associated response to treatments, i.e., theranostic marker. As there are increasing numbers of manuscripts that are dedicated to diffusion- and neuromelanin-based imaging methods, this review will focus on these topics cursorily and will delve into pharmacodynamic imaging as a means to get at theranostic aspects of PD.

  16. Virtual phantom magnetic resonance imaging (ViP MRI) on a clinical MRI platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Bordelois, Alejandro; Gambarota, Giulio

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement Virtual Phantom Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ViP MRI), a technique that allows for generating reference signals in MR images using radiofrequency (RF) signals, on a clinical MR system and to test newly designed virtual phantoms. MRI experiments were conducted on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Electromagnetic modelling of the ViP system was done using the principle of reciprocity. The ViP RF signals were generated using a compact waveform generator (dimensions of 26 cm × 18 cm × 16 cm), connected to a homebuilt 25 mm-diameter RF coil. The ViP RF signals were transmitted to the MRI scanner bore, simultaneously with the acquisition of the signal from the object of interest. Different types of MRI data acquisition (2D and 3D gradient-echo) as well as different phantoms, including the Shepp-Logan phantom, were tested. Furthermore, a uniquely designed virtual phantom - in the shape of a grid - was generated; this newly proposed phantom allows for the investigations of the vendor distortion correction field. High quality MR images of virtual phantoms were obtained. An excellent agreement was found between the experimental data and the inverse cube law, which was the expected functional dependence obtained from the electromagnetic modelling of the ViP system. Short-term time stability measurements yielded a coefficient of variation in the signal intensity over time equal to 0.23% and 0.13% for virtual and physical phantom, respectively. MR images of the virtual grid-shaped phantom were reconstructed with the vendor distortion correction; this allowed for a direct visualization of the vendor distortion correction field. Furthermore, as expected from the electromagnetic modelling of the ViP system, a very compact coil (diameter ~ cm) and very small currents (intensity ~ mA) were sufficient to generate a signal comparable to that of physical phantoms in MRI experiments. The ViP MRI technique was successfully implemented on a clinical MR

  17. 3-D MRI/CT fusion imaging of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Kamogawa, Junji; Misaki, Hiroshi; Kamada, Kazuo; Okuda, Shunsuke; Morino, Tadao; Ogata, Tadanori; Yamamoto, Haruyasu [Ehime University, Department of Bone and Joint Surgery, Toon-shi, Ehime (Japan); Katagi, Ryosuke; Kodama, Kazuaki [Katagi Neurological Surgery, Imabari-shi, Ehime (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    The objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of MRI/CT fusion in demonstrating lumbar nerve root compromise. We combined 3-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography (CT) imaging of bone with 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of neural architecture (cauda equina and nerve roots) for two patients using VirtualPlace software. Although the pathological condition of nerve roots could not be assessed using MRI, myelography or CT myelography, 3-D MRI/CT fusion imaging enabled unambiguous, 3-D confirmation of the pathological state and courses of nerve roots, both inside and outside the foraminal arch, as well as thickening of the ligamentum flavum and the locations, forms and numbers of dorsal root ganglia. Positional relationships between intervertebral discs or bony spurs and nerve roots could also be depicted. Use of 3-D MRI/CT fusion imaging for the lumbar vertebral region successfully revealed the relationship between bone construction (bones, intervertebral joints, and intervertebral disks) and neural architecture (cauda equina and nerve roots) on a single film, three-dimensionally and in color. Such images may be useful in elucidating complex neurological conditions such as degenerative lumbar scoliosis(DLS), as well as in diagnosis and the planning of minimally invasive surgery. (orig.)

  18. MRI-based diagnostic imaging of the intratemporal facial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, B.; Baehren, W.

    2001-01-01

    Detailed imaging of the five sections of the full intratemporal course of the facial nerve can be achieved by MRI and using thin tomographic section techniques and surface coils. Contrast media are required for tomographic imaging of pathological processes. Established methods are available for diagnostic evaluation of cerebellopontine angle tumors and chronic Bell's palsy, as well as hemifacial spasms. A method still under discussion is MRI for diagnostic evaluation of Bell's palsy in the presence of fractures of the petrous bone, when blood volumes in the petrous bone make evaluation even more difficult. MRI-based diagnostic evaluation of the idiopatic facial paralysis currently is subject to change. Its usual application cannot be recommended for routine evaluation at present. However, a quantitative analysis of contrast medium uptake of the nerve may be an approach to improve the prognostic value of MRI in acute phases of Bell's palsy. (orig./CB) [de

  19. Detailed Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Analysis in Infantile Spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harini, Chellamani; Sharda, Sonal; Bergin, Ann Marie; Poduri, Annapurna; Yuskaitis, Christopher J; Peters, Jurriaan M; Rakesh, Kshitiz; Kapur, Kush; Pearl, Phillip L; Prabhu, Sanjay P

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities in infantile spasms, correlate them to clinical characteristics, and describe repeat imaging findings. A retrospective review of infantile spasm patients was conducted, classifying abnormal MRI into developmental, acquired, and nonspecific subgroups. MRIs were abnormal in 52 of 71 infantile spasm patients (23 developmental, 23 acquired, and 6 nonspecific) with no correlation to the clinical infantile spasm characteristics. Both developmental and acquired subgroups exhibited cortical gray and/or white matter abnormalities. Additional abnormalities of deep gray structures, brain stem, callosum, and volume loss occurred in the structural acquired subgroup. Repeat MRI showed better definition of the extent of existing malformations. In structural infantile spasms, developmental/acquired subgroups showed differences in pattern of MRI abnormalities but did not correlate with clinical characteristics.

  20. Imaging the premature brain: ultrasound or MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, Linda S. de; Benders, Manon J.N.L.; Groenendaal, Floris [UMC Utrecht, Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, PO Box 85090, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Neuroimaging of preterm infants has become part of routine clinical care, but the question is often raised on how often cranial ultrasound should be done and whether every high risk preterm infant should at least have one MRI during the neonatal period. An increasing number of centres perform an MRI either at discharge or around term equivalent age, and a few centres have access to a magnet in or adjacent to the neonatal intensive care unit and are doing sequential MRIs. In this review, we try to discuss when best to perform these two neuroimaging techniques and the additional information each technique may provide. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in mild and moderate head injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, Hiroyuki; Nakazawa, Shozo; Okada, Takurou; Kobayashi, Shiro; Yajima, Kouzo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)); Tsuji, Yukihide

    1991-02-01

    One hundred and fifty-nine patients admitted for mild or moderate head injuries were studied in order to establish the advantage of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over computerized tomography (CT) in the acute stage. One hundred and twenty-three lesions were demonstrated by MRI in 106 patients. In contrast, CT demonstrated only 74 lesions in 76 patients. The advantage of MRI over CT in the imaging of these lesions was remarkable in cases of basal skull fractures or lesions in the cerebral parenchyma, especially in case of non-hemorrhagic contusions or focal brain edemas. MRI was superior to CT in demonstrating these lesions in 64 patients of our series. However, in 6 cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage located in the Sylvian fissure, CT was superior to MRI. It was thought that lesions were less commonly demonstrated by CT in cases of mild or moderate head injuries. However, many lesions were confirmed by MRI in these cases. MRI was thus found to be far superior to CT in demonstrating intracranial lesions in mild or moderate head injuries. (author).

  2. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizinga, W.; Poot, D. H. J.; Guyader, J.-M.; Klaassen, R.; Coolen, B. F.; van Kranenburg, M.; van Geuns, R. J. M.; Uitterdijk, A.; Polfliet, M.; Vandemeulebroucke, J.; Leemans, A.; Niessen, W. J.; Klein, S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T5 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different

  3. Medical image of the week: MRI of Wernicke's encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyes N

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A 61 year old male presented to the ED with altered mental status after being found down at home with several beer cans around him. He was noted to have horizontal nystagmus on hospital day 2 and a MRI was performed. MRI showed bilateral thalamic enhancement (Figure 1, arrows on flair imaging consistent with Wernicke’s encephalopathy. His thiamine dose was increased with improvement in his mental status.

  4. gr-MRI: A software package for magnetic resonance imaging using software defined radios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselwander, Christopher J.; Cao, Zhipeng; Grissom, William A.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop software that enables the rapid implementation of custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available software defined radios (SDRs). The developed gr-MRI software package comprises a set of Python scripts, flowgraphs, and signal generation and recording blocks for GNU Radio, an open-source SDR software package that is widely used in communications research. gr-MRI implements basic event sequencing functionality, and tools for system calibrations, multi-radio synchronization, and MR signal processing and image reconstruction. It includes four pulse sequences: a single-pulse sequence to record free induction signals, a gradient-recalled echo imaging sequence, a spin echo imaging sequence, and an inversion recovery spin echo imaging sequence. The sequences were used to perform phantom imaging scans with a 0.5 Tesla tabletop MRI scanner and two commercially-available SDRs. One SDR was used for RF excitation and reception, and the other for gradient pulse generation. The total SDR hardware cost was approximately 2000. The frequency of radio desynchronization events and the frequency with which the software recovered from those events was also measured, and the SDR's ability to generate frequency-swept RF waveforms was validated and compared to the scanner's commercial spectrometer. The spin echo images geometrically matched those acquired using the commercial spectrometer, with no unexpected distortions. Desynchronization events were more likely to occur at the very beginning of an imaging scan, but were nearly eliminated if the user invoked the sequence for a short period before beginning data recording. The SDR produced a 500 kHz bandwidth frequency-swept pulse with high fidelity, while the commercial spectrometer produced a waveform with large frequency spike errors. In conclusion, the developed gr-MRI software can be used to develop high-fidelity, low-cost custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available SDRs.

  5. Single-Channel Blind Estimation of Arterial Input Function and Tissue Impulse Response in DCE-MRI

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taxt, T.; Jiřík, Radovan; Rygh, C. B.; Grüner, R.; Bartoš, M.; Andersen, E.; Curry, F. R.; Reed, R. K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2012), s. 1012-1021 ISSN 0018-9294 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : arterial input function (AIF) * blind deconvolution * dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) * multichannel * perfusion * single channel Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.348, year: 2012

  6. A protocol for patients with cardiovascular implantable devices undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): should defibrillation threshold testing be performed post-(MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Peter Thomas; Ghanbari, Hamid; Alexander, Patrick B; Shaw, Michael K; Daccarett, Marcos; Machado, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIED) has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Recent data suggests MRI as a relative rather than absolute contraindication in CIED patients. Recently, the American Heart Association has recommended defibrillation threshold testing (DFTT) in implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients undergoing MRI. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of a protocol for MRI in CIED patients, incorporating the new recommendations on DFTT. Consecutive patients with CIED undergoing MRI were included. The protocol consisted of continuous monitoring during imaging, device interrogation pre- and post-MRI, reprogramming of the pacemaker to an asynchronous mode in pacemaker-dependent (PMD) patients and a non-tracking/sensing mode for non-PMD patients. All tachyarrhythmia therapies were disabled. Devices were interrogated for lead impedance, battery life, pacing, and sensing thresholds. All patients with ICD underwent DFTT/defibrillator safety margin testing (DSMT) post-MRI. A total of 92 MRI's at 1.5 Tesla were performed in 38 patients. A total of 13 PMD patients, ten ICD patients, four cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) patients, and 11 non-PMD patients were scanned from four major manufacturers. No device circuitry damage, programming alterations, inappropriate shocks, failure to pace, or changes in sensing, pacing, or defibrillator thresholds were found on single or multiple MRI sessions. Our protocol for MRI in CIED patients appears safe, feasible, and reproducible. This is irrespective of the type of CIED, pacemaker dependancy or multiple 24-h scanning sessions. Our protocol addresses early detection of potential complications and establishes a response system for potential device-related complications. Our observation suggests that routine DFTT/DSMT post-MRI may not be necessary.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in obstetrics. II. Fetal anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, M C; Worthington, B S; Buckley, J M; Symonds, E M

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 36 patients at between 10 and 38 weeks gestation to determine the fetal anatomy that could be identified at different gestations. Fetal motion significantly degraded the image quality in the first and second trimesters, but in the final trimester fetal anatomy was clearly demonstrated. T2 weighted sequences showed the fetal brain and lungs to have a high signal intensity. Shorter TR leading to a T1 weighting gave better resolution of the overall anatomy. MRI has revealed the potential for assessment of lung maturity and the growth-retarded fetus.

  8. Protocol of a single group prospective observational study on the diagnostic value of 3T susceptibility weighted MRI of nigrosome-1 in patients with parkinsonian symptoms: the N3iPD study (nigrosomal iron imaging in Parkinson's disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Stefan T; Xing, Yue; Naidu, Saadnah; Birchall, Jim; Skelly, Rob; Perkins, Alan; Evans, Jonathan; Sare, Gill; Martin-Bastida, Antonio; Bajaj, Nin; Gowland, Penny; Piccini, Paola; Auer, Dorothee P

    2017-12-14

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder in the elderly and is characterised clinically by bradykinesia, tremor and rigidity. Diagnosing Parkinson's can be difficult especially in the early stages. High-resolution nigrosome MRI offers promising diagnostic accuracy of patients with established clinical symptoms; however, it is unclear whether this may help to establish the diagnosis in the early stages of PD, when there is diagnostic uncertainty. In this scenario, a single photon emission CT scan using a radioactive dopamine transporter ligand can help to establish the diagnosis, or clinical follow-up may eventually clarify the diagnosis. A non-invasive, cost-effective diagnostic test that could replace this would be desirable. We therefore aim to prospectively test whether nigrosome MRI is as useful as DaTSCAN to establish the correct diagnosis in people with minor or unclear symptoms suspicious for PD. In a prospective study we will recruit 145 patients with unclear symptoms possibly caused by Parkinson's from three movement disorder centres in the UK to take part in the study. We will record the Movement Disorder Society - Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and participants will undergo DaTSCAN and high-resolution susceptibility weighted MRI at a field strength of 3T. DaTSCANs will be assessed visually and semiquantitatively; MRI scans will be visually assessed for signal loss in nigrosome-1 by blinded investigators. We will compare how the diagnosis suggested by MRI compares with the diagnosis based on DaTSCAN and will also validate the diagnosis based on the two tests with a clinical examination performed at least 1 year after the initial presentation as a surrogate gold standard diagnostic test. The local ethics commission (Health Research Authority East Midlands - Derby Research Ethics Committee) has approved this study (REC ref.: 16/EM/0229). The study is being carried out under the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (64

  9. Functional imaging of the kidneys with fast MRI techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, P.V.; Priatna, A.

    1999-01-01

    Availability of faster and stronger gradient systems have given rise to a multitude of fast MRI data acquisition strategies which have tremendously increased the scope of MRI applications. These have led to the realization of long desired comprehensive approaches to evaluate anatomy and function using a single modality. In this work, we describe some of our own experiences with functional evaluation of the kidneys using MRI. Examples that suggest the feasibility of comprehensive approaches for evaluation of renal disease are also provided. We also introduce BOLD renal MRI, a method that may allow basic understanding of human renal physiology and pathophysiology in a way that has not been previously possible. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): A review of genetic damage investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalaxmi; Fatahi, Mahsa; Speck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful, non-invasive diagnostic medical imaging technique widely used to acquire detailed information about anatomy and function of different organs in the body, in both health and disease. It utilizes electromagnetic fields of three different frequency bands: static magnetic field (SMF), time-varying gradient magnetic fields (GMF) in the kHz range and pulsed radiofrequency fields (RF) in the MHz range. There have been some investigations examining the extent of genetic damage following exposure of bacterial and human cells to all three frequency bands of electromagnetic fields, as used during MRI: the rationale for these studies is the well documented evidence of positive correlation between significantly increased genetic damage and carcinogenesis. Overall, the published data were not sufficiently informative and useful because of the small sample size, inappropriate comparison of experimental groups, etc. Besides, when an increased damage was observed in MRI-exposed cells, the fate of such lesions was not further explored from multiple 'down-stream' events. This review provides: (i) information on the basic principles used in MRI technology, (ii) detailed experimental protocols, results and critical comments on the genetic damage investigations thus far conducted using MRI equipment and, (iii) a discussion on several gaps in knowledge in the current scientific literature on MRI. Comprehensive, international, multi-centered collaborative studies, using a common and widely used MRI exposure protocol (cardiac or brain scan) incorporating several genetic/epigenetic damage end-points as well as epidemiological investigations, in large number of individuals/patients are warranted to reduce and perhaps, eliminate uncertainties raised in genetic damage investigations in cells exposed in vitro and in vivo to MRI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Coronary imaging techniques with emphasis on CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederlin, Mathieu; Latrabe, Valerie; Corneloup, Olivier; Cochet, Hubert; Montaudon, Michel; Laurent, Francois; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery imaging in children is challenging, with high demands both on temporal and spatial resolution due to high heart rates and smaller anatomy. Although invasive conventional coronary angiography remains the benchmark technique, over the past 10 years, CT and MRI have emerged in the field of coronary imaging. The choice of hardware is important. For CT, the minimum requirement is a 64-channel scanner. The temporal resolution of the scanner is most important for optimising image quality and minimising radiation dose. Manufacturers have developed several modes of electrocardiographic (ECG) triggering to facilitate dose reduction. Recent technical advances have opened new possibilities in MRI coronary imaging. As a non-ionising radiation technique, MRI is of great interest in paediatric imaging. It is currently recommended in centres with appropriate expertise for the screening of patients with suspected congenital coronary anomalies. However, MRI is still not feasible in infants. This review describes and discusses the technical requirements and the pros and cons of all three techniques. (orig.)

  12. Soft tissue manifestations of early rheumatic disease. Imaging with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treitl, M.; Panteleon, A.; Koerner, M.; Becker-Gaab, C.; Reiser, M.; Wirth, S.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in early rheumatic diseases manifesting at the soft tissues of the hand using a retrospective analysis. A total of 186 MRI examinations of patients with clinical suspicion of a rheumatic disease were evaluated in a consensus reading by two experienced radiologists. All imaging patterns were assessed with respect to their type and localization. Under blinded and non-blinded conditions diagnoses were correlated with final clinical diagnosis. The most frequent diagnoses were rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 45.7%) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA, 15.6%). The mean correlation between clinical and MRI diagnosis (r) was 0.75 in blinded and 0.853 in non-blinded reading (p [de

  13. Initial experience of oculodynamic MRI using ultrafast T2-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanitame, Keizo; Kaichi, Yoko; Nakamura, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    We designed cine MRI protocol using sequential static half-Fourier single-shot rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) images with the subjects staring at the series of targets in front of their eyes. This technique was applied to three healthy volunteers and four patients with ocular motility disorders, including blow-out fracture, globe restriction due to a large posterior staphyloma, neurogenic strabismus (convergence disorder), and intraocular adhesion. In the volunteers, smooth movements of their visual foci and extraocular muscles were observed. In the patients, the ocular movement disturbances were demonstrated. Oculodynamic MRI provides functional information in cases of diplopia. (author)

  14. Reference-free unwarping of single-shot spatiotemporally encoded MRI using asymmetric self-refocused echoes acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Song; Zhong, Jianhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a phase evolution rewinding algorithm for correcting the geometric and intensity distortions in single-shot spatiotemporally encoded (SPEN) MRI with acquisition of asymmetric self-refocused echo trains. Using the field map calculated from the phase distribution of the source image, the off-resonance induced phase errors are successfully rewound through deconvolution. The alias-free partial Fourier transform reconstruction helps improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the field maps and the output images. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was validated through 7 T MRI experiments on a lemon, a water phantom, and in vivo rat head. SPEN imaging was evaluated using rapid acquisition by sequential excitation and refocusing (RASER) which produces uniform T2 weighting. The results indicate that the new technique can more robustly deal with the cases in which the images obtained with conventional single-shot spin-echo EPI are difficult to be restored due to serious field variations.

  15. Simultaneous imaging using Si-PM-based PET and MRI for development of an integrated PET/MRI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Tadashi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Imaizumi, Masao; Kanai, Yasukazu; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photo-detector for PET for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems because it has high gain and is insensitive to static magnetic fields. Recently we developed a Si-PM-based depth-of-interaction PET system for small animals and performed simultaneous measurements by combining the Si-PM-based PET and the 0.15 T permanent MRI to test the interferences between the Si-PM-based PET and an MRI. When the Si-PM was inside the MRI and installed around the radio frequency (RF) coil of the MRI, significant noise from the RF sequence of the MRI was observed in the analog signals of the PET detectors. However, we did not observe any artifacts in the PET images; fluctuation increased in the count rate of the Si-PM-based PET system. On the MRI side, there was significant degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in the MRI images compared with those without PET. By applying noise reduction procedures, the degradation of the S/N was reduced. With this condition, simultaneous measurements of a rat brain using a Si-PM-based PET and an MRI were made with some degradation in the MRI images. We conclude that simultaneous measurements are possible using Si-PM-based PET and MRI.

  16. Simultaneous imaging using Si-PM-based PET and MRI for development of an integrated PET/MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Tadashi; Imaizumi, Masao; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photo-detector for PET for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems because it has high gain and is insensitive to static magnetic fields. Recently we developed a Si-PM-based depth-of-interaction PET system for small animals and performed simultaneous measurements by combining the Si-PM-based PET and the 0.15 T permanent MRI to test the interferences between the Si-PM-based PET and an MRI. When the Si-PM was inside the MRI and installed around the radio frequency (RF) coil of the MRI, significant noise from the RF sequence of the MRI was observed in the analog signals of the PET detectors. However, we did not observe any artifacts in the PET images; fluctuation increased in the count rate of the Si-PM-based PET system. On the MRI side, there was significant degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in the MRI images compared with those without PET. By applying noise reduction procedures, the degradation of the S/N was reduced. With this condition, simultaneous measurements of a rat brain using a Si-PM-based PET and an MRI were made with some degradation in the MRI images. We conclude that simultaneous measurements are possible using Si-PM-based PET and MRI. (note)

  17. Magnetic Resonance Medical Imaging (MRI)-from the inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, Paul

    There are about 36,000 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners in the world, with annual sales of 2500. In the USA about 34 million MRI studies are done annually, and 60-70% of all scanners operate at 1.5 Tesla (T). In 1982 there were none. How MRI got to be-and how it got to1.5T is the subject of this talk. Its an insider's view-mine-as a physics PhD student at Nottingham University when MRI (almost) began, through to the invention of the 1.5T clinical MRI scanner at GE's research center in Schenectady NY.Before 1977 all MRI was done on laboratory nuclear magnetic resonance instruments used for analyzing small specimens via chemical shift spectroscopy (MRS). It began with Lauterbur's 1973 observation that turning up the spectrometer's linear gradient magnetic field, generated a spectrum that was a 1D projection of the sample in the direction of the gradient. What followed in the 70's was the development of 3 key methods of 3D spatial localization that remain fundamental to MRI today.As the 1980's began, the once unimaginable prospect of upscaling from 2cm test-tubes to human body-sized magnets, gradient and RF transmit/receive systems, was well underway, evolving from arm-sized, to whole-body electromagnet-based systems operating at moved to Johns Hopkins University to apply MRI methods to localized MRS and study cardiac metabolism, and then to GE to build a whole-body MRS machine. The largest uniform magnet possible-then, a 1.5T superconducting system-was required. Body MRI was first thought impossible above 0.35T due to RF penetration, detector coil and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) issues. When GE finally did take on MRI, their plan was to drop the field to 0.3T. We opted to make MRI work at 1.5T instead. The result was a scanner that could study both anatomy and metabolism with a SNR way beyond its lower field rivals. MRI's success truly reflects the team efforts of many: from the NMR physics to the engineering of magnets, gradient and RF systems.

  18. Radiofrequency configuration to facilitate bilateral breast 31P MR spectroscopic imaging and high-resolution MRI at 7 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, Tijl A.; Italiaander, Michel; van der Kemp, Wybe J M; Raaijmakers, AJE; Schmitz, A. M Th; Luijten, Peter R.; Boer, VO; Klomp, DWJ

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: High-resolution MRI combined with phospholipid detection may improve breast cancer grading. Currently, configurations are optimized for either high-resolution imaging or 31 P spectroscopy. To be able to perform both imaging as well as spectroscopy in a single session, we integrated a 1 H

  19. MRI of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Imaging features and recommended MRI protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collie, D.A.; Sellar, R.J.; Zeidler, M.; Colchester, A.C.F.; Knight, R.; Will, R.G

    2001-09-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is a rare, progressive and invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by specific histopathological features. Of the four subtypes of CJD described, the commonest is sporadic CJD (sCJD). More recently, a new clinically distinct form of the disease affecting younger patients, known as variant CJD (vCJD), has been identified, and this has been causally linked to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent in cattle. Characteristic appearances on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been identified in several forms of CJD; sCJD may be associated with high signal changes in the putamen and caudate head and vCJD is usually associated with hyperintensity of the pulvinar (posterior nuclei) of the thalamus. These appearances and other imaging features are described in this article. Using appropriate clinical and radiological criteria and tailored imaging protocols, MRI plays an important part in the in vivodiagnosis of this disease. Collie, D.A. et al. (2001)

  20. MRI of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Imaging features and recommended MRI protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collie, D.A.; Sellar, R.J.; Zeidler, M.; Colchester, A.C.F.; Knight, R.; Will, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is a rare, progressive and invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by specific histopathological features. Of the four subtypes of CJD described, the commonest is sporadic CJD (sCJD). More recently, a new clinically distinct form of the disease affecting younger patients, known as variant CJD (vCJD), has been identified, and this has been causally linked to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent in cattle. Characteristic appearances on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been identified in several forms of CJD; sCJD may be associated with high signal changes in the putamen and caudate head and vCJD is usually associated with hyperintensity of the pulvinar (posterior nuclei) of the thalamus. These appearances and other imaging features are described in this article. Using appropriate clinical and radiological criteria and tailored imaging protocols, MRI plays an important part in the in vivodiagnosis of this disease. Collie, D.A. et al. (2001)

  1. Design, operation, and safety of single-room interventional MRI suites: practical experience from two centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark J; Thornton, John S; Hawkes, David J; Hill, Derek L G; Kitchen, Neil; Mancini, Laura; McEvoy, Andrew W; Razavi, Reza; Wilson, Sally; Yousry, Tarek; Keevil, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    The design and operation of a facility in which a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner is incorporated into a room used for surgical or endovascular cardiac interventions presents several challenges. MR safety must be maintained in the presence of a much wider variety of equipment than is found in a diagnostic unit, and of staff unfamiliar with the MRI environment, without compromising the safety and practicality of the interventional procedure. Both the MR-guided cardiac interventional unit at Kings College London and the intraoperative imaging suite at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery are single-room interventional facilities incorporating 1.5 T cylindrical-bore MRI scanners. The two units employ similar strategies to maintain MR safety, both in original design and day-to-day operational workflows, and between them over a decade of incident-free practice has been accumulated. This article outlines these strategies, highlighting both similarities and differences between the units, as well as some lessons learned and resulting procedural changes made in both units since installation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. In vivo imaging of stepwise vessel occlusion in cerebral photothrombosis of mice by 19F MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesa Weise

    Full Text Available (19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was recently introduced as a promising technique for in vivo cell tracking. In the present study we compared (19F MRI with iron-enhanced MRI in mice with photothrombosis (PT at 7 Tesla. PT represents a model of focal cerebral ischemia exhibiting acute vessel occlusion and delayed neuroinflammation.Perfluorocarbons (PFC or superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO were injected intravenously at different time points after photothrombotic infarction. While administration of PFC directly after PT induction led to a strong (19F signal throughout the entire lesion, two hours delayed application resulted in a rim-like (19F signal at the outer edge of the lesion. These findings closely resembled the distribution of signal loss on T2-weighted MRI seen after SPIO injection reflecting intravascular accumulation of iron particles trapped in vessel thrombi as confirmed histologically. By sequential administration of two chemically shifted PFC compounds 0 and 2 hours after illumination the different spatial distribution of the (19F markers (infarct core/rim could be visualized in the same animal. When PFC were applied at day 6 the fluorine marker was only detected after long acquisition times ex vivo. SPIO-enhanced MRI showed slight signal loss in vivo which was much more prominent ex vivo indicative for neuroinflammation at this late lesion stage.Our study shows that vessel occlusion can be followed in vivo by (19F and SPIO-enhanced high-field MRI while in vivo imaging of neuroinflammation remains challenging. The timing of contrast agent application was the major determinant of the underlying processes depicted by both imaging techniques. Importantly, sequential application of different PFC compounds allowed depiction of ongoing vessel occlusion from the core to the margin of the ischemic lesions in a single MRI measurement.

  3. Periodontoid pseudotumor: CT and MRI imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Eugene; Montanera, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Periodontoid pseudotumor (PP) can be a severe and disabling disease. This disease process typically presents in elderly patients with a longstanding history of myelopathy. We reviewed four cases of PP in order to summarize the clinical and imaging features. (orig.)

  4. Assessment of congenital heart disease (CHD): Is there a role for fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manganaro, L. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Savelli, S. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: sarasavelli@hotmail.it; Di Maurizio, M.; Perrone, A.; Francioso, A.; La Barbera, L.; Totaro, P.; Fierro, F.; Tomei, A.; Coratella, F. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Giancotti, A. [Department of Gynaecological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ballesio, L. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ventriglia, F. [Department of Pediatric Cardiology, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: To review our experience with fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: We performed fetal MRI in 32 fetuses with an echocardiographically assessed CHD. Both direct and indirect signs of CHD were investigated. Direct signs considered were: morpho-volumetric abnormalities of the heart; malrotations; ventricular and atrial septal defects; anomalies of the origin, size and course of the great arteries. Indirect signs considered were: difficulty to recognize a 'normal' anatomical structures in the reference projections; increase of the vascular size before a stenosis; hypertrophy of the papillary muscles; cardiomegaly and pericardial effusion. All MRI findings were compared with postnatal or autoptic findings. Results: MRI allowed the CHD to be visualised by direct signs in 17 fetuses, indirect signs in 5 and both direct and indirect signs in 9 fetuses, excluding the prenatal echocardiographic suspect of hypoplastic left heart syndrome in 1 fetus. Postnatal echocardiograms or autoptic findings confirmed a normal heart in 1 fetus and CHD in 31 fetuses including a single cardiac anomaly or syndrome in 19 fetuses, 2 associated cardiac abnormalities in 11 and 3 cardiac anomalies in 1 fetus. However, in 2 fetuses MRI detected a ventricular septal defect successively disclosed by gold standard. Conclusions: MRI is a promising method for further assessment of the cardiovascular pathologies diagnosed by echocardiography, and may be a valuable tool in assessing associated extracardiac anomalies.

  5. Whole-body MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, and diffusion-weighted imaging for the staging of multiple myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutoit, Julie C.; Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive imaging technique for the detection of bone marrow infiltration, and has therefore recently been included in the new diagnostic myeloma criteria, as proposed by the International Myeloma Working Group. Nevertheless, conventional MRI only provides anatomical information and is therefore only of limited use in the response assessment of patients with multiple myeloma. The additional information from functional MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, can improve the detection rate of bone marrow infiltration and the assessment of response. This can further enhance the sensitivity and specificity of MRI in the staging of multiple myeloma patients. This article provides an overview of the technical aspects of conventional and functional MRI techniques with practical recommendations. It reviews the diagnostic performance, prognostic value, and role in therapy assessment in multiple myeloma and its precursor stages. (orig.)

  6. The case of Cushings disease imaging by SPECT examination without manifestation of adenoma in MRI examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierach, M.; Pufal, J.; Pilecki, S.; Junik, R.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the possibility of imaging the pathological accumulation of 99mT c-MIBI in the pituitary gland in patients with Cushings disease when MRI examination does not show microadenomas. Cushings disease was diagnosed in a 27 year old male on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. The blood cortisol level of the patient was elevated (the average level was 47 microgram/dl) and it showed no changeability of day and night rhythm. In the patient with Cushing's disease, during the SPECT examination, an increased accumulation of 99mT c-MIBI in the pituitary gland was noticed. MRI scanning was negative. Single photon emission computed tomography using 99mT c-MIBI is a useful and sensitive means of pituitary gland microadenoma detection in patients with Cushings disease when microadenoma is not detected during MRI scanning and when the results of dexamethasone suppression test is positive. (author)

  7. Imaging brain microstructure with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B; Nilsson, Markus

    2018-01-01

    on practicalities of designing a working microstructure imaging technique: model selection, experiment design, parameter estimation, validation, and the pipeline of development of this class of technique. The article concludes with some future perspectives on opportunities in this topic and expectations on how...

  8. Imaging the fetus: when does MRI really help?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garel, Catherine [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Paris Cedex 12 (France)

    2008-06-15

    It is widely accepted that fetal MRI should be used to complement rather than to replace US, which remains the primary screening modality. Under certain circumstances where US is limited, such as maternal obesity, fetal MRI may be useful as a primary screening tool. It is well known that maternal obesity is increasing worldwide and is more common in certain countries. It certainly contributes to a shift from US to MRI as a prenatal diagnostic imaging modality. Inadequacies of US may also be directly related to the sonographer's level of experience. Use and development of fetal US are not comparable in different countries. Some countries prioritise the development of fetal US and increase the experience of sonographers by political initiatives such as reimbursement of US by social insurance, thus raising people's expectations. In other countries, fetal US is considered of secondary importance and is not exploited as much as it could be. Consequently, in those countries, the place occupied by fetal MRI and the expectations regarding its diagnostic accuracy are much more prominent. This is undoubtedly the reason why there are so many discrepancies regarding the relative contributions of fetal MRI and fetal US in the prenatal literature. (orig.)

  9. Imaging the fetus: when does MRI really help?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garel, Catherine

    It is widely accepted that fetal MRI should be used to complement rather than to replace US, which remains the primary screening modality. Under certain circumstances where US is limited, such as maternal obesity, fetal MRI may be useful as a primary screening tool. It is well known that maternal obesity is increasing worldwide and is more common in certain countries. It certainly contributes to a shift from US to MRI as a prenatal diagnostic imaging modality. Inadequacies of US may also be directly related to the sonographer's level of experience. Use and development of fetal US are not comparable in different countries. Some countries prioritise the development of fetal US and increase the experience of sonographers by political initiatives such as reimbursement of US by social insurance, thus raising people's expectations. In other countries, fetal US is considered of secondary importance and is not exploited as much as it could be. Consequently, in those countries, the place occupied by fetal MRI and the expectations regarding its diagnostic accuracy are much more prominent. This is undoubtedly the reason why there are so many discrepancies regarding the relative contributions of fetal MRI and fetal US in the prenatal literature. (orig.)

  10. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI) SPECTRUM OF Rotator Cuff Tears, with Arthroscopic – MRI Contextualizations

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Alexandre; Bagulho, Cecília

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of rotator cuff (RC) pathogenesis and the optimal management of RC pathology is evolving and shoulder magnetic imaging (MRI) has a crucial role in this development, as it functionally depicts pathology in the painful shoulder patient, conveys optimal sensitivity and specificity rates in rotator cuff tear evaluation and characterization, and allows useful additional information in terms of patient management, namely regarding muscle atrophy, reducing unnecessary arthroscopic ...

  11. Multiple imaging procedures including MRI for the bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikata, Noriharu; Suzuki, Makoto; Takeuchi, Takumi; Kunisawa, Yositaka; Fukutani, Keiko; Kawabe, Kazuki

    1986-01-01

    Endoscopic photography, double contrast cystography, transurethral echography, X-ray CT scan, and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) were utilized for the staging diagnosis of the four patients with carcinoma of the bladder. In the first case, a 70-year-old man, since all of the five imaging procedures suggested a superficial and pedunculated tumor, his bladder cancer was considered T1. The classification of stage T3 carcinoma was made for the second 86-year-old male. Because all of his imaging examinations showed a tumor infiltrating deep muscle and penetrating the bladder wall. The third case was a 36-year-old male. His clinical stage was diagnosed as T2 or T3a by cystophotography, double contrast cystogram, ultrasonography, and X-ray CT scan. However, MRI showed only thickened bladder wall and the infiltrating tumor could not be distinguished from the hypertrophic wall. The last patient, a 85-year-old female, had a smaller Ta cancer. Her double contrast cystography revealed the small tumor at the lateral bladder wall. But, the tumor could not be detected by transaxial, sagittal and coronal scans. Multiple imaging procedures combining MRI and staging diagnosis of the bladder carcinoma were discussed. (author)

  12. Nano-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Nano-MRI) Gives Personalized Medicine a New Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Lorenzo; Blackledge, Jonathan; Boretti, Albert

    2017-02-01

    This paper reviews some of the major and most recent advances in nanoscale-magnetic resonance imaging (nano-MRI) for personalized medicine (PM). Nano-MRI may drastically expand the capabilities of the traditional magnetic resonance images (MRI), down to the nanometer scale and possibly, in the near future, at the atomic scale. Nano-MRI is potentially able to observe structures which cannot be seen using today's molecular imaging, with sensitivities of many billions of times better than MRI as currently used in hospitals, for example. The paper briefly reports on the foremost research themes in nano-MRI.

  13. Wavelet-based de-noising algorithm for images acquired with parallel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delakis, Ioannis; Hammad, Omer; Kitney, Richard I

    2007-01-01

    Wavelet-based de-noising has been shown to improve image signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) while maintaining spatial resolution. Wavelet-based de-noising techniques typically implemented in MRI require that noise displays uniform spatial distribution. However, images acquired with parallel MRI have spatially varying noise levels. In this work, a new algorithm for filtering images with parallel MRI is presented. The proposed algorithm extracts the edges from the original image and then generates a noise map from the wavelet coefficients at finer scales. The noise map is zeroed at locations where edges have been detected and directional analysis is also used to calculate noise in regions of low-contrast edges that may not have been detected. The new methodology was applied on phantom and brain images and compared with other applicable de-noising techniques. The performance of the proposed algorithm was shown to be comparable with other techniques in central areas of the images, where noise levels are high. In addition, finer details and edges were maintained in peripheral areas, where noise levels are low. The proposed methodology is fully automated and can be applied on final reconstructed images without requiring sensitivity profiles or noise matrices of the receiver coils, therefore making it suitable for implementation in a clinical MRI setting

  14. Preoperative therapeutic neuroscience education for lumbar radiculopathy: a single-case fMRI report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Puentedura, Emilio J; Diener, Ina; Peoples, Randal R

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of mainly chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This case study aims to describe the changes in brain activation on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning, before and after the application of a newly-designed preoperative TNE program. A 30-year-old female with a current acute episode of low back pain (LBP) and radiculopathy participated in a single preoperative TNE session. She completed pre- and post-education measures including visual analog scale (VAS) for LBP and leg pain; Oswestry Disability Index (ODI); Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ); Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and a series of Likert-scale questions regarding beliefs and attitudes to lumbar surgery (LS). After a 30-minute TNE session, ODI decreased by 10%, PCS decreased by 10 points and her beliefs and attitudes shifted positively regarding LS. Immediately following TNE straight leg raise increased by 7° and forward flexion by 8 cm. fMRI testing following TNE revealed 3 marked differences compared to pre-education scanning: (1) deactivation of the periaqueductal gray area; (2) deactivation of the cerebellum; and (3) increased activation of the motor cortex. The immediate positive fMRI, psychometric and physical movement changes may indicate a cortical mechanism of TNE for patients scheduled for LS.

  15. mri evaluation of patients with shoulder pain at three imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    shoulder 104(86.7%) compared to the left which had only 16(13.3%) lesions. Different lesions were picked on MRI. Table 1 shows the lesions seen. Table 1. Lesions seen at MR imaging (n=120). Type of lesions. Right shoulder. Left shoulder. Total. Tendinitis. 31 (25.8). 3 (2.5). 34 (28.3). Bursitis. 11 (9.7). 1 (0.8). 12 (10.0).

  16. Degeneration of pyramidal tract of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagami, Tatsuhito; Harada, Noboru; Gotoh, Yasunobu; Imataka, Kiyoharu; Kinuta, Yuji; Okumura, Teizo; Niijima, Kyo; Taki, Waro; Kikuchi, Haruhiko.

    1988-02-01

    MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) examinaion was performed on cases of hemiplegia and hemiparesis. These included seven cases of intracerebral hemorrhage, four cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage, one case of cerebral infarct, and two cases of head trauma. The pyramidal tract in the brain stem was studied in five patients with complete hemiplegia and in nine with incomplete hemiparesis. The scanner of the MRI was a resistive type operating at a field of 0.2 Tesla. The inversion recovery (IR) and saturation recovery (SR) techniques were utilized. The pyramidal tract at the level of the midbrain and the pons was recognized as a low intensity area on the T/sub 1/ image (IR 150043) in the cases of complete hemiplegia. However, it was recognized as a high intensity area on the SR image (SR 100060) and the T/sub 2/ image (SR 2000100). No abnormal signal intensity was found in the cases of incomplete hemiparesis. A low intensity area on the T/sub 1/ image and a high intensity area on the T/sub 2/ image were recognized in the ventral portion of the midbrain and the pons on the affected side. These findings indicate a degeneration of the pyramidal tract at the level of the brain stem in patients with complete hemiplegia.

  17. Functional MRI studies of human vision on a clinical imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.S.; Lewine, J.D.; Aine, C.J.; van Hulsteyn, D.; Wood, C.C.; Sanders, J.; Maclin, E.; Belliveau, J.W.; Caprihan, A.

    1992-01-01

    During the past decade, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice for imaging the anatomy of the human brain. Recently, Belliveau and colleagues have reported the use of echo planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) to image patterns of neural activity. Here, we report functional MR imaging in response to visual stimulation without the use of contrast agents, and without the extensive hardware modifications required for EPI. Regions of activity were observed near the expected locations of V1, V2 and possibly V3 and another active region was observed near the parietal-occipital sulcus on the superior surface of the cerebrum. These locations are consistent with sources observed in neuromagnetic studies of the human visual response

  18. Application of dual-source CT perfusion imaging and MRI for the diagnosis of primary liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongwen; Xu, Aixia

    2017-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the application of dual-source CT perfusion imaging and MRI for the diagnosis of primary liver cancer. Sixty-three patients with primary liver cancer were selected between February 2015 and May 2016. All patients underwent examinations by dual-source CT perfusion imaging and MRI. The perfusion parameters of the focus center and normal liver parenchyma by CT examination and the hemodynamic parameters of the focus center and normal liver parenchyma by MRI examination were analyzed. The accuracy rates of the three detection methods (CT perfusion imaging, MRI, and combined examination) were analyzed and compared by ROC curves. Dual-source CT perfusion imaging revealed that blood flow and blood volume of the focus center were significantly higher than those of normal liver parenchyma (Pperfusion and hepatic perfusion index of the focus center were significantly higher than those of normal liver parenchyma; portal venous perfusion of the focus center was significantly lower than that of normal liver parenchyma (Pperfusion between the focus center and normal liver parenchyma was not significant (P>0.05); the accuracy rates of CT perfusion imaging, MRI, and combined examination were 76.19, 85.71, and 95.24% respectively; the area under the curve of CT perfusion imaging was 0.753 (PCT combined with MRI was 0.947 (PCT perfusion imaging combined with MRI for examination of primary liver cancer is superior to that of single use of CT or MRI, and has high clinical application and popularization value.

  19. Wavelet-space correlation imaging for high-speed MRI without motion monitoring or data segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Wang, Hui; Tkach, Jean; Roach, David; Woods, Jason; Dumoulin, Charles

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to (i) develop a new high-speed MRI approach by implementing correlation imaging in wavelet-space, and (ii) demonstrate the ability of wavelet-space correlation imaging to image human anatomy with involuntary or physiological motion. Correlation imaging is a high-speed MRI framework in which image reconstruction relies on quantification of data correlation. The presented work integrates correlation imaging with a wavelet transform technique developed originally in the field of signal and image processing. This provides a new high-speed MRI approach to motion-free data collection without motion monitoring or data segmentation. The new approach, called "wavelet-space correlation imaging", is investigated in brain imaging with involuntary motion and chest imaging with free-breathing. Wavelet-space correlation imaging can exceed the speed limit of conventional parallel imaging methods. Using this approach with high acceleration factors (6 for brain MRI, 16 for cardiac MRI, and 8 for lung MRI), motion-free images can be generated in static brain MRI with involuntary motion and nonsegmented dynamic cardiac/lung MRI with free-breathing. Wavelet-space correlation imaging enables high-speed MRI in the presence of involuntary motion or physiological dynamics without motion monitoring or data segmentation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Assessment of MRI Parameters as Imaging Biomarkers for Radiation Necrosis in the Rat Brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Silun; Tryggestad, Erik; Zhou Tingting; Armour, Michael; Wen Zhibo; Fu Dexue; Ford, Eric; Zijl, Peter C.M. van; Zhou Jinyuan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation necrosis is a major complication of radiation therapy. We explore the features of radiation-induced brain necrosis in the rat, using multiple MRI approaches, including T 1 , T 2 , apparent diffusion constant (ADC), cerebral blood flow (CBF), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), and amide proton transfer (APT) of endogenous mobile proteins and peptides. Methods and Materials: Adult rats (Fischer 344; n = 15) were irradiated with a single, well-collimated X-ray beam (40 Gy; 10 × 10 mm 2 ) in the left brain hemisphere. MRI was acquired on a 4.7-T animal scanner at ∼25 weeks’ postradiation. The MRI signals of necrotic cores and perinecrotic regions were assessed with a one-way analysis of variance. Histological evaluation was accomplished with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results: ADC and CBF MRI could separate perinecrotic and contralateral normal brain tissue (p 1 , T 2 , MTR, and APT could not. MRI signal intensities were significantly lower in the necrotic core than in normal brain for CBF (p 1 , T 2 , MTR, and ADC. Histological results demonstrated coagulative necrosis within the necrotic core and reactive astrogliosis and vascular damage within the perinecrotic region. Conclusion: ADC and CBF are promising imaging biomarkers for identifying perinecrotic regions, whereas CBF and APT are promising for identifying necrotic cores.

  1. Substitute CT generation from a single ultra short time echo MRI sequence: preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Soumya; Dowling, Jason A.; Rai, Robba; Liney, Gary P.

    2017-04-01

    In MR guided radiation therapy planning both MR and CT images for a patient are acquired and co-registered to obtain a tissue specific HU map. Generation of the HU map directly from the MRI would eliminate the CT acquisition and may improve radiation therapy planning. In this preliminary study of substitute CT (sCT) generation, two porcine leg phantoms were scanned using a 3D ultrashort echo time (PETRA) sequence and co-registered to corresponding CT images to build tissue specific regression models. The model was created from one co-registered CT-PETRA pair to generate the sCT for the other PETRA image. An expectation maximization based clustering was performed on the co-registered PETRA image to identify the soft tissues, dense bone and air class membership probabilities. A tissue specific non linear regression model was built from one registered CT-PETRA pair dataset to predict the sCT of the second PETRA image in a two-fold cross validation schema. A complete substitute CT is generated in 3 min. The mean absolute HU error for air was 0.3 HU, bone was 95 HU, fat was 30 HU and for muscle it was 10 HU. The mean surface reconstruction error for the bone was 1.3 mm. The PETRA sequence enabled a low mean absolute surface distance for the bone and a low HU error for other classes. The sCT generated from a single PETRA sequence shows promise for the generation of fast sCT for MRI based radiation therapy planning.

  2. A single, early magnetic resonance imaging study in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovira, Alex; Swanton, Josephine; Tintoré, Mar

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A diagnosis of multiple sclerosis in patients who present for the first time with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) can be established with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) if the MRI demonstrates demyelinating lesions with dissemination in space (DIS) and dissemination in time...... sclerosis (CDMS), if this occurred within 2 years. Main Outcome Measure All patients underwent 2 comparable brain MRI examinations, the first within 3 months (early) and the second between 3 and 12 months (delayed) after CIS onset. We defined DIS using several existing MRI criteria, and DIT was inferred...... when there were simultaneous gadolinium-enhancing and nonenhancing lesions on a single MRI. RESULTS: Two hundred fifty patients were included in the study. The comparison of the diagnostic performance of various MRI criteria for identifying early converters to CDMS showed similar sensitivity...

  3. CT and MRI imaging of the brain in MELAS syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauli, Wojciech; Zarzycki, Artur; Krzyształowski, Adam; Walecka, Anna

    2013-01-01

    MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes) is a rare, multisystem disorder which belongs to a group of mitochondrial metabolic diseases. As other diseases in this group, it is inherited in the maternal line. In this report, we discussed a case of a 10-year-old girl with clinical and radiological picture of MELAS syndrome. We would like to describe characteristic radiological features of MELAS syndrome in CT, MRI and MR spectroscopy of the brain and differential diagnosis. The rarity of this disorder and the complexity of its clinical presentation make MELAS patients among the most difficult to diagnose. Brain imaging studies require a wide differential diagnosis, primarily to distinguish between MELAS and ischemic stroke. Particularly helpful are the MRI and MR spectroscopy techniques

  4. MRI imaging of displaced meniscal tears: Report of a case highlighting new potential pitfalls of the MRI signs

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad, Abhishek; Brar, Rahat; Rana, Shaleen

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been found to be an excellent imaging tool for meniscal injuries. Various MRI signs have been described to detect displaced meniscal injuries, specifically the bucket-handle tears. Although these signs are quite helpful in diagnosing meniscal tears, various pitfalls have also been reported for these signs. Double anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) sign refers to presence of a linear hypointense soft tissue anterior to the ACL, which represented the flipped b...

  5. Quantitative Assessment of Single-Image Super-Resolution in Myocardial Scar Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Estner, Heidi L; Herzka, Daniel A; Mcveigh, Elliot R; Halperin, Henry R

    Single-image super resolution is a process of obtaining a high-resolution image from a set of low-resolution observations by signal processing. While super resolution has been demonstrated to improve image quality in scaled down images in the image domain, its effects on the Fourier-based image acquisition technique, such as MRI, remains unknown.We performed high-resolution ex vivo late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (0.4 × 0.4 × 0.4 mm 3 ) in postinfarction swine hearts ( n = 24). The swine hearts were divided into the training set ( n = 14) and the test set ( n = 10), and in all hearts, low-resolution images were simulated from the high-resolution images. In the training set, super-resolution dictionaries with pairs of small matching patches of the high- and low-resolution images were created. In the test set, super resolution recovered high-resolution images from low-resolution images using the dictionaries. The same algorithm was also applied to patient LGE ( n = 4) to assess its effects. Compared with interpolated images, super resolution significantly improved basic image quality indices ( P Super resolution using Fourier-based zero padding achieved the best image quality. However, the magnitude of improvement was small in images with zero padding. Super resolution substantially improved the spatial resolution of the patient LGE images by sharpening the edges of the heart and the scar. In conclusion, single-image super resolution significantly improves image errors. However, the magnitude of improvement was relatively small in images with Fourier-based zero padding. These findings provide evidence to support its potential use in myocardial scar imaging.

  6. Single Image Super-Resolution via L0 Image Smoothing

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhang; Huang, Qi; Li, Jian; Wang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    We propose a single image super-resolution method based on a L0 smoothing approach. We consider a low-resolution image as two parts: one is the smooth image generated by the L0 smoothing method and the other is the error image between the low-resolution image and the smoothing image. We get an intermediate high-resolution image via a classical interpolation and then generate a high-resolution smoothing image with sharp edges by the L0 smoothing method. For the error image, a...

  7. Nano-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Nano-MRI) Gives Personalized Medicine a New Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo Rosa; Jonathan Blackledge; Albert Boretti

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the major and most recent advances in nanoscale-magnetic resonance imaging (nano-MRI) for personalized medicine (PM). Nano-MRI may drastically expand the capabilities of the traditional magnetic resonance images (MRI), down to the nanometer scale and possibly, in the near future, at the atomic scale. Nano-MRI is potentially able to observe structures which cannot be seen using today?s molecular imaging, with sensitivities of many billions of times better than MRI as...

  8. Multispectral optoacoustic and MRI coregistration for molecular imaging of orthotopic model of human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Tay, Hui Chien; Burton, Neal C; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2016-07-01

    Multi-modality imaging methods are of great importance in oncologic studies for acquiring complementary information, enhancing the efficacy in tumor detection and characterization. We hereby demonstrate a hybrid non-invasive in vivo imaging approach of utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) for molecular imaging of glucose uptake in an orthotopic glioblastoma in mouse. The molecular and functional information from MSOT can be overlaid on MRI anatomy via image coregistration to provide insights into probe uptake in the brain, which is verified by ex vivo fluorescence imaging and histological validation. In vivo MSOT and MRI imaging of an orthotopic glioma mouse model injected with IRDye800-2DG. Image coregistration between MSOT and MRI enables multifaceted (anatomical, functional, molecular) information from MSOT to be overlaid on MRI anatomy images to derive tumor physiological parameters such as perfusion, haemoglobin and oxygenation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Image reconstruction of dynamic infrared single-pixel imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qi; Jiang, Yilin; Wang, Haiyan; Guo, Limin

    2018-03-01

    Single-pixel imaging technique has recently received much attention. Most of the current single-pixel imaging is aimed at relatively static targets or the imaging system is fixed, which is limited by the number of measurements received through the single detector. In this paper, we proposed a novel dynamic compressive imaging method to solve the imaging problem, where exists imaging system motion behavior, for the infrared (IR) rosette scanning system. The relationship between adjacent target images and scene is analyzed under different system movement scenarios. These relationships are used to build dynamic compressive imaging models. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the reconstruction quality of IR image and enhance the contrast between the target and the background in the presence of system movement.

  10. Generalized INverse imaging (GIN): ultrafast fMRI with physiological noise correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyacioğlu, Rasim; Barth, Markus

    2013-10-01

    An ultrafast functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique, called generalized inverse imaging (GIN), is proposed, which combines inverse imaging with a phase constraint-leading to a less underdetermined reconstruction-and physiological noise correction. A single 3D echo planar imaging (EPI) prescan is sufficient to obtain the necessary coil sensitivity information and reference images that are used to reconstruct standard images, so that standard analysis methods are applicable. A moving dots stimulus paradigm was chosen to assess the performance of GIN. We find that the spatial localization of activation for GIN is comparable to an EPI protocol and that maximum z-scores increase significantly. The high temporal resolution of GIN (50 ms) and the acquisition of the phase information enable unaliased sampling and regression of physiological signals. Using the phase time courses obtained from the 32 channels of the receiver coils as nuisance regressors in a general linear model results in significant improvement of the functional activation, rendering the acquisition of external physiological signals unnecessary. The proposed physiological noise correction can in principle be used for other fMRI protocols, such as simultaneous multislice acquisitions, which acquire the phase information sufficiently fast and sample physiological signals unaliased. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Heroin-induced leukoencephalopathy: characterization using MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, and MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offiah, C. [Department of Neuroradiology, St Bartholomew' s and the London Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hall, E. [Department of Neuroradiology, St Bartholomew' s and the London Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: curtis.offiah@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk

    2008-02-15

    Aim: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of heroin-induced leukoencephalopathy or 'chasing the dragon syndrome' and, in particular, the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) features. Material and methods: Six patients with a clinical or histopathological diagnosis of heroin-induced leukoencephalopathy were identified and MRI examinations, including DWI and single-voxel MRS, reviewed. Results: Cerebellar white matter was involved in all six cases demonstrating similar symmetrical distribution with sparing of the dentate nuclei. Brain stem signal change was evident in five of the six patients imaged. Supratentorial brain parenchymal involvement, as well as brain stem involvement, correlated anatomically with corticospinal tract distribution. None of the areas of signal abnormality were restricted on DWI. Of those patients subjected to MRS, the areas of parenchymal damage demonstrated reduced N-acetylaspartate, reduced choline, and elevated lactate. Conclusion: Heroin-induced leukoencephalopathy results in characteristic and highly specific signal abnormalities on MRI, which can greatly aid diagnosis. DWI and MRS findings can be explained by known reported neuropathological descriptions in this condition and can be used to support a proposed mechanism for the benefit of current recommended drug treatment regimes.

  12. Brain Tumor Segmentation Using Convolutional Neural Networks in MRI Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sergio; Pinto, Adriano; Alves, Victor; Silva, Carlos A

    2016-05-01

    Among brain tumors, gliomas are the most common and aggressive, leading to a very short life expectancy in their highest grade. Thus, treatment planning is a key stage to improve the quality of life of oncological patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used imaging technique to assess these tumors, but the large amount of data produced by MRI prevents manual segmentation in a reasonable time, limiting the use of precise quantitative measurements in the clinical practice. So, automatic and reliable segmentation methods are required; however, the large spatial and structural variability among brain tumors make automatic segmentation a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose an automatic segmentation method based on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), exploring small 3 ×3 kernels. The use of small kernels allows designing a deeper architecture, besides having a positive effect against overfitting, given the fewer number of weights in the network. We also investigated the use of intensity normalization as a pre-processing step, which though not common in CNN-based segmentation methods, proved together with data augmentation to be very effective for brain tumor segmentation in MRI images. Our proposal was validated in the Brain Tumor Segmentation Challenge 2013 database (BRATS 2013), obtaining simultaneously the first position for the complete, core, and enhancing regions in Dice Similarity Coefficient metric (0.88, 0.83, 0.77) for the Challenge data set. Also, it obtained the overall first position by the online evaluation platform. We also participated in the on-site BRATS 2015 Challenge using the same model, obtaining the second place, with Dice Similarity Coefficient metric of 0.78, 0.65, and 0.75 for the complete, core, and enhancing regions, respectively.

  13. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region. This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted.

  14. Paediatrics brain imaging in epilepsy: common presenting symptoms and spectrum of abnormalities detected on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Akram, F.; Khan, G.; Hussain, S.

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy, a common neurological disorder can present at any age and has a number of aetiologies with underlying brain disease being the most common aetiology. Brain imaging becomes important and mandatory in the work up for epilepsy in localization and lateralization of the seizure focus. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Radiology Ayub Medical Teaching Institution Abbottabad from 1st March 2015 to 31st March 2016. A total of 209 children aged 28 days to 14 years were included in the study who presented with seizures to clinicians. Information obtained from history, clinical examination and investigations especially MRI brains were recorded in a prescribed pro forma. The data was analysed in SPSS 20. Results: MRI examination was unremarkable in 44.01% (n=92) and mild generalized brain atrophy was noted in 12.91% (n=27). Arachnoid cysts, mild unilateral brain atrophy and hydrocephalous due to aqueduct stenosis were recorded in 3.82% (n=8) of each group. Neoplastic lesions were the second most common abnormal MRI finding and constituted 5.74% (n=12). Leukodystrophy was diagnosed in 4.78% (n=10). MRI examination showed ring enhancing lesions (tuberculomas) and AVM in 1.43% (n=3) of each group. Perinatal ischemia and intracranial infection, (focal or generalized) were recorded in 2.87% (n=6) of each group. A 0.95 % (n=2) of children in each group had agenesis of corpus callosum and cavernoma. The radiological MRI diagnosis of Raussmussen encephalitis was made in 3.34% (n=7). Single case, each of mesial temporal sclerosis, subdural haemorrhage, infarct and craniopharyngioma was recorded making 0.47 % of the total patients in each case. Conclusion: MRI examination was abnormal in significant number of patients (55.86%), so therefore if properly utilized, in a good clinical context, this can identify most of the structural brain abnormalities in paediatric patients presenting with seizures. (author)

  15. Automatic image processing solutions for MRI-guided minimally invasive intervention planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorda, YH

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, automatic image processing methods are discussed for the purpose of improving treatment planning of MRI-guided minimally invasive interventions. Specifically, the following topics are addressed: rib detection in MRI, liver motion modeling in MRI and MR-CT registration of planning

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Sponsored by Please note ...

  17. Trends in magnetic resonance imaging. Technical trends in MRI, noise reduction and fast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    At MRI examination, patients suffer the machine noise and long tight lying as well as an oppressive feeling. This paper describes the technological efforts against the former two. The noise is generated from the force (thumb-ward) to vibrate the magnetic field gradient coil according to the left-hand rule. Authors have developed a MRI machine (Pianissimo) where the coil is placed in vacuum and its actual noise level is found reduced from 105 - 112 to 84 dB(A) at 1.5T. Fast imaging to shorten the imaging time is attained by combination of parallel imaging where MR signals are into multiple high frequency receiver coils, and the usual pulse sequence imaging, which results in the increased encoding in a given time. Together with these, MR angiography and diffusion weighted imaging of abdomen for cancer examination are becoming popular as an additional MRI diagnosis, also acceptable to patients. Future progress of MRI machines conceivably accompanies the unavoidable noise increase and possibly significant magnetic effects on human body, and efforts for their reduction will be continued at patients' viewpoint. (T.I.)

  18. Multiflash X ray with Image Detanglement for Single Image Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-31

    conceived and developed to capture multiple flash X-rays on a single film or phosphor screen and digitally detangle the resulting image into separate images...capability was conceived and developed to capture multiple flash X-rays on a single film or phosphor screen and digitally detangle the resulting image...digital radiograph (ORAD); and 2) an appropriate averaging of the value of the pixels within the exposed region-of-interest on the ORAD needs to be

  19. Creating a strategic management plan for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepura, A; Clark, M

    2000-09-01

    We were commissioned by the West Midlands NHS Regional Specialized Services Group (RSSG) to formulate a strategic plan for the management of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) within the West Midlands, UK. We needed to establish whether an increase in MRI provision was required, and if so to develop criteria to shape both the nature and location of MRI provision. We found that the UK had relatively low MRI provision per capita by international standards, and that the West Midlands region of the UK had less than the UK average level of MRI provision per capita. Within the region there was a 'mixed economy' of MRI provision involving fixed site scanners owned by the NHS and private companies, and private sector mobile MRI provision. There was little evidence of inappropriate MRI use, but considerable evidence of under-provision. Most MRI scanners in the region were heavily utilized, and average waiting times for MRI frequently exceeded guidelines (of a maximum 13-week wait for non-urgent MRI scans). Projections from NHS Trusts, MRI suppliers, and experts in the MRI field, led us to the conclusion that demand for MRI was likely to grow by between 12.5 and 18.5% per annum. This implies that 8-14 additional MRI scanners might be required within the West Midlands over the next 5 years, to meet existing, and rising demand for MRI. We therefore developed criteria (outlined in the paper) to enhance the productive and allocative efficiency of the deployment of MRI provision, whilst improving the configuration of MRI with reference to geographical equality of access to MRI.

  20. Digital photography and 3D MRI-based multimodal imaging for individualized planning of resective neocortical epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Jörg; von Oertzen, Joachim; Schaller, Carlo; Urbach, Horst; König, Roy; Widman, Guido; Van Roost, Dirk; Elger, Christian E

    2002-12-01

    Invasive presurgical work up of pharmacoresistant epilepsies presumes integration of multiple diagnostic modalities into a comprehensive picture of seizure onset and eloquent brain areas. During resection, reliable transfer of evaluation results to the patient's individual anatomy must be made. We investigated the value of digital photography-based grid localization in combination with preoperative three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical routine. Digital photographs of the exposed cortex were taken before and after grid placement. Location of electrode contacts on the cortex was identified and schematically indicated on native cortex prints. Accordingly, transfer of contact positions to a 3D MRI brain-surface rendering was carried out manually by using the rendering software. Results of the electrophysiologic evaluation were transferred to either electrode contact reproduction and co-registered with imaging-based techniques such as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), and functional MRI (fMRI). Digital photography allows precise and highly realistic documentation of electrode contact positions on the individual neocortical surface. Lesions underneath grids can be highlighted by semitransparent MRI surface rendering, and lobar boundaries can be identified. Because of integrating electrode contact positions into the postprocessed 3D MRI data set, imaging-based techniques can be codisplayed with the results of the electrophysiologic evaluation. Comparison with CT/MRI co-registration showed good accuracy of the method. However, grids not sewn to the dura at implantation can become subject to significant displacement. Digital photography in combination with preimplantation 3D MRI allows the generation of reliable tailored resection plans in neocortical epilepsy surgery. The method enhances surgical safety and confidence.

  1. Software-based PET-MR image coregistration: combined PET-MRI for the rest of us

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Matthew S.; Liu, Xinyang; Vyas, Pranav K.; Safdar, Nabile M.; Plishker, William; Zaki, George F.; Shekhar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI), a new imaging option to acquire multimodality images with complementary anatomical and functional information has become available. Compared with hybrid PET/computed tomography (CT), hybrid PET/MRI is capable of providing superior anatomical detail while removing the radiation exposure associated with CT. The early adoption of hybrid PET/MRI, however, has been limited. To provide a viable alternative to the hybrid PET/MRI hardware by validating a software-based solution for PET-MR image coregistration. A fully automated, graphics processing unit-accelerated 3-D deformable image registration technique was used to align PET (acquired as PET/CT) and MR image pairs of 17 patients (age range: 10 months-21 years, mean: 10 years) who underwent PET/CT and body MRI (chest, abdomen or pelvis), which were performed within a 28-day (mean: 10.5 days) interval. MRI data for most of these cases included single-station post-contrast axial T1-weighted images. Following registration, maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) values observed in coregistered PET (cPET) and the original PET were compared for 82 volumes of interest. In addition, we calculated the target registration error as a measure of the quality of image coregistration, and evaluated the algorithm's performance in the context of interexpert variability. The coregistration execution time averaged 97±45 s. The overall relative SUV max difference was 7% between cPET-MRI and PET/CT. The average target registration error was 10.7±6.6 mm, which compared favorably with the typical voxel size (diagonal distance) of 8.0 mm (typical resolution: 0.66 mm x 0.66 mm x 8 mm) for MRI and 6.1 mm (typical resolution: 3.65 mm x 3.65 mm x 3.27 mm) for PET. The variability in landmark identification did not show statistically significant differences between the algorithm and a typical expert. We have presented a software

  2. Software-based PET-MR image coregistration: combined PET-MRI for the rest of us

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Matthew S.; Liu, Xinyang; Vyas, Pranav K.; Safdar, Nabile M. [Children' s National Health System, Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Washington, DC (United States); Plishker, William; Zaki, George F. [IGI Technologies, Inc., College Park, MD (United States); Shekhar, Raj [Children' s National Health System, Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Washington, DC (United States); IGI Technologies, Inc., College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-10-15

    With the introduction of hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI), a new imaging option to acquire multimodality images with complementary anatomical and functional information has become available. Compared with hybrid PET/computed tomography (CT), hybrid PET/MRI is capable of providing superior anatomical detail while removing the radiation exposure associated with CT. The early adoption of hybrid PET/MRI, however, has been limited. To provide a viable alternative to the hybrid PET/MRI hardware by validating a software-based solution for PET-MR image coregistration. A fully automated, graphics processing unit-accelerated 3-D deformable image registration technique was used to align PET (acquired as PET/CT) and MR image pairs of 17 patients (age range: 10 months-21 years, mean: 10 years) who underwent PET/CT and body MRI (chest, abdomen or pelvis), which were performed within a 28-day (mean: 10.5 days) interval. MRI data for most of these cases included single-station post-contrast axial T1-weighted images. Following registration, maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) values observed in coregistered PET (cPET) and the original PET were compared for 82 volumes of interest. In addition, we calculated the target registration error as a measure of the quality of image coregistration, and evaluated the algorithm's performance in the context of interexpert variability. The coregistration execution time averaged 97±45 s. The overall relative SUV{sub max} difference was 7% between cPET-MRI and PET/CT. The average target registration error was 10.7±6.6 mm, which compared favorably with the typical voxel size (diagonal distance) of 8.0 mm (typical resolution: 0.66 mm x 0.66 mm x 8 mm) for MRI and 6.1 mm (typical resolution: 3.65 mm x 3.65 mm x 3.27 mm) for PET. The variability in landmark identification did not show statistically significant differences between the algorithm and a typical expert. We have presented a software

  3. Fetal lung volume measurement by MRI with high-speed imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osada, Hisao; Kaku, Kenshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    2002-08-01

    Although ultrasonography is widely used for fetal morphologic observation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has gained popularity as a new prenatal diagnostic method with recent introduction of high-speed imaging systems. Infants with lung hypoplasia affecting respiratory function require intensive management starting immediately after birth. Therefore, accurate prenatal differential diagnosis and severity evaluation are extremely important for these fetuses. The aim of this study is to measure fetal lung volume using a computer-based, three-dimensional MRI imaging system and to evaluate the possibility of clinical applications of this procedure. A total of 96 fetuses were evaluated, all were morphologically abnormal, and MRI was done for advanced assessment from 24 to 39 weeks gestation. Three-directional views of fetal chest were imaged by Signa Horizon, 1.5 Tesla, version 5.6 (General Electronics) with the following conditions; coil: TORSO coil, sequence: SSFSE (single shot fast spin echo), slice thickness: 5 mm, and imaging speed: 2 seconds/slice. To calculate the lung volume and create three-dimensional image, the lung area in each slice was traced out, then multiplied using computer image processing. Simultaneously, the volumes of all slices were summed to give the volume of each lung. Linear regression analysis and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were used for statistical analyses. In all cases, clear images were obtained, and were adequate for three-dimensional evaluation of the fetal lung. Thirty-five fetuses had poor outcomes, such as intrauterine fetal death, neonatal death, and intensive respiratory care. Regression lines of lung volume versus gestational week were calculated for these fetuses with poor outcome and 61 other fetuses with good outcome. ANCOVA, with gestational week as a covariant, revealed a significant intergroup difference in the lung volume (p<0.001). Similarly, regression lines of lung volume versus fetal body weight estimated by

  4. Gradient-enhanced volume rendering: an image processing strategy to facilitate whole small bowel imaging with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyss, Michael [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); ETH and University of Zuerich, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Zuerich (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M.; Patak, Michael A.; Juli, Christoph F.; Zollikofer, Christoph L. [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Scheidegger, Markus B. [ETH and University of Zuerich, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Zuerich (Switzerland); Wentz, Klaus U. [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); University of Witten Herdecke, Herdecke (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    MRI of the small bowel with positive contrast from orally administered contrast agent is a promising non-invasive imaging method. The aim of our study was to introduce small bowel MRI in a display format that clinicians are accustomed to and that maximizes the amount of information visualized on a single image. Twelve healthy volunteers, median age 32 years (range 18-49 years) participated in the study. A mixture of 20 ml Gd-DOTA (Dotarem), 0.8 g/kg body weight psyllium fibre (Metamucil) and 1.2 l water were sequentially administered over a period of 4 h. Imaging was performed on a 1.5 T unit (Philips Gyroscan, Intera). Fat-saturated, 3D, gradient echo imaging was performed while the patient was in apnea (30 s). Bowel motion was reduced with 40 mg intravenously administered scopolamine (Buscopan). A 3D, gradient-enhanced, volume rendering technique was applied to the 3D data sets. Standard projections [left anterior oblique (LAO), right anterior oblique (RAO), supine and prone] resembling conventional enteroclysis were successfully generated within fewer than 10 min processing time. Reconstructions were reproducible and provided an entire overview of the small bowel. In addition thin-slab volume rendering allowed an overlap-free display of individual structures. Positive contrast from orally administered contrast agent, combined with a gradient enhanced volume rendering method, allows the reconstruction of the small bowel in a pattern resembling conventional double-contrast enteroclysis. Segmental display without overlay is possible. (orig.)

  5. Automated imaging system for single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Charles; Runnheim, Rodney; Forrest, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    There is provided a high throughput automated single molecule image collection and processing system that requires minimal initial user input. The unique features embodied in the present disclosure allow automated collection and initial processing of optical images of single molecules and their assemblies. Correct focus may be automatically maintained while images are collected. Uneven illumination in fluorescence microscopy is accounted for, and an overall robust imaging operation is provided yielding individual images prepared for further processing in external systems. Embodiments described herein are useful in studies of any macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, peptides and proteins. The automated image collection and processing system and method of same may be implemented and deployed over a computer network, and may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interaction.

  6. Single image super-resolution based on image patch classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ping; Yan, Hua; Li, Jing; Sun, Jiande

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposed a single image super-resolution algorithm based on image patch classification and sparse representation where gradient information is used to classify image patches into three different classes in order to reflect the difference between the different types of image patches. Compared with other classification algorithms, gradient information based algorithm is simpler and more effective. In this paper, each class is learned to get a corresponding sub-dictionary. High-resolution image patch can be reconstructed by the dictionary and sparse representation coefficients of corresponding class of image patches. The result of the experiments demonstrated that the proposed algorithm has a better effect compared with the other algorithms.

  7. Decoded fMRI neurofeedback can induce bidirectional confidence changes within single participants

    OpenAIRE

    Cortese, Aurelio; Amano, Kaoru; Koizumi, Ai; Lau, Hakwan; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Neurofeedback studies using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) have recently incorporated the multi-voxel pattern decoding approach, allowing for fMRI to serve as a tool to manipulate fine-grained neural activity embedded in voxel patterns. Because of its tremendous potential for clinical applications, certain questions regarding decoded neurofeedback (DecNef) must be addressed. Specifically, can the same participants learn to induce neural patterns in opposite directio...

  8. Photoacoustic imaging of breast tumor vascularization: a comparison with MRI and histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijblom, Michelle; Piras, Daniele; van den Engh, Frank M.; Klaase, Joost M.; Brinkhuis, Mariël.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among females. Early diagnosis improves the survival chances for the disease and that is why there is an ongoing search for improved methods for visualizing breast cancer. One of the hallmarks of breast cancer is the increase in tumor vascularization that is associated with angiogenesis: a crucial factor for survival of malignancies. Photoacoustic imaging can visualize the malignancyassociated increased hemoglobin concentration with optical contrast and ultrasound resolution, without the use of ionizing radiation or contrast agents and is therefore theoretically an ideal method for breast imaging. Previous clinical studies using the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM), which works in forward mode using a single wavelength (1064 nm), showed that malignancies can indeed be identified in the photoacoustic imaging volume as high contrast areas. However, the specific appearance of the malignancies led to questions about the contrast mechanism in relation to tumor vascularization. In this study, the photoacoustic lesion appearance obtained with an updated version of PAM is compared with the lesion appearance on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), both in general (19 patients) and on an individual basis (7 patients). Further, in 3 patients an extended histopathology protocol is being performed in which malignancies are stained for vascularity using an endothelial antibody: CD31. The correspondence between PAM and MRI and between PAM and histopathology makes it likely that the high photoacoustic contrast at 1064 nm is indeed largely the consequence of the increased tumor vascularization.

  9. MRI quality control: six imagers studied using eleven unified image quality parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihalainen, T.; Sipilae, O.; Savolainen, S.

    2004-01-01

    Quality control of the magnetic resonance imagers of different vendors in the clinical environment is non-harmonised, and comparing the performance is difficult. The purpose of this study was to develop and apply a harmonised long-term quality control protocol for the six imagers in our organisation in order to assure that they fulfil the same basic image quality requirements. The same Eurospin phantom set and identical imaging parameters were used with each imager. Values of 11 comparable parameters describing the image quality were measured. Automatic image analysis software was developed to objectively analyse the images. The results proved that the imagers were operating at a performance level adequate for clinical imaging. Some deficiencies were detected in image uniformity and geometry. The automated analysis of the Eurospin phantom images was successful. The measurements were successfully repeated after 2 weeks on one imager and after half a year on all imagers. As an objective way of examining the image quality, this kind of comparable and objective quality control of different imagers is considered as an essential step towards harmonisation of the clinical MRI studies through a large hospital organisation. (orig.)

  10. Brain activity modification produced by a single radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation pulse: a new tool for neuropsychiatric treatments. Preliminary fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castagna A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Rinaldi1,2, Vania Fontani1, Alessandro Castagna1 1Department of Neuro-Psycho-Physio Pathology, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, Italy; 2Medical School of Occupational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy Purpose: Radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation technology with its treatment protocols has shown efficacy in various psychiatric disorders. The aim of this work was to highlight the mechanisms by which these positive effects are achieved. The current study was conducted to determine whether a single 500-millisecond radioelectric asymmetric conveyor (REAC brain stimulation pulse (BSP, applied to the ear, can effect a modification of brain activity that is detectable using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers, six females and four males, underwent fMRI during a simple finger-tapping motor task before and after receiving a single 500-millisecond REAC-BSP. Results: The fMRI results indicate that the average variation in task-induced encephalic activation patterns is lower in subjects following the single REAC pulse. Conclusion: The current report demonstrates that a single REAC-BSP is sufficient to modulate brain activity in awake subjects, able to be measured using fMRI. These initial results open new perspectives into the understanding of the effects of weak and brief radio pulses upon brain activity, and provide the basis for further indepth studies using REAC-BSP and fMRI. Keywords: fMRI, brain stimulation, brain modulation, REAC, neuropsychiatric treatments

  11. Assessment of MRI Parameters as Imaging Biomarkers for Radiation Necrosis in the Rat Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Silun [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhou Tingting [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Armour, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wen Zhibo [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Radiology, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Fu Dexue [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zijl, Peter C.M. van [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); F. M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Zhou Jinyuan, E-mail: jzhou@mri.jhu.edu [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); F. M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation necrosis is a major complication of radiation therapy. We explore the features of radiation-induced brain necrosis in the rat, using multiple MRI approaches, including T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, apparent diffusion constant (ADC), cerebral blood flow (CBF), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), and amide proton transfer (APT) of endogenous mobile proteins and peptides. Methods and Materials: Adult rats (Fischer 344; n = 15) were irradiated with a single, well-collimated X-ray beam (40 Gy; 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 mm{sup 2}) in the left brain hemisphere. MRI was acquired on a 4.7-T animal scanner at {approx}25 weeks' postradiation. The MRI signals of necrotic cores and perinecrotic regions were assessed with a one-way analysis of variance. Histological evaluation was accomplished with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results: ADC and CBF MRI could separate perinecrotic and contralateral normal brain tissue (p < 0.01 and < 0.05, respectively), whereas T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, MTR, and APT could not. MRI signal intensities were significantly lower in the necrotic core than in normal brain for CBF (p < 0.001) and APT (p < 0.01) and insignificantly higher or lower for T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, MTR, and ADC. Histological results demonstrated coagulative necrosis within the necrotic core and reactive astrogliosis and vascular damage within the perinecrotic region. Conclusion: ADC and CBF are promising imaging biomarkers for identifying perinecrotic regions, whereas CBF and APT are promising for identifying necrotic cores.

  12. Signal to noise comparison of metabolic imaging methods on a clinical 3T MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, C. A.; Hansen, Rie Beck; Skinner, J. G.

    MRI with hyperpolarized tracers has enabled new diagnostic applications, e.g. metabolic imaging in cancer research. However, the acquisition of the transient, hyperpolarized signal with spatial and frequency resolution requires dedicated imaging methods. Here, we compare three promising candidate...

  13. High-resolution T2-weighted cervical cancer imaging : a feasibility study on ultra-high-field 7.0-T MRI with an endorectal monopole antenna

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogendam, Jaap; van Kalleveen, Irene; Arteaga de Castro, Catalina; Raaijmakers, AJE; Verheijen, René H M; van Den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Klomp, DWJ; Zweemer, RP; Veldhuis, Wouter B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We studied the feasibility of high-resolution T2-weighted cervical cancer imaging on an ultra-high-field 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system using an endorectal antenna of 4.7-mm thickness. Methods A feasibility study on 20 stage IB1?IIB cervical cancer patients was conducted. All underwent pre-treatment 1.5-T MRI. At 7.0-T MRI, an external transmit/receive array with seven dipole antennae and a single endorectal monopole receive antenna were used. Discomfort levels were ...

  14. Testing the quality of images for permanent magnet desktop MRI systems using specially designed phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guozhu; Min, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Pengcheng

    2013-12-21

    Our aim was to measure the performance of desktop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems using specially designed phantoms, by testing imaging parameters and analysing the imaging quality. We designed multifunction phantoms with diameters of 18 and 60 mm for desktop MRI scanners in accordance with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report no. 28. We scanned the phantoms with three permanent magnet 0.5 T desktop MRI systems, measured the MRI image parameters, and analysed imaging quality by comparing the data with the AAPM criteria and Chinese national standards. Image parameters included: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and image uniformity. The image parameters of three desktop MRI machines could be measured using our specially designed phantoms, and most parameters were in line with MRI quality control criterion, including: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, image uniformity and slice position accuracy. However, SNR was significantly lower than in some references. The imaging test and quality control are necessary for desktop MRI systems, and should be performed with the applicable phantom and corresponding standards.

  15. Clinical safety of the ProMRI pacemaker system in patients subjected to thoracic spine and cardiac 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging scanning conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, William M; Mazur, Alexander; McCotter, Craig; Woodard, Pamela K; Rosenthal, Lawrence; Johnson, Whitney; Mela, Theofanie

    2016-02-01

    Permanent cardiac pacemakers have historically been considered a contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of the ProMRI Phase B Study, a multicenter, prospective, single-arm, nonrandomized study, was to evaluate the clinical safety of the Biotronik ProMRI pacemaker system in patients undergoing thoracic spine and cardiac MRI. The ProMRI Phase B study enrolled 245 patients with stable baseline pacing indices implanted with an Entovis pacemaker (DR-T or SR-T) and Setrox 53-cm and/or 60-cm lead(s). Device interrogation was performed at enrollment, pre- and post-MRI scan, and 1 and 3 months post-MRI. End-points were (1) freedom from MRI- and pacing system-related serious adverse device effects through 1 month post-MRI; (2) freedom from atrial and ventricular MRI-induced pacing threshold increase (>0.5 V); and (3) freedom from P- and R-wave amplitude attenuation (pacemaker system in patients subjected to thoracic spine and cardiac MRI conditions. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of personal computer image for processing a magnetic resonance image (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    1988-01-01

    Image processing of MR imaging was attempted by using a popular personal computer as 16-bit model. The computer processed the images on a 256 x 256 matrix and 512 x 512 matrix. The softwer languages for image-processing were those of Macro-Assembler performed by (MS-DOS). The original images, acuired with an 0.5 T superconducting machine (VISTA MR 0.5 T, Picker International) were transfered to the computer by the flexible disket. Image process are the display of image to monitor, other the contrast enhancement, the unsharped mask contrast enhancement, the various filter process, the edge detections or the color histogram was obtained in 1.6 sec to 67 sec, indicating that commercialzed personal computer had ability for routine clinical purpose in MRI-processing. (author)

  17. Image Restoration Using Functional and Anatomical Information Fusion with Application to SPECT-MRI Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Benameur

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Image restoration is usually viewed as an ill-posed problem in image processing, since there is no unique solution associated with it. The quality of restored image closely depends on the constraints imposed of the characteristics of the solution. In this paper, we propose an original extension of the NAS-RIF restoration technique by using information fusion as prior information with application in SPECT medical imaging. That extension allows the restoration process to be constrained by efficiently incorporating, within the NAS-RIF method, a regularization term which stabilizes the inverse solution. Our restoration method is constrained by anatomical information extracted from a high resolution anatomical procedure such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. This structural anatomy-based regularization term uses the result of an unsupervised Markovian segmentation obtained after a preliminary registration step between the MRI and SPECT data volumes from each patient. This method was successfully tested on 30 pairs of brain MRI and SPECT acquisitions from different subjects and on Hoffman and Jaszczak SPECT phantoms. The experiments demonstrated that the method performs better, in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, than a classical supervised restoration approach using a Metz filter.

  18. Technique of obstetric pelvimetry by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigmund, G.; Wenz, W.; Bauer, M.; DeGregorio, G.; Henne, K.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRL) allows for the first time direct determination of maternal pelvic dimensions without ionising radiation. Phantom measurements and the correlation with traditional pelvimetric measurements in 10 patients after Caesarean section have shown mean differences of ± 2 mm, with a maximum of 5 mm. The evaluation of pelvic configuration is obtained analogous to the conventional roentgenogram. In addition to conventional or digital X-ray pelvimetry, the soft tissues of the maternal pelvis and the presenting part of the foetus is delineated with high contrast. Positioning in the body coil can be accomplished even late in pregnancy or in impending labour, acceptance by the pregnant women being high. Whereas in a given indication after delivery conventional X-ray pelvimetry continues to be performed, antenatally MRI pelvimetry has now been established in our Departments as the method of choice - based on meanwhile 107 examinations. Present drawbacks are the relatively high cost and the limited availability of MR units. (orig.) [de

  19. Multishot versus single-shot pulse sequences in very high field fMRI: a comparison using retinotopic mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jascha D Swisher

    Full Text Available High-resolution functional MRI is a leading application for very high field (7 Tesla human MR imaging. Though higher field strengths promise improvements in signal-to-noise ratios (SNR and BOLD contrast relative to fMRI at 3 Tesla, these benefits may be partially offset by accompanying increases in geometric distortion and other off-resonance effects. Such effects may be especially pronounced with the single-shot EPI pulse sequences typically used for fMRI at standard field strengths. As an alternative, one might consider multishot pulse sequences, which may lead to somewhat lower temporal SNR than standard EPI, but which are also often substantially less susceptible to off-resonance effects. Here we consider retinotopic mapping of human visual cortex as a practical test case by which to compare examples of these sequence types for high-resolution fMRI at 7 Tesla. We performed polar angle retinotopic mapping at each of 3 isotropic resolutions (2.0, 1.7, and 1.1 mm using both accelerated single-shot 2D EPI and accelerated multishot 3D gradient-echo pulse sequences. We found that single-shot EPI indeed led to greater temporal SNR and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR than the multishot sequences. However, additional distortion correction in postprocessing was required in order to fully realize these advantages, particularly at higher resolutions. The retinotopic maps produced by both sequence types were qualitatively comparable, and showed equivalent test/retest reliability. Thus, when surface-based analyses are planned, or in other circumstances where geometric distortion is of particular concern, multishot pulse sequences could provide a viable alternative to single-shot EPI.

  20. Unsupervised segmentation of MRI knees using image partition forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marčan, Marija; Voiculescu, Irina

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays many people are affected by arthritis, a condition of the joints with limited prevention measures, but with various options of treatment the most radical of which is surgical. In order for surgery to be successful, it can make use of careful analysis of patient-based models generated from medical images, usually by manual segmentation. In this work we show how to automate the segmentation of a crucial and complex joint -- the knee. To achieve this goal we rely on our novel way of representing a 3D voxel volume as a hierarchical structure of partitions which we have named Image Partition Forest (IPF). The IPF contains several partition layers of increasing coarseness, with partitions nested across layers in the form of adjacency graphs. On the basis of a set of properties (size, mean intensity, coordinates) of each node in the IPF we classify nodes into different features. Values indicating whether or not any particular node belongs to the femur or tibia are assigned through node filtering and node-based region growing. So far we have evaluated our method on 15 MRI knee images. Our unsupervised segmentation compared against a hand-segmented gold standard has achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.95 for femur and 0.93 for tibia, and an average symmetric surface distance of 0.98 mm for femur and 0.73 mm for tibia. The paper also discusses ways to introduce stricter morphological and spatial conditioning in the bone labelling process.

  1. Assessing MRI susceptibility artefact through an indicator of image distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Illanes Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility artefacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI caused by medical devices can result in a severe degradation of the MR image quality. The quantification of susceptibility artefacts is regulated by the ASTM standard which defines a manual method to assess the size of an artefact. This means that the estimated artefact size can be user dependent. To cope with this problem, we propose an algorithm to automatically quantify the size of such susceptibility artefacts. The algorithm is based on the analysis of a 3D surface generated from the 2D MR images. The results obtained by the automatic algorithm were compared to the manual measurements performed by study participants. The results show that the automatic and manual measurements follow the same trend. The clear advantage of the automated algorithm is the absence of the inter- and intra-observer variability. In addition, the algorithm also detects the slice containing the largest artefact which was not the case for the manual measurements.

  2. LH-RH agonists modulate amygdala response to visual sexual stimulation: a single case fMRI study in pedophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermeyer, Benedikt; Händel, Nadja; Lemoine, Patrick; Klarhöfer, Markus; Seifritz, Erich; Dittmann, Volker; Graf, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Pedophilia is characterized by a persistent sexual attraction to prepubescent children. Treatment with anti-androgen agents, such as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonists, reduces testosterone levels and thereby sexual drive and arousal. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare visual erotic stimulation pre- and on-treatment with the LH-RH agonist leuprolide acetate in the case of homosexual pedophilia. The pre-treatment contrasts of the erotic pictures against the respective neutral pictures showed an activation of the right amygdala and adjacent parahippocampal gyrus that decreased significantly under treatment with leuprolide acetate. Our single case fMRI study supports the notion that anti-androgens may modify amygdala response to visual erotic stimulation, a hypothesis that should be further examined in larger studies.

  3. Magnetosomes used as biogenic MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of glioblastoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    This work takes place in the context of molecular imaging, which aims at tailoring medical treatments and therapies to the individual context by revealing molecular or cellular phenomenon of medical interest in the less invasive manner. In particular, it can be achieved with MRI molecular imaging using engineered iron-oxide contrast agent.This PhD thesis focuses on the study of a new class of iron-oxide contrast agent for high field MRI. Indeed, magnetosomes are natural iron-oxide vesicles produced by magneto-tactic bacteria. These bacteria synthesized such magnetic vesicles and ordered them like a nano-compass in order to facilitate their navigation in sediments. This explains why magnetosomes are awarded with tremendous magnetic properties: around 50 nm, mono-crystalline, single magnetic domain and high saturation magnetization. Furthermore, a wide variety of bacterial strains exist in nature and size and shape of magnetosomes are highly stable within strain and can be very different between strains. Finally, magnetosomes are naturally coated with a bi-lipidic membrane whose content is genetically determined. Lately, researchers have unravelled magnetosomes membrane protein contents, opening the way to create functionalized magnetosomes thanks to fusion of the gene coding for a protein of interest with the gene coding for an abundant protein at magnetosomes membrane.A new alternative path using living organisms to tackle the production of engineered high efficiency molecular imaging probes have been investigated with magneto-tactic bacteria in this PhD. The production and engineering of magnetosomes have been carried out by our partner, the Laboratoire de Bio-energetique Cellulaire (LBC, CEA Cadarache), and will be presented and discussed. We then characterized magnetosomes as contrast agent for high field MRI. We showed they present very promising contrasting properties in vitro, and assessed this observation in vivo by establishing they can be used as efficient

  4. SU-F-I-16: Short Breast MRI with High-Resolution T2-Weighted and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced T1-Weighted Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J; Son, J; Arun, B; Hazle, J; Hwang, K; Madewell, J; Yang, W; Dogan, B [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, K; Bayram, E [GE Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, Wisconsin (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and demonstrate a short breast (sb) MRI protocol that acquires both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images in approximately ten minutes. Methods: The sb-MRI protocol consists of two novel pulse sequences. The first is a flexible fast spin-echo triple-echo Dixon (FTED) sequence for high-resolution fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging, and the second is a 3D fast dual-echo spoiled gradient sequence (FLEX) for volumetric fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging before and post contrast agent injection. The flexible FTED sequence replaces each single readout during every echo-spacing period of FSE with three fast-switching bipolar readouts to produce three raw images in a single acquisition. These three raw images are then post-processed using a Dixon algorithm to generate separate water-only and fat-only images. The FLEX sequence acquires two echoes using dual-echo readout after each RF excitation and the corresponding images are post-processed using a similar Dixon algorithm to yield water-only and fat-only images. The sb-MRI protocol was implemented on a 3T MRI scanner and used for patients who had undergone concurrent clinical MRI for breast cancer screening. Results: With the same scan parameters (eg, spatial coverage, field of view, spatial and temporal resolution) as the clinical protocol, the total scan-time of the sb-MRI protocol (including the localizer, bilateral T2-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images) was 11 minutes. In comparison, the clinical breast MRI protocol took 43 minutes. Uniform fat suppression and high image quality were consistently achieved by sb-MRI. Conclusion: We demonstrated a sb-MRI protocol comprising both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images can be performed in approximately ten minutes. The spatial and temporal resolution of the images easily satisfies the current breast MRI accreditation guidelines by the American College of Radiology. The protocol has the

  5. MRI imaging of displaced meniscal tears: Report of a case highlighting new potential pitfalls of the MRI signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Abhishek; Brar, Rahat; Rana, Shaleen

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been found to be an excellent imaging tool for meniscal injuries. Various MRI signs have been described to detect displaced meniscal injuries, specifically the bucket-handle tears. Although these signs are quite helpful in diagnosing meniscal tears, various pitfalls have also been reported for these signs. Double anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) sign refers to presence of a linear hypointense soft tissue anterior to the ACL, which represented the flipped bucket-handle tear of the meniscus. Disproportional posterior horn and flipped meniscus signs represent asymmetrically thickened horns of the menisci due to overlying displaced meniscal fragments. We report a case wherein MRI of the knee showed tear and displacement of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and vastus medialis complex, medial collateral ligament (MCL), and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) mimicking these signs. To our knowledge, internally displaced MPFL and MCLs have not been described as mimics for displaced meniscal fragments

  6. MRI imaging of displaced meniscal tears: Report of a case highlighting new potential pitfalls of the MRI signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been found to be an excellent imaging tool for meniscal injuries. Various MRI signs have been described to detect displaced meniscal injuries, specifically the bucket-handle tears. Although these signs are quite helpful in diagnosing meniscal tears, various pitfalls have also been reported for these signs. Double anterior cruciate ligament (ACL sign refers to presence of a linear hypointense soft tissue anterior to the ACL, which represented the flipped bucket-handle tear of the meniscus. Disproportional posterior horn and flipped meniscus signs represent asymmetrically thickened horns of the menisci due to overlying displaced meniscal fragments. We report a case wherein MRI of the knee showed tear and displacement of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL and vastus medialis complex, medial collateral ligament (MCL, and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL mimicking these signs. To our knowledge, internally displaced MPFL and MCLs have not been described as mimics for displaced meniscal fragments.

  7. Decoded fMRI neurofeedback can induce bidirectional confidence changes within single participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Aurelio; Amano, Kaoru; Koizumi, Ai; Lau, Hakwan; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2017-04-01

    Neurofeedback studies using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) have recently incorporated the multi-voxel pattern decoding approach, allowing for fMRI to serve as a tool to manipulate fine-grained neural activity embedded in voxel patterns. Because of its tremendous potential for clinical applications, certain questions regarding decoded neurofeedback (DecNef) must be addressed. Specifically, can the same participants learn to induce neural patterns in opposite directions in different sessions? If so, how does previous learning affect subsequent induction effectiveness? These questions are critical because neurofeedback effects can last for months, but the short- to mid-term dynamics of such effects are unknown. Here we employed a within-subjects design, where participants underwent two DecNef training sessions to induce behavioural changes of opposing directionality (up or down regulation of perceptual confidence in a visual discrimination task), with the order of training counterbalanced across participants. Behavioral results indicated that the manipulation was strongly influenced by the order and the directionality of neurofeedback training. We applied nonlinear mathematical modeling to parametrize four main consequences of DecNef: main effect of change in confidence, strength of down-regulation of confidence relative to up-regulation, maintenance of learning effects, and anterograde learning interference. Modeling results revealed that DecNef successfully induced bidirectional confidence changes in different sessions within single participants. Furthermore, the effect of up- compared to down-regulation was more prominent, and confidence changes (regardless of the direction) were largely preserved even after a week-long interval. Lastly, the effect of the second session was markedly diminished as compared to the effect of the first session, indicating strong anterograde learning interference. These results are interpreted in the framework

  8. Decoded fMRI neurofeedback can induce bidirectional confidence changes within single participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Aurelio; Amano, Kaoru; Koizumi, Ai; Lau, Hakwan; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Neurofeedback studies using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) have recently incorporated the multi-voxel pattern decoding approach, allowing for fMRI to serve as a tool to manipulate fine-grained neural activity embedded in voxel patterns. Because of its tremendous potential for clinical applications, certain questions regarding decoded neurofeedback (DecNef) must be addressed. Specifically, can the same participants learn to induce neural patterns in opposite directions in different sessions? If so, how does previous learning affect subsequent induction effectiveness? These questions are critical because neurofeedback effects can last for months, but the short- to mid-term dynamics of such effects are unknown. Here we employed a within-subjects design, where participants underwent two DecNef training sessions to induce behavioural changes of opposing directionality (up or down regulation of perceptual confidence in a visual discrimination task), with the order of training counterbalanced across participants. Behavioral results indicated that the manipulation was strongly influenced by the order and the directionality of neurofeedback training. We applied nonlinear mathematical modeling to parametrize four main consequences of DecNef: main effect of change in confidence, strength of down-regulation of confidence relative to up-regulation, maintenance of learning effects, and anterograde learning interference. Modeling results revealed that DecNef successfully induced bidirectional confidence changes in different sessions within single participants. Furthermore, the effect of up- compared to down-regulation was more prominent, and confidence changes (regardless of the direction) were largely preserved even after a week-long interval. Lastly, the effect of the second session was markedly diminished as compared to the effect of the first session, indicating strong anterograde learning interference. These results are interpreted in the framework

  9. Electric field imaging of single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Findlay, Scott D.; Kohno, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), single atoms can be imaged by detecting electrons scattered through high angles using post-specimen, annular-type detectors. Recently, it has been shown that the atomic-scale electric field of both the positive atomic nuclei and the surrounding negative electrons within crystalline materials can be probed by atomic-resolution differential phase contrast STEM. Here we demonstrate the real-space imaging of the (projected) atomic electric field distribution inside single Au atoms, using sub-Å spatial resolution STEM combined with a high-speed segmented detector. We directly visualize that the electric field distribution (blurred by the sub-Å size electron probe) drastically changes within the single Au atom in a shape that relates to the spatial variation of total charge density within the atom. Atomic-resolution electric field mapping with single-atom sensitivity enables us to examine their detailed internal and boundary structures. PMID:28555629

  10. Diagnostic imaging of maxillofacial lesions with CT and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, J

    1990-01-01

    Normal anatomy of the maxillofacial regions is clearly shown by both CT and MRI. The use of dental devices causes deterioration in CT and MRI of the tongue and oral floor. A high-resolution bone window display is highly useful in examining bony structures. Contrast CT is useful in diagnosis of tumorous, inflammatory, and vascular lesions. MRI shows the extensions of tumors more clearly than CT, and MRI enhanced with Gd-DTPA is very useful in determining tumor extensions into bony structures. Both CT and MRI should be used in diagnosis of maxillofacial lesions.

  11. Vision 20/20: Simultaneous CT-MRI — Next chapter of multimodality imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ge, E-mail: wangg6@rpi.edu; Xi, Yan; Gjesteby, Lars; Getzin, Matthew; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang [Biomedical Imaging Center/Cluster, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Kalra, Mannudeep; Murugan, Venkatesh [Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Vannier, Michael [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Multimodality imaging systems such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and MRI-PET are widely available, but a simultaneous CT-MRI instrument has not been developed. Synergies between independent modalities, e.g., CT, MRI, and PET/SPECT can be realized with image registration, but such postprocessing suffers from registration errors that can be avoided with synchronized data acquisition. The clinical potential of simultaneous CT-MRI is significant, especially in cardiovascular and oncologic applications where studies of the vulnerable plaque, response to cancer therapy, and kinetic and dynamic mechanisms of targeted agents are limited by current imaging technologies. The rationale, feasibility, and realization of simultaneous CT-MRI are described in this perspective paper. The enabling technologies include interior tomography, unique gantry designs, open magnet and RF sequences, and source and detector adaptation. Based on the experience with PET-CT, PET-MRI, and MRI-LINAC instrumentation where hardware innovation and performance optimization were instrumental to construct commercial systems, the authors provide top-level concepts for simultaneous CT-MRI to meet clinical requirements and new challenges. Simultaneous CT-MRI fills a major gap of modality coupling and represents a key step toward the so-called “omnitomography” defined as the integration of all relevant imaging modalities for systems biology and precision medicine.

  12. Assessing the Accuracy and Reliability of Root Crack and Fracture Detection in Teeth Using Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transform (SWIFT) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurmans, Tyler J.

    -delineated, high-signal (bright/white) line shape(s) that must be visible on multiple contiguous image slices. The line shape(s) must present as: single entities, or parallel pairs in close proximity, or pairs in close proximity exhibiting convergence or divergence extending from the external boundary of the tooth to the pulpal cavity. Intra-rater reliability for MRI was fair-to-almost perfect (kappa = 0.38-1.00) and for CBCT was moderate-to-almost perfect (kappa = 0.66-1.00). Inter-rater reliability for MRI was fair (kappa = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.10-0.31; p Education and training for both imaging modalities is needed to improve reliabilities for the identification of tooth-root crack/fractures. Despite the advantages of increased contrast and absence of artifact from radio-dense materials in MRI, comparable measures of sensitivity and specificity (in relation to CBCT) suggest quality MRI improvements are needed, specifically in image acquisition and post-processing parameters. Given the early stage of technology development and multiple available pathways to optimize MR imaging of teeth, there may be a use for SWIFT MRI in detecting cracks and fractures in teeth.

  13. DW-MRI of liver lesions: Can a single ADC-value represent the entire lesion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid-Tannwald, C.; Dahi, F.; Jiang, Y.; Ivancevic, M.K.; Rist, C.; Sethi, I.; Oommen, J.; Oto, A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate whether focal liver lesions (FLLs) exhibit a homogeneous appearance on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps and whether there is inter-section variation in the calculated ADC values of FLLs (inter-section range). Materials and methods: Eighty-eight patients with 128 FLLs (70 benign, 58 malignant) who underwent abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI were included. Two observers evaluated variation of signal intensity of each FLL within each ADC map image (intra-section) and among different ADC map images through the lesion (inter-section). ADC values of each FLL and neighbouring liver parenchyma were measured on all sections. The inter-section range of FLLs was compared with the neighbouring liver parenchyma. Results: Intra-section inhomogeneity was noted in 39.8% (97/244 sections) and 38.9% (95/244) of benign lesions, and 61% (114/187 sections) and 61.5% (115/187) of malignant lesions, by observer 1 and observer 2, respectively. Inter-section inhomogeneity was noted in 25.7% (18/70) and 27.1% (19/70) of benign lesions, and 51.7% (30/58) and 50% (29/58) of malignant lesions, by observer 1 and observer 2, respectively. The inter-section range for both benign (0.28 × 10 −3  mm²/s) and malignant (0.25 × 10 −3  mm²/s) FLLs were significantly greater than that of liver parenchyma surrounding benign (0.16 × 10 −3  mm²/s, p < 0.001) and malignant (0.14 × 10 −3  mm²/s, p = 0.01) FLLs. Conclusion: Due to intra-/inter-section variations in ADC values of benign and malignant FLLs, a single ADC value may not reliably represent the entire lesion

  14. Comparison of particle image velocimetry and phase contrast MRI in a patient-specific extracardiac total cavopulmonary connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Hiroumi D; Sundareswaran, Kartik S; Teisseyre, Thomas Z; Astary, Garrett W; Parks, W James; Skrinjar, Oskar; Oshinski, John N; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2008-08-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) have not been compared in complex biofluid environments. Such analysis is particularly useful to investigate flow structures in the correction of single ventricle congenital heart defects, where fluid dynamic efficiency is essential. A stereolithographic replica of an extracardiac total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) is studied using PIV and PC-MRI in a steady flow loop. Volumetric two-component PIV is compared to volumetric three-component PC-MRI at various flow conditions. Similar flow structures are observed in both PIV and PC-MRI, where smooth flow dominates the extracardiac TCPC, and superior vena cava flow is preferential to the right pulmonary artery, while inferior vena cava flow is preferential to the left pulmonary artery. Where three-component velocity is available in PC-MRI studies, some helical flow in the extracardiac TCPC is observed. Vessel cross sections provide an effective means of validation for both experiments, and velocity magnitudes are of the same order. The results highlight similarities to validate flow in a complex patient-specific extracardiac TCPC. Additional information obtained by velocity in three components further describes the complexity of the flow in anatomic structures.

  15. Study of human brain functions by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and spectroscopy (fMRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagannathan, N.R.

    1998-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a powerful tool in the detection and assessment of cerebral pathophysiology and the regional mapping and characterization of cognitive processes such as motor skills, vision, language and memory. The results of the effect of motor cortex stimulation during repetitive hand squeezing task activation using in-vivo single voxel NMR spectroscopy carried out on normal volunteer subjects are presented

  16. Imaging children suffering from lymphoma: an evaluation of different {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI protocols compared to whole-body DW-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchner, Julian; Buchbender, Christian; Antoch, Gerald [University Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Dusseldorf (Germany); Deuschl, Cornelius; Schweiger, Bernd; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of different PET/MRI reading protocols, entailing non-enhanced / contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging and whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI for lesion detection and determination of the tumor stage in pediatric lymphoma patients. A total of 28 {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI datasets were included for analysis of four different reading protocols: (1) PET/MRI utilizing sole unenhanced T2w and T1w imaging, (2) PET/MRI utilizing additional contrast enhanced sequences, (3) PET/MR imaging utilizing unenhanced, contrast enhanced and DW imaging or (4) WB-DW-MRI. Statistical analyses were performed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis. Follow-up and prior examinations as well as histopathology served as reference standards. PET/MRI correctly identified all 17 examinations with active lymphoma disease, while WB-DW-MRI correctly identified 15/17 examinations. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy were 96%, 96.5%, 97%, 95%, and 96% for PET/MRI{sub 1}; 97%, 96.5%, 97%, 96.5%, and 97% for PET/MRI{sub 2}; 97%, 96.5%, 97%, 96.5%, and 97% for PET/MRI{sub 3} and 77%, 96%, 96%, 78.5% and 86% for MRI-DWI. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI is superior to WB-DW-MRI in staging pediatric lymphoma patients. Neither application of contrast media nor DWI leads to a noticeable improvement of the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI. Thus, unenhanced PET/MRI may play a crucial role for the diagnostic work-up of pediatric lymphoma patients in the future. (orig.)

  17. Dual isotope, single acquisition parathyroid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantafillou, M.; McDonald, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Medicine parathyroid imaging using Thallium-201(TI) and Technetium-99m(Tc) is an often used imaging modality for the detection of parathyroid adenomas and hyper parathyroidism. The conventional Tl/Tc subtraction technique requires 2 separate injections and acquisitions which are then normalised and subtracted from each other. This lengthy technique is uncomfortable for patients and can result in false positive scan results due to patient movement between and during the acquisition process. We propose a simplified injection and single acquisition technique, that reduces the chance of movement and thus reduces the chance of false positive scan results. The technique involves the injection of Tc followed by the Tl injection 10 minutes later. After a further 10 min wait, imaging is performed using a dual isotope acquisition, with window (W) 1 set on 140 keV 20%W 5% off peak and W2 peaked for 70 keV 20%W., acquired for 10 minutes. We have imaged 27 patients with this technique, 15 had positive parathyroid imaging. Of the 15, 11 had positive ultrasound correlation. Of the remaining 4, 2 have had positive surgical findings for adenomas, the other 2 are awaiting follow-up. Of the 12 patients with negative parathyroid imaging, 2 have been shown to be false - negative with surgery. In conclusion, the single acquisition technique suggested by us is a valid method of imaging parathyroids that reduces the chance of false positive results due to movement

  18. SU-F-J-110: MRI-Guided Single-Session Simulation, Online Adaptation, and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P; Geurts, M; Mittauer, K; Bayouth, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a combined simulation and treatment workflow for MRI-guided radiation therapy using the ViewRay treatment planning and delivery system. Methods: Several features of the ViewRay MRIdian planning and treatment workflows are used to simulate and treat patients that require emergent radiotherapy. A simple “pre-plan” is created on diagnostic imaging retrieved from radiology PACS, where conformal fields are created to target a volume defined by a physician based on review of the diagnostic images and chart notes. After initial consult in radiation oncology, the patient is brought to the treatment room, immobilized, and imaged in treatment position with a volumetric MR. While the patient rests on the table, the pre-plan is applied to the treatment planning MR and dose is calculated in the treatment geometry. After physician review, modification of the plan may include updating the target definition, redefining fields, or re-balancing beam weights. Once an acceptable treatment plan is finalized and approved, the patient is treated. Results: Careful preparation and judicious choices in the online planning process allow conformal treatment plans to be created and delivered in a single, thirty-minute session. Several advantages have been identified using this process as compared to conventional urgent CT simulation and delivery. Efficiency gains are notable, as physicians appreciate the predictable time commitment and patient waiting time for treatment is decreased. MR guidance in a treatment position offers both enhanced contrast for target delineation and reduction of setup uncertainties. The MRIdian system tools designed for adaptive radiotherapy are particularly useful, enabling plan changes to be made in minutes. Finally, the resulting plans, typically 6 conformal beams, are delivered as quickly as more conventional AP/PA beam arrangements with comparatively superior dose distributions. Conclusion: The ViewRay treatment planning software and

  19. An MRI system for imaging neonates in the NICU: initial feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkach, Jean A.; Loew, Wolfgang; Pratt, Ron G.; Daniels, Barret R.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Winter, Patrick M.; Li, Yu; Dumoulin, Charles L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Hillman, Noah H.; Jobe, Alan H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Merhar, Stephanie L.; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A. [Perinatal Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Kline-Fath, Beth M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Transporting premature infants from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to a radiology department for MRI has medical risks and logistical challenges. To develop a small 1.5-T MRI system for neonatal imaging that can be easily installed in the NICU and to evaluate its performance using a sheep model of human prematurity. A 1.5-T MRI system designed for orthopedic use was adapted for neonatal imaging. The system was used for MRI examinations of the brain, chest and abdomen in 12 premature lambs during the first hours of life. Spin-echo, fast spin-echo and gradient-echo MR images were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists. All animals remained physiologically stable throughout the imaging sessions. Animals were imaged at two or three time points. Seven brain MRI examinations were performed in seven different animals, 23 chest examinations in 12 animals and 19 abdominal examinations in 11 animals. At each anatomical location, high-quality images demonstrating good spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and tissue contrast were routinely obtained within 30 min using standard clinical protocols. Our preliminary experience demonstrates the feasibility and potential of the neonatal MRI system to provide state-of-the-art MRI capabilities within the NICU. Advantages include overall reduced cost and site demands, lower acoustic noise, improved ease of access and reduced medical risk to the neonate. (orig.)

  20. The OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Scoring System: Updated Recommendations by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Peterfy, Charles G; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Glinatsi, Daniel; Eshed, Iris; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Lillegraven, Siri; Bøyesen, Pernille; Ejbjerg, Bo; Foltz, Violaine; Emery, Paul; Genant, Harry K; Conaghan, Philip G

    2017-11-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scoring system (RAMRIS), evaluating bone erosion, bone marrow edema/osteitis, and synovitis, was introduced in 2002, and is now the standard method of objectively quantifying inflammation and damage by MRI in RA trials. The objective of this paper was to identify subsequent advances and based on them, to provide updated recommendations for the RAMRIS. MRI studies relevant for RAMRIS and technical and scientific advances were analyzed by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group, which used these data to provide updated considerations on image acquisition, RAMRIS definitions, and scoring systems for the original and new RA pathologies. Further, a research agenda was outlined. Since 2002, longitudinal studies and clinical trials have documented RAMRIS variables to have face, construct, and criterion validity; high reliability and sensitivity to change; and the ability to discriminate between therapies. This has enabled RAMRIS to demonstrate inhibition of structural damage progression with fewer patients and shorter followup times than has been possible with conventional radiography. Technical improvements, including higher field strengths and improved pulse sequences, allow higher image resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio. These have facilitated development and validation of scoring methods of new pathologies: joint space narrowing and tenosynovitis. These have high reproducibility and moderate sensitivity to change, and can be added to RAMRIS. Combined scores of inflammation or joint damage may increase sensitivity to change and discriminative power. However, this requires further research. Updated 2016 RAMRIS recommendations and a research agenda were developed.

  1. Multimodal in vivo MRI and NIRF imaging of bladder tumor using peptide conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Jaehong; Dhawan, Deepika; Knapp, Deborah W.; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Choi, Kuiwon; Leary, James F.

    2012-03-01

    Exact detection and complete removal of cancer is a key point to minimize cancer recurrence. However, it is currently very difficult to detect small tumors inside human body and continuously monitor tumors using a non-invasive imaging modality. Presently, positron emission tomography (PET) can provide the most sensitive cancer images in the human body. However, PET imaging has very limited imaging time because they typically use isotopes with short halflives. PET imaging cannot also visualize anatomical information. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide highresolution images inside the body but it has a low sensitivity, so MRI contrast agents are necessary to enhance the contrast of tumor. Near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging has a good sensitivity to visualize tumor using optical probes, but it has a very limited tissue penetration depth. Therefore, we developed multi-modality nanoparticles for MRI based diagnosis and NIRF imaging based surgery of cancer. We utilized glycol chitosan of 350 nm as a vehicle for MRI contrast agents and NIRF probes. The glycol chitosan nanoparticles were conjugated with NIRF dye, Cy5.5 and bladder cancer targeting peptides to increase the internalization of cancer. For MR contrast effects, iron oxide based 22 nm nanocubes were physically loaded into the glycol chitosan nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized and evaluated in bladder tumor bearing mice. Our study suggests the potential of our nanoparticles by both MRI and NIRF imaging for tumor diagnosis and real-time NIRF image-guided tumor surgery.

  2. Comparison between target magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in-gantry and cognitively directed transperineal or transrectal-guided prostate biopsies for Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) 3-5 MRI lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaxley, Anna J; Yaxley, John W; Thangasamy, Isaac A; Ballard, Emma; Pokorny, Morgan R

    2017-11-01

    To compare the detection rates of prostate cancer (PCa) in men with Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) 3-5 abnormalities on 3-Tesla multiparametric (mp) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using in-bore MRI-guided biopsy compared with cognitively directed transperineal (cTP) biopsy and transrectal ultrasonography (cTRUS) biopsy. This was a retrospective single-centre study of consecutive men attending the private practice clinic of an experienced urologist performing MRI-guided biopsy and an experienced urologist performing cTP and cTRUS biopsy techniques for PI-RADS 3-5 lesions identified on 3-Tesla mpMRI. There were 595 target mpMRI lesions from 482 men with PI-RADS 3-5 regions of interest during 483 episodes of biopsy. The abnormal mpMRI target lesion was biopsied using the MRI-guided method for 298 biopsies, the cTP method for 248 biopsies and the cTRUS method for 49 biopsies. There were no significant differences in PCa detection among the three biopsy methods in PI-RADS 3 (48.9%, 40.0% and 44.4%, respectively), PI-RADS 4 (73.2%, 81.0% and 85.0%, respectively) or PI-RADS 5 (95.2, 92.0% and 95.0%, respectively) lesions, and there was no significant difference in detection of significant PCa among the biopsy methods in PI-RADS 3 (42.2%, 30.0% and 33.3%, respectively), PI-RADS 4 (66.8%, 66.0% and 80.0%, respectively) or PI-RADS 5 (90.5%, 89.8% and 90.0%, respectively) lesions. There were also no differences in PCa or significant PCa detection based on lesion location or size among the methods. We found no significant difference in the ability to detect PCa or significant PCa using targeted MRI-guided, cTP or cTRUS biopsy methods. Identification of an abnormal area on mpMRI appears to be more important in increasing the detection of PCa than the technique used to biopsy an MRI abnormality. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Phase-encoded MRI for geometrically undistorted imaging and signal characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorp, JS

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a versatile diagnostic modality that has earned its place in clinical practice all over the world. MRI delivers excellent soft-tissue contrast that can be utilized to detect disease and measure physiological properties in a non-invasive manner. As long as the main

  4. Prospective MR image alignment between breath-holds: Application to renal BOLD MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalis, Inge M; Pilutti, David; Krafft, Axel J; Hennig, Jürgen; Bock, Michael

    2017-04-01

    To present an image registration method for renal blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) measurements that enables semiautomatic assessment of parenchymal and medullary R2* changes under a functional challenge. In a series of breath-hold acquisitions, three-dimensional data were acquired initially for prospective image registration of subsequent BOLD measurements. An algorithm for kidney alignment for BOLD renal imaging (KALIBRI) was implemented to detect the positions of the left and right kidney so that the kidneys were acquired in the subsequent BOLD measurement at consistent anatomical locations. Residual in-plane distortions were corrected retrospectively so that semiautomatic dynamic R2* measurements of the renal cortex and medulla become feasible. KALIBRI was tested in six healthy volunteers during a series of BOLD experiments, which included a 600- to 1000-mL water challenge. Prospective image registration and BOLD imaging of each kidney was achieved within a total measurement time of about 17 s, enabling its execution within a single breath-hold. KALIBRI improved the registration by up to 35% as found with mutual information measures. In four volunteers, a medullary R2* decrease of up to 40% was observed after water ingestion. KALIBRI improves the quality of two-dimensional time-resolved renal BOLD MRI by aligning local renal anatomy, which allows for consistent R2* measurements over many breath-holds. Magn Reson Med 77:1573-1582, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Indications and value of bone scintigraphy in comparison to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haug, A.; Hacker, M.; Weiss, M.; Hahn, K.; Pfluger, T.

    2006-01-01

    With increasing use of cross-sectional imaging (CT/MRI) in radiology as well as PET and PET/CT in nuclear medicine, remaining indications for bone scintigraphy are in question. Recently introduced whole-body MRI represents an attractive alternative to bone scintigraphy, as MRI is additionally able to assess lesions that are limited to bone marrow and are located extraosseously. In this overview, indication-related strengths and limitations of MRI and bone scintigraphy are presented and discussed. Furthermore, complementary use of both modalities for special clinical questions is demonstrated. (orig.)

  6. Can multi-slice or navigator-gated R2* MRI replace single-slice breath-hold acquisition for hepatic iron quantification?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeffler, Ralf B.; McCarville, M.B.; Song, Ruitian; Hillenbrand, Claudia M. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States); Wagstaff, Anne W. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States); Rhodes College, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL (United States); Smeltzer, Matthew P. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Memphis, Division of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Memphis, TN (United States); Krafft, Axel J. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States); University Hospital Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Hankins, Jane S. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Hematology, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Liver R2* values calculated from multi-gradient echo (mGRE) magnetic resonance images (MRI) are strongly correlated with hepatic iron concentration (HIC) as shown in several independently derived biopsy calibration studies. These calibrations were established for axial single-slice breath-hold imaging at the location of the portal vein. Scanning in multi-slice mode makes the exam more efficient, since whole-liver coverage can be achieved with two breath-holds and the optimal slice can be selected afterward. Navigator echoes remove the need for breath-holds and allow use in sedated patients. To evaluate if the existing biopsy calibrations can be applied to multi-slice and navigator-controlled mGRE imaging in children with hepatic iron overload, by testing if there is a bias-free correlation between single-slice R2* and multi-slice or multi-slice navigator controlled R2*. This study included MRI data from 71 patients with transfusional iron overload, who received an MRI exam to estimate HIC using gradient echo sequences. Patient scans contained 2 or 3 of the following imaging methods used for analysis: single-slice images (n = 71), multi-slice images (n = 69) and navigator-controlled images (n = 17). Small and large blood corrected region of interests were selected on axial images of the liver to obtain R2* values for all data sets. Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis were used to compare R2* values from single-slice images to those of multi-slice images and navigator-controlled images. Bland-Altman analysis showed that all imaging method comparisons were strongly associated with each other and had high correlation coefficients (0.98 ≤ r ≤ 1.00) with P-values ≤0.0001. Linear regression yielded slopes that were close to 1. We found that navigator-gated or breath-held multi-slice R2* MRI for HIC determination measures R2* values comparable to the biopsy-validated single-slice, single breath-hold scan. We conclude that these three R2* methods can be

  7. Can multi-slice or navigator-gated R2* MRI replace single-slice breath-hold acquisition for hepatic iron quantification?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, Ralf B.; McCarville, M.B.; Song, Ruitian; Hillenbrand, Claudia M.; Wagstaff, Anne W.; Smeltzer, Matthew P.; Krafft, Axel J.; Hankins, Jane S.

    2017-01-01

    Liver R2* values calculated from multi-gradient echo (mGRE) magnetic resonance images (MRI) are strongly correlated with hepatic iron concentration (HIC) as shown in several independently derived biopsy calibration studies. These calibrations were established for axial single-slice breath-hold imaging at the location of the portal vein. Scanning in multi-slice mode makes the exam more efficient, since whole-liver coverage can be achieved with two breath-holds and the optimal slice can be selected afterward. Navigator echoes remove the need for breath-holds and allow use in sedated patients. To evaluate if the existing biopsy calibrations can be applied to multi-slice and navigator-controlled mGRE imaging in children with hepatic iron overload, by testing if there is a bias-free correlation between single-slice R2* and multi-slice or multi-slice navigator controlled R2*. This study included MRI data from 71 patients with transfusional iron overload, who received an MRI exam to estimate HIC using gradient echo sequences. Patient scans contained 2 or 3 of the following imaging methods used for analysis: single-slice images (n = 71), multi-slice images (n = 69) and navigator-controlled images (n = 17). Small and large blood corrected region of interests were selected on axial images of the liver to obtain R2* values for all data sets. Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis were used to compare R2* values from single-slice images to those of multi-slice images and navigator-controlled images. Bland-Altman analysis showed that all imaging method comparisons were strongly associated with each other and had high correlation coefficients (0.98 ≤ r ≤ 1.00) with P-values ≤0.0001. Linear regression yielded slopes that were close to 1. We found that navigator-gated or breath-held multi-slice R2* MRI for HIC determination measures R2* values comparable to the biopsy-validated single-slice, single breath-hold scan. We conclude that these three R2* methods can be

  8. Modeling decision-making in single- and multi-modal medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canosa, R. L.; Baum, K. G.

    2009-02-01

    This research introduces a mode-specific model of visual saliency that can be used to highlight likely lesion locations and potential errors (false positives and false negatives) in single-mode PET and MRI images and multi-modal fused PET/MRI images. Fused-modality digital images are a relatively recent technological improvement in medical imaging; therefore, a novel component of this research is to characterize the perceptual response to these fused images. Three different fusion techniques were compared to single-mode displays in terms of observer error rates using synthetic human brain images generated from an anthropomorphic phantom. An eye-tracking experiment was performed with naÃve (non-radiologist) observers who viewed the single- and multi-modal images. The eye-tracking data allowed the errors to be classified into four categories: false positives, search errors (false negatives never fixated), recognition errors (false negatives fixated less than 350 milliseconds), and decision errors (false negatives fixated greater than 350 milliseconds). A saliency model consisting of a set of differentially weighted low-level feature maps is derived from the known error and ground truth locations extracted from a subset of the test images for each modality. The saliency model shows that lesion and error locations attract visual attention according to low-level image features such as color, luminance, and texture.

  9. Defining active sacroiliitis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for classification of axial spondyloarthritis: a consensual approach by the ASAS/OMERACT MRI group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudwaleit, M.; Jurik, A. G.; Hermann, K.-G. A.; Landewé, R.; van der Heijde, D.; Baraliakos, X.; Marzo-Ortega, H.; Ostergaard, M.; Braun, J.; Sieper, J.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of sacroiliac joints has evolved as the most relevant imaging modality for diagnosis and classification of early axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) including early ankylosing spondylitis. To identify and describe MRI findings in sacroiliitis and to reach consensus on

  10. A study on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based radiation treatment planning of intracranial lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu, T.; Jans, H.-S.; Pervez, N.; Stavrev, P.; Fallone, B. G.

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based treatment planning procedure for intracranial lesions. The method relies on (a) distortion correction of raw magnetic resonance (MR) images by using an adaptive thresholding and iterative technique, (b) autosegmentation of head structures relevant to dosimetric calculations (scalp, bone and brain) using an atlas-based software and (c) conversion of MR images into computed tomography (CT)-like images by assigning bulk CT values to organ contours and dose calculations performed in Eclipse (Philips Medical Systems). Standard CT + MRI-based and MRI-only plans were compared by means of isodose distributions, dose volume histograms and several dosimetric parameters. The plans were also ranked by using a tumor control probability (TCP)-based technique for heterogeneous irradiation, which is independent of radiobiological parameters. For our 3 T Intera MRI scanner (Philips Medical Systems), we determined that the total maximum image distortion corresponding to a typical brain study was about 4 mm. The CT + MRI and MRI-only plans were found to be in good agreement for all patients investigated. Following our clinical criteria, the TCP-based ranking tool shows no significant difference between the two types of plans. This indicates that the proposed MRI-based treatment planning procedure is suitable for the radiotherapy of intracranial lesions.

  11. Functional and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation after single-tendon rotator cuff reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, H B; Gelineck, J; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate tendon integrity after surgical repair of single-tendon rotator cuff lesions. In 31 patients, 31 single-tendon repairs were evaluated. Thirty-one patients were available for clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at follow-up. A standard...... series of MR images was obtained for each. The results of functional assessment were scored according to the system of Constant. According to MRI evaluation, 21 (68%) patients had an intact or thinned rotator cuff and 10 (32%) had recurrence of a full-thickness cuff defect at follow-up. Patients...... with an intact or thinned rotator cuff had a median Constant score of 75.5 points; patients with a full-thickness cuff defect had a median score of 62 points. There was no correlation between tendon integrity on postoperative MR images and functional outcome. Patients with intact or thinned cuffs did not have...

  12. DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, and MRS in Cancer: Challenges and Advantages of Implementing Qualitative and Quantitative Multi-parametric Imaging in the Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, Jessica M.; Payne, Geoffrey S.; Weller, Alex; deSouza, Nandita M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) offers a unique insight into tumor biology by combining functional MRI techniques that inform on cellularity (diffusion-weighted MRI), vascular properties (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), and metabolites (magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and has scope to provide valuable information for prognostication and response assessment. Challenges in the application of mpMRI in the clinic include the technical considerations in acquiring good quality functional MRI data, development of robust techniques for analysis, and clinical interpretation of the results. This article summarizes the technical challenges in acquisition and analysis of multi-parametric MRI data before reviewing the key applications of multi-parametric MRI in clinical research and practice. PMID:27748710

  13. Structural Image Analysis of the Brain in Neuropsychology Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain provides exceptional image quality for visualization and neuroanatomical classification of brain structure. A variety of image analysis techniques provide both qualitative as well as quantitative methods to relate brain structure with neuropsychological outcome and are reviewed herein. Of particular importance are more automated methods that permit analysis of a broad spectrum of anatomical measures including volume, thickness and shape. The challenge for neuropsychology is which metric to use, for which disorder and the timing of when image analysis methods are applied to assess brain structure and pathology. A basic overview is provided as to the anatomical and pathoanatomical relations of different MRI sequences in assessing normal and abnormal findings. Some interpretive guidelines are offered including factors related to similarity and symmetry of typical brain development along with size-normalcy features of brain anatomy related to function. The review concludes with a detailed example of various quantitative techniques applied to analyzing brain structure for neuropsychological outcome studies in traumatic brain injury.

  14. Multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Li, Ziwei; Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-22

    Existing multispectral imagers mostly use available array sensors to separately measure 2D data slices in a 3D spatial-spectral data cube. Thus they suffer from low photon efficiency, limited spectrum range and high cost. To address these issues, we propose to conduct multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector, to take full advantage of its high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost, small size and light weight. Technically, utilizing the detector's fast response, a scene's 3D spatial-spectral information is multiplexed into a dense 1D measurement sequence and then demultiplexed computationally under the single pixel imaging scheme. A proof-of-concept setup is built to capture multispectral data of 64 pixels × 64 pixels × 10 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 650 nm, with the acquisition time being 1 minute. The imaging scheme holds great potentials for various low light and airborne applications, and can be easily manufactured as production-volume portable multispectral imagers.

  15. Diffusion Weighted/Tensor Imaging, Functional MRI and Perfusion Weighted Imaging in Glioblastoma—Foundations and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayle R. Salama

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we review the basics of diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI, their current utility in preoperative neurosurgical mapping, and their limitations. We also discuss potential future applications, including implementation of resting state functional MRI. We then discuss perfusion and diffusion-weighted imaging and their application in advanced neuro-oncologic practice. We explain how these modalities can be helpful in guiding surgical biopsies and differentiating recurrent tumor from treatment related changes.

  16. DEEP IMPACT 9P/TEMPEL ENCOUNTER - REDUCED MRI IMAGES V3.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains calibrated images of comet 9P/Tempel 1 acquired by the Medium Resolution Instrument Visible CCD (MRI) from 01 May through 06 July 2005 during...

  17. EPOXI C/GARRADD (2009 P1) - MRI CALIBRATED IMAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains calibrated clear-filter, C2, CN, OH and dust continuum images of comet C/Garradd (2009 P1) acquired by the Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI)...

  18. EPOXI C/GARRADD (2009 P1) - MRI RAW IMAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains Raw clear-filter, C2, CN, OH and dust continuum images of comet C/Garradd (2009 P1) acquired by the Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI) from 20...

  19. EPOXI 103P/HARTLEY2 ENCOUNTER - MRI RAW IMAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains raw images of comet 103/P Hartley 2 acquired by the Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI) from 05 September through 26 November 2010 during the...

  20. EPOXI 103P/HARTLEY2 ENCOUNTER - MRI CALIBRATED IMAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains calibrated images of comet 103/P Hartley 2 acquired by the Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI) from 05 September through 26 November 2010...

  1. EPOXI C/ISON (2012 S1) - MRI RAW IMAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains raw clear-filter, CN, OH and dust continuum images of comet C/ISON (2012 S1) acquired by the Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI) from 17...

  2. EPOXI C/ISON (2012 S1) - MRI CALIBRATED IMAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains calibrated clear-filter, CN, OH and dust continuum images of comet C/ISON (2012 S1) acquired by the Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI) from 17...

  3. Reducing sedation for pediatric body MRI using accelerated and abbreviated imaging protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Hu, Houchun Harry; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established diagnostic imaging tool for investigating pediatric disease. MRI allows assessment of structure, function, and morphology in cardiovascular imaging, as well as tissue characterization in body imaging, without the use of ionizing radiation. For MRI in children, sedation and general anesthesia (GA) are often utilized to suppress patient motion, which can otherwise compromise image quality and diagnostic efficacy. However, evidence is emerging that use of sedation and GA in children might have long-term neurocognitive side effects, in addition to the short-term procedure-related risks. These concerns make risk-benefit assessment of sedation and GA more challenging. Therefore, reducing or eliminating the need for sedation and GA is an important goal of imaging innovation and research in pediatric MRI. In this review, the authors focus on technical and clinical approaches to reducing and eliminating the use of sedation in the pediatric population based on image acquisition acceleration and imaging protocols abbreviation. This paper covers important physiological and technical considerations for pediatric body MR imaging and discusses MRI techniques that offer the potential of recovering diagnostic-quality images from accelerated scans. In this review, the authors also introduce the concept of reporting elements for important indications for pediatric body MRI and use this as a basis for abbreviating the MR protocols. By employing appropriate accelerated and abbreviated approaches based on an understanding of the imaging needs and reporting elements for a given clinical indication, it is possible to reduce sedation and GA for pediatric chest, cardiovascular and abdominal MRI. (orig.)

  4. Imaging of tautomerism in a single molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwoński, Hubert; Stupperich, Clemens; Hartschuh, Achim; Sepioł, Jerzy; Meixner, Alfred; Waluk, Jacek

    2005-04-20

    Fluorescence imaging is used to visualize directly the transfer of two inner hydrogen atoms in single porphycene molecules. This reaction leads to a chemically equivalent but differently oriented structure and hence results in a rotation of the transition dipole moments. By probing single immobilized molecules with an azimuthally polarized laser beam in the focal spot of a confocal microscope we observe ring-like emission patterns, possible only for a chromophore with two nearly orthogonal transition dipole moments. Numerical simulations of the observed emission patterns yield a value of 72 degrees for the angle between the S0-S1 transition moments in the two tautomeric forms.

  5. Assessing motor, visual and language function using a single 5-minute fMRI paradigm: three birds with one stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Simona; Zendler, Carolin; Hauser, Till-Karsten; Lidzba, Karen; Wilke, Marko

    2018-02-26

    Clinical functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) requires inferences on localization of major brain functions at the individual subject level. We hypothesized that a single "triple use" task would satisfy sensitivity and reliability requirements for successfully assessing the motor, visual and language domain in this context. This was tested here by the application in a group of healthy adults, assessing sensitivity and reliability at the individual subject level, separately for each domain.Our "triple use" task consisted of 2 conditions (condition 1, assessing motor and visual domain, and condition 2, assessing the language domain), serving mutually as active/control. We included 20 healthy adult subjects. Random effect analyses showed activation in primary motor, visual and language regions, as expected. Less expected regions were activated both for the motor and visual domains. Further, reliability of primary activation patterns was very high across individual subjects, with activation seen in 70-100% of subjects in primary motor, visual, and left-lateralized language regions.These findings suggest the "triple use" task to be reliable at the individual subject's level to assess motor, visual and language domains in the clinical fMRI context. Benefits of such an approach include shortening of acquisition time, simplicity of the task for each domain, and using a visual stimulus. Following establishment of reliability in adults, the task may also be a valuable addition in the pediatric clinical fMRI context, where each of these factors is of high relevance.

  6. An introduction to the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Edmonds, J; McQueen, F

    2005-01-01

    This article gives a short overview of the development and characteristics of the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI scoring system (RAMRIS), followed by an introduction to the use of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. With this atlas, MRIs of wrist and metacarpophala...... and metacarpophalangeal joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis can be scored for synovitis, bone oedema, and bone erosion, guided by standard reference images...

  7. Automatic delineation of brain regions on MRI and PET images from the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Jonas; Hansen, Hanne D; Jørgensen, Louise M

    2018-01-01

    : Manual inter-modality spatial normalization to a MRI atlas is operator-dependent, time-consuming, and can be inaccurate with lack of cortical radiotracer binding or skull uptake. NEW METHOD: A parcellated PET template that allows for automatic spatial normalization to PET images of any radiotracer......BACKGROUND: The increasing use of the pig as a research model in neuroimaging requires standardized processing tools. For example, extraction of regional dynamic time series from brain PET images requires parcellation procedures that benefit from being automated. COMPARISON WITH EXISTING METHODS....... RESULTS: MRI and [11C]Cimbi-36 PET scans obtained in sixteen pigs made the basis for the atlas. The high resolution MRI scans allowed for creation of an accurately averaged MRI template. By aligning the within-subject PET scans to their MRI counterparts, an averaged PET template was created in the same...

  8. Ecological nuances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI): psychological stressors, posture, and hydrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Amir; Lieber, Baruch; Soliman, Fatima; Buhle, Jason; Posner, Jonathan; Peterson, Bradley S; Posner, Michael I

    2005-03-01

    Brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have forged an impressive link between psychology and neuroscience. Whereas most experiments in cognitive psychology require participants to perform while sitting upright in front of display devices, fMRI obliges participants to perform cognitive tasks while lying supine and motionless inside a narrow bore. In addition to introducing psychological and physical stressors, such as loud thumps and head restraints, fMRI procedures also alter brain hydrostatics. The ecological factors associated with current fMRI technology, such as supine posture, may skew cognitive processing and influence hemodynamic and electrophysiological measurements, especially in extreme age groups and pathological populations. Recognizing the central role of fMRI in unraveling the neural mechanisms of cognition, we outline ways to address these limitations.

  9. Tunable and noncytotoxic PET/SPECT-MRI multimodality imaging probes using colloidally stable ligand-free superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, TH Nguyen; Lengkeek, Nigel A; Greguric, Ivan; Kim, Byung J; Pellegrini, Paul A; Bickley, Stephanie A; Tanudji, Marcel R; Jones, Stephen K; Hawkett, Brian S; Pham, Binh TT

    2017-01-01

    Physiologically stable multimodality imaging probes for positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography (PET/SPECT)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were synthesized using the superparamagnetic maghemite iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles (SPIONs). The SPIONs were sterically stabilized with a finely tuned mixture of diblock copolymers with either methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG) or primary amine NH2 end groups. The radioisotope for PET or SPECT imaging was incorporated with the SPIONs at high temperature. 57Co2+ ions with a long half-life of 270.9 days were used as a model for the radiotracer to study the kinetics of radiolabeling, characterization, and the stability of the radiolabeled SPIONs. Radioactive 67Ga3+ and Cu2+-labeled SPIONs were also produced successfully using the optimized conditions from the 57Co2+-labeling process. No free radioisotopes were detected in the aqueous phase for the radiolabeled SPIONs 1 week after dispersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). All labeled SPIONs were not only well dispersed and stable under physiological conditions but also noncytotoxic in vitro. The ability to design and produce physiologically stable radiolabeled magnetic nanoparticles with a finely controlled number of functionalizable end groups on the SPIONs enables the generation of a desirable and biologically compatible multimodality PET/SPECT-MRI agent on a single T2 contrast MRI probe. PMID:28184160

  10. Design and implementation of a simple multinuclear MRI system for ultra high-field imaging of animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang-Hoon; Ha, YongHyun; Veeraiah, Pandichelvam; Felder, Jörg; Möllenhoff, Klaus; Shah, N. Jon

    2016-12-01

    Non-proton MRI has recently garnered gathering interest with the increased availability of ultra high-field MRI system. Assuming the availability of a broadband RF amplifier, performing multinuclear MR experiments essentially requires additional hardware, such as an RF resonator and a T/R switch for each nucleus. A double- or triple-resonant RF probe is typically constructed using traps or PIN-diode circuits, but this approach degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image quality compared to a single-resonant coil and this is a limiting factor. In this work, we have designed the required hardware for multinuclear MR imaging experiments employing six single-resonant coil sets and a purpose-built animal bed; these have been implemented into a home-integrated 9.4 T preclinical MRI scanner. System capabilities are demonstrated by distinguishing concentration differences and sensitivity of X-nuclei imaging and spectroscopy without SNR penalty for any nuclei, no subject interruption and no degradation of the static shim conditions.

  11. MRI-based elastic-mapping method for inter-subject comparison of brain FDG-PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Huang, S.C.; Lin, K.P.; Small, G.; Phelps, M.E. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Inter-subject anatomic differences prohibits direct image-wise statistical evaluation of brain FDG-PET images of Alzheimer`s disease (AD) patients. In this study, we propose a MRI-based elastic-mapping method which enables image-wise evaluation. The method involves intra-subject MR-PET registration, 3-D elastic mapping of two set of MR images, and elastically transforming the co-registered PET images. The MR-PET registration used simulated PET images, which were based on segmentation of MR images. In the 3-D elastic mapping stage, first a global linear scaling was applied to compensate for brain size difference, then a deformation field was obtained by minimizing the regional sum of squared difference between the two sets of MR images. Two groups (AD patient and normal control), each with three subjects, were included in the current study. After processing, images from all subjects have similar shapes. Averaging the images across all subjects (either within the individual group or for both groups) give images indistinguishable from original single subject FDG images (i.e. without much spatial resolution loss), except with lower image noise level. The method is expected to allow statistical image-wise analysis to be performed across different subjects.

  12. Image artifacts from MR-based attenuation correction in clinical, whole-body PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Holm, Søren; Hansen, Adam E

    2013-01-01

    Integrated whole-body PET/MRI tomographs have become available. PET/MR imaging has the potential to supplement, or even replace combined PET/CT imaging in selected clinical indications. However, this is true only if methodological pitfalls and image artifacts arising from novel MR-based attenuation...

  13. The development of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bird, P; Conaghan, P; Ejbjerg, B

    2005-01-01

    Based on a previously developed rheumatoid arthritis MRI scoring system (OMERACT 2002 RAMRIS), the development team agreed which joints, MRI features, MRI sequences, and image planes would best illustrate the scoring system in an atlas. After collecting representative examples for all grades for ......) was extracted. These images were then re-read by the group at a different time point to confirm the scores originally assigned. Finally, all selected images were photographed and formatted by one centre and distributed to all readers for final approval.......Based on a previously developed rheumatoid arthritis MRI scoring system (OMERACT 2002 RAMRIS), the development team agreed which joints, MRI features, MRI sequences, and image planes would best illustrate the scoring system in an atlas. After collecting representative examples for all grades...... for each abnormality (synovitis, bone oedema, and bone erosion), the team met for a three day period to review the images and choose by consensus the most illustrative set for each feature, site, and grade. A predefined subset of images (for example, for erosion—all coronal slices through the bone...

  14. MRI of the scrotum. Recommendations of the ESUR Scrotal and Penile Imaging Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsili, Athina C.; Ntorkou, Alexandra [University of Ioannina, Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Bertolotto, Michele [Uco di Radiologia, Trieste Univ. (Italy); Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay [Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Dogra, Vikram [University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Imaging Sciences, Rochester, NY (United States); Freeman, Simon [Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Rocher, Laurence [Hopitaux Universitaires Paris Sud, APHP, Ecole Doctorale Biosigne, Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Belfield, Jane [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Studniarek, Michal [Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk (Poland); Derchi, Lorenzo E. [Universita di Genova, Genova (Italy); Oyen, Raymond [KU Leuven, Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Ramchandani, Parvati [Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Secil, Mustafa [Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Izmir (Turkey); Richenberg, Jonathan [Royal Sussex County Hospital Brighton and Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2018-01-15

    The Scrotal and Penile Imaging Working Group (SPI-WG) appointed by the board of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has produced recommendations for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the scrotum. The SPI-WG searched for original and review articles published before September 2016 using the Pubmed and Medline databases. Keywords used were 'magnetic resonance imaging', 'testis or testicle or testicular', 'scrotum', 'intratesticular', 'paratesticular', 'extratesticular' 'diffusion-weighted', 'dynamic MRI'. Consensus was obtained among the members of the subcommittee. The expert panel proposed recommendations using Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine 2011 Levels of Evidence. The recommended MRI protocol should include T1-, T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Scrotal MRI can be clinically applied for lesion characterisation (primary), including both intratesticular and paratesticular masses, differentiation between germ-cell and non-germ-cell neoplasms (evolving), characterisation of the histological type of testicular germ cell neoplasms (TGCNs, in selected cases), local staging of TGCNs (primary), acute scrotum (in selected cases), trauma (in selected cases) and undescended testes (primary). The ESUR SPI-WG produced this consensus paper in which the existing literature on MRI of the scrotum is reviewed. The recommendations for the optimal imaging technique and clinical indications are presented. (orig.)

  15. A single-mode data acquisition architecture for PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sportelli, Giancarlo; Belcari, Nicola; Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Camarlinghi, Niccolo; Zaccaro, Emanuele; Del Guerra, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The development of MRI compatible detectors based on compact solid state photomultipliers has recently led to simultaneous fully integrated PET/MRI systems for human imaging. The PET acquisition design for MRI integration is known to have several additional constraints, including smaller space, electromagnetic compatibility issues and thermal management. The current work presents the PET acquisition architecture that has been developed for the TRIMAGE project, whose aim is to provide a cost effective, commercial grade trimodality PET/MRI/EEG scanner. The TRIMAGE PET component consists of 216 modules of 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm, arranged in 18 rectangular detectors of 5 cm x 15 cm, the latter in the axial direction, to form a full ring of 31 cm diameter. Each module consists of a staggered dual layer LYSO matrix read out by two arrays of 4 x 8 SiPMs and an ASIC. The detector board hosts a low-power low-end FPGA that performs pixel identification, energy calibration and handles the communication between the ASICs and the motherboard, which is located in proximity of the scanner. Data is streamed using high-density shielded cables and high-speed LVDS transmission to 9 low-end SoC FPGAs and from there to a central mainboard where coincidences and events statistics are processed. Coincidence data is finally transmitted to a host PC for image reconstruction. The proposed architecture and technological solutions will be presented and discussed.

  16. The utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing hemosiderosis of long term hemodialysis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishi, Osamu; Sako, Mamoru; Murata, Tamaki; Uchino, Hitomi (Kyouritsu Clinic, Osaka (Japan)); AkagaKi, Youji; Taniguchi, Toshio

    1992-10-01

    The utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing hemosiderosis (H) was evaluated in patients on long-term hemodialysis. The study subjects were 19 patients with serum ferritin (Ft) [>=]300 [mu]g/l, and 4 patients, with Ft<300 [mu]g/l served as controls, for a total of 23 patients on long-term hemodialysis receiving MRI examination. As a result, the intensity of the liver was diffusely reduced on T2 images in all 19 patients with Ft[>=]300 [mu]g/l. The severity of hemosiderosis was divided into groups designated 0 to III according to the degree of siderosis as evaluated by MRI. In a patient of severity I, the T1 image was normal and the intensity was reduced only on the T2 image. In a patient of severity III, the intensity was reduced on both T1 and T2 images. On the other hand, both T1 and T2 images showed normal liver intensity in all 4 controls with Ft<300 [mu]g/l. Furthermore, the results of liver function tests including GOT and GPT were normal in all 23 patients. The MRI-assessed severity of H (0 to III) correlated positively with serum Ft and serum Fe. These results suggest that the T1 image is useful for evaluating the severity of H, the T2 image for early diagnosis and that MRI and Ft are useful for evaluating the therapeutic effects on hemosiderosis. (author).

  17. In vivo tomographic imaging with fluorescence and MRI using tumor-targeted dual-labeled nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yue Zhang,1 Bin Zhang,1 Fei Liu,1,2 Jianwen Luo,1,3 Jing Bai1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, 2Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, 3Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Dual-modality imaging combines the complementary advantages of different modalities, and offers the prospect of improved preclinical research. The combination of fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides cross-validated information and direct comparison between these modalities. Here, we report on the application of a novel tumor-targeted, dual-labeled nanoparticle (NP, utilizing iron oxide as the MRI contrast agent and near infrared (NIR dye Cy5.5 as the fluorescent agent. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the NP to tumor cells. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the NPs in a mouse model were visualized by fluorescence and MR imaging collected at different time points. Quantitative analysis was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of MRI contrast enhancement. Furthermore, tomographic images were also acquired using both imaging modalities and cross-validated information of tumor location and size between these two modalities was revealed. The results demonstrate that the use of dual-labeled NPs can facilitate the dual-modal detection of tumors, information cross-validation, and direct comparison by combing fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT and MRI. Keywords: dual-modality, fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, nanoparticle

  18. Patient satisfaction with coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, myocardial perfusion MRI, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging and conventional coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feger, S.; Rief, M.; Zimmermann, E.; Richter, F.; Roehle, R. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Dewey, M. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany); Schoenenberger, E. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Department of Medicine, Hannover (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate patient acceptance of noninvasive imaging tests for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD), including single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI), stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), coronary CT angiography (CTA) in combination with CT myocardial stress perfusion (CTP), and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). Intraindividual comparison of perception of 48 patients from the CORE320 multicentre multinational study who underwent rest and stress SPECT-MPI with a technetium-based tracer, combined CTA and CTP (both with contrast agent, CTP with adenosine), MRI, and CCA. The analysis was performed by using a validated questionnaire. Patients had significantly more concern prior to CCA than before CTA/CTP (p < 0.001). CTA/CTP was also rated as more comfortable than SPECT-MPI (p = 0.001). Overall satisfaction with CT was superior to that of MRI (p = 0.007). More patients preferred CT (46 %; p < 0.001) as a future diagnostic test. Regarding combined CTA/CTP, CTP was characterised by higher pain levels and an increased frequency of angina pectoris during the examination (p < 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed a higher degree of pain during SPECT-MPI with adenosine stress compared to physical exercise (p = 0.016). All noninvasive cardiac imaging tests are well accepted by patients, with CT being the preferred examination. (orig.)

  19. Neurite density imaging versus imaging of microscopic anisotropy in diffusion MRI: A model comparison using spherical tensor encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampinen, Björn; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; Mårtensson, Johan; van Westen, Danielle; Sundgren, Pia C; Nilsson, Markus

    2017-02-15

    In diffusion MRI (dMRI), microscopic diffusion anisotropy can be obscured by orientation dispersion. Separation of these properties is of high importance, since it could allow dMRI to non-invasively probe elongated structures such as neurites (axons and dendrites). However, conventional dMRI, based on single diffusion encoding (SDE), entangles microscopic anisotropy and orientation dispersion with intra-voxel variance in isotropic diffusivity. SDE-based methods for estimating microscopic anisotropy, such as the neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) method, must thus rely on model assumptions to disentangle these features. An alternative approach is to directly quantify microscopic anisotropy by the use of variable shape of the b-tensor. Along those lines, we here present the 'constrained diffusional variance decomposition' (CODIVIDE) method, which jointly analyzes data acquired with diffusion encoding applied in a single direction at a time (linear tensor encoding, LTE) and in all directions (spherical tensor encoding, STE). We then contrast the two approaches by comparing neurite density estimated using NODDI with microscopic anisotropy estimated using CODIVIDE. Data were acquired in healthy volunteers and in glioma patients. NODDI and CODIVIDE differed the most in gray matter and in gliomas, where NODDI detected a neurite fraction higher than expected from the level of microscopic diffusion anisotropy found with CODIVIDE. The discrepancies could be explained by the NODDI tortuosity assumption, which enforces a connection between the neurite density and the mean diffusivity of tissue. Our results suggest that this assumption is invalid, which leads to a NODDI neurite density that is inconsistent between LTE and STE data. Using simulations, we demonstrate that the NODDI assumptions result in parameter bias that precludes the use of NODDI to map neurite density. With CODIVIDE, we found high levels of microscopic anisotropy in white matter

  20. The EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas: the metacarpophalangeal joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, P; Bird, P; Ejbjerg, B

    2005-01-01

    in the metacarpal head and the phalangeal base (grades 0-3), and bone erosion in the metacarpal head and the phalangeal base (grades 0-3, and examples of higher grades). The presented reference images can be used to guide scoring of MCP joints according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system......This paper presents the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint magnetic resonance images of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. The illustrations include synovitis in the MCP joints (OMERACT RA magnetic resonance imaging scoring system (RAMRIS), grades 0-3), bone oedema...

  1. An iterative reconstruction method of complex images using expectation maximization for radial parallel MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joonsung; Kim, Dongchan; Oh, Changhyun; Han, Yeji; Park, HyunWook

    2013-01-01

    In MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), signal sampling along a radial k-space trajectory is preferred in certain applications due to its distinct advantages such as robustness to motion, and the radial sampling can be beneficial for reconstruction algorithms such as parallel MRI (pMRI) due to the incoherency. For radial MRI, the image is usually reconstructed from projection data using analytic methods such as filtered back-projection or Fourier reconstruction after gridding. However, the quality of the reconstructed image from these analytic methods can be degraded when the number of acquired projection views is insufficient. In this paper, we propose a novel reconstruction method based on the expectation maximization (EM) method, where the EM algorithm is remodeled for MRI so that complex images can be reconstructed. Then, to optimize the proposed method for radial pMRI, a reconstruction method that uses coil sensitivity information of multichannel RF coils is formulated. Experiment results from synthetic and in vivo data show that the proposed method introduces better reconstructed images than the analytic methods, even from highly subsampled data, and provides monotonic convergence properties compared to the conjugate gradient based reconstruction method. (paper)

  2. Single particle raster image analysis of diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longfils, M; Schuster, E; Lorén, N; Särkkä, A; Rudemo, M

    2017-04-01

    As a complement to the standard RICS method of analysing Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy images with estimation of the image correlation function, we introduce the method SPRIA, Single Particle Raster Image Analysis. Here, we start by identifying individual particles and estimate the diffusion coefficient for each particle by a maximum likelihood method. Averaging over the particles gives a diffusion coefficient estimate for the whole image. In examples both with simulated and experimental data, we show that the new method gives accurate estimates. It also gives directly standard error estimates. The method should be possible to extend to study heterogeneous materials and systems of particles with varying diffusion coefficient, as demonstrated in a simple simulation example. A requirement for applying the SPRIA method is that the particle concentration is low enough so that we can identify the individual particles. We also describe a bootstrap method for estimating the standard error of standard RICS. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  3. Fetal MRI versus postnatal imaging in the MR-compatible incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika; Romaniuk-Doroszewska, Anna; Duczkowska, Agnieszka; Duczkowski, Marek; Iwanowska, Beata; Szkudlińska-Pawlak, Sylwia

    2016-09-01

    One of the aims of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to avoid postnatal scanning. However, clinicians sometimes wish to have postnatal confirmation of prenatal findings. This study's purpose was to check whether there was indeed the added value of neonatal MRI performed in the MR-compatible incubator (INC) after fetal examination. Material consists of 25 neonates (14 girls) who underwent prenatal and postnatal MRI in a 1.5 T scanner, the latter in INC. Mean time of prenatal MRI was 30th gestational week, of postnatal MRI-16th day of life. In 14 cases (56 %) postnatal findings were the same as prenatal ones. In 11 (44 %) postnatal MRI showed some different/new/more precise results, in two the differences were attributed to other factors than the advantage of postnatal MRI over prenatal one. Altogether then postnatal results were partly discordant with prenatal ones in 9/25 cases (36 %). In most cases there was no added value of postnatal MRI as compared to prenatal one. This value lied in small details that could not have been noticed on prenatal MRI or required contrast medium administration to be noticed. On the other hand, MR examination performed with use of the dedicated neonatal coils in the MR-compatible incubator is a safe and reliable method of visualization of these small details with better spatial resolution thus helping to establish final diagnosis, treatment plan and prognosis.

  4. Single-task fMRI overlap predicts concurrent multitasking interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijboer, Menno; Borst, Jelmer; van Rijn, Hedderik; Taatgen, Niels

    2014-10-15

    There is no consensus regarding the origin of behavioral interference that occurs during concurrent multitasking. Some evidence points toward a multitasking locus in the brain, while other results imply that interference is the consequence of task interactions in several brain regions. To investigate this issue, we conducted a functional MRI (fMRI) study consisting of three component tasks, which were performed both separately and in combination. The results indicated that no specific multitasking area exists. Instead, different patterns of activation across conditions could be explained by assuming that the interference is a result of task interactions. Additionally, similarity in single-task activation patterns correlated with a decrease in accuracy during dual-task conditions. Taken together, these results support the view that multitasking interference is not due to a bottleneck in a single "multitasking" brain region, but is a result of interactions between concurrently running processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The development of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bird, P; Conaghan, P; Ejbjerg, B

    2005-01-01

    Based on a previously developed rheumatoid arthritis MRI scoring system (OMERACT 2002 RAMRIS), the development team agreed which joints, MRI features, MRI sequences, and image planes would best illustrate the scoring system in an atlas. After collecting representative examples for all grades...... for each abnormality (synovitis, bone oedema, and bone erosion), the team met for a three day period to review the images and choose by consensus the most illustrative set for each feature, site, and grade. A predefined subset of images (for example, for erosion—all coronal slices through the bone......) was extracted. These images were then re-read by the group at a different time point to confirm the scores originally assigned. Finally, all selected images were photographed and formatted by one centre and distributed to all readers for final approval....

  6. Application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique on monitoring flower bud differentiation of tulip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Haojun; Yang Hongguang; Han Hongbin; Sun Xiaomei

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used for observing morphogenesis process in the living specimen situation of tulip flower buds. Through a comparison of different MRI imaging formation technique (longitudinal relaxation-T1WI, transverse relaxation time weighted imaging-T2WI, proton density weighted imaging-PDWI), seeking for an accurate and practical MRI technique to observe tulip bulb and differentiation period of flower bud. The results showed that in the demonstration of the morphological characters as well as morphogenesis process of flower bud differentiation, the T1WI was completely consistent with the results of rough slice, PDWI and T1WI also had obviously higher map quality than the T2WI (P<0.05). It is indicated that the magnetic resonance imaging technique could monitor the development of flower bud differentiation in vivo. (authors)

  7. Imaging of tumor viability in lung cancer. Initial results using 23Na-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henzler, T.; Apfaltrer, P.; Haneder, S.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Fink, C.; Konstandin, S.; Schad, L.; Schmid-Bindert, G.; Manegold, C.; Wenz, F.

    2012-01-01

    23 Na-MRI has been proposed as a potential imaging biomarker for the assessment of tumor viability and the evaluation of therapy response but has not yet been evaluated in patients with lung cancer. We aimed to assess the feasibility of 23 Na-MRI in patients with lung cancer. Three patients with stage IV adenocarcinoma of the lung were examined on a clinical 3 Tesla MRI system (Magnetom TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany). Feasibility of 23 Na-MRI images was proven by comparison and fusion of 23 Na-MRI with 1 H-MR, CT and FDG-PET-CT images. 23 Na signal intensities (SI) of tumor and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the spinal canal were measured and the SI ratio in tumor and CSF was calculated. One chemonaive patient was examined before and after the initiation of combination therapy (Carboplatin, Gemcitabin, Cetuximab). All 23 Na-MRI examinations were successfully completed and were of diagnostic quality. Fusion of 23 Na-MRI images with 1 H-MRI, CT and FDG-PET-CT was feasible in all patients and showed differences in solid and necrotic tumor areas. The mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF SI ratio were 13.3 ± 1.8 x 103 and 0.83 ± 0.14, respectively. In necrotic tumors, as suggested by central non-FDG-avid areas, the mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF ratio were 19.4 x 103 and 1.10, respectively. 23 Na-MRI is feasible in patients with lung cancer and could provide valuable functional molecular information regarding tumor viability, and potentially treatment response. (orig.)

  8. 3D pulmonary perfusion MRI and MR angiography of pulmonary embolism in pigs after a single injection of a blood pool MR contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Christian; Ley, Sebastian; Puderbach, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Radiology, Innovative Cancer Diagnostic and Therapy, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Bock, Michael [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, Innovative Cancer Diagnostic and Therapy, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MR angiography (MRA) of pulmonary embolism (PE) in pigs using a single injection of the blood pool contrast Gadomer. PE was induced in five domestic pigs by injection of autologous blood thrombi. Contrast-enhanced first-pass 3D perfusion MRI (TE/TR/FA: 1.0 ms/2.2 ms/40 ; voxel size: 1.3 x 2.5 x 4.0 mm{sup 3}; TA: 1.8 s per data set) and high-resolution 3D MRA (TE/TR/FA: 1.4 ms/3.4 ms/40 ; voxel size: 0.8 x 1.0 x 1.6 mm{sup 3}) was performed during and after a single injection of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight of Gadomer. Image data were compared to pre-embolism Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI and post-embolism thin-section multislice CT (n=2). SNR measurements were performed in the pulmonary arteries and lung. One animal died after induction of PE. In all other animals, perfusion MRI and MRA could be acquired after a single injection of Gadomer. At perfusion MRI, PE could be detected by typical wedge-shaped perfusion defects. While the visualization of central PE at MRA correlated well with the CT, peripheral PE were only visualized by CT. Gadomer achieved a higher peak SNR of the lungs compared to Gd-DTPA (21{+-}8 vs. 13{+-}3). Contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MRA of PE can be combined using a single injection of the blood pool contrast agent Gadomer. (orig.)

  9. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  10. MRI reconstruction of multi-image acquisitions using a rank regularizer with data reordering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adluru, Ganesh, E-mail: gadluru@gmail.com; Anderson, Jeffrey [UCAIR, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 (United States); Gur, Yaniv [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Chen, Liyong; Feinberg, David [Advanced MRI Technologies, Sebastpool, California, 95472 (United States); DiBella, Edward V. R. [UCAIR, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 and Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To improve rank constrained reconstructions for undersampled multi-image MRI acquisitions. Methods: Motivated by the recent developments in low-rank matrix completion theory and its applicability to rapid dynamic MRI, a new reordering-based rank constrained reconstruction of undersampled multi-image data that uses prior image information is proposed. Instead of directly minimizing the nuclear norm of a matrix of estimated images, the nuclear norm of reordered matrix values is minimized. The reordering is based on the prior image estimates. The method is tested on brain diffusion imaging data and dynamic contrast enhanced myocardial perfusion data. Results: Good quality images from data undersampled by a factor of three for diffusion imaging and by a factor of 3.5 for dynamic cardiac perfusion imaging with respiratory motion were obtained. Reordering gave visually improved image quality over standard nuclear norm minimization reconstructions. Root mean squared errors with respect to ground truth images were improved by ∼18% and ∼16% with reordering for diffusion and perfusion applications, respectively. Conclusions: The reordered low-rank constraint is a way to inject prior image information that offers improvements over a standard low-rank constraint for undersampled multi-image MRI reconstructions.

  11. Automatic delineation of brain regions on MRI and PET images from the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadsen, Jonas; Hansen, Hanne D; Jørgensen, Louise M; Keller, Sune H; Andersen, Flemming L; Petersen, Ida N; Knudsen, Gitte M; Svarer, Claus

    2018-01-15

    The increasing use of the pig as a research model in neuroimaging requires standardized processing tools. For example, extraction of regional dynamic time series from brain PET images requires parcellation procedures that benefit from being automated. Manual inter-modality spatial normalization to a MRI atlas is operator-dependent, time-consuming, and can be inaccurate with lack of cortical radiotracer binding or skull uptake. A parcellated PET template that allows for automatic spatial normalization to PET images of any radiotracer. MRI and [ 11 C]Cimbi-36 PET scans obtained in sixteen pigs made the basis for the atlas. The high resolution MRI scans allowed for creation of an accurately averaged MRI template. By aligning the within-subject PET scans to their MRI counterparts, an averaged PET template was created in the same space. We developed an automatic procedure for spatial normalization of the averaged PET template to new PET images and hereby facilitated transfer of the atlas regional parcellation. Evaluation of the automatic spatial normalization procedure found the median voxel displacement to be 0.22±0.08mm using the MRI template with individual MRI images and 0.92±0.26mm using the PET template with individual [ 11 C]Cimbi-36 PET images. We tested the automatic procedure by assessing eleven PET radiotracers with different kinetics and spatial distributions by using perfusion-weighted images of early PET time frames. We here present an automatic procedure for accurate and reproducible spatial normalization and parcellation of pig PET images of any radiotracer with reasonable blood-brain barrier penetration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Intersection based motion correction of multislice MRI for 3-D in utero fetal brain image formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A; Barkovich, Anthony J; Studholme, Colin

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, postprocessing of fast multislice magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to correct fetal motion has provided the first true 3-D MR images of the developing human brain in utero. Early approaches have used reconstruction based algorithms, employing a two-step iterative process, where slices from the acquired data are realigned to an approximate 3-D reconstruction of the fetal brain, which is then refined further using the improved slice alignment. This two step slice-to-volume process, although powerful, is computationally expensive in needing a 3-D reconstruction, and is limited in its ability to recover subvoxel alignment. Here, we describe an alternative approach which we term slice intersection motion correction (SIMC), that seeks to directly co-align multiple slice stacks by considering the matching structure along all intersecting slice pairs in all orthogonally planned slices that are acquired in clinical imaging studies. A collective update scheme for all slices is then derived, to simultaneously drive slices into a consistent match along their lines of intersection. We then describe a 3-D reconstruction algorithm that, using the final motion corrected slice locations, suppresses through-plane partial volume effects to provide a single high isotropic resolution 3-D image. The method is tested on simulated data with known motions and is applied to retrospectively reconstruct 3-D images from a range of clinically acquired imaging studies. The quantitative evaluation of the registration accuracy for the simulated data sets demonstrated a significant improvement over previous approaches. An initial application of the technique to studying clinical pathology is included, where the proposed method recovered up to 15 mm of translation and 30 degrees of rotation for individual slices, and produced full 3-D reconstructions containing clinically useful additional information not visible in the original 2-D slices.

  13. Tunable and noncytotoxic PET/SPECT-MRI multimodality imaging probes using colloidally stable ligand-free superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham THN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available TH Nguyen Pham,1 Nigel A Lengkeek,2 Ivan Greguric,2 Byung J Kim,1 Paul A Pellegrini,2 Stephanie A Bickley,3 Marcel R Tanudji,3 Stephen K Jones,3 Brian S Hawkett,1 Binh TT Pham1 1Key Centre for Polymers and Colloids, School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, 2Radioisotopes and Radiotracers, NSTLI, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney, 3Sirtex Medical Limited, North Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Physiologically stable multimodality imaging probes for positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography (PET/SPECT-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were synthesized using the superparamagnetic maghemite iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (SPIONs. The SPIONs were sterically stabilized with a finely tuned mixture of diblock copolymers with either methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG or primary amine NH2 end groups. The radioisotope for PET or SPECT imaging was incorporated with the SPIONs at high temperature. 57Co2+ ions with a long half-life of 270.9 days were used as a model for the radiotracer to study the kinetics of radiolabeling, characterization, and the stability of the radiolabeled SPIONs. Radioactive 67Ga3+ and Cu2+-labeled SPIONs were also produced successfully using the optimized conditions from the 57Co2+-labeling process. No free radioisotopes were detected in the aqueous phase for the radiolabeled SPIONs 1 week after dispersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS. All labeled SPIONs were not only well dispersed and stable under physiological conditions but also noncytotoxic in vitro. The ability to design and produce physiologically stable radiolabeled magnetic nanoparticles with a finely controlled number of functionalizable end groups on the SPIONs enables the generation of a desirable and biologically compatible multimodality PET/SPECT-MRI agent on a single T2 contrast MRI probe. Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography

  14. Functional and molecular imaging with MRI: potential applications in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthurs, Owen J.; Gallagher, Ferdia A.

    2011-01-01

    MRI is a very versatile tool for noninvasive imaging and it is particularly attractive as an imaging technique in paediatric patients given the absence of ionizing radiation. Recent advances in the field of MRI have enabled tissue function to be probed noninvasively, and increasingly MRI is being used to assess cellular and molecular processes. For example, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI has been used to assess tissue vascularity, diffusion-weighted imaging can quantify molecular movements of water in tissue compartments and MR spectroscopy provides a quantitative assessment of metabolite levels. A number of targeted contrast agents have been developed that bind specifically to receptors on the vascular endothelium or cell surface and there are several MR methods for labelling cells and tracking cellular movements. Hyperpolarization techniques have the capability of massively increasing the sensitivity of MRI and these have been used to image tissue pH, successful response to drug treatment as well as imaging the microstructure of the lungs. Although there are many challenges to be overcome before these techniques can be translated into routine paediatric imaging, they could potentially be used to aid diagnosis, predict disease outcome, target biopsies and determine treatment response noninvasively. (orig.)

  15. Single photon imaging. New instrumentation and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehllehner, G.; Colsher, J.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of Anger scintillation cameras continues to be enhanced through a series of small improvements which result in significantly better imaging characteristics. The most recent changes in camera design consist of: (1) the introduction of photomultipliers with better photocathode and electron collection efficiencies, (2) the use of thinner (3/8 or 1/4 in) crystals giving slightly better intrinsic resolution for low gamma-ray energies, (3) inclusion of a spatially varying energy window to compensate for variations of light collection efficiency, (4) event-by-event, real-time distortion removal for uniformity correction, and (5) introduction of new methods to improve the count-rate capability. Whereas some of these improvements are due to better understanding of the fundamentals of camera design, others are the result of technological advances in electronic components such as analogue-to-digital converters, microprocessors and high-density digital memories. The development of single photon tomography has developed along two parallel paths. Multipinhole and rotating slant-hole collimator attachments provide some degree of longitudinal tomography, and are currently being applied to cardiac imaging. At the same time rotating camera systems capable of transverse as well as longitudinal imaging are being refined technically and evaluated clinically. Longitudinal tomography is of limited use in quantitative studies and is likely to be an interim solution to three-dimensional imaging. Rotating camera systems, on the other hand, not only provide equal resolution in all three dimensions but are also capable of providing quantitative accuracy. This is the result of progress in attenuation correction and the design of special collimators. Single photon tomography provides a small but noticeable improvement in diagnostic accuracy which is likely to result in widespread use of rotating camera systems in the future

  16. Towards simultaneous single emission microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Liang

    In recent years, the combined nuclear imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has drawn extensive research effort. They can provide simultaneously acquired anatomical and functional information inside the human/small animal body in vivo. In this dissertation, the development of an ultrahigh resolution MR-compatible SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) system that can be operated inside a pre-existing clinical MR scanner for simultaneous dual-modality imaging of small animals will be discussed. This system is constructed with 40 small pixel CdTe detector modules assembled in a fully stationary ring SPECT geometry. Series of experiments have demonstrated that this system is capable of providing an imaging resolution of CdTe detector module that we recently developed. Each module consists of CdTe detectors having an overall size of 2.2 cm x 1.1 cm, divided into 64 x 32 pixels of 350 mum in size. A novel hybrid pixel-waveform (HPWF) readout system is also designed to alleviate several challenges for using small-pixel CdTe detectors in ultrahigh-resolution SPECT imaging applications. The HPWF system utilizes a modified version of a 2048-channel 2-D CMOS ASIC to readout the anode pixel, and a digitizing circuitry to sample the signal waveform induced on the cathode. The cathode waveform acquired with the HPWF circuitry offers excellent spatial resolution, energy resolution and depth of interaction (DOI) information, even with the presence of excessive charge-sharing/charge-loss between the small anode pixels. The HPWF CdTe detector is designed and constructed with a minimum amount of ferromagnetic materials, to ensure the MR-compatibility. To achieve sub-500?m imaging resolution, two special designed SPECT apertures have been constructed with different pinhole sizes of 300?m and 500?m respectively. It has 40 pinhole inserts that are made of cast platinum (90%)-iridium (10%) alloy, which provides the maximum stopping power and are compatible with MR

  17. Selecting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome measures for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) clinical trials: first report of the MRI in JIA special interest group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemke, Robert; Doria, Andrea S; Tzaribachev, Nikolay; Maas, Mario; van der Heijde, Désirée M F M; van Rossum, Marion A J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have substantially improved the evaluation of joint pathologies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Because of the current availability of highly effective antirheumatic therapies and the unique and useful features of MRI, there is a growing need for an accurate and reproducible MRI assessment scoring system for JIA, such as the rheumatoid arthritis MRI Scoring (RAMRIS) for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To effectively evaluate the efficacy of treatment in clinical research trials, we need to develop and validate scoring methods to accurately measure joint outcomes, standardize imaging protocols for data acquisition and interpretation, and create imaging atlases to differentiate physiologic and pathologic joint findings in childhood and adolescence. Such a standardized, validated, JIA-MRI scoring method could be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  18. Defining active sacroiliitis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for classification of axial spondyloarthritis: a consensual approach by the ASAS/OMERACT MRI group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudwaleit, M; Jurik, A G; Hermann, K-G A

    2009-01-01

    and to reach consensus on which MRI findings are essential for the definition of sacroiliitis. METHODS: Ten doctors (two radiologists and eight rheumatologists) from the ASAS/OMERACT MRI working group reviewed and discussed in three workshops MR images depicting sacroiliitis associated with SpA and other......BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of sacroiliac joints has evolved as the most relevant imaging modality for diagnosis and classification of early axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) including early ankylosing spondylitis. OBJECTIVES: To identify and describe MRI findings in sacroiliitis...... conditions which may mimic SpA. Descriptions of the pathological findings and technical requirements for the appropriate acquisition were formulated. In a consensual approach MRI findings considered to be essential for sacroiliitis were defined. RESULTS: Active inflammatory lesions such as bone marrow oedema...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer: does the time interval between biopsy and MRI influence MRI-pathology discordance in lesion sizing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennella, Simone; Paparo, Francesco; Revelli, Matteo; Baccini, Paola; Secondini, Lucia; Barbagallo, Stella; Friedman, Daniele; Garlaschi, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    Background Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more accurate than ultrasound and mammography in estimating local extension of both invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and it is part of a breast cancer patient's preoperative management. Purpose To verify if time interval between breast biopsy and preoperative MRI, lesion margins, and biopsy technique can influence tumor sizing on MRI. Material and Methods By a database search, we retrospectively identified all women with a newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven, primary breast cancer who underwent MRI before surgery. The time interval between biopsy and MRI, the type of biopsy procedure, and various pathological features of tumors were collected. We defined the concordance between MRI and pathology measurements as a difference of 30 days ( P < 0.05). By means of multivariate analysis, we found that DCIS subtype and the presence of poorly defined margins on MRI are the only two factors independently and strongly associated with MRI-pathology discordance in lesion sizing. Conclusion Size, histology, and margins of tumors may affect the accuracy of MRI measurements. The type of biopsy procedure and the time interval between biopsy and preoperative MRI are not independently associated to MRI-pathology discordance.

  20. MRI methods for pulmonary ventilation and perfusion imaging; Methoden der MRT zur Ventilations- und Perfusionsbildgebung der Lunge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, G. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland); Bauman, G. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin - Radiologische Physik, Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    Separate assessment of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and pulmonary circulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases. Due to the global character of the information obtained clinical lung function tests are often not sufficiently specific in the differential diagnosis or have a limited sensitivity in the detection of early pathological changes. The standard procedures of pulmonary imaging are computed tomography (CT) for depiction of the morphology as well as perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for functional assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases, O{sub 2}-enhanced MRI, MRI with fluorinated gases and Fourier decomposition MRI (FD-MRI) are available for assessment of pulmonary ventilation. For assessment of pulmonary perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and FD-MRI can be used. Imaging provides a more precise insight into the pathophysiology of pulmonary function on a regional level. The advantages of MRI are a lack of ionizing radiation, which allows a protective acquisition of dynamic data as well as the high number of available contrasts and therefore accessible lung function parameters. Sufficient clinical data exist only for certain applications of DCE-MRI. For the other techniques, only feasibility studies and case series of different sizes are available. The clinical applicability of hyperpolarized gases is limited for technical reasons. The clinical application of the techniques described, except for DCE-MRI, should be restricted to scientific studies. (orig.) [German] Die separate Beurteilung von Atemmechanik, Gasaustauschprozessen und Lungenzirkulation ist wesentlich fuer die Diagnose und Therapie von Lungenerkrankungen. Klinische Lungenfunktionstests sind aufgrund ihrer zumeist nur globalen Aussage oft nicht hinreichend spezifisch in der Differenzialdiagnostik oder eingeschraenkt sensitiv bei der

  1. Imaging Appearance and Clinical Impact of Preoperative Breast MRI in Pregnancy-Associated Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kelly S; Green, Lauren A; Lebron, Lizza; Morris, Elizabeth A

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the imaging features of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) on breast MRI and to consider the impact of preoperative MRI on patient management. A retrospective review of medical records from January 1994 to May 2014 identified 183 women who presented with a new diagnosis of breast cancer during pregnancy or within 1 year postpartum. MR images were available for 53 of these patients, all of whom were included in the study. Clinical history and available breast images were reviewed. The clinical impact of preoperative breast MRI was also recorded. Of the 53 women, nine (17%) presented during pregnancy and 44 (83%) presented during the first year postpartum. The sensitivity of MRI was 98% (52/53). Among the 53 patients, the most common findings of PABC on MRI included a solitary mass (29 patients [55%]), nonmass enhancement (12 patients [23%]), and multiple masses (eight patients [15%]). For 12 patients (23%), MRI showed a pathologically proven larger tumor size or greater extent of disease than did mammography or ultrasound, with an additional eight patients (15%) having findings suspicious for greater extent of disease but having unavailable pathologic data. Breast MRI changed surgical management for 15 patients (28%), with four patients (8%) requiring a larger lumpectomy, seven (13%) no longer being considered candidates for lumpectomy, two (4%) having contralateral disease, and two (4%) having unsuspected metastasis. Breast MRI had a high sensitivity for PABC in our study population. MRI may play an important role in PABC because it changed the surgical management of 28% of patients.

  2. Comparative study on developmental stages of the clavicle by postmortem MRI and CT imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sara Tangmose; Lynnerup, Niels; Jensen, K.E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The developmental stages of the clavicles are important for forensic age estimation purposes in adolescents. This study compares the 4-stage system to evaluate the ossification of the medial end of the clavicle as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography...... (CT). As several forensic institutes routinely perform CT scans, the large amount of available data may serve as reference sample for MRI in specific cases. Material and methods: This prospective study included an MRI and CT scan of 47 autopsy cases performed prior to medico-legal autopsy (age range...... 12.9-27.5 years). All images were scored in blind trials using a 4-stage system by a trained observer. Results: Intra-observer agreements were substantial within (MRI: K=0.685, CT: K=0.611) and between modalities (K=0.644, p...

  3. Multispectral image classification of MRI data using an empirically-derived clustering algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, K.M.; Osbourn, G.C.; Bouchard, A.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanders, J.A. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[VA Hospital, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Multispectral image analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has been performed using an empirically-derived clustering algorithm. This algorithm groups image pixels into distinct classes which exhibit similar response in the T{sub 2} 1st and 2nd-echo, and T{sub 1} (with ad without gadolinium) MRI images. The grouping is performed in an n-dimensional mathematical space; the n-dimensional volumes bounding each class define each specific tissue type. The classification results are rendered again in real-space by colored-coding each grouped class of pixels (associated with differing tissue types). This classification method is especially well suited for class volumes with complex boundary shapes, and is also expected to robustly detect abnormal tissue classes. The classification process is demonstrated using a three dimensional data set of MRI scans of a human brain tumor.

  4. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abril, A.; Agulles-Pedrós, L.

    2016-01-01

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the 99m Tc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  5. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abril, A., E-mail: ajabrilf@unal.edu.co; Agulles-Pedrós, L., E-mail: lagullesp@unal.edu.co [Medical Physics Group, Physics department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the {sup 99m}Tc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  6. The EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas: the wrist joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, B; McQueen, F; Lassere, M

    2005-01-01

    , capitate, and a metacarpal base. In these bones, grades 0-3 of bone oedema are illustrated, and for bone erosion, grades 0-3 and examples of higher grades are presented. The presented reference images can be used to guide scoring of wrist joints according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system......This paper presents the wrist joint MR images of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. Reference images for scoring synovitis, bone oedema, and bone erosions according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) system are provided. All grades (0-3) of synovitis...... are illustrated in each of the three wrist joint areas defined in the scoring system-that is, the distal radioulnar joint, the radiocarpal joint, and the intercarpal-carpometacarpal joints. For reasons of feasibility, examples of bone abnormalities are limited to five selected bones: the radius, scaphoid, lunate...

  7. Fast single image dehazing based on image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haibo; Yang, Jie; Wu, Zhengping; Zhang, Qingnian

    2015-01-01

    Images captured in foggy weather conditions often fade the colors and reduce the contrast of the observed objects. An efficient image fusion method is proposed to remove haze from a single input image. First, the initial medium transmission is estimated based on the dark channel prior. Second, the method adopts an assumption that the degradation level affected by haze of each region is the same, which is similar to the Retinex theory, and uses a simple Gaussian filter to get the coarse medium transmission. Then, pixel-level fusion is achieved between the initial medium transmission and coarse medium transmission. The proposed method can recover a high-quality haze-free image based on the physical model, and the complexity of the proposed method is only a linear function of the number of input image pixels. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can allow a very fast implementation and achieve better restoration for visibility and color fidelity compared to some state-of-the-art methods.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubo, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Aoki, Shigeki

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-seven patients with the clinical diagnosis of or suspicious of avascular necrosis (AN) of the femoral head were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In all patients with AN confirmed from clinical symptoms, past history and plain radiographs, MRI demonstrated abnormal low intensity area in the necrosed femoral head. The abnormal findings on MRI were divided into three patterns: low signal intensity occupying the greater part of the femoral head (type A), low signal intensity localized in the periphery (type B), ring-shaped or band-like low signal intensity (type C). No correlation was found among MRI patterns, radiographic findings and radionuclide bone scan images, except that the type C was not found in the stage IV determined radiographically. In the patients suspicious of AN, the positive rate of MRI was higher than that of radionuclide scan. Abnormal findings on only MRI may not necessarily indicate AN. However, such a patient must be kept under observation, because the possibility exists that only MRI detects early or asymptomatic AN of the femoral head. (author)

  9. Evaluation of electrode position in deep brain stimulation by image fusion (MRI and CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnaure, I.; Lovblad, K.O.; Vargas, M.I. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Pollak, P.; Horvath, J.; Boex, C.; Burkhard, P. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Geneva (Switzerland); Momjian, S. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Geneva (Switzerland); Remuinan, J. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    Imaging has an essential role in the evaluation of correct positioning of electrodes implanted for deep brain stimulation (DBS). Although MRI offers superior anatomic visualization of target sites, there are safety concerns in patients with implanted material; imaging guidelines are inconsistent and vary. The fusion of postoperative CT with preoperative MRI images can be an alternative for the assessment of electrode positioning. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of measurements realized on fused images (acquired without a stereotactic frame) using a manufacturer-provided software. Data from 23 Parkinson's disease patients who underwent bilateral electrode placement for subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS were acquired. Preoperative high-resolution T2-weighted sequences at 3 T, and postoperative CT series were fused using a commercially available software. Electrode tip position was measured on the obtained images in three directions (in relation to the midline, the AC-PC line and an AC-PC line orthogonal, respectively) and assessed in relation to measures realized on postoperative 3D T1 images acquired at 1.5 T. Mean differences between measures carried out on fused images and on postoperative MRI lay between 0.17 and 0.97 mm. Fusion of CT and MRI images provides a safe and fast technique for postoperative assessment of electrode position in DBS. (orig.)

  10. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arabi, Hossein; Koutsouvelis, Nikolaos; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial

  11. Comparative study on developmental stages of the clavicle by postmortem MRI and CT imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sara Tangmose; Lynnerup, Niels; Jensen, K.E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The developmental stages of the clavicles are important for forensic age estimation purposes in adolescents. This study compares the 4-stage system to evaluate the ossification of the medial end of the clavicle as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography...... (CT). As several forensic institutes routinely perform CT scans, the large amount of available data may serve as reference sample for MRI in specific cases. Material and methods: This prospective study included an MRI and CT scan of 47 autopsy cases performed prior to medico-legal autopsy (age range...

  12. MRI-only lesions: application of diffusion-weighted imaging obviates unnecessary MR-guided breast biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spick, Claudio; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H.; Baltzer, Pascal A. [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), General Hospital Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Wien (Austria); Rudas, Margaretha [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Clinical Institute of Pathology, Wien (Austria)

    2014-06-15

    To assess if the application of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) obviates unnecessary MR-guided biopsies in suspicious breast lesions visible only on contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI). This institutional review board (IRB)-approved, retrospective, single-centre study included 101 patients (mean age, 49.5; SD 13.9 years) who underwent additional DWI at 1.5 T prior to MRI-guided biopsy of 104 lesions classified as suspicious for malignancy and visible on CE-MRI only. An experienced radiologist, blinded to histopathologic and follow-up results, measured apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values obtained from DWI. Diagnostic accuracy was investigated using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Histopathology revealed 20 malignant and 84 benign lesions. Lesions were masses in 61 (15 malignant, 24.6 %) and non-masses in 43 cases (five malignant, 11.6 %). Mean ADC values were 1.53 ± 0.38 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in benign lesions and 1.06 ± 0.27 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in malignant lesions. ROC analysis revealed exclusively benign lesions if ADC values were greater than 1.58 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. As a consequence, 29 false-positive biopsies (34.5 %) could have been avoided without any false-negative findings. Both in mass and in non-mass lesions, rule-in and rule-out criteria were identified using flexible ADC thresholds based on ROC analysis. Additional application of DWI in breast lesions visible only on MRI can avoid false-positive, MR-guided biopsies. Thus, DWI should be an integral part of breast MRI protocols. (orig.)

  13. Software Toolbox for Low-Frequency Conductivity and Current Density Imaging Using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajib, Saurav Z K; Katoch, Nitish; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2017-11-01

    Low-frequency conductivity and current density imaging using MRI includes magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), diffusion tensor MREIT (DT-MREIT), conductivity tensor imaging (CTI), and magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI). MRCDI and MREIT provide current density and isotropic conductivity images, respectively, using current-injection phase MRI techniques. DT-MREIT produces anisotropic conductivity tensor images by incorporating diffusion weighted MRI into MREIT. These current-injection techniques are finding clinical applications in diagnostic imaging and also in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), deep brain stimulation (DBS), and electroporation where treatment currents can function as imaging currents. To avoid adverse effects of nerve and muscle stimulations due to injected currents, conductivity tensor imaging (CTI) utilizes B1 mapping and multi-b diffusion weighted MRI to produce low-frequency anisotropic conductivity tensor images without injecting current. This paper describes numerical implementations of several key mathematical functions for conductivity and current density image reconstructions in MRCDI, MREIT, DT-MREIT, and CTI. To facilitate experimental studies of clinical applications, we developed a software toolbox for these low-frequency conductivity and current density imaging methods. This MR-based conductivity imaging (MRCI) toolbox includes 11 toolbox functions which can be used in the MATLAB environment. The MRCI toolbox is available at http://iirc.khu.ac.kr/software.html . Its functions were tested by using several experimental datasets, which are provided together with the toolbox. Users of the toolbox can focus on experimental designs and interpretations of reconstructed images instead of developing their own image reconstruction softwares. We expect more toolbox functions to be added from future research outcomes. Low-frequency conductivity and current density imaging using MRI includes

  14. Evaluating fibre orientation dispersion in white matter: Comparison of diffusion MRI, histology and polarized light imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollink, Jeroen; Kleinnijenhuis, Michiel; Cappellen van Walsum, Anne-Marie van; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Cottaar, Michiel; Mirfin, Christopher; Heinrich, Mattias P; Jenkinson, Mark; Pallebage-Gamarallage, Menuka; Ansorge, Olaf; Jbabdi, Saad; Miller, Karla L

    2017-08-15

    Diffusion MRI is an exquisitely sensitive probe of tissue microstructure, and is currently the only non-invasive measure of the brain's fibre architecture. As this technique becomes more sophisticated and microstructurally informative, there is increasing value in comparing diffusion MRI with microscopic imaging in the same tissue samples. This study compared estimates of fibre orientation dispersion in white matter derived from diffusion MRI to reference measures of dispersion obtained from polarized light imaging and histology. Three post-mortem brain specimens were scanned with diffusion MRI and analyzed with a two-compartment dispersion model. The specimens were then sectioned for microscopy, including polarized light imaging estimates of fibre orientation and histological quantitative estimates of myelin and astrocytes. Dispersion estimates were correlated on region - and voxel-wise levels in the corpus callosum, the centrum semiovale and the corticospinal tract. The region-wise analysis yielded correlation coefficients of r = 0.79 for the diffusion MRI and histology comparison, while r = 0.60 was reported for the comparison with polarized light imaging. In the corpus callosum, we observed a pattern of higher dispersion at the midline compared to its lateral aspects. This pattern was present in all modalities and the dispersion profiles from microscopy and diffusion MRI were highly correlated. The astrocytes appeared to have minor contribution to dispersion observed with diffusion MRI. These results demonstrate that fibre orientation dispersion estimates from diffusion MRI represents the tissue architecture well. Dispersion models might be improved by more faithfully incorporating an informed mapping based on microscopy data. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for patients with unilateral tinnitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, Motoyasu; Yoshida, Haruo; Kumagami, Hidetaka; Takahashi, Haruo; Dotsu, Mitsuru

    2004-01-01

    Audiography, X-ray (Stenvers view) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) were performed on 88 patients exhibiting unilateral tinnitus. We diagnosed 4 cases (4.5%) of vestibular schwannoma and 41 cases (46.6%) of other abnormalities, including 2 cases of meningioma, 24 cases of old cerebral infarction, and 5 cases of mastoiditis. MRI was considered to be a first-line clinical examination for patients with unilateral tinnitus. (author)

  16. Innovative multimodal DOTA/NODA nanoparticles for MRI and PET imaging for tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truillet, Charles; Bouziotis, Penelope; Tsoukalas, Charalambos; Sancey, Lucie; Denat, Franck; Boschetti, Frédéric; Stellas, Dimitris; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos D; Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Moulopoulos, Lia A; Lux, François; Perriat, P; Tillement, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of the exact tumor stage is essential to adapt therapeutic strategies or to follow the evolution of the tumor after therapy in order to increase the survival chance. The multi-tasking diagnostics that combine techniques such as PET and MRI could really improve imaging tumor stage. PET mainly offers functional information about the disease with high sensitivity. MRI offers predominantly morphological information, able to provide an excellent soft tissue contrasts due to its high resolution.

  17. Current and future diagnostic tools for traumatic brain injury: CT, conventional MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, David L; Mac Donald, Christine L; Shimony, Joshua S

    2015-01-01

    Brain imaging plays a key role in the assessment of traumatic brain injury. In this review, we present our perspectives on the use of computed tomography (CT), conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and newer advanced modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging. Specifically, we address assessment for immediately life-threatening intracranial lesions (noncontrast head CT), assessment of progression of intracranial lesions (noncontrast head CT), documenting intracranial abnormalities for medicolegal reasons (conventional MRI with blood-sensitive sequences), presurgical planning for post-traumatic epilepsy (high spatial resolution conventional MRI), early prognostic decision making (conventional MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging), prognostic assessment for rehabilitative planning (conventional MRI and possibly diffusion tensor imaging in the future), stratification of subjects and pharmacodynamic tracking of targeted therapies in clinical trials (specific MRI sequences or positron emission tomography (PET) ligands, e.g., diffusion tensor imaging for traumatic axonal injury). We would like to emphasize that all of these methods, especially the newer research approaches, require careful radiologic-pathologic validation for optimal interpretation. We have taken this approach in a mouse model of pericontusional traumatic axonal injury. We found that the extent of reduction in the diffusion tensor imaging parameter relative anisotropy directly correlated with the number of amyloid precursor protein (APP)-stained axonal varicosities (r(2)=0.81, p<0.0001, n=20 injured mice). Interestingly, however, the least severe contusional injuries did not result in APP-stained axonal varicosities, but did cause reduction in relative anisotropy. Clearly, both the imaging assessments and the pathologic assessments will require iterative refinement. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 3D T2-weighted imaging to shorten multiparametric prostate MRI protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanec, Stephan H; Lazar, Mathias; Wengert, Georg J; Bickel, Hubert; Spick, Claudio; Susani, Martin; Shariat, Shahrokh; Clauser, Paola; Baltzer, Pascal A T

    2018-04-01

    To determine whether 3D acquisitions provide equivalent image quality, lesion delineation quality and PI-RADS v2 performance compared to 2D acquisitions in T2-weighted imaging of the prostate at 3 T. This IRB-approved, prospective study included 150 consecutive patients (mean age 63.7 years, 35-84 years; mean PSA 7.2 ng/ml, 0.4-31.1 ng/ml). Two uroradiologists (R1, R2) independently rated image quality and lesion delineation quality using a five-point ordinal scale and assigned a PI-RADS score for 2D and 3D T2-weighted image data sets. Data were compared using visual grading characteristics (VGC) and receiver operating characteristics (ROC)/area under the curve (AUC) analysis. Image quality was similarly good to excellent for 2D T2w (mean score R1, 4.3 ± 0.81; R2, 4.7 ± 0.83) and 3D T2w (mean score R1, 4.3 ± 0.82; R2, 4.7 ± 0.69), p = 0.269. Lesion delineation was rated good to excellent for 2D (mean score R1, 4.16 ± 0.81; R2, 4.19 ± 0.92) and 3D T2w (R1, 4.19 ± 0.94; R2, 4.27 ± 0.94) without significant differences (p = 0.785). ROC analysis showed an equivalent performance for 2D (AUC 0.580-0.623) and 3D (AUC 0.576-0.629) T2w (p > 0.05, respectively). Three-dimensional acquisitions demonstrated equivalent image and lesion delineation quality, and PI-RADS v2 performance, compared to 2D in T2-weighted imaging of the prostate. Three-dimensional T2-weighted imaging could be used to considerably shorten prostate MRI protocols in clinical practice. • 3D shows equivalent image quality and lesion delineation compared to 2D T2w. • 3D T2w and 2D T2w image acquisition demonstrated comparable diagnostic performance. • Using a single 3D T2w acquisition may shorten the protocol by 40%. • Combined with short DCE, multiparametric protocols of 10 min are feasible.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging goes postmortem: noninvasive detection and assessment of myocardial infarction by postmortem MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackowski, Christian; Warntjes, Marcel J.B.; Persson, Anders; Berge, Johan; Baer, Walter

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the performance of postmortem magnetic resonance imaging (pmMRI) in identification and characterization of lethal myocardial infarction in a non-invasive manner on human corpses. Before forensic autopsy, 20 human forensic corpses were examined on a 1.5-T system for the presence of myocardial infarction. Short axis, transversal and longitudinal long axis images (T1-weighted; T2-weighted; PD-weighted) were acquired in situ. In subsequent autopsy, the section technique was adapted to short axis images. Histological investigations were conducted to confirm autopsy and/or radiological diagnoses. Nineteen myocardial lesions were detected and age staged with pmMRI, of which 13 were histologically confirmed (chronic, subacute and acute). Six lesions interpreted as peracute by pmMRI showed no macroscopic or histological finding. Five of the six peracute lesions correlated well to coronary pathology, and one case displayed a severe hypertrophic alteration. pmMRI reliably demonstrates chronic, subacute and acute myocardial infarction in situ. In peracute cases pmMRI may display ischemic lesions undetectable at autopsy and routine histology. pmMRI has the potential to substantiate autopsy and to counteract the loss of reliable information on causes of death due to the recent disappearance of the clinical autopsy. (orig.)

  20. MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of the HER2/neu receptor using targeted magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Akhlaghpoor, Shahram

    2011-06-01

    In this study, Trastuzumab modified Magnetic Nanoparticles (TMNs) were prepared as a new contrast agent for detecting HER2 (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) expression tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TMNs were prepared based on iron oxide nanoparticles core and Trastuzumab modified dextran coating. The TMNs core and hydrodynamic size were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. TMNs stability and cytotoxicity were investigated. The ability of TMNs for HER2 detection were evaluated in breast carcinoma cell lines (SKBr3 and MCF7 cells) and tumor-bearing mice by MRI and iron uptake determination. The particles core and hydrodynamic size were 9 ± 2.5 and 41 ± 15 nm (size range: 15-87 nm), respectively. The molar antibody/nanoparticle ratio was 3.1-3.5. TMNs were non-toxic to the cells below the 30 μg (Fe)/mL concentration and good stable up to 8 weeks in PBS buffer. TMNs could detect HER2 oncogenes in the cells surface with imagable contrast by MRI. The invivo study in mice bearing tumors indicated that TMNs possessed a good diagnostic ability as HER2 specific contrast agent by MRI. TMNs were demonstrated to be able to selectively accumulate in the tumor cells, with a proper signal enhancement in MRI T2 images. So, the complex may be considered for further investigations as an MRI contrast agent for detection of HER2 expression tumors in human.

  1. MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of the HER2/neu receptor using targeted magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein, E-mail: hrajabi@modares.ac.ir [Tarbiat Modares University, Department of Medical Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babaei, Mohammad Hossein [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Department of Radioisotope (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhlaghpoor, Shahram [Sina Hospital, Tehran Medical University, Noor Medical Imaging Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    In this study, Trastuzumab modified Magnetic Nanoparticles (TMNs) were prepared as a new contrast agent for detecting HER2 (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) expression tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TMNs were prepared based on iron oxide nanoparticles core and Trastuzumab modified dextran coating. The TMNs core and hydrodynamic size were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. TMNs stability and cytotoxicity were investigated. The ability of TMNs for HER2 detection were evaluated in breast carcinoma cell lines (SKBr3 and MCF7 cells) and tumor-bearing mice by MRI and iron uptake determination. The particles core and hydrodynamic size were 9 {+-} 2.5 and 41 {+-} 15 nm (size range: 15-87 nm), respectively. The molar antibody/nanoparticle ratio was 3.1-3.5. TMNs were non-toxic to the cells below the 30 {mu}g (Fe)/mL concentration and good stable up to 8 weeks in PBS buffer. TMNs could detect HER2 oncogenes in the cells surface with imagable contrast by MRI. The invivo study in mice bearing tumors indicated that TMNs possessed a good diagnostic ability as HER2 specific contrast agent by MRI. TMNs were demonstrated to be able to selectively accumulate in the tumor cells, with a proper signal enhancement in MRI T2 images. So, the complex may be considered for further investigations as an MRI contrast agent for detection of HER2 expression tumors in human.

  2. Magnetisk resonans-imaging (MRI)-styret fokuseret ultralyd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomir, Rares; Hokland, S.; Pedersen, M.

    2005-01-01

    demonstrated with this unique technology, and based on these experiments the combination of focussed ultrasound and MRI thermometry holds promise for future oncological diagnostics and treatment. In this paper we review some of the recent methodological developments as well as experimental and first clinical...

  3. Diagnostic imaging in 13 cases of Rasmussen's encephalitis. Can early MRI suggest the diagnosis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapparini, L.; Farina, L.; Ciceri, E.; Erbetta, A.; Savoiardo, M. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Ist. Nazionale Neurologico ' ' C. Besta' ' , Milano (Italy); Granata, T.; Ragona, F.; Freri, E. [Dept. of Paediatric Neurology, Ist. Nazionale Neurologico ' ' C. Besta' ' , Milano (Italy); Fusco, L. [Dept. of Paediatric Neurology, Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Roma (Italy); Gobbi, G. [Dept. of Paediatric Neurology, Ospedale Maggiore Pizzardi, Bologna (Italy); Capovilla, G. [Dept. of Paediatric Neurology, Ospedale Poma, Mantova (Italy); Tassi, L. [Dept. of Epilepsy Surgery, Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milano (Italy); Viri, M. [Epilepsy Centre, Ospedale Fatebenefratelli-Oftalmico, Milano (Italy); Giordano, L. [Dept. of Paediatric Neurology, Ospedale Civile, Brescia (Italy); Bernardina, B.D. [Dept. of Paediatric Neurology, Policlinico Borgo Roma, Verona (Italy); Spreafico, R. [Dept. of Neurophysiology, Ist. Nazionale Neurologico ' ' C. Besta' ' , Milano (Italy)

    2003-03-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis (RE) is a rare, progressive, chronic encephalitis characterised by drug-resistant epilepsy, progressive hemiparesis and mental impairment. It typically involves only one cerebral hemisphere, which becomes atrophic. We present neuroradiological findings in 13 children with RE. MRI was performed in all patients, fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (PET) in three, Tc-99m hexamethylpropylenamine oxime single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in two and proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}HMRS) in two. MRI showed progression of the hemisphere atrophy, always prevalent in the region primarily involved (13 patients), spread of the abnormal signal in white matter (11) and cortex (10) and progression of atrophy of the head of the caudate nucleus (nine). Associated secondary changes were: atrophy of the contralateral cerebellar hemisphere (in four patients), the ipsilateral hippocampus (in five) and the brain stem (in five). The earliest CT and MRI abnormalities, seen between 1 day and 4 months after the first seizure (in 12 patients examined, nine of whom had MRI) in one cerebral hemisphere included: high signal on T2-weighted images in the cortex (seven patients) and white matter (nine), cortical atrophy usually involving the frontoinsular region, with mild or severe enlargement of the lateral ventricle (eight) and moderate atrophy of the head of the caudate nucleus (seven). (orig.)

  4. Locating the central sulcus using three dimensional image fusion system of helmet shaped whole head MEG and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Tsuyoshi; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Seki, Kaoru; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Satoru (Kohnan Hospital, Sendai (Japan)); Yoshimoto, Takashi

    1994-08-01

    We compared MR anatomy and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) functional methods in locating the central sulcus. In 20 normal volunteers and 58 patients with intracranial structural lesions, the short latency somatosensory evoked magnetic fields for median nerve and posterior tibial nerve stimuli were measured over the entire head, using a helmet shaped MEG system. The dipole positions estimated by a single current dipole model were projected onto the three dimensional MRI. In 94% of a total of 156 hemispheres, N20m dipole positions for median nerve stimuli coincided with the central sulcus difined by MR anatomical image only. For posterior tibial nerve stimuli, the P38m dipole positions were estimated as being near the medial end of the anatomical central sulcus. MRI and MEG are complementary in locating the central sulcus, even in cases of intracranial structural lesions. (author).

  5. Virtual Humans for Implantable Device Safety Assessment in MRI: Mitigating Magnetic Resonance Imaging Hazards for Implanted Medical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James E; Qiang, Rui; Stadnik, Paul J; Stotts, Larry J; Von Arx, Jeffrey A

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred modality for soft tissue imaging because of its nonionizing radiation and lack of contrast agent. Due to interactions between the MR system and active implantable medical devices (AIMDs), patients with implants such as pacemakers are generally denied access to MRI, which presents a detriment to that population. It has been estimated that 50-75% of patients with a cardiac device were denied access to MRI scanning and, moreover, that 17% of pacemaker patients need an MRI within 12 months of implantation [1]. In recent years, AIMD manufacturers, such as Biotronik, have assessed the conditional safety of devices in MRI.

  6. TU-G-BRA-08: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): Hybrid PET-MRI Imaging of Acute Radiation Induced Cardiac Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sherif, O; Xhaferllari, I; Gaede, S [Western Univeristy, London, ON (United Kingdom); London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON (United Kingdom); Sykes, J; Butler, J [Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON (United Kingdom); Wisenberg, G; Prato, F [Western Univeristy, London, ON (United Kingdom); Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify the presence of low-dose radiation induced cardiac toxicity in a canine model using hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Research ethics board approval was obtained for a longitudinal imaging study of 5 canines after cardiac irradiation. Animals were imaged at baseline, 1 week post cardiac irradiation, and 1 month post cardiac irradiation using a hybrid PET- MRI system (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). The imaging protocol was designed to assess acute changes in myocardial perfusion and inflammation. Myocardial perfusion imaging was performed using N13-ammonia tracer followed by a dynamic PET acquisition scan. A compartmental tracer kinetic model was used for absolute perfusion quantification. Myocardial inflammation imaging was performed using F18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tracer. The standard uptake value (SUV) over a region encompassing the whole heart was used to compare FDG scans. All animals received a simulation CT scan (GE Medical Systems) for radiation treatment planning. Radiation treatment plans were created using the Pinncale3 treatment planning system (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems) and designed to resemble the typical cardiac exposure during left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy. Cardiac irradiations were performed in a single fraction using a TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: The delivered dose (mean ± standard deviation) to heart was 1.8±0.2 Gy. Reductions in myocardial stress perfusion relative to baseline were observed in 2 of the 5 animals 1 month post radiation. A global inflammatory response 1 month post radiation was observed in 4 of the 5 animals. The calculated SUV at 1 month post radiation was significantly higher (p=0.05) than the baseline SUV. Conclusion: Low doses of cardiac irradiation (< 2 Gy) may lead to myocardial perfusion defects and a global inflammatory response that can be detectable as early as 1 month post irradiation

  7. MO-A-BRA-01: State of the Art in Quantitative Imaging in CT, PET and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNitt-Gray, M; Kinahan, P; Jackson, E

    2012-06-01

    Diagnostic Imaging is evolving from a modality where the emphasis is on the acquisition and interpretation of image data by radiologists to one where imaging devices may be used as measurement devices that are able to produce quantitative results. Some examples of quantitative measured values are already in clinical practice, including coronary artery calcium scores from CT, Standard Uptake Values (SUV) in PET imaging and Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) in MRI. Clinical and clinical research applications of quantitative anatomical and functional imaging biomarkers, including those focused on treatment assessment, have continued to dramatically expand. Studies at single centers have clearly demonstrated the potential of such applications. However, sources of bias and variance of quantitative imaging biomarkers have not previously been adequately investigated, thus limiting the implementation of robust methods to mitigate their effects. Therefore, when it comes to applications of such techniques across vendor platforms, centers, and time, challenges arise due to lack of standards, appropriate phantoms, and protocols. During the past few years, several quantitative imaging initiatives have been instigated. This symposium presentation will review selected applications of quantitative imaging biomarkers, illustrate some of the current challenges in broadening the use of such biomarkers, and discuss some of the current initiatives of various scientific and federal organizations that are focused on the standardization, qualification, and validation of quantitative imaging biomarkers. 1. Understand selected applications of quantitative imaging biomarkers. 2. Understand the factors that currently limit widespread acceptance and use of such quantitative imaging biomarkers, including sources of bias and variance. 3. Understand some of the current initiatives focused on the standardization, qualification, and validation of selected quantitative imaging biomarkers. 1

  8. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI in Preclinical Studies of Antivascular Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Horsman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antivascular treatments can either be antiangiogenic or targeting established tumour vasculature. These treatments affect the tumour microvasculature and microenvironment but may not change clinical measures like tumour volume and growth. In research on antivascular treatments, information on the tumour vasculature is therefore essential. Preclinical research is often used for optimization of antivascular drugs alone or in combined treatments. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI is an in vivo imaging method providing vascular information, which has become an important tool in both preclinical and clinical research. This review discusses common DCE-MRI imaging protocols and analysis methods and provides an overview of preclinical research on antivascular treatments utilizing DCE-MRI.

  9. Imaging features of spinal osteoid osteoma with emphasis on MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harish, Srinivasan [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, Asif [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University College London, Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-01

    A retrospective evaluation of the imaging of 13 patients with a diagnosis of osteoid osteoma (OO) of the spine was undertaken. Available imaging included radiographs (n=10), computed tomography (CT) (n=13), bone scintigraphy (n=5) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (n=13). MRI features evaluated were pattern of neural arch and vertebral body oedema and the presence of an identifiable nidus. MRI features were correlated with other available imaging. There were seven males and six females with an age range of 8-59 years. On radiographs, scoliosis was present in ten and a sclerotic pedicle in nine patients. Focal increased uptake on bone scintigraphy consistent with OO was seen in all five patients where scintigraphy was available. On CT, a nidus was identified in all patients and reactive sclerosis was seen in 12. MRI demonstrated the nidus in eight patients and unilateral neural arch oedema with anterior extension to involve the ipsilateral posterolateral vertebral body in 11. When MRI is performed in the evaluation of back pain, the presence of unilateral neural arch oedema extending to involve the posterolateral vertebral body raises the possibility of spinal OO and should prompt CT to confirm the presence of a nidus. (orig.)

  10. Imaging of the myocardium using {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferda, Jiří, E-mail: ferda@fnplzen.cz [Clinic of the Imaging Methods, University Hospital Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzeň (Czech Republic); Hromádka, Milan, E-mail: hromadkam@fnplzen.cz [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzeň (Czech Republic); Baxa, Jan, E-mail: baxaj@fnplzen.cz [Clinic of the Imaging Methods, University Hospital Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzeň (Czech Republic)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The natural combination of the metabolic and structural information is the most important strenghtof myocardial PET/MRI. • Metabolic conversion to glycolysis is needed in the assesment ov the viable myocardium. • Metabolic conversion to the fatty acid metabolism is the crucial in the assesment of the ischemic memory and myocardial inflammation. - Abstract: The introduction of the integrated hybrid PET/MRI equipment creates the possibility to perform PET and MRI simultaneously. Depending on the clinical question, the metabolic conversion to glycolytic activity or beta-oxidation is performed before the application of FDG. Since FDG aids to evaluate the energetic metabolism of the myocytes and myocardial MRI reaches the imaging capabilities of perfusion and tissue characterization in the daily routine, FDG-PET/MRI looks to be a promising method of PET/MRI exploitation in cardiac imaging. When myocardial FDG uptake should be evaluated in association with the perfusion distribution, the cross-evaluation of FDG accumulation distribution and perfusion distribution pattern is necessary. The different scenarios may be used in the assessment of myocardium, the conversion to glycolytic activity is used in the imaging of the viable myocardium, but the glycolytic activity suppression might be used in the indications of the identification of injured myocardium by ischemia or inflammation. FDG-PET/MRI might aid to answer the clinical tasks according to the structure, current function and possibilities to improve the function in ischemic heart disease or to display the extent or activity of myocardial inflammation in sarcoidosis. The tight coupling between metabolism, perfusion and contractile function offers an opportunity for the simultaneous assessment of cardiac performance using one imaging modality.

  11. Application prospective of nanoprobes with MRI and FI dual-modality imaging on breast cancer stem cells in tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hetao; Wang, Yu; Wang, Tong; Shi, Dongxing; Sun, Zengrong; Xia, Chunhui; Wang, Baiqi

    2016-06-23

    Breast cancer (BC) is a serious disease to threat lives of women. Numerous studies have proved that BC originates from cancer stem cells (CSCs). But at present, no one approach can quickly and simply identify breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in solid tumor. Nanotechnology is probably able to realize this goal. But in study process, scientists find it seems that nanomaterials with one modality, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or fluorescence imaging (FI), have their own advantages and drawbacks. They cannot meet practical requirements in clinic. The nanoprobe combined MRI with FI modality is a promising tool to accurately detect desired cells with low amount in tissue. In this work, we briefly describe the MRI and FI development history, analyze advantages and disadvantages of nanomaterials with single modality in cancer cell detection. Then the application development of nanomaterials with dual-modality in cancer field is discussed. Finally, the obstacles and prospective of dual-modal nanoparticles in detection field of BCSCs are also pointed out in order to speed up clinical applications of nanoprobes.

  12. Atlas-based deformable image registration for MRI-guided prostate radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, J.; Fripp, J.; Salvado, O.; Lambert, J.; Denham, J.W.; Capp, A.; Grer, P.B.; Parker, J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To develop atlas-based deformable image registration methods to automatically segment organs and map electron densities to pelvic MRI scans for MRI-guided radiation therapy. Methods An MRT pelvic atlas and corresponding CT atlas were developed based on whole pelvic T 2 MRI scans and CT scans for 39 patients. Expert manual segmentations on both MRI and CT scans were obtained. The atlas was deformably registered to the individual patient MRI scans for automatic prostate, rectum, bladder and bone segmentation. These were compared to the manual segmentations using the Dice overlap coefficient. The same deformation vectors were then applied to the CT-atlas to produce pseudo-CT scans that correspond to the patient MRI scan anatomy but are populated with Hounsfield units. The original patient plan was recalculated on the pseudo-CT and compared to the original CT plan and bulk density plans on the MRI scans. Results Dice coefficient results were high (>0.8) for bone and prostate but lower (<0.7) for bladder and rectum which exhibit greater changes in shape and volume. Doses calculated on pseudo-CT scans were within 3% of original patient plans. Two sources of discrepancy were found; MR anatomy differences from CT due to patient setup differences at the MR scanner. and Hounsfield unit differences for bone in the pseudo-CT from original CT. Patient setup will be adressed with a

  13. Analysis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) involving the central nervous system by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kimihiro; Hara, Masako; Nakajima, Shinji and others

    1989-04-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) commonly occurs in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). But definitive diagnosis remains difficult even with computed tomography (CT). In this study, we used the recently developed technique, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for CNS lupus and compared it with CT scans. CT was performed with a General Electric 8800 CT/T scanner. MRI was performed using a Mitsubishi Electric MMI-150 S. Ten patients with CNS lupus were divided into 3 groups. Group I included 4 cases with neurological manifestations alone. All lesions seen on CT were also detected by MRI, with greater clarity and extent. Furthermore, MRI depicted several microinfarcts in white matter without symptoms. Group II included 5 cases with psychiatric features alone. MRI detected a thalamic microinfarct in only one case while CT showed no abnormality in all cases. Group III included 1 case with both neurological and psychiatric symptoms. MRI demonstrated a small infarct of midbrain corresponding with neurological symptoms, more clearly than CT. Therefore MRI demonstrates the degree of brain involvement in SLE more accurately than CT. (author).

  14. Analysis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) involving the central nervous system by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kimihiro; Hara, Masako; Nakajima, Shinji

    1989-01-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) commonly occurs in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). But definitive diagnosis remains difficult even with computed tomography (CT). In this study, we used the recently developed technique, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for CNS lupus and compared it with CT scans. CT was performed with a General Electric 8800 CT/T scanner. MRI was performed using a Mitsubishi Electric MMI-150 S. Ten patients with CNS lupus were divided into 3 groups. Group I included 4 cases with neurological manifestations alone. All lesions seen on CT were also detected by MRI, with greater clarity and extent. Furthermore, MRI depicted several microinfarcts in white matter without symptoms. Group II included 5 cases with psychiatric features alone. MRI detected a thalamic microinfarct in only one case while CT showed no abnormality in all cases. Group III included 1 case with both neurological and psychiatric symptoms. MRI demonstrated a small infarct of midbrain corresponding with neurological symptoms, more clearly than CT. Therefore MRI demonstrates the degree of brain involvement in SLE more accurately than CT. (author)

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nearby harm. These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and hearing aids, all of which can be ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest ...

  16. Staging of endometrial cancer with MRI: Guidelines of the European Society of Urogenital Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinkel, K. [Geneva University Hospital and Institut de Radiologie, Clinique des Grangettes, Chene-Bougeries/Geneva (Switzerland); Clinique des Grangettes, Institut de radiologie, Chene-Bougerie/Geneva (Switzerland); Forstner, R. [LandesklinikenSalzburg, Zentralroentgeninstitut, Salzburg (Austria); Danza, F.M. [Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Dipartimento di Bioimmagini e scienze radiologiche, Rome (Italy); Oleaga, L. [Hospital Clinic, Radiology Department, Barcelona (Spain); Cunha, T.M. [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia de Lisboa Francisco Gentil, Department of Radiology, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Bergman, A. [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Barentsz, J.O. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Balleyguier, C. [Institut de Cancerologie Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Brkljacic, B. [University Hospital ' ' Dubrava' ' , Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zagreb (Croatia); University of Zagreb, Medical School, Zagreb (Croatia); Spencer, J.A. [St James' s Institute of Oncology, Department of Clinical Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to define guidelines for endometrial cancer staging with MRI. The technique included critical review and expert consensus of MRI protocols by the female imaging subcommittee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology, from ten European institutions, and published literature between 1999 and 2008. The results indicated that high field MRI should include at least two T2-weighted sequences in sagittal, axial oblique or coronal oblique orientation (short and long axis of the uterine body) of the pelvic content. High-resolution post-contrast images acquired at 2 min {+-} 30 s after intravenous contrast injection are suggested to be optimal for the diagnosis of myometrial invasion. If cervical invasion is suspected, additional slice orientation perpendicular to the axis of the endocervical channel is recommended. Due to the limited sensitivity of MRI to detect lymph node metastasis without lymph node-specific contrast agents, retroperitoneal lymph node screening with pre-contrast sequences up to the level of the kidneys is optional. The likelihood of lymph node invasion and the need for staging lymphadenectomy are also indicated by high-grade histology at endometrial tissue sampling and by deep myometrial or cervical invasion detected by MRI. In conclusion, expert consensus and literature review lead to an optimized MRI protocol to stage endometrial cancer. (orig.)

  17. Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, G.; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    of essential cortex, it cannot provide information preoperatively for surgical planning.Brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly being used to localize functionally critical cortical......, if the stimulated cortex makes a critical contribution to the brain functions subserving the task. While the relationship between task and functional activation as revealed by fMRI is correlative in nature, the neurodisruptive effect of TMS reflects a causal effect on brain activity.The use of preoperative f...

  18. MRI-based measurements of respiratory motion variability and assessment of imaging strategies for radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackall, J. M.; Ahmad, S.; Miquel, M. E.; McClelland, J. R.; Landau, D. B.; Hawkes, D. J.

    2006-09-01

    Respiratory organ motion has a significant impact on the planning and delivery of radiotherapy (RT) treatment for lung cancer. Currently widespread techniques, such as 4D-computed tomography (4DCT), cannot be used to measure variability of this motion from one cycle to the next. In this paper, we describe the use of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to investigate the intra- and inter-cycle reproducibility of respiratory motion and also to estimate the level of errors that may be introduced into treatment delivery by using various breath-hold imaging strategies during lung RT planning. A reference model of respiratory motion is formed to enable comparison of different breathing cycles at any arbitrary position in the respiratory cycle. This is constructed by using free-breathing images from the inhale phase of a single breathing cycle, then co-registering the images, and thereby tracking landmarks. This reference model is then compared to alternative models constructed from images acquired during the exhale phase of the same cycle and the inhale phase of a subsequent cycle, to assess intra- and inter-cycle variability ('hysteresis' and 'reproducibility') of organ motion. The reference model is also compared to a series of models formed from breath-hold data at exhale and inhale. Evaluation of these models is carried out on data from ten healthy volunteers and five lung cancer patients. Free-breathing models show good levels of intra- and inter-cycle reproducibility across the tidal breathing range. Mean intra-cycle errors in the position of organ surface landmarks of 1.5(1.4)-3.5(3.3) mm for volunteers and 2.8(1.8)-5.2(5.2) mm for patients. Equivalent measures of inter-cycle variability across this range are 1.7(1.0)-3.9(3.3) mm for volunteers and 2.8(1.8)-3.3(2.2) mm for patients. As expected, models based on breath-hold sequences do not represent normal tidal motion as well as those based on free-breathing data, with mean errors of 4

  19. MRI-based measurements of respiratory motion variability and assessment of imaging strategies for radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackall, J M; Ahmad, S; Miquel, M E; McClelland, J R; Landau, D B; Hawkes, D J

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory organ motion has a significant impact on the planning and delivery of radiotherapy (RT) treatment for lung cancer. Currently widespread techniques, such as 4D-computed tomography (4DCT), cannot be used to measure variability of this motion from one cycle to the next. In this paper, we describe the use of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to investigate the intra- and inter-cycle reproducibility of respiratory motion and also to estimate the level of errors that may be introduced into treatment delivery by using various breath-hold imaging strategies during lung RT planning. A reference model of respiratory motion is formed to enable comparison of different breathing cycles at any arbitrary position in the respiratory cycle. This is constructed by using free-breathing images from the inhale phase of a single breathing cycle, then co-registering the images, and thereby tracking landmarks. This reference model is then compared to alternative models constructed from images acquired during the exhale phase of the same cycle and the inhale phase of a subsequent cycle, to assess intra- and inter-cycle variability ('hysteresis' and 'reproducibility') of organ motion. The reference model is also compared to a series of models formed from breath-hold data at exhale and inhale. Evaluation of these models is carried out on data from ten healthy volunteers and five lung cancer patients. Free-breathing models show good levels of intra- and inter-cycle reproducibility across the tidal breathing range. Mean intra-cycle errors in the position of organ surface landmarks of 1.5(1.4)-3.5(3.3) mm for volunteers and 2.8(1.8)-5.2(5.2) mm for patients. Equivalent measures of inter-cycle variability across this range are 1.7(1.0)-3.9(3.3) mm for volunteers and 2.8(1.8)-3.3(2.2) mm for patients. As expected, models based on breath-hold sequences do not represent normal tidal motion as well as those based on free-breathing data, with mean errors of 4

  20. Foundations of MRI phase imaging and processing for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweser, Ferdinand [New York State Univ., Buffalo, NY (United States). Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center; New York State Univ., Buffalo, NY (United States). MRI Clinical and Translational Research Center; Deistung, Andreas [Jena Univ. (Germany). Medical Physics Group; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Medical Physics Group; Jena Univ. (Germany). Michael Stifel Center for Data-driven and Simulation Science Jena

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) is a novel MRI based technique that relies on estimates of the magnetic field distribution in the tissue under examination. Several sophisticated data processing steps are required to extract the magnetic field distribution from raw MRI phase measurements. The objective of this review article is to provide a general overview and to discuss several underlying assumptions and limitations of the pre-processing steps that need to be applied to MRI phase data before the final field-to-source inversion can be performed. Beginning with the fundamental relation between MRI signal and tissue magnetic susceptibility this review covers the reconstruction of magnetic field maps from multi-channel phase images, background field correction, and provides an overview of state of the art QSM solution strategies.

  1. Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System on CT and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Dong Ik; Jang, Kyung Mi; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kang, Tae Wook; Song, Kyoung Doo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    To assess major imaging features of Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS) on contrast-enhanced CT and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and to estimate whether the combination of signal intensity favouring HCC on hepatobiliary phase (HBP) and diffusion-weighted images (DWI) can act as a major feature in LI-RADS. Four hundred twenty one patients with 445 observations were included. Major features of LI-RADS on CT and MRI as well as HBP and DWI features were assessed. Diagnostic performances of LR-5 according to LI-RADS v2014 and modified LI-RADS which incorporate combination of HBP and DWI were assessed. Pairwise comparisons of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed. For HCCs, capsule appearance had the highest rate of discordance between CT and MRI (32.7%), followed by washout appearance (22.2%). Specificity (75%) of LR-5 of LI-RADS v2014 was lower than that (77.1-79.2%) of modified LI-RADS. Area under the ROC curve of modified LI-RADS (0.755-0.775) was not significantly different from that of LI-RADS v 2014 (0.709) (p > 0.05). There were substantial discordances between CT and MRI for capsule and washout appearances in hepatic observations, and combination of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI might be able to be incorporated as a major feature of LI-RADS. (orig.)

  2. Image quality transfer and applications in diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Daniel C.; Zikic, Darko; Ghosh, Aurobrata

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a new computational imaging technique called image quality transfer (IQT). IQT uses machine learning to transfer the rich information available from one-off experimental medical imaging devices to the abundant but lower-quality data from routine acquisitions. The procedure u......, highlighting IQT's benefits even when the training set does not directly represent the application domain. The concept extends naturally to many other imaging modalities and reconstruction problems....

  3. Fusing MRI and Mechanical Imaging for Improved Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Radiomics, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Prostate Mechanical Imaging, Digital Pathology, Computer Tomography Imaging, Intra-tumoral Texture Features...ongoing journal article, and 1 approved patent. We are currently on track to complete all the remaining tasks proposed in this project by the end...Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov 27- Dec 3, Chicago, IL. - A clinical imaging analysis journal such as Journal of Urology. o A

  4. The use of MRI and CT in Imaging Occult Hip Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obadă B.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of hip fractures is particularly important due to the high dependence on the integrity of this structure for people to function in their daily lives. Left unrecognized, patients face increasing morbidity and mortality as time from the original injury lengthens. A delay of just 2 days in surgical treatment for an acute hip fracture doubles mortality. In addition, an unrecognized non-displaced fracture may displace, requiring surgery of much higher risk. This may be part of the reason that the most frequent lawsuit against Emergency Physicians is for missed orthopedic injury. We reviewed the use of MRI and CT for occult hip fractures (OHF detection at a major urban trauma unit. Our study is a retrospective review. Inclusion criteria: all patients presenting to the Emergency Clinical Hospital of Constanta with a suspected, posttraumatic, occult hip fracture, over a 5 years period were included. All patients had negative initial radiographs and underwent further imaging with either CT or MRI. A total of 185 cases meeting the inclusion criteria were identified. 72 occult hip fractures were detected with both imaging modalities. Although MRI certainly enables greater image detail, in our experience both modalities are able to provide satisfactory fracture characterization. The choice of imaging should be determined by availability and indication. MRI provides superior imaging of soft tissue but is less sensitive for degenerative changes in presence of bone edema.

  5. Development of a new RF coil and {gamma}-ray radiation shielding assembly for improved MR image quality in SPECT/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Seunghoon; Hamamura, Mark J; Roeck, Werner W; Muftuler, L Tugan; Nalcioglu, Orhan [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)], E-mail: seunghoh@uci.edu

    2010-05-07

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-based multimodality imaging systems, such as single-photon emission tomography (SPECT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI, face many difficulties because of problems with the compatibility of the nuclear detector system with the MR system. However, several studies have reported on the design considerations of MR-compatible nuclear detectors for combined SPECT/MRI. In this study, we developed a new radiofrequency (RF) coil and {gamma}-ray radiation shielding assembly to advance the practical implementation of SPECT/MRI in providing high sensitivity while minimizing the interference between the MRI and SPECT systems. The proposed assembly consists of a three-channel receive-only RF coil and {gamma}-ray radiation shields made of a specialized lead composite powder designed to reduce conductivity and thus minimizing any effect on the magnetic field arising from the induced eddy currents. A conventional birdcage RF coil was also tested for comparison with the proposed RF coil. Quality (Q)-factors were measured using both RF coils without any shielding, with solid lead shielding, and with our composite lead shielding. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were calculated using 4 T MR images of phantoms both with and without the new {gamma}-ray radiation shields. The Q-factor and SNR measurements demonstrate the improved MRI performance due to the new RF coil/{gamma}-ray radiation shield assembly designed for SPECT/MRI, making it a useful addition to multimodality imaging technology not only for animal studies but also for in vivo study of humans.

  6. Measurement of Strain in the Left Ventricle during Diastole withcine-MRI and Deformable Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veress, Alexander I.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2005-07-20

    The assessment of regional heart wall motion (local strain) can localize ischemic myocardial disease, evaluate myocardial viability and identify impaired cardiac function due to hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathies. The objectives of this research were to develop and validate a technique known as Hyperelastic Warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle from clinical cine-MRI image datasets. The technique uses differences in image intensities between template (reference) and target (loaded) image datasets to generate a body force that deforms a finite element (FE) representation of the template so that it registers with the target image. To validate the technique, MRI image datasets representing two deformation states of a left ventricle were created such that the deformation map between the states represented in the images was known. A beginning diastoliccine-MRI image dataset from a normal human subject was defined as the template. A second image dataset (target) was created by mapping the template image using the deformation results obtained from a forward FE model of diastolic filling. Fiber stretch and strain predictions from Hyperelastic Warping showed good agreement with those of the forward solution. The technique had low sensitivity to changes in material parameters, with the exception of changes in bulk modulus of the material. The use of an isotropic hyperelastic constitutive model in the Warping analyses degraded the predictions of fiber stretch. Results were unaffected by simulated noise down to an SNR of 4.0. This study demonstrates that Warping in conjunction with cine-MRI imaging can be used to determine local ventricular strains during diastole.

  7. Imaging of female pelvic malignancies regarding MRI, CT, and PET/CT. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alt, Celine D.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hallscheidt, Peter [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Brocker, Kerstin A.; Eichbaum, Michael; Sohn, Christof; Arnegger, Florian U. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    2011-11-15

    To compose diagnostic standard operating procedures for both clinical and imaging assessment for vulvar and vaginal cancer, for vaginal sarcoma, and for ovarian cancer. The literature was reviewed for diagnosing the above mentioned malignancies in the female pelvis. Special focus herein lies in tumor representation in MRI, followed by the evaluation of CT and PET/CT for this topic. MRI is a useful additional diagnostic complement but by no means replaces established methods of gynecologic diagnostics and ultrasound. In fact, MRI is only implemented in the guidelines for vulvar cancer. According to the current literature, CT is still the cross-sectional imaging modality of choice for evaluating ovarian cancer. PET/CT appears to have advantages for staging and follow-up in sarcomas and cancers of the ovaries. (orig.)

  8. WE-DE-206-03: MRI Image Formation - Slice Selection, Phase Encoding, Frequency Encoding, K-Space, SNR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C. [Indiana University School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  9. WE-DE-206-03: MRI Image Formation - Slice Selection, Phase Encoding, Frequency Encoding, K-Space, SNR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  10. Intra-observer agreement in single and joint double readings of contrast-enhanced breast MRI screening for women with high genetic breast cancer risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo C

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine intra-observer reliability (IR for lesion detection on contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance images (MRI for screening women at high risk of breast cancer in single and joint double readings, without case selection. Methods: Contrast-enhanced breast MRIs were interpreted twice by the same independent reader and twice in joint readings. IR was assessed for lesion detection, normal MRI identification, mass, non-mass like enhancements (NMLE and focus characterisation, and BI-RADS assessment. Results: MRI examinations for 124 breasts, 65 women (mean age 43.4y were retrospectively reviewed with 110 lesions identified. Abnormal BIRADS (3-5 classifications were found for 52.3% in single readings and 58.5% in joint readings. Seven biopsies were performed for 4 histologically confirmed cancers. IR for BI-RADS classifications was good for single (0.63, 95% CI: 0.49-0.77, and joint readings (0.77, 95% CI: 0.61-0.93. IR for background parenchymal enhancement (BPE was moderate across single (0.53, 95% CI: 0.40-0.65 and joint readings (0.44, 95% CI: 0.33-0.56. IR for BI-RADS category according to each enhancement was poor for single (0.27, 95% CI: 0.10-0.44, and higher for joint readings, (0.58, 95% CI: 0.43-0.72. Conclusions: IR in BI-RADS breast assessments or BI-RADS lesion assessments are better with joint reading in screening for women with high genetic risks, in particular for abnormal MRI (BI-RADS 3, 4 and 5.

  11. Arcuate fasciculus laterality by diffusion tensor imaging correlates with language laterality by functional MRI in preadolescent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, Ruma Madhu; Menon, Amitha C; James, Jija S; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Sanjeev V

    2015-03-01

    Language lateralization is unique to humans. Functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) enable the study of language areas and white matter fibers involved in language, respectively. The objective of this study was to correlate arcuate fasciculus (AF) laterality by diffusion tensor imaging with that by fMRI in preadolescent children which has not yet been reported. Ten children between 8 and 12 years were subjected to fMRI and DTI imaging using Siemens 1.5 T MRI. Two language fMRI paradigms--visual verb generation and word pair task--were used. Analysis was done using SPM8 software. In DTI, the fiber volume of the arcuate fasciculus (AFV) and fractional anisotropy (FA) was measured. The fMRI Laterality Index (fMRI-LI) and DTI Laterality Index (DTI-LI) were calculated and their correlation assessed using the Pearson Correlation Index. Of ten children, mean age 10.6 years, eight showed left lateralization while bilateral language lateralization was seen in two. AFV by DTI was more on the left side in seven of the eight children who had left lateralization by fMRI. DTI could not trace the AF in one child. Of the two with bilateral language lateralization on fMRI, one showed larger AFV on the right side while the other did not show any asymmetry. There was a significant correlation (p laterality in children with a high degree of correlation between the two imaging modalities.

  12. Imaging characteristics of supratentorial ependymomas: Study on a large single institutional cohort with histopathological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalore, Sandhya; Aryan, Saritha; Prasad, Chandrajit; Santosh, Vani

    2015-01-01

    Supratentorial ependymoma (STE) is a tumor whose unique clinical and imaging characteristics have not been studied. Histopathologically, they resemble ependymoma elsewhere. We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings with clinicopathological correlation in a large number of patients with STE to identify these characteristics. Computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance images (MRI), pathology reports, and clinical information from 41 patients with pathology-confirmed STE from a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. CT and MRI findings including location, size, signal intensity, hemorrhage, and enhancement pattern were tabulated and described separately in intraventricular and intraparenchymal forms. STE was more common in pediatric age group and intraparenchymal was more common than intraventricular form. The most common presentation was features of raised intracranial tension. There were equal numbers of Grade II and Grade III tumors. The imaging characteristics in adult and pediatric age group were similar. The tumor was large and had both solid and cystic components. Advanced imaging such as diffusion, perfusion, and spectroscopy were suggestive of high-grade tumor. Only differentiating factor between Grade II and Grade III was the presence of calcification. 1234 rule and periwinkle sign which we have described in this article may help characterize this tumor on imaging. This series expands the clinical and imaging spectrum of STE and identifies characteristics that should suggest consideration of this uncommon diagnosis.

  13. Utility of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography imaging in evaluation of chronic low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harisankar, Chidambaram Natrajan Balasubramanian; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Bhattacharya, Anish; Singh, Paramjeet; Sen, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal morphologic findings in imaging were thought to explain the etiology of low back pain (LBP). However, it is now known that variety of morphologic abnormalities is noted even in asymptomatic individuals. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) could be used to differentiate incidental findings from clinically significant findings. This study was performed to define the SPECT/CT patterns in patients with LBP and to correlate these with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Thirty adult patients with LBP of duration 3 months or more were prospectively evaluated in this study. Patients with known or suspected malignancy, trauma or infectious processes were excluded. A detailed history of sensory and motor symptoms and neurologic examination was performed. All the patients were subjected to MRI and bone scintigraphy with hybrid SPECT/CT of the lumbo-sacral spine within 1 month of each other. The patients were classified into those with and without neurologic symptoms, activity limitation. The findings of clinical examination and imaging were compared. MRI and SPECT/CT findings were also compared. Thirty patients (18 men and 12 women; mean age 38 years; range 17-64 years) were eligible for the study. Clinically, 14 of 30 (46%) had neurologic signs and or symptoms. Six of the 30 patients (20%) had positive straight leg raising test (SLRT). Twenty-two of the 30 patients (73%) had SPECT abnormality. Most frequent SPECT/CT abnormality was tracer uptake in the anterior part of vertebral body with osteophytes/sclerotic changes. Significant positive agreement was noted between this finding and MRI evidence of degenerative disc disease. Only 13% of patients had more than one abnormality in SPECT. All 30 patients had MRI abnormalities. The most frequent abnormality was degenerative disc disease and facet joint arthropathy. MRI showed single intervertebral disc abnormality in 36% of the patients and more than one

  14. Accurate model-based segmentation of gynecologic brachytherapy catheter collections in MRI-images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastmeyer, Andre; Pernelle, Guillaume; Ma, Ruibin; Barber, Lauren; Kapur, Tina

    2017-12-01

    The gynecological cancer mortality rate, including cervical, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, is more than 20,000 annually in the US alone. In many countries, including the US, external-beam radiotherapy followed by high dose rate brachytherapy is the standard-of-care. The superior ability of MR to visualize soft tissue has led to an increase in its usage in planning and delivering brachytherapy treatment. A technical challenge associated with the use of MRI imaging for brachytherapy, in contrast to that of CT imaging, is the visualization of catheters that are used to place radiation sources into cancerous tissue. We describe here a precise, accurate method for achieving catheter segmentation and visualization. The algorithm, with the assistance of manually provided tip locations, performs segmentation using image-features, and is guided by a catheter-specific, estimated mechanical model. A final quality control step removes outliers or conflicting catheter trajectories. The mean Hausdorff error on a 54 patient, 760 catheter reference database was 1.49  mm; 51 of the outliers deviated more than two catheter widths (3.4  mm) from the gold standard, corresponding to catheter identification accuracy of 93% in a Syed-Neblett template. In a multi-user simulation experiment for evaluating RMS precision by simulating varying manually-provided superior tip positions, 3σ maximum errors were 2.44  mm. The average segmentation time for a single catheter was 3 s on a standard PC. The segmentation time, accuracy and precision, are promising indicators of the value of this method for clinical translation of MR-guidance in gynecologic brachytherapy and other catheter-based interventional procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Conventional MRI and magnetisation transfer imaging of tumour-like multiple sclerosis in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metafratzi, Z.; Argyropoulou, M.I.; Efremidis, S.C.; Tzoufi, M.; Papadopoulou, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Tumefactive multiple sclerosis is a rare entity in children. Differential diagnosis includes other mass lesions such as neoplasm and abscess. A case of tumefactive multiple sclerosis in a child is presented. The open-ring pattern of enhancement on conventional MRI and magnetisation transfer imaging was important for the initial diagnosis and the evaluation of the course of the disease. (orig.)

  16. Calix[4]arenes as Molecular Platforms for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Contrast Agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schehle, Daniel T.; Schatz, Juergen; Laurent, Sophie; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert N.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Peters, Joop A.

    2009-01-01

    An amphiphilic conjugate 1 of a calix[4]arene with four Gd-DOTA chelates (DOTA=1,4,7,10-tetra(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane) was prepared and the properties relevant to its application as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent were investigated by NMR, dynamic light

  17. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motaal, Abdallah G.; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L.; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M. J.; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously

  18. Cardiovascular hybrid imaging using PET/MRI; Kardiovaskulaere Hybridbildgebung mit PET/MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nensa, Felix; Schlosser, Thomas [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie

    2014-12-15

    The following overview provides a summary of the state of the art and research as well as potential clinical applications of cardiovascular PET/MR imaging. PET/MRI systems have been clinically available for a few years, and their use in cardiac imaging has been successfully demonstrated. At this period in time, some of the technical difficulties that arose at the beginning have been solved; in particular with respect to MRI-based attenuation correction, caution should be exercised with PET quantification. In addition, many promising technical options are still in the developmental stage, such as MRI-based motion correction of PET data resulting from simultaneous MR acquisition, and are not yet available for cardiovascular imaging. On the other hand, PET/MRI has been used to demonstrate significant pathologies such as acute and chronic myocardial infarction, myocarditis or cardiac sarcoidosis; future applications in clinical routine or within studies appear to be possible. In coming years additional studies will have to be performed to prove diagnostic gain at a reasonable cost-benefit ratio before valid conclusions are possible regarding the clinical utility and future of cardiovascular PET/MR imaging.

  19. Fat ViP MRI: Virtual Phantom Magnetic Resonance Imaging of water-fat systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvati, Roberto; Hitti, Eric; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Gambarota, Giulio

    2016-06-01

    Virtual Phantom Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ViP MRI) is a method to generate reference signals on MR images, using external radiofrequency (RF) signals. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of ViP MRI to generate complex-data images of phantoms mimicking water-fat systems. Various numerical phantoms with a given fat fraction, T2* and field map were designed. The k-space of numerical phantoms was converted into RF signals to generate virtual phantoms. MRI experiments were performed at 4.7T using a multi-gradient-echo sequence on virtual and physical phantoms. The data acquisition of virtual and physical phantoms was simultaneous. Decomposition of the water and fat signals was performed using a complex-based water-fat separation algorithm. Overall, a good agreement was observed between the fat fraction, T2* and phase map values of the virtual and numerical phantoms. In particular, fat fractions of 10.5±0.1 (vs 10% of the numerical phantom), 20.3±0.1 (vs 20%) and 30.4±0.1 (vs 30%) were obtained in virtual phantoms. The ViP MRI method allows for generating imaging phantoms that i) mimic water-fat systems and ii) can be analyzed with water-fat separation algorithms based on complex data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The hypofunctioning thyroid nodule: Radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, R.; Wagner-Manslau, C.

    1992-01-01

    The hyperfunctioning thyroid nodule is a scintigraphic diagnosis by definition. Its dignity is assessed by fine needle aspiration biopsy. Radiographic methods and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are no primary tools in diagnosis of the hypofunctioning thyroid nodule but may reveal additional information, especially in cases of retrosternal goiter and thyroid malignomas. (orig.) [de

  1. Semi-automatic delitneation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitton, I.; Cornelissen, S. A. P.; Duppen, J. C.; Steenbakkers, R. J. H. M.; Peeters, S. T. H.; Hoebers, F. J. P.; Kaanders, J. H. A. M.; Nowak, P. J. C. M.; Rasch, C. R. N.; van Herk, M.

    Purpose: To develop a delineation tool that refines physician-drawn contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in nasopharynx cancer, using combined pixel value information from x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during delineation. Methods: Operator-guided delineation

  2. Investigating the Feasibility of Rapid MRI for Image-Guided Motion Management in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sawant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner. A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter, tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter, tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  3. Investigating the feasibility of rapid MRI for image-guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Amit; Keall, Paul; Pauly, Kim Butts; Alley, Marcus; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Loo, Billy W; Hinkle, Jacob; Joshi, Sarang

    2014-01-01

    Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner). A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP) sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D) images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter), tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter), tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  4. High-resolution three-dimensional diffusion-weighted imaging of middle ear cholesteatoma at 3.0 T MRI: Usefulness of 3D turbo field-echo with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation (TFE–DSDE) compared to single-shot echo-planar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Obara, Makoto; Togao, Osamu; Matsumoto, Nozomu; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively evaluate the usefulness of a newly developed high-resolution three-dimensional diffusion-weighted imaging method, turbo field-echo with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium (TFE–DSDE) in diagnosing middle-ear cholesteatoma by comparing it to conventional single-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging (SS-EP DWI). Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and informed consent from all participants were obtained. We studied 30 patients with preoperatively suspected acquired cholesteatoma. Each patient underwent an MR examination including both SS-EP DWI and DSDE-TFE using a 3.0 T MR scanner. Images of the 30 patients (60 temporal bones including 30 with and 30 without cholesteatoma) were reviewed by two independent neuroradiologists. The confidence level for the presence of cholesteatoma was graded on a scale of 0–2 (0 = definite absence, 1 = equivocal, 2 = definite presence). Interobserver agreement as well as sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for detection were assessed for the two reviewers. Results: Excellent interobserver agreement was shown for TFE–DSDE (κ = 0.821) whereas fair agreement was obtained for SS-EP DWI (κ = 0.416). TFE–DSDE was associated with significantly higher sensitivity (83.3%) and accuracy (90.0%) compared to SS-EP DWI (sensitivity = 35.0%, accuracy = 66.7%; p < 0.05). No significant difference was found in specificity (96.7% for TFE–DSDE, 98.3% for SS-EP DWI) Conclusion: With increased spatial resolution and reduced susceptibility artifacts, TFE–DSDE improves the accuracy in diagnosing acquired middle ear cholesteatomas compared to SS-EP DWI

  5. Quantitative analysis of the breath-holding half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo technique in abdominal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    A consecutive series of 50 patients (28 males and 22 females) who underwent hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from August to December 2011 were enrolled in this study. The appropriate parameters for abdominal MRI scans were determined by comparing the images (TE = 90 and 128 msec) produced using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) technique at different signal acquisition times. The patients consisted of 15 normal patients, 25 patients with a hepatoma and 10 patients with a hemangioma. The TE in a single patient was set to either 90 msec or 128 msec. This was followed by measurements using the four normal rendering methods of the biliary tract system and the background signal intensity using the maximal signal intensity techniques in the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, fat, muscles and hemangioma. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were obtained. The image quality was assessed subjectively, and the results were compared. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly higher at TE = 128 msec than at TE = 90 when diseases of the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, and fat and muscles, hepatocellular carcinomas and hemangiomas, and rendering the hepatobiliary tract system based on the maximum signal intensity technique were involved (p breath-hold half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) was found to be effective in illustrating the abdominal organs for TE = 128 msec. Overall, the image quality at TE = 128 msec was better than that at TE = 90 msec due to the improved signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Overall, the HASTE technique for abdominal MRI based on a high-magnetic field (3.0 T) at a TE of 128 msec can provide useful data.

  6. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  7. Shoulder MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee: Identification of difficult-to-diagnose meniscal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecouvet, F; Van Haver, T; Acid, S; Perlepe, V; Kirchgesner, T; Vande Berg, B; Triqueneaux, P; Denis, M-L; Thienpont, E; Malghem, J

    2018-02-01

    This article characterizes common meniscal pathologies, reviews magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnostic criteria for meniscal tears, and identifies difficult-to-detect tears and fragments and the best MRI sequences and practices for recognizing these lesions. These difficult-to-diagnose meniscal lesions that radiologists should consider include tears, meniscocapsular separation lesions, and displaced meniscal fragments. Meniscus tears are either vertical, which are generally associated with traumatic injury, horizontal, which are associated with degenerative injury, or combinations of both. MRI has a high sensitivity for tears but not for fragments; MRI performance is also better for medial than lateral meniscal lesions. Fragment detection can be improved by recognizing signs secondary to migration, especially signs of epiphyseal irritation and mechanical impingement. Radial and peripheral tears, as well as those close to the posterior horn insertion, have been traditionally difficult to detect, but improvements in arthroscopic knowledge, identification of common lesion patterns, and selection of the proper MRI sequence and plane for each lesion type mean that, when properly used, MRI is an invaluable tool in detecting all types of meniscal tears. Copyright © 2017 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7.0 tesla MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of ischemic stroke. Current conventional imaging techniques assessing intracranial arterial disease in vivo only visualize the vessel wall lumen instead of the pathological vessel wall itself. Therefore, not much is known about the imaging

  10. Ultrasound imaging and contrast agents: a safe alternative to MRI?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, Margot H.; Wijkstra, Hessel; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Grimbergen, Cornelis A.

    2006-01-01

    Microbubble contrast media are used to enhance ultrasound images. Because ultrasound is a real-time investigation, contrast-enhanced ultrasound offers possibilities for perfusion imaging. This review is conducted to evaluate the safety of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and its possible role in medical

  11. Usefulness and limitation of functional MRI with echo planar imaging using clinical MR apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Katsusuke; Zenke, Kiichiro; Saito, Masahiro; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Ohue, Shiro; Sakaki, Saburo; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki; Nagasawa, Kiyoshi

    1998-01-01

    We studied blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) with EPI sequence in 21 normal volunteers and 8 presurgical clinical patients using a 1.5 T clinical MRI apparatus. To optimize the imaging parameters, we compared the fMRI images obtained by GFE-EPI and by SE-EPI in normal volunteers while each squeezed a sponge ball. We identified the motor cortex in 85.7% of normal volunteers by GFE-EPI in contrast to only 28.6% by SE-EPI. In addition, our clinical MR apparatus, using optimized parameters, maximally provides 15 slices per 5 seconds. In patients with brain tumor close to the sensorimotor cortex, we attempted to identify the motor cortex preoperatively by this procedure and found a significant increase of signal intensity in the motor cortex in 5 of 8 patients. In conclusion, fMRI using EPI may be useful for identifying the motor cortex preoperatively. However, further development of the apparatus is needed to obtain better temporal and spatial resolution for clinical applications. (author)

  12. Robotically Assisted Long Bone Biopsy Under MRI Imaging: Workflow and Preclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Kevin; Lim, Sunghwan; Jun, Changhan; Monfaredi, Reza; Sharma, Karun; Fricke, Stanley Thomas; Vargas, Luis; Petrisor, Doru; Stoianovici, Dan

    2018-01-01

    Our research team has developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible robot for long bone biopsy. The robot is intended to enable a new workflow for bone biopsy in pediatrics under MRI imaging. Our long-term objectives are to minimize trauma and eliminate radiation exposure when diagnosing children with bone cancers and bone infections. This article presents our robotic systems, phantom accuracy studies, and workflow analysis. This section describes several aspects of our work including the envisioned clinical workflow, the MRI-compatible robot, and the experimental setup. The workflow consists of five steps and is intended to enable the entire procedure to be completed in the MRI suite. The MRI-compatible robot is MR Safe, has 3 degrees of freedom, and a remote center of motion mechanism for orienting a needle guide. The accuracy study was done in a Siemens Aera 1.5T scanner with a long bone phantom. Four targeting holes were drilled in the phantom. Each target was approached twice at slightly oblique angles using the robot needle guide for a total of eight attempts. A workflow analysis showed the average time for each targeting attempt was 32 minutes, including robot setup time. The average 3D targeting error was 1.39 mm with a standard deviation of 0.40 mm. All of the targets were successfully reached. The results showed the ability of the robotic system in assisting the radiologist to precisely target a bone phantom in the MRI environment. The robot system has several potential advantages for clinical application, including the ability to work at the MRI isocenter and serve as a steady and precise guide. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MRI-Derived Cellularity Index as a Potential Noninvasive Imaging Biomarker of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    shows that two-thirds of cancers have no genetic or environmental predisposition .25 This highlights the importance of noninvasive screening measures...oncologic imaging, such as prostate, liver, and breast cancer , andwe briefly present some preliminary data in prostate cancer at the end of "clinical...magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an emer- ging diagnostic tool for the screening, staging and treatment of prostate cancer (PCa).1–17 However

  14. High resolution imaging of the mitral valve in the natural state with 7 Tesla MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, Sam E.; Liachenko, Serguei; Ingels, Neil B.; Wenk, Jonathan F.; Jensen, Morten O.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging techniques of the mitral valve have improved tremendously during the last decade, but challenges persist. The delicate changes in annulus shape and papillary muscle position throughout the cardiac cycle have significant impact on the stress distribution in the leaflets and chords, thus preservation of anatomically accurate positioning is critical. The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro method and apparatus for obtaining high-resolution 3D MRI images of porcine mitral valves ...

  15. IMAGING KEY TO DIAGNOSE ADNEXAL MASSES- MRI WITH HISTOPATHOLOGICAL CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri Sampathi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of our study is to evaluate the accuracy of MR imaging in characterisation of adnexal masses. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was done for a span of 7 months from July 2016 to January 2017. Preoperative MR imaging of the pelvis was performed in 77 women with clinically and sonographically detected adnexal masses. The accuracy of MR imaging in the differentiation between benign and malignant ovarian masses was evaluated using histopathological results as the standard of reference. RESULTS The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MR imaging in characterisation of ovarian masses were 95.2%, 98.4% and 97.6%, respectively. CONCLUSION In conclusion, MR imaging is a better diagnostic modality for differentiating and characterising benign and malignant adnexal masses.

  16. Brain tumor segmentation using holistically nested neural networks in MRI images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Ying; Krauze, Andra V; Ning, Holly; Cheng, Jason Y; Arora, Barbara C; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W

    2017-10-01

    Gliomas are rapidly progressive, neurologically devastating, largely fatal brain tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used technique employed in the diagnosis and management of gliomas in clinical practice. MRI is also the standard imaging modality used to delineate the brain tumor target as part of treatment planning for the administration of radiation therapy. Despite more than 20 yr of research and development, computational brain tumor segmentation in MRI images remains a challenging task. We are presenting a novel method of automatic image segmentation based on holistically nested neural networks that could be employed for brain tumor segmentation of MRI images. Two preprocessing techniques were applied to MRI images. The N4ITK method was employed for correction of bias field distortion. A novel landmark-based intensity normalization method was developed so that tissue types have a similar intensity scale in images of different subjects for the same MRI protocol. The holistically nested neural networks (HNN), which extend from the convolutional neural networks (CNN) with a deep supervision through an additional weighted-fusion output layer, was trained to learn the multiscale and multilevel hierarchical appearance representation of the brain tumor in MRI images and was subsequently applied to produce a prediction map of the brain tumor on test images. Finally, the brain tumor was obtained through an optimum thresholding on the prediction map. The proposed method was evaluated on both the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation (BRATS) Benchmark 2013 training datasets, and clinical data from our institute. A dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and sensitivity of 0.78 and 0.81 were achieved on 20 BRATS 2013 training datasets with high-grade gliomas (HGG), based on a two-fold cross-validation. The HNN model built on the BRATS 2013 training data was applied to ten clinical datasets with HGG from a locally developed database. DSC and sensitivity of

  17. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arabi, H.; Koutsouvelis, N.; Rouzaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial...... the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas...... voting. The obtained bone map is then used to assess the quality of deformed atlases to perform voxel-wise weighted atlas fusion. To evaluate the performance of the method, a leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) scheme was devised to find optimal parameters for the model. Geometric evaluation...

  18. CT and MRI findings of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the early stage. The usefulness of diffusion-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukisu, Ryutaro; Kushihashi, Tamio; Gokan, Takehiko

    2001-01-01

    To detect subtle CT and MRI features of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD) in the early stage is important to prevent a human-to-human transmission. This study included 10 patients of CJD who underwent CT and/or MRI in its early stage. CT, T1- and T2-weighted MRI, DWI, and FLAIR images were obtained in 10, 6, 4, and 2 patients respectively. On DWI, abnormal hyperintensities were observed in both cerebral cortex, and in basal ganglia in all patients. On FLAIR images, abnormal hyperintensies were observed in one patient. Detection of abnormal intensities may be possible in the early stage of CJD using MRI, particularly with DWI. (author)

  19. CT and MRI findings of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the early stage. The usefulness of diffusion-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukisu, Ryutaro; Kushihashi, Tamio; Gokan, Takehiko [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    2001-02-01

    To detect subtle CT and MRI features of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD) in the early stage is important to prevent a human-to-human transmission. This study included 10 patients of CJD who underwent CT and/or MRI in its early stage. CT, T1- and T2-weighted MRI, DWI, and FLAIR images were obtained in 10, 6, 4, and 2 patients respectively. On DWI, abnormal hyperintensities were observed in both cerebral cortex, and in basal ganglia in all patients. On FLAIR images, abnormal hyperintensies were observed in one patient. Detection of abnormal intensities may be possible in the early stage of CJD using MRI, particularly with DWI. (author)

  20. Neuronal pathology in deep grey matter structures: a multimodal imaging analysis combining PET and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosque-Freeman, L.; Leroy, C.; Galanaud, D.; Sureau, F.; Assouad, R.; Tourbah, A.; Papeix, C.; Comtat, C.; Trebossen, R.; Lubetzki, C.; Delforge, J.; Bottlaender, M.; Stankoff, B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess neuronal damage in deep gray matter structures by positron emission tomography (PET) using [ 11 C]-flumazenil (FMZ), a specific central benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, and [ 18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), which reflects neuronal metabolism. To compare results obtained by PET and those with multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Background: It is now accepted that neuronal injury plays a crucial role in the occurrence and progression of neurological disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). To date, available MRI techniques do not specifically assess neuronal damage, but early abnormalities, such as iron deposition or atrophy, have been described in deep gray matter structures. Whether those MRI modifications correspond to neuronal damage remains to be further investigated. Materials and methods: Nine healthy volunteers were compared to 10 progressive and 9 relapsing remitting (RR) MS patients. Each subject performed two PET examinations with [ 11 C]-FMZ and [ 18 F]-FDG, on a high resolution research tomograph dedicated to brain imaging (Siemens Medical Solution, spatial resolution of 2.5 mm). Deep gray matter regions were manually segmented on T1-weighted MR images with the mutual information algorithm (www.brainvisa.info), and co-registered with PET images. A multimodal MRI including T1 pre and post gadolinium, T2-proton density sequences, magnetization transfer, diffusion tensor, and protonic spectroscopy was also performed for each subject. Results: On PET with [ 11 C]-FMZ, there was a pronounced decrease in receptor density for RR patients in all deep gray matter structures investigated, whereas the density was unchanged or even increased in the same regions for progressive patients. Whether the different patterns between RR and progressive patients reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms is currently investigated by comparing PET and multimodal MRI results. Conclusion: Combination of PET and multimodal MR imaging may provide new