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Sample records for single molecular detection

  1. Microcavity single virus detection and sizing with molecular sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantham, V. R.; Holler, S.; Kolchenko, V.; Wan, Z.; Arnold, S.

    2013-02-01

    We report the label-free detection and sizing of the smallest individual RNA virus, MS2 by a spherical microcavity. Mass of this virus is ~6 ag and produces a theoretical resonance shift ~0.25 fm upon adsorbing an individual virus at the equator of the bare microcavity, which is well below the r.m.s background noise of 2 fm. However, detection was accomplished with ease (S/N = 8, Q = 4x105) using a single dipole stimulated plasmonic-nanoshell as a microcavity wavelength shift enhancer. Analytical expressions based on the "reactive sensing principle" are developed to extract the radius of the virus from the measured signals. Estimated limit of detection for these experiments was ~0.4 ag or 240 kDa below the size of all known viruses, largest globular and elongated proteins [Phosphofructokinase (345 kDa) and Fibrinogen (390 kDa), respectively].

  2. DNA detection and single nucleotide mutation identification using SERS for molecular diagnostics and global health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Hoan T.; Gandra, Naveen; Fales, Andrew M.; Taylor, Steve M.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2017-02-01

    Nucleic acid-based molecular diagnostics at the point-of-care (POC) and in resource-limited settings is still a challenge. We present a sensitive yet simple DNA detection method with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification capability. The detection scheme involves sandwich hybridization of magnetic beads conjugated with capture probes, target sequences, and ultrabright surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) nanorattles conjugated with reporter probes. Upon hybridization, the sandwich probes are concentrated at the detection focus controlled by a magnetic system for SERS measurements. The ultrabright SERS nanorattles, consisting of a core and a shell with resonance Raman reporters loaded in the gap space between the core and the shell, serve as SERS tags for ultrasensitive signal detection. Specific DNA sequences of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and dengue virus 1 (DENV1) were used as the model marker system. Detection limit of approximately 100 attomoles was achieved. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination of wild type malaria DNA and mutant malaria DNA, which confers resistance to artemisinin drugs, was also demonstrated. The results demonstrate the molecular diagnostic potential of the nanorattle-based method to both detect and genotype infectious pathogens. The method's simplicity makes it a suitable candidate for molecular diagnosis at the POC and in resource-limited settings.

  3. A Biofunctional Molecular Beacon for Detecting Single Base Mutations in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a convenient and sensitive biosensing system to detect specific DNA sequences is an important issue in the field of genetic disease therapy. As a classic DNA detection technique, molecular beacon (MB is often used in the biosensing system. However, it has intrinsic drawbacks, including high assay cost, complicated chemical modification, and operational complexity. In this study, we developed a simple and cost-effective label-free multifunctional MB (LMMB by integrating elements of polymerization primer, template, target recognition, and G-quadruplex into one entity to detect target DNA. The core technique was accomplished by introducing a G-hairpin that features fragments of both G-quadruplex and target DNA recognition in the G-hairpin stem. Hybridization between LMMB and target DNA triggered conformational change between the G-hairpin and the common C-hairpin, resulting in significant SYBR-green signal amplification. The hybridization continues to the isothermal circular strand-displacement polymerization and accumulation of the double-stranded fragments, causing the uninterrupted extension of the LMMB without a need of chemical modification and other assistant DNA sequences. The novel and programmable LMMB could detect target DNA with sensitivity at 250 pmol/l with a linear range from 2 to 100 nmol/l and the relative standard deviation of 7.98%. The LMMB could sense a single base mutation from the normal DNA, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplicons of the mutant-type cell line from the wild-type one. The total time required for preparation and assaying was only 25 minutes. Apparently, the LMMB shows great potential for detecting DNA and its mutations in biosamples, and therefore it opens up a new prospect for genetic disease therapy.

  4. A molecular beacon microarray based on a quantum dot label for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingsheng; Bai, Zhixiong; Liu, Yuqian; Sun, Qingjiang

    2016-03-15

    In this work, we report the application of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (strAV-QD) in molecular beacon (MB) microarray assays by using the strAV-QD to label the immobilized MB, avoiding target labeling and meanwhile obviating the use of amplification. The MBs are stem-loop structured oligodeoxynucleotides, modified with a thiol and a biotin at two terminals of the stem. With the strAV-QD labeling an "opened" MB rather than a "closed" MB via streptavidin-biotin reaction, a sensitive and specific detection of label-free target DNA sequence is demonstrated by the MB microarray, with a signal-to-background ratio of 8. The immobilized MBs can be perfectly regenerated, allowing the reuse of the microarray. The MB microarray also is able to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms, exhibiting genotype-dependent fluorescence signals. It is demonstrated that the MB microarray can perform as a 4-to-2 encoder, compressing the genotype information into two outputs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Real-time PCR with molecular beacons provides a highly accurate assay for detection of Tay-Sachs alleles in single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, John E; Sanchez, J Aquiles; Pierce, Kenneth E; Wangh, Lawrence J

    2002-12-01

    The results presented here provide the first single-cell genetic assay for Tay-Sachs disease based on real-time PCR. Individual lymphoblasts were lysed with an optimized lysis buffer and assayed using one pair of primers that amplifies both the wild type and 1278 + TATC Tay-Sachs alleles. The resulting amplicons were detected in real time with two molecular beacons each with a different colored fluorochrome. The kinetics of amplicon accumulation generate objective criteria by which to evaluate the validity of each reaction. The assay had an overall utility of 95%, based on the detection of at least one signal in 235 of the 248 attempted tests and an efficiency of 97%, as 7 of the 235 samples were excluded from further analysis for objective quantitative reasons. The accuracy of the assay was 99.1%, because 228 of 230 samples gave signals consistent with the genotype of the cells. Only two of the 135 heterozygous samples were allele drop-outs, a rate far lower than previously reported for single-cell Tay-Sachs assays using conventional methods of PCR. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element against the Pesticide Fipronil and Sensitive Detection in River Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka L. Hong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fipronil is a commonly used insecticide that has been shown to have environmental and human health risks. The current standard methods of detection for fipronil and its metabolites, such as GC-MS, are time consuming and labor intensive. In this study, a variant of systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX, was utilized to identify the first single-stranded DNA (ssDNA molecular recognition element (MRE that binds to fipronil with high affinity (Kd = 48 ± 8 nM. The selected MRE displayed low cross binding activity on various environmentally relevant, structurally unrelated herbicides and pesticides, in addition to broad-spectrum binding activity on major metabolites of fipronil and a structurally similar pesticide in prepared river samples. Additionally, a proof-of-principle fluorescent detection assay was developed by using the selected ssDNA MRE as a signal-reporting element, with a limit of detection of 105 nM in a prepared river water sample.

  7. Molecular Detection of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluit, Ad C.; Visser, Maarten R.; Schmitz, Franz-Josef

    2001-01-01

    The determination of antimicrobial susceptibility of a clinical isolate, especially with increasing resistance, is often crucial for the optimal antimicrobial therapy of infected patients. Nucleic acid-based assays for the detection of resistance may offer advantages over phenotypic assays. Examples are the detection of the methicillin resistance-encoding mecA gene in staphylococci, rifampin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the spread of resistance determinants across the globe. However, molecular assays for the detection of resistance have a number of limitations. New resistance mechanisms may be missed, and in some cases the number of different genes makes generating an assay too costly to compete with phenotypic assays. In addition, proper quality control for molecular assays poses a problem for many laboratories, and this results in questionable results at best. The development of new molecular techniques, e.g., PCR using molecular beacons and DNA chips, expands the possibilities for monitoring resistance. Although molecular techniques for the detection of antimicrobial resistance clearly are winning a place in routine diagnostics, phenotypic assays are still the method of choice for most resistance determinations. In this review, we describe the applications of molecular techniques for the detection of antimicrobial resistance and the current state of the art. PMID:11585788

  8. A modified molecular beacons-based multiplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of eight foodborne pathogens in a single reaction and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qinghua; Lyu, Dongyue; Shi, Xiaolu; Jiang, Yixiang; Lin, Yiman; Li, Yinghui; Qiu, Yaqun; He, Lianhua; Zhang, Ran; Li, Qingge

    2014-03-01

    Foodborne disease outbreaks are often caused by one of the major pathogens. Early identification of the causal pathogen is crucial for disease control and prevention. We describe a real-time polymerase chain reaction (rtPCR) assay that can identify, in a single reaction, up to eight common foodborne bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterobacter sakazakii, and Shigella spp. This multiplex rtPCR assay takes advantage of modified molecular beacons and the multicolor combinational probe coding strategy to discriminate each pathogen and the homo-tag assisted non-dimer (HAND) system to prevent dimer formation. The detection limits of the assay ranged from 1.3×10(3) colony-forming units (CFU)/g stool (L. monocytogenes) to 1.6×10(4) CFU/g stool (Shigella spp.). The target genes were 100% specific as assessed on 986 reference strains covering 41 species since no cross-reactions were observed. The assay was applied to the detection of foodborne pathogens in 11,167 clinical samples and the results were compared with culture methods for further validation. The sensitivity and specificity of the rtPCR were 100% and 99%, respectively. When performed in a 96-well rtPCR system, more than 90 samples could be analyzed within 3 h. Given the high accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and short turn-around time, the established assay could be used for the rapid and reliable identification of the causative pathogens responsible for a certain foodborne disease outbreak and rapid screening of these major foodborne pathogens in laboratory-based surveillance of outpatient clinical samples or even food samples.

  9. Molecular detection of foodborne pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann

    of the VBNC state, and would thus be able to assess the outcome and impact of increasingly applied post-slaughter reduction strategies. A real-time PCR-based method for detection of Salmonella was optimized following a diversified approach to enable the shortest time of analysis possible. Positive effects...... of these pathogens in the food chain, in order to improve intervention strategies and make more effective the control of production lines and single food items. To serve this purpose, rapid and reliable detection and quantification methods are imperative. The culture-based standard methods currently applied...... for detection and enumeration of Salmonella and Campylobacter are time-consuming and laborious. They lack specificity and do not enable detection of viable but non-culturable (VBNC) bacteria. The focus of the present thesis has been development and validation of PCR-based detection methods for Salmonella...

  10. Molecular detection of foodborne pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann

    .84) was obtained between the Campylobacter counts obtained by PMA-PCR and culture, indicating that the method presents as a reliable tool for producing accurate quantitative data on viable Campylobacter. DNA from dead cells was not detected by the proposed method, however, it recognized the infectious potential...... of these pathogens in the food chain, in order to improve intervention strategies and make more effective the control of production lines and single food items. To serve this purpose, rapid and reliable detection and quantification methods are imperative. The culture-based standard methods currently applied...... for detection and enumeration of Salmonella and Campylobacter are time-consuming and laborious. They lack specificity and do not enable detection of viable but non-culturable (VBNC) bacteria. The focus of the present thesis has been development and validation of PCR-based detection methods for Salmonella...

  11. Molecular detection by active Fano-sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Yifei; Guo, Zhongyi [School of Computer and Information, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, 230009 (China)

    2017-04-15

    The optical properties and sensing performances of the molecular sensors based on plasmonic Fano-resonance (PFR) nanostructures have been numerically investigated in detail. The on-resonance sensor, in which the Fano-resonance position is overlapping with the absorption-band of the detected molecules perfectly, reveals a powerful ability to detect the molecules with a low concentration or thin thickness. By the bias-modulation of a single-layer graphene, the Fano-resonance position of the nanostructures can be tuned effectively. On being modulated properly, the PFR sensor shows an ultrahigh performance because of the unprecedentedly high overlap of the Fano-resonance position with the absorption-band of molecules, which is enabling superior signal strength in the molecular detections based on their vibrational fingerprints. Our proposed strategy may enable the development of dynamic sensors and open exciting prospects for bio-sensing. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Molecular detection of human bacterial pathogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Dongyou

    2011-01-01

    .... Molecular Detection of Human Bacterial Pathogens addresses this issue, with international scientists in respective bacterial pathogen research and diagnosis providing expert summaries on current...

  13. Novel approaches for single molecule activation and detection

    CERN Document Server

    Benfenati, Fabio; Torre, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    How can we obtain tools able to process and exchange information at the molecular scale In order to do this, it is necessary to activate and detect single molecules under controlled conditions. This book focuses on the generation of biologically-inspired molecular devices. These devices are based on the developments of new photonic tools able to activate and stimulate single molecule machines. Additionally, new light sensitive molecules can be selectively activated by photonic tools. These technological innovations will provide a way to control activation of single light-sensitive molecules, a

  14. Single microwave photon detection in the micromaser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M L; Varcoe, B T H; Wilkes, G J

    2009-01-01

    High-efficiency single photon detection is an interesting problem for many areas of physics, including low temperature measurement, quantum information science and particle physics. For optical photons, there are many examples of devices capable of detecting single photons with high efficiency. However reliable single photon detection of microwaves is very difficult, principally due to their low energy. In this paper, we present the theory of a cascade amplifier operating in the microwave regime that has an optimal quantum efficiency of 93%. The device uses a microwave photon to trigger the stimulated emission of a sequence of atoms where the energy transition is readily detectable. A detailed description of the detector's operation and some discussion of the potential limitations of the detector are presented.

  15. Quantum Dot Molecular Beacons for DNA Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Nathaniel C.

    Molecular beacons have become an important fluorescent probe for sequence-specific DNA detection. To improve the sensitivity and robustness of molecular beacon assays, fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are now being used as the fluorescent moiety for molecular beacon synthesis. Multiple linkage strategies can be used for attaching molecular beacon DNA to QDs, and multiple quenchers, including gold particles, can be used for fluorescence quenching. Covalent attachment of QDs to DNA can be achieved through amide linkage, and affinity-based attachment can be achieved with streptavidin-biotin linkage. We have shown that these linkage strategies can be used to successfully create quantum dot molecular beacons that can be used in DNA detection assays with high specificity.

  16. Molecular Detection of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-01

    based on the identification of novel genes found in tasks 3C and 3D . -3B. Develop non-radioactive detection schema. A nested primer approach was...genes. - 3D . As described in the proposal, screening for novel breast cancer peptides will begin this year. In order to identify cell surface...Clarke Springer Semin Immunopathoi Springer, Heidelberg Bearbeitung: Artikel: 539 Seite(n): 1-10 Springer, EB Schneider Druck GmbH, Rothenburg 1

  17. Ventricular beat detection in single channel electrocardiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotsinsky, Ivan A; Stoyanov, Todor V

    2004-01-29

    Detection of QRS complexes and other types of ventricular beats is a basic component of ECG analysis. Many algorithms have been proposed and used because of the waves' shape diversity. Detection in a single channel ECG is important for several applications, such as in defibrillators and specialized monitors. The developed heuristic algorithm for ventricular beat detection includes two main criteria. The first of them is based on steep edges and sharp peaks evaluation and classifies normal QRS complexes in real time. The second criterion identifies ectopic beats by occurrence of biphasic wave. It is modified to work with a delay of one RR interval in case of long RR intervals. Other algorithm branches classify already detected QRS complexes as ectopic beats if a set of wave parameters is encountered or the ratio of latest two RR intervals RRi-1/RRi is less than 1:2.5. The algorithm was tested with the AHA and MIT-BIH databases. A sensitivity of 99.04% and a specificity of 99.62% were obtained in detection of 542014 beats. The algorithm copes successfully with different complicated cases of single channel ventricular beat detection. It is aimed to simulate to some extent the experience of the cardiologist, rather than to rely on mathematical approaches adopted from the theory of signal analysis. The algorithm is open to improvement, especially in the part concerning the discrimination between normal QRS complexes and ectopic beats.

  18. Single molecule transistor based nanopore for the detection of nicotine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    A nanopore based detection methodology was proposed and investigated for the detection of Nicotine. This technique uses a Single Molecular Transistor working as a nanopore operational in the Coulomb Blockade regime. When the Nicotine molecule is pulled through the nanopore area surrounded by the Source(S), Drain (D), and Gate electrodes, the charge stability diagram can detect the presence of the molecule and is unique for a specific molecular structure. Due to the weak coupling between the different electrodes which is set by the nanopore size, the molecular energy states stay almost unaffected by the electrostatic environment that can be realised from the charge stability diagram. Identification of different orientation and position of the Nicotine molecule within the nanopore area can be made from specific regions of overlap between different charge states on the stability diagram that could be used as an electronic fingerprint for detection. This method could be advantageous and useful to detect the presence of Nicotine in smoke which is usually performed using chemical chromatography techniques.

  19. Single molecule transistor based nanopore for the detection of nicotine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, S. J., E-mail: ray.sjr@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Technical University of Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-28

    A nanopore based detection methodology was proposed and investigated for the detection of Nicotine. This technique uses a Single Molecular Transistor working as a nanopore operational in the Coulomb Blockade regime. When the Nicotine molecule is pulled through the nanopore area surrounded by the Source(S), Drain (D), and Gate electrodes, the charge stability diagram can detect the presence of the molecule and is unique for a specific molecular structure. Due to the weak coupling between the different electrodes which is set by the nanopore size, the molecular energy states stay almost unaffected by the electrostatic environment that can be realised from the charge stability diagram. Identification of different orientation and position of the Nicotine molecule within the nanopore area can be made from specific regions of overlap between different charge states on the stability diagram that could be used as an electronic fingerprint for detection. This method could be advantageous and useful to detect the presence of Nicotine in smoke which is usually performed using chemical chromatography techniques.

  20. Detection of a single enzyme molecule based on a solid-state nanopore sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, ShengWei; Gu, DeJian; Liu, Hang; Liu, QuanJun

    2016-04-15

    The nanopore sensor as a high-throughput and low-cost technology can detect a single molecule in a solution. In the present study, relatively large silicon nitride (Si3N4) nanopores with diameters of ∼28 and ∼88 nm were fabricated successfully using a focused Ga ion beam. We have used solid-state nanopores with various sizes to detect the single horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecule and for the first time analyzed single HRP molecular translocation events. In addition, a real-time monitored single enzyme molecular biochemical reaction and a translocation of the product of enzyme catalysis substrates were investigated by using a Si3N4 nanopore. Our nanopore system showed a high sensitivity in detecting single enzyme molecules and a real-time monitored single enzyme molecular biochemical reaction. This method could also be significant for studying gene expression or enzyme dynamics at the single-molecule level.

  1. Single-molecule imaging towards precise detection of individual photophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Toshiro; Oda, Masaru; Mashimo, Kei; Tachibana, Fumi; Horiuchi, Hiromi

    2006-01-01

    We present our recent study of single fluorescent molecules with specific structure, i.e. tetramethylrhodamine derivative linked with a propyl chain onto silica glass surface. For fluorescent reagent in its synthesis, we used a mixture of two kinds of isomers, which provides a sample with single molecules photophysically different each other even if chemically the same. The isomeric structural difference so introduced in the molecules will provide rather small but probably distinctive photophysical difference, for example, in non-radiative relaxation rates, which we try to detect out with our improved single-molecule microscope imaging technique. To make clear the detectability of such weak inter- or intra-molecular interactions microscopically is significant for versatile applications of single-molecule detections in life science. Our present observation at room temperatures shows so far that such decoupled contributions can be discriminated in the histograms of the intensities of the observed fluorescent spots as broader but separated multi-component structures in the distribution under specific experimental configurations. We will discuss some of the prerequisite for such detections; suitable spatio-temporal resolutions with sufficient S/N ratio, algorithms for data analysis, etc. but also precise sample operations are inevitable

  2. Molecular mechanics applied to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Ávila,Antonio Ferreira; Lacerda,Guilherme Silveira Rachid

    2008-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes, with stiffness of 1.0 TPa and strength of 60 GPa, are a natural choice for high strength materials. A problem, however, arises when experimental data are compiled. The large variability of experimental data leads to the development of numerical models denominated molecular mechanics, which is a "symbiotic" association of molecular dynamics and solid mechanics. This paper deals with molecular mechanics simulations of single-walled carbon nanotubes. To be able to...

  3. Single-molecule manipulation and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Deyu; Liu, Siyun; Gao, Ying

    2018-01-25

    Compared to conventional ensemble methods, studying macromolecules at single-molecule level can reveal extraordinary clear and even surprising views for a biological reaction. In the past 20 years, single-molecule techniques have been undergoing a very rapid development, and these cutting edge technologies have revolutionized the biological research by facilitating single-molecule manipulation and detection. Here we give a brief review about these advanced techniques, including optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy (AFM), hydrodynamic flow-stretching assay, and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET). We are trying to describe their basic principles and provide a few examples of applications for each technique. This review aims to give a rather introductory survey of single-molecule techniques for audiences with biological or biophysical background. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. On detecting selective sweeps using single genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka eSinha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the genetic basis of human adaptation has remained a central focal point of modern population genetics. One major area of interest has been the use of polymorphism data to detect so-called 'footprints' of selective sweeps - patterns produced as a beneficial mutation arises and rapidly fixes in the population. Based on numerous simulation studies and power analyses, the necessary sample size for achieving appreciable power has been shown to vary from a few individuals to a few dozen, depending on the test statistic. And yet, the sequencing of multiple copies of a single region, or of multiple genomes as is now often the case, incurs considerable cost. Enard et al. (2010 have recently proposed a method to identify patterns of selective sweeps using a single genome - and apply this approach to human and non¬human primates (chimpanzee, orangutan and macaque. They employ essentially a modification of the Hudson, Kreitman and Aguade (HKA test - using heterozygous single nucleotide poly¬morphisms (SNPs from single individuals, and divergence data from two closely related spe¬cies (human-chimpanzee, human-orangutan and human-macaque. Given the potential importance of this finding, we here investigate the properties of this statistic. We demonstrate through simulation that this approach is neither robust to demography nor background selection; nor is it robust to variable recombination rates.

  5. A new microcavity design for single molecule detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.; Schleifenbaum, F.; Stupperich, C.; Failla, A.V.; Hartschuh, A.; Meixner, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new microcavity design which allows for efficient detection of single molecules by measuring the molecular fluorescence emission coupled into a resonant cavity mode. The Fabry-Perot-type microresonator consists of two silver mirrors separated by a thin polymer film doped with dye molecules in ultralow concenctration. By slightly tilting one of the mirrors different cavity lengths can be selected within the same sample. Locally, on a μm scale, the microcavity still acts as a planar Fabry-Perot resonator. Using scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy, single emitters on resonance with a single mode of the microresonator can be spatially addressed. Our microcavity is demonstrated to be well-suited for investigating the coupling mechanism between single quantum emitters and single modes of the electromagnetic field. The microcavity layout could be integrated in a lab-on-a-microchip design for ultrasensitive microfluidic analytics and can be considered as an important improvement for single photon sources based on single molecules operating at room temperature

  6. Single photon detection in the SQS mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, M.A.; Fraga, M.M.; Lima, E.P. de; Marques, R.F.; Neves, F.; Policarpo, A.

    1997-01-01

    Results are presented concerning the detection of single UV photons in self quenching streamer detectors by photoionization of one of the gas mixture components, in this case TEA (tri ethyl-amine), whose molecules have low photoionization potential and large absorption cross section. As a UV light source, a gas scintillation counter filled with krypton was used, whose emission light spectrum, centered at approximately 150 nm, overlaps well the photoionization spectrum of TEA. The mixtures studied were argon/ethane/TEA, argon/isobutane/TEA, argon/ethane/methylal/TEA and argon/isobutane/methylal/ TEA. (author). 4 refs., 4 figs

  7. Single Nanoparticle Detection Using Optical Microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yanyan; Yu, Xiao-Chong; Gong, Qihuang; Yang, Lan; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2017-03-01

    Detection of nanoscale objects is highly desirable in various fields such as early-stage disease diagnosis, environmental monitoring and homeland security. Optical microcavity sensors are renowned for ultrahigh sensitivities due to strongly enhanced light-matter interaction. This review focuses on single nanoparticle detection using optical whispering gallery microcavities and photonic crystal microcavities, both of which have been developing rapidly over the past few years. The reactive and dissipative sensing methods, characterized by light-analyte interactions, are explained explicitly. The sensitivity and the detection limit are essentially determined by the cavity properties, and are limited by the various noise sources in the measurements. On the one hand, recent advances include significant sensitivity enhancement using techniques to construct novel microcavity structures with reduced mode volumes, to localize the mode field, or to introduce optical gain. On the other hand, researchers attempt to lower the detection limit by improving the spectral resolution, which can be implemented by suppressing the experimental noises. We also review the methods of achieving a better temporal resolution by employing mode locking techniques or cavity ring up spectroscopy. In conclusion, outlooks on the possible ways to implement microcavity-based sensing devices and potential applications are provided. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Molecular methods for the detection of mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, C; Marcelino, L A; Conde, A R; Saraiva, C; Giphart-Gassler, M; De Nooij-van Dalen, A G; Van Buuren-van Seggelen, V; Van der Keur, M; May, C A; Cole, J; Lehmann, A R; Steinsgrimsdottir, H; Beare, D; Capulas, E; Armour, J A

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of a collaborative study aimed at developing reliable, direct assays for mutation in human cells. The project used common lymphoblastoid cell lines, both with and without mutagen treatment, as a shared resource to validate the development of new molecular methods for the detection of low-level mutations in the presence of a large excess of normal alleles. As the "gold standard, " hprt mutation frequencies were also measured on the same samples. The methods under development included i) the restriction site mutation (RSM) assay, in which mutations lead to the destruction of a restriction site; ii) minisatellite length-change mutation, in which mutations lead to alleles containing new numbers of tandem repeat units; iii) loss of heterozygosity for HLA epitopes, in which antibodies can be used to direct selection for mutant cells; iv) multiple fluorescence-based long linker arm nucleotides assay (mf-LLA) technology, for the detection of substitutional mutations; v) detection of alterations in the TP53 locus using a (CA) array as the target for the screening; and vi) PCR analysis of lymphocytes for the presence of the BCL2 t(14:18) translocation. The relative merits of these molecular methods are discussed, and a comparison made with more "traditional" methods.

  9. Molecular detection of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lager, Malin; Faller, Maximilian; Wilhelmsson, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most common tick transmitted disease in Europe. The diagnosis of LB today is based on the patient´s medical history, clinical presentation and laboratory findings. The laboratory diagnostics are mainly based on antibody detection, but in certain conditions...... molecular detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may serve as a complement. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the analytical sensitivity, analytical specificity and concordance of eight different real-time PCR methods at five laboratories in Sweden, Norway and Denmark. Method: Each...... participating laboratory was asked to analyse three different sets of samples (reference panels; all blinded) i) cDNA extracted and transcribed from water spiked with cultured Borrelia strains, ii) cerebrospinal fluid spiked with cultured Borrelia strains, and iii) DNA dilution series extracted from cultured...

  10. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

  11. BRCA Testing by Single-Molecule Molecular Inversion Probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neveling, K.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Derks, R; Kwint, M.P.; Ouchene, H.; Steehouwer, M.; Lier, L.A. van; Bosgoed, E.A.J.; Rikken, A.; Tychon, M.W.J.; Zafeiropoulou, D.; Castelein, S.; Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Thung, G.W.; Hofste, T.; Lelieveld, S.H.; Bertens, S.M.; Adan, I.B.; Eijkelenboom, A.; Tops, B.B.J.; Yntema, H.G.; Stokowy, T.; Knappskog, P.M.; Hoberg-Vetti, H.; Steen, V.M.; Boyle, E.; Martin, B.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Shendure, J.; Nelen, M.R.; Hoischen, A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite advances in next generation DNA sequencing (NGS), NGS-based single gene tests for diagnostic purposes require improvements in terms of completeness, quality, speed, and cost. Single-molecule molecular inversion probes (smMIPs) are a technology with unrealized potential in the

  12. Molecular detection of airborne Coccidioides in Tucson, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Nancy A.; Griffin, Dale W.; Barker, Bridget M.; Loparev, Vladimir N.; Litvintseva, Anastasia P.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the soil-dwelling fungus Coccidioides is essential for the prevention of Valley fever, a disease primarily caused by inhalation of the arthroconidia. Methods for collecting and detectingCoccidioides in soil samples are currently in use by several laboratories; however, a method utilizing current air sampling technologies has not been formally demonstrated for the capture of airborne arthroconidia. In this study, we collected air/dust samples at two sites (Site A and Site B) in the endemic region of Tucson, Arizona, and tested a variety of air samplers and membrane matrices. We then employed a single-tube nested qPCR assay for molecular detection. At both sites, numerous soil samples (n = 10 at Site A and n = 24 at Site B) were collected and Coccidioides was detected in two samples (20%) at Site A and in eight samples (33%) at Site B. Of the 25 air/dust samples collected at both sites using five different air sampling methods, we detected Coccidioides in three samples from site B. All three samples were collected using a high-volume sampler with glass-fiber filters. In this report, we describe these methods and propose the use of these air sampling and molecular detection strategies for environmental surveillance of Coccidioides.

  13. Molecular detection of airborne Coccidioides in Tucson, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Nancy A; Griffin, Dale W; Barker, Bridget M; Loparev, Vladimir N; Litvintseva, Anastasia P

    2016-08-01

    Environmental surveillance of the soil-dwelling fungus Coccidioides is essential for the prevention of Valley fever, a disease primarily caused by inhalation of the arthroconidia. Methods for collecting and detecting Coccidioides in soil samples are currently in use by several laboratories; however, a method utilizing current air sampling technologies has not been formally demonstrated for the capture of airborne arthroconidia. In this study, we collected air/dust samples at two sites (Site A and Site B) in the endemic region of Tucson, Arizona, and tested a variety of air samplers and membrane matrices. We then employed a single-tube nested qPCR assay for molecular detection. At both sites, numerous soil samples (n = 10 at Site A and n = 24 at Site B) were collected and Coccidioides was detected in two samples (20%) at Site A and in eight samples (33%) at Site B. Of the 25 air/dust samples collected at both sites using five different air sampling methods, we detected Coccidioides in three samples from site B. All three samples were collected using a high-volume sampler with glass-fiber filters. In this report, we describe these methods and propose the use of these air sampling and molecular detection strategies for environmental surveillance of Coccidioides. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cun; Xu, Shichao; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Sun, Shuqing; Feng, Teilin; Zi, Yan; Liang, Chu; Luo, Hao

    2009-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a kind of microscopic parasite that may infect humans, and there are increasing concerns on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. This research highlights a new type of molecular beacon (MB) fluorescent probe for Toxoplasma DNA testing. We combined high-efficiency fluorescent inorganic core-shell quantum dots-CdTe/ZnS (as fluorescent energy donor) and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) to the single-strand DNA of Toxoplasma gondii, and a molecular beacon sensing system based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was achieved. Core-shell quantum dots CdTe/ZnS was firstly prepared in aqueous solution, and the influencing factor of its fluorescent properties, including CdTe/Na2S/Zn(CH3COO)2 (v/v), dependence of reaction time, temperature, and pH, is investigated systematically. The synthesized quantum dots and molecular beacon were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis), fluorescent spectrophotometer (FS), respectively. The TEM results showed that CdTe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots is ~11nm in size, and the quantum dots is water-soluble well. The sensing ability of target DNA of assembled MB was investigated, and results showed that the target Toxoplasma gonddi DNA can be successfully detected by measuring the change of fluorescence intensity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  15. Molecular detection of Toxoplasma gondii in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Vahid; Teymurzadeh, Shohreh; Karimi, Gholamreza; Nasiri, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite, is responsible for one of the most common zoonotic parasitic diseases in almost all warm-blooded vertebrates worldwide, and it is estimated that about one-third of the world human population is chronically infected with this parasite. Little is known about the circulation of T. gondii in snakes and this study for the first time aimed to evaluate the infection rates of snakes by this parasite by PCR methods. The brain of 68 Snakes, that were collected between May 2012 and September 2015 and died after the hold in captivity, under which they were kept for taking poisons, were examined for the presence of this parasite. DNA was extracted and Nested-PCR method was carried out with two of pairs of primers to detect the 344 bp fragment of T. gondii GRA6 gene. Five positive nested-PCR products were directly sequenced in the forward and reverse directions by Sequetech Company (Mountain View, CA). T. gondii GRA6 gene were detected from 55 (80.88%) of 68 snakes brains. Sequencing of the GRA6 gene revealed 98-100% of similarity with T. gondii sequences deposited in GenBank. To our knowledge, this is the first study of molecular detection of T. gondii in snakes and our findings show a higher frequency of this organism among them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Habuka, S.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Frederiksen, T.; Paulsson, M.; Ueba, H.

    2015-01-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment. PMID:26135251

  17. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Detecting molecules and their interactions lies at the heart of all biosensor devices, which have important applications in health, environmental monitoring and biomedicine. Achieving biosensing capability at the single molecule level is, moreover, a particularly important goal since single molecule biosensors would not only operate at the ultimate detection limit by resolving individual molecular interactions, but they could also monitor biomolecular properties which are otherwise obscured in ensemble measurements. For example, a single molecule biosensor could resolve the fleeting interaction kinetics between a molecule and its receptor, with immediate applications in clinical diagnostics. We have now developed a label-free biosensing platform that is capable of monitoring single DNA molecules and their interaction kinetics[1], hence achieving an unprecedented sensitivity in the optical domain, Figure 1. We resolve the specific contacts between complementary oligonucleotides, thereby detecting DNA strands with less than 2.4 kDa molecular weight. Furthermore we can discern strands with single nucleotide mismatches by monitoring their interaction kinetics. Our device utilizes small glass microspheres as optical transducers[1,2, 3], which are capable of increasing the number of interactions between a light beam and analyte molecules. A prism is used to couple the light beam into the microsphere. Ourr biosensing approach resolves the specific interaction kinetics between single DNA fragments. The optical transducer is assembled in a simple three-step protocol, and consists of a gold nanorod attached to a glass microsphere, where the surface of the nanorod is further modified with oligonucleotide receptors. The interaction kinetics of an oligonucleotide receptor with DNA fragments in the surrounding aqueous solution is monitored at the single molecule level[1]. The light remains confined inside the sphere where it is guided by total internal reflections along a

  18. Single particle detection: Phase control in submicron Hall sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Shelly, Connor; Gallop, John; Kazakova, Olga

    2010-01-01

    We present a phase-sensitive ac-dc Hall magnetometry method which allows a clear and reliable separation of real and parasitic magnetic signals of a very small magnitude. High-sensitivity semiconductor-based Hall crosses are generally accepted as a preferential solution for non-invasive detection of superparamagnetic nanobeads used in molecular biology, nanomedicine, and nanochemistry. However, detection of such small beads is often hindered by inductive pick-up and other spurious signals. The present work demonstrates an unambiguous experimental route for detection of small magnetic moments and provides a simple theoretical background for it. The reliability of the method has been tested for a variety of InSb Hall sensors in the range 600 nm-5 μm. Complete characterization of empty devices, involving Hall coefficients and noise measurements, has been performed and detection of a single FePt bead with diameter of 140 nm and magnetic moment of μ≅10 8 μ B has been achieved with a 600 nm-wide sensor.

  19. Molecular techniques: An overview of methods for the detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several DNA molecular markers are now available for use in surveillance and investigation of food-borne outbreaks that were previously difficult to detect. The results from several sources of literature indicate substantially different degrees of sensitivities between conventional detection methods and molecular-based ...

  20. Lab-on-chip components for molecular detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Tijjani; Dhahi, Th S.; Mohammed, Mohammed; Hashim, U.; Noriman, N. Z.; Dahham, Omar S.

    2017-09-01

    We successfully fabricated Lab on chip components and integrated for possible use in biomedical application. The sensor was fabricated by using conventional photolithography method integrated with PDMS micro channels for smooth delivery of sample to the sensing domain. The sensor was silanized and aminated with 3-Aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) to functionalize the surface with biomolecules and create molecular binding chemistry. The resulting Si-O-Si- components were functionalized with oligonucleotides probe of HPV, which interacted with the single stranded HPV DNA target to create a field across on the device. The fabrication, immobilization and hybridization processes were characterized with current voltage (I-V) characterization (KEITHLEY, 6487). The sensor show selectivity for the HPV DNA target in a linear range from concentration 0.1 nM to 1 µM. This strategy presented a simple, rapid and sensitive platform for HPV detection and would become a powerful tool for pathogenic microorganisms screening in clinical diagnosis.

  1. Probing single nanometer-scale pores with polymeric molecular rulers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; DiMarzio, Edmund A.; Wang, Qian; Stanford, Vincent M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2010-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that individual molecules of single-stranded DNA can be driven electrophoretically through a single Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin ion channel. Polynucleotides thread through the channel as extended chains and the polymer-induced ionic current blockades exhibit stable modes during the interactions. We show here that polynucleotides can be used to probe structural features of the α-hemolysin channel itself. Specifically, both the pore length and channel aperture profile can be estimated. The results are consistent with the channel crystal structure and suggest that polymer-based "molecular rulers" may prove useful in deducing the structures of nanometer-scale pores in general.

  2. Optofluidic lasers with a single molecular layer of gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiushu; Ritt, Michael; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Sun, Yuze; Fan, Xudong

    2014-01-01

    We achieve optofluidic lasers with a single molecular layer of gain, in which green fluorescent protein, dye-labeled bovine serum albumin, and dye-labeled DNA are respectively used as the gain medium and attached to the surface of a ring resonator via surface immobilization biochemical methods. It is estimated that the surface density of the gain molecules is on the order of 1012/cm2, sufficient for lasing under pulsed optical excitation. It is further shown that the optofluidic laser can be tuned by energy transfer mechanisms through biomolecular interactions. This work not only opens a door to novel photonic devices that can be controlled at the level of a single molecular layer, but also provides a promising sensing platform to analyze biochemical processes at the solid-liquid interface. PMID:25312306

  3. Early Detection of Breast Cancer Using Molecular Beacons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Lily

    2004-01-01

    .... We also developed a procedure to detect both survivin and cyclin Dl gene expression simultaneously in single cancer cells, which increases the sensitivity and specificity of detection of cancer cells...

  4. Single-particle detection of transcription following rotavirus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Eric N; Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Harrison, Stephen C

    2017-07-12

    Infectious rotavirus particles are triple-layered, icosahedral assemblies. The outer layer proteins, VP4 (cleaved to VP8* and VP5*) and VP7, surround a transcriptionally competent, double-layer particle (DLP), which they deliver into the cytosol. During entry of rhesus rotavirus, VP8* interacts with cell-surface gangliosides, allowing engulfment into a membrane vesicle by a clathrin-independent process. Escape into the cytosol and outer-layer shedding depend on interaction of a hydrophobic surface on VP5* with the membrane bilayer and on a large-scale conformational change. We report here experiments that detect the fate of released DLPs and their efficiency in initiating RNA synthesis. By replacing the outer layer with fluorescently tagged, recombinant proteins and also tagging the DLP, we distinguish particles that have lost their outer layer and entered the cytosol (uncoated) from those still within membrane vesicles. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization with probes for nascent transcripts to determine how soon after uncoating transcription began and what fraction of the uncoated particles were active in initiating RNA synthesis. We detected RNA synthesis by uncoated particles as early as 15 minutes after adding virus. Uncoating efficiency was 20-50%; of the uncoated particles, about 10% synthesized detectable RNA. In the format of our experiments, about 1% of the added particles attached to the cell surface, giving an overall added-particle to RNA-synthesizing particle ratio of between 1000 and 5000 to 1, in good agreement with the particle-to-focus-forming unit determined by infectivity assays. Thus, RNA synthesis by even a single, uncoated particle can initiate infection in a cell. IMPORTANCE The pathways by which a virus enters a cell transform its packaged genome into an active one. Contemporary fluorescence microscopy can detect individual virus particles as they enter cells, allowing us to map their multi-step entry pathways. Rotaviruses, like most

  5. A single molecular marker to distinguish between species of Dioscorea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techen, Natascha; Parveen, Iffat; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-03-01

    Yams are species of the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae), which consists of approximately 630 species. The majority of the world production of yams occurs in Africa with 58.8 million t annually, but they are also produced in the Americas and Asia. The saponins in yams have been reported to possess various properties to improve health. The tuber and aerial parts of various species often share morphological similarities, which can cause problems in the proper identification of sample material. For example, the rootstocks and aerial parts of Dioscorea villosa L. share similarities with Dioscorea polystachia Turcz. Dioscorea bulbifera L. may be mistaken for Dioscorea alata L. owing to similar morphologies. Various molecular analyses have been published to help with the identification of species and varieties within the genus Dioscorea. The multi-loci or single-locus analysis has resulted in varying success, some with only a limited discrimination rate. In the present study, a single nuclear genomic region, biparentally inherited, was analyzed for its usefulness as a molecular marker for species identification and discrimination between D. bulbifera, D. villosa, D. nipponica, D. alata, D. caucasica, and D. deltoidea samples. The results of this study show that the LFY genomic region can be useful as a molecular marker to distinguish between samples.

  6. Molecular single photon double K-shell ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penent, F.; Nakano, M.; Tashiro, M.; Grozdanov, T.P.; Žitnik, M.; Carniato, S.; Selles, P.; Andric, L.; Lablanquie, P.; Palaudoux, J.; Shigemasa, E.; Iwayama, H.; Hikosaka, Y.; Soejima, K.; Suzuki, I.H.; Kouchi, N.; Ito, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied single photon double K-shell ionization of small molecules (N 2 , CO, C 2 H 2n (n = 1–3), …) and the Auger decay of the resulting double core hole (DCH) molecular ions thanks to multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy using a magnetic bottle time-of-flight spectrometer. The relative cross-sections for single-site (K −2 ) and two-site (K −1 K −1 ) double K-shell ionization with respect to single K-shell (K −1 ) ionization have been measured that gives important information on the mechanisms of single photon double ionization. The spectroscopy of two-site (K −1 K −1 ) DCH states in the C 2 H 2n (n = 1–3) series shows important chemical shifts due to a strong dependence on the C-C bond length. In addition, the complete cascade Auger decay following single site (K −2 ) ionization has been obtained

  7. Toward Molecular 4f Single-Ion Magnet Qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Kasper S; Ariciu, Ana-Maria; McAdams, Simon; Weihe, Høgni; Bendix, Jesper; Tuna, Floriana; Piligkos, Stergios

    2016-05-11

    Quantum coherence is detected in the 4f single-ion magnet (SIM) Yb(trensal), by isotope selective pulsed EPR spectroscopy on an oriented single crystal. At X-band, the spin-lattice relaxation (T1) and phase memory (Tm) times are found to be independent of the nuclei bearing, or not, a nuclear spin. The observation of Rabi oscillations of the spin echo demonstrates the possibility to coherently manipulate the system for more than 70 rotations. This renders Yb(trensal), a sublimable and chemically modifiable SIM, an excellent candidate for quantum information processing.

  8. Manipulating localized molecular orbitals by single-atom contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weihua; Shi, Xingqiang; Lin, Chensheng; Zhang, Rui Qin; Minot, Christian; Van Hove, Michel A; Hong, Yuning; Tang, Ben Zhong; Lin, Nian

    2010-09-17

    We have fabricated atom-molecule contacts by attachment of single Cu atoms to terpyridine side groups of bis-terpyridine tetra-phenyl ethylene molecules on a Cu(111) surface. By means of scanning tunneling microscopy, spectroscopy, and density functional calculations, we have found that, due to the localization characteristics of molecular orbitals, the Cu-atom contact modifies the state localized at the terpyridine side group which is in contact with the Cu atom but does not affect the states localized at other parts of the molecule. These results illustrate the contact effects at individual orbitals and offer possibilities to manipulate orbital alignments within molecules.

  9. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element Specific for Bromacil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bromacil is a widely used herbicide that is known to contaminate environmental systems. Due to the hazards it presents and inefficient detection methods, it is necessary to create a rapid and efficient sensing device. Towards this end, we have utilized a stringent in vitro selection method to identify single-stranded DNA molecular recognition elements (MRE specific for bromacil. We have identified one MRE with high affinity (Kd=9.6 nM and specificity for bromacil compared to negative targets of selection and other pesticides. The selected ssDNA MRE will be useful as the sensing element in a field-deployable bromacil detection device.

  10. Molecular sieves analysis by elastic recoil detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah, H.; Azzouz, A.

    1992-01-01

    The opportunity of water determination in zeolites via hydrogen detection using the elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) was investigated. The radiation effect upon the desorption rate of hydrogen in miscellaneous types of zeolites, e.g. Y-Faujasite, ZSM-5, SK, etc. and in a natural clay, e.g. an Algerian bentonite was discussed. Quantitative measurements were carried out in order to determine the amount and distribution shape of hydrogen in each material. Various explanations dealing with hydration and constitution water in such a crystalline framework were proposed. The experimental results are in a good agreement with the corresponding theoretical values

  11. Molecular Methods for Detection of Antimicrobial Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anjum, Muna F.; Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    The increase in bacteria harboring antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global problem because there is a paucity of antibiotics available to treat multidrug-resistant bacterial infections in humans and animals. Detection of AMR present in bacteria that may pose a threat to veterinary and public...

  12. Molecular detection of Cylindrocarpon destructans in infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for rapid detection of C. destructans in diseased ginseng roots and artificially inoculated soil. One pair of specific primers was designed from comparisons of nucleotide sequences of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of ...

  13. A Locked Nucleic Acid Probe Based on Selective Salt-Induced Effect Detects Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of single based genetic mutation by using oligonucleotide probes is one of the common methods of detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms at known loci. In this paper, we demonstrated a hybridization system which included a buffer solution that produced selective salt-induced effect and a locked nucleic acid modified 12 nt oligonucleotide probe. The hybridization system is suitable for hybridization under room temperature. By using magnetic nanoparticles as carriers for PCR products, the SNPs (MDR1 C3435T/A from 45 volunteers were analyzed, and the results were consistent with the results from pyrophosphoric acid sequencing. The method presented in this paper differs from the traditional method of using molecular beacons to detect SNPs in that it is suitable for research institutions lacking real-time quantitative PCR detecting systems, to detect PCR products at room temperature.

  14. SISGR: Room Temperature Single-Molecule Detection and Imaging by Stimulated Emission Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2017-03-13

    Single-molecule spectroscopy has made considerable impact on many disciplines including chemistry, physics, and biology. To date, most single-molecule spectroscopy work is accomplished by detecting fluorescence. On the other hand, many naturally occurring chromophores, such as retinal, hemoglobin and cytochromes, do not have detectable fluorescence. There is an emerging need for single-molecule spectroscopy techniques that do not require fluorescence. In the last proposal period, we have successfully demonstrated stimulated emission microscopy, single molecule absorption, and stimulated Raman microscopy based on a high-frequency modulation transfer technique. These first-of-a- kind new spectroscopy/microscopy methods tremendously improved our ability to observe molecules that fluorescence weakly, even to the limit of single molecule detection for absorption measurement. All of these methods employ two laser beams: one (pump beam) excites a single molecule to a real or virtual excited state, and the other (probe beam) monitors the absorption/emission property of the single. We extract the intensity change of the probe beam with high sensitivity by implementing a high-frequency phase-sensitive detection scheme, which offers orders of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity over direct absorption/emission measurement. However, single molecule detection based on fluorescence or absorption is fundamentally limited due to their broad spectral response. It is important to explore other avenues in single molecule detection and imaging which provides higher molecular specificity for studying a wide variety of heterogeneous chemical and biological systems. This proposal aimed to achieve single-molecule detection sensitivity with near resonance stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. SRS microscopy was developed in our lab as a powerful technique for imaging heterogeneous samples based on their intrinsic vibrational contrasts, which provides much higher molecular

  15. Molecular investigation of evaporation of biodroplets containing single-strand DNA on graphene surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Fahimeh; Foroutan, Masumeh

    2018-02-14

    In this study, the water droplet behaviour of four different types of single-strand DNA with homogeneous base sequence on a graphene substrate during evaporation of the droplet was investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The simulation results indicated that the evaporation depended on the DNA sequence. The observed changes can be divided into four parts: (i) vaporization mode, (ii) evaporation flux, (iii) mechanism of single-strand placement on the surface, and (iv) consideration of remaining single strands after evaporation. Our simulation observations indicated different evaporation modes for thymine biodroplets as compared to those for other biodroplets. The evaporation of the thymine biodroplets occurred with an increase in the contact angle, while that of the other biodroplets occur in a constant contact angle mode. Moreover, thymine biodroplets generate the lowest contact line compared to other single strands, and it is always placed far away from the centre of the droplets during evaporation. Investigating variations in the evaporation flux shows that thymine has the highest evaporation flux and guanine has the lowest. Moreover, during initial evaporation, the flux of evaporation increases at the triple point of the biodroplets containing thymine single strands, while it decreases in the other biodroplets. The following observation was obtained from the study of the placement of single strands on the substrate: guanine and thymine interacted slower than other single strands during evaporation with graphene, adenine single strand had a higher folding during evaporation, and guanine single strand showed the lowest end-to-end distance. The investigation of single-strand DNA after evaporation shows that adenine produces the most stable structure at the end of evaporation. In addition, cytosine is the most stretched single-strand DNA due to its lack of internal π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding. Therefore, cytosine single strand is more

  16. Single molecular biology: coming of age in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Lou, Hui-Qiang

    2017-09-20

    DNA replication is an essential process of the living organisms. To achieve precise and reliable replication, DNA polymerases play a central role in DNA synthesis. Previous investigations have shown that the average rates of DNA synthesis on the leading and lagging strands in a replisome must be similar to avoid the formation of significant gaps in the nascent strands. The underlying mechanism has been assumed to be coordination between leading- and lagging-strand polymerases. However, Kowalczykowski's lab members recently performed single molecule techniques in E. coli and showed the real-time behavior of a replisome. The leading- and lagging-strand polymerases function stochastically and independently. Furthermore, when a DNA polymerase is paused, the helicase slows down in a self-regulating fail-safe mechanism, akin to a ''dead-man's switch''. Based on the real-time single-molecular observation, the authors propose that leading- and lagging-strand polymerases synthesize DNA stochastically within a Gaussian distribution. Along with the development and application of single-molecule techniques, we will witness a new age of DNA replication and other biological researches.

  17. Defects detecting method of lamp cap of single soldering lug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jihe; Lv, Jidong

    2017-07-01

    In order to resolve the problems of low efficiency and large separating difference in fault detection of lamp holders with single soldering lug, an image-detection-based defect detection method is presented in this paper. The selected image is first preprocessed, where the possible area of soldering lug is cut in this preprocessing to narrow the scope for subsequent partition with the consideration that the smooth surface of metal at lamp holder and black insulation glass may reflect the light. Then, the soldering lug is extracted by a series of processing including clustering partition. Based on this, the defects are detected by regional marking, area comparison, circularity and coordinate deviation. The experiment results show that the designed method is simple and practical to detect main quality defects of lamp holder with single soldering lug correctly and efficiently.

  18. Detection of kinetic change points in piece-wise linear single molecule motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Flynn R.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Duderstadt, Karl E.

    2018-03-01

    Single-molecule approaches present a powerful way to obtain detailed kinetic information at the molecular level. However, the identification of small rate changes is often hindered by the considerable noise present in such single-molecule kinetic data. We present a general method to detect such kinetic change points in trajectories of motion of processive single molecules having Gaussian noise, with a minimum number of parameters and without the need of an assumed kinetic model beyond piece-wise linearity of motion. Kinetic change points are detected using a likelihood ratio test in which the probability of no change is compared to the probability of a change occurring, given the experimental noise. A predetermined confidence interval minimizes the occurrence of false detections. Applying the method recursively to all sub-regions of a single molecule trajectory ensures that all kinetic change points are located. The algorithm presented allows rigorous and quantitative determination of kinetic change points in noisy single molecule observations without the need for filtering or binning, which reduce temporal resolution and obscure dynamics. The statistical framework for the approach and implementation details are discussed. The detection power of the algorithm is assessed using simulations with both single kinetic changes and multiple kinetic changes that typically arise in observations of single-molecule DNA-replication reactions. Implementations of the algorithm are provided in ImageJ plugin format written in Java and in the Julia language for numeric computing, with accompanying Jupyter Notebooks to allow reproduction of the analysis presented here.

  19. Molecular methods for detecting and typing of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Deirdre A; Elliott, Briony; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-04-01

    Since the early 2000s, Clostridium difficile has emerged as a major international pathogen. Recently, strains of C. difficile in circulation appear to be changing, with greater diversity, leading to challenges for diagnostics and surveillance. Currently molecular diagnostic methods are favoured for their high sensitivity and rapid processing times; however, a number of issues still exist with molecular tests, in particular high cost, low clinical specificity and failure to detect some variant C. difficile strains. Molecular typing methods are used to determine the continually evolving epidemiology of C. difficile infection. Typing methods including PCR ribotyping and pulsed field gel electrophoresis are currently popular in Europe and North America, respectively, while high-throughput next-generation sequencing is likely to become more widely used in years to come. This review discusses current molecular detection and typing techniques for C. difficile.

  20. Spin models for the single molecular magnet Mn12-AC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saqer, Mohamad A.

    2005-11-01

    The single molecular magnet (SMM) Mn12-AC attracted the attention of scientists since the discovery of its magnetic hystereses which are accompanied by sudden jumps in magnetic moments at low temperature. Unlike conventional bulk magnets, hysteresis in SMMs is of molecular origin. This qualifies them as candidates for next generation of high density storage media where a molecule which is at most few nanometers in size can be used to store a bit of information. However, the jumps in these hystereses, due to spin tunneling, can lead to undesired loss of information. Mn12-AC molecule contains twelve magnetic ions antiferromagnetically coupled by exchanges leading to S = 10 ground state manifold. The magnetic ions are surrounded by ligands which isolate them magnetically from neighboring molecules. The lowest state of S = 9 manifold is believed to lie at about 40 K above the ground state. Therefore, at low temperatures, the molecule is considered as a single uncoupled moment of spin S = 10. Such model has been used widely to understand phenomena exhibited by the molecule at low temperatures including the tunneling of its spin, while a little attention has been paid for the multi-spin nature of the molecule. Using the 8-spin model, we demonstrate that in order to understand the phenomena of tunneling, a full spin description of the molecule is required. We utilized a calculation scheme where a fraction of energy levels are used in the calculations and the influence of levels having higher energy is neglected. From the dependence of tunnel splittings on the number of states include, we conclude that models based on restricting the number of energy levels (single-spin and 8-spin models) lead to unreliable results of tunnel splitting calculations. To attack the full 12-spin model, we employed the Davidson algorithm to calculated lowest energy levels produced by exchange interactions and single ion anisotropies. The model reproduces the anisotropy properties at low

  1. Nonlinear and Nonsymmetric Single-Molecule Electronic Properties Towards Molecular Information Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Takashi; Ogawa, Takuji

    2017-09-05

    This review highlights molecular design for nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronic properties such as rectification, negative differential resistance, and switching, which are important components of future single-molecule information processing devices. Perspectives on integrated "molecular circuits" are also provided. Nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronics can be designed by utilizing (1) asymmetric molecular cores, (2) asymmetric anchoring groups, (3) an asymmetric junction environment, and (4) asymmetric electrode materials. This review mainly focuses on the design of molecular cores.

  2. Compositions and methods for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Werner, James; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2016-11-22

    Described herein are nucleic acid based probes and methods for discriminating and detecting single nucleotide variants in nucleic acid molecules (e.g., DNA). The methods include use of a pair of probes can be used to detect and identify polymorphisms, for example single nucleotide polymorphism in DNA. The pair of probes emit a different fluorescent wavelength of light depending on the association and alignment of the probes when hybridized to a target nucleic acid molecule. Each pair of probes is capable of discriminating at least two different nucleic acid molecules that differ by at least a single nucleotide difference. The methods can probes can be used, for example, for detection of DNA polymorphisms that are indicative of a particular disease or condition.

  3. Flagellates as model system for gravity detection of single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Daiker, Viktor; Schuster, Martin; Tebart, Jenny; Strauch, Sebastian M.; Donat-Peter, H.

    Euglena gracilis is a unicellular, photosynthetic organism which uses light and gravity as en-vironmental hints to reach and stay in horizons of the water column which are optimal for growth and reproduction. The orientation in respect to light (so called positive and nega-tive phototaxis, i.e. movement toward or away of a light source) was well known and fairly good understood. In contrast, knowledge about the movement away from the centre of gravity (negative gravitaxis) was rather scarce. Over a century it was unclear whether orientation in respect to the gravity vector is based on a physical or a physiological mechanism. Recent results clearly favour the latter. Knock-down mutants (RNAi) were characterized which define certain key components of the gravitactic signal transduction chain. These key components include a TRP-like channel, a gravitaxis-specific calmodulin and a protein kinase A. The molecular characterization of these components is currently performed and will be presented. Euglena is not only a model system for the close understanding of gravity detection in single cells, but can also be used as photosynthetic component, i.e. oxygen source and carbon dioxide as well as nitrogenic components sink in Closed Environmental Systems (CES). Due CES are systems of choice in times of scarce flight opportunities. They allow a massive sample sharing and combine possibilities to do microgravity research for biologists but also for engineers, physicists and material scientists. Recent attempts include Aquacells and Omegahab. In the near future miniaturized systems (Chinese ShenZhou) as well as advanced CES will be flown or tested, respectively. Current attempts and plans will be presented.

  4. A molecular ruler based on plasmon coupling of single gold andsilver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnichsen, Carsten; Reinhard, Bjorn M.; Liphardt, Jan; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-05-22

    Molecular rulers based on Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) that report conformational changes and intramolecular distances of single biomolecules have helped to understand important biological processes. However, these rulers suffer from low and fluctuating signal intensities from single dyes and limited observation time due to photobleaching. The plasmon resonance in noble metal particles has been suggested as an alternative probe to overcome the limitations of organic fluorophores and the coupling of plasmons in nearby particles has been exploited to detect particle aggregation by a distinct color change in bulk experiments. Here we demonstrate that plasmon coupling can be used to monitor distances between single pairs of gold and silver nanoparticles. We use this effect to follow the directed assembly of gold and silver nanoparticle dimers in real time and to study the time dynamics of single DNA hybridization events. These ''plasmon rulers'' allowed us to continuously monitor separations of up to 70 nm for more than 3000 seconds. Single molecule in vitro studies of biological processes previously inaccessible with fluorescence based molecular rulers are enabled with plasmon rulers with extended time and distance range.

  5. Molecular Etiology of Hereditary Single-Side Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Ah Reum; Choi, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Young; Chun, Eun Hi; Oh, Seung-Ha; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL)/single-side deafness (SSD) is a frequently encountered disability in children. The etiology of a substantial portion of USNHL/SSD still remains unknown, and genetic causes have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the authors evaluated the heritability of USNHL/SSD. The authors sequentially recruited 50 unrelated children with SSD. For an etiologic diagnosis, we performed a rigorous review on the phenotypes of family members of all children and conducted, if necessary, molecular genetic tests including targeted exome sequencing of 129 deafness genes. Among the 50 SSD children cohort, the authors identify 4 (8%) unrelated SSD probands from 4 families (SH136, SB173, SB177, and SB199) with another hearing impaired family members. Notably, all 4 probands in our cohort with a familial history of SSD also have pigmentary abnormalities such as brown freckles or premature gray hair within first degree relatives, which may indicate that genes whose products are involved with pigmentary disorder could be candidates for heritable SSD. Indeed, SH136 and SB199 turned out to segregate a mutation in MITF and PAX3, respectively, leading to a molecular diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (WS). We report, for the first time in the literature, a significant heritability of pediatric SSD. There is a strong association between the heritability of USNHL/SSD and the pigmentary abnormality, shedding a new light on the understanding of the molecular basis of heritable USNHL/SSD. In case of children with congenital SSD, it would be mandatory to rigorously screen pigmentary abnormalities. WS should also be included in the differential diagnosis of children with USNHL/SSD, especially in a familial form. PMID:26512583

  6. Single molecule DNA detection with an atomic vapor notch filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhland, Denis; Rendler, Torsten; Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Wrachtrup, Joerg; Gerhardt, Ilja [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    The detection of single molecules has facilitated many advances in life- and material-science. Commonly the fluorescence of dye molecules is detected, which are attached to a non-fluorescent structure under study. For fluorescence microscopy one desires to maximize the detection efficiency together with an efficient suppression of undesired laser leakage. Here we present the use of the narrow-band filtering properties of hot atomic sodium vapor to selectively filter the excitation light from the red-shifted fluorescence of dye labeled single-stranded DNA molecules. A statistical analysis proves an enhancement in detection efficiency of more than 15% in a confocal and in a wide-field configuration. (orig.)

  7. Atomically precise graphene nanoribbon heterojunctions from a single molecular precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Giang D.; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Omrani, Arash A.; Marangoni, Tomas; Wu, Meng; Rizzo, Daniel J.; Rodgers, Griffin F.; Cloke, Ryan R.; Durr, Rebecca A.; Sakai, Yuki; Liou, Franklin; Aikawa, Andrew S.; Chelikowsky, James R.; Louie, Steven G.; Fischer, Felix R.; Crommie, Michael F.

    2017-11-01

    The rational bottom-up synthesis of atomically defined graphene nanoribbon (GNR) heterojunctions represents an enabling technology for the design of nanoscale electronic devices. Synthetic strategies used thus far have relied on the random copolymerization of two electronically distinct molecular precursors to yield GNR heterojunctions. Here we report the fabrication and electronic characterization of atomically precise GNR heterojunctions prepared through late-stage functionalization of chevron GNRs obtained from a single precursor. Post-growth excitation of fully cyclized GNRs induces cleavage of sacrificial carbonyl groups, resulting in atomically well-defined heterojunctions within a single GNR. The GNR heterojunction structure was characterized using bond-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy, which enables chemical bond imaging at T = 4.5 K. Scanning tunnelling spectroscopy reveals that band alignment across the heterojunction interface yields a type II heterojunction, in agreement with first-principles calculations. GNR heterojunction band realignment proceeds over a distance less than 1 nm, leading to extremely large effective fields.

  8. Nondestructive fluorescent state detection of single neutral atom qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Michael J; Hamley, Christopher D; Shih, Chung-Yu; Chapman, Michael S

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate nondestructive (lossless) fluorescent state detection of individual neutral atom qubits trapped in an optical lattice. The hyperfine state of the atom is measured with a 95% accuracy and an atom loss rate of 1%. Individual atoms are initialized and detected over 100 times before being lost from the trap, representing a 100-fold improvement in data collection rates over previous experiments. Microwave Rabi oscillations are observed with repeated measurements of one and the same single atom. © 2011 American Physical Society

  9. Single-molecule detection of dihydroazulene photo-thermal reaction using break junction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cancan; Jevric, Martyn; Borges, Anders; Olsen, Stine T.; Hamill, Joseph M.; Zheng, Jue-Ting; Yang, Yang; Rudnev, Alexander; Baghernejad, Masoud; Broekmann, Peter; Petersen, Anne Ugleholdt; Wandlowski, Thomas; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.; Solomon, Gemma C.; Brøndsted Nielsen, Mogens; Hong, Wenjing

    2017-05-01

    Charge transport by tunnelling is one of the most ubiquitous elementary processes in nature. Small structural changes in a molecular junction can lead to significant difference in the single-molecule electronic properties, offering a tremendous opportunity to examine a reaction on the single-molecule scale by monitoring the conductance changes. Here, we explore the potential of the single-molecule break junction technique in the detection of photo-thermal reaction processes of a photochromic dihydroazulene/vinylheptafulvene system. Statistical analysis of the break junction experiments provides a quantitative approach for probing the reaction kinetics and reversibility, including the occurrence of isomerization during the reaction. The product ratios observed when switching the system in the junction does not follow those observed in solution studies (both experiment and theory), suggesting that the junction environment was perturbing the process significantly. This study opens the possibility of using nano-structured environments like molecular junctions to tailor product ratios in chemical reactions.

  10. Super-Resolution Imaging of Molecular Emission Spectra and Single Molecule Spectral Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlodzianoski, Michael J; Curthoys, Nikki M; Gunewardene, Mudalige S; Carter, Sean; Hess, Samuel T

    2016-01-01

    Localization microscopy can image nanoscale cellular details. To address biological questions, the ability to distinguish multiple molecular species simultaneously is invaluable. Here, we present a new version of fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM) which detects the emission spectrum of each localized molecule, and can quantify changes in emission spectrum of individual molecules over time. This information can allow for a dramatic increase in the number of different species simultaneously imaged in a sample, and can create super-resolution maps showing how single molecule emission spectra vary with position and time in a sample.

  11. Molecular analysis of desmoid tumors with a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism array identifies new molecular candidate lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erben, Philipp; Nowak, Daniel; Sauer, Christian; Ströbel, Philipp; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Hohenberger, Peter; Kasper, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are neoplastic proliferations of connective tissues. The mutation status of the gene coding for catenin (cadherin-associated protein) beta 1 (CTNNB1) and trisomy 8 on the chromosomal level have been described to have prognostic relevance. In order to elucidate new molecular mechanisms underlying these tumors, we carried out a molecular analysis with a genome-wide human high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, in 9 patients. Single samples showed numerical aberrations on chromosomes (Chrs) 20 and 6 with either trisomy 20 or monosomy 6. No trisomy 8 could be detected. Recurrent heterozygous deletions were found in Chr 5q (including the APC gene locus, n = 3) and Chr 8p23 (n = 4, containing coding regions for the potential tumor suppressor gene CSMD1). This novel deletion in 8p23 showed an association with local recurrence. In addition, structural chromosomal changes (gain of Chrs 8 and 20) were found in a minority of cases. The genomic alteration affecting the candidate gene CSMD1 could be important in the development of desmoid tumors.

  12. Detection of polymorphisms in leptin gene using single strand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    student

    Sachs B1 variant. Nucleic Acids Res. 19, 405-406. Barroso, A., Dunner, S. & Cañon, J., 1998. Technical note: detection of bovine kappa-casein variants A, B,. C and E by means of Polymerase Chain Reaction-Single Strand Conformation ...

  13. Detecting Semantic Priming at the Single-Trial Level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuze, J.; Gerven, M.A.J. van; Farquhar, J.D.R.; Desain, P.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Semantic priming is usually studied by examining ERPs over many trials and subjects. This article aims at detecting semantic priming at the single-trial level. By using machine learning techniques it is possible to analyse and classify short traces of brain activity, which could, for example, be

  14. Detection of MspI polymorphism and the single nucleotide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to detect the genetic polymorphism of GH gene in five camel breeds reared in Egypt which are Sudany, Somali, Mowaled, Maghrabi and Falahy, using polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Also, this work aimed to identify the single nucleotide ...

  15. Weighing Designs to Detect a Single Counterfeit Coin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 2. Weighing Designs to Detect a Single Counterfeit Coin. Jyotirmoy Sarkar Bikas K Sinha. General Article Volume 21 Issue 2 February 2016 pp 125-150. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Detection of three honeybee viruses simultaneously by a single ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A single multiplex reverse transcriptase (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for the simultaneous detection of three honeybee viruses: acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), sacbrood virus (SBV) and black queen cell virus (BQCV). Unique PCR primers were designed from the complete genome ...

  17. Single-photon light detection with transition-edge sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajteri, M.; Taralli, E.; Portesi, C.; Monticone, E.

    2008-01-01

    Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) are micro calorimeters that measure the energy of incident single-photons by the resistance increase of a superconducting film biased within the superconducting-to-normal transition. TES are able to detect single photons from x-ray to IR with an intrinsic energy resolution and photon-number discrimination capability. Metrological, astronomical and quantum communication applications are the fields where these properties can be particularly important. In this work, we report about characterization of different TESs based on Ti films. Single-photons have been detected from 200 nm to 800 nm working at T c ∼ 100 m K. Using a pulsed laser at 690 nm we have demonstrated the capability to resolve up to five photons.

  18. Molecular analysis of cross-bacterial contamination detected in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the isolate Delftia acidovorans BP(R2) and it is also coupled to protein with molecular weight 25-26 KDa. As well as, this bacterial contamination was the reason for the false positive results observed during the detection of HCV infections. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management Vol. 9(1) 2005: 5-10.

  19. Molecular detection of salmonella species from selected vegetables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular detection of salmonella species from selected vegetables sold in a north-central Nigerian setting. ... This finding shows that virulent Salmonella strains pose a major health hazard and public health concern to the affected population. Our study shows that there is a high prevalence rate of virulent Salmonella ...

  20. Molecular detection of carbapenemase-producing genes in referral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular confirmation of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) was introduced in South Africa (SA) at the end of 2011. We report on the detection of these resistance genes based on referral isolates. Enterobacteriaceae with non-susceptibility to any of the carbapenems according to defined criteria for ...

  1. Molecular detection of disease resistance genes to powdery mildew ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to detect the presence of disease resistance genes to infection of wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici) in selected wheat cultivars from China using molecular markers. Genomic DNA of sixty cultivars was extracted and tested for the presence of selected prominent resistance genes to ...

  2. Molecular approaches to detect and study the organisms causing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review will summarise the molecular approaches used to detect and analyse the genomes of Babesia bovis, B. bigemina and Anaplasma marginale which cause bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. These tick borne diseases are widely distributed in Africa, Asia, Australia, and Central and South America and for ...

  3. High sensitivity fluorescent single particle and single molecule detection apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathies, Richard A.; Peck, Konan; Stryer, Lubert

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus is described for ultrasensitive detection of single fluorescent particles down to the single fluorescent molecule limit in a fluid or on a substrate comprising means for illuminating a predetermined volume of the fluid or area of the substrate whereby to emit light including background light from the fluid and burst of photons from particles residing in the area. The photon burst is detected in real time to generate output representative signal. The signal is received and the burst of energy from the fluorescent particles is distinguished from the background energy to provide an indication of the number, location or concentration of the particles or molecules.

  4. Detection of multidrug resistance using molecular nuclear technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Tae; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Although the outcome of cancer patients after cytotoxic chemotherapy is related diverse mechanisms, multidrug resistance (MDR) for chemotherapeutic drugs due to cellular P-glycoprotein (Pgp) or multidrug-resistance associated protein (MRP) is most important factor in the chemotherapy failure to cancer. A large number of pharmacologic compounds, including verapamil, quinidine, tamoxifen, cyclosporin A and quinolone derivatives have been reported to overcome MDR. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are available for the detection of Pgp and MRP-mediated transporter. {sup 99}m-Tc-MIBI and other {sup 99}m-Tc-radiopharmaceuticals are substrates for Pgp and MRP, and have been used in clinical studies for tumor imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of Pgp pump. Colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin labeled with {sup 11}C have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo and reported to be feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumors. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP and N-({sup 11}C)acetyl-leukotriene E4 provides an opportunity to study MRP function non-invasively in vivo. SPECT and PET pharmaceuticals have successfully used to evaluate pharmacologic effects of MDR modulators. Imaging of MDR and reversal of MDR with bioluminescence in a living animal is also evaluated for future clinical trial. We have described recent advances in molecular imaging of MDR and reviewed recent publications regarding feasibility of SPECT and PET imaging to study the functionality of MDR transporters in vivo.

  5. Polymorphic transitions in single crystals: A new molecular dynamics method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1981-12-01

    A new Lagrangian formulation is introduced. It can be used to make molecular dynamics (MD) calculations on systems under the most general, externally applied, conditions of stress. In this formulation the MD cell shape and size can change according to dynamical equations given by this Lagrangian. This new MD technique is well suited to the study of structural transformations in solids under external stress and at finite temperature. As an example of the use of this technique we show how a single crystal of Ni behaves under uniform uniaxial compressive and tensile loads. This work confirms some of the results of static (i.e., zero temperature) calculations reported in the literature. We also show that some results regarding the stress-strain relation obtained by static calculations are invalid at finite temperature. We find that, under compressive loading, our model of Ni shows a bifurcation in its stress-strain relation; this bifurcation provides a link in configuration space between cubic and hexagonal close packing. It is suggested that such a transformation could perhaps be observed experimentally under extreme conditions of shock.

  6. Direct single-molecule dynamic detection of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jianxin; Jia, Chuancheng; Li, Yanwei; Liu, Zitong; Wang, Jinying; Yang, Zhongyue; Gu, Chunhui; Su, Dingkai; Houk, Kendall N; Zhang, Deqing; Guo, Xuefeng

    2018-02-01

    Single-molecule detection can reveal time trajectories and reaction pathways of individual intermediates/transition states in chemical reactions and biological processes, which is of fundamental importance to elucidate their intrinsic mechanisms. We present a reliable, label-free single-molecule approach that allows us to directly explore the dynamic process of basic chemical reactions at the single-event level by using stable graphene-molecule single-molecule junctions. These junctions are constructed by covalently connecting a single molecule with a 9-fluorenone center to nanogapped graphene electrodes. For the first time, real-time single-molecule electrical measurements unambiguously show reproducible large-amplitude two-level fluctuations that are highly dependent on solvent environments in a nucleophilic addition reaction of hydroxylamine to a carbonyl group. Both theoretical simulations and ensemble experiments prove that this observation originates from the reversible transition between the reactant and a new intermediate state within a time scale of a few microseconds. These investigations open up a new route that is able to be immediately applied to probe fast single-molecule physics or biophysics with high time resolution, making an important contribution to broad fields beyond reaction chemistry.

  7. Photoionisation detection of single {sup 87}Rb-atoms using channel electron multipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkel, Florian Alexander

    2011-09-02

    atomic or molecular species. As efficient readout unit for single atoms or even ions, it might represent a considerable alternative to conventional detection methods due to the high optical access and the large sensitive volume of the CEM detection system. Additionally, its spatial selectivity makes it particularly suited for the readout of single atomic qubit sites in arrays of neutral atoms as required in future applications such as the quantum-repeater or quantum computation with neutral atoms. The obtained high detection efficiency {eta} and fast detection time t{sub tot} of the new detection method fulfill the demanding detector requirements for a future loophole-free test of Bell's inequality under strict Einstein locality conditions using two optically trapped, entangled {sup 87}Rb-atoms at remote locations. In such a configuration, the locality and the detection loophole can be simultaneously closed in one experiment. (orig.)

  8. Molecular excitations: a new way to detect Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' vra, J.

    2014-09-01

    We believe that the Dark Matter (DM) search should be expanded into the domain of detectors sensitive to molecular excitations, and so that we should create detectors which are more sensitive to collisions with very light WIMPs. In this paper we investigate in detail diatomic molecules, such as fused silica material with large OH-molecule content, and water molecules. Presently, we do not have suitable low-cost IR detectors to observe single photons, however some OH-molecular excitations extend to visible and UV wavelengths and can be measured by bialkali photocathodes. There are many other chemical substances with diatomic molecules, or more complex oil molecules, which could be also investigated. This idea invites searches in experiments having large target volumes of such materials coupled to a large array of single-photon detectors with bialkali or infrared-sensitive photocathodes.

  9. Anti-dynamic-crosstalk method for single photon LIDAR detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Liu, Qiang; Gong, Mali; Fu, Xing

    2017-11-01

    With increasing number of vehicles equipped with light detection and ranging (LIDAR), crosstalk is identified as a critical and urgent issue in the range detection for active collision avoidance. Chaotic pulse position modulation (CPPM) applied in the transmitting pulse train has been shown to prevent crosstalk as well as range ambiguity. However, static and unified strategy on discrimination threshold and the number of accumulated pulse is not valid against crosstalk with varying number of sources and varying intensity of each source. This paper presents an adaptive algorithm to distinguish the target echo from crosstalk with dynamic and unknown level of intensity in the context of intelligent vehicles. New strategy is given based on receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves that consider the detection requirements of the probability of detection and false alarm for the scenario with varying crosstalk. In the adaptive algorithm, the detected results are compared by the new strategy with both the number of accumulated pulses and the threshold being raised step by step, so that the target echo can be exactly identified from crosstalk with the dynamic and unknown level of intensity. The validity of the algorithm has been verified through the experiments with a single photon detector and the time correlated single photo counting (TCSPC) technique, demonstrating a marked drop in required shots for identifying the target compared with static and unified strategy

  10. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    Enkephalin, an endogeneous substance in the human brain showing morphine-like biological functions, has been detected at the single molecule level based on the surface-enhanced Raman signal of the ring breathing mode of phenylalanine, which is one building block of the molecule. For enhancing...... the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  11. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  12. Rationale for single molecule detection by means of Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponenko, S.V.; Guzatov, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    A consistent quantum electrodynamical description is proposed of Raman scattering of light by a molecule in a medium with a modified photon density of states. Enhanced local density of states near a metal nanobody is shown to increase a scattering rate by several orders of magnitude, thus providing a rationale for experimental detection of single molecules by means of Raman spectroscopy. For an ellipsoidal particle 10 14 -fold enhancement of the Raman scattering cross-section is obtained. (authors)

  13. Molecular detection of Rickettsia typhi in cats and fleas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mercedes Nogueras

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rickettsiatyphi is the etiological agent of murine typhus (MT, a disease transmitted by two cycles: rat-flea-rat, and peridomestic cycle. Murine typhus is often misdiagnosed and underreported. A correct diagnosis is important because MT can cause severe illness and death. Our previous seroprevalence results pointed to presence of human R. typhi infection in our region; however, no clinical case has been reported. Although cats have been related to MT, no naturally infected cat has been described. The aim of the study is to confirm the existence of R. typhi in our location analyzing its presence in cats and fleas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 221 cats and 80 fleas were collected from Veterinary clinics, shelters, and the street (2001-2009. Variables surveyed were: date of collection, age, sex, municipality, living place, outdoor activities, demographic area, healthy status, contact with animals, and ectoparasite infestation. IgG against R. typhi were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Molecular detection in cats and fleas was performed by real-time PCR. Cultures were performed in those cats with positive molecular detection. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS. A p < 0.05 was considered significant. Thirty-five (15.8% cats were seropositive. There were no significant associations among seropositivity and any variables. R. typhi was detected in 5 blood and 2 cultures. High titres and molecular detection were observed in stray cats and pets, as well as in spring and winter. All fleas were Ctenocephalides felis. R. typhi was detected in 44 fleas (55%, from shelters and pets. Co-infection with R. felis was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Although no clinical case has been described in this area, the presence of R. typhi in cats and fleas is demonstrated. Moreover, a considerable percentage of those animals lived in households. To our knowledge, this is the first time R. typhi is detected in naturally infected cats.

  14. Rotation Detection Using the Precession of Molecular Electric Dipole Moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yi; Deng, Xiao-Bing; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2017-11-01

    We present a method to detect the rotation by using the precession of molecular electric dipole moment in a static electric field. The molecular electric dipole moments are polarized under the static electric field and a nonzero electric polarization vector emerges in the molecular gas. A resonant radio-frequency pulse electric field is applied to realize a 90° flip of the electric polarization vector of a particular rotational state. After the pulse electric field, the electric polarization vector precesses under the static electric field. The rotation induces a shift in the precession frequency which is measured to deduce the angular velocity of the rotation. The fundamental sensitivity limit of this method is estimated. This work is only a proposal and does not involve experimental results.

  15. Molecular detection of Capillaria philippinensis: An emerging zoonosis in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dib, Nadia A; El-Badry, Ayman A; Ta-Tang, Thuy-Huong; Rubio, Jose M

    2015-07-01

    Human infection with Capillaria philippinensis is accidental; however, it may end fatally if not diagnosed and treated in the proper time. The first case was detected in the Philippines in 1963, but later reported in other countries around the world, including Egypt. In this report, molecular diagnosis using a specific nested PCR for detection of C. philippinensis in faeces is described based on the amplification of small ribosomal subunit. The test showed sensitivity and specificity, as it detected all the positive cases and gave no cross-reaction with human DNA and DNA of other tested parasites. This method can be very useful not only for improvement of diagnosis, but also to understand the different environmental routes of transmission by detection of C. philippinensis DNA-stages in the possible fish intermediate hosts and reservoir animal host, helping to improve strategies for surveillance and prevention of human disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Overt foot movement detection in one single Laplacian EEG derivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Escalante, Teodoro; Müller-Putz, Gernot; Pfurtscheller, Gert

    2008-10-30

    In this work one single Laplacian derivation and a full description of band power values in a broad frequency band are used to detect brisk foot movement execution in the ongoing EEG. Two support vector machines (SVM) are trained to detect the event-related desynchronization (ERD) during motor execution and the following beta rebound (event-related synchronization, ERS) independently. Their performance is measured through the simulation of an asynchronous brain switch. ERS (true positive rate=0.74+/-0.21) after motor execution is shown to be more stable than ERD (true positive rate=0.21+/-0.12). A novel combination of ERD and post-movement ERS is introduced. The SVM outputs are combined with a product rule to merge ERD and ERS detection. For this novel approach the average information transfer rate obtained was 11.19+/-3.61bits/min.

  17. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the RIS technique, a laser is tuned to a wavelength which will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or nonresonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms; and since detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples are given of one-atom detection, including that of the noble gases, in order to show complementarity with AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81 Kr using RIS has interesting applications for solar neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Detection Using Au-Decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keum-Ju Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that Au-cluster-decorated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs may be used to discriminate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP. Nanoscale Au clusters were formed on the side walls of carbon nanotubes in a transistor geometry using electrochemical deposition. The effect of Au cluster decoration appeared as hole doping when electrical transport characteristics were examined. Thiolated single-stranded probe peptide nucleic acid (PNA was successfully immobilized on Au clusters decorating single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT-FETs, resulting in a conductance decrease that could be explained by a decrease in Au work function upon adsorption of thiolated PNA. Although a target single-stranded DNA (ssDNA with a single mismatch did not cause any change in electrical conductance, a clear decrease in conductance was observed with matched ssDNA, thereby showing the possibility of SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism detection using Au-cluster-decorated SWNT-FETs. However, a power to discriminate SNP target is lost in high ionic environment. We can conclude that observed SNP discrimination in low ionic environment is due to the hampered binding of SNP target on nanoscale surfaces in low ionic conditions.

  19. Towards high-throughput molecular detection of Plasmodium: new approaches and molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier Christophe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several strategies are currently deployed in many countries in the tropics to strengthen malaria control toward malaria elimination. To measure the impact of any intervention, there is a need to detect malaria properly. Mostly, decisions still rely on microscopy diagnosis. But sensitive diagnosis tools enabling to deal with a large number of samples are needed. The molecular detection approach offers a much higher sensitivity, and the flexibility to be automated and upgraded. Methods Two new molecular methods were developed: dot18S, a Plasmodium-specific nested PCR based on the 18S rRNA gene followed by dot-blot detection of species by using species-specific probes and CYTB, a Plasmodium-specific nested PCR based on cytochrome b gene followed by species detection using SNP analysis. The results were compared to those obtained with microscopic examination and the "standard" 18S rRNA gene based nested PCR using species specific primers. 337 samples were diagnosed. Results Compared to the microscopy the three molecular methods were more sensitive, greatly increasing the estimated prevalence of Plasmodium infection, including P. malariae and P. ovale. A high rate of mixed infections was uncovered with about one third of the villagers infected with more than one malaria parasite species. Dot18S and CYTB sensitivity outranged the "standard" nested PCR method, CYTB being the most sensitive. As a consequence, compared to the "standard" nested PCR method for the detection of Plasmodium spp., the sensitivity of dot18S and CYTB was respectively 95.3% and 97.3%. Consistent detection of Plasmodium spp. by the three molecular methods was obtained for 83% of tested isolates. Contradictory results were mostly related to detection of Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium ovale in mixed infections, due to an "all-or-none" detection effect at low-level parasitaemia. Conclusion A large reservoir of asymptomatic infections was uncovered using the

  20. Single Molecule Electrochemical Detection in Aqueous Solutions and Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Joshua C; Paulose Nadappuram, Binoy; Perry, David; McKelvey, Kim; Colburn, Alex W; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-10-20

    Single molecule electrochemical detection (SMED) is an extremely challenging aspect of electroanalytical chemistry, requiring unconventional electrochemical cells and measurements. Here, SMED is reported using a "quad-probe" (four-channel probe) pipet cell, fabricated by depositing carbon pyrolytically into two diagonally opposite barrels of a laser-pulled quartz quadruple-barreled pipet and filling the open channels with electrolyte solution, and quasi-reference counter electrodes. A meniscus forms at the end of the probe covering the two working electrodes and is brought into contact with a substrate working electrode surface. In this way, a nanogap cell is produced whereby the two carbon electrodes in the pipet can be used to promote redox cycling of an individual molecule with the substrate. Anticorrelated currents generated at the substrate and tip electrodes, at particular distances (typically tens of nanometers), are consistent with the detection of single molecules. The low background noise realized in this droplet format opens up new opportunities in single molecule electrochemistry, including the use of ionic liquids, as well as aqueous solution, and the quantitative assessment and analysis of factors influencing redox cycling currents, due to a precisely known gap size.

  1. Nonequilibrium Chemical Effects in Single-Molecule SERS Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Sean A.; Apra, Edoardo; Govind, Niranjan; Hess, Wayne P.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.

    2017-02-03

    Recent developments in nanophotonics have paved the way for achieving significant advances in the realm of single molecule chemical detection, imaging, and dynamics. In particular, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful analytical technique that is now routinely used to identify the chemical identity of single molecules. Understanding how nanoscale physical and chemical processes affect single molecule SERS spectra and selection rules is a challenging task, and is still actively debated. Herein, we explore underappreciated chemical phenomena in ultrasensitive SERS. We observe a fluctuating excited electronic state manifold, governed by the conformational dynamics of a molecule (4,4’-dimercaptostilbene, DMS) interacting with a metallic cluster (Ag20). This affects our simulated single molecule SERS spectra; the time trajectories of a molecule interacting with its unique local environment dictates the relative intensities of the observable Raman-active vibrational states. Ab initio molecular dynamics of a model Ag20-DMS system are used to illustrate both concepts in light of recent experimental results.

  2. Single-molecule detection of dihydroazulene photo-thermal reaction using break junction technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Cancan; Jevric, Martyn; Borges, Anders Christian

    2017-01-01

    a quantitative approach for probing the reaction kinetics and reversibility, including the occurrence of isomerization during the reaction. The product ratios observed when switching the system in the junction does not follow those observed in solution studies (both experiment and theory), suggesting......Charge transport by tunnelling is one of the most ubiquitous elementary processes in nature. Small structural changes in a molecular junction can lead to significant difference in the single-molecule electronic properties, offering a tremendous opportunity to examine a reaction on the single......-molecule scale by monitoring the conductance changes. Here, we explore the potential of the single-molecule break junction technique in the detection of photo-thermal reaction processes of a photochromic dihydroazulene/vinylheptafulvene system. Statistical analysis of the break junction experiments provides...

  3. Detection of gastritis by single- and double-contrast radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoeni, R.F.; Goldberg, H.I.; Ominsky, S.; Cello, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    Sixty-eight patients with various types of gastritis, 23 patients with normal stomachs, and four patients with other gastric diseases were examined in a prospective study to assess the sensitivity and specificity of single-contrast (SC) and double-contrast (DC) upper gastrointestinal examinations in the evaluation of gastritis. All patients underwent endoscopy with biopsy followed first by DC and then by SC radiography. The respective sensitivities of SC and DC radiography were 58% and 72% for all examinations and 59% and 77% for adequate examinations only. The respective specificities were 59% and 55% based on all examinations. Useful radiographic features included polypoid defects and erosions detected by both methods, abnormal folds and flattened margins detected by the SC technique, and narrowed lumen and crenulated margins detected by the DC technique. In 93% of all cases, the correct diagnosis was based on two or more of these radiographic features. According to this study, the radiographic sensitivity in the detection of gastritis is reliable only in cases of moderate-to-severe disease and only when based on findings of the DC examination. Neither SC nor DC radiography should be used as the primary screening method for patients with suspected gastritis, and the radiographic diagnosis should be restricted to the terms ''erosive'' or ''nonerosive gastritis.''

  4. Induction of prophage lambda by chlorinated organics: Detection of some single-species/single-site carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarini, D.M.; Brooks, H.G. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-eight chlorinated organic compounds were evaluated for their ability to induce DNA damage using the Microscreen prophage-induction assay in Escherichia coli. Comparison of the performance characteristics of the prophage-induction and Salmonella assays to rodent carcinogenicity assays showed that the prophage-induction assay had a somewhat higher specificity than did the Salmonella assay (70% vs. 50%); sensitivity, concordance, and positive and negative predictivity were similar for the two microbial assays. The Microscreen prophage-induction assay failed to detect eight carcinogens, perhaps due to toxicity or other unknown factors; five of these eight carcinogens were detected by the Salmonella assay. However, the prophage-induction assay did detect six carcinogens that were not detected by the Salmonella assay, and five of these were single-species, single-site carcinogens, mostly mouse liver carcinogens. Some of these carcinogens, such as the chloroethanes, produce free radicals, which may be the basis for their carcinogenicity and ability to induce prophage. The prophage-induction (or other SOS) assay may be useful in identifying some genotoxic chlorinated carcinogens that induce DNA damage that do not revert the standard Salmonella tester strains.

  5. Molecular electronics: the single molecule switch and transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Geskin, Victor; Heimbuch, Rene; Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected

  6. Molecular biophysics: detection and characterization of damage in molecular, cellular, and physiological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danyluk, S.S.

    1979-01-01

    This section contains summaries of research on the detection and characterization of damage in molecular, cellular, and physiological systems. Projects under investigation in this section include: chemical synthesis of nucleic acid derivatives; structural and conformational properties of biological molecules in solution; crystallographic and chemical studies of immunoglobulin structure; instrument design and development for x-ray and neutron scattering studies of biological molecules; and chromobiology and circadian regulation

  7. Steps to detect catalytic ethylene oxide formation on single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boecklein, Sebastian; Guenther, Sebastian; Reichelt, Robert; Seibald, Markus; Preimesser, Andreas; Ehrensberger, Martin; Rozsa, Gergely; Wintterlin, Joost [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, 81377 Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    As part of a project to bridge the ''pressure gap'' for the catalytic synthesis of ethylene oxide (EtO) on Ag surfaces we have undertaken extensive studies in a model reactor. The investigations aimed at finding conditions under which the production of EtO can be unambiguously and quantitatively detected on single crystal Ag surfaces, a challenging task because of the extremely low ethylene-to-EtO reaction probability. The experiments were performed in a specially designed reactor, and they involved the variation of partial pressures, temperature, and type of Ag samples (powders and polycrystalline sheets), and great effort was expended for proper background subtraction. We find that for the sheets an essential ingredient is an activation treatment by annealing in oxygen, which raises the activity by more than one order of magnitude. There are indications that subsurface O atoms are created by this pretreatment. The maximum values obtained for activity, selectivity, yield, and reaction probability allow us to predict that EtO produced on a single Ag crystal can indeed be detected under flow conditions in a UHV chamber. Experiments on the deactivation show that sintering plays an important role for the dispersed samples, but that there is an additional deactivation process for the sheets that is not caused by sintering or poisoning.

  8. Single cell detection using a magnetic zigzag nanowire biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao-Ting; Ger, Tzong-Rong; Lin, Ya-Hui; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2013-08-07

    A magnetic zigzag nanowire device was designed for single cell biosensing. Nanowires with widths of 150, 300, 500, and 800 nm were fabricated on silicon trenches by electron beam lithography, electron beam evaporation, and lift-off processes. Magnetoresistance measurements were performed before and after the attachment of a single magnetic cell to the nanowires to characterize the magnetic signal change due to the influence of the magnetic cell. Magnetoresistance responses were measured in different magnetic field directions, and the results showed that this nanowire device can be used for multi-directional detection. It was observed that the highest switching field variation occurred in a 150 nm wide nanowire when the field was perpendicular to the substrate plane. On the other hand, the highest magnetoresistance ratio variation occurred in a 800 nm wide nanowire also when the field was perpendicular to the substrate plane. Besides, the trench-structured substrate proposed in this study can fix the magnetic cell to the sensor in a fluid environment, and the stray field generated by the corners of the magnetic zigzag nanowires has the function of actively attracting the magnetic cells for detection.

  9. Automated single particle detection and tracking for large microscopy datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rhodri S; Yang, Lei; Dun, Alison; Smyth, Annya M; Duncan, Rory R; Rickman, Colin; Lu, Weiping

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in optical microscopy have enabled the acquisition of very large datasets from living cells with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Our ability to process these datasets now plays an essential role in order to understand many biological processes. In this paper, we present an automated particle detection algorithm capable of operating in low signal-to-noise fluorescence microscopy environments and handling large datasets. When combined with our particle linking framework, it can provide hitherto intractable quantitative measurements describing the dynamics of large cohorts of cellular components from organelles to single molecules. We begin with validating the performance of our method on synthetic image data, and then extend the validation to include experiment images with ground truth. Finally, we apply the algorithm to two single-particle-tracking photo-activated localization microscopy biological datasets, acquired from living primary cells with very high temporal rates. Our analysis of the dynamics of very large cohorts of 10 000 s of membrane-associated protein molecules show that they behave as if caged in nanodomains. We show that the robustness and efficiency of our method provides a tool for the examination of single-molecule behaviour with unprecedented spatial detail and high acquisition rates.

  10. Thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hua

    2012-06-01

    Conventional multi-component gas analysis is based either on laser spectroscopy, laser and photoacoustic absorption at specific wavelengths, or on gas chromatography by separating the components of a gas mixture primarily due to boiling point (or vapor pressure) differences. This paper will present a new gas molecular mass detection method based on thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection by fiber Bragg grating-based gas sensors. Such a nanomaterial and fiber Bragg grating integrated sensing device has been designed to be operated either at high-energy level (highly thermal strained status) or at low-energy level (low thermal strained status). Thermal energy absorption of gas molecular trigs the sensing device transition from high-thermal-energy status to low-thermal- energy status. Experiment has shown that thermal energy variation due to gas molecular thermal energy absorption is dependent upon the gas molecular mass, and can be detected by fiber Bragg resonant wavelength shift with a linear function from 17 kg/kmol to 32 kg/kmol and a sensitivity of 0.025 kg/kmol for a 5 micron-thick nano-trampoline structure and fiber Bragg grating integrated gas sensing device. The laboratory and field validation data have further demonstrated its fast response characteristics and reliability to be online gas analysis instrument for measuring effective gas molecular mass from single-component gas, binary-component gas mixture, and multi-gas mixture. The potential industrial applications include fouling and surge control for gas charge centrifugal compressor ethylene production, gas purity for hydrogen-cooled generator, gasification for syngas production, gasoline/diesel and natural gas fuel quality monitoring for consumer market.

  11. Quantifying single nucleotide variant detection sensitivity in exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynert, Alison M; Bicknell, Louise S; Hurles, Matthew E; Jackson, Andrew P; Taylor, Martin S

    2013-06-18

    The targeted capture and sequencing of genomic regions has rapidly demonstrated its utility in genetic studies. Inherent in this technology is considerable heterogeneity of target coverage and this is expected to systematically impact our sensitivity to detect genuine polymorphisms. To fully interpret the polymorphisms identified in a genetic study it is often essential to both detect polymorphisms and to understand where and with what probability real polymorphisms may have been missed. Using down-sampling of 30 deeply sequenced exomes and a set of gold-standard single nucleotide variant (SNV) genotype calls for each sample, we developed an empirical model relating the read depth at a polymorphic site to the probability of calling the correct genotype at that site. We find that measured sensitivity in SNV detection is substantially worse than that predicted from the naive expectation of sampling from a binomial. This calibrated model allows us to produce single nucleotide resolution SNV sensitivity estimates which can be merged to give summary sensitivity measures for any arbitrary partition of the target sequences (nucleotide, exon, gene, pathway, exome). These metrics are directly comparable between platforms and can be combined between samples to give "power estimates" for an entire study. We estimate a local read depth of 13X is required to detect the alleles and genotype of a heterozygous SNV 95% of the time, but only 3X for a homozygous SNV. At a mean on-target read depth of 20X, commonly used for rare disease exome sequencing studies, we predict 5-15% of heterozygous and 1-4% of homozygous SNVs in the targeted regions will be missed. Non-reference alleles in the heterozygote state have a high chance of being missed when commonly applied read coverage thresholds are used despite the widely held assumption that there is good polymorphism detection at these coverage levels. Such alleles are likely to be of functional importance in population based studies of

  12. An improved system of detecting single event effect in SRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Teng; Wang Xiaohui; Zhang Zhangang; Liu Tianqi; Gu Song; Yang Zhenlei; Su Hong; Liu Jie

    2014-01-01

    The material research center in Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP, CAS) have made a fruitful achievements in the research of single event effects (SEEs) occurring in static random access memory (SRAM). However, there are some drawbacks exist in the two systems of detecting SEE owning by the material research center. Therefore, an improved method of detecting SEE is proposed, and the method functionality is implemented in a circuit. Further, a sequence of experiments are carried out in the beam radiation terminal of the Heavy Ion Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), and a bunch of experimental data are collected. The irradiation tests were carried out using 129 Xe for the SEE research of 65 nm SRAMs; Using 12 C for the SEE research of the 65, 130 and 150 nm SRAMs with ECC module; Using 129 Xe for the SEL research of the common commercial SRAMs and so on. These experiments provide a statistical evidence of the effectiveness and robustness of the improved system. It is believed that the proposed system will be beneficial for detecting SEE in diverse settings, and it could be taken advantage of as a platform for future research on SEE tests in more intricate devices. (authors)

  13. Molecular analysis of desmoid tumors with a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism array identifies new molecular candidate lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Erben, Philipp; Nowak, Daniel; Sauer, Christian; Ströbel, Philipp; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Hohenberger, Peter; Kasper, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Background: Desmoid tumors are neoplastic proliferations of connective tissues. The mutation status of the gene coding for catenin (cadherin-associated protein) beta 1 (CTNNB1) and trisomy 8 on the chromosomal level have been described to have prognostic relevance. Patients and Methods: In order to elucidate new molecular mechanisms underlying these tumors, we carried out a molecular analysis with a genome-wide human high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, in 9 patients. Resu...

  14. Detection of biological threats. A challenge for directed molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Valery A; Sorokulova, Iryna B

    2004-08-01

    The probe technique originated from early attempts of Anton van Leeuwenhoek to contrast microorganisms under the microscope using plant juices, successful staining of tubercle bacilli with synthetic dyes by Paul Ehrlich and discovery of a stain for differentiation of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria by Hans Christian Gram. The technique relies on the principle that pathogens have unique structural features, which can be recognized by specifically labeled organic molecules. A hundred years of extensive screening efforts led to discovery of a limited assortment of organic probes that are used for identification and differentiation of bacteria. A new challenge--continuous monitoring of biological threats--requires long lasting molecular probes capable of tight specific binding of pathogens in unfavorable conditions. To respond to the challenge, probe technology is being revolutionized by utilizing methods of combinatorial chemistry, phage display and directed molecular evolution. This review describes how molecular evolution methods are applied for development of peptide, antibody and phage probes, and summarizes the author's own data on development of landscape phage probes against Salmonella typhimurium. The performance of the probes in detection of Salmonella is illustrated by a precipitation test, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescent, optical and electron microscopy.

  15. Conventional and molecular methods to detect bacterial pathogens in mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliandolo, C; Lentini, V; Spanò, A; Maugeri, T L

    2011-01-01

    To detect Aeromonas spp., Salmonella spp., Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in mussels and water samples from a farming area, conventional and molecular methods were applied to enrichment cultures. The aerolysin gene (aero) of Aeromonas spp., the invasion plasmid antigen B (ipaB) gene of Salmonella spp., the enterotoxin secretion protein (epsM) gene of V. cholerae, the species-specific region of 16S rRNA gene of V. vulnificus, the 16S-23S rDNA (IGS) gene of V. parahaemolyticus and the pR72H fragment of V. parahaemolyticus were amplified by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays on DNA extracted from enrichment cultures. The haemolysin gene (tdh) of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus was also amplified. Conventional culture method allowed the isolation of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus from water and mussels. The genes aero, epsM and 16S rRNA of V. vulnificus were occasionally detected in the enrichment cultures. In mussels, the ipaB and IGS genes were detected from June to September and from April to November, respectively. All genes, except aero, were amplified from mussels collected in September, when pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus (tdh+) strains were also isolated. Multiplex-PCR assays were more sensitive and faster than conventional procedures. The results emphasize the need of an accurate and rapid detection of bacterial pathogens in mussels to protect human health. © 2010 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Pinched flow fractionation devices for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, A.V.; Poulsen, L.; Birgens, H.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a new and flexible micro fluidic based method for genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs). The method relies on size separation of selectively hybridized polystyrene microspheres in a micro fluidic pinched flow fractionation (PFF) device. The micro fluidic PFF devices...... and 5.6 mu m were functionalized with biotin-labeled oligonucleotides for the detection of a mutant (Mt) or wild-type (Wt) DNA sequence in the HBB gene, respectively. Hybridization to functionalized beads was performed with fluorescent targets comprising synthetic DNA oligonucleotides or amplified RNA......, synthesized using human DNA samples from individuals with point mutations in the HBB gene. Following a stringent wash, the beads were separated in a PFF device and the fluorescent signal from the beads was analyzed. Patients being wildtypes, heterozygotes or mutated respectively for the investigated mutation...

  17. Detecting semantic priming at the single-trial level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Geuze

    Full Text Available Semantic priming is usually studied by examining ERPs over many trials and subjects. This article aims at detecting semantic priming at the single-trial level. By using machine learning techniques it is possible to analyse and classify short traces of brain activity, which could, for example, be used to build a Brain Computer Interface (BCI. This article describes an experiment where subjects were presented with word pairs and asked to decide whether the words were related or not. A classifier was trained to determine whether the subjects judged words as related or unrelated based on one second of EEG data. The results show that the classifier accuracy when training per subject varies between 54% and 67%, and is significantly above chance level for all subjects (N  = 12 and the accuracy when training over subjects varies between 51% and 63%, and is significantly above chance level for 11 subjects, pointing to a general effect.

  18. PathogenMIPer: a tool for the design of molecular inversion probes to detect multiple pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhras Michael

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we describe PathogenMIPer, a software program for designing molecular inversion probe (MIP oligonucleotides for use in pathogen identification and detection. The software designs unique and specific oligonucleotide probes targeting microbial or other genomes. The tool tailors all probe sequence components (including target-specific sequences, barcode sequences, universal primers and restriction sites and combines these components into ready-to-order probes for use in a MIP assay. The system can harness the genetic variability available in an entire genome in designing specific probes for the detection of multiple co-infections in a single tube using a MIP assay. Results PathogenMIPer can accept sequence data in FASTA file format, and other parameter inputs from the user through a graphical user interface. It can design MIPs not only for pathogens, but for any genome for use in parallel genomic analyses. The software was validated experimentally by applying it to the detection of human papilloma virus (HPV as a model system, which is associated with various human malignancies including cervical and skin cancers. Initial tests of laboratory samples using the MIPs developed by the PathogenMIPer to recognize 24 different types of HPVs gave very promising results, detecting even a small viral load of single as well as multiple infections (Akhras et al, personal communication. Conclusion PathogenMIPer is a software for designing molecular inversion probes for detection of multiple target DNAs in a sample using MIP assays. It enables broader use of MIP technology in the detection through genotyping of pathogens that are complex, difficult-to-amplify, or present in multiple subtypes in a sample.

  19. Single vs. dual color fire detection systems: operational tradeoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danino, Meir; Danan, Yossef; Sinvani, Moshe

    2017-10-01

    In attempt to supply a reasonable fire plume detection, multinational cooperation with significant capital is invested in the development of two major Infra-Red (IR) based fire detection alternatives, single-color IR (SCIR) and dual-color IR (DCIR). False alarm rate was expected to be high not only as a result of real heat sources but mainly due to the IR natural clutter especially solar reflections clutter. SCIR uses state-of-the-art technology and sophisticated algorithms to filter out threats from clutter. On the other hand, DCIR are aiming at using additional spectral band measurements (acting as a guard), to allow the implementation of a simpler and more robust approach for performing the same task. In this paper we present the basics of SCIR & DCIR architecture and the main differences between them. In addition, we will present the results from a thorough study conducted for the purpose of learning about the added value of the additional data available from the second spectral band. Here we consider the two CO2 bands of 4-5 micron and of 2.5-3 micron band as well as off peak band (guard). The findings of this study refer also to Missile warning systems (MWS) efficacy, in terms of operational value. We also present a new approach for tunable filter to such sensor.

  20. Electrochemistry of single molecules and biomolecules, molecular scale nanostructures, and low-dimensional systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.

    2018-01-01

    Electrochemistry at ultra-small scales, where even the single molecule or biomolecule can be characterized and manipulated, is on the way to a consolidated status. At the same time molecular electrochemistry is expanding into other areas of sophisticated nano- and molecular scale systems including...

  1. Molecular engineering and fluorescence for the detection of toxic cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souchon, V.

    2007-11-01

    This work is a part of the 'Toxicologie Nucleaire Environnementale' program which aims at studying the effects on the living of heavy metals or radionuclides involved in nuclear industry. Most particularly, it deals with the design of new fluorescent sensors for the selective detection of Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ and Cs + in biological media. Several fluorescent calixarenes possessing nitrogen atoms were synthesized and their properties as potential lead sensors were investigated. One of them could be used in experimental conditions close to biological media and new target compounds with amide functional groups were proposed. Many approaches were considered for the design of selective fluorescent sensors for cadmium. On the basis of literature results, many chelating compounds incorporating sulfur atoms were synthesized but showed no significant affinity towards cadmium. On the opposite, compounds functionalized with several pyridine-2'-yl-1,2,3-triazol fluorescent moieties linked to a β-cyclodextrin or a calix[4]arene showed good affinity for cadmium in methanol, but the selectivity was found to be insufficient. In contrast, very satisfying results in terms of both selectivity and sensitivity could be obtained with the commercial calcium sensor Rhod-5N in an aqueous medium at neutral pH. Lastly, micromolar detection limits for the selective detection of caesium were reached in an aqueous medium at neutral pH thanks to a new sulfonated fluorescent calixarene with two appended crown-ethers. An original complexation mechanism was proposed and validated by molecular modelling (DFT). (author)

  2. Deployable Molecular Detection of Arboviruses in the Australian Outback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Timothy J J; Bradbury, Richard S; McInnes, Russell L; Frances, Stephen P; Merritt, Adam J; Levy, Avram; Nicholson, Jay; Neville, Peter J; Lindsay, Michael; Smith, David W

    2016-09-07

    The most common causes of human infection from the arboviruses that are endemic in Australia are the arthritogenic alphaviruses: Ross River virus (RRV) and Barmah Forest virus (BFV). The most serious infections are caused by the neurotropic flaviviruses, Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV) and the Kunjin subtype of West Nile virus. The greatest individual risk of arbovirus infection occurs in tropical/subtropical northern Australia because of the warm, wet summer conditions from December to June, where conventional arbovirus surveillance is difficult due to a combination of low population density, large distances between population centers, poor roads, and seasonal flooding. Furthermore, virus detection requires samples to be sent to Perth up to 2,000 km away for definitive analysis, causing delays of days to weeks before test results are available and public health interventions can be started. We deployed a portable molecular biology laboratory for remote field detection of endemic arboviruses in northern Queensland, then in tropical Western Australia and detected BFV, MVEV, and RRV RNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays of extracts from mosquitoes trapped in Queensland. We then used a field-portable compact real-time thermocycler for the samples collected in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. Real-time field PCR assays enabled concurrent endemic arbovirus distribution mapping in outback Queensland and Western Australia. Our deployable laboratory method provides a concept of operations for future remote area arbovirus surveillance. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  3. Rapid Isolation and Molecular Detection of Streptomycin-Producing Streptomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Motovali-bashi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Streptomyces species are mycelial, aerobic gram-positive bacteria that are isolated from soil and produce a diverse range of antibiotics. Streptomyces griseus produces the antibiotic, streptomycin and forms spores even in a liquid culture. The gene cluster for the production of Streptomycin antibiotic contains strR gene that encodes StrR, a pathway-specific regulator. Then, this pathway-specific regulator induces transcription of other streptomycin production genes in the gene cluster. The overall aim of this work was rapid isolation and molecular detection of streptomycin-producing Streptomycetes, especially S. griseus, from Iranian soils in order to manipulate them for increased production of streptomycin. Methods: This research used new initiative half-specific medium for isolation of Streptomycetes from natural environments, called FZmsn. The fifty colonies of Streptomyces strains grown on the surface of FZmsn medium isolated from environmental samples were defined on the basis of their morphological characteristics and light microscope studies. A set of primers was designed to detect strR by OLIGO software. Results: In colony-PCR reactions followed by gel electrophoresis, 6 colonies from Streptomyces strains colonies were detected as S. griseus colonies. Conclusion: These native Streptomyces strains will be used for genetic manipulation of S. griseus in order to increase production levels of streptomycin.

  4. Molecular Detection of Schistosome Infections with a Disposable Microfluidic Cassette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhao Song

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic helminths such as schistosomes, as well as filarial and soil-transmitted nematodes, are estimated to infect at least a billion people worldwide, with devastating impacts on human health and economic development. Diagnosis and monitoring of infection dynamics and efficacy of treatment depend almost entirely on methods that are inaccurate, labor-intensive, and unreliable. These shortcomings are amplified and take on added significance in mass drug administration programs, where measures of effectiveness depend on accurate monitoring of treatment success (or failure, changes in disease transmission rates, and emergence of possible drug resistance. Here, we adapt isothermal molecular assays such as loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP to a simple, hand-held, custom-made field-ready microfluidic device that allows sensitive and specific detection of schistosome cell-free nucleic acids in serum and plasma (separated with a point-of-care plasma separator from Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice. Cell-free S. mansoni DNA was detected with our device without prior extraction from blood. Our chip exhibits high sensitivity (~2 x 10(-17 g/μL, with a positive signal for S. mansoni DNA detectable as early as one week post infection, several weeks before parasite egg production commences. These results indicate that incorporation of isothermal amplification strategies with our chips could represent a strategy for rapid, simple, low-cost diagnosis of both pre-patent and chronic schistosome infections as well as potential monitoring of treatment efficacy.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of a solid-state nanopore with self-aligned carbon nanoelectrodes for molecular detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinney, Patrick S; Collins, Scott D; Smith, Rosemary L; Howitt, David G

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic molecular sensors based on resistive pulse nanopore modalities are envisioned as facile DNA sequencers. However, recent advances in nanotechnology fabrication have highlighted promising alternative detection mechanisms with higher sensitivity and potential single-base resolution. In this paper we present the novel self-aligned fabrication of a solid-state nanopore device with integrated transverse graphene-like carbon nanoelectrodes for polyelectrolyte molecular detection. The electrochemical transduction mechanism is characterized and found to result primarily from thermionic emission between the two transverse electrodes. Response of the nanopore to Lambda dsDNA and short (16-mer) ssDNA is demonstrated and distinguished. (paper)

  6. Molecular beam epitaxy of single crystal colossal magnetoresistive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, J.N.; Bozovic, I.; Rzchowski, M.; O'Donnell, J.; Hinaus, B.; Onellion, M.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have grown films of (LaSr)MnO 3 (LSMO) and (LaCa)MnO 3 (LCMO) using atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE). Depending on growth conditions, substrate lattice constant and the exact cation stoichiometry, the films are either pseudomorphic or strain relaxed. The pseudomorphic films show atomically flat surfaces, with a unit cell terrace structure that is a replica of that observed on the slightly vicinal substrates, while the strain relaxed films show bumpy surfaces correlated with a dislocation network. All films show tetragonal structure and exhibit anisotropic magnetoresistance, with a low field response, (1/R)(dR/dH) as large as 5 T -1

  7. The long tail of molecular alterations in non-small cell lung cancer: a single-institution experience of next-generation sequencing in clinical molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Caterina; Vacirca, Davide; Rappa, Alessandra; Passaro, Antonio; Guarize, Juliana; Rafaniello Raviele, Paola; de Marinis, Filippo; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Casadio, Chiara; Viale, Giuseppe; Barberis, Massimo; Guerini-Rocco, Elena

    2018-03-13

    Molecular profiling of advanced non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) is essential to identify patients who may benefit from targeted treatments. In the last years, the number of potentially actionable molecular alterations has rapidly increased. Next-generation sequencing allows for the analysis of multiple genes simultaneously. To evaluate the feasibility and the throughput of next-generation sequencing in clinical molecular diagnostics of advanced NSCLC. A single-institution cohort of 535 non-squamous NSCLC was profiled using a next-generation sequencing panel targeting 22 actionable and cancer-related genes. 441 non-squamous NSCLC (82.4%) harboured at least one gene alteration, including 340 cases (63.6%) with clinically relevant molecular aberrations. Mutations have been detected in all but one gene ( FGFR1 ) of the panel. Recurrent alterations were observed in KRAS , TP53 , EGFR , STK11 and MET genes, whereas the remaining genes were mutated in <5% of the cases. Concurrent mutations were detected in 183 tumours (34.2%), mostly impairing KRAS or EGFR in association with TP53 alterations. The study highlights the feasibility of targeted next-generation sequencing in clinical setting. The majority of NSCLC harboured mutations in clinically relevant genes, thus identifying patients who might benefit from different targeted therapies. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Detection of Acute Gastroenteritis Agents By Molecular Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şafak Göktaş

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Gastroenteritis is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups all over the world. Multiplex PCR tests give sensitive and specific results in the investigation of bacterial, viral, parasitic agents. In this study, it was aimed to determine the agents of the stool specimens of patients with acute diarrhea by multiplex PCR. Materials and Methods: Stool sample taken from 471 patients sent to Istanbul Gelişim Laboratories between January 1, 2015 and September 30, 2016 was included in the study. All stool samples were processed according to manufacturer’s instructions with GastroFinder SMART 18 FAST multiplex PCR test (Pathofinder, Holland. 18 different gastrointestinal pathogens were diagnosed in one study. Results: Of the 471 patients stool sample included in the study. The agent was negative in 241 (51.2%, while the agent was isolated in 230 (48.8%. 190 (82% had a single pathogen, 40 had two or more pathogens. Of the 190 samples detected with single agent, 149 (31.6% were bacterial, 26 (5.5% were parasitic and 15 (3.1% were viral agents. Of the 149 bacterial agents, 108 (23% was detected as Salmonella spp, 14 (6% as EHEC, 8 (3.5% as Clostridium difficile toxin A / B, 8 (3.5% as Campylobacter spp., 7 (3% Aeromonas spp., 2 (0.8% Yersinia enterocolitica, 2 (0.8% Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC. Of 26 parasitic agents, 18 (7.8% was detected as Giardia lamblia, 6 (2.6% as Dientamoeba fragilis and 2 (0.8% as Cryptosporidium spp. Conclusion: Identification of enteric pathogens by multiplex PCR will avoids the use of unnecessary antibiotic treatments

  9. Imaging and Force Recognition of Single Molecular Behaviors Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM has provided a powerful tool for investigating the behaviors of single native biological molecules under physiological conditions. AFM can not only image the conformational changes of single biological molecules at work with sub-nanometer resolution, but also sense the specific interactions of individual molecular pair with piconewton force sensitivity. In the past decade, the performance of AFM has been greatly improved, which makes it widely used in biology to address diverse biomedical issues. Characterizing the behaviors of single molecules by AFM provides considerable novel insights into the underlying mechanisms guiding life activities, contributing much to cell and molecular biology. In this article, we review the recent developments of AFM studies in single-molecule assay. The related techniques involved in AFM single-molecule assay were firstly presented, and then the progress in several aspects (including molecular imaging, molecular mechanics, molecular recognition, and molecular activities on cell surface was summarized. The challenges and future directions were also discussed.

  10. Novel tailor-made externally triggerable single-molecular switches for molecular electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Harzmann, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Molecular electronics marks a highly interdisciplinary scientific field, in which physicists, chemists, and biologist jointly investigate electronic phenomena on a molecular level. Herein, the foremost task of the chemist is the design and synthesis of novel, tailor-made model compounds bearing externally addressable or controllable functions, which are predominantly of electronic nature. This present PhD thesis mainly focusses on the synthetic aspects towards innovative metalorga...

  11. Molecularly Imprinted Quartz Crystal Microbalance Sensor (QCM for Bilirubin Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem Çiçek

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims the preparation of a QCM sensor for the detection of bilirubin in human plasma. Bilirubin-imprinted poly-(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-l-tryptophan methyl ester (PHEMATrp nanofilm (MIP on the gold surface of a QCM chip was synthesized by the molecular imprinting technique. Meanwhile, the non-imprinted PHEMATrp (NIP nanofilm was synthesized by the same experimental technique to examine the imprinting effect. Characterization of MIP and NIP nanofilms on the QCM chip surface was achieved by atomic force microscopy (AFM, ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR and contact angle measurements (CA. The observations indicated that the nanofilm was almost in a monolayer. Thereinafter, the imprinted and the non-imprinted QCM chips were connected to the QCM system to investigate kinetic and affinity properties. In order to examine the selectivity of the MIP-PHEMATrp nanofilm, competitive adsorption of bilirubin with cholesterol and estradiol was performed. Limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantitation (LOQ values were calculated as 0.45 μg/mL and 0.9 μg/mL, respectively.

  12. Single-cell technologies in molecular marine studies

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2015-01-24

    Middle Eastern countries are experiencing a renaissance, with heavy investment in both in infrastructure and science. King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) is a new and modern university in Saudi Arabia. At the Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC) we are working on exploring the Red Sea and beyond, collaborating with Japanese and other research centers. We are using the environment to collect and analyze the microorganisms present. The platform being established at CBRC allows to process samples in a pipeline. The pipeline components consist of sample collection, processing and sequencing, following the in silico analysis, determining the gene functions, identifying the organisms. The genomes of microorganisms of interest are targeted modified by genome editing technology such as CRISPR and desired properties are selected by single cell instrumentation. The final output is to identify valuable microorganisms with production of bio-energy, nutrients, the food and fine chemicals.

  13. Quantitative Molecular Imaging with a Single Gd-Based Contrast Agent Reveals Specific Tumor Binding and Retention in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mette L; Gao, Ying; Hutnick, Melanie A; Craig, Sonya E L; Pokorski, Jonathan K; Flask, Chris A; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2017-06-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, especially cancer. However, the poor sensitivity of MRI relative to other imaging modalities, such as PET, has hindered the development and clinical use of molecular MRI contrast agents that could provide vital diagnostic information by specifically locating a molecular target altered in the disease process. This work describes the specific and sustained in vivo binding and retention of a protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ)-targeted, molecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent with a single gadolinium (Gd) chelate using a quantitative MRI T 1 mapping technique in glioma xenografts. Quantitative T 1 mapping is an imaging method used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time, the T 1 relaxation time, of protons in a magnetic field after excitation by a radiofrequency pulse. T 1 relaxation times can in turn be used to calculate the concentration of a gadolinium-containing contrast agent in a region of interest, thereby allowing the retention or clearance of an agent to be quantified. In this context, retention is a measure of molecular contrast agent binding. Using conventional peptide chemistry, a PTPμ-targeted peptide was linked to a chelator that had been conjugated to a lysine residue. Following complexation with Gd, this PTPμ-targeted molecular contrast agent containing a single Gd ion showed significant tumor enhancement and a sustained increase in Gd concentration in both heterotopic and orthotopic tumors using dynamic quantitative MRI. This single Gd-containing PTPμ agent was more effective than our previous version with three Gd ions. Differences between nonspecific and specific agents, due to specific tumor binding, can be determined within the first 30 min after agent administration by examining clearance rates. This more facile chemistry, when combined with quantitative MR techniques, allows for widespread adoption by academic

  14. The Evolution of Advanced Molecular Diagnostics for the Detection and Characterization of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Maureen H; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advancements in the methods used for detecting and characterizing Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a common cause of respiratory illness and community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. The repertoire of available molecular diagnostics has greatly expanded from nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAATs) that encompass a variety of chemistries used for detection, to more sophisticated characterizing methods such as multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), single nucleotide polymorphism typing, and numerous macrolide susceptibility profiling methods, among others. These many molecular-based approaches have been developed and employed to continually increase the level of discrimination and characterization in order to better understand the epidemiology and biology of M. pneumoniae. This review will summarize recent molecular techniques and procedures and lend perspective to how each has enhanced the current understanding of this organism and will emphasize how Next Generation Sequencing may serve as a resource for researchers to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the genomic complexities of this insidious pathogen.

  15. Molecular approaches for the detection and identification of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the human gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Satokari, R.M.; Vaughan, E.E.; Smidt, H.; Saarela, M.; Matto, J.; Vos, de W.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this review an overview of various molecular techniques and their application for the detection and identification of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is presented. The techniques include molecular typing techniques such as amplified ribosomal DNA restriction

  16. DETECTION OF MOLECULAR GAS IN VOID GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR STAR FORMATION IN ISOLATED ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, M.; Honey, M. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore (India); Saito, T. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate school of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 133-0033 (Japan); Iono, D. [Chile Observatory, NAOJ (Japan); Ramya, S., E-mail: mousumi@iiap.res.in [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Shanghai (China)

    2015-12-10

    We present the detection of molecular gas from galaxies located in nearby voids using the CO(1–0) line emission as a tracer. The observations were performed using the 45 m single dish radio telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. Void galaxies lie in the most underdense parts of our universe and a significant fraction of them are gas rich, late-type spiral galaxies. Although isolated, they have ongoing star formation but appear to be slowly evolving compared to galaxies in denser environments. Not much is known about their star formation properties or cold gas content. In this study, we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively high IRAS fluxes or Hα line luminosities, both of which signify ongoing star formation. All five galaxies appear to be isolated and two lie within the Bootes void. We detected CO(1–0) emission from four of the five galaxies in our sample and their molecular gas masses lie between 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}. We conducted follow-up Hα imaging observations of three detected galaxies using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope and determined their star formation rates (SFRs) from their Hα fluxes. The SFR varies from 0.2 to 1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}; which is similar to that observed in local galaxies. Our study indicates that although void galaxies reside in underdense regions, their disks contain molecular gas and have SFRs similar to galaxies in denser environments. We discuss the implications of our results.

  17. Optical detection of singlet oxygen from single cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snyder, John; Skovsen, Esben; Lambert, John D. C.

    2006-01-01

    The lowest excited electronic state of molecular oxygen, singlet molecular oxygen, O2(a 1g), is a reactive species involved in many chemical and biological processes. To better understand the roles played by singlet oxygen in biological systems, particularly at the sub-cellular level, optical tools...

  18. Chemical point detection using differential fluorescence from molecularly imprinted polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestov, Dmitry; Anderson, John E.; Nelson, Jean; Tepper, Gary C.

    2004-12-01

    Fluorescence represents one of the most attractive approaches for chemical sensing due to the abundant light produced by most fluorophores, resulting in excellent detection sensitivity. However, the broad and overlapping emission spectra of target and background species have made it difficult to perform species identification in a field instrument because of the need to perform spectral decomposition and analysis. This paper describes a new chemical sensing strategy based on differential fluorescence measurements from molecularly imprinted polymers, which eliminates the need to perform any spectral analysis. Species identification is accomplished by measuring the differential light output from a pair of polymers-one imprinted to a target species and the other identical, but not imprinted. The imprinted polymer selectively concentrates the target molecule and controls the energy (wavelength) of the emitted fluorescence signal and the differential output eliminates common mode signals associated with non-specific background interference. Because no spectral analysis is required, the sensors can be made extremely small and require very little power. Preliminary performance parameters from a prototype sensor are presented and discussed.

  19. Development of a new molecular detection method for Taylorella equigenitalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazumi, Akihiro; Hirayama, Junichi; Hayashi, Kyohei; Petry, Sandrine; Moore, John E; Millar, B Cherie; Matsuda, Motoo

    2011-06-01

    On PCR amplification of the intervening sequences (IVSs) in the central (helix 45) region within 23S rRNA gene sequences with T. equigenitalis (n = 34), as well as T. asinigenitalis (n = 35) and Bordetella (n = 11) isolates by using the primer pair of f-/r-23STis2, approximately 0.8 kb of the amplicons were generated, sequenced and analyzed. One IVS of approximately 70 bp in length was identified in all the Taylorella organisms but not Bordetella. PCR amplification was further developed for the convenient and rapid molecular detection of T. equigenitalis organisms with the IVS in the helix 45 region within the 23S rRNA genes as target by using the primer pairs (f-IVSde/r-23de). Thus, these results clearly demonstrated that PCR amplification with the primer pair (f-IVSde/r-23de) can be reliable in order to differentiate the T. equigenitalis isolates from both the T. asinigenitalis and Bordetella organisms. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Conventional, molecular methods and biomarkers molecules in detection of septicemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Arabestani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients worldwide and based on studies, 30-40% of all cases of severe sepsis and septic shock results from the blood stream infections (BSIs. Identifying of the disease, performing laboratory tests, and consequently treatment are factors that required for optimum management of BSIs. In addition, applying precise and immediate identification of the etiologic agent is a prerequisite for specific antibiotic therapy of pathogen and thereby decreasing mortality rates. The diagnosis of sepsis is difficult because clinical signs of sepsis often overlap with other noninfectious cases of systemic inflammation. BSIs are usually diagnosed by performing a series of techniques such as blood cultures, polymerase chain reaction-based methods, and biomarkers of sepsis. Extremely time-consuming even to take up to several days is a major limitation of conventional methods. In addition, yielding false-negative results due to fastidious and slow-growing microorganisms and also in case of antibiotic pretreated samples are other limitations. In comparison, molecular methods are capable of examining a blood sample obtained from suspicious patient with BSI and gave the all required information to prescribing antimicrobial therapy for detected bacterial or fungal infections immediately. Because of an emergency of sepsis, new methods are being developed. In this review, we discussed about the most important sepsis diagnostic methods and numbered the advantage and disadvantage of the methods in detail.

  1. Comprehensive detection of diverse exon 19 deletion mutations of EGFR in lung Cancer by a single probe set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jin Ho; Jo, Seong-Min; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-12-15

    Detection of exon 19 deletion mutation of EGFR, one of the most frequently occurring mutations in lung cancer, provides the crucial information for diagnosis and treatment guideline in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we demonstrate a simple and efficient method to detect various exon 19 deletion mutations of EGFR using a single probe set comprising of an oligo-quencher (oligo-Q) and a molecular beacon (MB). While the MB hybridizes to both the wild and mutant target DNA, the oligo-Q only binds to the wild target DNA, leading to a fluorescent signal in case of deletion mutation. This enables the comprehensive detection of the diverse exon 19 deletion mutations using a single probe set. We demonstrated the utility and efficiency of the approach by detecting the frequent exon 19 deletion mutations of EGFR through a real-time PCR and in situ fluorescence imaging. Our approach enabled the detection of genomic DNA as low as 0.02 ng, showing a detection limit of 2% in a heterogeneous DNA mixture, and could be used for detecting mutations in a single cell level. The present MB and oligo-Q dual probe system can be used for diagnosis and treatment guideline in NSCLC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Single electron based binary multipliers with overflow detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    electron based device. Multipliers with overflow detection based on serial and parallel prefix computation algorithm are elaborately discussed analytically and designed. The overflow detection circuits works in parallel with a simplified multiplier to ...

  3. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from a single molecularly bridged silver nanoparticle aggregate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sládková, M.; Vlčková, B.; Pavel, I.; Šišková, Karolína; Šlouf, Miroslav

    924-26, SI (2009), s. 567-570 ISSN 0022-2860. [European Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy /29./. Opatija, 31.08.2008-05.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/07/0717; GA AV ČR KAN100500652 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : single molecule SERS * 4,4"-diaminoterphenyl * molecularly bridget Ag nanoparticle aggregates Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.551, year: 2009

  4. Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection with a magnetic molecular beacon probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma Gondii infection is widespread in humans worldwide and reported infection rates range from 3%-70%, depending on the populations or geographic areas, and it has been recognized as a potential food safety hazard in our daily life. A magnetic molecular beacon probe (mMBP), based on theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), was currently reported to detect Toxoplasma Gondii DNA. Nano-sized Fe3O4 were primarily prepared by coprecipitation method in aqueous phase with NaOH as precipitator, and was used as magnetic core. The qualified coreshell magnetic quantum dots (mQDs), i.e. CdTe(symbol)Fe3O4, were then achieved by layer-by-layer method when mol ratio of Fe3O4/CdTe is 1/3, pH at 6.0, 30 °C, and reactant solution was refluxed for 30 min, the size of mQDs were determined to be 12-15 nm via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Over 70% overlap between emission spectrum of mQDs and absorbance spectrum of BHQ-2 was observed, this result suggests the synthesized mQDs and BHQ-2 can be utilized as energy donor and energy acceptor, respectively. The sensing probe was fabricated and a stem-loop Toxoplasma Gondii DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with mQDs at the 5' end and BHQ-2 at 3' end, respectively. Target Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected under conditions of 37 °C, hybridization for 2h, at pH8.0 in Tris-HCl buffer. About 30% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed via fluorescence spectrum (FS) after the Toxoplasma gondii DNA was added, which suggested that the Toxoplasma Gondii DNA was successfully detected. Specificity investigation of the mMBP indicated that relative low recovery of fluorescence intensity was obtained when the target DNA with one-base pair mismatch was added, this result indicated the high specificity of the sensing probe. Our research simultaneously indicated that mMBP can be conveniently separated from the unhybridized stem-loop DNA and target DNA, which will be meaningful in DNA sensing and purification process.

  5. Cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen in a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takamasa; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tanabe, Yoshiaki; Yuki, Masahiro; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-20

    The N≡N bond of molecular dinitrogen bridging two molybdenum atoms in the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl molybdenum complexes that bear ferrocenyldiphosphine as an auxiliary ligand is homolytically cleaved under visible light irradiation at room temperature to afford two molar molybdenum nitride complexes. Conversely, the bridging molecular dinitrogen is reformed by the oxidation of the molybdenum nitride complex at room temperature. This result provides a successful example of the cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen induced by a pair of two different external stimuli using a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine under ambient conditions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Recent Advances in Molecular Technologies and Their Application in Pathogen Detection in Foods with Particular Reference to Yersinia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Gui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia enterocolitica is an important zoonotic pathogen that can cause yersiniosis in humans and animals. Food has been suggested to be the main source of yersiniosis. It is critical for the researchers to be able to detect Yersinia or any other foodborne pathogen with increased sensitivity and specificity, as well as in real-time, in the case of a foodborne disease outbreak. Conventional detection methods are known to be labor intensive, time consuming, or expensive. On the other hand, more sensitive molecular-based detection methods like next generation sequencing, microarray, and many others are capable of providing faster results. DNA testing is now possible on a single molecule, and high-throughput analysis allows multiple detection reactions to be performed at once, thus allowing a range of characteristics to be rapidly and simultaneously determined. Despite better detection efficiencies, results derived using molecular biology methods can be affected by the various food matrixes. With the improvements in sample preparation, data analysis, and testing procedures, molecular detection techniques will likely continue to simplify and increase the speed of detection while simultaneously improving the sensitivity and specificity for tracking pathogens in food matrices.

  7. Optical microscopy techniques based on structured illumination and single-pixel detection

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Jiménez, Ángel David

    2017-01-01

    In this Thesis, we explore single-pixel microscopy to design and develop proof-of-principle experiments where the single-pixel detection strategy outperforms conventional optical array detection in wide-field microscopy. The ability of the single-pixel detection strategy to generate a spatially resolved image of an object hidden by arbitrary scattering media has been recently demonstrated. Strikingly, a sensor without spatial resolution is able to retrieve a high-resolution image of a sample ...

  8. Practical Application of Aptamer-Based Biosensors in Detection of Low Molecular Weight Pollutants in Water Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Water pollution has become one of the leading causes of human health problems. Low molecular weight pollutants, even at trace concentrations in water sources, have aroused global attention due to their toxicity after long-time exposure. There is an increased demand for appropriate methods to detect these pollutants in aquatic systems. Aptamers, single-stranded DNA or RNA, have high affinity and specificity to each of their target molecule, similar to antigen-antibody interaction. Aptamers can be selected using a method called Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX. Recent years we have witnessed great progress in developing aptamer selection and aptamer-based sensors for low molecular weight pollutants in water sources, such as tap water, seawater, lake water, river water, as well as wastewater and its effluents. This review provides an overview of aptamer-based methods as a novel approach for detecting low molecular weight pollutants in water sources.

  9. Comparison of variations detection between whole-genome amplification methods used in single-cell resequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yong; Wu, Kui; Shi, Xulian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-cell resequencing (SCRS) provides many biomedical advances in variations detection at the single-cell level, but it currently relies on whole genome amplification (WGA). Three methods are commonly used for WGA: multiple displacement amplification (MDA), degenerate-oligonucleoti......BACKGROUND: Single-cell resequencing (SCRS) provides many biomedical advances in variations detection at the single-cell level, but it currently relies on whole genome amplification (WGA). Three methods are commonly used for WGA: multiple displacement amplification (MDA), degenerate...

  10. Diffusion of Supercritical Fluids through Single-Layer Nanoporous Solids: Theory and Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulebsir, Fouad; Vermorel, Romain; Galliero, Guillaume

    2018-01-16

    With the advent of graphene material, membranes based on single-layer nanoporous solids appear as promising devices for fluid separation, be it liquid or gaseous mixtures. The design of such architectured porous materials would greatly benefit from accurate models that can predict their transport and separation properties. More specifically, there is no universal understanding of how parameters such as temperature, fluid loading conditions, or the ratio of the pore size to the fluid molecular diameter influence the permeation process. In this study, we address the problem of pure supercritical fluids diffusing through simplified models of single-layer porous materials. Basically, we investigate a toy model that consists of a single-layer lattice of Lennard-Jones interaction sites with a slit gap of controllable width. We performed extensive equilibrium and biased molecular dynamics simulations to document the physical mechanisms involved at the molecular scale. We propose a general constitutive equation for the diffusional transport coefficient derived from classical statistical mechanics and kinetic theory, which can be further simplified in the ideal gas limit. This transport coefficient relates the molecular flux to the fluid density jump across the single-layer membrane. It is found to be proportional to the accessible surface porosity of the single-layer porous solid and to a thermodynamic factor accounting for the inhomogeneity of the fluid close to the pore entrance. Both quantities directly depend on the potential of mean force that results from molecular interactions between solid and fluid atoms. Comparisons with the simulations data show that the kinetic model captures how narrowing the pore size below the fluid molecular diameter lowers dramatically the value of the transport coefficient. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our general constitutive equation allows for a consistent interpretation of the intricate effects of temperature and fluid loading

  11. Improvement of Barley yellow dwarf virus-PAV detection in single aphids using a fluorescent real time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Frédéric; Kervarrec, Christine; Mieuzet, Lucie; Riault, Gérard; Vialatte, Aude; Jacquot, Emmanuel

    2003-06-09

    One of the major factors determining the incidence of Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) on autumn-sown cereals is the viruliferous state of immigrant winged aphids. This variable is assessed routinely using the enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). However, the threshold for virus detection by ELISA can lead to false negative results for aphids carrying less than 10(6) particles. Although molecular detection techniques enabling the detection of lower virus quantities in samples are available, the relatively laborious sample preparation and data analysis have restricted their use in routine applications. A gel-free real-time one-step reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol is described for specific detection and quantitation of BYDV-PAV, the most widespread BYDV species in Western Europe. This new assay, based on TaqMan technology, detects and quantifies from 10(2) to 10(8) BYDV-PAV RNA copies. This test is 10 and 10(3) times more sensitive than the standard RT-PCR and ELISA assays published previously for BYDV-PAV detection and significantly improves virus detection in single aphids. Extraction of nucleic acids from aphids using either phenol/chloroform or chelatin resin-based protocols allow the use of pooled samples or of a small part (up to 1/1600th) of a single aphid extract for efficient BYDV-PAV detection.

  12. Detection of HD in the Orion molecular outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Frank; Timmermann, Ralf; Rosenthal, Dirk; Drapatz, Siegfried; Wright, Christopher M.

    1999-06-01

    We report a detection in the interstellar medium of an infrared transition within the electronic ground state of the deuterated hydrogen molecule, HD. Through a deep integration with the Short-Wavelength-Spectrometer (SWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), the pure rotational v=0-0 R(5) line at 19.43 mu m was detected toward the Orion (OMC-1) outflow at its brightest H_2\\ emission region, Peak 1. The ~ 20'' beam-averaged observed flux of the line is (1.84 +/- 0.4) x 10(-5) erg cm(-2) s(-1) sr(-1) . Upper flux limits were derived for sixteen other rotational and ro-vibrational HD lines in the wavelength range 2.5 to 38 mu m. We utilize the rich spectrum of H_2\\ lines observed at the same position to correct for extinction, and to derive a total warm HD column density under the assumption that similar excitation conditions apply to H_2\\ and HD. Because the observed HD level population is not thermalized at the densities prevailing in the emitting region, the total HD column density is sensitive to the assumed gas density, temperature, and dissociation fraction. Accounting for non-LTE HD level populations in a partially dissociated gas, our best estimate for the total warm HD column density is N(HD)=(2.0+/- 0.75)x 10(16) cm(-2) . The warm molecular hydrogen column density is (2.21+/-0.24)x 10(21) cm(-2) , so that the relative abundance is [HD]/[H_2]=(9.0+/- 3.5)x 10(-6) . The observed emission presumably arises in the warm layers of partially dissociative magnetic shocks, where HD can be depleted relative to H_2 due to an asymmetry in the deuterium-hydrogen exchange reaction. This leads to an average HD depletion relative to H_2\\ of about 40%. Correcting for this chemical depletion, we derive a deuterium abundance in the warm shocked gas, [D]/[H]= (7.6+/- 2.9) x 10(-6) . The derived deuterium abundance is not very sensitive to the dissociation fraction in the emitting region, since both the non-LTE and the chemical depletion corrections act in

  13. Molecular inversion probe: a new tool for highly specific detection of plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Han Yih; Palanisamy, Ramkumar; Trau, Matt; Botella, Jose R

    2014-01-01

    Highly specific detection methods, capable of reliably identifying plant pathogens are crucial in plant disease management strategies to reduce losses in agriculture by preventing the spread of diseases. We describe a novel molecular inversion probe (MIP) assay that can be potentially developed into a robust multiplex platform to detect and identify plant pathogens. A MIP has been designed for the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans and the proof of concept for the efficiency of this technology is provided. We demonstrate that this methodology can detect as little as 2.5 ng of pathogen DNA and is highly specific, being able to accurately differentiate Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans from other fungal pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea and even pathogens of the same species such as Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici. The MIP assay was able to detect the presence of the pathogen in infected Arabidopsis thaliana plants as soon as the tissues contained minimal amounts of pathogen. MIP methods are intrinsically highly multiplexable and future development of specific MIPs could lead to the establishment of a diagnostic method that could potentially screen infected plants for hundreds of pathogens in a single assay.

  14. [Suitability of SSCP-PCR analysis for molecular detection of quinolone resistance in Campylobacter jejuni].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Lutz; Müller, Monika; Luber, Petra; Schrader, Christina; Bartelt, Edda; Klein, Günter

    2003-01-01

    Foodborne infections with Campylobacter spp. are increasing, especially antibiotic resistant strains are emerging. Quinolone resistant isolates can cause failure of therapy in severe clinical infections. Molecular characterisation is needed for the detection of resistant variants of C. jejuni. Therefore 23 isolates from poultry and human medicine as well as three control strains were tested for their minimal inhibitory concentration, their Single-Strand-Conformation-Polymorphism (SSCP)-PCR pattern (a method for the detection of resistance determining point mutations), and their sequence of the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR). Six different SSCP types could be identified: two types for quinolone resistant isolates and other types containing so called silent mutations without influence on the resistance. A genotypic monitoring of the quinolone resistance in C. jejuni can be useful for the early detection of new resistance variants. As a screening method for detection of point mutations in the QRDR the SSCP-PCR can be applied. Compared to other genotypic methods the SSCP-PCR is less time and cost consuming and needs only standard technical equipment.

  15. Flow system for optical activity detection of vegetable extracts employing molecular exclusion continuous chromatographic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajer, V.; Rodríguez, C.; Naranjo, S.; Mesa, G.; Mora, W.; Arista, E.; Cepero, T.; Fernández, H.

    2006-02-01

    The combination of molecular exclusion chromatography and laser polarimetric detection has turned into a carbohydrate separation and quantification system for plant fluids of industrial value, making it possible the evaluation of the quality of sugarcane juices, agave juices and many other plant extracts. Some previous papers described a system where liquid chromatography separation and polarimetric detection using a LASERPOL 101M polarimeter with He-Ne light source allowed the collection and quantification of discrete samples for analytical purposes. In this paper, the authors are introducing a new improved system which accomplishes polarimetric measurements in a continuous flux. Chromatograms of several carbohydrates standard solutions were obtained as useful references to study juice quality of several sugarcane varieties under different physiological conditions. Results by either discrete or continuous flux systems were compared in order to test the validation of the new system. An application of the system to the diagnostics of scalded foliar is described. A computer program allowing the output of the chromatograms to a display on line and the possibility of digital storing, maxima detections, zone integration, and some other possibilities make this system very competitive and self-convincing.

  16. Single particle and molecular assembly analysis of polyribosomes by single- and double-tilt cryo electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasnikov, Alexander G. [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Department of Integrative Structural Biology, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/ Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale INSERM U964/ Université de Strasbourg, 1 rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Afonina, Zhanna A. [Institute of Protein Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142290 Pushchino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Klaholz, Bruno P., E-mail: klaholz@igbmc.fr [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Department of Integrative Structural Biology, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/ Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale INSERM U964/ Université de Strasbourg, 1 rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France)

    2013-03-15

    Cryo electron tomography (cryo-ET) can provide cellular and molecular structural information on various biological samples. However, the detailed interpretation of tomograms reconstructed from single-tilt data tends to suffer from low signal-to-noise ratio and artefacts caused by some systematically missing angular views. While these can be overcome by sub-tomogram averaging, they remain limiting for the analysis of unique structures. Double-tilt ET can improve the tomogram quality by acquiring a second tilt series after an in-plane rotation, but its usage is not widespread yet because it is considered technically demanding and it is rarely used under cryo conditions. Here we show that double-tilt cryo-ET improves the quality of 3D reconstructions so significantly that even single particle analysis can be envisaged despite of the intrinsically low image contrast obtained from frozen-hydrated specimens. This is illustrated by the analysis of eukaryotic polyribosomes in which individual ribosomes were reconstructed using single-tilt, partial and full double-tilt geometries. The improved tomograms favour the faster convergence of iterative sub-tomogram averaging and allow a better 3D classification using multivariate statistical analysis. Our study of single particles and molecular assemblies within polysomes illustrates that the dual-axis approach is particularly useful for cryo applications of ET, both for unique objects and for structures that can be classified and averaged. - Highlights: ► Double-tilt cryo-ET improves 3D reconstructions thus making single particle analysis possible. ► Dual-axis cryo-ET data favour a faster convergence of iterative sub-tomogram averaging. ► Individual ribosomes were reconstructed from single-tilt, partial/ full double-tilt geometries. ► Double-tilt cryo-ET facilitates analysis of larger molecular assemblies such as in cell sections. ► Dual-axis cryo-ET is applicable to unique objects and to structures that can be

  17. The role of nanotechnology in single-cell detection: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changling; Zhang, Yuxiang; Xia, Mingdian; Zhu, Xingxi; Qi, Shitao; Shen, Huaqiang; Liu, Tiebing; Tang, Liming

    2014-10-01

    Biological processes in single cells, such as signal transduction, DNA duplication, and protein synthesis and trafficking, occur in subcellular compartments at nanoscale level. Achieving high spatial-temporal resolution, high sensitivity, and high specificity in single-cell detection poses a great challenge. Nanotechnology, which has been widely applied in the fields of medicine, electronics, biomaterials, and energy production, has the potential to provide solutions for single-cell detection. Here we present a review of the use of nanotechnology in single-cell detection over the past two decades. First, we review the main areas of scientific interest, including morphology, ion concentration, DNA, RNA, protein, intracellular temperature, elements, and mechanical properties. Second, four categories of application of nanotechnology to single-cell detection are described: nanomanipulation, nanodevices, nanomaterials as labels, and nano Secondary ion mass spectrometry. Finally, the prospects and future trends in single-cell detection and analysis are discussed.

  18. Fast detection of narcotics by single photon ionization mass spectrometry and laser ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudien, Robert; Schultze, Rainer; Wieser, Jochen

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution two analytical devices for the fast detection of security-relevant substances like narcotics and explosives are presented. One system is based on an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) with single photon ionization (SPI). This soft ionization technique, unlike electron impact ionization (EI), reduces unwanted fragment ions in the mass spectra allowing the clear determination of characteristic (usually molecular) ions. Their enrichment in the ion trap and identification by tandem MS investigations (MS/MS) enables the detection of the target substances in complex matrices at low concentrations without time-consuming sample preparation. For SPI an electron beam pumped excimer light source of own fabrication (E-Lux) is used. The SPI-ITMS system was characterized by the analytical study of different drugs like cannabis, heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, and some precursors. Additionally, it was successfully tested on-site in a closed illegal drug laboratory, where low quantities of MDMA could be directly detected in samples from floors, walls and lab equipments. The second analytical system is based on an ion mobility (IM) spectrometer with resonant multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With the frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (266 nm), used for ionization, a selective and sensitive detection of aromatic compounds is possible. By application of suited aromatic dopants, in addition, also non-aromatic polar compounds are accessible by ion molecule reactions like proton transfer or complex formation. Selected drug precursors could be successfully detected with this device as well, qualifying it to a lower-priced alternative or useful supplement of the SPI-ITMS system for security analysis.

  19. Generic Single-Channel Detection of Absence Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Eline B.; Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Mazzaretto, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    is obtained for the derivation F7-FP1. Using this channel a sensitivity of 99.1 %, positive predictive value of 94.8 %, mean detection latency of 3.7 s, and false detection rate value of 0.5/h was obtained. The topographical visualization of the results clearly shows that the frontal, midline, and parietal...

  20. Profilographic detection system for single-track scanning device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silar, J.; Kula, J.

    1988-01-01

    A profilographic detection system is claimed for diagnosing the renal function by isotope nephrography, and the bladder filling in small children and infants. The configuration described guarantees good position resolution and sensitivity of the detection system. (E.J.). 2 figs

  1. Successful Noninvasive Trisomy 18 Detection Using Single Molecule Sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Oever, Jessica M. E.; Balkassmi, Sahila; Johansson, Lennart F.; van Scheltema, Phebe N. Adama; Suijkerbuijk, Ron F.; Hoffer, Mariette J. V.; Sinke, Richard J.; Bakker, Egbert; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Boon, Elles M. J.

    BACKGROUND: Noninvasive trisomy 21 detection performed by use of massively parallel sequencing is achievable with high diagnostic sensitivity and low false-positive rates. Detection of fetal trisomy 18 and 13 has been reported as well but seems to be less accurate with the use of this approach. The

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection on a magnetoresistive sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Dufva, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We present a magnetoresistive sensor platform for hybridization assays and demonstrate its applicability on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. The sensor relies on anisotropic magnetoresistance in a new geometry with a local negative reference and uses the magnetic field from...

  3. Single-trial detection for intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L; Zhang, Z G; Liu, H T; Luk, K D K; Hu, Y

    2015-12-01

    Abnormalities of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) provide effective evidence for impairment of the somatosensory system, so that SEPs have been widely used in both clinical diagnosis and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. However, due to their low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), SEPs are generally measured using ensemble averaging across hundreds of trials, thus unavoidably producing a tardiness of SEPs to the potential damages caused by surgical maneuvers and a loss of dynamical information of cortical processing related to somatosensory inputs. Here, we aimed to enhance the SNR of single-trial SEPs using Kalman filtering and time-frequency multiple linear regression (TF-MLR) and measure their single-trial parameters, both in the time domain and in the time-frequency domain. We first showed that, Kalman filtering and TF-MLR can effectively capture the single-trial SEP responses and provide accurate estimates of single-trial SEP parameters in the time domain and time-frequency domain, respectively. Furthermore, we identified significant correlations between the stimulus intensity and a set of indicative single-trial SEP parameters, including the correlation coefficient (between each single-trial SEPs and their average), P37 amplitude, N45 amplitude, P37-N45 amplitude, and phase value (at the zero-crossing points between P37 and N45). Finally, based on each indicative single-trial SEP parameter, we investigated the minimum number of trials required on a single-trial basis to suggest the existence of SEP responses, thus providing important information for fast SEP extraction in intraoperative monitoring.

  4. Detection of new single nucleotide polymorphisms by means of real ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a new technique in molecular genetics which allows quantifica- tion of polymorphic DNA regions and genotyping of sin- gle nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in one run. A by- product of real time PCR is the opportunity to identify new SNPs in the proximity of gene loci of ...

  5. Molecular and serological detection of bovine babesiosis in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azirwan Guswanto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine babesiosis, mainly caused by Babesia bovis and B. bigemina, is a huge threat to the livestock industry. In Indonesia, the current distribution of the disease is unknown due to a lack of scientific study. Methods In the present study, 487 blood samples were collected from cattle with different breeding and age groups in a broad geographical area across the archipelago. The presence of antibodies and current infections of B. bovis and B. bigemina were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, immunochromatographic test (ICT, and nested PCR (nPCR targeting B. bovis SBP-4 and B. bigemina RAP-1a genes. Sequence analysis was performed to the amplicon of B. bovis SBP-4, B. bigemina RAP-1a, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of ribosomal RNA of both Babesia species. Results In total, B. bovis positives were detected by ELISA, single-ICT, dual-ICT and nPCR in 340 (69.8%, 317 (65.1%, 307 (63.0% and 247 (50.7% samples, respectively. For B. bigemina, the positive samples were detected in 134 (27.5%, 130 (26.7%, 127 (26.1% and 93 (19.1%, respectively. Furthermore, mixed infections were found in 125 (25.7%, 113 (23.2%, 109 (22.4% and 52 (10.7% samples, respectively, which occurred only by chance and were not influenced by additional factors. The obtained nucleotide sequences of B. bovis SBP-4 and B. bigemina RAP-1a genes showed a high homology with other isolates from different countries. Further nucleotide sequence analysis using ITS region showed a great genetic diversity of B. bovis isolates among sampling locations; a lower diversity was found in B. bigemina ITS isolates. Conclusions These data revealed the current distribution of B. bovis and B. bigemina infection in cattle in Indonesia. The rate of infection varied among sampling locations, cattle breeds and age groups. Furthermore, B. bovis ITS isolates from Indonesia were found to be more genetically diverse than B. bigemina ITS isolates. The data

  6. Molecular Techniques for the Detection of Organisms in Aquatic Environments, with Emphasis on Harmful Algal Bloom Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlin, Linda K; Orozco, Jahir

    2017-05-22

    Molecular techniques to detect organisms in aquatic ecosystems are being gradually considered as an attractive alternative to standard laboratory methods. They offer faster and more accurate means of detecting and monitoring species, with respect to their traditional homologues based on culture and microscopic counting. Molecular techniques are particularly attractive when multiple species need to be detected and/or are in very low abundance. This paper reviews molecular techniques based on whole cells, such as microscope-based enumeration and Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) and molecular cell-free formats, such as sandwich hybridization assay (SHA), biosensors, microarrays, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and real time PCR (RT-PCR). Those that combine one or several laboratory functions into a single integrated system (lab-on-a-chip) and techniques that generate a much higher throughput data, such as next-generation systems (NGS), were also reviewed. We also included some other approaches that enhance the performance of molecular techniques. For instance, nano-bioengineered probes and platforms, pre-concentration and magnetic separation systems, and solid-phase hybridization offer highly pre-concentration capabilities. Isothermal amplification and hybridization chain reaction (HCR) improve hybridization and amplification techniques. Finally, we presented a study case of field remote sensing of harmful algal blooms (HABs), the only example of real time monitoring, and close the discussion with future directions and concluding remarks.

  7. Enhancement of kalman filter single loss detection capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, G.W.; Downing, D.J.; Pike, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    A new technique to significantly increase the sensitivity of the Kalman filter to detect one-time losses for nuclear marterial accountability and control has been developed. The technique uses the innovations sequence obtained from a Kalman filter analysis of a material balance area. The innovations are distributed as zero mean independent Gaussion random variables with known variance. This property enables an estimator to be formed with enhanced one time loss detection capabilities. Simulation studies of a material balance area indicate the new estimator greatly enhances the one time loss detection capability of the Kalman filter

  8. Research Update: Molecular electronics: The single-molecule switch and transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Sotthewes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected to macroscopic leads and how the transport properties of the molecule can be measured. Based on this knowledge we have realized two single-molecule devices: a molecular switch and a molecular transistor. The switch can be opened and closed at will by carefully adjusting the separation between the electrical contacts and the voltage drop across the contacts. This single-molecular switch operates in a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures all the way up to room temperature. Via mechanical gating, i.e., compressing or stretching of the octanethiol molecule, by varying the contact's interspace, we are able to systematically adjust the conductance of the electrode-octanethiol-electrode junction. This two-terminal single-molecule transistor is very robust, but the amplification factor is rather limited.

  9. Molecular detection of Theileria and Babesia infections in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Kursat; Aydin, M Fatih; Dumanli, Nazir; Aktas, Munir

    2008-12-20

    This study was carried out to determine the presence and distribution of tick-borne haemoprotozoan parasites (Theileria and Babesia) in apparently healthy cattle in the East Black Sea Region of Turkey. A total of 389 blood samples were collected from the animals of various ages in six provinces in the region. Prevalence of infection was determined by reverse line blot (RLB) assay. The hypervariable V4 region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was amplified with a set of primers for members of the genera Theileria and Babesia. Amplified PCR products were hybridized onto a membrane to which generic- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes were covalently linked. RLB hybridization identified infection in 16.19% of the samples. Blood smears were also examined microscopically for Theileria and/or Babesia spp. and 5.14% were positive. All samples shown to be positive by microscopy also tested positive with RLB assay. Two Theileria (T. annulata and T. buffeli/orientalis) and three Babesia (B. bigemina, B. major and Babesia sp.) species or genotypes were identified in the region. Babesia sp. genotype shared 99% similarity with the previously reported sequences of Babesia sp. Kashi 1, Babesia sp. Kashi 2 and Babesia sp. Kayseri 1. The most frequently found species was T. buffeli/orientalis, present in 11.56% of the samples. T. annulata was identified in five samples (1.28%). Babesia infections were less frequently detected: B. bigemina was found in three samples (0.77%), B. major in two samples (0.51%) and Babesia sp. in five samples (1.28%). A single animal infected with T. buffeli/orientalis was also infected with B. bigemina.

  10. Electronic structure of surface-supported bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) single molecular magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Lucia; Fabris, Stefano; Conte, Adriano Mosca; Brink, Susan; Ruben, Mario; Baroni, Stefano; Kern, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    The electronic structure of isolated bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) molecules, a novel single-molecular-magnet (SMM), supported on the Cu(111) surface has been characterized by density functional theory and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. These studies reveal that the interaction with the metal surface preserves both the molecular structure and the large spin magnetic moment of the metal center. The 4f electron states are not perturbed by the adsorption while a strong molecular/metal interaction can induce the suppression of the minor spin contribution delocalized over the molecular ligands. The calculations show that the inherent spin magnetic moment of the molecule is only weakly affected by the interaction with the surface and suggest that the SMM character might be preserved.

  11. Possibility designing half-wave and full-wave molecular rectifiers by using single benzene molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohammed A.; Hanoon, Falah H.; Al-Badry, Lafy F.

    2018-02-01

    This work focused on possibility designing half-wave and full-wave molecular rectifiers by using single and two benzene rings, respectively. The benzene rings were threaded by a magnetic flux that changes over time. The quantum interference effect was considered as the basic idea in the rectification action, the para and meta configurations were investigated. All the calculations are performed by using steady-state theoretical model, which is based on the time-dependent Hamiltonian model. The electrical conductance and the electric current are considered as DC output signals of half-wave and full-wave molecular rectifiers. The finding in this work opens up the exciting potential to use these molecular rectifiers in molecular electronics.

  12. Acyclic cucurbit[n]uril molecular containers selectively solubilize single-walled carbon nanotubes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Cai; Ma, Da; Meany, Brendan; Isaacs, Lyle; Wang, YuHuang

    2012-05-02

    Making single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) soluble in water is a challenging first step to use their remarkable electronic and optical properties in a variety of applications. We report that acyclic cucurbit[n]uril molecular containers 1 and 2 selectively solubilize small-diameter and low chiral angle SWNTs. The selectivity is tunable by increasing the concentration of the molecular containers or by adjusting the ionic strength of the solution. Even at a concentration 1000 times lower than typically required for surfactants, the molecular containers render SWNTs soluble in water. Molecular mechanics simulations suggest that these C-shaped acyclic molecules complex the SWNTs such that a large portion of nanotube sidewalls are exposed to the external environment. These "naked" nanotubes fluoresce upon patching the exposed surface with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  13. Variable contact gap single-molecule conductance determination for a series of conjugated molecular bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haiss, W.; Wang, Christian; Jitchati, R.

    2008-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that the characteristics of the whole junction are important in determining the conductance of single molecules bound between two metal contacts. This paper shows through measurements on a series of seven conjugated molecular bridges that contact separation is an important...... that conductance increases rather dramatically at higher tilt angle away from the normal for conformationally rigid molecular wires and that this increase in conductance arises from increased electronic coupling between the molecular bridge and the gold contacts.......-distance curves and knowledge of the terminal to terminal length of the molecular wire. The contact gap separation dependence is interpreted as arising from tilting of these molecules in the junction and this model is underpinned by ab initio transport computations. In this respect we make the general observation...

  14. Molecular biomarker set for early detection of ovarian cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-06-16

    Embodiments of the present invention concern methods and compositions related to detection of ovarian cancer, including detection of the stage of ovarian cancer, in some cases. In particular, the invention encompasses use of expression of TFAP2A and in some embodiments CA125 and/or E2F5 to identify ovarian cancer, including detecting mRNA and/or protein levels of the respective gene products. Kits for detection of ovarian cancer are also described.

  15. Detection of anomalies in NLO sulphamic acid single crystals by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ultrasonic pulse echo overlap technique (PEO) has been used to measure the velocities of 10 MHz acoustic waves in sulphamic acid single crystals in the range of 300–400 K. This study evaluated all the elastic stiffnessconstants, compliance constants and Poisson's ratios of the crystal. The temperature variations of the ...

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection on a magnetoresistive sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Dufva, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We present a magnetoresistive sensor platform for hybridization assays and demonstrate its applicability on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. The sensor relies on anisotropic magnetoresistance in a new geometry with a local negative reference and uses the magnetic field from the se...

  17. Sequence-specific detection of different strains of LCMV in a single sample using tentacle probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Lina S; Holechek, Susan A; Caplan, Michael R; Blattman, Joseph N

    2017-10-13

    Virus infections often result in quasispecies of viral strains that can have dramatic impacts on disease outcomes. However, sequencing of viruses to determine strain composition is time consuming and often cost-prohibitive. Rapid, cost-effective methods are needed for accurate measurement of virus diversity to understand virus evolution and can be useful for experimental systems. We have developed a novel molecular method for sequence-specific detection of RNA virus genetic variants called Tentacle Probes. The probes are modified molecular beacons that have dramatically improved false positive rates and specificity in routine qPCR. To validate this approach, we have designed Tentacle Probes for two different strains of Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV) that differ by only 3 nucleotide substitutions, the parental Armstrong and the more virulent Clone-13 strain. One of these mutations is a missense mutation in the receptor protein GP1 that leads to the Armstrong strain to cause an acute infection and Clone-13 to cause a chronic infection instead. The probes were designed using thermodynamic calculations for hybridization between target or non-target sequences and the probe. Using this approach, we were able to distinguish these two strains of LCMV individually by a single nucleotide mutation. The assay showed high reproducibility among different concentrations of viral cDNA, as well as high specificity and sensitivity, especially for the Clone-13 Tentacle Probe. Furthermore, in virus mixing experiments we were able to detect less than 10% of Clone-13 cDNA diluted in Armstrong cDNA. Thus, we have developed a fast, cost-effective approach for identifying Clone-13 strain in a mix of other LCMV strains.

  18. Single-Tube Flow Cytometry Assay for the Detection of Mature Lymphoid Neoplasms in Paucicellular Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacchini, Alessandra; Demurtas, Anna; Aliberti, Sabrina; Barreca, Antonella; Novero, Domenico; Pacchioni, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FC) has become a useful support for cytomorphologic evaluation (CM) of fine-needle aspirates (FNA) and serous cavity effusions (SCE) in cases of suspected non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). FC results may be hampered by the scarce viability and low cellularity of the specimens. We developed a single-tube FC assay (STA) that included 10 antibodies cocktailed in 8-color labeling, a cell viability dye, and a logical gating strategy to detect NHL in hypocellular samples. The results were correlated with CM and confirmed by histologic or molecular data when available. Using the STA, we detected B-type NHL in 31 out of 103 hypocellular samples (81 FNA and 22 SCE). Of these, 8 were not confirmed by CM and 2 were considered to be only suspicious. The FC-negative samples had a final diagnosis of benign/reactive process (42/72), carcinoma (27/72), or Hodgkin lymphoma (3/72). The STA approach allowed obtainment of maximum immunophenotyping data in specimens containing a low number of cells and a large amount of debris. The information obtained by STA can help cytomorphologists not only to recognize but also to exclude malignant lymphomas. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Single-Copy Genes as Molecular Markers for Phylogenomic Studies in Seed Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; De La Torre, Amanda R; Sterck, Lieven; Cánovas, Francisco M; Avila, Concepción; Merino, Irene; Cabezas, José Antonio; Cervera, María Teresa; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Van de Peer, Yves

    2017-05-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among seed plant taxa, especially within the gymnosperms, remain contested. In contrast to angiosperms, for which several genomic, transcriptomic and phylogenetic resources are available, there are few, if any, molecular markers that allow broad comparisons among gymnosperm species. With few gymnosperm genomes available, recently obtained transcriptomes in gymnosperms are a great addition to identifying single-copy gene families as molecular markers for phylogenomic analysis in seed plants. Taking advantage of an increasing number of available genomes and transcriptomes, we identified single-copy genes in a broad collection of seed plants and used these to infer phylogenetic relationships between major seed plant taxa. This study aims at extending the current phylogenetic toolkit for seed plants, assessing its ability for resolving seed plant phylogeny, and discussing potential factors affecting phylogenetic reconstruction. In total, we identified 3,072 single-copy genes in 31 gymnosperms and 2,156 single-copy genes in 34 angiosperms. All studied seed plants shared 1,469 single-copy genes, which are generally involved in functions like DNA metabolism, cell cycle, and photosynthesis. A selected set of 106 single-copy genes provided good resolution for the seed plant phylogeny except for gnetophytes. Although some of our analyses support a sister relationship between gnetophytes and other gymnosperms, phylogenetic trees from concatenated alignments without 3rd codon positions and amino acid alignments under the CAT + GTR model, support gnetophytes as a sister group to Pinaceae. Our phylogenomic analyses demonstrate that, in general, single-copy genes can uncover both recent and deep divergences of seed plant phylogeny. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  20. Electrical detection of single magnetic skyrmion at room temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Tomasello

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a protocol for the electrical detection of a magnetic skyrmion via the change of the tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR signal in a three-terminal device. This approach combines alternating spin-transfer torque from both spin-filtering (due to a perpendicular polarizer and spin-Hall effect with the TMR signal. Micromagnetic simulations, used to test and verify such working principle, show that there exists a frequency region particularly suitable for this achievement. This result can be at the basis of the design of a TMR based read-out for skyrmion detection, overcoming the difficulties introduced by the thermal drift of the skyrmion once nucleated.

  1. An improved labeling strategy enables automated detection of single-virus fusion and assessment of HIV-1 protease activity in single virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Chetan; Francis, Ashwanth C; Desai, Tanay M; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2017-12-08

    Enveloped viruses transfer their genomes into host cells by fusing their membrane to that of the cell. To visualize single-virus fusion in living cells, researchers take advantage of the proteolytic maturation of HIV, type 1 (HIV-1), which can generate free fluorescent proteins within the viral particle. Co-labeling viruses with a content marker and a fluorescently tagged Vpr (a viral core protein) enables detection of single-virus fusions, but a major limitation of this approach is that not all viral particles incorporate both markers. Here we designed a labeling strategy based on the bifunctional mCherry-2xCL-YFP-Vpr construct, in which 2xCL denotes a tandem cleavage site for the viral protease. This bifunctional marker was efficiently cleaved during virus maturation, producing free mCherry and the core-associated YFP-Vpr. A nearly perfect colocalization of these two markers in virions and their fixed 1:1 ratio enabled automated detection of single-particle fusion in both fixed and live cells based on loss of the mCherry signal. Furthermore, a drop in FRET efficiency between YFP and mCherry because of cleavage of the bifunctional marker, which manifested as a marked shift in the normalized YFP/mCherry fluorescence ratio, reliably predicted viral protease activity in single virions. This feature could discriminate between the particles containing free mCherry, and therefore likely representing mature viruses, and immature particles whose fusion cannot be detected. In summary, our new labeling strategy offers several advantages compared with previous approaches, including increased reliability and throughput of detection of viral fusion. We anticipate that our method will have significant utility for studying viral fusion and maturation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Detection of Fusarium in single wheat kernels using spectral Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, G.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Waalwijk, C.; Young, I.T.

    2005-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a harmful fungal disease that occurs in small grains. Non-destructive detection of this disease is traditionally done using spectroscopy or image processing. In this paper the combination of these two in the form of spectral imaging is evaluated. Transmission spectral

  3. Microarray-based large scale detection of single feature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The background corrected and quantile-normalized log2 intensity values of all probes of triplicate data of each cotton variety were subjected to SFPs call by using SAM procedure in R language software. We detected a total of 37,473 SFPs among six pair genotype combinations of two superior (JKC777 and JKC725) and ...

  4. Pinched flow fractionation devices for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Asger Vig; Poulsen, Lena; Birgens, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    and 5.6 mu m were functionalized with biotin-labeled oligonucleotides for the detection of a mutant (Mt) or wild-type (Wt) DNA sequence in the HBB gene, respectively. Hybridization to functionalized beads was performed with fluorescent targets comprising synthetic DNA oligonucleotides or amplified RNA...

  5. Detection of new single nucleotide polymorphisms by means of real ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    as genotyping by melting curve analysis is possible by the use of hybridisation probes. These hybridisation probes are sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes, labelled by fluorescence dyes. For the detection of a SNP two hy- bridisation probes are required, one that binds to the. DNA strand in a way that the polymorphic ...

  6. Towards single Ce ion detection in a bulk crystal for the development of a single-ion qubit readout scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis was concerned with investigating the relevant spectroscopic properties of Ce ions randomly doped in an Y2SiO5 crystal at low temperatures (around 4 K), in order to develop a technique and an experimental set-up to detect the fluorescence photons emitted by a single Ce ion. The aim of the work was to determine whether a single Ce ion (referred to as the readout ion) can be used as a local probe to sense the quantum state of a neighbouring single-ion qubit via ...

  7. Molecular evolution of enterovirus 68 detected in the Philippines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadatsugu Imamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Detection of Enterovirus 68 (EV68 has recently been increased. However, underlying evolutionary mechanism of this increasing trend is not fully understood. METHODS: Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 5,240 patients with acute respiratory infections in the Philippines from June 2009 to December 2011. EV68 was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting for 5' untranslated region (5'UTR, viral protein 1 (VP1, and VP4/VP2. Phylogenetic trees were generated using the obtained sequences. RESULTS: Of the 5,240 tested samples, 12 EV68 positive cases were detected between August and December in 2011 (detection rate, 0.23%. The detection rate was higher among inpatients than outpatients (p<0.0001. Among VP1 sequences detected from 7 patients in 2011, 5 in lineage 2 were diverged from those detected in the Philippines in 2008, however, 2 in lineage 3 were not diverged from strains detected in the Philippines in 2008 but closely associated with strains detected in the United States. Combined with our previous report, EV68 occurrences were observed twice in the Philippines within the last four years. CONCLUSIONS: EV68 detections might be occurring in cyclic patterns, and viruses might have been maintained in the community while some strains might have been newly introduced.

  8. Nanoscale heterostructures with molecular-scale single-crystal metal wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Paromita; Halder, Aditi; Viswanath, B; Kundu, Dipan; Ramanath, Ganpati; Ravishankar, N

    2010-01-13

    Creating nanoscale heterostructures with molecular-scale (synthesis of nanoscale heterostructures with single-crystal molecular-scale Au nanowires attached to different nanostructure substrates. Our method involves the formation of Au nanoparticle seeds by the reduction of rocksalt AuCl nanocubes heterogeneously nucleated on the substrates and subsequent nanowire growth by oriented attachment of Au nanoparticles from the solution phase. Nanoscale heterostructures fabricated by such site-specific nucleation and growth are attractive for many applications including nanoelectronic device wiring, catalysis, and sensing.

  9. MicroCantilever (MC) based nanomechanical sensor for detection of molecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyung [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Specific aims of this study are to investigate the mechanism governing surface stress generation associated with chemical or molecular binding on functionalized microcantilevers. Formation of affinity complexes on cantilever surfaces leads to charge redistribution, configurational change and steric hindrance between neighboring molecules resulting in surface stress change and measureable cantilever deformation. A novel interferometry technique employing two adjacent micromachined cantilevers (a sensing/reference pair) was utilized to measure the cantilever deformation. The sensing principle is that binding/reaction of specific chemical or biological species on the sensing cantilever transduces to mechanical deformation. The differential bending of the sensing cantilever respect to the reference cantilever ensures that measured response is insensitive to environmental disturbances. As a proof of principle for the measurement technique, surface stress changes associated with: self-assembly of alkanethiol, hybridization of ssDNA, and the formation of cocaine-aptamer complexes were measured. Dissociation constant (Kd) for each molecular reaction was utilized to estimate the surface coverage of affinity complexes. In the cases of DNA hybridization and cocaine-aptamer binding, measured surface stress was found to be dependent on the surface coverage of the affinity complexes. In order to achieve a better sensitivity for DNA hybridization, immobilization of receptor molecules was modified to enhance the deformation of underlying surface. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) strands with thiol-modification on both 3-foot and 5-foot ends were immobilized on the gold surface such that both ends are attached to the gold surface. Immobilization condition was controlled to obtain similar receptor density as single-thiolated DNA strands. Hybridization of double-thiolated DNA strands leads to an almost two orders of magnitude increase in cantilever deformation. In both DNA

  10. Stochastic adaptation and fold-change detection: from single-cell to population behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leier André

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cell signaling terminology, adaptation refers to a system's capability of returning to its equilibrium upon a transient response. To achieve this, a network has to be both sensitive and precise. Namely, the system must display a significant output response upon stimulation, and later on return to pre-stimulation levels. If the system settles at the exact same equilibrium, adaptation is said to be 'perfect'. Examples of adaptation mechanisms include temperature regulation, calcium regulation and bacterial chemotaxis. Results We present models of the simplest adaptation architecture, a two-state protein system, in a stochastic setting. Furthermore, we consider differences between individual and collective adaptive behavior, and show how our system displays fold-change detection properties. Our analysis and simulations highlight why adaptation needs to be understood in terms of probability, and not in strict numbers of molecules. Most importantly, selection of appropriate parameters in this simple linear setting may yield populations of cells displaying adaptation, while single cells do not. Conclusions Single cell behavior cannot be inferred from population measurements and, sometimes, collective behavior cannot be determined from the individuals. By consequence, adaptation can many times be considered a purely emergent property of the collective system. This is a clear example where biological ergodicity cannot be assumed, just as is also the case when cell replication rates are not homogeneous, or depend on the cell state. Our analysis shows, for the first time, how ergodicity cannot be taken for granted in simple linear examples either. The latter holds even when cells are considered isolated and devoid of replication capabilities (cell-cycle arrested. We also show how a simple linear adaptation scheme displays fold-change detection properties, and how rupture of ergodicity prevails in scenarios where transitions between

  11. Modified Single Photo-diode (MSPD) Detection Technique for SAC-OCDMA System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulqader, Sarah G.; Fadhil, Hilal A.; Aljunid, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a new detection technique called modified single photo-diode (MSPD) detection for SAC-OCDMA system is proposed. The proposed system based on the single photo-diode (SPD) detection technique. The new detection technique is proposed to overcome the limitation of phase-induced intensity noise (PIIN) in SPD detection technique. However, the proposed detection is based on an optical hard limiter (OHL) followed by a SPD and a low-pass filter (LPF) in order to suppress the phase intensity noise (PIIN) at the receiver side. The results show that the MSPD detection based on OHL has a good performance even when the transmission distance is long, which is different from the case of SPD detection technique. Therefore, the MSPD detection technique is shown to be effective to improve the bit error rate (BER<10-9) and to suppress the noise in the practical optical fiber network.

  12. A three-step vehicle detection framework for range estimation using a single camera

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kanjee, R

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes and validates a real-time onroad vehicle detection system, which uses a single camera for the purpose of intelligent driver assistance. A three-step vehicle detection framework is presented to detect and track the target vehicle...

  13. Detecting Flying Objects Using a Single Moving Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozantsev, Artem; Lepetit, Vincent; Fua, Pascal

    2017-05-01

    We propose an approach for detecting flying objects such as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and aircrafts when they occupy a small portion of the field of view, possibly moving against complex backgrounds, and are filmed by a camera that itself moves. We argue that solving such a difficult problem requires combining both appearance and motion cues. To this end we propose a regression-based approach for object-centric motion stabilization of image patches that allows us to achieve effective classification on spatio-temporal image cubes and outperform state-of-the-art techniques. As this problem has not yet been extensively studied, no test datasets are publicly available. We therefore built our own, both for UAVs and aircrafts, and will make them publicly available so they can be used to benchmark future flying object detection and collision avoidance algorithms.

  14. Optomechanical terahertz detection with single meta-atom resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belacel, Cherif; Todorov, Yanko; Barbieri, Stefano; Gacemi, Djamal; Favero, Ivan; Sirtori, Carlo

    2017-11-17

    Most of the common technologies for detecting terahertz photons (>1 THz) at room temperature rely on slow thermal devices. The realization of fast and sensitive detectors in this frequency range is indeed a notoriously difficult task. Here we propose a novel device consisting of a subwavelength terahertz meta-atom resonator, which integrates a nanomechanical element and allows energy exchange between the mechanical motion and the electromagnetic degrees of freedom. An incident terahertz wave thus produces a nanomechanical signal that can be read out optically with high precision. We exploit this concept to demonstrate a terahertz detector that operates at room temperature with high sensitivity and a much higher frequency response compared to standard detectors. Beyond the technological issue of terahertz detection, our architecture opens up new perspectives for fundamental science of light-matter interaction at terahertz frequencies, combining optomechanical approaches with semiconductor quantum heterostructures.

  15. Molecular-crowding effects on single-molecule RNA folding/unfolding thermodynamics and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of “molecular crowding” on elementary biochemical processes due to high solute concentrations are poorly understood and yet clearly essential to the folding of nucleic acids and proteins into correct, native structures. The present work presents, to our knowledge, first results on the single-molecule kinetics of solute molecular crowding, specifically focusing on GAAA tetraloop–receptor folding to isolate a single RNA tertiary interaction using time-correlated single-photon counting and confocal single-molecule FRET microscopy. The impact of crowding by high–molecular-weight polyethylene glycol on the RNA folding thermodynamics is dramatic, with up to ΔΔG° ∼ −2.5 kcal/mol changes in free energy and thus >60-fold increase in the folding equilibrium constant (Keq) for excluded volume fractions of 15%. Most importantly, time-correlated single-molecule methods permit crowding effects on the kinetics of RNA folding/unfolding to be explored for the first time (to our knowledge), which reveal that this large jump in Keq is dominated by a 35-fold increase in tetraloop–receptor folding rate, with only a modest decrease in the corresponding unfolding rate. This is further explored with temperature-dependent single-molecule RNA folding measurements, which identify that crowding effects are dominated by entropic rather than enthalpic contributions to the overall free energy change. Finally, a simple “hard-sphere” treatment of the solute excluded volume is invoked to model the observed kinetic trends, and which predict ΔΔG° ∼ −5 kcal/mol free-energy stabilization at excluded volume fractions of 30%. PMID:24850865

  16. A Comprehensive Experiment for Molecular Biology: Determination of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Human REV3 Gene Using PCR-RFLP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Shao, Meng; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zixuan; Zhou, Liping; Yan, Yongmin; Shao, Qixiang; Xu, Wenrong; Qian, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory exercise is helpful for medical students to understand the basic principles of molecular biology and to learn about the practical applications of molecular biology. We have designed a lab course on molecular biology about the determination of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in human REV3 gene, the product of which is a subunit of…

  17. Detectable states, cycle fluxes, and motility scaling of molecular motor kinesin: An integrative kinetic graph theory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jie

    2017-12-01

    The process by which a kinesin motor couples its ATPase activity with concerted mechanical hand-over-hand steps is a foremost topic of molecular motor physics. Two major routes toward elucidating kinesin mechanisms are the motility performance characterization of velocity and run length, and single-molecular state detection experiments. However, these two sets of experimental approaches are largely uncoupled to date. Here, we introduce an integrative motility state analysis based on a theorized kinetic graph theory for kinesin, which, on one hand, is validated by a wealth of accumulated motility data, and, on the other hand, allows for rigorous quantification of state occurrences and chemomechanical cycling probabilities. An interesting linear scaling for kinesin motility performance across species is discussed as well. An integrative kinetic graph theory analysis provides a powerful tool to bridge motility and state characterization experiments, so as to forge a unified effort for the elucidation of the working mechanisms of molecular motors.

  18. Single particle detection and characterization of synuclein co-aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giese, Armin; Bader, Benedikt; Bieschke, Jan; Schaffar, Gregor; Odoy, Sabine; Kahle, Philipp J.; Haass, Christian; Kretzschmar, Hans

    2005-01-01

    Protein aggregation is the key event in a number of human diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. We present a general method to quantify and characterize protein aggregates by dual-colour scanning for intensely fluorescent targets (SIFT). In addition to high sensitivity, this approach offers a unique opportunity to study co-aggregation processes. As the ratio of two fluorescently labelled components can be analysed for each aggregate separately in a homogeneous assay, the molecular composition of aggregates can be studied even in samples containing a mixture of different types of aggregates. Using this method, we could show that wild-type α-synuclein forms co-aggregates with a mutant variant found in familial Parkinson's disease. Moreover, we found a striking increase in aggregate formation at non-equimolar mixing ratios, which may have important therapeutic implications, as lowering the relative amount of aberrant protein may cause an increase of protein aggregation leading to adverse effects

  19. Deep Joint Rain Detection and Removal from a Single Image

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wenhan; Tan, Robby T.; Feng, Jiashi; Liu, Jiaying; Guo, Zongming; Yan, Shuicheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address a rain removal problem from a single image, even in the presence of heavy rain and rain streak accumulation. Our core ideas lie in the new rain image models and a novel deep learning architecture. We first modify an existing model comprising a rain streak layer and a background layer, by adding a binary map that locates rain streak regions. Second, we create a new model consisting of a component representing rain streak accumulation (where individual streaks cannot b...

  20. Molecular Detection of Strongyloides ratti in Faecal Samples from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A PCR method targeting the small subunit of the rRNA gene was performed in this study for the detection of DNA from Strongyloides ratti (an animal model of S. stercoralis) in faecal samples of wild Brown rats, Rattus norvegicus. Results: Strongyloides ratti was detected in 34.2 % of collected rats by different ...

  1. Molecular Evolution of Enterovirus 68 Detected in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tadatsugu; Suzuki, Akira; Lupisan, Socorro; Okamoto, Michiko; Aniceto, Rapunzel; Egos, Rutchie J.; Daya, Edgardo E.; Tamaki, Raita; Saito, Mariko; Fuji, Naoko; Roy, Chandra Nath; Opinion, Jaime M.; Santo, Arlene V.; Macalalad, Noel G.; Tandoc, Amado; Sombrero, Lydia; Olveda, Remigio; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background Detection of Enterovirus 68 (EV68) has recently been increased. However, underlying evolutionary mechanism of this increasing trend is not fully understood. Methods Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 5,240 patients with acute respiratory infections in the Philippines from June 2009 to December 2011. EV68 was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting for 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR), viral protein 1 (VP1), and VP4/VP2. Phylogenetic trees were generated using the obtained sequences. Results Of the 5,240 tested samples, 12 EV68 positive cases were detected between August and December in 2011 (detection rate, 0.23%). The detection rate was higher among inpatients than outpatients (pPhilippines in 2008, however, 2 in lineage 3 were not diverged from strains detected in the Philippines in 2008 but closely associated with strains detected in the United States. Combined with our previous report, EV68 occurrences were observed twice in the Philippines within the last four years. Conclusions EV68 detections might be occurring in cyclic patterns, and viruses might have been maintained in the community while some strains might have been newly introduced. PMID:24073203

  2. Rapid molecular detection of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnosis is a more reliable and sensitive diagnostic tool for detecting greening bacterium than other conventional approaches like electron microscopy, DNA-DNA hybridization and immunofluorescence (IF) for detection of citrus greening. Results reveal that sodium sulphite method of ...

  3. Macroscopic quantum coherence in a single molecular magnet and Kondo effect of electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Bo; Wang, Qiang; Xie, Haiqing; Liang, J.-Q.

    2011-01-01

    We report a Kondo-effect study of electron transport through a quantum dot with embedded biaxial single-molecule magnet based on slave boson mean-field theory and non-equilibrium Green-function technique. It is found the macroscopic quantum coherence of molecule-magnet results in the Kondo peak split of differential conductance due to interaction between electron and molecular magnet. It is also demonstrated that both the peak height and position can be controlled by the sweeping magnetic field and polarization of ferromagnetic electrodes. The characteristic peak split may be used to identify the macroscopic quantum coherence and develop molecule devices. -- Highlights: → Splits of Kondo peak are induced by the single molecular magnet. → Kondo effect can be controlled by magnetic field and its sweeping speed in our model. → The suppression and broadening of Kondo peaks is also observed with increase of temperature. → The peaks height and position is sensitive to polarization of the electrode.

  4. Molecular detection and variability of Strawberry vein banding virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíková-Vašková, Dana; Špak, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 656, - (2004), 33-38 ISSN 0567-7572 Grant - others:EU EU QLR5-1999-1553 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902 Keywords : AmpliDet RNA * caulimovirus * molecular beacon * nucleic acid sequence based amplification * PCR, SVBV * CaM Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  5. Molecular Recognition: Detection of Colorless Compounds Based on Color Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalafi, Lida; Kashani, Samira; Karimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which students measure the amount of cetirizine in allergy-treatment tablets based on molecular recognition. The basis of recognition is competition of cetirizine with phenolphthalein to form an inclusion complex with ß-cyclodextrin. Phenolphthalein is pinkish under basic condition, whereas it's complex form…

  6. Molecular detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Herrmann, B; Jensen, K.T.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter highlights the use of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for the molecular diagnosis of gonorrhoea and chlamydia infection. In addition, good laboratory practice and issues that should be considered before and after implementation of NAATs for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae...

  7. Immunological and molecular diagnostic methods for detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The immuno-diagnostic and moleculardiagnostic methods have shown great potential as far as specificity and sensitivity are concerned and can generate accurate results rapidly. The aim of this overview is to discuss the various immunodiagnostic and molecular diagnostic methods such as enzymes linked immunosorbent ...

  8. Molecular detection and characterization of VRSA among clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    *

    Molecular typing of VRSA isolates was performed using randomly amplified ... VanA-type strains display high levels of inducible resistance to both vancomycin and teicoplanin, whereas VanB-type strains have variable levels of inducible resistance to vancomycin only .... 100, 0.2 mg/ml of bovine serum albumin, 50 µM each.

  9. Molecular scale buckling mechanics in individual aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes on elastomeric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Dahl-Young; Xiao, Jianliang; Kocabas, Coskun; MacLaren, Scott; Banks, Tony; Jiang, Hanqing; Huang, Yonggang Y; Rogers, John A

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the scaling of controlled nonlinear buckling processes in materials with dimensions in the molecular range (i.e., approximately 1 nm) through experimental and theoretical studies of buckling in individual single-wall carbon nanotubes on substrates of poly(dimethylsiloxane). The results show not only the ability to create and manipulate patterns of buckling at these molecular scales, but also, that analytical continuum mechanics theory can explain, quantitatively, all measurable aspects of this system. Inverse calculation applied to measurements of diameter-dependent buckling wavelengths yields accurate values of the Young's moduli of individual SWNTs. As an example of the value of this system beyond its use in this type of molecular scale metrology, we implement parallel arrays of buckled SWNTs as a class of mechanically stretchable conductor.

  10. Single and double charge transfer in Be/sup 4+/+He collisions: A molecular (Feshbach) approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.; Riera, A.; Yaez, M.

    1986-12-01

    In recent articles, we pointed out the fundamental difference between the molecular treatment of processes involving a multicharged ion and hydrogen or helium atoms, which is the (formal) autoionizing character of the molecular channels, and we reported a (new) implementation of the Feshbach method to calculate the molecular energies and couplings. In the present work we use the wave functions calculated with this Feshbach method for the BeHe/sup 4+/ quasimolecule, introduce a common translation factor in the formalism, and calculate the single and double charge-exchange cross sections in Be/sup 4+/+He(1s/sup 2/) collisions for impact energies 0.2--20 keV/amu. The mechanisms of the processes are discussed in detail.

  11. Molecular detection methods of resistance to antituberculosis drugs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossier, F; Sougakoff, W

    2017-09-01

    Molecular methods predict drug resistance several weeks before phenotypic methods and enable rapid implementation of appropriate therapeutic treatment. We aimed to detail the most representative molecular tools used in routine practice for the rapid detection of resistance to antituberculosis drugs among Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. The molecular diagnosis of resistance to antituberculosis drugs in clinical samples or from in vitro cultures is based on the detection of the most common mutations in the genes involved in the development of resistance in M. tuberculosis strains (encoding either protein targets of antibiotics, or antibiotic activating enzymes) by commercial molecular kits or by sequencing. Three hypotheses could explain the discrepancies between the genotypic results and the phenotypic drug susceptibility testing results: a low percentage of resistant mutants precluding the detection by genotypic methods on the primary culture; a low level of resistance not detected by phenotypic testing; and other resistance mechanisms not yet characterized. Molecular methods have varying sensitivity with regards to detecting antituberculosis drug resistance; that is why phenotypic susceptibility testing methods are mandatory for detecting antituberculosis drug-resistant isolates that have not been detected by molecular methods. The questionable ability of existing phenotypic and genotypic drug susceptibility testing to properly classify strains as susceptible or resistant, and at what level of resistance, was raised for several antituberculosis agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular detection of Phytophthora ramorum by real-time PCR using Taqman, SYBR Green and molecular beacons with three genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.J. Bilodeau; C.A. Lévesque; A.W.A.M. De Cock; C. Duchaine; G. Kristjansson; R.C. Hamelin

    2006-01-01

    Sudden oak death, caused by Phytophthora ramorum, is a severe disease that can affect numerous species of trees and shrubs. This pathogen has been spread via nursery stock, and quarantine measures are currently in place to prevent further spread. Molecular assays have been developed to rapidly detect and identify P. ramorum, but...

  13. Quantum Tunneling of Magnetization in Single Molecular Magnets Coupled to Ferromagnetic Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnas, Józef

    2006-01-01

    The role of spin polarized reservoirs in quantum tunneling of magnetization and relaxation processes in a single molecular magnet (SMM) is investigated theoretically. The SMM is exchange-coupled to the reservoirs and also subjected to a magnetic field varying in time, which enables the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). The spin relaxation times are calculated from the Fermi golden rule. The exchange interaction with tunneling electrons is shown to affect the spin reversal due to QTM. ...

  14. Magnetic Switching of a Single Molecular Magnet due to Spin-Polarized Current

    OpenAIRE

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnas, Józef

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic switching of a single molecular magnet (SMM) due to spin-polarized current flowing between ferromagnetic metallic electrodes is investigated theoretically. Magnetic moments of the electrodes are assumed to be collinear and parallel to the magnetic easy axis of the molecule. Electrons tunneling through a barrier between magnetic leads are coupled to the SMM via exchange interaction. The current flowing through the system as well as the spin relaxation times of the SMM are calculated f...

  15. Pumping $ac$ Josephson current in the Single Molecular Magnets by spin nutation

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahipour, B.; Abouie, J.; Rostami, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that an {\\it ac} Josephson current is pumped through the Single Molecular Magnets (SMM) by the spin nutation. The spin nutation is generated by applying a time dependent magnetic field to the SMM. We obtain the flowing charge current through the junction by working in the tunneling limit and employing Green's function technique. At the resonance conditions some discontinuities and divergencies are appeared in the normal and Josephson currents, respectively. Such discontinuities...

  16. Deuteron NMR resolved mesogen vs. crosslinker molecular order and reorientational exchange in liquid single crystal elastomers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Milavec, J.; Domenici, V.; Zupančič, B.; Rešetič, A.; Bubnov, Alexej; Zalar, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 5 (2016), s. 4071-4077 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02843S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14007 Grant - others:EU - ICT(XE) COST Action IC1208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : liquid single crystal elastomer * NMR * liquid crystal * molecular order * monomers Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  17. Detectability of single and plural flaws by ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, K.

    1985-01-01

    An outline and up-to-date test results of an eight year project of proving tests on the effectiveness of in-service inspection is described in the first part of the present paper. Effects on the detectability of such testing parameters as refraction angle, thickness of stainless steel cladding, inspectors, standard flaws in reference specimens, stress state subjected to defects are discussed. This is followed by a discussion of detection reproducibility, resolution and accuracy of inspected size of a defects. The latter part of the paper deals with up-to-date results of tests on resolution and shape determination of propagating adjacent and co-linear fatigue cracks by ultrasonic examination. It was found that real lengths of fatigue crack and EDM surface notch will be roughly estimated by 12 dB and 8 dB down methods, respectively. It is also concluded that the 10 dB down method is available for estimation of the inside distance of two co-linear surface cracks

  18. Nanofabrication of SERS Substrates for Single/Few Molecules Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Melino, Gianluca

    2015-05-04

    Raman spectroscopy is among the most widely employed methods to investigate the properties of materials in several fields of study. Evolution in materials science allowed us to fabricate suitable substrates, at the nanoscale, capable to enhance the electromagnetic field of the signals coming from the samples which at this range turn out to be in most cases singles or a few molecules. This particular variation of the classical technique is called SERS (Surface Enanched Raman Spectroscopy). In this work, the enhancement of the electromagnetic field is obtained by manipulation of the optical properties of metals with respect to their size. By using electroless deposition (bottom up technique), gold and silver nanoparticles were deposited in nanostructured patterns obtained on silicon wafers by means of electron beam lithography (top down technique). Rhodamine 6G in aqueous solution at extremely low concentration (10-8 M) was absorbed on the resultant dimers and the collection of the Raman spectra demonstrated the high efficiency of the substrates.

  19. Development of a Single-Axis Edge Detection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanshaw, R.A.

    2000-02-18

    A SIP (Societe Genevoise d'Instruments de Physique) Trioptic coordinate measuring machine was modified for calibration of high quality single-axis glass standards to an uncertainty of {+-}0.000020 inch. The modification was accomplished through the addition of a frame grabber board, vision software, a high-resolution camera, stepper motors, a two-axis motor controller, and an HP-IB interface card. An existing temperature system (hygrometer, barometer, laser interferometer system, and optics) was retained as part of the system. An existing Hewlett Packard computer was replaced with a personal computer to accommodate the frame grabber board. Each component was integrated into the existing system using Visual Basic. The system was automated for unattended measurements by creating a machine programming language, which is recognized within the main program.

  20. Silver-Stained Fibrin Zymography: Separation of Proteases and Activity Detection Using a Single Substrate-Containing Gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang-Su; Kang, Dae-Ook; Choi, Nack-Shick

    2017-01-01

    Silver-stained fibrin zymography for separation of protease bands and activity detection using a single substrate gel was designed. The method takes advantage of the nano-scale sensitivity of both zymography and silver staining. After sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) in a gel containing fibrin (protease substrate), the gel was incubated in enzyme reaction buffer and the zymogram gel was silver-stained. Bands with protease activity were stained with silver in clear areas where the protein substrate had been degraded. The molecular sizes of proteases were accurately determined.

  1. Molecular detection of intestinal parasites for clinical diagnosis and epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, Robert Jan ten

    2009-01-01

    The detection of intestinal parasitic infections for routine diagnosis and for epidemiological research still depends mainly on microscopical examination of stool samples for the identification of helminth eggs and protozoan trophozoites and cysts. Because microscopy has several limitations,

  2. Molecular sieve sensors for selective detection at the nanogram level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bein, Thomas; Brown, Kelly D.; Frye, Gregory C.; Brinker, Charles J.

    1992-01-01

    The invention relates to a selective chemical sensor for selective detection of chemical entities even at the nanogram level. The invention further relates to methods of using the sensor. The sensor comprises: (a) a piezoelectric substrate capable of detecting mass changes resulting from adsorption of material thereon; and (b) a coating applied to the substrate, which selectively sorbs chemical entities of a size smaller than a preselected magnitude.

  3. Single Scattering Detection in Turbin Media Using Single-Phase Structured Illumination Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, E.; Johnsson, J.; Kristensson, E.; Alden, M.

    2012-05-01

    This work shows a unique possibility of visualizing the exponential intensity decay due to light extinction, when laser adiation propagates through a homogeneous scattering edium. This observation implies that the extracted intensity mostly riginates from single scattering events. The filtering of this single light scattering intensity is performed by means of a single-phase structured illumination filtering approach. Results from numerical Monte Carlo simulation confirm the experimental findings for an extinction coefficient of μ_e = 0.36 mm^-1. This article demonstrates an original and reliable way of measuring the extinction coefficient of particulate turbid media based on sidescattering imaging. Such an approach has capabilities to replace the commonly used transmission measurement within the intermediate single-to multiple scattering regime where the optical depth ranges between 1 procedure and set-up. Applications of the technique has potential in probing challenging homogeneous scattering media, such as biomedical tissues, turbid emulsions, etc, in situations where dilution cannot be applied and where conventional transmission measurements fail.

  4. Single-molecule chemical reaction reveals molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuwei; Song, Ping; Fu, Qiang; Ruan, Mingbo; Xu, Weilin

    2014-06-25

    Understanding the microscopic elementary process of chemical reactions, especially in condensed phase, is highly desirable for improvement of efficiencies in industrial chemical processes. Here we show an approach to gaining new insights into elementary reactions in condensed phase by combining quantum chemical calculations with a single-molecule analysis. Elementary chemical reactions in liquid-phase, revealed from quantum chemical calculations, are studied by tracking the fluorescence of single dye molecules undergoing a reversible redox process. Statistical analyses of single-molecule trajectories reveal molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics of elementary reactions. The reactivity dynamic fluctuations of single molecules are evidenced and probably arise from either or both of the low-frequency approach of the molecule to the internal surface of the SiO2 nanosphere or the molecule diffusion-induced memory effect. This new approach could be applied to other chemical reactions in liquid phase to gain more insight into their molecular reaction kinetics and the dynamics of elementary steps.

  5. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  6. Estimating single molecule conductance from spontaneous evolution of a molecular contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, M.; Malinowski, T.; Iazykov, M.; Klein, H. R.

    2018-03-01

    We present an original method to estimate the conductivity of a single molecule anchored to nanometric-sized metallic electrodes, using a Mechanically Controlled Break Junction operated at room temperature in the liquid. We record the conductance through the metal/molecules/metal nanocontact while keeping the metallic electrodes at a fixed distance. Taking advantage of thermal diffusion and electromigration, we let the contact naturally explore the more stable configurations around a chosen conductance value. The conductance of a single molecule is estimated from a statistical analysis of raw conductance and conductance standard deviation data for molecular contacts containing up to 14 molecules. The single molecule conductance values are interpreted as time-averaged conductance of an ensemble of conformers at thermal equilibrium.

  7. Molecular Detection of Strongyloides ratti in Faecal Samples from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for all collected stool samples. Briefly, 2 g of each sample was placed in the center of plastic petri dish containing approximately 20 mL of nutrient agar. Dishes were sealed with parafilm tape to prevent larvae from crawling .... loops spiraling around the intestine or running parallel with intestine. Eggs in single row in uterus.

  8. Single-molecule detection of protein efflux from microorganisms using fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotube sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Markita Patricia; Ando, Hiroki; Chen, Allen Y.; Cao, Jicong; Kottadiel, Vishal Isaac; Chio, Linda; Yang, Darwin; Dong, Juyao; Lu, Timothy K.; Strano, Michael S.

    2017-05-01

    A distinct advantage of nanosensor arrays is their ability to achieve ultralow detection limits in solution by proximity placement to an analyte. Here, we demonstrate label-free detection of individual proteins from Escherichia coli (bacteria) and Pichia pastoris (yeast) immobilized in a microfluidic chamber, measuring protein efflux from single organisms in real time. The array is fabricated using non-covalent conjugation of an aptamer-anchor polynucleotide sequence to near-infrared emissive single-walled carbon nanotubes, using a variable chemical spacer shown to optimize sensor response. Unlabelled RAP1 GTPase and HIV integrase proteins were selectively detected from various cell lines, via large near-infrared fluorescent turn-on responses. We show that the process of E. coli induction, protein synthesis and protein export is highly stochastic, yielding variability in protein secretion, with E. coli cells undergoing division under starved conditions producing 66% fewer secreted protein products than their non-dividing counterparts. We further demonstrate the detection of a unique protein product resulting from T7 bacteriophage infection of E. coli, illustrating that nanosensor arrays can enable real-time, single-cell analysis of a broad range of protein products from various cell types.

  9. Sleep Apnoea Detection in Single Channel ECGs by Analyzing Heart Rate Dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zywietz, C

    2001-01-01

    .... Sleep disorders are typically investigated by means of polysomnographic recordings. We have analyzed 70 eight-hour single-channel ECG recordings to find out to which extent sleep apneas may be detected from the ECG alone...

  10. Detection and characterization of chemical aerosol using laser-trapping single-particle Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalume, Aimable; Beresnev, Leonid A; Santarpia, Joshua; Pan, Yong-Le

    2017-08-10

    Detection and characterization of the presence of chemical agent aerosols in various complex atmospheric environments is an essential defense mission. Raman spectroscopy has the ability to identify chemical molecules, but there are limited numbers of photons detectable from single airborne aerosol particles as they are flowing through a detection system. In this paper, we report on a single-particle Raman spectrometer system that can measure strong spontaneous, stimulated, and resonance Raman spectral peaks from a single laser-trapped chemical aerosol particle, such as a droplet of the VX nerve agent chemical simulant diethyl phthalate. Using this system, time-resolved Raman spectra and elastic scattered intensities were recorded to monitor the chemical properties and size variation of the trapped particle. Such a system supplies a new approach for the detection and characterization of single airborne chemical aerosol particles.

  11. Gene length and detection bias in single cell RNA sequencing protocols [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Phipson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq has rapidly gained popularity for profiling transcriptomes of hundreds to thousands of single cells. This technology has led to the discovery of novel cell types and revealed insights into the development of complex tissues. However, many technical challenges need to be overcome during data generation. Due to minute amounts of starting material, samples undergo extensive amplification, increasing technical variability. A solution for mitigating amplification biases is to include unique molecular identifiers (UMIs, which tag individual molecules. Transcript abundances are then estimated from the number of unique UMIs aligning to a specific gene, with PCR duplicates resulting in copies of the UMI not included in expression estimates. Methods: Here we investigate the effect of gene length bias in scRNA-Seq across a variety of datasets that differ in terms of capture technology, library preparation, cell types and species. Results: We find that scRNA-seq datasets that have been sequenced using a full-length transcript protocol exhibit gene length bias akin to bulk RNA-seq data. Specifically, shorter genes tend to have lower counts and a higher rate of dropout. In contrast, protocols that include UMIs do not exhibit gene length bias, with a mostly uniform rate of dropout across genes of varying length. Across four different scRNA-Seq datasets profiling mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs, we found the subset of genes that are only detected in the UMI datasets tended to be shorter, while the subset of genes detected only in the full-length datasets tended to be longer. Conclusions: We find that the choice of scRNA-seq protocol influences the detection rate of genes, and that full-length datasets exhibit gene-length bias. In addition, despite clear differences between UMI and full-length transcript data, we illustrate that full-length and UMI data can be combined to reveal the underlying biology

  12. Molecular detection of Orientia tsutsugamushi from suspected scrub typhus cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seethalakshmi Srinivasan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Scrub typhus is an acute febrile illness caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. The disease is under-diagnosed in India, because of low index of suspicion and also due to its nonspecific presentation, and lack of confirmatory diagnostic tests. Aims: This study was undertaken to diagnose scrub typhus in patients with undifferentiated fevers by serology and molecular methods. Materials and Methods: A total of 68 blood samples were collected from patients clinically suspected to have scrub typhus. After transportation to the laboratory, the serum was separated from the blood and subjected to rapid card test. The ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid blood samples were subjected to DNA extraction using QIAamp DNA Mini Kit followed by nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR. Results: 24/68 (35.29% cases showed the presence of antibody against scrub typhus by serology. 6/68 (8.8% patients showed the presence of outer membrane protein antigen gene 56 kDa by nPCR. 5/24 serology positive cases showed the presence of 56 kDa outer membrane protein antigen gene by nPCR. A large number of cases positive by serology were negative by PCR which may indicate a low sensitivity of this test either due to low copy numbers or due to excess host DNA. Conclusion: Delay in treatment may increase disease severity and leads to higher mortality. Thus, molecular methods of diagnosis may aid in the early diagnosis of infection and enable prompt treatment. This is the first report on the diagnosis of scrub typhus in the suburbs of Chennai using molecular methods and reemphasizes the need for increased awareness of rickettsial infections in rural areas.

  13. Molecular detection of Brucella spp. from broth culture of clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PCR was employed to detect Brucella spp. from broth cultures of clinical samples using a group specific primer based on IS6501 sequence. The sensitivity and specificity of this assay was confirmed by Southern hybridization analysis using a digoxigenin-labeled DNA probe while reproducibility of the analysis was ...

  14. Distribution and molecular detection of apple mosaic virus in apple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apple mosaic virus (ApMV) is one of the most important diseases limiting the production of hazelnut and apple in Turkey and the objectives of this research were to determine the convenient and reliable method for RNA isolation and also to determine primer pair for real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection of ...

  15. Molecular detection of Edwardsiella tarda with gyr B gene isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 16S rRNA gene was identical and exhibited 99% sequence similarity with the other known isolates of E. tarda available in the GenBank. This paper reports the isolation and detection of E. tarda with the gyrB gene in pirarucu, A. gigas, which was exhibited in an indoor private commercial aquarium in Seoul, South Korea ...

  16. Detection of Streptococcus pyogenes using rapid visual molecular assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangna; He, Xiaoming; Li, Huan; Zhao, Jiangtao; Huang, Simo; Liu, Wei; Wei, Xiao; Ding, Yiwei; Wang, Zhaoyan; Zou, Dayang; Wang, Xuesong; Dong, Derong; Yang, Zhan; Yan, Xiabei; Huang, Liuyu; Du, Shuangkui; Yuan, Jing

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an increasingly important pathogen in many parts of the world. Rapid and accurate detection of S. pyogenes aids in the control of the infection. In this study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed and validated for the specific detection of S. pyogenes. The assay incorporates two methods: a chromogenic analysis using a calcein/Mn(2+) complex and real-time turbidity monitoring to assess the reaction. Both methods detected the target DNA within 60 min under 64°C isothermal conditions. The assay used specifically designed primers to target spy1258, and correctly identified 111 strains of S. pyogenes and 32 non-S. pyogenes strains, including other species of the genus Streptococcus. Tests using reference strains showed that the LAMP assay was highly specific. The sensitivity of the assay, with a detection limit of 1.49 pg DNA, was 10-fold greater than that of PCR. The LAMP assay established in this study is simple, fast and sensitive, and does not rely upon any special equipment; thus, it could be employed in clinical diagnosis. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Molecular detection of disease resistance genes to powdery mildew ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2017-01-04

    Jan 4, 2017 ... 2. State Key Laboratory of Biology for Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of. Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China. Received 10 October, 2016; Accepted 14 December, 2016. A study was conducted to detect the presence of disease resistance genes to ...

  18. Molecular and serological detection of occult hepatitis B virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Occult hepatitis B infections are becoming a major global threat, but the available data on its prevalence in various parts of the world are often divergent. Objective: This study aimed to detect occult hepatitis B virus in hepatitis B surface antigen-negative serum using anti-HBc as a marker of previous infection.

  19. Detection and molecular characterization of betanodaviruses retrieved from bivalve molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, E; Grodzki, M; Panzarin, V; Guercio, A; Purpari, G; Serratore, P; Ciulli, S

    2018-04-01

    Betanodaviruses are small ssRNA viruses responsible for viral encephalopathy and retinopathy, otherwise known as viral nervous necrosis, in marine fish worldwide. These viruses can be either horizontally or vertically transmitted and have been sporadically detected in invertebrates, which seem to be one of the possible viral sources. Twenty-eight new betanodavirus strains were retrieved in three molluscs species collected from different European countries between 2008 and 2015. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that strains retrieved from bivalve molluscs are closely related to viruses detected in finfish in Southern Europe in the period 2000-2009. Nevertheless, a new betanodavirus strain, markedly different from the other members of the RGNNV genotype, was detected. Such a massive and varied presence of betanodaviruses in bivalve molluscs greatly stresses the risks of transmission previously feared for other invertebrates. Bivalve molluscs reared in the same area as farmed and wild finfish could act as a reservoir of the virus. Furthermore, current European regulations allow relaying activities and the sale of live bivalve molluscs, which could pose a real risk of spreading betanodaviruses across different geographic regions. To our knowledge, this is the first study, which focuses on the detection and genetic characterization of betanodaviruses in bivalve molluscs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Assay optimization for molecular detection of Zika virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corman, Victor M.; Rasche, Andrea; Baronti, Cecile; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Cadar, Daniel; Reusken, Chantal Bem; Pas, Suzan D.; Goorhuis, Abraham; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Bleicker, Tobias; Brünink, Sebastian; Eschbach-Bludau, Monika; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M.; Koopmans, Marion P.; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Grobusch, Martin P.; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Drosten, Christian; Drexler, Jan Felix

    2016-01-01

    To examine the diagnostic performance of real-time reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for Zika virus detection. We compared seven published real-time RT-PCR assays and two new assays that we have developed. To determine the analytical sensitivity of each assay, we

  1. Cultural and molecular detection of zoonotic tuberculosis and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is a chronic infectious disease of animals characterized by the formation of granulomas in tissues and its detection is carried out most commonly on the basis of tuberculin skin testing, abattoir meat inspection and rarely on bacteriological techniques. A study was conducted to assess the ...

  2. Molecular modelling of a chemodosimeter for the selective detection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    performance liquid chromatography-inductively cou- pled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS).12. Though such analytical detection techniques are highly accurate, they require expensive instruments with clean laboratory conditions and proper sample preparations. This calls for the development of new cost-effective ...

  3. Highly sensitive single polyaniline nanowire biosensor for the detection of immunoglobulin G and myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Innam; Luo, Xiliang; Cui, Xinyan Tracy; Yun, Minhee

    2011-01-01

    A single polyaniline (PANI) nanowire-based biosensor was established to detect immunoglobulin G (IgG) and myoglobin (Myo), which is one of the cardiac biomarkers. The single PANI nanowires were fabricated via an electrochemical growth method, in which single nanowires were formed between a pair of patterned electrodes. The single PANI nanowires were functionalized with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of IgG or Myo via a surface immobilization method, using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC), and N-Hydroxysuccinimde (NHS). The functionalization was then verified by Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The target proteins of IgG and Myo were detected by measuring the conductance change of functionalized single PANI nanowires owing to the capturing of target proteins by mAbs. The detection limit was found to be 3 ng/mL for IgG and 1.4 ng/mL for Myo. No response was observed when single nanowires were exposed to a non-specific protein demonstrating excellent specificity to expected target detection. Together with the fast response time (a few seconds), high sensitivity, and good specificity, this single PANI nanowire-based biosensor shows great promise in the detection of cardiac markers and other proteins. PMID:21269820

  4. Direct determination of recoil ion detection efficiency for coincidence time-of-flight studies of molecular fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Itzhak, I.; Carnes, K. D.; Ginther, S. G.; Johnson, D. T.; Norris, P. J.; Weaver, O. L.

    1993-06-01

    Molecular fragmentation of diatomic and small polyatomic molecules caused by fast ion impact has been studied. The evaluation of the cross sections of the different fragmentation channels depends strongly on the recoil ion detection efficiency, ɛ r (single ions proportional to ɛ r, and ion pairs to ɛ r2, etc.). A method is suggested for the direct determination of this detection efficiency. This method is based on the fact that fast H + + CH 4 collisions produce C 2+ fragments only in coincidence with H + and H +2 fragments, that is, there is a negligible number of C 2+ singles, if any. The measured yield of C 2+ singles is therefore due to events in which the H +m of the H +m +C 2+ ion pair was not detected and thus is proportional to 1-ɛ r. Methane fragmentation caused by 1 MeV proton impact is used to evaluate directly the recoil ion detection efficiency and to demonstrate the method of deriving the cross sections of all breakup channels.

  5. Direct detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in bacterial DNA by SNPtrap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Hugo Ahlm; Moen, Birgitte; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge with single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) fingerprinting of bacteria and higher organisms is the combination of genome-wide screenings with the potential of multiplexing and accurate SNP detection. Single-nucleotide extension by the minisequencing principle represents a technology...

  6. Electrochemical detection of single molecules using abiotic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansinena, Jose-Maria; Redondo, Antonio; Olazabal, Virginia; Hoffbauer, Mark A.

    2017-09-12

    A barrier structure for use in an electrochemical stochastic membrane sensor for single molecule detection. The sensor is based upon inorganic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions. The inorganic nanopores are formed from inorganic materials and an electrically conductive polymer. Methods of making the barrier structure and sensing single molecules using the barrier structure are also described.

  7. Electrochemical detection of single molecules using abiotic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansinena, Jose-Maria [Los Alamos, NM; Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos, NM; Olazabal, Virginia [Los Alamos, NM; Hoffbauer, Mark A [Los Alamos, NM; Akhadov, Elshan A [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-12-29

    A barrier structure for use in an electrochemical stochastic membrane sensor for single molecule detection. The sensor is based upon inorganic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions. The inorganic nanopores are formed from inorganic materials and an electrically conductive polymer. Methods of making the barrier structure and sensing single molecules using the barrier structure are also described.

  8. Electrochemical detection of single molecules using abiotic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansinena, Jose-Maria; Redondo, Antonio; Olazabal, Virginia; Hoffbauer, Mark A.; Akhadov, Elshan A.

    2017-10-31

    A barrier structure for use in an electrochemical stochastic membrane sensor for single molecule detection. The sensor is based upon inorganic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions. The inorganic nanopores are formed from inorganic materials and an electrically conductive polymer. Methods of making the barrier structure and sensing single molecules using the barrier structure are also described.

  9. A Failure Criterion for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Based on Molecular Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Antonio; Lacerda, Guilherme

    2008-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are the natural choice for high performance materials. The problem, however, rises when the experimental data are compared against each other. The large variability of experimental data lead to development of a new set of numerical simulations called molecular mechanics, which is a ``symbiotic'' association of molecular dynamics and solid mechanics. This papers deals with a molecular mechanics simulations of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Three SWNT configurations and its combinations were simulated, i.e. armchair, zigzag and chiral. The failure criterion introduced is based on modified Morse's potential with dissociation energy of 124 Kcal/mol and an inflection point considered is around 13% of strain. The numerical data are in good agreement with data from Belytschko et al. (2002) where the failure occurred at 10.6% strain at 65.2 GPa of stress. To be able to identify the highest stress concentration region, one end of the SWNT all degrees-of-freedom were fixed and a prescribed axial displacement was applied at the opposite end. The Sadoc (chiral-chiral) configuration had the highest stress at the smallest chiral SWNT. For the Dunlap configuration (chiral-zigzag) the highest stress occurred at chiral part close to the pentagon location.

  10. Molecular detection of drug resistance in microbes by isotopic techniques: The IAEA experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dar, L.; Boussaha, A.; Padhy, A.K.; Khan, B.

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supports various programmes on the uses of radionuclide techniques in the management of human communicable diseases. An important issue, being addressed through several technology transfer projects, is the detection of drug resistance in microbes by radioisotope based molecular-biology diagnostic procedures. The techniques employed include dot blot hybridisation with P-32 labelled oligonucleotide probes to detect point mutations, associated with drug resistance, in microbial genes amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Molecular methods have been used for the detection of drug resistance in the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, and in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Radioisotope based molecular-biology methods have been demonstrated to have comparative advantages in being sensitive, specific, cost-effective, and suitable for application to large-scale molecular surveillance for drug resistance. (author)

  11. Recombinations in staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements compromise the molecular detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    KAUST Repository

    Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.

    2014-06-27

    Clinical laboratories are increasingly using molecular tests for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening. However, primers have to be targeted to a variable chromosomal region, the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). We initially screened 726 MRSA isolates from a single UK hospital trust by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), a novel, isothermal alternative to PCR. Undetected isolates were further characterised using multilocus sequence, spa typing and whole genome sequencing. 96% of our tested phenotypically MRSA isolates contained one of the six orfX-SCCmec junctions our RPA test and commercially available molecular tests target. However 30 isolates could not be detected. Sequencing of 24 of these isolates demonstrated recombinations within the SCCmec element with novel insertions that interfered with the RPA, preventing identification as MRSA. This result suggests that clinical laboratories cannot rely solely upon molecular assays to reliably detect all methicillin-resistance. The presence of significant recombinations in the SCCmec element, where the majority of assays target their primers, suggests that there will continue to be isolates that escape identification. We caution that dependence on amplification-based molecular assays will continue to result in failure to diagnose a small proportion (?4%) of MRSA isolates, unless the true level of SCCmec natural diversity is determined by whole genome sequencing of a large collection of MRSA isolates. © 2014 Hill-Cawthorne et al.

  12. Recombinations in staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements compromise the molecular detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant A Hill-Cawthorne

    Full Text Available Clinical laboratories are increasingly using molecular tests for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA screening. However, primers have to be targeted to a variable chromosomal region, the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec. We initially screened 726 MRSA isolates from a single UK hospital trust by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA, a novel, isothermal alternative to PCR. Undetected isolates were further characterised using multilocus sequence, spa typing and whole genome sequencing. 96% of our tested phenotypically MRSA isolates contained one of the six orfX-SCCmec junctions our RPA test and commercially available molecular tests target. However 30 isolates could not be detected. Sequencing of 24 of these isolates demonstrated recombinations within the SCCmec element with novel insertions that interfered with the RPA, preventing identification as MRSA. This result suggests that clinical laboratories cannot rely solely upon molecular assays to reliably detect all methicillin-resistance. The presence of significant recombinations in the SCCmec element, where the majority of assays target their primers, suggests that there will continue to be isolates that escape identification. We caution that dependence on amplification-based molecular assays will continue to result in failure to diagnose a small proportion (∼4% of MRSA isolates, unless the true level of SCCmec natural diversity is determined by whole genome sequencing of a large collection of MRSA isolates.

  13. LITERATURE REVIEW OF MOLECULAR METHODS FOR SIMULTANEOUS DETECTION OF PATHOGENS IN WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This literature search is a review of molecular technologies (qPCR, microarray, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip) for simultaneous detection of multiple waterborne pathogens in order to understand the state of the technology. The search content focuses on: pathogen detection witho...

  14. Molecular diagnosis of toxoplasmosis: value of the buffy coat for the detection of circulating Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Capderou, Elodie; Bertini, Rose-Laurence; Bailly, Sébastien; Fricker-Hidalgo, Hélène; Varlet-Marie, Emmanuelle; Murat, Jean-Benjamin; Sterkers, Yvon; Touafek, Fériel; Bastien, Patrick; Pelloux, Hervé

    2015-08-01

    Early detection of Toxoplasma tachyzoites circulating in blood using PCR is recommended for immunosuppressed patients at high risk for disseminated toxoplasmosis. Using a toxoplasmosis mouse model, we show that the sensitivity of detection is higher using buffy coat isolated from a large blood volume than using whole blood for this molecular monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The thinnest molecular separation sheet by graphene gates of single-walled carbon nanohorns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Tomonori

    2014-11-25

    Graphene is possibly the thinnest membrane that could be used as a molecular separation gate. Several techniques including absorption, cryogenic distillation, adsorption, and membrane separation have been adopted for constructing separation systems. Molecular separation using graphene as the membrane has been studied because large area synthesis of graphene is possible by chemical vapor deposition. Control of the gate sizes is necessary to achieve high separation performances in graphene membranes. The separation of molecules and ions using graphene and graphene oxide layers could be achieved by the intrinsic defects and defect donation of graphene. However, the controllability of the graphene gates is still under debate because gate size control at the picometer level is inevitable for the fabrication of the thinnest graphene membranes. In this paper, the controlled gate size in the graphene sheets in single-walled carbon nanohorns (NHs) is studied and the molecular separation ability of the graphene sheets is assessed by molecular probing with CO2, O2, N2, CH4, and SF6. Graphene sheets in NHs with different sized gates of 310, 370, and >500 pm were prepared and assessed by molecular probing. The 310 pm-gates in the graphene sheets could separate the molecules tested, whereas weak separation properties were observed for 370 pm-gates. The amount of CO2 that penetrated the 310 pm-gates was more than 35 times larger than that of CH4. These results were supported by molecular dynamics simulations of the penetration of molecules through 300, 400, and 700 pm-gates in graphene sheets. Therefore, a gas separation membrane using a 340-pm-thick graphene sheet has high potential. These findings provide unambiguous evidence of the importance of graphene gates on the picometer level. Control of the gates is the primary challenge for high-performance separation membranes made of graphene.

  16. Profiling of Molecular Interactions in Real Time using Acoustic Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godber, Benjamin; Frogley, Mark; Rehak, Marian; Sleptsov, Alexander; Thompson, Kevin S.J.; Uludag, Yildiz; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic sensors that exploit resonating quartz crystals to directly detect the binding of an analyte to a receptor are finding increasing utility in the quantification of clinically-relevant analytes. We have developed a novel acoustic detection technology, which we term Resonant Acoustic Profiling (RAP™). This technology builds on the fundamental basics of the “quartz crystal microbalance” or “QCM” with several key additional features including two- or four-channel automated sample delivery, in-line referencing and microfluidic sensor ‘cassettes’ that are pre-coated with easy-to-use surface chemistries. Example applications are described for the quantification of myoglobin concentration and its interaction kinetics, and for the ranking of enzyme-cofactor specificities. PMID:17129723

  17. Minimum Symbol Error Rate Detection in Single-Input Multiple-Output Channels with Markov Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Minimum symbol error rate detection in Single-Input Multiple- Output(SIMO) channels with Markov noise is presented. The special case of zero-mean Gauss-Markov noise is examined closer as it only requires knowledge of the second-order moments. In this special case, it is shown that optimal detection...

  18. Molecular Detection of a Potentially Toxic Diatom Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidhan Chandra Dhar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A few diatom species produce toxins that affect human and animal health. Among these, members of the Pseudo-nitzschia genus were the first diatoms unambiguously identified as producer of domoic acid, a neurotoxin affecting molluscan shell-fish, birds, marine mammals, and humans. Evidence exists indicating the involvement of another diatom genus, Amphora, as a potential producer of domoic acid. We present a strategy for the detection of the diatom species Amphora coffeaeformis based on the development of species-specific oligonucleotide probes and their application in microarray hybridization experiments. This approach is based on the use of two marker genes highly conserved in all diatoms, but endowed with sufficient genetic divergence to discriminate diatoms at the species level. A region of approximately 450 bp of these previously unexplored marker genes, coding for elongation factor 1-a (eEF1-a and silicic acid transporter (SIT, was used to design oligonucleotide probes that were tested for specificity in combination with the corresponding fluorescently labeled DNA targets. The results presented in this work suggest a possible use of this DNA chip technology for the selective detection of A. coffeaeformis in environmental settings where the presence of this potential toxin producer may represent a threat to human and animal health. In addition, the same basic approach can be adapted to a wider range of diatoms for the simultaneous detection of microorganisms used as biomarkers of different water quality levels.

  19. Molecular detection and isolation of avian metapneumovirus in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Martínez-Bautista, Rebeca; Ríos-Cambre, Francisco; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a longitudinal study to detect and isolate avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) in two highly productive poultry areas in Mexico. A total of 968 breeder hens and pullets from 2 to 73 weeks of age were analysed. Serology was performed to detect aMPV antibodies and 105 samples of tracheal tissue were collected, pooled by age, and used for attempted virus isolation and aMPV nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (nRT-PCR). The serological analysis indicated that 100% of the sampled chickens showed aMPV antibodies by 12 weeks of age. Five pools of pullet samples collected at 3 to 8 weeks of age were positive by nRT-PCR and the sequences obtained indicated 98 to 99% similarity with the reported sequences for aMPV subtype A. Virus isolation of nRT-PCR-positive samples was successfully attempted using chicken embryo lung and trachea mixed cultures with subsequent adaptation to Vero cells. This is the first report of detection and isolation of aMPV in Mexico.

  20. Computational exploration of single-protein mechanics by steered molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotomayor, Marcos [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Hair cell mechanotransduction happens in tens of microseconds, involves forces of a few picoNewtons, and is mediated by nanometer-scale molecular conformational changes. As proteins involved in this process become identified and their high resolution structures become available, multiple tools are being used to explore their “single-molecule responses” to force. Optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy offer exquisite force and extension resolution, but cannot reach the high loading rates expected for high frequency auditory stimuli. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can reach these fast time scales, and also provide a unique view of the molecular events underlying protein mechanics, but its predictions must be experimentally verified. Thus a combination of simulations and experiments might be appropriate to study the molecular mechanics of hearing. Here I review the basics of MD simulations and the different methods used to apply force and study protein mechanics in silico. Simulations of tip link proteins are used to illustrate the advantages and limitations of this method.

  1. Molecular Techniques for Dicistrovirus Detection without RNA Extraction or Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jailson F. B. Querido

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dicistroviridae is a new family of small, nonenveloped, and +ssRNA viruses pathogenic to both beneficial arthropods and insect pests as well. Triatoma virus (TrV, a dicistrovirus, is a pathogen of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae, one of the main vectors of Chagas disease. In this work, we report a single-step method to identify TrV, a dicistrovirus, isolated from fecal samples of triatomines. The identification method proved to be quite sensitive, even without the extraction and purification of RNA virus.

  2. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Waveguides for Direct Optical Detection of Low-Molecular-Weight Analytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sharma, N.; Petri, C.; Jonas, U.; Bach, M.; Tovar, G.; Mrkvová, Kateřina; Vala, Milan; Homola, Jiří; Knoll, W.; Dostálek, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 215, č. 23 (2014), s. 2295-2304 ISSN 1022-1352 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP205/12/G118 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Label-free biosensors * Molecularly imprinted polymers * Hydrogels Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.616, year: 2014

  3. Molecular detection of cancer cells in saliva from oral and pharyngeal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okami, Kenji; Imate, Yuji; Hashimoto, Yoko; Kamada, Tomomi; Takahashi, Masahiro

    2002-09-01

    A key to improve the prognosis of head and neck cancers is an early diagnosis of the disease. No screening method to detect these cancers has been developed yet. Molecular techniques using polymerase chain reaction are a sensitive method to detect a small population of cancer cells among normal cells. We conducted a series of microsatellite analysis to detect cancer cells in saliva from 23 oral and pharyngeal cancer patients. Eight microsatellite markers were selected to test for microsatellite instability (MSI) in the tumor and saliva samples. Of 23 samples, 5 (22%) had MSI in the tumor samples. In 4 of 5 (80%) MSI positive samples, we detected the identical MSI in saliva. The possibility of the molecular screening and molecular follow-up is discussed.

  4. Interaction of molecular oxygen with single wall nanotubes: Role of surfactant contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larciprete, R.; Goldoni, A.; Lizzit, S.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of molecular oxygen with single wall nanotubes in the form of a commercial bucky paper was investigated by high resolution photoemission spectroscopy. Sodium contamination was found in the sample, which was completely removed only after prolonged heating at 1250 K. The C 1s core level spectrum measured on the sample annealed to 1020 K dramatically changed upon exposure to molecular oxygen. On the contrary, when exposing the Na-free SWNTs to several KL of O 2 , the sample remained oxygen free and no modification in the C 1s core level was observed. Therefore the observed sensitivity of the sample to O 2 was due to a Na mediated oxidation, determining a charge transfer from the C tubes to the Na-O complex

  5. Improving Precision of Proximity Ligation Assay by Amplified Single Molecule Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Rongqin; Nong, Rachel Yuan; Fredriksson, Simon; Landegren, Ulf; Nilsson, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Proximity ligation assay (PLA) has been proven to be a robust protein detection method. The technique is characterized by high sensitivity and specificity, but the assay precision is probably limited by the PCR readout. To investigate this potential limitation and to improve precision, we developed a digital proximity ligation assay for protein measurement in fluids based on amplified single molecule detection. The assay showed significant improvements in precision, and thereby also detection...

  6. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsin, Tse-Ming [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  7. Molecular detection of cashew husk (Anacardium occidentale) adulteration in market samples of dry tea (Camellia sinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Bandana; Singh, Mahipal

    2003-09-01

    Species-specific PCR primers were developed from intergenic spacer regions of 5S ribosomal RNA genes and used successfully in the detection of adulteration of cashew husk (Anacardium occidentale L.) in tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] samples. This is the first report of detecting adulteration in tea using molecular tools. Application of this approach in detecting adulteration of other biological materials in tea, medicinal herbs and the composition of admixtures of ayurvedic herbs has been discussed.

  8. Formation of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes from molecular precursors and curved nanoscale intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucelen, G Ipek; Choudhury, Rudra Prosad; Vyalikh, Anastasia; Scheler, Ulrich; Beckham, Haskell W; Nair, Sankar

    2011-04-13

    We report the identification and elucidation of the mechanistic role of molecular precursors and nanoscale (1-3 nm) intermediates with intrinsic curvature in the formation of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes. We characterize the structural and compositional evolution of molecular and nanoscale species over a length scale of 0.1-100 nm by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((27)Al liquid-state, (27)Al and (29)Si solid-state MAS), and dynamic light scattering. Together with structural optimization of key experimentally identified species by solvated density functional theory calculations, this study reveals the existence of intermediates with bonding environments, as well as intrinsic curvature, similar to the structure of the final nanotube product. We show that "proto-nanotube-like" intermediates with inherent curvature form in aqueous synthesis solutions immediately after initial hydrolysis of reactants, disappear from the solution upon heating to 95 °C due to condensation accompanied by an abrupt pH decrease, and finally form ordered single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes. Detailed quantitative analysis of NMR and ESI-MS spectra from the relevant aluminosilicate, aluminate, and silicate solutions reveals the presence of a variety of monomeric and polymeric aluminate and aluminosilicate species (Al(1)Si(x)-Al(13)Si(x)), such as Keggin ions [AlO(4)Al(12)(OH)(24)(H(2)O)(12)](7+) and polynuclear species with a six-membered Al oxide ring unit. Our study also directly reveals the complexation of aluminate and aluminosilicate species with perchlorate species that most likely inhibit the formation of larger condensates or nontubular structures. Integration of all of our results leads to the construction of the first molecular-level mechanism of single-walled metal oxide nanotube formation, incorporating the role of monomeric and polymeric aluminosilicate species as well as larger nanoparticles. © 2011 American

  9. Quantum tunneling of magnetization in single molecular magnets coupled to ferromagnetic reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorny, M.; Barnas, J.

    2007-04-01

    The role of spin polarized reservoirs in quantum tunneling of magnetization and relaxation processes in a single molecular magnet (SMM) is investigated theoretically. The SMM is exchange-coupled to the reservoirs and also subjected to a magnetic field varying in time, which enables the quantum tunneling of magnetization. The spin relaxation times are calculated from the Fermi golden rule. The exchange interaction of SMM and electrons in the leads is shown to affect the spin reversal due to quantum tunneling of magnetization. It is shown that the switching is associated with transfer of a certain charge between the leads.

  10. An improved method for the molecular identification of single dinoflagellate cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangchun Gao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Dinoflagellate cysts (i.e., dinocysts are biologically and ecologically important as they can help dinoflagellate species survive harsh environments, facilitate their dispersal and serve as seeds for harmful algal blooms. In addition, dinocysts derived from some species can produce more toxins than vegetative forms, largely affecting species through their food webs and even human health. Consequently, accurate identification of dinocysts represents the first crucial step in many ecological studies. As dinocysts have limited or even no available taxonomic keys, molecular methods have become the first priority for dinocyst identification. However, molecular identification of dinocysts, particularly when using single cells, poses technical challenges. The most serious is the low success rate of PCR, especially for heterotrophic species. Methods In this study, we aim to improve the success rate of single dinocyst identification for the chosen dinocyst species (Gonyaulax spinifera, Polykrikos kofoidii, Lingulodinium polyedrum, Pyrophacus steinii, Protoperidinium leonis and Protoperidinium oblongum distributed in the South China Sea. We worked on two major technical issues: cleaning possible PCR inhibitors attached on the cyst surface and designing new dinoflagellate-specific PCR primers to improve the success of PCR amplification. Results For the cleaning of single dinocysts separated from marine sediments, we used ultrasonic wave-based cleaning and optimized cleaning parameters. Our results showed that the optimized ultrasonic wave-based cleaning method largely improved the identification success rate and accuracy of both molecular and morphological identifications. For the molecular identification with the newly designed dinoflagellate-specific primers (18S634F-18S634R, the success ratio was as high as 86.7% for single dinocysts across multiple taxa when using the optimized ultrasonic wave-based cleaning method, and much higher than that

  11. Molecular Field Calculation of Magnetization on NdRh2Ge2 Single Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Himori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Calculation of magnetization of the ternary single crystal compound NdRh2Ge2 has been carried out by using the wave-like molecular field model to explain the complex magnetic behavior. The field-induced magnetic structures having the propagation vectors, 2=(0,0,39/40, 3=(0,0,35/40, 4=(0,0,31/40, and 5=(0,0,0/40 (= the field-induced ferromagnetic phase were proposed. Calculation on the basis of these structures and the antiferromagnetic phase with 1=(0,0,1 well reproduces the experimental magnetization processes and - magnetic phase diagram.

  12. Direct and enantioselective α-allylation of ketones via singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracchio, Anthony; Warkentin, Alexander A.; Walji, Abbas M.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2010-01-01

    The first enantioselective organocatalytic α-allylation of cyclic ketones has been accomplished via singly occupied molecular orbital catalysis. Geometrically constrained radical cations, forged from the one-electron oxidation of transiently generated enamines, readily undergo allylic alkylation with a variety of commercially available allyl silanes. A reasonable latitude in both the ketone and allyl silane components is readily accommodated in this new transformation. Moreover, three new oxidatively stable imidazolidinone catalysts have been developed that allow cyclic ketones to successfully participate in this transformation. The new catalyst platform has also been exploited in the first catalytic enantioselective α-enolation and α-carbooxidation of ketones. PMID:20921367

  13. [Prediction of the molecular response to pertubations from single cell measurements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacle, Françoise; Levine, Raphael D

    2014-12-01

    The response of protein signalization networks to perturbations is analysed from single cell measurements. This experimental approach allows characterizing the fluctuations in protein expression levels from cell to cell. The analysis is based on an information theoretic approach grounded in thermodynamics leading to a quantitative version of Le Chatelier principle which allows to predict the molecular response. Two systems are investigated: human macrophages subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, analogous to the immune response against Gram-negative bacteria and the response of the proteins involved in the mTOR signalizing network of GBM cancer cells to changes in partial oxygen pressure. © 2014 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  14. Molecular dynamic simulation for nanometric cutting of single-crystal face-centered cubic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanhua; Zong, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting of single crystal copper and aluminum with a diamond cutting tool. The atomic interactions in the two metallic materials are modeled by two sets of embedded atom method (EAM) potential parameters. Simulation results show that although the plastic deformation of the two materials is achieved by dislocation activities, the deformation behavior and related physical phenomena, such as the machining forces, machined surface quality, and chip morphology, are significantly different for different materials. Furthermore, the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting has a strong dependence on the operating temperature.

  15. A single-loop recombinant pseudotyped-virus-based assay to detect HIV-1 phenotypic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shouli; Yan, Pingping; Yan, Yansheng; Qiu, Lijun; Xie, Meirong

    2015-06-01

    HIV/AIDS is a leading public health concern throughout the world. Currently, treatment of HIV/AIDS still depends on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART); however, there is increasing evidence showing the emergence of resistance to antiretroviral drugs in HIV-1 strains, making ART less effective over time. Intensive monitoring of HIV-1 drug resistance is therefore of great importance to evaluate the current sensitivity of antiretroviral agents and is urgently needed. The aim of this study was to develop a single-loop recombinant pseudotyped-virus-based assay to detect phenotypic resistance in clinical HIV-1 strains. HIV-1 RNA was extracted from HIV-1-infected human plasma samples, and an approximately 3-kb fragment containing p7/p1/p6 cleavage sites and full-length protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), thermonuclease (TNase), and integrase (1-280 aa) genes was amplified by nested RT-PCR. A retroviral vector was constructed using the HIV-1 infectious molecular clone pLWJ to test antiretroviral drug susceptibility. pLWJ-SV40-Luc contained a luciferase expression cassette inserted within a deleted region of the envelope (env) gene as an indicator gene. Resistance test vectors (RTVs) were constructed by incorporating amplified target genes into pLWJ-SV40-Luc by using ApaI or AgeI and AarI restriction sites and conventional cloning methods. The virus stocks used for drug susceptibility test were produced by co-transfecting 293T cells with RTVs and a plasmid that provided vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G). Viral replication was monitored by measuring luciferase activity in infected target cells at approximately 48 h postinfection. A total of 35 clinical plasma samples from HIV-1-infected humans were tested, and target fragments were successfully amplified from 34 samples (97.1 %) and 33 RTVs were successfully constructed by directional cloning, with an overall success rate of 94.3 %. A clear-cut dose-dependent relationship was detected between

  16. [Development of molecular tests for rapid detection of enteropathogens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavzori, M; Uriel, N; Porat, N; Dagan, R; Ambar, R; Shpilberg, O; Cohen, D

    2000-05-01

    Amplification of specific DNA sequences by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), enables rapid, sensitive and direct, specific identification of pathogens at very low concentrations in clinical samples. Studies in recent years have reported identification of several enteropathogens directly from stool samples by PCR. The amplification process includes the use of primers complementary to the DNA sequences specific to the pathogen, thus relying on the pathogen's genotype, rather than its phenotype on which identification by the methods of classical microbiology were based. We have developed PCR protocols for the differential identification of enteropathogens resembling the normal flora (enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), E. coli O-157), Shigella spp, and the detection of enteropathogens that can not be grown on classic growth media (Norwalk virus). The amplification process is inhibited by several substrates present in fecal material (phenol, hemoglobin), limiting DNA extraction by phenol. The protocols we have developed for direct detection of Shigella spp and ETEC in stools circumvent inhibition of PCR by the use of a 4-hour pre-enrichment step in brain-heart infusion broth. Rapid and accurate identification of enteropathogens is important for prompt and focused intervention to stop the chain of transmission in outbreaks of gastroenteritis in military and civilian populations.

  17. Replica Node Detection Using Enhanced Single Hop Detection with Clonal Selection Algorithm in Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Sindhuja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Security of Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks is a vital challenge as the sensor nodes are deployed in unattended environment and they are prone to various attacks. One among them is the node replication attack. In this, the physically insecure nodes are acquired by the adversary to clone them by having the same identity of the captured node, and the adversary deploys an unpredictable number of replicas throughout the network. Hence replica node detection is an important challenge in Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks. Various replica node detection techniques have been proposed to detect these replica nodes. These methods incur control overheads and the detection accuracy is low when the replica is selected as a witness node. This paper proposes to solve these issues by enhancing the Single Hop Detection (SHD method using the Clonal Selection algorithm to detect the clones by selecting the appropriate witness nodes. The advantages of the proposed method include (i increase in the detection ratio, (ii decrease in the control overhead, and (iii increase in throughput. The performance of the proposed work is measured using detection ratio, false detection ratio, packet delivery ratio, average delay, control overheads, and throughput. The implementation is done using ns-2 to exhibit the actuality of the proposed work.

  18. Towards Phosphate Detection in Hydroponics Using Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Christopher S; Coldrick, Zachary; Tate, Daniel J; Donoghue, Jack Marsden; Grieve, Bruce

    2018-02-10

    An interdigitated electrode sensor was designed and microfabricated for measuring the changes in the capacitance of three phosphate selective molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) formulations, in order to provide hydroponics users with a portable nutrient sensing tool. The MIPs investigated were synthesised using different combinations of the functional monomers methacrylic acid (MAA) and N -allylthiourea, against the template molecules diphenyl phosphate, triethyl phosphate, and trimethyl phosphate. A cross-interference study between phosphate, nitrate, and sulfate was carried out for the MIP materials using an inductance, capacitance, and resistance (LCR) meter. Capacitance measurements were taken by applying an alternating current (AC) with a potential difference of 1 V root mean square (RMS) at a frequency of 1 kHz. The cross-interference study demonstrated a strong binding preference to phosphate over the other nutrient salts tested for each formulation. The size of template molecule and length of the functional monomer side groups also determined that a short chain functional monomer in combination with a template containing large R-groups produced the optimal binding site conditions when synthesising a phosphate selective MIP.

  19. Strong exciton-photon coupling in organic single crystal microcavity with high molecular orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Kaname [Department of Electronics, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yamashita, Kenichi, E-mail: yamasita@kit.ac.jp [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yanagi, Hisao [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu [Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2016-08-08

    Strong exciton-photon coupling has been observed in a highly oriented organic single crystal microcavity. This microcavity consists of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) single crystal laminated on a high-reflection distributed Bragg reflector. In the TPCO crystal, molecular transition dipole was strongly polarized along a certain horizontal directions with respect to the main crystal plane. This dipole polarization causes significantly large anisotropies in the exciton transition and optical constants. Especially the anisotropic exciton transition was found to provide the strong enhancement in the coupling with the cavity mode, which was demonstrated by a Rabi splitting energy as large as ∼100 meV even in the “half-vertical cavity surface emitting lasing” microcavity structure.

  20. Structural modeling of dahlia-type single-walled carbon nanohorn aggregates by molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawelek, L; Brodka, A; Dore, John C; Hannon, Alex C; Iijima, S; Yudasaka, M; Ohba, T; Kaneko, K; Burian, A

    2013-09-19

    The structure of dahlia-type single-walled carbon nanohorn aggregates has been modeled by classical molecular dynamics simulations, and the validity of the model has been verified by neutron diffraction. Computer-generated models consisted of an outer part formed from single-walled carbon nanohorns with diameters of 20-50 Å and a length of 400 Å and an inner turbostratic graphite-like core with a diameter of 130 Å. The diffracted intensity and the pair correlation function computed for such a constructed model are in good agreement with the neutron diffraction experimental data. The proposed turbostratic inner core explains the occurrence of the additional (002) and (004) graphitic peaks in the diffraction pattern of the studied sample and provides information about the interior structure of the dahlia-type aggregates.

  1. A visualization method for probing grain boundaries of single layer graphene via molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Linjie; Wan, Wen; Zhu, Zhenwei; Zhao, Zhijuan; Zhang, Zhenhan; Shih, Tien-Mo; Cai, Weiwei

    2017-07-01

    Graphene, a member of layered two-dimensional (2D) materials, possesses high carrier mobility, mechanical flexibility, and optical transparency, as well as enjoying a wide range of promising applications in electronics. Adopting the chemical vaporization deposition method, the majority of investigators have ubiquitously grown single layer graphene (SLG), which inevitably involves polycrystalline properties. Here we demonstrate a simple method for the direct visualization of arbitrarily large-size SLG domains by synthesizing one-hundred-nm-scale MoS2 single crystals via a high-vacuum molecular beam epitaxy process. The present study based on epitaxial growth provides a guide for probing the grain boundaries of various 2D materials and implements higher potentials for the next-generation electronic devices.

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy of single crystalline GaN nanowires on a flexible Ti foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Gabriele; Corfdir, Pierre; Gao, Guanhui; Pfüller, Carsten; Trampert, Achim; Brandt, Oliver; Geelhaar, Lutz; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the self-assembled growth of vertically aligned GaN nanowire ensembles on a flexible Ti foil by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The analysis of single nanowires by transmission electron microscopy reveals that they are single crystalline. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that in comparison to standard GaN nanowires grown on Si, the nanowires prepared on the Ti foil exhibit an equivalent crystalline perfection, a higher density of basal-plane stacking faults, but a reduced density of inversion domain boundaries. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the nanowire ensemble is not influenced or degraded by the bending of the substrate. The present results pave the way for the fabrication of flexible optoelectronic devices based on GaN nanowires on metal foils.

  3. Molecular beam epitaxy of single crystalline GaN nanowires on a flexible Ti foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Gabriele; Corfdir, Pierre; Gao, Guanhui; Pfüller, Carsten; Trampert, Achim; Brandt, Oliver; Geelhaar, Lutz; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the self-assembled growth of vertically aligned GaN nanowire ensembles on a flexible Ti foil by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The analysis of single nanowires by transmission electron microscopy reveals that they are single crystalline. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that in comparison to standard GaN nanowires grown on Si, the nanowires prepared on the Ti foil exhibit an equivalent crystalline perfection, a higher density of basal-plane stacking faults, but a reduced density of inversion domain boundaries. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the nanowire ensemble is not influenced or degraded by the bending of the substrate. The present results pave the way for the fabrication of flexible optoelectronic devices based on GaN nanowires on metal foils.

  4. Innovative molecular-based fluorescent nanoparticles for multicolor single particle tracking in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, Jonathan; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Godin, Antoine G; Palayret, Matthieu; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Based on an original molecular-based design, we present bright and photostable fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) showing excellent colloidal stability in various aqueous environments. Complementary near-infrared emitting and green emitting FONs were prepared using a simple, fast and robust protocol. Both types of FONs could be simultaneously imaged at the single-particle level in solution as well as in biological environments using a monochromatic excitation and a dual-color fluorescence microscope. No evidence of acute cytotoxicity was found upon incubation of live cells with mixed solutions of FONs, and both types of nanoparticles were found internalized in the cells where their motion could be simultaneously tracked at video-rate up to minutes. These fluorescent organic nanoparticles open a novel non-toxic alternative to existing nanoparticles for imaging biological structures, compatible with live-cell experiments and specially fitted for multicolor single particle tracking. (paper)

  5. Single-molecule detection of chaperonin dynamics through polarization rotation modulation of CdSe QD luminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Toshiro; Oda, Masaru; Araki, Daisuke; Miyashita, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Koudai; Arita, Mayuno; Yohda, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    We report our recent trials examining the single-molecule three-dimensional (3D) detection of protein conformational dynamics at room temperature. Using molecular chaperones as model proteins and cadmium selenide (CdSe) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as nanometer-scale probes, we monitored the temporal evolution of ATP-induced conformation changes with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging technique in buffer solutions. The two-dimensional (2D) degenerate nature of the emission dipoles of the QDs, due to the uniaxial wurtzite crystal structure, made it possible to capture the 3D orientation using a polarization modulation technique in real time. The temporal resolution was half the period of analyzer rotation. Although still insufficient, the obtained signals suggest possible 3D detection of specific motions, which supports the two-step conformational changes triggered by ATP attachment. - Highlights: • We report our recent trials examining the single-molecule three-dimensional (3D) detection of protein conformational dynamics at room temperature. • Using molecular chaperones as model proteins and cadmium selenide (CdSe) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as nanometer-scale probes, we monitored the temporal evolution of ATP-induced conformation changes with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging technique in buffer solutions. • The two-dimensional (2D) degenerate nature of the emission dipoles of the QDs, due to the uniaxial wurtzite crystal structure, made it possible to capture the 3D orientation using a polarization modulation technique in real time. • The temporal resolution was half the period of analyzer rotation. • Although still insufficient, the obtained signals suggest possible 3D detection of specific motions, which supports the two-step conformational changes triggered by ATP attachment

  6. High-Density Dielectrophoretic Microwell Array for Detection, Capture, and Single-Cell Analysis of Rare Tumor Cells in Peripheral Blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Morimoto

    Full Text Available Development of a reliable platform and workflow to detect and capture a small number of mutation-bearing circulating tumor cells (CTCs from a blood sample is necessary for the development of noninvasive cancer diagnosis. In this preclinical study, we aimed to develop a capture system for molecular characterization of single CTCs based on high-density dielectrophoretic microwell array technology. Spike-in experiments using lung cancer cell lines were conducted. The microwell array was used to capture spiked cancer cells, and captured single cells were subjected to whole genome amplification followed by sequencing. A high detection rate (70.2%-90.0% and excellent linear performance (R2 = 0.8189-0.9999 were noted between the observed and expected numbers of tumor cells. The detection rate was markedly higher than that obtained using the CellSearch system in a blinded manner, suggesting the superior sensitivity of our system in detecting EpCAM- tumor cells. Isolation of single captured tumor cells, followed by detection of EGFR mutations, was achieved using Sanger sequencing. Using a microwell array, we established an efficient and convenient platform for the capture and characterization of single CTCs. The results of a proof-of-principle preclinical study indicated that this platform has potential for the molecular characterization of captured CTCs from patients.

  7. Solid-state molecular organometallic chemistry. Single-crystal to single-crystal reactivity and catalysis with light hydrocarbon substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, F Mark; McKay, Alasdair I; Martinez-Martinez, Antonio J; Rees, Nicholas H; Krämer, Tobias; Macgregor, Stuart A; Weller, Andrew S

    2017-08-01

    0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 CHCD 3 , using [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(η 2 η 2 -NBA)][BAr F 4 ] scrambles the D-label into all possible positions of the propene, as shown by isotopic perturbation of equilibrium measurements for the agostic interaction. Periodic DFT calculations show a low barrier to H/D exchange (10.9 kcal mol -1 , PBE-D3 level), and GIPAW chemical shift calculations guide the assignment of the experimental data. When synthesized using solution routes a bis-propene complex, [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(propene) 2 ][BAr F 4 ] , is formed. [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(butene)][BAr F 4 ] ( x = 1) is characterized as having 2-butene bound as the cis -isomer and a single Rh···H 3 C agostic interaction. In the solid-state two low-energy fluxional processes are proposed. The first is a simple libration of the 2-butene that exchanges the agostic interaction, and the second is a butene isomerization process that proceeds via an allyl-hydride intermediate with a low computed barrier of 14.5 kcal mol -1 . [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(η 2 η 2 -NBA)][BAr F 4 ] and the polymorphs of [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(ethene) 2 ][BAr F 4 ] are shown to be effective in solid-state molecular organometallic catalysis (SMOM-Cat) for the isomerization of 1-butene to a mixture of cis - and trans -2-butene at 298 K and 1 atm, and studies suggest that catalysis is likely dominated by surface-active species. [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(η 2 η 2 -NBA

  8. Molecular detection of oomycetes species in water courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oszako Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In Poland, about 20% of forest nurseries use irrigation water coming from natural superficial reservoirs, presumed to be the first source of infection caused by harmful pathogens belonging to the Oomycota class, especially Phytophthora genus and Pythium genus. The forest nursery is the only place where forest managers can react before pathogens leave it with asymptomatic plants or soil attached to their roots. The aim of this research was detection and identification phytopathogens in water samples. In order to recognise genus Phytophthora or Pythium in water collected from 33 places in five different forest districts in Poland, two DNA-based approaches of identification were applied: (i the TaqMan probes, and (ii sequencing of the ITS6/4 region.

  9. New Molecular Detections in TMC-1 with the Green Bank Telescope: Carbon-Chain and Aromatic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Andrew Michael

    2018-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles PA(N)Hs are believed to be widespread throughout the Universe, and are likely responsible for the unidentified infrared bands. However, the individual detection of aromatic molecules has been limited to a single weak absorption feature of an infrared bending mode of benzene (c-C6H6). The cold core TMC-1 has long been a source of new molecular detections, particularly for unsaturated carbon-rich molecules that are appealing potential precursors of PA(N)Hs. Through deep observations with the Green Bank Telescope of TMC-1, we report the first rotational detection of an aromatic molecule, benzonitrile (c-C6H5CN), along with 8 new isotopologues of HC5N and HC7N and an entirely new molecular family (HC5O, HC7O). These new detections provide crucial insights to the formation of PAHs and the underlying carbon-chain chemistry of dark clouds.

  10. Ion assisted structural collapse of a single stranded DNA: A molecular dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumadwip; Dixit, Himanshu; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi, E-mail: rajarshi@chem.iitb.ac.in

    2015-09-28

    Highlights: • The dynamics of a single-stranded DNA in presence of different concentrations of Mg{sup 2+} is investigated. • The initial DNA chain collapse is characterized by the formation of non-sequentially stacked base pairs. • The DNA chain re-swells at high concentrations of Mg{sup 2+} as a consequence of overcharging. - Abstract: The structure and dynamics of negatively charged nucleic acids strongly correlate with the concentration and charge of the oppositely charged counterions. It is well known that the structural collapse of DNA is favoured in the presence of additional salt, a source of excess oppositely charged ions. Under such conditions single stranded DNA adopts a collapsed coil like conformation, typically characterized by stacking base pairs. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulation, we demonstrate that in the presence of additional divalent salt (MgCl{sub 2}) single stranded DNA with base sequence 5′-CGCGAATTCGCG-3′ (Dickerson Drew dodecamer) initially collapses and then expands with increasing salt concentration. This is due to the overcharging induced DNA chain swelling, a dominant factor at a higher divalent salt concentration. In a nutshell, our simulations show how in the presence of divalent salt, non-sequential base stacking and overcharging competes and affect single stranded DNA dynamics unlike a monovalent salt.

  11. Latent Membrane Protein 1 as a molecular adjuvant for single-cycle lentiviral vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmberg Andrew R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular adjuvants are a promising method to enhance virus-specific immune responses and protect against HIV-1 infection. Immune activation by ligands for receptors such as CD40 can induce dendritic cell activation and maturation. Here we explore the incorporation of two CD40 mimics, Epstein Barr Virus gene LMP1 or an LMP1-CD40 chimera, into a strain of SIV that was engineered to be limited to a single cycle of infection. Results Full length LMP1 or the chimeric protein LMP1-CD40 was cloned into the nef-locus of single-cycle SIV. Human and Macaque monocyte derived macrophages and DC were infected with these viruses. Infected cells were analyzed for activation surface markers by flow cytometry. Cells were also analyzed for secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p70 and TNF by cytometric bead array. Conclusions Overall, single-cycle SIV expressing LMP1 and LMP1-CD40 produced a broad and potent TH1-biased immune response in human as well as rhesus macaque macrophages and DC when compared with control virus. Single-cycle SIV-LMP1 also enhanced antigen presentation by lentiviral vector vaccines, suggesting that LMP1-mediated immune activation may enhance lentiviral vector vaccines against HIV-1.

  12. Detection of human filarial parasite Brugia malayi in dogs by histochemical staining and molecular techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambily, V R; Pillai, Usha Narayana; Arun, R; Pramod, S; Jayakumar, K M

    2011-09-27

    Human filariasis caused by Brugia malayi is still a public health problem in many countries of Asia including India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. The World Health Organization (WHO) has targeted to eliminate filariasis by the year 2020 by Mass annual single dose Diethylcarbamazine Administration (MDA). Results of the MDA programme after the first phase was less satisfactory than expected. Malayan filariasis caused by B. malayi is endemic in the south of Thailand where domestic cat serves as the major reservoir host. There is no report about the occurrence of B. malayi in dogs. The present work was carried out to find out the incidence of microfilariasis in dogs and also to detect the presence of human filarial infection in dogs, if any. One hundred dogs above 6 months of age presented to the veterinary college Hospital, Mannuthy, Kerala, with clinical signs suggestive of microfilariasis - fever, anorexia, conjunctivitis, limb and scrotal oedema - were screened for microfilariae by wet film examination. Positive cases were subjected to Giemsa staining, histochemical staining and molecular techniques. Results of the study showed that 80% of dogs had microfilariasis; out of which 20% had sheathed microfilaria. Giemsa and histochemical staining character, PCR and sequencing confirmed it as B. malayi. High prevalence of B. malayi in dogs in this study emphasized the possible role of dogs in transmission of human filariasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Single-site Lennard-Jones models via polynomial chaos surrogates of Monte Carlo molecular simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim

    2016-06-01

    In this work, two Polynomial Chaos (PC) surrogates were generated to reproduce Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation results of the canonical (single-phase) and the NVT-Gibbs (two-phase) ensembles for a system of normalized structureless Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles. The main advantage of such surrogates, once generated, is the capability of accurately computing the needed thermodynamic quantities in a few seconds, thus efficiently replacing the computationally expensive MC molecular simulations. Benefiting from the tremendous computational time reduction, the PC surrogates were used to conduct large-scale optimization in order to propose single-site LJ models for several simple molecules. Experimental data, a set of supercritical isotherms, and part of the two-phase envelope, of several pure components were used for tuning the LJ parameters (ε, σ). Based on the conducted optimization, excellent fit was obtained for different noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) and other small molecules (CH4, N2, and CO). On the other hand, due to the simplicity of the LJ model used, dramatic deviations between simulation and experimental data were observed, especially in the two-phase region, for more complex molecules such as CO2 and C2 H6.

  14. VNAR single-domain antibodies specific for BAFF inhibit B cell development by molecular mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häsler, Julien; Flajnik, Martin F; Williams, Gareth; Walsh, Frank S; Rutkowski, J Lynn

    2016-07-01

    B cell-activating factor (BAFF) plays a dominant role in the B cell homeostasis. However, excessive BAFF promotes the development of autoreactive B-cells and several antibodies have been developed to block its activity. Bispecific antibodies with added functionality represent the next wave of biologics that may be more effective in the treatment of complex autoimmune disease. The single variable domain from the immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (VNAR) is one of the smallest antibody recognition units that could be combined with monospecific antibodies to develop bispecific agents. We isolated a panel of BAFF-binding VNARs with low nM potency from a semi-synthetic phage display library and examined their functional activity. The anti-BAFF VNARs blocked the binding of BAFF to all three of its receptors (BR3, TACI and BCMA) and the presence of the conserved DXL receptor motif found in the CDR3 regions suggests molecular mimicry as the mechanism of antagonism. One clone was formatted as an Fc fusion for functional testing and it was found to inhibit both mouse and human BAFF with equal potency ex vivo in a splenocyte proliferation assay. In mice, subchronic administration reduced the number of immature and transitional intermediates B cells and mature B cell subsets. These results indicate that VNAR single domain antibodies function as selective B-cell inhibitors and offer an alternative molecular format for targeting B-cell disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Single intra-articular injection of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid for hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Fabrizio

    2016-03-01

    Intra-articular (IA) injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) into the hip joint appears to be safe and well tolerated but only a small number of randomized clinical trials in humans has been published. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a single IA injection of high-molecular-weight (2800 kDa) HA (Coxarthrum) for hip osteoarthritis. All patients received a single IA administration of 2.5 % sodium hyaluronate (75 mg/3 mL) of high molecular weight. Fluoroscopy requires an iodized contrast medium (iopamidol, 1 ml) which highlights the capsule before administering HA. Patients were evaluated before IA injection (T0), after 3 months, after 6 months and after 1 year from injection. Results were evaluated by the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI II), Harris Hip Score and a visual analog scale of pain (pain VAS). All treated patients were considered for statistical analysis. Two hundred seven patients were included at T0. The mean age was 67 years (range 46-81). Regarding BPI severity score, changes in pain between T0 and the three following visits were statistically highly significant (p injection of Coxarthrum is effective from the third month and that the results are stable or continue to improve up to 1 year. IV.

  16. Scattering of atomic and molecular ions from single crystal surfaces of Cu, Ag and Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoest, J.M. van.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with analysis of crystal surfaces of Cu, Ag and Fe with Low Energy Ion scattering Spectroscopy (LEIS). Different atomic and molecular ions with fixed energies below 7 keV are scattered by a metal single crystal (with adsorbates). The energy and direction of the scattered particles are analysed for different selected charge states. In that way information can be obtained concerning the composition and atomic and electronic structure of the single crystal surface. Energy spectra contain information on the composition of the surface, while structural atomic information is obtained by direction measurements (photograms). In Ch.1 a description is given of the experimental equipment, in Ch.2 a characterization of the LEIS method. Ch.3 deals with the neutralization of keV-ions in surface scattering. Two different ways of data interpretation are presented. First a model is treated in which the observed directional dependence of neutralization action of the first atom layer of the surface is presented by a laterally varying thickness of the neutralizing layer. Secondly it is shown that the data can be reproduced by a more realistic, physical model based on atomic transition matrix elements. In Ch.4 the low energy hydrogen scattering is described. The study of the dissociation of H 2 + at an Ag surface r0230ted in a model based on electronic dissociation, initialized by electron capture into a repulsive (molecular) state. In Ch.5 finally the method is applied to the investigation of the surface structure of oxidized Fe. (Auth.)

  17. Molecular detection of Rickettsia amblyommii in Amblyomma americanum parasitizing humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ju; Yarina, Tamasin; Miller, Melissa K; Stromdahl, Ellen Y; Richards, Allen L

    2010-05-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay to detect and quantify a portion of the outer membrane protein B gene (ompB) of Rickettsia amblyommii was employed to assess the threat of R. amblyommii exposure to humans parasitized by Amblyomma americanum (the lone star tick). A total of 72 pools of lone star ticks removed from humans were acquired from two collections and used in this study: 44 pools of A. americanum submitted to the Department of Defense Human Tick Test Kit Program in 2003 collected from 220 individuals from 14 states, and 28 pools of A. americanum representing 120 ticks obtained from boy scouts and adult leaders at the Boy Scouts of America National Jamboree held at Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia, in 2005. Of the 72 lone star tick pools representing 340 lone star ticks, 58 pools (80.5%) were positive for R. amblyommii. In addition, individual A. americanum ticks parasitizing humans collected as part of the Department of Defense Human Tick Test Kit Program in 2002 and 2003 from 17 states were evaluated. It was found that 244 of 367 (66.5%) individual A. americanum ticks tested positive for the presence of R. amblyommii DNA. These results clearly show that lone star ticks parasitizing humans are highly infected with R. amblyommii, which may potentiate rickettsial infection of and possibly disease in humans.

  18. Immunosignaturing can detect products from molecular markers in brain cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa K Hughes

    Full Text Available Immunosignaturing shows promise as a general approach to diagnosis. It has been shown to detect immunological signs of infection early during the course of disease and to distinguish Alzheimer's disease from healthy controls. Here we test whether immunosignatures correspond to clinical classifications of disease using samples from people with brain tumors. Blood samples from patients undergoing craniotomies for therapeutically naïve brain tumors with diagnoses of astrocytoma (23 samples, Glioblastoma multiforme (22 samples, mixed oligodendroglioma/astrocytoma (16 samples, oligodendroglioma (18 samples, and 34 otherwise healthy controls were tested by immunosignature. Because samples were taken prior to adjuvant therapy, they are unlikely to be perturbed by non-cancer related affects. The immunosignaturing platform distinguished not only brain cancer from controls, but also pathologically important features about the tumor including type, grade, and the presence or absence of O(6-methyl-guanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation promoter (MGMT, an important biomarker that predicts response to temozolomide in Glioblastoma multiformae patients.

  19. Synthetic lethality between gene defects affecting a single non-essential molecular pathway with reversible steps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Zinovyev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Systematic analysis of synthetic lethality (SL constitutes a critical tool for systems biology to decipher molecular pathways. The most accepted mechanistic explanation of SL is that the two genes function in parallel, mutually compensatory pathways, known as between-pathway SL. However, recent genome-wide analyses in yeast identified a significant number of within-pathway negative genetic interactions. The molecular mechanisms leading to within-pathway SL are not fully understood. Here, we propose a novel mechanism leading to within-pathway SL involving two genes functioning in a single non-essential pathway. This type of SL termed within-reversible-pathway SL involves reversible pathway steps, catalyzed by different enzymes in the forward and backward directions, and kinetic trapping of a potentially toxic intermediate. Experimental data with recombinational DNA repair genes validate the concept. Mathematical modeling recapitulates the possibility of kinetic trapping and revealed the potential contributions of synthetic, dosage-lethal interactions in such a genetic system as well as the possibility of within-pathway positive masking interactions. Analysis of yeast gene interaction and pathway data suggests broad applicability of this novel concept. These observations extend the canonical interpretation of synthetic-lethal or synthetic-sick interactions with direct implications to reconstruct molecular pathways and improve therapeutic approaches to diseases such as cancer.

  20. Transcriptional profiling at whole population and single cell levels reveals somatosensory neuron molecular diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Isaac M; Barrett, Lee B; Williams, Erika K; Strochlic, David E; Lee, Seungkyu; Weyer, Andy D; Lou, Shan; Bryman, Gregory S; Roberson, David P; Ghasemlou, Nader; Piccoli, Cara; Ahat, Ezgi; Wang, Victor; Cobos, Enrique J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ma, Qiufu; Liberles, Stephen D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The somatosensory nervous system is critical for the organism's ability to respond to mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli. Somatosensory neurons are functionally and anatomically diverse but their molecular profiles are not well-defined. Here, we used transcriptional profiling to analyze the detailed molecular signatures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used two mouse reporter lines and surface IB4 labeling to purify three major non-overlapping classes of neurons: 1) IB4+SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, 2) IB4−SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, and 3) Parv-Cre/TdTomato+ cells, encompassing the majority of nociceptive, pruriceptive, and proprioceptive neurons. These neurons displayed distinct expression patterns of ion channels, transcription factors, and GPCRs. Highly parallel qRT-PCR analysis of 334 single neurons selected by membership of the three populations demonstrated further diversity, with unbiased clustering analysis identifying six distinct subgroups. These data significantly increase our knowledge of the molecular identities of known DRG populations and uncover potentially novel subsets, revealing the complexity and diversity of those neurons underlying somatosensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04660.001 PMID:25525749

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations on aqueous two-phase systems - Single PEG-molecules in solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oelmeier Stefan A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations are a promising tool to generate molecular understanding of processes related to the purification of proteins. Polyethylene glycols (PEG of various length are commonly used in the production and purification of proteins. The molecular mechanisms behind PEG driven precipitation, aqueous two-phase formation or the effects of PEGylation are however still poorly understood. Results In this paper, we ran MD simulations of single PEG molecules of variable length in explicitly simulated water. The resulting structures are in good agreement with experimentally determined 3D structures of PEG. The increase in surface hydrophobicity of PEG of longer chain length could be explained on an atomic scale. PEG-water interactions as well as aqueous two-phase formation in the presence of PO4 were found to be correlated to PEG surface hydrophobicity. Conclusions We were able to show that the taken MD simulation approach is capable of generating both structural data as well as molecule descriptors in agreement with experimental data. Thus, we are confident of having a good in silico representation of PEG.

  2. Detection of Diverse and High Molecular Weight Nesprin-1 and Nesprin-2 Isoforms Using Western Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carthew, James; Karakesisoglou, Iakowos

    2016-01-01

    Heavily utilized in cell and molecular biology, western blotting is considered a crucial technique for the detection and quantification of proteins within complex mixtures. In particular, the detection of members of the nesprin (nuclear envelope spectrin repeat protein) family has proven difficult to analyze due to their substantial isoform diversity, molecular weight variation, and the sheer size of both nesprin-1 and nesprin-2 giant protein variants (>800 kDa). Nesprin isoforms contain distinct domain signatures, perform differential cytoskeletal associations, occupy different subcellular compartments, and vary in their tissue expression profiles. This structural and functional variance highlights the need to distinguish between the full range of proteins within the nesprin protein family, allowing for greater understanding of their specific roles in cell biology and disease. Herein, we describe a western blotting protocol modified for the detection of low to high molecular weight (50-1000 kDa) nesprin proteins.

  3. Multi-scale Modeling of Compressible Single-phase Flow in Porous Media using Molecular Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Ahmed Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    In this study, an efficient coupling between Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation and Darcy-scale flow in porous media is presented. The cell-centered finite difference method with a non-uniform rectangular mesh were used to discretize the simulation domain and solve the governing equations. To speed up the MC simulations, we implemented a recently developed scheme that quickly generates MC Markov chains out of pre-computed ones, based on the reweighting and reconstruction algorithm. This method astonishingly reduces the required computational time by MC simulations from hours to seconds. In addition, the reweighting and reconstruction scheme, which was originally designed to work with the LJ potential model, is extended to work with a potential model that accounts for the molecular quadrupole moment of fluids with non-spherical molecules such as CO2. The potential model was used to simulate the thermodynamic equilibrium properties for single-phase and two-phase systems using the canonical ensemble and the Gibbs ensemble, respectively. Comparing the simulation results with the experimental data showed that the implemented model has an excellent fit outperforming the standard LJ model. To demonstrate the strength of the proposed coupling in terms of computational time efficiency and numerical accuracy in fluid properties, various numerical experiments covering different compressible single-phase flow scenarios were conducted. The novelty in the introduced scheme is in allowing an efficient coupling of the molecular scale and Darcy scale in reservoir simulators. This leads to an accurate description of the thermodynamic behavior of the simulated reservoir fluids; consequently enhancing the confidence in the flow predictions in porous media.

  4. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.; Dees, H.C.

    1998-11-10

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method includes the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention is also a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. 13 figs.

  5. Impact of transition from microscopy to molecular screening for detection of intestinal protozoa in Dutch patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svraka-Latifovic, S; Bouter, S; Naus, H; Bakker, L J; Timmerman, C P; Dorigo-Zetsma, J W

    2014-11-01

    Detection of intestinal protozoa by PCR methods has been described as being sensitive and specific, and as improving the diagnostic yield. Here we present the outcome of the transition from microscopy to molecular screening for detection of a select group of intestinal protozoa in faeces in our laboratory. Introduction of molecular screening for intestinal protozoa resulted in higher sensitivity, reduced hands-on-time, reduced time-to-results, leading to improved diagnostic efficiency. © 2014 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  6. DNA nanotechnology for nucleic acid analysis: multifunctional molecular DNA machine for RNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A J; Bengtson, H N; Rohde, K H; Kolpashchikov, D M

    2016-12-06

    The Nobel prize in chemistry in 2016 was awarded for 'the design and synthesis of molecular machines'. Here we designed and assembled a molecular machine for the detection of specific RNA molecules. An association of several DNA strands, named multifunctional DNA machine for RNA analysis (MDMR1), was designed to (i) unwind RNA with the help of RNA-binding arms, (ii) selectively recognize a targeted RNA fragment, (iii) attract a signal-producing substrate and (iv) amplify the fluorescent signal by catalysis. MDMR1 enabled detection of 16S rRNA at concentrations ∼24 times lower than that by a traditional deoxyribozyme probe.

  7. Molecularly imprinted fluorescent probe based on FRET for selective and sensitive detection of doxorubicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhifeng, E-mail: 897061147@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Deng, Peihong; Li, Junhua [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Xu, Li [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Tang, Siping [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • FRET-based molecularly imprinted probe for detection of doxorubicin was prepared. • The detection limit of the probe was 13.8 nM for doxorubicin. • The FRET-based probe had a higher selectivity for the template than ordinary MIMs. - Abstract: In this work, a new type of fluorescent probe for detection of doxorubicin has been constructed by the combined use of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and molecular imprinting technique (MIT). Using doxorubicin as the template, the molecularly imprinted polymer thin layer was fabricated on the surfaces of carbon dot (CD) modified silica by sol-gel polymerization. The excitation energy of the fluorescent donor (CDs) could be transferred to the fluorescent acceptor (doxorubicin). The FRET based fluorescent probe demonstrated high sensitivity and selectivity for doxorubicin. The detection limit was 13.8 nM. The fluorescent probe was successfully applied for detecting doxorubicin in doxorubicin-spiked plasmas with a recovery of 96.8–103.8%, a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.3–2.8%. The strategy for construction of FRET-based molecularly imprinted materials developed in this work is very promising for analytical applications.

  8. Detection Procedure for a Single Additive Outlier and Innovational Outlier in a Bilinear Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azami Zaharim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A single outlier detection procedure for data generated from BL(1,1,1,1 models is developed. It is carried out in three stages. Firstly, the measure of impact of an IO and AO denoted by IO ω , AO ω , respectively are derived based on least squares method. Secondly, test statistics and test criteria are defined for classifying an observation as an outlier of its respective type. Finally, a general single outlier detection procedure is presented to distinguish a particular type of outlier at a time point t.

  9. Drift correction for single-molecule imaging by molecular constraint field, a distance minimum metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Renmin; Wang, Liansan; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Yongdeng; Zhang, Mingshu; Liu, Zhiyong; Ren, Fei; Zhang, Fa

    2015-01-01

    The recent developments of far-field optical microscopy (single molecule imaging techniques) have overcome the diffraction barrier of light and improve image resolution by a factor of ten compared with conventional light microscopy. These techniques utilize the stochastic switching of probe molecules to overcome the diffraction limit and determine the precise localizations of molecules, which often requires a long image acquisition time. However, long acquisition times increase the risk of sample drift. In the case of high resolution microscopy, sample drift would decrease the image resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel metric based on the distance between molecules to solve the drift correction. The proposed metric directly uses the position information of molecules to estimate the frame drift. We also designed an algorithm to implement the metric for the general application of drift correction. There are two advantages of our method: First, because our method does not require space binning of positions of molecules but directly operates on the positions, it is more natural for single molecule imaging techniques. Second, our method can estimate drift with a small number of positions in each temporal bin, which may extend its potential application. The effectiveness of our method has been demonstrated by both simulated data and experiments on single molecular images

  10. Detection of colonic polyps in the elderly: Optimization of the single-contrast barium enema examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfand, D.W.; Chen, Y.M.; Ott, D.J.; Munitz, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    Single-contrast studies account for 75% of barium enema examinations and are often performed in the elderly. By optimizing all factors, the following results were obtained: for polyps of less than 1 cm, 40 of 57 were detected (sensitivity, 70.2%); for polyps of 1 cm or larger, 33 of 35 were detected (sensitivity, 94%). Overall, 73 of 92 polyps were detected (sensitivity, 79.3%). These sensitivities result from meticulous preparation and the use of compression filming, low-density barium, moderate kilovoltages, high-resolution screens, remote control apparatus, and high-bandpass TV fluoroscopy. The authors conclude that an optimal single-contrast barium enema examination detects colonic polyps with a sensitivity approaching that of the double-contrast study and may be employed in elderly patients who cannot undergo the double-contrast study

  11. Single-photon detectors combining high efficiency, high detection rates, and ultra-high timing resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Esmaeil Zadeh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Single-photon detection with high efficiency, high time resolution, low dark counts, and high photon detection rates is crucial for a wide range of optical measurements. Although efficient detectors have been reported before, combining all performance parameters in a single device remains a challenge. Here, we show a broadband NbTiN superconducting nanowire detector with an efficiency exceeding 92%, over 150 MHz photon detection rate, and a dark count rate below 130 Hz operated in a Gifford-McMahon cryostat. Furthermore, with careful optimization of the detector design and readout electronics, we reach an ultra-low system timing jitter of 14.80 ps (13.95 ps decoupled while maintaining high detection efficiencies (>75%.

  12. High-fidelity state detection and tomography of a single-ion Zeeman qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keselman, A; Glickman, Y; Akerman, N; Kotler, S; Ozeri, R

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate high-fidelity Zeeman qubit state detection in a single trapped 88 Sr + ion. Qubit readout is performed by shelving one of the qubit states to a metastable level using a narrow linewidth diode laser at 674 nm, followed by state-selective fluorescence detection. The average fidelity reached for the readout of the qubit state is 0.9989(1). We then measure the fidelity of state tomography, averaged over all possible single-qubit states, which is 0.9979(2). We also fully characterize the detection process using quantum process tomography. This readout fidelity is compatible with recent estimates of the detection error threshold required for fault-tolerant computation, whereas high-fidelity state tomography opens the way for high-precision quantum process tomography.

  13. High-fidelity state detection and tomography of a single-ion Zeeman qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keselman, A; Glickman, Y; Akerman, N; Kotler, S; Ozeri, R, E-mail: ozeri@weizmann.ac.il [Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2011-07-15

    We demonstrate high-fidelity Zeeman qubit state detection in a single trapped {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ion. Qubit readout is performed by shelving one of the qubit states to a metastable level using a narrow linewidth diode laser at 674 nm, followed by state-selective fluorescence detection. The average fidelity reached for the readout of the qubit state is 0.9989(1). We then measure the fidelity of state tomography, averaged over all possible single-qubit states, which is 0.9979(2). We also fully characterize the detection process using quantum process tomography. This readout fidelity is compatible with recent estimates of the detection error threshold required for fault-tolerant computation, whereas high-fidelity state tomography opens the way for high-precision quantum process tomography.

  14. Real-time Bacterial Detection by Single Cell Based Sensors UsingSynchrotron FTIR Spectromicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Bertozzi,Carolyn; Zhang, Miqin

    2005-08-10

    Microarrays of single macrophage cell based sensors weredeveloped and demonstrated for real time bacterium detection bysynchrotron FTIR microscopy. The cells were patterned on gold-SiO2substrates via a surface engineering technique by which the goldelectrodes were immobilized with fibronectin to mediate cell adhesion andthe silicon oxide background were passivated with PEG to resist proteinadsorption and cell adhesion. Cellular morphology and IR spectra ofsingle, double, and triple cells on gold electrodes exposed tolipopolysaccharide (LPS) of different concentrations were compared toreveal the detection capabilities of these biosensors. The single-cellbased sensors were found to generate the most significant IR wave numbervariation and thus provide the highest detection sensitivity. Changes inmorphology and IR spectrum for single cells exposed to LPS were found tobe time- and concentration-dependent and correlated with each other verywell. FTIR spectra from single cell arrays of gold electrodes withsurface area of 25 mu-m2, 100 mu-m2, and 400 mu-m2 were acquired usingboth synchrotron and conventional FTIR spectromicroscopes to study thesensitivity of detection. The results indicated that the developedsingle-cell platform can be used with conventional FTIRspectromicroscopy. This technique provides real-time, label-free, andrapid bacterial detection, and may allow for statistic and highthroughput analyses, and portability.

  15. Reverse engineering of an affinity-switchable molecular interaction characterized by atomic force microscopy single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Dario; Bartels, Frank Wilco; Becker, Anke; Decker, Björn; Eckel, Rainer; McIntosh, Matthew; Mattay, Jochen; Plattner, Patrik; Ros, Robert; Schäfer, Christian; Sewald, Norbert

    2008-02-19

    Tunable and switchable interaction between molecules is a key for regulation and control of cellular processes. The translation of the underlying physicochemical principles to synthetic and switchable functional entities and molecules that can mimic the corresponding molecular functions is called reverse molecular engineering. We quantitatively investigated autoinducer-regulated DNA-protein interaction in bacterial gene regulation processes with single atomic force microscopy (AFM) molecule force spectroscopy in vitro, and developed an artificial bistable molecular host-guest system that can be controlled and regulated by external signals (UV light exposure and thermal energy). The intermolecular binding functionality (affinity) and its reproducible and reversible switching has been proven by AFM force spectroscopy at the single-molecule level. This affinity-tunable optomechanical switch will allow novel applications with respect to molecular manipulation, nanoscale rewritable molecular memories, and/or artificial ion channels, which will serve for the controlled transport and release of ions and neutral compounds in the future.

  16. A Lateral Flow Biosensor for the Detection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingwen; Xiao, Zhuo

    2017-01-01

    A lateral flow biosensor (LFB) is introduced for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The assay is composed of two steps: circular strand displacement reaction and lateral flow biosensor detection. In step 1, the nucleotide at SNP site is recognized by T4 DNA ligase and the signal is amplified by strand displacement DNA polymerase, which can be accomplished at a constant temperature. In step 2, the reaction product of step 1 is detected by a lateral flow biosensor, which is a rapid and cost effective tool for nuclei acid detection. Comparing with conventional methods, it requires no complicated machines. It is suitable for the use of point of care diagnostics. Therefore, this simple, cost effective, robust, and promising LFB detection method of SNP has great potential for the detection of genetic diseases, personalized medicine, cancer related mutations, and drug-resistant mutations of infectious agents.

  17. Single Electron Detection in Quadruple-GEM Detector with Pad Readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' vra, Jaroslav

    2001-03-07

    Using a system of four GEMs operating in tandem and coupled to pad readout, we have demonstrated the detection of single electrons in ethane at 1 bar. The paper presents measurements of single electron pulse height distributions, total gas gain measurement and calculation, pad-to-pad cross-talk, quenching capability, high rate capability, charging effects, etc. We describe the overall operational experience, including addition of a gaseous photocathode, TMAE, and compare it to the SLD CRID single-electron detector [1], which has been operational during the past decade.

  18. Comparison of Molecular Typing Methods Useful for Detecting Clusters of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli Isolates through Routine Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Eduardo; Grant, Christopher C. R.; Blakeston, Connie; Pollari, Frank; Marshall, Barbara; Rahn, Kris; MacKinnon, Joanne; Daignault, Danielle; Pillai, Dylan; Ng, Lai-King

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter spp. may be responsible for unreported outbreaks of food-borne disease. The detection of these outbreaks is made more difficult by the fact that appropriate methods for detecting clusters of Campylobacter have not been well defined. We have compared the characteristics of five molecular typing methods on Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli isolates obtained from human and nonhuman sources during sentinel site surveillance during a 3-year period. Comparative genomic fingerprinting (CGF) appears to be one of the optimal methods for the detection of clusters of cases, and it could be supplemented by the sequencing of the flaA gene short variable region (flaA SVR sequence typing), with or without subsequent multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Different methods may be optimal for uncovering different aspects of source attribution. Finally, the use of several different molecular typing or analysis methods for comparing individuals within a population reveals much more about that population than a single method. Similarly, comparing several different typing methods reveals a great deal about differences in how the methods group individuals within the population. PMID:22162562

  19. Stability of detectability over 17 years at a single site and other lizard detection comparisons from Guam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, Gordon H.; Dean-Bradley, Kathryn; Campbell, Earl W.; Fritts, Thomas H.; Lardner, Bjorn; Yackel Adams, Amy A.; Reed, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    To obtain quantitative information about population dynamics from counts of animals, the per capita detectabilities of each species must remain constant over the course of monitoring. We characterized lizard detection constancy for four species over 17 yr from a single site in northern Guam, a relatively benign situation because detection was relatively easy and we were able to hold constant the site, habitat type, species, season, and sampling method. We monitored two species of diurnal terrestrial skinks (Carlia ailanpalai [Curious Skink], Emoia caeruleocauda [Pacific Bluetailed Skink]) using glueboards placed on the ground in the shade for 3 h on rainless mornings, yielding 10,286 skink captures. We additionally monitored two species of nocturnal arboreal geckos (Hemidactylus frenatus [Common House Gecko]; Lepidodactylus lugubris [Mourning Gecko]) on the basis of 15,212 sightings. We compared these count samples to a series of complete censuses we conducted from four or more total removal plots (everything removed to mineral soil) totaling 400 m2(about 1% of study site) in each of the years 1995, 1999, and 2012, providing time-stamped quantification of detectability for each species. Unfortunately, the actual population trajectories taken by the four species were masked by unexplained variation in detectability. This observation of debilitating latent variability in lizard detectability under nearly ideal conditions undercuts our trust in population estimation techniques that fail to quantify venue-specific detectability, rely on pooled detection probability estimates, or assume that modulation in predefined environmental covariates suffices for estimating detectability.

  20. Contemporary nucleic acid-based molecular techniques for detection, identification, and characterization of Bifidobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mianzhi, Yao; Shah, Nagendra P

    2017-03-24

    Bifidobacteria are one of the most important bacterial groups found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Medical and food industry researchers have focused on bifidobacteria because of their health-promoting properties. Researchers have historically relied on classic phenotypic approaches (culture and biochemical tests) for detection and identification of bifidobacteria. Those approaches still have values for the identification and detection of some bifidobacterial species, but they are often labor-intensive and time-consuming and can be problematic in differentiating closely related species. Rapid, accurate, and reliable methods for detection, identification, and characterization of bifidobacteria in a mixed bacterial population have become a major challenge. The advent of nucleic acid-based molecular techniques has significantly advanced isolation and detection of bifidobacteria. Diverse nucleic acid-based molecular techniques have been employed, including hybridization, target amplification, and fingerprinting. Certain techniques enable the detection, characterization, and identification at genus-, species-, and strains-levels, whereas others allow typing of species or strains of bifidobacteria. In this review, an overview of methodological principle, technique complexity, and application of various nucleic acid-based molecular techniques for detection, identification, and characterization of bifidobacteria is presented. Advantages and limitations of each technique are discussed, and significant findings based on particular techniques are also highlighted.

  1. Molecular relapse in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients after bone marrow transplantation detected by polymerase chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyers, C.L.; Timson, L.; Clark, S.S.; Witte, O.N.; Champlin, R.; Kawasaki, E.S.

    1990-01-01

    Relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia after bone marrow transplantation can be detected by using clinical, cytogenetic, or molecular tools. A modification of the polymerase chain reaction can be used in patients to detect low levels of the BCR-ABL-encoded mRNA transcript, a specific marker for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Early detection of relapse after bone marrow transplantation could potentially alter treatment decisions. The authors prospectively evaluated 19 patients for evidence of molecular relapse, cytogenetic relapse, and clinical relapse after bone marrow transplantation. They used the polymerase chain reaction to detect residual BCR-ABL mRNA in patients followed up to 45 months after treatment and found 4 patients with BCR-ABL mRNA expression following bone marrow transplantation. Fifteen patients did not express detectable BCR-ABL mRNA. All 19 patients remain in clinical remission. In this prospective study of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients treated with bone marrow transplantation, molecular relapse preceded cytogenetic relapse in those patients who persistently express BCR-ABL mRNA. They recommend using standard clinical and cytogenetic testing to make patient care decisions until further follow-up determines the clinical outcome of those patients with residual BCR-ABL mRNA transcripts detected by polymerase chain reaction

  2. Molecular Assembly of Hemin on Single-Crystal Au(111)-electrode Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ling; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    also acts as catalyst in electrochemical reduction of dioxygen and other small inert molecules such as nitrogen monoxide, and in electrochemiluminescent detection of dioxygen, peroxide, DNA, and proteins. л-л interactions of hemin with carbon materials have been broadly studied. Hemin onnoble metal......-defined single-crystal Au(111)-electrodesurfaces using electrochemistry combined with scanning tunnelling microscopy under electrochemical control. Hemin gives two voltammetric peaks assigned to adsorbed monomers and dimmers (Fig. 1A). In situ STM shows that hemin self-assembles in ordered monolayers through non...

  3. The rise of 3-d single-ion magnets in molecular magnetism: towards materials from molecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jamie M; Harriman, Katie L M; Murugesu, Muralee

    2016-04-21

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) that contain one spin centre (so-called single-ion magnets) theoretically represent the smallest possible unit for spin-based electronic devices. The realisation of this and related technologies, depends on first being able to design systems with sufficiently large energy barriers to magnetisation reversal, U eff , and secondly, on being able to organise these molecules into addressable arrays. In recent years, significant progress has been made towards the former goal - principally as a result of efforts which have been directed towards studying complexes based on highly anisotropic lanthanide ions, such as Tb(iii) and Dy(iii). Since 2013 however, and the remarkable report by Long and co-workers of a linear Fe(i) system exhibiting U eff = 325 K, single-ion systems of transition metals have undergone something of a renaissance in the literature. Not only do they have important lessons to teach us about anisotropy and relaxation dynamics in the quest to enhance U eff , the ability to create strongly coupled spin systems potentially offers access to a whole of host of 1, 2 and 3-dimensional materials with interesting structural and physical properties. This perspective summarises recent progress in this rapidly expanding sub-genre of molecular magnetism from the viewpoint of the synthetic chemist, with a particular focus on the lessons that have so far been learned from single-ion magnets of the d-block, and, the future research directions which we feel are likely to emerge in the coming years.

  4. Single particle tracking-based reaction progress kinetic analysis reveals a series of molecular mechanisms of cetuximab-induced EGFR processes in a single living cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Kyun; Zhou, Kai; Park, Soyeon; Kwon, Yonghoon; Jeong, Min Gyu; Lee, Nam Ki; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2017-07-01

    Cellular processes occur through the orchestration of multi-step molecular reactions. Reaction progress kinetic analysis (RPKA) can provide the mechanistic details to elucidate the multi-step molecular reactions. However, current tools have limited ability to simultaneously monitor dynamic variations in multiple complex states at the single molecule level to apply RPKA in living cells. In this research, a single particle tracking-based reaction progress kinetic analysis (sptRPKA) was developed to simultaneously determine the kinetics of multiple states of protein complexes in the membrane of a single living cell. The subpopulation ratios of different states were quantitatively (and statistically) reliably extracted from the diffusion coefficient distribution rapidly acquired by single particle tracking at constant and high density over a long period of time using super-resolution microscopy. Using sptRPKA, a series of molecular mechanisms of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) cellular processing induced by cetuximab were investigated. By comprehensively measuring the rate constants and cooperativity of the molecular reactions involving four EGFR complex states, a previously unknown intermediate state was identified that represents the rate limiting step responsible for the selectivity of cetuximab-induced EGFR endocytosis to cancer cells.

  5. Single walled carbon nanotube-based stochastic resonance device with molecular self-noise source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hayato; Setiadi, Agung; Kuwahara, Yuji; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi

    2017-09-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is an intrinsic noise usage system for small-signal sensing found in various living creatures. The noise-enhanced signal transmission and detection system, which is probabilistic but consumes low power, has not been used in modern electronics. We demonstrated SR in a summing network based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) device that detects small subthreshold signals with very low current flow. The nonlinear current-voltage characteristics of this SWNT device, which incorporated Cr electrodes, were used as the threshold level of signal detection. The adsorption of redox-active polyoxometalate molecules on SWNTs generated additional noise, which was utilized as a self-noise source. To form a summing network SR device, a large number of SWNTs were aligned parallel to each other between the electrodes, which increased the signal detection ability. The functional capabilities of the present small-size summing network SR device, which rely on dense nanomaterials and exploit intrinsic spontaneous noise at room temperature, offer a glimpse of future bio-inspired electronic devices.

  6. Magnetic switching of a single molecular magnet due to spin-polarized current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnaś, Józef

    2007-04-01

    Magnetic switching of a single molecular magnet (SMM) due to spin-polarized current flowing between ferromagnetic metallic leads (electrodes) is investigated theoretically. Magnetic moments of the leads are assumed to be collinear and parallel to the magnetic easy axis of the molecule. Electrons tunneling through the barrier between magnetic leads are coupled to the SMM via exchange interaction. The current flowing through the system, as well as the spin relaxation times of the SMM, are calculated from the Fermi golden rule. It is shown that spin of the SMM can be reversed by applying a certain voltage between the two magnetic electrodes. Moreover, the switching may be visible in the corresponding current-voltage characteristics.

  7. Direct monolithic integration of vertical single crystalline octahedral molecular sieve nanowires on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carretero-Genevrier, Adrian [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL), UMR-CNRS 5270, Ecole Central de Lyon, Ecully (France); Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona ICMAB, Catalonia (Spain); Sorbonne Univ., UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS, College de France, Paris (France); Oro-Sole, Judith [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona ICMAB, Catalonia (Spain); Gazquez, Jaume [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona ICMAB, Catalonia (Spain); Magen, Cesar [Univ. de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Miranda, Laura [Sorbonne Univ., UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS, College de France, Paris (France); Puig, Teresa [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona ICMAB, Catalonia (Spain); Obradors, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona ICMAB, Catalonia (Spain); Ferain, Etienne [Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Sanchez, Clement [Sorbonne Univ., UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS, College de France, Paris (France); Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble Cedex (France); Mestres, Narcis [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona ICMAB, Catalonia (Spain)

    2013-12-13

    We developed an original strategy to produce vertical epitaxial single crystalline manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS) nanowires with tunable pore sizes and compositions on silicon substrates by using a chemical solution deposition approach. The nanowire growth mechanism involves the use of track-etched nanoporous polymer templates combined with the controlled growth of quartz thin films at the silicon surface, which allowed OMS nanowires to stabilize and crystallize. α-quartz thin films were obtained after thermal activated crystallization of the native amorphous silica surface layer assisted by Sr2+- or Ba2+-mediated heterogeneous catalysis in the air at 800 °C. These α-quartz thin films work as a selective template for the epitaxial growth of randomly oriented vertical OMS nanowires. Furthermore, the combination of soft chemistry and epitaxial growth opens new opportunities for the effective integration of novel technological functional tunneled complex oxides nanomaterials on Si substrates.

  8. Failure of single electron descriptions of molecular orbital collision processes. [Electron promotion mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elston, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    Inner-shell excitation occurring in low and moderate (keV range) energy collisions between light atomic and ionic systems is frequently describable in terms of molecular promotion mechanisms, which were extensively explored both theoretically and experimentally. The bulk of such studies have concentrated on processes understandable through the use of single- and independent-electron models. Nonetheless, it is possible to find cases of inner-shell excitation in relatively simple collision systems which involve nearly simultaneous multiple-electron transitions and transitions induced by inherently two-electron interactions. Evidence for these many- and nonindependent-electron phenomena in inner-shell excitation processes and the importance of considering such effects in the interpretation of collisionally induced excitation spectra is discussed. 13 references.

  9. Wafer-Scale Leaning Silver Nanopillars for Molecular Detection at Ultra-Low Concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kaiyu; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2015-01-01

    Wafer-scale surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates fabricated using maskless lithography are important for scalable production targets. Large-area, leaning silver-capped silicon nanopillar (Ag NP) structures suitable for SERS molecular detection at extremely low analyte concentrations...

  10. Evaluation of molecular markers for Phytophthora ramorum detection and identification using a standardized library of isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.N. Martin; M. Coffey; R. Hamelin; P. Tooley; M. Garbelotto; K. Hughes; T. Kubisiak

    2008-01-01

    A number of molecular diagnostic procedures for detection of Phytophthora ramorum have been reported in the literature. In an effort to evaluate the specificity of 10 of these techniques a standardized DNA library for 317 isolates was assembled that included 60 described species as well as 22 taxonomically unclassified isolates. These were sent blind...

  11. Molecular detection of Edwardsiella tarda with gyrB gene isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-01-31

    Jan 31, 2011 ... marine fishes (Lan et al., 2008). This pathogen is also important from a public health point of view as it is known to cause disease in reptiles, birds, humans and other mammals (Mohanty and Sahoo, 2007). This study reports the molecular detection and isolation of E. tarda with the. gyrB gene from pirarucu ...

  12. Use of molecular biology techniques in the detection of fraud meat in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microsoft

    2015-02-04

    Feb 4, 2015 ... Use of molecular biology techniques in the detection of fraud meat in the Egyptian market ... Nowadays consumers are increasingly aware of their health and are looking for more comprehensive information on the safety of the foods they consume. (Verbeke and Ward, 2006). In spite of the food labeling.

  13. Molecular techniques for the identification and detection of microorganisms relevant for the food industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, N.

    1996-01-01

    The research described in this thesis concerns the development and application in food microbiology of molecular identification and detection techniques based on 16S rRNA sequences. The technologies developed were applied to study the microbial ecology of two groups of bacteria, namely

  14. Simplified molecular detection of Leishmania parasites in various clinical samples from patients with leishmaniasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugasa, Claire M.; Laurent, Thierry; Schoone, Gerard J.; Basiye, Frank L.; Saad, Alfarazdeg A.; El Safi, Sayda; Kager, Piet A.; Schallig, Henk Dfh

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Molecular methods to detect Leishmania parasites are considered specific and sensitive, but often not applied in endemic areas of developing countries due to technical complexity. In the present study isothermal, nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA) was coupled to

  15. Molecular Detection of Campylobacter spp. in California Gull (Larus californicus) Excreta

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the prevalence, quantity, and diversity of Campylobacter species in the excreta of 159 California gull samples using PCR and qPCR based detection assays. While Campylobacter prevalence and abundance was relatively high in the gull excreta examined, molecular data ind...

  16. Detection of PRRSV in 218 field samples using six molecular methods: What we are looking for?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toplak, Ivan; Štukelj, Marina; Gracieux, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and the specificity of six molecular methods used for the detection of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Methods 218 field samples (serum, tissues) were collected between 2009 and 2011 from 50 PRRSV...

  17. SINGLE ATOM DETECTABILITY OF A ToF ATOM-PROBE

    OpenAIRE

    Sakurai, T.; Hashizume, T.; Jimbo, A.

    1984-01-01

    Making use of our new focusing type ToF atom-probe which is capable of detecting all the signals entering into the probe hole with 100 % detection efficiency, we have attempted to evaluate the aiming-error of a ToF atom-probe. Our preliminary data suggests that the aiming-error is primarily due to the shift of the ionization disc from the actual atom position. In the low index planes it is possible to detect every single atom by compensating this shift. However in the case of some of the high...

  18. Multiplexed detection of metabolites of narcotic drugs from a single latent fingermark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Pompi; Jickells, Sue M; Wolff, Kim; Russell, David A

    2010-11-15

    An immunoassay based technique is used for the detection of psychoactive substances in the sweat deposited within fingermarks of a narcotic drug user. Magnetic particles functionalized with antimorphine and antibenzoylecgonine antibodies were used for the detection of a metabolite of heroin (morphine) and a metabolite of cocaine (benzoylecgonine), respectively. The drug metabolites were detected individually as well as simultaneously from a single fingermark. The images of the fingermarks obtained using brightfield and fluorescence microscopy were of high evidential quality with resolution to enable identification of an individual in addition to providing information on drug usage.

  19. Kondo peak splitting and Kondo dip in single molecular magnet junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Pengbin, E-mail: 120233951@qq.com [Institute of Solid State Physics, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China); Shi, Yunlong; Sun, Zhu [Institute of Solid State Physics, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China); Nie, Yi-Hang [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Luo, Hong-Gang [Center for Interdisciplinary Studies & Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the MoE, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Many factors containing bias, spin–orbit coupling, magnetic fields applied, and so on can strongly influence the Kondo effect, and one of the consequences is Kondo peak splitting (KPS). It is natural that KPS should also appear when another spin degree of freedom is involved. In this work we study the KPS effects of single molecular magnets (SMM) coupled with two metallic leads in low-temperature regime. It is found that the Kondo transport properties are strongly influenced by the exchange coupling and anisotropy of the magnetic core. By employing Green's function method in Hubbard operator representation, we give an analytical expression for local retarded Green's function of SMM and discussed its low-temperature transport properties. We find that the anisotropy term behaves as a magnetic field and the splitting behavior of exchange coupling is quite similar to the spin–orbit coupling. These splitting behaviors are explained by introducing inter-level or intra-level transitions, which account for the seven-peak splitting structure. Moreover, we find a Kondo dip at Fermi level under proper parameters. These Kondo peak splitting behaviors in SMM deepen our understanding to Kondo physics and should be observed in the future experiments. - Highlights: • We study Kondo peak splitting in single molecular magnets. • We study Kondo effect by Hubbard operator Green's function method. • We find Kondo peak splitting structures and a Kondo dip at Fermi level. • The exchange coupling and magnetic anisotropy induce fine splitting structure. • The splitting structures are explained by inter-level or intra-level transitions.

  20. Molecular Etiology of Hereditary Single-Side Deafness: Its Association With Pigmentary Disorders and Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Ah Reum; Choi, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Young; Chun, Eun Hi; Oh, Seung-Ha; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-10-01

    Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL)/single-side deafness (SSD) is a frequently encountered disability in children. The etiology of a substantial portion of USNHL/SSD still remains unknown, and genetic causes have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the authors evaluated the heritability of USNHL/SSD.The authors sequentially recruited 50 unrelated children with SSD. For an etiologic diagnosis, we performed a rigorous review on the phenotypes of family members of all children and conducted, if necessary, molecular genetic tests including targeted exome sequencing of 129 deafness genes.Among the 50 SSD children cohort, the authors identify 4 (8%) unrelated SSD probands from 4 families (SH136, SB173, SB177, and SB199) with another hearing impaired family members. Notably, all 4 probands in our cohort with a familial history of SSD also have pigmentary abnormalities such as brown freckles or premature gray hair within first degree relatives, which may indicate that genes whose products are involved with pigmentary disorder could be candidates for heritable SSD. Indeed, SH136 and SB199 turned out to segregate a mutation in MITF and PAX3, respectively, leading to a molecular diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (WS).We report, for the first time in the literature, a significant heritability of pediatric SSD. There is a strong association between the heritability of USNHL/SSD and the pigmentary abnormality, shedding a new light on the understanding of the molecular basis of heritable USNHL/SSD. In case of children with congenital SSD, it would be mandatory to rigorously screen pigmentary abnormalities. WS should also be included in the differential diagnosis of children with USNHL/SSD, especially in a familial form.

  1. Detection of Mixtures of Bean and Cowpea Viruses by Using Single ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sensitivity of ELISA to detect bean common mosaic potyvirus (BCMV), cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV), bean yellow mosaic potyvirus (BYMV), cowpea mottle carmovirus (CPMoV), cowpea mosaic como virus (CPMV) and blackeye cowpea mosaic potyvirus (BLCMV) singly or in mixtures was evaluated using ...

  2. Real-time single airborne nanoparticle detection with nanomechanical resonant filter-fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Kurek, Maksymilian; Adolphsen, Jens Q

    2013-01-01

    technique and gravimetric detection of airborne nanoparticles with a nanomechanical resonant filter-fiber. By increasing the nanoparticle momentum the dominant collection mechanism changes from diffusion to more efficient inertial impaction. In doing so we reach a single filter-fiber collection efficiency...

  3. Feasibility of detecting Aflatoxin B1 in single maize kernels using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The feasibility of detecting Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in single maize kernel inoculated with Aspergillus flavus conidia in the field, as well as its spatial distribution in the kernels, was assessed using near-infrared hyperspectral imaging (HSI) technique. Firstly, an image mask was applied to a pixel-b...

  4. Experimental detection of nonclassicality of single-mode fields via intensity moments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arkhipov, Ie.I.; Peřina, Jan; Haderka, O.; Michálek, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 26 (2016), s. 29496-29505 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : experimental detection of nonclassicality * single-mode fields * intensity moments Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016

  5. Detecting the Presence of Nora Virus in "Drosophila" Utilizing Single Fly RT-PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Bethany; Ericson, Brad; Carlson, Darby J.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    A single fly RT-PCR protocol has recently been developed to detect the presence of the persistent, horizontally transmitted Nora virus in "Drosophila." Wild-caught flies from Ohio were tested for the presence of the virus, with nearly one-fifth testing positive. The investigation presented can serve as an ideal project for biology…

  6. Detection of User Independent Single Trial ERPs in Brain Computer Interfaces: An Adaptive Spatial Filtering Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leza, Cristina; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2017-01-01

    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) use brain signals to communicate with the external world. The main challenges to address are speed, accuracy and adaptability. Here, a novel algorithm for P300 based BCI spelling system is presented, specifically suited for single-trial detection of Event...

  7. Change Detection in Full and Dual Polarization, Single- and Multifrequency SAR Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2015-01-01

    of obtaining a smaller value of the test statistic are given. In a case study, airborne EMISAR C- and L-band SAR images from the spring of 1998 covering agricultural fields and wooded areas near Foulum, Denmark, are used in single- and bifrequency, bitemporal change detection with full and dual polarimetry...

  8. Change detection in quad and dual pol, single- and bi-frequency SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2015-01-01

    -value are given. In a case study airborne EMISAR C- and L-band SAR images covering agricultural fields and wooded areas near Foulum, Denmark, are used in single- and bi-frequency, bi-temporal change detection with full and dual polarimetry data. © (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation...

  9. Fast Detection of Airports on Remote Sensing Images with Single Shot MultiBox Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Li, HuiZhou

    2018-01-01

    This paper introduces a method for fast airport detection on remote sensing images (RSIs) using Single Shot MultiBox Detector (SSD). To our knowledge, this could be the first study which introduces an end-to-end detection model into airport detection on RSIs. Based on the common low-level features between natural images and RSIs, a convolution neural network trained on large amounts of natural images was transferred to tackle the airport detection problem with limited annotated data. To deal with the specific characteristics of RSIs, some related parameters in the SSD, such as the scales and layers, were modified for more accurate and rapider detection. The experiments show that the proposed method could achieve 83.5% Average Recall at 8 FPS on RSIs with the size of 1024*1024. In contrast to Faster R-CNN, an improvement on AP and speed could be obtained.

  10. Single-Shot Quantum Nondemolition Detection of Individual Itinerant Microwave Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Jean-Claude; Gasparinetti, Simone; Collodo, Michele C.; Walter, Theo; Kurpiers, Philipp; Pechal, Marek; Eichler, Christopher; Wallraff, Andreas

    2018-04-01

    Single-photon detection is an essential component in many experiments in quantum optics, but it remains challenging in the microwave domain. We realize a quantum nondemolition detector for propagating microwave photons and characterize its performance using a single-photon source. To this aim, we implement a cavity-assisted conditional phase gate between the incoming photon and a superconducting artificial atom. By reading out the state of this atom in a single shot, we reach an external (internal) photon-detection fidelity of 50% (71%), limited by transmission efficiency between the source and the detector (75%) and the coherence properties of the qubit. By characterizing the coherence and average number of photons in the field reflected off the detector, we demonstrate its quantum nondemolition nature. We envisage applications in generating heralded remote entanglement between qubits and for realizing logic gates between propagating microwave photons.

  11. Single reaction, real time RT-PCR detection of all known avian and human metapneumoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, E; Allée, C; Vabret, A; Eterradossi, N; Brown, P A

    2018-01-01

    Current molecular methods for the detection of avian and human metapneumovirus (AMPV, HMPV) are specifically targeted towards each virus species or individual subgroups of these. Here a broad range SYBR Green I real time RT-PCR was developed which amplified a highly conserved fragment of sequence in the N open reading frame. This method was sufficiently efficient and specific in detecting all MPVs. Its validation according to the NF U47-600 norm for the four AMPV subgroups estimated low limits of detection between 1000 and 10copies/μL, similar with detection levels described previously for real time RT-PCRs targeting specific subgroups. RNA viruses present a challenge for the design of durable molecular diagnostic test due to the rate of change in their genome sequences which can vary substantially in different areas and over time. The fact that the regions of sequence for primer hybridization in the described method have remained sufficiently conserved since the AMPV and HMPV diverged, should give the best chance of continued detection of current subgroups and of potential unknown or future emerging MPV strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens in meat samples by using molecular methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Ikuko; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Mimura, Kanako; Yumine, Natsuko; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Akimoto, Shigeru; McClane, Bruce A

    2011-11-01

    To prevent food-borne bacterial diseases and to trace bacterial contamination events to foods, microbial source tracking (MST) methods provide important epidemiological information. To apply molecular methods to MST, it is necessary not only to amplify bacterial cells to detection limit levels but also to prepare DNA with reduced inhibitory compounds and contamination. Isolates carrying the Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin gene (cpe) on the chromosome or a plasmid rank among the most important food-borne pathogens. Previous surveys indicated that cpe-positive C. perfringens isolates are present in only ∼5% of nonoutbreak food samples and then only at low numbers, usually less than 3 cells/g. In this study, four molecular assays for the detection of cpe-positive C. perfringens isolates, i.e., ordinary PCR, nested PCR, real-time PCR, and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), were developed and evaluated for their reliability using purified DNA. For use in the artificial contamination of meat samples, DNA templates were prepared by three different commercial DNA preparation kits. The four molecular assays always detected cpe when >10³ cells/g of cpe-positive C. perfringens were present, using any kit. Of three tested commercial DNA preparation kits, the InstaGene matrix kit appeared to be most suitable for the testing of a large number of samples. By using the InstaGene matrix kit, the four molecular assays efficiently detected cpe using DNA prepared from enrichment culture specimens of meat samples contaminated with low numbers of cpe-positive C. perfringens vegetative cells or spores. Overall, the current study developed molecular assay protocols for MST to detect the contamination of foods with low numbers of cells, and at a low frequency, of cpe-positive C. perfringens isolates.

  13. Detection of Enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens in Meat Samples by Using Molecular Methods▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Ikuko; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Mimura, Kanako; Yumine, Natsuko; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Akimoto, Shigeru; McClane, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    To prevent food-borne bacterial diseases and to trace bacterial contamination events to foods, microbial source tracking (MST) methods provide important epidemiological information. To apply molecular methods to MST, it is necessary not only to amplify bacterial cells to detection limit levels but also to prepare DNA with reduced inhibitory compounds and contamination. Isolates carrying the Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin gene (cpe) on the chromosome or a plasmid rank among the most important food-borne pathogens. Previous surveys indicated that cpe-positive C. perfringens isolates are present in only ∼5% of nonoutbreak food samples and then only at low numbers, usually less than 3 cells/g. In this study, four molecular assays for the detection of cpe-positive C. perfringens isolates, i.e., ordinary PCR, nested PCR, real-time PCR, and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), were developed and evaluated for their reliability using purified DNA. For use in the artificial contamination of meat samples, DNA templates were prepared by three different commercial DNA preparation kits. The four molecular assays always detected cpe when >103 cells/g of cpe-positive C. perfringens were present, using any kit. Of three tested commercial DNA preparation kits, the InstaGene matrix kit appeared to be most suitable for the testing of a large number of samples. By using the InstaGene matrix kit, the four molecular assays efficiently detected cpe using DNA prepared from enrichment culture specimens of meat samples contaminated with low numbers of cpe-positive C. perfringens vegetative cells or spores. Overall, the current study developed molecular assay protocols for MST to detect the contamination of foods with low numbers of cells, and at a low frequency, of cpe-positive C. perfringens isolates. PMID:21890671

  14. Nanopore arrays in a silicon membrane for parallel single-molecule detection: DNA translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Schmidt, Torsten; Jemt, Anders; Sahlén, Pelin; Sychugov, Ilya; Lundeberg, Joakim; Linnros, Jan

    2015-08-07

    Optical nanopore sensing offers great potential in single-molecule detection, genotyping, or DNA sequencing for high-throughput applications. However, one of the bottle-necks for fluorophore-based biomolecule sensing is the lack of an optically optimized membrane with a large array of nanopores, which has large pore-to-pore distance, small variation in pore size and low background photoluminescence (PL). Here, we demonstrate parallel detection of single-fluorophore-labeled DNA strands (450 bps) translocating through an array of silicon nanopores that fulfills the above-mentioned requirements for optical sensing. The nanopore array was fabricated using electron beam lithography and anisotropic etching followed by electrochemical etching resulting in pore diameters down to ∼7 nm. The DNA translocation measurements were performed in a conventional wide-field microscope tailored for effective background PL control. The individual nanopore diameter was found to have a substantial effect on the translocation velocity, where smaller openings slow the translocation enough for the event to be clearly detectable in the fluorescence. Our results demonstrate that a uniform silicon nanopore array combined with wide-field optical detection is a promising alternative with which to realize massively-parallel single-molecule detection.

  15. Detection of gas molecules on single Mn adatom adsorbed graphyne: a DFT-D study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhansheng; Lv, Peng; Ma, Dongwei; Yang, Xinwei; Li, Shuo; Yang, Zongxian

    2018-02-01

    As one of the prominent applications in intelligent systems, gas sensing technology has attracted great interest in both industry and academia. In the current study, the pristine graphyne (GY) without and with a single Mn atom is investigated to detect the gas molecules (CO, CH4, CO2, NH3, NO and O2). The pristine GY is promising to detect O2 molecules because of its chemical adsorption on GY with large electron transfer. The great stability of the Mn/GY is found, and the Mn atom prefers to anchor at the alkyne ring as a single atom. Upon single Mn atom anchoring, the sensitivity and selectivity of GY based gas sensors is significantly improved for various molecules, except CH4. The recovery time of the Mn/GY after detecting the gas molecules may help to appraise the detection efficiency for the Mn/GY. The current study will help to understand the mechanism of detecting the gas molecules, and extend the potentially fascinating applications of GY-based materials.

  16. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok; Khare, Shashi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml −1 with a limit of detection of 0.16 ng ml −1

  17. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok, E-mail: rajesh-csir@yahoo.com, E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com [CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Mall Road, Delhi 110007 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), New Delhi (India); Khare, Shashi [National Centre for Disease Control, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi 110054 (India); Mulchandani, Ashok [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh-csir@yahoo.com, E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2014-11-24

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml{sup −1} with a limit of detection of 0.16 ng ml{sup −1}.

  18. Multiplex and quantitative pathogen detection with high-resolution capillary electrophoresis-based single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hee Sung; Shin, Gi Won; Chung, Boram; Na, Jeongkyeong; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2013-01-01

    Among the molecular diagnostic methods for bacteria-induced diseases, capillary electrophoresis-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) combined with 16S rRNA gene-specific PCR has enormous potential because it can separate sequence variants using a simple procedure. However, conventional CE-SSCP systems have limited resolution and cannot separate most 16S rRNA gene-specific markers into separate peaks. A high-resolution CE-SSCP system that uses a poly(ethyleneoxide)-poly(propyleneoxide)-poly(ethyleneoxide) triblock copolymer matrix was recently developed and shown to effectively separate highly similar PCR products. In this report, a protocol for the detection of 12 pathogenic bacteria is provided. Pathogen markers were amplified by PCR using universal primers and separated by CE-SSCP; each marker peak was well separated at baseline and showed a characteristic mobility, allowing the easy identification of the pathogens.

  19. A complete molecular biology assay for hepatitis C virus detection, quantification and genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Silva Casanova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Molecular biology procedures to detect, genotype and quantify hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA in clinical samples have been extensively described. Routine commercial methods for each specific purpose (detection, quantification and genotyping are also available, all of which are typically based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting the HCV 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR. This study was performed to develop and validate a complete serial laboratory assay that combines real-time nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP techniques for the complete molecular analysis of HCV (detection, genotyping and viral load in clinical samples. Methods Published HCV sequences were compared to select specific primers, probe and restriction enzyme sites. An original real-time nested RT-PCR-RFLP assay was then developed and validated to detect, genotype and quantify HCV in plasma samples. Results The real-time nested RT-PCR data were linear and reproducible for HCV analysis in clinical samples. High correlations (> 0.97 were observed between samples with different viral loads and the corresponding read cycle (Ct - Cycle threshold, and this part of the assay had a wide dynamic range of analysis. Additionally, HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3 were successfully distinguished using the RFLP method. Conclusions A complete serial molecular assay was developed and validated for HCV detection, quantification and genotyping.

  20. A simple optimization can improve the performance of single feature polymorphism detection by Affymetrix expression arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujisawa Hironori

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-density oligonucleotide arrays are effective tools for genotyping numerous loci simultaneously. In small genome species (genome size: Results We compared the single feature polymorphism (SFP detection performance of whole-genome and transcript hybridizations using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Rice Genome Array, using the rice cultivars with full genome sequence, japonica cultivar Nipponbare and indica cultivar 93-11. Both genomes were surveyed for all probe target sequences. Only completely matched 25-mer single copy probes of the Nipponbare genome were extracted, and SFPs between them and 93-11 sequences were predicted. We investigated optimum conditions for SFP detection in both whole genome and transcript hybridization using differences between perfect match and mismatch probe intensities of non-polymorphic targets, assuming that these differences are representative of those between mismatch and perfect targets. Several statistical methods of SFP detection by whole-genome hybridization were compared under the optimized conditions. Causes of false positives and negatives in SFP detection in both types of hybridization were investigated. Conclusions The optimizations allowed a more than 20% increase in true SFP detection in whole-genome hybridization and a large improvement of SFP detection performance in transcript hybridization. Significance analysis of the microarray for log-transformed raw intensities of PM probes gave the best performance in whole genome hybridization, and 22,936 true SFPs were detected with 23.58% false positives by whole genome hybridization. For transcript hybridization, stable SFP detection was achieved for highly expressed genes, and about 3,500 SFPs were detected at a high sensitivity (> 50% in both shoot and young panicle transcripts. High SFP detection performances of both genome and transcript hybridizations indicated that microarrays of a complex genome (e.g., of Oryza sativa can be

  1. DNA biosensor based on hybridization refractory mutation system approach for single mismatch detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joda, Hamdi; Beni, Valerio; Katakis, Ioanis; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2015-04-01

    We report on a simple approach to enhance solid-phase hybridization-based single base mismatch discrimination at high ionic strength based on the deliberate insertion of a natural DNA base mismatch in the surface-tethered probe. A large drop in hybridization signal of single base mismatched alleles using the designed probe as compared with the conventional probe, from 80% to less than 25% of the signal obtained with the fully complementary, non-mutation-containing sequence, when using colorimetric detection was further improved to 20% when using electrochemical detection, attributable to a difference of spacing of immobilized probes. Finally, the designed probe was used for the electrochemical detection of the DQA1*05:05 allele amplified from real human blood samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection of single macromolecules using a cryogenic particle detector coupled to a biopolymer mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twerenbold, Damian; Vuilleumier, Jean-Luc; Gerber, Daniel; Tadsen, Almut; van den Brandt, Ben; Gillevet, Patrick M.

    1996-06-01

    Macromolecules with masses up to 50 kDa have been detected with a cryogenic particle detector in a MALDI time-of-flight biopolymer mass spectrometer. The cryogenic particle detector was a Sn/Sn-ox/Sn tunnel junction operated at a temperature of 0.4 K. A calibration with 6 keV single photons inferred that the delayed detector pulses corresponded to the absorption of the kinetic energy of a single macromolecule. Time-of-flight spectra of lysozyme proteins are presented. The mass resolution is 100 Da at 14 300 Da. The energy sensitive detection mechanism suggests that cryogenic particle detectors have a high and mass independent detection efficiency for macromolecules.

  3. Single-molecule study of molecular mobility in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, Yoriko; Kaserer, Wallace A.; Newton, Salete M.; Lill, Markus; Klebba, Phillip E.; Ritchie, Ken

    2012-08-01

    The cytoplasm of bacterial cells is filled with individual molecules and molecular complexes that rely on diffusion to bring them together for interaction. The mobility of molecules in the cytoplasm has been characterized by several techniques mainly using fluorescent probes and ensemble methods. In order to probe the microenvrionment inside the cytoplasm as viewed by an individual molecule, we have studied single green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) diffusing in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli cells at observation at rates ranging from 60 to 1000 Hz. Over long times the diffusion shows confinement due to the geometry of the cells themselves. A simulation in model cells using the actual distribution of cell sizes found in the experiments describes accurately the experimental results as well as reveals a short time diffusion coefficient that agrees well with that determined by ensemble methods. Higher short time diffusion coefficients can be obtained by filling the simulated cell with small spheres modeling cytoplasmic molecules and, depending on the density of particles included in the modeled cytoplasm, can approach the diffusion coefficient of GFPs found in water. Thus, single-molecule tracking combined with analysis using simple simulation of Brownian motion is able to reveal the main contributors to the GFP mobility in the cytoplasm of E. coli.

  4. A novel molecular solution for ultraviolet light detection in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey L Edwards

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available For many organisms the ability to transduce light into cellular signals is crucial for survival. Light stimulates DNA repair and metabolism changes in bacteria, avoidance responses in single-cell organisms, attraction responses in plants, and both visual and nonvisual perception in animals. Despite these widely differing responses, in all of nature there are only six known families of proteins that can transduce light. Although the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has none of the known light transduction systems, we show here that C. elegans strongly accelerates its locomotion in response to blue or shorter wavelengths of light, with maximal responsiveness to ultraviolet light. Our data suggest that C. elegans uses this light response to escape the lethal doses of sunlight that permeate its habitat. Short-wavelength light drives locomotion by bypassing two critical signals, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and diacylglycerol (DAG, that neurons use to shape and control behaviors. C. elegans mutants lacking these signals are paralyzed and unresponsive to harsh physical stimuli in ambient light, but short-wavelength light rapidly rescues their paralysis and restores normal levels of coordinated locomotion. This light response is mediated by LITE-1, a novel ultraviolet light receptor that acts in neurons and is a member of the invertebrate Gustatory receptor (Gr family. Heterologous expression of the receptor in muscle cells is sufficient to confer light responsiveness on cells that are normally unresponsive to light. Our results reveal a novel molecular solution for ultraviolet light detection and an unusual sensory modality in C. elegans that is unlike any previously described light response in any organism.

  5. Reverse-Transcriptase PCR Detection of Leptospira: Absence of Agreement with Single-Specimen Microscopic Agglutination Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Jesse J; Balassiano, Ilana; Mohamed-Hadley, Alisha; Vital-Brazil, Juliana Magalhães; Sahoo, Malaya K; Pinsky, Benjamin A

    2015-01-01

    Reference diagnostic tests for leptospirosis include nucleic acid amplification tests, bacterial culture, and microscopic agglutination testing (MAT) of acute and convalescent serum. However, clinical laboratories often do not receive paired specimens. In the current study, we tested serum samples using a highly sensitive real-time nucleic acid amplification test for Leptospira and compared results to MAT performed on the same specimens. 478 serum samples from suspected leptospirosis cases in Rio de Janeiro were tested using a real-time RT-PCR for the diagnosis of leptospirosis, malaria and dengue (the Lepto-MD assay). The Lepto-MD assay detects all species of Leptospira (saprophytic, intermediate, and pathogenic), and in the current study, we demonstrate that this assay amplifies both Leptospira RNA and DNA. Dengue virus RNA was identified in 10 patients, and no cases of malaria were detected. A total of 65 samples (13.6%) were positive for Leptospira: 35 samples (7.3%) in the Lepto-MD assay, 33 samples (6.9%) by MAT, and 3 samples tested positive by both (kappa statistic 0.02). Poor agreement between methods was consistent regardless of the titer used to define positive MAT results or the day of disease at sample collection. Leptospira nucleic acids were detected in the Lepto-MD assay as late as day 22, and cycle threshold values did not differ based on the day of disease. When Lepto-MD assay results were added to the MAT results for all patients in 2008 (n=818), the number of detected leptospirosis cases increased by 30.4%, from 102 (12.5%) to 133 (16.3%). This study demonstrates a lack of agreement between nucleic acid detection of Leptospira and single-specimen MAT, which may result from the clearance of bacteremia coinciding with the appearance of agglutinating antibodies. A combined testing strategy for acute leptospirosis, including molecular and serologic testing, appears necessary to maximize case detection.

  6. Detection of Janus Kinase 2 gene single point mutation in real samples with electrochemical DNA biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkaya, Seda Nur; Kosova, Buket; Ozsoz, Mehmet

    2014-02-15

    Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) gene single point mutations, which have been reported to be associated with myeloproliferative disorders, are usually detected through conventional methods such as melting curve assays, allele-specific and quantitative Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCRs). Herein, an electrochemical biosensor for the detection of a Guanine (G) to Thymine (T) transversion at nucleotide position 1849 of the JAK2 gene was reported. Due to clinical importance of this mutation, easy and sensitive tests are needed to be developed. Our aim was to design a biosensor system that is capable of detecting the mutation within less than 1h with high sensitivity. For these purposes, an electrochemical sensing system was developed based on detecting hybridization. Hybridization between probe and its target and discrimination of single point mutation was investigated by monitoring guanine oxidation signals observed at +1.0 V with Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) by using synthetic oligonucleotides and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) amplicons. Hybridization between probe and PCR amplicons was also determined with Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). We successfully detect hybridization first in synthetic samples, and ultimately in real samples involving blood samples from patients as well as additional healthy controls. The limit of detection (S/N=3) was calculated as 44 pmol of target sequence in a 40-μl reaction volume in real samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Validation of the 3M molecular detection system for the detection of listeria in meat, seafood, dairy, and retail environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Esther D; David, John; Koeritzer, Bob; Wiedmann, Martin

    2013-05-01

    There is a continued need to develop improved rapid methods for detection of foodborne pathogens. The aim of this project was to evaluate the 3M Molecular Detection System (3M MDS), which uses isothermal DNA amplification, and the 3M Molecular Detection Assay Listeria using environmental samples obtained from retail delicatessens and meat, seafood, and dairy processing plants. Environmental sponge samples were tested for Listeria with the 3M MDS after 22 and 48 h of enrichment in 3M Modified Listeria Recovery Broth (3M mLRB); enrichments were also used for cultural detection of Listeria spp. Among 391 samples tested for Listeria, 74 were positive by both the 3M MDS and the cultural method, 310 were negative by both methods, 2 were positive by the 3M MDS and negative by the cultural method, and one sample was negative by the 3M MDS and positive by the cultural method. Four samples were removed from the sample set, prior to statistical analyses, due to potential cross-contamination during testing. Listeria isolates from positive samples represented L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, and L. seeligeri. Overall, the 3M MDS and culture-based detection after enrichment in 3M mLRB did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) with regard to the number of positive samples, when chi-square analyses were performed for (i) number of positive samples after 22 h, (ii) number of positive samples after 48 h, and (iii) number of positive samples after 22 and/or 48 h of enrichment in 3M mLRB. Among 288 sampling sites that were tested with duplicate sponges, 67 each tested positive with the 3M MDS and the traditional U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual method, further supporting that the 3M MDS performs equivalently to traditional methods when used with environmental sponge samples.

  8. Cascade Amplification-Mediated In Situ Hot-Spot Assembly for MicroRNA Detection and Molecular Logic Gate Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sha; Wang, Yingying; Jiang, Li-Ping; Bi, Sai; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2018-03-23

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in many biological processes and are associated with various diseases, especially cancers. Combination of technological developments such as nanomaterials, functional enzyme-mediated reactions, and DNA nanotechnology holds great potential for high-performance detection of miRNAs in molecular diagnostic systems. In this work, we have fabricated a cascade signal amplification platform through integrating duplex-specific nuclease (DSN)-assisted target recycling with catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) reaction for the detection of microRNA-141 (miR-141). The target recycling process driven by DSN results in highly amplified translation of target miRNA to single-stranded connector DNA fragments. The CHA reaction is further initiated by connector DNAs using hairpin-modified gold nanoparticles (HP-AuNPs) as the sensing unit, leading to the formation of AuNP network architecture on the electrode for electrochemical and photoelectrochemical detection of miR-141 in signal-on and signal-off modes, respectively. The developed electrochemical biosensor exhibits a detection limit down to 25.1 aM miR-141 (60 copies in 4 μL sample) and excellent selectivity to discriminate a single base-mismatched sequence and other miRNAs. This assay is also applied to the determination of miR-141 in total RNAs extracted from human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231), confirming the applicability of this method for absolute quantification of specific miRNAs in real-world samples. Furthermore, two-input AND and INHIBIT (INH) logic gates are constructed to detect miRNAs. In particular, the AND gate achieves cell-specific gate activation based on expression profiles of miR-141 and microRNA-21 (miR-21). Therefore, our proposed cascade amplification platform has great potential applications in miRNA-related clinical diagnostics and biochemical research.

  9. Molecular detection of trophic links in a complex insect host-parasitoid food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrcek, Jan; Miller, Scott E; Quicke, Donald L J; Smith, M Alex

    2011-09-01

    Previously, host-parasitoid links have been unveiled almost exclusively by time-intensive rearing, while molecular methods were used only in simple agricultural host-parasitoid systems in the form of species-specific primers. Here, we present a general method for the molecular detection of these links applied to a complex caterpillar-parasitoid food web from tropical rainforest of Papua New Guinea. We DNA barcoded hosts, parasitoids and their tissue remnants and matched the sequences to our extensive library of local species. We were thus able to match 87% of host sequences and 36% of parasitoid sequences to species and infer subfamily or family in almost all cases. Our analysis affirmed 93 hitherto unknown trophic links between 37 host species from a wide range of Lepidoptera families and 46 parasitoid species from Hymenoptera and Diptera by identifying DNA sequences for both the host and the parasitoid involved in the interaction. Molecular detection proved especially useful in cases where distinguishing host species in caterpillar stage was difficult morphologically, or when the caterpillar died during rearing. We have even detected a case of extreme parasitoid specialization in a pair of Choreutis species that do not differ in caterpillar morphology and ecology. Using the molecular approach outlined here leads to better understanding of parasitoid host specificity, opens new possibilities for rapid surveys of food web structure and allows inference of species associations not already anticipated. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Practices and Exploration on Competition of Molecular Biological Detection Technology among Students in Food Quality and Safety Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yaning; Peng, Yuke; Li, Pengfei; Zhuang, Yingping

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing importance in the application of the molecular biological detection technology in the field of food safety, strengthening education in molecular biology experimental techniques is more necessary for the culture of the students in food quality and safety major. However, molecular biology experiments are not always in curricula…

  11. On-slide detection of enzymatic activities in selected single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Josephine Geertsen; Tesauro, Cinzia; Coletta, Andrea; Graversen, Astrid Damgaard; Ho, Yi-Ping; Kristensen, Peter; Stougaard, Magnus; Knudsen, Birgitta Ruth

    2017-09-21

    With increasing recognition of the importance in addressing cell-to-cell heterogeneity for the understanding of complex biological systems, there is a growing need for assays capable of single cell analyses. In the current study, we describe the measurement of human topoisomerase I activity in single CD44 positive Caco2 cells specifically captured from a mixed population on glass slides, which were dual functionalized with anti-CD44-antibodies and specific DNA primers. On-slide lysis of captured CD44 positive cells, resulted in the release of human topoisomerase I, allowing the enzyme to circularize a specific linear DNA substrate added to the slides. The generated circles hybridized to the anchored DNA primers and acted as templates for a solid support rolling circle amplification reaction leading to the generation of long tandem repeat products that were detected at the single molecule level in a fluorescent microscope upon hybridization of fluorescent labelled probes. The on-slide detection system was demonstrated to be directly quantitative and specific towards CD44 positive cells. Moreover, it allowed reproducible detection of human topoisomerase I activity in single cells.

  12. Simultaneous detection of mRNA and protein in single cells using immunofluorescence-combined single-molecule RNA FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochan, Jakub; Wawro, Mateusz; Kasza, Aneta

    2015-10-01

    Although the concept of combining immunofluorescence (IF) with single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (smRNA FISH) seems obvious, the specific materials used during IF and smRNA FISH make it difficult to perform these procedures simultaneously on the same specimen. Even though there are reports where IF and smRNA FISH were combined with success, these were insufficient in terms of signal intensities, staining patterns, and GFP-compatibility, and a detailed exploration of the various factors that influence IF and smRNA FISH outcome has not been published yet. Here, we report a detailed study of conditions and reagents used in classic IF and smRNA FISH that allowed us to establish an easy, robust, and GFP-compatible procedure. Our protocol enables simultaneous detection of mRNA and protein quantity as well as the subcellular distribution of these molecules in single cells by combining an RNase-free modification of the IF technique and the more recent smRNA FISH method. Using this procedure, we have shown the direct interaction of RNase MCPIP1 with IL-6 mRNA. We also demonstrate the use of our protocol in heterogeneous cell population analysis, revealing cell-to-cell differences in mRNA and protein content.

  13. Sensitive simultaneous detection of seven sexually transmitted agents in semen by multiplex-PCR and of HPV by single PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrícia Gimenes

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs may impair sperm parameters and functions thereby promoting male infertility. To date limited molecular studies were conducted to evaluate the frequency and type of such infections in semen Thus, we aimed at conceiving and validating a multiplex PCR (M-PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of the following STD pathogens in semen: Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, Herpes virus simplex (HSV -1 and -2, and Treponema pallidum; We also investigated the potential usefulness of this M-PCR assay in screening programs for semen pathogens. In addition, we aimed: to detect human Papillomavirus (HPV and genotypes by single PCR (sPCR in the same semen samples; to determine the prevalence of the seven STDs, HPV and co-infections; to assess the possibility that these infections affect semen parameters and thus fertility. The overall validation parameters of M-PCR were extremely high including agreement (99.2%, sensitivity (100.00%, specificity (99.70%, positive (96.40% and negative predictive values (100.00% and accuracy (99.80%. The prevalence of STDs was very high (55.3%. Furthermore, associations were observed between STDs and changes in semen parameters, highlighting the importance of STD detection in semen. Thus, this M-PCR assay has great potential for application in semen screening programs for pathogens in infertility and STD clinics and in sperm banks.

  14. Scattering measurement of single particle for highly sensitive homogeneous detection of DNA in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang; Li, Guohua; He, Yonghong; Tan, Hui; Sun, Shuqing

    2018-02-01

    A highly sensitive homogeneous method for DNA detection has been developed. The system relies on two kinds of gold nanorod (AuNR) probes with complementary DNA sequences to the target DNA. In the presence of the target DNA, two kinds of AuNR probes are assembling into dimers or small aggregates. The target-induced AuNR aggregate has higher scattering intensity than that of a single AuNR because of the plasmonic coupling effect. Dark field microscopy was utilized to image the single particle and measure its scattering intensity. We wrote our own Matlab code and used it to extract the scattering signal of all particles. Difference in distribution of scattering intensity between the single AuNR and its aggregate provides a quantitative basis for the detection of target DNA. A linear dynamic range spanning from 0.1pM to 1nM and a detection limit of ~ 30fM were achieved for the detection of DNA in serum sample. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Single cell detection using a glass-based optofluidic device fabricated by femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moosung; Hwang, David J; Jeon, Hojeong; Hiromatsu, Kuniaki; Grigoropoulos, Costas P

    2009-01-21

    We demonstrate the fabrication of integrated three-dimensional microchannel and optical waveguide structures inside fused silica for the interrogation and processing of single cells. The microchannels are fabricated by scanning femtosecond laser pulses (523 nm) and subsequent selective wet etching process. Optical waveguides are additionally integrated with the fabricated microchannels by scanning the laser pulse train inside the glass specimen. Single red blood cells (RBC) in diluted human blood inside of the manufactured microchannel were detected by two optical schemes. The first involved sensing the intensity change of waveguide-delivered He-Ne laser light (632.8 nm) induced by the refractive index difference of a cell flowing in the channel. The other approach was via detection of fluorescence emission from dyed RBC excited by Ar laser light (488 nm) delivered by the optical waveguide. The proposed device was tested to detect 23 fluorescent particles per second by increasing the flow rate up to 0.5 microl min(-1). The optical cell detection experiments support potential implementation of a new generation of glass-based optofluidic biochip devices in various single cell treatment processes including laser based cell processing and sensing.

  16. Potentiometric Sensors Based on Surface Molecular Imprinting: Detection of Cancer Biomarkers and Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, Z; Jain, V; Yi, J; Mueller, S; Sokolov, J; Liu, Z; Levon, K; Rigas, B; Rafailovich, M

    2010-01-01

    The continuing discovery of cancer biomarkers necessitates improved methods for their detection. Molecular imprinting using artificial materials provides an alternative to the detection of a wide range of substances. We applied surface molecular imprinting using self-assembled monolayers to design sensing elements for the detection of cancer biomarkers and other proteins. These elements consist of a gold-coated silicon chip onto which hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiol molecules and template biomolecule are co-adsorbed, where the thiol molecules are chemically bound to the metal substrate and self-assembled into highly ordered monolayers, the biomolecules can be removed, creating the foot-print cavities in the monolayer matrix for this kind of template molecules. Re-adsorption of the biomolecules to the sensing chip changes its potential, which can be measured potentiometrically. We applied this method to the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in both solutions of purified CEA and in the culture medium of a CEA-producing human colon cancer cell line. The CEA assay, validated also against a standard immunoassay, was both sensitive (detection range 2.5-250 ng/mL) and specific (no cross-reactivity with hemoglobin; no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Similar results were obtained for human amylase. In addition, we detected virions of poliovirus in a specific manner (no cross-reactivity to adenovirus, no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Our findings demonstrate the application of the principles of molecular imprinting to the development of a new method for the detection of protein cancer biomarkers and to protein-based macromolecular structures such as the capsid of a virion. This approach has the potential of generating a general assay methodology that could be highly sensitive, specific, simple and likely inexpensive.

  17. Culture- and molecular-based detection of swine-adapted Salmonella shed by avian scavengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Guillermo; Díaz de Tuesta, Juan A

    2018-04-13

    Salmonella can play an important role as a disease agent in wildlife, which can then act as carriers and reservoirs of sanitary importance at the livestock-human interface. Transmission from livestock to avian scavengers can occur when these species consume contaminated carcasses and meat remains in supplementary feeding stations and rubbish dumps. We compared the performance of PCR-based detection with conventional culture-based methods to detect Salmonella in the faeces of red kites (Milvus milvus) and griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus) in central Spain. The occurrence of culturable Salmonella was intermediate in red kites (1.9%, n=52) and high in griffon vultures (26.3%, n=99). These proportions were clearly higher with PCR-based detection (13.5% and 40.4%, respectively). Confirmation cultures failed to grow Salmonella in all faecal samples positive by the molecular assay but negative by the initial conventional culture in both scavenger species, indicating the occurrence of false (non-culturable) positives by PCR-based detection. This suggests that the molecular assay is highly sensitive to detecting viable Salmonella in cultures, but also partial genomes and dead or unviable bacteria from past infections or contamination. Thus, the actual occurrence of Salmonella in a particular sampling time period can be underestimated when using only culture detection. The serovars found in the scavenger faeces were among the most frequently isolated in pigs from Spain and other EU countries, especially those generally recognized as swine-adapted monophasic variants of S. Typhimurium. Because the studied species obtain much of their food from pig carcasses, this livestock may be the primary source of Salmonella via direct ingestion of infected carcasses and indirectly via contamination due to the unsanitary conditions found in supplementary feeding stations established for scavenger conservation. Combining culture- and molecular-based detection is encouraged to understand the

  18. Molecular Processes Studied at a Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Nanostructures and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilko Bald

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA origami nanostructures allow for the arrangement of different functionalities such as proteins, specific DNA structures, nanoparticles, and various chemical modifications with unprecedented precision. The arranged functional entities can be visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM which enables the study of molecular processes at a single-molecular level. Examples comprise the investigation of chemical reactions, electron-induced bond breaking, enzymatic binding and cleavage events, and conformational transitions in DNA. In this paper, we provide an overview of the advances achieved in the field of single-molecule investigations by applying atomic force microscopy to functionalized DNA origami substrates.

  19. Amperometric detection of morphine based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) immobilized molecularly imprinted polymer particles prepared by precipitation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.-C.; Yeh, W.-M.; Tung, T.-S.; Liao, J.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is a novel technique used for chiral separation, artificial antibodies, sensors, and assays. Typically, molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) are monoliths with irregular shapes. However, microspherical shapes with more uniform size can be obtained by the method of precipitation polymerization, which offers a higher active surface area by manipulating its compositions. In this study, MIP particles for the target molecule, morphine, were synthesized using a precipitation polymerization method that is more facile than the previous one that produced a thermally polymerized bulk. The conducting polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), was utilized to immobilize the MIP particles onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) glass as a MIP/PEDOT-modified electrode. The sensitivity for the MIP/PEDOT-modified electrode with MIP particles was 41.63 μA/cm 2 mM, which is more sensitive than that with non-MIP particles or that of a single PEDOT film with no incorporated particles in detecting morphine ranging from 0.1 to 2 mM. The detection limit was 0.3 mM (S/N = 3). In addition, we presented that the modified electrode can discriminate codeine that plays an interfering species

  20. Smartphone-Based Mobile Detection Platform for Molecular Diagnostics and Spatiotemporal Disease Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jinzhao; Pandian, Vikram; Mauk, Michael G; Bau, Haim H; Cherry, Sara; Tisi, Laurence C; Liu, Changchun

    2018-04-03

    Rapid and quantitative molecular diagnostics in the field, at home, and at remote clinics is essential for evidence-based disease management, control, and prevention. Conventional molecular diagnostics requires extensive sample preparation, relatively sophisticated instruments, and trained personnel, restricting its use to centralized laboratories. To overcome these limitations, we designed a simple, inexpensive, hand-held, smartphone-based mobile detection platform, dubbed "smart-connected cup" (SCC), for rapid, connected, and quantitative molecular diagnostics. Our platform combines bioluminescent assay in real-time and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (BART-LAMP) technology with smartphone-based detection, eliminating the need for an excitation source and optical filters that are essential in fluorescent-based detection. The incubation heating for the isothermal amplification is provided, electricity-free, with an exothermic chemical reaction, and incubation temperature is regulated with a phase change material. A custom Android App was developed for bioluminescent signal monitoring and analysis, target quantification, data sharing, and spatiotemporal mapping of disease. SCC's utility is demonstrated by quantitative detection of Zika virus (ZIKV) in urine and saliva and HIV in blood within 45 min. We demonstrate SCC's connectivity for disease spatiotemporal mapping with a custom-designed website. Such a smart- and connected-diagnostic system does not require any lab facilities and is suitable for use at home, in the field, in the clinic, and particularly in resource-limited settings in the context of Internet of Medical Things (IoMT).

  1. The reverse single radial immunodiffusion technique for detecting antibodies to Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, A A

    1980-04-26

    The reverse single radial immunodiffusion technique was used to detect Dermatophilus congolensis antibody in sera collected from animals previously infected to varying levels with D congolensis. Ammonium sulphate and trichloroacetic acid extracts of five different strains of D congolensis obtained from different geographical locations were used as antigens. All the extracts showed variations in their sensitivities in detecting D congolensis antibody in the various serum samples. Multiple antibodies were detected by some extracts while some showed negative antibody reaction to all extracts. Two extracts also showed cross-reactions with the serum from an animal that was infected by Nocardia species. Trichloroacetic acid extracts of all the strains were found to be more active serologically, detecting antibody in more sera and giving sharper and clearer reactions than ammonium sulphate extracts.

  2. Supercontinuum Fourier transform spectrometry with balanced detection on a single photodiode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, Vasily V.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method of combining a supercontinuum light source with a commercial Fourier transform spectrometer, using a novel approach to dual-beam balanced detection, implemented with phase-sensitive detection on a single light detector. A 40 dB reduction in the relative intensity noise is achieved for broadband light, analogous to conventional balanced detection methods using two matched photodetectors. Unlike conventional balanced detection, however, this method exploits the time structure of the broadband source to interleave signal and reference pulse trains in the time domain, recording the broadband differential signal at the fundamental pulse repetition frequency of the supercontinuum. The method is capable of real-time correction for instability in the supercontinuum spectral structure over a broad range of wavelengths and is compatible with commercially designed spectrometers. A proof-of-principle experimental setup is demonstrated for weak absorption in the 1500-1600 nm region.

  3. Achieving single-nucleotide resolution of 5-methylcytosine detection with TALEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Grzegorz; Summerer, Daniel

    2015-01-19

    We report engineered transcription-activator-like effectors (TALEs) as the first DNA-binding molecules that detect 5-methylcytosine (mC) at single-nucleotide resolution with fully programmable sequence selectivity. This is achieved by a design strategy such that a single cytosine (C) in a DNA sequence is selectively interrogated for its mC-modification level by targeting with a discriminatory TALE repeat; other Cs are ignored by targeting with universal-binding TALE repeats. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Detecting Earthquakes over a Seismic Network using Single-Station Similarity Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Karianne J.; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2018-03-01

    New blind waveform-similarity-based detection methods, such as Fingerprint and Similarity Thresholding (FAST), have shown promise for detecting weak signals in long-duration, continuous waveform data. While blind detectors are capable of identifying similar or repeating waveforms without templates, they can also be susceptible to false detections due to local correlated noise. In this work, we present a set of three new methods that allow us to extend single-station similarity-based detection over a seismic network; event-pair extraction, pairwise pseudo-association, and event resolution complete a post-processing pipeline that combines single-station similarity measures (e.g. FAST sparse similarity matrix) from each station in a network into a list of candidate events. The core technique, pairwise pseudo-association, leverages the pairwise structure of event detections in its network detection model, which allows it to identify events observed at multiple stations in the network without modeling the expected move-out. Though our approach is general, we apply it to extend FAST over a sparse seismic network. We demonstrate that our network-based extension of FAST is both sensitive and maintains a low false detection rate. As a test case, we apply our approach to two weeks of continuous waveform data from five stations during the foreshock sequence prior to the 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique earthquake. Our method identifies nearly five times as many events as the local seismicity catalog (including 95% of the catalog events), and less than 1% of these candidate events are false detections.

  5. New real-time heartbeat detection method using the angle of a single-lead electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mi-Hye; Cho, Sung-Pil; Kim, Wonky; Lee, Kyoung-Joung

    2015-04-01

    This study presents a new real-time heartbeat detection algorithm using the geometric angle between two consecutive samples of single-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. The angle was adopted as a new index representing the slope of ECG signal. The method consists of three steps: elimination of high-frequency noise, calculation of the angle of ECG signal, and detection of R-waves using a simple adaptive thresholding technique. The MIT-BIH arrhythmia database, QT database, European ST-T database, T-wave alternans database and synthesized ECG signals were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm and compare with the results of other methods suggested in literature. The proposed method shows a high detection rate-99.95% of the sensitivity, 99.95% of the positive predictivity, and 0.10% of the fail detection rate on the four databases. The result shows that the proposed method can yield better or comparable performance than other literature despite the relatively simple process. The proposed algorithm needs only a single-lead ECG, and involves a simple and quick calculation. Moreover, it does not require post-processing to enhance the detection. Thus, it can be effectively applied to various real-time healthcare and medical devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A single-layer, planar, optofluidic Mach-Zehnder interferometer for label-free detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapsley, Michael Ian; Chiang, I-Kao; Zheng, Yue Bing; Ding, Xiaoyun; Mao, Xiaole; Huang, Tony Jun

    2011-05-21

    We have developed a planar, optofluidic Mach-Zehnder interferometer for the label-free detection of liquid samples. In contrast to most on-chip interferometers which require complex fabrication, our design was realized via a simple, single-layer soft lithography fabrication process. In addition, a single-wavelength laser source and a silicon photodetector were the only optical equipment used for data collection. The device was calibrated using published data for the refractive index of calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) in solution, and the biosensing capabilities of the device were tested by detecting bovine serum albumin (BSA). Our design enables a refractometer with a low limit of detection (1.24 × 10(-4) refractive index units (RIU)), low variability (1 × 10(-4) RIU), and high sensitivity (927.88 oscillations per RIU). This performance is comparable to state-of-the-art optofluidic refractometers that involve complex fabrication processes and/or expensive, bulky optics. The advantages of our device (i.e. simple fabrication process, straightforward optical equipment, low cost, and high detection sensitivity) make it a promising candidate for future mass-producible, inexpensive, highly sensitive, label-free optical detection systems. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  7. Using the time shift in single pushbroom datatakes to detect ships and their heading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willburger, Katharina A. M.; Schwenk, Kurt

    2017-10-01

    The detection of ships from remote sensing data has become an essential task for maritime security. The variety of application scenarios includes piracy, illegal fishery, ocean dumping and ships carrying refugees. While techniques using data from SAR sensors for ship detection are widely common, there is only few literature discussing algorithms based on imagery of optical camera systems. A ship detection algorithm for optical pushbroom data has been developed. It takes advantage of the special detector assembly of most of those scanners, which allows apart from the detection of a ship also the calculation of its heading out of a single acquisition. The proposed algorithm for the detection of moving ships was developed with RapidEye imagery. It algorithm consists mainly of three steps: the creation of a land-watermask, the object extraction and the deeper examination of each single object. The latter step is built up by several spectral and geometric filters, making heavy use of the inter-channel displacement typical for pushbroom sensors with multiple CCD lines, finally yielding a set of ships and their direction of movement. The working principle of time-shifted pushbroom sensors and the developed algorithm is explained in detail. Furthermore, we present our first results and give an outlook to future improvements.

  8. Deconvolution single shot multibox detector for supermarket commodity detection and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dejian; Li, Jian; Nie, Binling; Sun, Shouqian

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes an image detection model to detect and classify supermarkets shelves' commodity. Based on the principle of the features directly affects the accuracy of the final classification, feature maps are performed to combine high level features with bottom level features. Then set some fixed anchors on those feature maps, finally the label and the position of commodity is generated by doing a box regression and classification. In this work, we proposed a model named Deconvolutiuon Single Shot MultiBox Detector, we evaluated the model using 300 images photographed from real supermarket shelves. Followed the same protocol in other recent methods, the results showed that our model outperformed other baseline methods.

  9. Highly sensitive, non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer mutations using single molecule, third generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Russo

    2015-12-01

    We present the first study that applies the high read accuracy and depth of single molecule, real time, circular consensus sequencing (SMRT-CCS to the detection of mutations in stool DNA in order to provide a non-invasive, sensitive and accurate test for CRC. In stool DNA isolated from patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, we are able to detect mutations at frequencies below 0.5% with no false positives. This approach establishes a foundation for a non-invasive, highly sensitive assay to screen the population for CRC and the early stage adenomas that lead to CRC.

  10. A confocal optical microscope for detection of single impurities in a bulk crystal at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Jenny; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    A compact sample-scanning confocal optical microscope for detection of single impurities below the surface of a bulk crystal at cryogenic temperatures is described. The sample, lens, and scanners are mounted inside a helium bath cryostat and have a footprint of only 19 × 19 mm. Wide field imaging and confocal imaging using a Blu-ray lens immersed in liquid helium are demonstrated with excitation at 370 nm. A spatial resolution of 300 nm and a detection efficiency of 1.6% were achieved.

  11. Molecular-dynamic simulations of the thermophysical properties of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane single crystal at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlova, S. A.; Gubin, S. A.; Maklashova, I. V.; Selezenev, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations of isothermal compression parameters are performed for a hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane single crystal (C6H6O12N12) using a modified ReaxFF-log reactive force field. It is shown that the pressure-compression ratio curve for a single C6H6O12N12 crystal at constant temperature T = 300 K in pressure range P = 0.05-40 GPa is in satisfactory agreement with experimental compression isotherms obtained for a single C6H6O12N12 crystal. Hugoniot molecular-dynamic simulations of the shock-wave hydrostatic compression of a single C6H6O12N12 crystal are performed. Along with Hugoniot temperature-pressure curves, calculated shock-wave pressure-compression ratios for a single C6H6O12N12 crystal are obtained for a wide pressure range of P = 1-40 GPa. It is established that the percussive adiabat obtained for a single C6H6O12N12 crystal is in a good agreement with the experimental data. All calculations are performed using a LAMMPS molecular dynamics simulation software package that provides a ReaxFF-lg reactive force field to support the approach.

  12. Scrambled eggs: A highly sensitive molecular diagnostic workflow for Fasciola species specific detection from faecal samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvani, Nichola Eliza Davies; Windsor, Peter Andrew; Bush, Russell David

    2017-01-01

    Background Fasciolosis, due to Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, is a re-emerging zoonotic parasitic disease of worldwide importance. Human and animal infections are commonly diagnosed by the traditional sedimentation and faecal egg-counting technique. However, this technique is time-consuming and prone to sensitivity errors when a large number of samples must be processed or if the operator lacks sufficient experience. Additionally, diagnosis can only be made once the 12-week pre-patent period has passed. Recently, a commercially available coprological antigen ELISA has enabled detection of F. hepatica prior to the completion of the pre-patent period, providing earlier diagnosis and increased throughput, although species differentiation is not possible in areas of parasite sympatry. Real-time PCR offers the combined benefits of highly sensitive species differentiation for medium to large sample sizes. However, no molecular diagnostic workflow currently exists for the identification of Fasciola spp. in faecal samples. Methodology/Principal findings A new molecular diagnostic workflow for the highly-sensitive detection and quantification of Fasciola spp. in faecal samples was developed. The technique involves sedimenting and pelleting the samples prior to DNA isolation in order to concentrate the eggs, followed by disruption by bead-beating in a benchtop homogeniser to ensure access to DNA. Although both the new molecular workflow and the traditional sedimentation technique were sensitive and specific, the new molecular workflow enabled faster sample throughput in medium to large epidemiological studies, and provided the additional benefit of speciation. Further, good correlation (R2 = 0.74–0.76) was observed between the real-time PCR values and the faecal egg count (FEC) using the new molecular workflow for all herds and sampling periods. Finally, no effect of storage in 70% ethanol was detected on sedimentation and DNA isolation outcomes; enabling

  13. Scrambled eggs: A highly sensitive molecular diagnostic workflow for Fasciola species specific detection from faecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvani, Nichola Eliza Davies; Windsor, Peter Andrew; Bush, Russell David; Šlapeta, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Fasciolosis, due to Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, is a re-emerging zoonotic parasitic disease of worldwide importance. Human and animal infections are commonly diagnosed by the traditional sedimentation and faecal egg-counting technique. However, this technique is time-consuming and prone to sensitivity errors when a large number of samples must be processed or if the operator lacks sufficient experience. Additionally, diagnosis can only be made once the 12-week pre-patent period has passed. Recently, a commercially available coprological antigen ELISA has enabled detection of F. hepatica prior to the completion of the pre-patent period, providing earlier diagnosis and increased throughput, although species differentiation is not possible in areas of parasite sympatry. Real-time PCR offers the combined benefits of highly sensitive species differentiation for medium to large sample sizes. However, no molecular diagnostic workflow currently exists for the identification of Fasciola spp. in faecal samples. A new molecular diagnostic workflow for the highly-sensitive detection and quantification of Fasciola spp. in faecal samples was developed. The technique involves sedimenting and pelleting the samples prior to DNA isolation in order to concentrate the eggs, followed by disruption by bead-beating in a benchtop homogeniser to ensure access to DNA. Although both the new molecular workflow and the traditional sedimentation technique were sensitive and specific, the new molecular workflow enabled faster sample throughput in medium to large epidemiological studies, and provided the additional benefit of speciation. Further, good correlation (R2 = 0.74-0.76) was observed between the real-time PCR values and the faecal egg count (FEC) using the new molecular workflow for all herds and sampling periods. Finally, no effect of storage in 70% ethanol was detected on sedimentation and DNA isolation outcomes; enabling transport of samples from endemic to non

  14. Scrambled eggs: A highly sensitive molecular diagnostic workflow for Fasciola species specific detection from faecal samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichola Eliza Davies Calvani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fasciolosis, due to Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, is a re-emerging zoonotic parasitic disease of worldwide importance. Human and animal infections are commonly diagnosed by the traditional sedimentation and faecal egg-counting technique. However, this technique is time-consuming and prone to sensitivity errors when a large number of samples must be processed or if the operator lacks sufficient experience. Additionally, diagnosis can only be made once the 12-week pre-patent period has passed. Recently, a commercially available coprological antigen ELISA has enabled detection of F. hepatica prior to the completion of the pre-patent period, providing earlier diagnosis and increased throughput, although species differentiation is not possible in areas of parasite sympatry. Real-time PCR offers the combined benefits of highly sensitive species differentiation for medium to large sample sizes. However, no molecular diagnostic workflow currently exists for the identification of Fasciola spp. in faecal samples.A new molecular diagnostic workflow for the highly-sensitive detection and quantification of Fasciola spp. in faecal samples was developed. The technique involves sedimenting and pelleting the samples prior to DNA isolation in order to concentrate the eggs, followed by disruption by bead-beating in a benchtop homogeniser to ensure access to DNA. Although both the new molecular workflow and the traditional sedimentation technique were sensitive and specific, the new molecular workflow enabled faster sample throughput in medium to large epidemiological studies, and provided the additional benefit of speciation. Further, good correlation (R2 = 0.74-0.76 was observed between the real-time PCR values and the faecal egg count (FEC using the new molecular workflow for all herds and sampling periods. Finally, no effect of storage in 70% ethanol was detected on sedimentation and DNA isolation outcomes; enabling transport of samples from endemic

  15. Single-electron capture collisions of ground and metastable Ne2+ ions with molecular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, A.; Abu-Haija, O.; Harris, J.; Elkafrawy, T.; Kayani, A.; Kamber, E. Y.

    2013-09-01

    Using the translational energy-gain spectroscopy technique, we have measured the energy-gain spectra and absolute total cross sections for single-electron capture in collisions of Ne2+ with N2, CO2 and H2O at laboratory impact energies between 50 and 400 eV and 0° scattering angles. In all the collision systems studied here, reaction channels have been observed which indicate the presence of the long-lived metastable states of (2s2 2p4 1D and 1S) in the Ne2+ incident beam. These measurements also indicate that capture from the metastable states into excited states of the projectile product ions is the most important inelastic process. Contributions from capture accompanied by the excitation and ionization of the target product are also detected. In addition, the energy dependence of the total single-electron capture cross sections is studied and found to slowly increase with increasing impact energy. The present data are compared with the theoretical calculations of the classical over the barrier, extended classical over the barrier and Landau-Zener models.

  16. Rapid Molecular Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis by PCR-Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphee, Hatairat; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Prammananan, Therdsak; Wiriyachaiporn, Natpapas; Kanchanatavee, Airin; Dharakul, Tararaj

    2015-01-01

    Several existing molecular tests for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) are limited by complexity and cost, hindering their widespread application. The objective of this proof of concept study was to develop a simple Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow (NALF) immunoassay as a potential diagnostic alternative, to complement conventional PCR, for the rapid molecular detection of MDR-TB. The NALF device was designed using antibodies for the indirect detection of labeled PCR amplification products. Multiplex PCR was optimized to permit the simultaneous detection of the drug resistant determining mutations in the 81-bp hot spot region of the rpoB gene (rifampicin resistance), while semi-nested PCR was optimized for the S315T mutation detection in the katG gene (isoniazid resistance). The amplification process additionally targeted a conserved region of the genes as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) DNA control. The optimized conditions were validated with the H37Rv wild-type (WT) Mtb isolate and Mtb isolates with known mutations (MT) within the rpoB and katG genes. Results indicate the correct identification of WT (drug susceptible) and MT (drug resistant) Mtb isolates, with the least limit of detection (LOD) being 104 genomic copies per PCR reaction. NALF is a simple, rapid and low-cost device suitable for low resource settings where conventional PCR is already employed on a regular basis. Moreover, the use of antibody-based NALF to target primer-labels, without the requirement for DNA hybridization, renders the device generic, which could easily be adapted for the molecular diagnosis of other infectious and non-infectious diseases requiring nucleic acid detection. PMID:26355296

  17. Rapid Molecular Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis by PCR-Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow Immunoassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatairat Kamphee

    Full Text Available Several existing molecular tests for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB are limited by complexity and cost, hindering their widespread application. The objective of this proof of concept study was to develop a simple Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow (NALF immunoassay as a potential diagnostic alternative, to complement conventional PCR, for the rapid molecular detection of MDR-TB. The NALF device was designed using antibodies for the indirect detection of labeled PCR amplification products. Multiplex PCR was optimized to permit the simultaneous detection of the drug resistant determining mutations in the 81-bp hot spot region of the rpoB gene (rifampicin resistance, while semi-nested PCR was optimized for the S315T mutation detection in the katG gene (isoniazid resistance. The amplification process additionally targeted a conserved region of the genes as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb DNA control. The optimized conditions were validated with the H37Rv wild-type (WT Mtb isolate and Mtb isolates with known mutations (MT within the rpoB and katG genes. Results indicate the correct identification of WT (drug susceptible and MT (drug resistant Mtb isolates, with the least limit of detection (LOD being 104 genomic copies per PCR reaction. NALF is a simple, rapid and low-cost device suitable for low resource settings where conventional PCR is already employed on a regular basis. Moreover, the use of antibody-based NALF to target primer-labels, without the requirement for DNA hybridization, renders the device generic, which could easily be adapted for the molecular diagnosis of other infectious and non-infectious diseases requiring nucleic acid detection.

  18. Acanthamoeba keratitis: improving the Scottish diagnostic service for the rapid molecular detection of Acanthamoeba species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Claire Low; Coyne, Michael; Jones, Brian; Anijeet, Deepa

    2015-07-01

    Acanthamoeba species are responsible for causing the potentially sight-threatening condition, Acanthamoeba keratitis, which is commonly associated with contact lens use. In this report, we highlight the challenges faced using conventional laboratory identification methods to identify this often under-reported pathogen, and discuss the reasons for introducing the first national service in Scotland for the rapid and sensitive molecular identification of Acanthamoeba species. By comparing culture and molecular testing data from a total of 63 patients (n = 80 samples) throughout Scotland presenting with ocular eye disease, we describe the improvement in detection rates where an additional four positive cases were identified using a molecular assay versus culture. The testing of a further ten patients by confocal imaging is also presented. This report emphasizes the importance of continuing to improve clinical laboratory services to ensure a prompt, correct diagnosis and better prognosis, in addition to raising awareness of this potentially debilitating opportunistic pathogen.

  19. Clinical and molecular characterization of 112 single-center patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsello, Giovanni; Antona, Vincenzo; Serra, Gregorio; Zara, Federico; Giambrone, Clara; Lagalla, Luca; Piccione, Maria; Piro, Ettore

    2018-04-04

    The aim of this retrospective study was to define clinical and molecular characteristics of a large sample of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients, as well as to evaluate mutational spectrum and genotype-phenotype correlation. NF1 is a relatively common neurogenetic disorder (1:2500-1:3000 individuals). It is caused by mutations of the NF1 gene on chromosome 17ql1.2, with autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and wide phenotypical variability. Café-au-lait spots (CALs), cutaneous and/or subcutaneous neurofibromas (CNFs/SCNFs), skinfold freckling, skeletal abnormalities, Lisch nodules of the iris and increased risk of learning and intellectual disabilities, as well as tumors of the nervous system and other organs are its main clinical features. The preliminary group collected 168 subjects with clinical suspicion of NF1. They were evaluated following the National Institutes of Health (NIH) criteria for NF1, revised by Gutmann et al. 1997, integrated for 67 of them by molecular testing. According to these references, 112 of 168 patients were diagnosed as NF1. The sample was characterized by an equal sex ratio (57 males, 55 females) and age distribution ranging from 10 days to 60 years of age (mean age, 13 years). A wide spectrum of clinical features has been observed in our patients. Mutational analysis resulted positive in 51 cases (76%). Twenty-four mutations detected in our cohort have not been reported to date. This study may contribute to a better definition of genotypic and phenotypic features of NF1 patients, with respect to further insights into the clinical characterization of the disease. In addition, an amplification of the spectrum of mutations in the NF1 gene has been documented.

  20. SINGLE TREE DETECTION FROM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA USING A MARKED POINT PROCESS BASED METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tree detection and reconstruction is of great interest in large-scale city modelling. In this paper, we present a marked point process model to detect single trees from airborne laser scanning (ALS data. We consider single trees in ALS recovered canopy height model (CHM as a realization of point process of circles. Unlike traditional marked point process, we sample the model in a constraint configuration space by making use of image process techniques. A Gibbs energy is defined on the model, containing a data term which judge the fitness of the model with respect to the data, and prior term which incorporate the prior knowledge of object layouts. We search the optimal configuration through a steepest gradient descent algorithm. The presented hybrid framework was test on three forest plots and experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Molecular detection of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar infection among wild rats in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Y L; Jamaiah, I; Rohela, M; Fong, M Y; Siti, C O S; Siti, F A

    2014-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica infection is the third-greatest parasitic disease responsible for death in the world. Wild rats harbouring E. histolytica can be the possible reservoir hosts for human amoebiasis. There were numerous studies on prevalence of intestinal parasites among wild rats in Malaysia but none has reported E. histolytica. Rats were captured from Sentul and Chow Kit areas, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The preserved stool samples were used for microscopy examination and molecular analysis. Out of 137 samples collected, 12 were positive for E. histolytica / E. dispar / E. moshkovskii microscopically. Two E. histolytica (1.4%), 1 E. dispar (0.7%) and 6 mixed infections of E. histolytica and E. dispar (4.3%) were detected using PCR. This is the first report of molecular detection of E. histolytica/dispar infection among wild rats in Malaysia. This study provides useful information about the potential risks of zoonotic agents and the importance of developing control measures to prevent zoonotic transmission.

  2. Comparison between Conventional OCDMA and Subcarrier Multiplexing SAC OCDMA System Based on Single Photodiode Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad N. A. A; Junita M. N; Aljunid Syed Alwi; Che Beson Mohd Rashidi; Endut Rosdisham

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the comparison between conventional OCDMA system and subcarrier multiplexing (SCM) SAC-OCDMA system by applying Recursive Combinatorial (RC) code based on single photodiode detection (SPD). SPD is used in the receiver part to reduce the effect of multiple access interference (MAI) which contributes as a dominant noise in incoherent SAC-OCDMA systems. From this analysis, the performance of SCM OCDMA network could be improved by using lower data rates and higher received...

  3. Rapid detection of single nucleotide mutation in p53 gene based on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of target complementary DNA in the range 0.5 fM to 0.05 nM, with a detection limit of 0.36 ± 0.04 fM. ... reaction between single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and its ... ing more selective and sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensors.12,13. Graphene, a new class of two-dimensional sheet material, which was discovered by Geim ...

  4. Overview of molecular typing methods for outbreak detection and epidemiological surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabat, A J; Budimir, A; Nashev, D; Sá-Leão, R; van Dijl, J m; Laurent, F; Grundmann, H; Friedrich, A W

    2013-01-24

    Typing methods for discriminating different bacterial isolates of the same species are essential epidemiological tools in infection prevention and control. Traditional typing systems based on phenotypes, such as serotype, biotype, phage-type, or antibiogram, have been used for many years. However, more recent methods that examine the relatedness of isolates at a molecular level have revolutionised our ability to differentiate among bacterial types and subtypes. Importantly, the development of molecular methods has provided new tools for enhanced surveillance and outbreak detection. This has resulted in better implementation of rational infection control programmes and efficient allocation of resources across Europe. The emergence of benchtop sequencers using next generation sequencing technology makes bacterial whole genome sequencing (WGS) feasible even in small research and clinical laboratories. WGS has already been used for the characterisation of bacterial isolates in several large outbreaks in Europe and, in the near future, is likely to replace currently used typing methodologies due to its ultimate resolution. However, WGS is still too laborious and time-consuming to obtain useful data in routine surveillance. Also, a largely unresolved question is how genome sequences must be examined for epidemiological characterisation. In the coming years, the lessons learnt from currently used molecular methods will allow us to condense the WGS data into epidemiologically useful information. On this basis, we have reviewed current and new molecular typing methods for outbreak detection and epidemiological surveillance of bacterial pathogens in clinical practice, aiming to give an overview of their specific advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Urinary high molecular weight matrix metalloproteinases as non-invasive biomarker for detection of bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Mohammed A; Seleim, Manar F; Abdalla, Mohga S; Sharada, Hayat M; Abdel Wahab, Abdel Hady A

    2013-01-01

    Background Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key molecules for tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. Over-expression of different MMPs in tumor tissues can disturb the homeostasis and increase the level of various body fluids. Many MMPs including high molecular weights (HMWs) were detected in the urine of prostate and bladder cancer patients. Our aim here is to assess the usefulness of HMW MMPs as non invasive biomarkers in bilharzial bladder cancer in Egyptian patients. Methods The activ...

  6. Coherent manipulation of three-qubit states in a molecular single-ion magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, M. D.; Duan, Y.; Diosdado, B.; García-Ripoll, J. J.; Gaita-Ariño, A.; Giménez-Saiz, C.; Alonso, P. J.; Coronado, E.; Luis, F.

    2017-02-01

    We study the quantum spin dynamics of nearly isotropic Gd3 + ions entrapped in polyoxometalate molecules and diluted in crystals of a diamagnetic Y3 + derivative. The full energy-level spectrum and the orientations of the magnetic anisotropy axes have been determined by means of continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance experiments, using X-band (9-10 GHz) cavities and on-chip superconducting waveguides and 1.5-GHz resonators. The results show that seven allowed transitions between the 2 S +1 spin states can be separately addressed. Spin coherence T2 and spin-lattice relaxation T1 rates have been measured for each of these transitions in properly oriented single crystals. The results suggest that quantum spin coherence is limited by residual dipolar interactions with neighbor electronic spins. Coherent Rabi oscillations have been observed for all transitions. The Rabi frequencies increase with microwave power and agree quantitatively with predictions based on the spin Hamiltonian of the molecular spin. We argue that the spin states of each Gd3 + ion can be mapped onto the states of three addressable qubits (or, alternatively, of a d =8 -level "qudit"), for which the seven allowed transitions form a universal set of operations. Within this scheme, one of the coherent oscillations observed experimentally provides an implementation of a controlled-controlled-NOT (or Toffoli) three-qubit gate.

  7. A Single Molecular Diels-Alder Crosslinker for Achieving Recyclable Cross-Linked Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shengli; Wang, Fenfen; Peng, Yongjin; Chen, Tiehong; Wu, Qiang; Sun, Pingchuan

    2015-09-01

    A triol-functional crosslinker combining the thermoreversible properties of Diels-Alder (DA) adducts in one molecule is designed, synthesized, and used as an ideal substitute of a traditional crosslinker to prepare thermal recyclable cross-linked polyurethanes with excellent mechanical properties and recyclability in a very simple and efficient way. The recycle property of these materials achieved by the DA/retro-DA reaction at a suitable temperature is verified by differential scanning calorimetry and in situ variable temperature solid-state NMR experiments during the cyclic heating and cooling processes. The thermal recyclability and remending ability of the bulk polyurethanes is demonstrated by three polymer processing methods, including hot-press molding, injection molding, and solution casting. It is notable that all the recycled cross-linked polymers display nearly invariable elongation/stress at break compared to the as-synthesized samples. Further end-group functionalization of this single molecular DA crosslinker provides the potential in preparing a wide range of recyclable cross-linked polymers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Integrative Single-Cell Transcriptomics Reveals Molecular Networks Defining Neuronal Maturation During Postnatal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Wang, Feifei; Eisinger, Brian E; Kelnhofer, Laurel E; Jobe, Emily M; Zhao, Xinyu

    2017-03-01

    In mammalian hippocampus, new neurons are continuously produced from neural stem cells throughout life. This postnatal neurogenesis may contribute to information processing critical for cognition, adaptation, learning, and memory, and is implicated in numerous neurological disorders. During neurogenesis, the immature neuron stage defined by doublecortin (DCX) expression is the most sensitive to regulation by extrinsic factors. However, little is known about the dynamic biology within this critical interval that drives maturation and confers susceptibility to regulatory signals. This study aims to test the hypothesis that DCX-expressing immature neurons progress through developmental stages via activity of specific transcriptional networks. Using single-cell RNA-seq combined with a novel integrative bioinformatics approach, we discovered that individual immature neurons can be classified into distinct developmental subgroups based on characteristic gene expression profiles and subgroup-specific markers. Comparisons between immature and more mature subgroups revealed novel pathways involved in neuronal maturation. Genes enriched in less mature cells shared significant overlap with genes implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, while genes positively associated with neuronal maturation were enriched for autism-related gene sets. Our study thus discovers molecular signatures of individual immature neurons and unveils potential novel targets for therapeutic approaches to treat neurodevelopmental and neurological diseases. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Molecular Modeling of PEGylated Peptides, Dendrimers, and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwankyu Lee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG has been conjugated to many drugs or drug carriers to increase their solubility and circulating lifetime, and reduce toxicity. This has motivated many experimental studies to understand the effect of PEGylation on delivery efficiency. To complement the experimental findings and uncover the mechanism that cannot be captured by experiments, all-atom and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD simulations have been performed. This has become possible, due to recent advances in simulation methodologies and computational power. Simulations of PEGylated peptides show that PEG chains wrap antimicrobial peptides and weaken their binding interactions with lipid bilayers. PEGylation also influences the helical stability and tertiary structure of coiled-coil peptides. PEGylated dendrimers and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs were simulated, showing that the PEG size and grafting density significantly modulate the conformation and structure of the PEGylated complex, the interparticle aggregation, and the interaction with lipid bilayers. In particular, simulations predicted the structural transition between the dense core and dense shell of PEGylated dendrimers, the phase behavior of self-assembled complexes of lipids, PEGylated lipids, and SWNTs, which all favorably compared with experiments. Overall, these new findings indicate that simulations can now predict the experimentally observed structure and dynamics, as well as provide atomic-scale insights into the interactions of PEGylated complexes with other molecules.

  10. Detection Of Volatile Oil Content Of Single-Grainzanthoxylum Seed Based on Nir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Wang, Yiming; Wu, Jingzhu; Zhu, Shiping

    A NIR model was established to predict the volatile oil content of single particle red Zanthoxylum seed in this paper. With the characteristic of irregular surface, A single Zanthoxylum seed will reflect the great difference in response to spectrum signals the entire spectrum detection and exceptional sample rejection method were employed before model optimization. As a result, the NIR model for predicting the content of volatile oil were built up by 74 red Zanthoxylum seed and results indicated: the NIR model of the single grain Zanthoxylum seed had good stability and predictability (RSD3). Results of this paper suggested that NIR could be used as a quick and convenient method for predicting the volatile oil content of Zanthoxylum seed, which is useful for breeding and the quality evaluation of it.

  11. GAGG:ce single crystalline films: New perspective scintillators for electron detection in SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jan; Lalinský, Ondřej; Hanuš, Martin; Onderišinová, Zuzana; Kelar, Jakub; Kučera, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Single crystal scintillators are frequently used for electron detection in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We report gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (GAGG:Ce) single crystalline films as a new perspective scintillators for the SEM. For the first time, the epitaxial garnet films were used in a practical application: the GAGG:Ce scintillator was incorporated into a SEM scintillation electron detector and it showed improved image quality. In order to prove the GAGG:Ce quality accurately, the scintillation properties were examined using electron beam excitation and compared with frequently used scintillators in the SEM. The results demonstrate excellent emission efficiency of the GAGG:Ce single crystalline films together with their very fast scintillation decay useful for demanding SEM applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Highly sensitive immunoassay of protein molecules based on single nanoparticle fluorescence detection in a nanowell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hee-Joo; Lakshmana, Sudheendra; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2011-03-01

    A nanoarray based-single molecule detection system was developed for detecting proteins with extremely high sensitivity. The nanoarray was able to effectively trap nanoparticles conjugated with biological sample into nanowells by integrating with an electrophoretic particle entrapment system (EPES). The nanoarray/EPES is superior to other biosensor using immunoassays in terms of saving the amounts of biological solution and enhancing kinetics of antibody binding due to reduced steric hindrance from the neighboring biological molecules. The nanoarray patterned onto a layer of PMMA and LOL on conductive and transparent indium tin oxide (ITO)-glass slide by using e-beam lithography. The suspension of 500 nm-fluorescent (green emission)-carboxylated polystyrene (PS) particles coated with protein-A followed by BDE 47 polyclonal antibody was added to the chip that was connected to the positive voltage. The droplet was covered by another ITO-coated-glass slide and connected to a ground terminal. After trapping the particles into the nanowells, the solution of different concentrations of anti-rabbit- IgG labeled with Alexa 532 was added for an immunoassay. A single molecule detection system could quantify the anti-rabbit IgG down to atto-mole level by counting photons emitted from the fluorescent dye bound to a single nanoparticle in a nanowell.

  13. Molecular basis of proton uptake in single and double mutants of cytochrome c oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Rowan M; Caplan, David; Pomes, Regis [Molecular Structure and Function, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Fadda, Elisa, E-mail: pomes@sickkids.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Galway (Ireland)

    2011-06-15

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, utilizes the reduction of dioxygen into water to pump protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The principal pathway of proton uptake into the enzyme, the D channel, is a 2.5 nm long channel-like cavity named after a conserved, negatively charged aspartic acid (D) residue thought to help recruiting protons to its entrance (D132 in the first subunit of the S. sphaeroides enzyme). The single-point mutation of D132 to asparagine (N), a neutral residue, abolishes enzyme activity. Conversely, replacing conserved N139, one-third into the D channel, by D, induces a decoupled phenotype, whereby oxygen reduction proceeds but not proton pumping. Intriguingly, the double mutant D132N/N139D, which conserves the charge of the D channel, restores the wild-type phenotype. We use molecular dynamics simulations and electrostatic calculations to examine the structural and physical basis for the coupling of proton pumping and oxygen chemistry in single and double N139D mutants. The potential of mean force for the conformational isomerization of N139 and N139D side chains reveals the presence of three rotamers, one of which faces the channel entrance. This out-facing conformer is metastable in the wild-type and in the N139D single mutant, but predominant in the double mutant thanks to the loss of electrostatic repulsion with the carboxylate group of D132. The effects of mutations and conformational isomerization on the pKa of E286, an essential proton-shuttling residue located at the top of the D channel, are shown to be consistent with the electrostatic control of proton pumping proposed recently (Fadda et al 2008 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1777 277-84). Taken together, these results suggest that preserving the spatial distribution of charges at the entrance of the D channel is necessary to guarantee both the uptake and the relay of protons to the active site of the enzyme. These findings highlight the interplay

  14. Single photon detection and localization accuracy with an ebCMOS camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cajgfinger, T. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Dominjon, A., E-mail: agnes.dominjon@nao.ac.jp [Université de Lyon, Université de Lyon 1, Lyon 69003 France. (France); Barbier, R. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Université de Lyon, Université de Lyon 1, Lyon 69003 France. (France)

    2015-07-01

    The CMOS sensor technologies evolve very fast and offer today very promising solutions to existing issues facing by imaging camera systems. CMOS sensors are very attractive for fast and sensitive imaging thanks to their low pixel noise (1e-) and their possibility of backside illumination. The ebCMOS group of IPNL has produced a camera system dedicated to Low Light Level detection and based on a 640 kPixels ebCMOS with its acquisition system. After reminding the principle of detection of an ebCMOS and the characteristics of our prototype, we confront our camera to other imaging systems. We compare the identification efficiency and the localization accuracy of a point source by four different photo-detection devices: the scientific CMOS (sCMOS), the Charge Coupled Device (CDD), the Electron Multiplying CCD (emCCD) and the Electron Bombarded CMOS (ebCMOS). Our ebCMOS camera is able to identify a single photon source in less than 10 ms with a localization accuracy better than 1 µm. We report as well efficiency measurement and the false positive identification of the ebCMOS camera by identifying more than hundreds of single photon sources in parallel. About 700 spots are identified with a detection efficiency higher than 90% and a false positive percentage lower than 5. With these measurements, we show that our target tracking algorithm can be implemented in real time at 500 frames per second under a photon flux of the order of 8000 photons per frame. These results demonstrate that the ebCMOS camera concept with its single photon detection and target tracking algorithm is one of the best devices for low light and fast applications such as bioluminescence imaging, quantum dots tracking or adaptive optics.

  15. Molecular and serological detection of Ehrlichia canis and Babesia vogeli in dogs in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hernández, G; André, M R; Faria, J L M; Munhoz, T D; Hernandez-Rodriguez, M; Machado, R Z; Tinucci-Costa, M

    2012-05-25

    Ehrlichiosis and babesiosis are tick-borne diseases, caused mainly by Ehrlichia canis and Babesia canis, respectively, with a worldwide occurrence in dogs, whose main vector is the brown-dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. The present work aimed to detect the presence of E. canis and Babesia sp. in 91 dog blood samples in Colombia, by molecular and serological techniques. We also performed sequence alignment to indicate the identity of the parasite species infecting these animals. The present work shows the first molecular detection of E. canis and B. vogeli in dogs from Colombia. Immunoglobulin-G (IgG) antibodies to E. canis and Babesia vogeli were found in 75 (82.4%) and 47 (51.6%) sampled dogs, respectively. Thirty-seven (40.6%) and 5 (5.5%) dogs were positive in PCR for E. canis and Babesia sp., respectively. After sequencing, amplicons showed 99% of identity with isolates of E. canis and B. vogeli. The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA-Anaplasmataceae sequences and 18S rRNA-piroplasmid sequences supported the identity of the found E. canis and B. vogeli DNAs, respectively. The present work shows the first molecular detection of E. canis and B. vogeli in dogs in Colombia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A molecular imaging biosensor detects in vivo protein folding and misfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheahan, Anjali V; Sekar, Thillai V; Chen, Kai; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Massoud, Tarik F

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant protein folding represents the molecular basis of many important human diseases. Although the discovery of new anti-misfolding drugs is a major priority in molecular therapeutics, there is currently no generalizable protein folding assay for use in cell-based high throughput screening (HTS) of chemical libraries, or for in vivo imaging. We molecularly engineered a bioluminescence-based biosensor composed of rationally split Firefly luciferase reporter fragments flanking a test protein, and used this in a protein-fragment complementation assay to quantitatively measure folding of the test protein. We comprehensively validated this biosensor in vitro, in cells, and by optically imaging protein folding and misfolding in living mice using several test proteins including enhanced green fluorescent protein, Renilla luciferase, Gaussia luciferase, and SIRT1. Applications of this novel biosensor are potentially far-reaching in both cell-based HTS approaches to discover new anti-misfolding drugs, and when using the same biosensor in validation studies of drug candidates in small animal models. Novel anti-misfolding drugs are needed as molecular therapeutics for many diseases. We developed first in vivo imaging protein folding biosensor to aid drug discovery. Biosensor created by flanking a test protein with rationally split Firefly luciferase. Biosensor validated by detecting folding of test proteins EGFP, Rluc, Gluc, and SIRT1. Generalizable molecular biosensor for translational applications in drug screening.

  17. Detecting Stems in Dense and Homogeneous Forest Using Single-Scan TLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobo Xia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stem characteristics of plants are of great importance to both ecology study and forest management. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS may provide an effective way to characterize the fine-scale structures of vegetation. However, clumping plants, dense foliage and thin structure could intensify the shadowing effect and pose a series of problems in identifying stems, distinguishing neighboring stems, and merging disconnected stem parts in point clouds. This paper presents a new method to automatically detect stems in dense and homogeneous forest using single-scan TLS data. Stem points are first identified with a two-scale classification method. Then a clustering approach is used to group the candidate stem points. Finally, a direction-growing algorithm based on a simple stem curve model is applied to merge stem points. Field experiments were carried out in two different bamboo plots with a stem density of about 7500 stems/ha. Overall accuracy of the stem detection is 88% and the quality of detected stems is mainly affected by the shadowing effect. Results indicate that the proposed method is feasible and effective in detection of bamboo stems using TLS data, and can be applied to other species of single-stem plants in dense forests.

  18. Single-trial lie detection using a combined fNIRS-polygraph system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raheel eBhutta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Deception is a human behavior that many people experience in daily life. It involves complex neuronal activities in addition to several physiological changes in the body. A polygraph, which can measure some of the physiological responses from the body, has been widely employed in lie-detection. Many researchers, however, believe that lie detection can become more precise if the neuronal changes that occur in the process of deception can be isolated and measured. In this study, we combine both measures (i.e., physiological and neuronal changes for enhanced lie-detection. Specifically, to investigate the deception-related hemodynamic response, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS is applied at the prefrontal cortex besides a commercially available polygraph system. A mock crime scenario with a single-trial stimulus is set up as a deception protocol. The acquired data are classified into true and lie classes based on the fNIRS-based hemoglobin-concentration changes and polygraph-based physiological signal changes. Linear discriminant analysis is utilized as a classifier. The results indicate that the combined fNIRS-polygraph system delivers much higher classification accuracy than that of a singular system. This study demonstrates a plausible solution toward single-trial lie-detection by combining fNIRS and the polygraph.

  19. Detection of Staphylococci aureus cells with single domain antibody functionalized Raman nanoparobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Li-Lin; Tanha, Jamshid; Ryan, Shannon; Veres, Teodor

    2007-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated to be an effective tool in the detection and classification of pathogenic microorganisms. The technique is, however, limited by the inherently low cross-section of the Raman scattering process. Among the many enhanced Raman processes, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique provides the highest sensitivity and can be easily adapted in the bio-sensing applications such as DNA hybridization and protein binding events. In this study, we report the targeted detection of the pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, with novel single domain antibody (sdAb) conjugated SERS nanoprobes. A sdAb specific to protein A of S. aureus cells was conjugated to silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP). Bacteria recognition was achieved through specific binding of the sdAb (conjugated to SERS nanoprobe) to protein A. Binding rendered the nanoparticle-labeled S. aureus cells SERS active. As a result, S. aureus cells could be detected rapidly and with excellent sensitivity by monitoring the SERS vibrational signatures. This work demonstrates that the SERS imaging technique offers excellent sensitivity with a detection limit of a single bacterium.

  20. Single-trial lie detection using a combined fNIRS-polygraph system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutta, M Raheel; Hong, Melissa J; Kim, Yun-Hee; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2015-01-01

    Deception is a human behavior that many people experience in daily life. It involves complex neuronal activities in addition to several physiological changes in the body. A polygraph, which can measure some of the physiological responses from the body, has been widely employed in lie-detection. Many researchers, however, believe that lie detection can become more precise if the neuronal changes that occur in the process of deception can be isolated and measured. In this study, we combine both measures (i.e., physiological and neuronal changes) for enhanced lie-detection. Specifically, to investigate the deception-related hemodynamic response, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is applied at the prefrontal cortex besides a commercially available polygraph system. A mock crime scenario with a single-trial stimulus is set up as a deception protocol. The acquired data are classified into "true" and "lie" classes based on the fNIRS-based hemoglobin-concentration changes and polygraph-based physiological signal changes. Linear discriminant analysis is utilized as a classifier. The results indicate that the combined fNIRS-polygraph system delivers much higher classification accuracy than that of a singular system. This study demonstrates a plausible solution toward single-trial lie-detection by combining fNIRS and the polygraph.

  1. A highly selective molecularly imprinted electrochemiluminescence sensor for ultra-trace beryllium detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianping, E-mail: likianping@263.net; Ma, Fei; Wei, Xiaoping; Fu, Cong; Pan, Hongcheng

    2015-04-29

    Graphical abstract: A novel molecular imprinted electrochemiluminescence sensor was fabricated for ultra-trace Be{sup 2+} detection with an extremely lower detection limit based on the luminol–H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ECL system. - Highlights: • A novel molecular imprinted electrochemiluminescence sensor was fabricated for ultra-trace Be{sup 2+} detection. • Imprint cavities in the MIPs from elution the Be–PAR complex could provide more recognition sites for analytes. • ECL emission produced by the luminol–H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ECL system, which was applied to detect Be{sup 2+}. • It gave an extremely lower detection limit (2.35 × 10{sup −11} mol L{sup −1}) than the reported methods. - Abstract: A new molecularly imprinted electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor was proposed for highly sensitive and selective determination of ultratrace Be{sup 2+} determination. The complex of Be{sup 2+} with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR) was chosen as the template molecule for the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP). In this assay, the complex molecule could be eluted from the MIP, and the cavities formed could then selectively recognize the complex molecules. The cavities formed could also work as the tunnel for the transfer of probe molecules to produce sound responsive signal. The determination was based on the intensity of the signal, which was proportional to the concentrations of the complex molecule in the sample solution, and the Be{sup 2+} concentration could then be determined indirectly. The results showed that in the range of 7 × 10{sup −11} mol L{sup −1} to 8.0 × 10{sup −9} mol L{sup −1}, the ECL intensity had a linear relationship with the Be{sup 2+} concentrations, with the limit of detection of 2.35 × 10{sup −11} mol L{sup −1}. This method was successfully used to detect Be{sup 2+} in real water samples.

  2. Photonic-crystal membranes for optical detection of single nano-particles, designed for biosensor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grepstad, Jon Olav; Kaspar, Peter; Solgaard, Olav; Johansen, Ib-Rune; Sudbø, Aasmund S

    2012-03-26

    A sensor designed to detect bio-molecules is presented. The sensor exploits a planar 2D photonic crystal (PC) membrane with sub-micron thickness and through holes, to induce high optical fields that allow detection of nano-particles smaller than the diffraction limit of an optical microscope. We report on our design and fabrication of a PC membrane with a nano-particle trapped inside. We have also designed and built an imaging system where an optical microscope and a CCD camera are used to take images of the PC membrane. Results show how the trapped nano-particle appears as a bright spot in the image. In a first experimental realization of the imaging system, single particles with a radius of 75 nm can be detected.

  3. Topoisomerase I as a Biomarker: Detection of Activity at the Single Molecule Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proszek, Joanna; Roy, Amit; Jakobsen, Ann-Katrine

    2014-01-01

    of hTopI cleavage-religation activity at the single molecule level, may be used to detect posttranslational enzymatic differences influencing CPT response. These differences cannot be detected by analysis of hTopI gene copy number, mRNA amount, or protein amount, and only become apparent upon measuring......Human topoisomerase I (hTopI) is an essential cellular enzyme. The enzyme is often upregulated in cancer cells, and it is a target for chemotherapeutic drugs of the camptothecin (CPT) family. Response to CPT-based treatment is dependent on hTopI activity, and reduction in activity, and mutations...... in hTopI have been reported to result in CPT resistance. Therefore, hTOPI gene copy number, mRNA level, protein amount, and enzyme activity have been studied to explain differences in cellular response to CPT. We show that Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD), allowing measurement...

  4. Network single-walled carbon nanotube biosensors for fast and highly sensitive detection of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pingán; Zhang, Jia; Wen, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Can

    2011-08-19

    Detection of proteins is powerfully assayed in the diagnosis of diseases. A strategy for the development of an ultrahigh sensitivity biosensor based on a network single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) has been demonstrated. Metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs) in the network nanotube FET were selectively removed or cut via a carefully controlled procedure of electrical break-down (BD), and left non-conducting m-SWNTs which magnified the Schottky barrier (SB) area. This nanotube FET exhibited ultrahigh sensitivity and fast response to biomolecules. The lowest detection limit of 0.5 pM was achieved by exploiting streptavidin (SA) or a biotin/SA pair as the research model, and BD-treated nanotube biosensors had a 2 × 10(4)-fold lower minimum detectable concentration than the device without BD treatment. The response time is in the range of 0.3-3 min.

  5. Technical Note: The single particle soot photometer fails to reliably detect PALAS soot nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gysel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The single particle soot photometer (SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence (LII for the measurement of atmospheric black carbon (BC particles. The BC mass concentration is obtained by combining quantitative detection of BC mass in single particles with a counting efficiency of 100% above its lower detection limit. It is commonly accepted that a particle must contain at least several tenths of a femtogram BC in order to be detected by the SP2.

    Here we show the result that most BC particles from a PALAS spark discharge soot generator remain undetected by the SP2, even if their BC mass, as independently determined with an aerosol particle mass analyser (APM, is clearly above the typical lower detection limit of the SP2. Comparison of counting efficiency and effective density data of PALAS soot with flame generated soot (combustion aerosol standard burner, CAST, fullerene soot and carbon black particles (Cabot Regal 400R reveals that particle morphology can affect the SP2's lower detection limit. PALAS soot particles are fractal-like agglomerates of very small primary particles with a low fractal dimension, resulting in a very low effective density. Such loosely packed particles behave like "the sum of individual primary particles" in the SP2's laser. Accordingly, most PALAS soot particles remain undetected as the SP2's laser intensity is insufficient to heat the primary particles to their vaporisation temperature because of their small size (Dpp ≈ 5–10 nm. Previous knowledge from pulsed laser-induced incandescence indicated that particle morphology might have an effect on the SP2's lower detection limit, however, an increase of the lower detection limit by a factor of ∼5–10, as reported here for PALAS soot, was not expected.

    In conclusion, the SP2's lower detection limit at a certain laser power depends primarily on the total BC mass per particle for compact particles with sufficiently high effective

  6. Data-Driven Techniques for Detecting Dynamical State Changes in Noisily Measured 3D Single-Molecule Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Calderon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Optical microscopes and nanoscale probes (AFM, optical tweezers, etc. afford researchers tools capable of quantitatively exploring how molecules interact with one another in live cells. The analysis of in vivo single-molecule experimental data faces numerous challenges due to the complex, crowded, and time changing environments associated with live cells. Fluctuations and spatially varying systematic forces experienced by molecules change over time; these changes are obscured by “measurement noise” introduced by the experimental probe monitoring the system. In this article, we demonstrate how the Hierarchical Dirichlet Process Switching Linear Dynamical System (HDP-SLDS of Fox et al. [IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 59] can be used to detect both subtle and abrupt state changes in time series containing “thermal” and “measurement” noise. The approach accounts for temporal dependencies induced by random and “systematic overdamped” forces. The technique does not require one to subjectively select the number of “hidden states” underlying a trajectory in an a priori fashion. The number of hidden states is simultaneously inferred along with change points and parameters characterizing molecular motion in a data-driven fashion. We use large scale simulations to study and compare the new approach to state-of-the-art Hidden Markov Modeling techniques. Simulations mimicking single particle tracking (SPT experiments are the focus of this study.

  7. Visual detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotolune by molecularly imprinted colloidal array photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Asher, Sanford A., E-mail: asher@pitt.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Meng, Zihui, E-mail: m_zihui@yahoo.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Yan, Zequn [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Xue, Min, E-mail: minxue@bit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Qiu, Lili, E-mail: qiulili@bit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Yi, Da [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China)

    2016-10-05

    Graphical abstract: Molecularly imprinted colloidal array (MICA) was explored for the selective visual detection of TNT with color changing from green to red. And molecularly imprinted colloidal particles (MICs) were evaluated for the adsorption capacity and the imprinting efficiency. The MICA had excellent flexibility, reversibility and stability. It promised high potential for the visual semi-quantitative detection of other explosives. - Highlights: • Molecularly imprinted colloidal array (MICA) was used to visually detect TNT. • The relationship of particle size, diffracted wavelength and color was discussed. • The adsorption capacity and imprinting efficiency of MICs were calculated. • MICA had short response time, high selectivity, good reversibility and stability. • MICA had high potential to be used in other customed visual explosive detection. - Abstract: We developed a photonic crystal (PhC) sensor for the quantification of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in solution. Monodisperse (210 nm in diameter) molecularly imprinted colloidal particles (MICs) for TNT were prepared by the emulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate and acrylamide in the presence of TNT as a template. The MICs were then self-assembled into close-packed opal PhC films. The adsorption capacity of the MICs for TNT was 64 mg TNT/g. The diffraction from the PhC depended on the TNT concentration in a methanol/water (3/2, v/v) potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer solution (pH = 7.0, 30 mM). The limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor was 1.03 μg. The color of the molecularly imprinted colloidal array (MICA) changed from green to red with an 84 nm diffraction red shift when the TNT concentration increased to 20 mM. The sensor response time was 3 min. The PhC sensor was selective for TNT compared to similar compounds such as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2-nitromesitylene, 4-nitrotoluene, 2-nitrotoluene, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, methylbenzene, 4-nitrophenol

  8. Advanced molecular diagnostic techniques for detection of food-borne pathogens: Current applications and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesha, S; Manukumar, H M

    2018-01-02

    The elimination of disease-causing microbes from the food supply is a primary goal and this review deals with the overall techniques available for detection of food-borne pathogens. Now-a-days conventional methods are replaced by advanced methods like Biosensors, Nucleic Acid-based Tests (NAT), and different PCR-based techniques used in molecular biology to identify specific pathogens. Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli, Campylobacter, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp., Penicillium spp., and pathogens are detected in contaminated food items that cause always diseases in human in any one or the other way. Identification of food-borne pathogens in a short period of time is still a challenge to the scientific field in general and food technology in particular. The low level of food contamination by major pathogens requires specific sensitive detection platforms and the present area of hot research looking forward to new nanomolecular techniques for nanomaterials, make them suitable for the development of assays with high sensitivity, response time, and portability. With the sound of these, we attempt to highlight a comprehensive overview about food-borne pathogen detection by rapid, sensitive, accurate, and cost affordable in situ analytical methods from conventional methods to recent molecular approaches for advanced food and microbiology research.

  9. Facilitating adverse drug event detection in pharmacovigilance databases using molecular structure similarity: application to rhabdomyolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Santiago; Harpaz, Rave; Chase, Herbert S; Costanzi, Stefano; Rabadan, Raul

    2011-01-01

    Background Adverse drug events (ADE) cause considerable harm to patients, and consequently their detection is critical for patient safety. The US Food and Drug Administration maintains an adverse event reporting system (AERS) to facilitate the detection of ADE in drugs. Various data mining approaches have been developed that use AERS to detect signals identifying associations between drugs and ADE. The signals must then be monitored further by domain experts, which is a time-consuming task. Objective To develop a new methodology that combines existing data mining algorithms with chemical information by analysis of molecular fingerprints to enhance initial ADE signals generated from AERS, and to provide a decision support mechanism to facilitate the identification of novel adverse events. Results The method achieved a significant improvement in precision in identifying known ADE, and a more than twofold signal enhancement when applied to the ADE rhabdomyolysis. The simplicity of the method assists in highlighting the etiology of the ADE by identifying structurally similar drugs. A set of drugs with strong evidence from both AERS and molecular fingerprint-based modeling is constructed for further analysis. Conclusion The results demonstrate that the proposed methodology could be used as a pharmacovigilance decision support tool to facilitate ADE detection. PMID:21946238

  10. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  11. Molecular detection of CTX-M-15-type β-lactamases in Escherichia coli strains from Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Dia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to detect the extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs secreted by clinical strains of Escherichia coli at Fann University Hospital in Dakar and to characterize them molecularly. We identified 32 isolates producing ESBLs. The CTX-M-15 gene was the most frequently detected ESBL gene, detected in 90.63% of the isolates studied.

  12. Preanalytical considerations in detection of colorectal cancer in blood serum using Raman molecular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treado, Patrick J.; Stewart, Shona D.; Smith, Aaron; Kirschner, Heather; Post, Christopher; Overholt, Bergein F.

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and women in the United States. Raman Molecular Imaging (RMI) is an effective technique to evaluate human tissue, cells and bodily fluids, including blood serum for disease diagnosis. ChemImage Corporation, in collaboration with clinicians, has been engaged in development of an in vitro diagnostic Raman assay focused on CRC detection. The Raman Assay for Colorectal Cancer (RACC) exploits the high specificity of Raman imaging to distinguish diseased from normal dried blood serum droplets without additional reagents. Pilot Study results from testing of hundreds of biobank patient samples have demonstrated that RACC detects CRC with high sensitivity and specificity. However, expanded clinical trials, which are ongoing, are revealing a host of important preanalytical considerations associated with sample collection, sample storage and stability, sample shipping, sample preparation and sample interferents, which impact detection performance. Results from recent clinical studies will be presented.

  13. Ultrasensitive Detection of Testosterone Using Microring Resonator with Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangqing Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report ultrasensitive and highly selective detection of testosterone based on microring resonance sensor using molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP. A silicon-on-insulator (SOI micoring resonator was modified by MIP films (MIPs on a surface. The MIPs was synthesized by thermopolymerization using methacrylic acid as functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as crosslinking agent. The concentration of detected testosterone varies from 0.05 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL. The detection limit reaches 48.7 pg/mL. Ultrahigh sensitivity, good specificity and reproducibility have been demonstrated, indicating the great potential of making a cost effective and easy to operate lab-on-Chip and down scaling micro-fluidics devices in biosensing.

  14. Rapid Molecular Detection Methods for Arboviruses of Livestock of Importance to Northern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses have been responsible for some of the most explosive epidemics of emerging infectious diseases over the past decade. Their impact on both human and livestock populations has been dramatic. The early detection either through surveillance or diagnosis of virus will be a critical feature in responding and resolving the emergence of such epidemics in the future. Although some of the most important emerging arboviruses are human pathogens, this paper aims to highlight those diseases that primarily affect livestock, although many are zoonotic and some occasionally cause human mortality. This paper also highlights the molecular detection methods specific to each virus and identifies those emerging diseases for which a rapid detection methods are not yet developed.

  15. Highly sensitive detection of NT-proBNP by molecular motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available FoF1-ATPase is an active rotary motor, and generates three-ATP for each rotation. At saturated substrate concentration, the motor can achieve about 103 r.p.m, which means one motor can generate about 105 ATP molecules during 30 min. Here, we constituted a novel nanodevice with a molecular rotary motor and a “battery”, FoF1-ATPase and chromatophore, and presented a novel method of sandwich type rotary biosensor based on ε subunit with one target-to-one motor, in which one target corresponds 105 ATP molecules as detection signals during 30 min. The target such as NT-proBNP detection demonstrated that this novel nanodevice has potential to be developed into an ultrasensitive biosensor to detect low expressed targets.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors for Space Molecule Detection and Clinical Molecular Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie

    2001-01-01

    Both space molecule detection and clinical molecule diagnostics need to develop ultra sensitive biosensors for detection of less than attomole molecules such as amino acids for DNA. However all the electrode sensor systems including those fabricated from the existing carbon nanotubes, have a background level of nA (nanoAmp). This has limited DNA or other molecule detection to nA level or molecules whose concentration is, much higher than attomole level. A program has been created by NASA and NCI (National Cancer Institute) to exploit the possibility of carbon nanotube based biosensors to solve this problem for both's interest. In this talk, I will present our effort on the evaluation and novel design of carbon nanotubes as electrode biosensors with strategies to minimize background currents while maximizing signal intensity.The fabrication of nanotube electrode arrays, immobilization of molecular probes on nanotube electrodes and in vitro biosensor testing will also be discussed.

  17. Applications of a single-molecule detection in early disease diagnosis and enzymatic reaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiangwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Various single-molecule techniques were utilized for ultra-sensitive early diagnosis of viral DNA and antigen and basic mechanism study of enzymatic reactions. DNA of human papilloma virus (HPV) served as the screening target in a flow system. Alexa Fluor 532 (AF532) labeled single-stranded DNA probes were hybridized to the target HPV-16 DNA in solution. The individual hybridized molecules were imaged with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) in two ways. In the single-color mode, target molecules were detected via fluorescence from hybridized probes only. This system could detect HPV-16 DNA in the presence of human genomic DNA down to 0.7 copy/cell and had a linear dynamic range of over 6 orders of magnitude. In the dual-color mode, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was employed to achieve zero false-positive count. We also showed that DNA extracts from Pap test specimens did not interfere with the system. A surface-based method was used to improve the throughput of the flow system. HPV-16 DNA was hybridized to probes on a glass surface and detected with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope. In the single-probe mode, the whole genome and target DNA were fluorescently labeled before hybridization, and the detection limit is similar to the flow system. In the dual-probe mode, a second probe was introduced. The linear dynamic range covers 1.44-7000 copies/cell, which is typical of early infection to near-cancer stages. The dual-probe method was tested with a crudely prepared sample. Even with reduced hybridization efficiency caused by the interference of cellular materials, we were still able to differentiate infected cells from healthy cells. Detection and quantification of viral antigen with a novel single-molecule immunosorbent assay (SMISA) was achieved. Antigen from human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1) was chosen to be the target in this study. The target was sandwiched between a monoclonal capture antibody and a

  18. Molecular detection and characterization of tick-borne pathogens in dogs and ticks from Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Kamani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Only limited information is currently available on the prevalence of vector borne and zoonotic pathogens in dogs and ticks in Nigeria. The aim of this study was to use molecular techniques to detect and characterize vector borne pathogens in dogs and ticks from Nigeria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Blood samples and ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Rhipicephalus turanicus and Heamaphysalis leachi collected from 181 dogs from Nigeria were molecularly screened for human and animal vector-borne pathogens by PCR and sequencing. DNA of Hepatozoon canis (41.4%, Ehrlichia canis (12.7%, Rickettsia spp. (8.8%, Babesia rossi (6.6%, Anaplasma platys (6.6%, Babesia vogeli (0.6% and Theileria sp. (0.6% was detected in the blood samples. DNA of E. canis (23.7%, H. canis (21.1%, Rickettsia spp. (10.5%, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis (5.3% and A. platys (1.9% was detected in 258 ticks collected from 42 of the 181 dogs. Co- infections with two pathogens were present in 37% of the dogs examined and one dog was co-infected with 3 pathogens. DNA of Rickettsia conorii israelensis was detected in one dog and Rhipicephalus sanguineus tick. DNA of another human pathogen, Candidatus N. mikurensis was detected in Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Heamaphysalis leachi ticks, and is the first description of Candidatus N. mikurensis in Africa. The Theileria sp. DNA detected in a local dog in this study had 98% sequence identity to Theileria ovis from sheep. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study indicate that human and animal pathogens are abundant in dogs and their ticks in Nigeria and portray the potential high risk of human exposure to infection with these agents.

  19. Transgenes in Mexican maize: molecular evidence and methodological considerations for GMO detection in landrace populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeyro-Nelson, A; Van Heerwaarden, J; Perales, H R; Serratos-Hernández, J A; Rangel, A; Hufford, M B; Gepts, P; Garay-Arroyo, A; Rivera-Bustamante, R; Alvarez-Buylla, E R

    2009-02-01

    A possible consequence of planting genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in centres of crop origin is unintended gene flow into traditional landraces. In 2001, a study reported the presence of the transgenic 35S promoter in maize landraces sampled in 2000 from the Sierra Juarez of Oaxaca, Mexico. Analysis of a large sample taken from the same region in 2003 and 2004 could not confirm the existence of transgenes, thereby casting doubt on the earlier results. These two studies were based on different sampling and analytical procedures and are thus hard to compare. Here, we present new molecular data for this region that confirm the presence of transgenes in three of 23 localities sampled in 2001. Transgene sequences were not detected in samples taken in 2002 from nine localities, while directed samples taken in 2004 from two of the positive 2001 localities were again found to contain transgenic sequences. These findings suggest the persistence or re-introduction of transgenes up until 2004 in this area. We address variability in recombinant sequence detection by analyzing the consistency of current molecular assays. We also present theoretical results on the limitations of estimating the probability of transgene detection in samples taken from landraces. The inclusion of a limited number of female gametes and, more importantly, aggregated transgene distributions may significantly lower detection probabilities. Our analytical and sampling considerations help explain discrepancies among different detection efforts, including the one presented here, and provide considerations for the establishment of monitoring protocols to detect the presence of transgenes among structured populations of landraces.

  20. An insight into the isolation, enumeration, and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration, and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria enrichment broth, Fraser broth, and University of Vermont Medium (UVM) Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as Food and Drug Administration-bacteriological and analytical method (FDA-BAM), US Department of Agriculture-Food and Safety (USDA-FSIS), and International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, polymyxin acriflavin lithium-chloride ceftazidime aesculin mannitol, Oxford, and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method, and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. most probable number technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction, multiplex polymerase chain reaction, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, loop-mediated isothermal amplification, DNA microarray, and next generation sequencing technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labor-saving. In future, there are

  1. Molecular method for detection of total coliforms in drinking water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, Andrée F; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bisson, Marc-Antoine; Dion-Dupont, Vanessa; Bouchard, Sébastien; Nkuranga, Martine; Bergeron, Michel G; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2014-07-01

    This work demonstrates the ability of a bacterial concentration and recovery procedure combined with three different PCR assays targeting the lacZ, wecG, and 16S rRNA genes, respectively, to detect the presence of total coliforms in 100-ml samples of potable water (presence/absence test). PCR assays were first compared to the culture-based Colilert and MI agar methods to determine their ability to detect 147 coliform strains representing 76 species of Enterobacteriaceae encountered in fecal and environmental settings. Results showed that 86 (58.5%) and 109 (74.1%) strains yielded a positive signal with Colilert and MI agar methods, respectively, whereas the lacZ, wecG, and 16S rRNA PCR assays detected 133 (90.5%), 111 (75.5%), and 146 (99.3%) of the 147 total coliform strains tested. These assays were then assessed by testing 122 well water samples collected in the Québec City region of Canada. Results showed that 97 (79.5%) of the samples tested by culture-based methods and 95 (77.9%), 82 (67.2%), and 98 (80.3%) of samples tested using PCR-based methods contained total coliforms, respectively. Consequently, despite the high genetic variability of the total coliform group, this study demonstrated that it is possible to use molecular assays to detect total coliforms in potable water: the 16S rRNA molecular assay was shown to be as efficient as recommended culture-based methods. This assay might be used in combination with an Escherichia coli molecular assay to assess drinking water quality. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. An insight into the isolation, enumeration, and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration, and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria enrichment broth, Fraser broth, and University of Vermont Medium (UVM) Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as Food and Drug Administration-bacteriological and analytical method (FDA-BAM), US Department of Agriculture-Food and Safety (USDA-FSIS), and International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, polymyxin acriflavin lithium-chloride ceftazidime aesculin mannitol, Oxford, and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method, and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. most probable number technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction, multiplex polymerase chain reaction, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, loop-mediated isothermal amplification, DNA microarray, and next generation sequencing technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labor-saving. In future, there are

  3. An insight into the isolation, enumeration and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Woan-Fei Law

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria Enrichment Broth (BLEB, Fraser broth and University of Vermont Medium (UVM Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as FDA-BAM, USDA-FSIS and ISO. Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, PALCAM, Oxford and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. MPN technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction (PCR, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP, DNA microarray and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labour-saving. In future, there are chances for the development of new techniques for the detection and identification of foodborne with improved features.

  4. Single Molecular Level Probing of Structure and Dynamics of Papain Under Denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bhaswati; Chaudhury, Apala; Das, Nilimesh; Sen, Pratik

    2017-01-01

    Papain is a cysteine protease enzyme present in papaya and known to help in digesting peptide. Thus the structure and function of the active site of papain is of interest. The objective of present study is to unveil the overall structural transformation and the local structural change around the active site of papain as a function of chemical denaturant. Papain has been tagged at Cys-25 with a thiol specific fluorescence probe N-(7- dimethylamino-4-methylcoumarin-3-yl) iodoacetamide (DACIA). Guanidine hydrochloride (GnHCl) has been used as the chemical denaturant. Steady state, time-resolved, and single molecular level fluorescence techniques was applied to map the change in the local environment. It is found that papain undergoes a two-step denaturation in the presence of GnHCl. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopic (FCS) data indicate that the size (hydrodynamic diameter) of native papain is ~36.8 Å, which steadily increases to ~53 Å in the presence of 6M GnHCl. FCS study also reveals that the conformational fluctuation time of papain is 6.3 µs in its native state, which decreased to 2.7 µs in the presence of 0.75 M GnHCl. Upon further increase in GnHCl concentration the conformational fluctuation time increase monotonically till 6 M GnHCl, where the time constant is measured as 14 µs. On the other hand, the measurement of ellipticity, hence the helical structure, by circular dichroism spectroscopy is found to be incapable to capture such structural transformation. It is concluded that in the presence of small amount of GnHCl the active site of papain takes up a more compact structure (although the overall size increases) than in the native state, which has been designated as the intermediate state. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Molecular asymmetry in the 8-cell stage Xenopus tropicalis embryo described by single blastomere transcript sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Domenico, Elena; Owens, Nick D L; Grant, Ian M; Gomes-Faria, Rosa; Gilchrist, Michael J

    2015-12-15

    Correct development of the vertebrate body plan requires the early definition of two asymmetric, perpendicular axes. The first axis is established during oocyte maturation, and the second is established by symmetry breaking shortly after fertilization. The physical processes generating the second asymmetric, or dorsal-ventral, axis are well understood, but the specific molecular determinants, presumed to be maternal gene products, are poorly characterized. Whilst enrichment of maternal mRNAs at the animal and vegetal poles in both the oocyte and the early embryo has been studied, little is known about the distribution of maternal mRNAs along either the dorsal-ventral or left-right axes during the early cleavage stages. Here we report an unbiased analysis of the distribution of maternal mRNA on all axes of the Xenopus tropicalis 8-cell stage embryo, based on sequencing of single blastomeres whose positions within the embryo are known. Analysis of pooled data from complete sets of blastomeres from four embryos has identified 908 mRNAs enriched in either the animal or vegetal blastomeres, of which 793 are not previously reported as enriched. In contrast, we find no evidence for asymmetric distribution along either the dorsal-ventral or left-right axes. We confirm that animal pole enrichment is on average distinctly lower than vegetal pole enrichment, and that considerable variation is found between reported enrichment levels in different studies. We use publicly available data to show that there is a significant association between genes with human disease annotation and enrichment at the animal pole. Mutations in the human ortholog of the most animally enriched novel gene, Slc35d1, are causative for Schneckenbecken dysplasia, and we show that a similar phenotype is produced by depletion of the orthologous protein in Xenopus embryos. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Serological and molecular detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection among an Orang Asli community in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Arine Fadzlun; Hadip, Faizah; Ngui, Romano; Lim, Yvonne A L; Mahmud, Rohela

    2013-08-01

    Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection particularly in asymptomatic individuals is often hampered due to the lack of standard diagnostic tools. In this study, the use of serological and molecular approaches were investigated for the detection of S. stercoralis infection among an Orang Asli (indigenous) community following a preliminary detection by microscopic examination of faecal samples. Out of 54 individuals studied, 17/54 (31.5%) were detected to be positive for S. stercoralis infection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), compared to 0/54 (0%) by faecal examination. Further confirmation performed by a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using DNA extracted from faecal samples of these 17 individuals yielded 3/17 (17.6%) positives for S. stercoralis DNA amplification. No amplification was seen with the other 37 faecal samples, which were negative by microscopy and ELISA. As the high ELISA positive results were suspected to be false-positives, ELISA is not recommended for use as a detection tool but may be beneficial for evaluating the effectiveness of anti-Strongyloides drugs. The present finding indicated that PCR should be considered as an alternative diagnostic tool for the detection of S. stercoralis infection.

  7. Autonomous Gait Event Detection with Portable Single-Camera Gait Kinematics Analysis System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-based nonwearable motion analysis systems have significantly advanced with robust objective measurement of the limb motion, resulting in quantified, standardized, and reliable outcome measures compared with traditional, semisubjective, observational gait analysis. However, the requirement for large laboratory space and operational expertise makes these systems impractical for gait analysis at local clinics and homes. In this paper, we focus on autonomous gait event detection with our bespoke, relatively inexpensive, and portable, single-camera gait kinematics analysis system. Our proposed system includes video acquisition with camera calibration, Kalman filter + Structural-Similarity-based marker tracking, autonomous knee angle calculation, video-frame-identification-based autonomous gait event detection, and result visualization. The only operational effort required is the marker-template selection for tracking initialization, aided by an easy-to-use graphic user interface. The knee angle validation on 10 stroke patients and 5 healthy volunteers against a gold standard optical motion analysis system indicates very good agreement. The autonomous gait event detection shows high detection rates for all gait events. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system can automatically measure the knee angle and detect gait events with good accuracy and thus offer an alternative, cost-effective, and convenient solution for clinical gait kinematics analysis.

  8. Sensitivity of single and double contrast barium enema in the detection of colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myllylae, V.; Paeivansalo, M.; Laitinen, S.; Oulu Univ.

    1984-01-01

    The preoperative barium enema of the 188 colorectal carcinoma patients operated at the Oulu University Central Hospital (Finland) during 1977-1982 were examined retrospectively. Altogether 112 single contrast studies and 87 double contrast studies had been made on these patients. The single contrast barium enemas had resulted in a correct diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma in 93 cases (sensitivity 83%). The correct diagnosis in the double contrast studies numbered 71 (sensitivity 82%). Most of the overlooked carcinomas were located in the caecum, in the sigmoid or the rectum. Most of the errors made in the single contrast studies were due to detection errors and poor evacuation. The most common failures in double contrast enemas were detection errors and nonvisualisation of the sigmoid. The authors recommend use of the double contrast technique and suggest that the two methods of barium enema be used to complement each other. A false negative diagnosis delayed the operation of the colorectal carcinoma patients by 2.2 months (median). (orig.) [de

  9. Endoleak detection using single-acquisition split-bolus dual-energy computer tomography (DECT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javor, D.; Wressnegger, A.; Unterhumer, S.; Kollndorfer, K.; Nolz, R.; Beitzke, D.; Loewe, C. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-04-15

    To assess a single-phase, dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) with a split-bolus technique and reconstruction of virtual non-enhanced images for the detection of endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Fifty patients referred for routine follow-up post-EVAR CT and a history of at least one post-EVAR follow-up CT examination using our standard biphasic (arterial and venous phase) routine protocol (which was used as the reference standard) were included in this prospective trial. An in-patient comparison and an analysis of the split-bolus protocol and the previously used double-phase protocol were performed with regard to differences in diagnostic accuracy, radiation dose, and image quality. The analysis showed a significant reduction of radiation dose of up to 42 %, using the single-acquisition split-bolus protocol, while maintaining a comparable diagnostic accuracy (primary endoleak detection rate of 96 %). Image quality between the two protocols was comparable and only slightly inferior for the split-bolus scan (2.5 vs. 2.4). Using the single-acquisition, split-bolus approach allows for a significant dose reduction while maintaining high image quality, resulting in effective endoleak identification. (orig.)

  10. Marangoni Convection Assisted Single Molecule Detection with Nanojet Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Te-Wei; Wang, Xinhao; Mahigir, Amirreza; Veronis, Georgios; Liu, Gang Logan; Gartia, Manas Ranjan

    2017-08-25

    Many single-molecule (SM) label-free techniques such as scanning probe microscopies (SPM) and magnetic force spectroscopies (MFS) provide high resolution surface topography information, but lack chemical information. Typical surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) systems provide chemical information on the analytes, but lack spatial resolution. In addition, a challenge in SERS sensors is to bring analytes into the so-called "hot spots" (locations where the enhancement of electromagnetic field amplitude is larger than 10 3 ). Previously described methods of fluid transport around hot spots like thermophoresis, thermodiffusion/Soret effect, and electrothermoplasmonic flow are either too weak or detrimental in bringing new molecules to hot spots. Herein, we combined the resonant plasmonic enhancement and photonic nanojet enhancemnet of local electric field on nonplanar SERS structures, to construct a stable, high-resolution, and below diffraction limit platform for single molecule label-free detection. In addition, we utilize Marangoni convection (mass transfer due to surface tension gradient) to bring new analytes into the hotspot. An enhancement factor of ∼3.6 × 10 10 was obtained in the proposed system. Rhodamine-6G (R6G) detection of up to a concentration of 10 -12 M, an improvement of two orders of magnitude, was achieved using the nanojet effect. The proposed system could provide a simple, high throughput SERS system for single molecule analysis at high spatial resolution.

  11. Primer system for single cell detection of double mutation for Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M C; Drury, K C; Kipersztok, S; Zheng, W; Williams, R S

    2000-02-01

    Nearly 100% of infantile Tay-Sachs disease is produced by two mutations occurring in the alpha chain of the lysosomal enzyme beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase (HEXA) in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Although others have described primer systems used to amplify both sites simultaneously, few discuss the allele dropout problems inherent in this test. Our goal was to construct a more robust test enabling stronger signal generation for single cell preimplantation genetic diagnosis and to investigate the occurrence of allele dropout. New nested primers were designed to optimize detection of both major Tay-Sachs mutations. Four hundred fifty-seven single cells, including normal cells and those carrying mutations of either the 4bp insertion exon 11 or splice-site intron 12 defects, were used to screen a new primer system. Based on PCR amplified product analysis, total efficiency of amplification was 85.3%, (390/457). The allele dropout rate for the 4bp insertion mutation in exon 11 and splice-site mutation in intron 12 was 4.8% and 5.8%, respectively. Multiple mutation detection and analysis within the Tay-Sachs disease gene (HEXA) is possible using single cells for clinical preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Alternative PCR primers and conditions offer various methods for developing systems compatible to specific program requirements.

  12. Single assay for simultaneous detection and differential identification of human and avian influenza virus types, subtypes, and emergent variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Metzgar

    Full Text Available For more than four decades the cause of most type A influenza virus infections of humans has been attributed to only two viral subtypes, A/H1N1 or A/H3N2. In contrast, avian and other vertebrate species are a reservoir of type A influenza virus genome diversity, hosting strains representing at least 120 of 144 combinations of 16 viral hemagglutinin and 9 viral neuraminidase subtypes. Viral genome segment reassortments and mutations emerging within this reservoir may spawn new influenza virus strains as imminent epidemic or pandemic threats to human health and poultry production. Traditional methods to detect and differentiate influenza virus subtypes are either time-consuming and labor-intensive (culture-based or remarkably insensitive (antibody-based. Molecular diagnostic assays based upon reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR have short assay cycle time, and high analytical sensitivity and specificity. However, none of these diagnostic tests determine viral gene nucleotide sequences to distinguish strains and variants of a detected pathogen from one specimen to the next. Decision-quality, strain- and variant-specific pathogen gene sequence information may be critical for public health, infection control, surveillance, epidemiology, or medical/veterinary treatment planning. The Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM-Flu is a robust, highly multiplexed and target gene sequencing-based alternative to both traditional culture- or biomarker-based diagnostic tests. RPM-Flu is a single, simultaneous differential diagnostic assay for all subtype combinations of type A influenza viruses and for 30 other viral and bacterial pathogens that may cause influenza-like illness. These other pathogen targets of RPM-Flu may co-infect and compound the morbidity and/or mortality of patients with influenza. The informative specificity of a single RPM-Flu test represents specimen-specific viral gene sequences as determinants of virus type, A

  13. Putting prions into focus: application of single molecule detection to the diagnosis of prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, A; Bieschke, J; Eigen, M; Kretzschmar, H A

    2000-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by the cerebral deposition of an aggregated pathological isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) which constitutes the principal component of the transmissible agent termed prion. In order to develop a highly sensitive method for the detection of PrP(Sc) aggregates in biological samples such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we used a method based on Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), a technique which allows detection of single fluorescently labeled molecules in solution. Within the FCS setup, fluorescent photons emitted by molecules passing an open volume element defined by the beam of an excitation laser focussed into a diffraction-limited spot are imaged confocally onto a single photon counting detector. Aggregates of PrP(Sc) could be labeled by co-aggregation of probe molecules such as monomeric recombinant PrP or PrP-specific antibodies tagged with a fluorescent dye. In addition to slow diffusion, labeled aggregates are characterized by high fluorescence intensity, which allows detection and quantification by analysis of fluorescence intensity distribution. To improve detection of rare target particles, the accessible volume element was increased by scanning for intensely fluorescent targets (SIFT). To further improve sensitivity and specificity, two different probes were used simultaneously in a two-color setup. In a diagnostic model system of CSF spiked with purified prion rods, dual-color SIFT was more sensitive than Western blot analysis. In addition, a PrP(Sc)-specific signal was also detected in a number of CSF samples derived from CJD patients but not in controls.

  14. Breast Cancer Detection by B7-H3-Targeted Ultrasound Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachawal, Sunitha V; Jensen, Kristin C; Wilson, Katheryne E; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-06-15

    Ultrasound complements mammography as an imaging modality for breast cancer detection, especially in patients with dense breast tissue, but its utility is limited by low diagnostic accuracy. One emerging molecular tool to address this limitation involves contrast-enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles targeted to molecular signatures on tumor neovasculature. In this study, we illustrate how tumor vascular expression of B7-H3 (CD276), a member of the B7 family of ligands for T-cell coregulatory receptors, can be incorporated into an ultrasound method that can distinguish normal, benign, precursor, and malignant breast pathologies for diagnostic purposes. Through an IHC analysis of 248 human breast specimens, we found that vascular expression of B7-H3 was selectively and significantly higher in breast cancer tissues. B7-H3 immunostaining on blood vessels distinguished benign/precursors from malignant lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in human specimens. In a transgenic mouse model of cancer, the B7-H3-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues and highly correlated with ex vivo expression levels of B7-H3 on quantitative immunofluorescence. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of B7-H3-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging as a tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer detection in patients. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Molecular Detection of Multiple Emerging Pathogens in Sputa from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittar, Fadi; Richet, Hervé; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Stremler, Nathalie; Sarles, Jacques; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence that culture-based methods detect only a small proportion of bacteria present in the respiratory tracts of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Methodology/Principal Findings Standard microbiological culture and phenotypic identification of bacteria in sputa from CF patients have been compared to molecular methods by the use of 16S rDNA amplification, cloning and sequencing. Twenty-five sputa from CF patients were cultured that yield 33 isolates (13 species) known to be pathogens during CF. For molecular cloning, 760 clones were sequenced (7.2±3.9 species/sputum), and 53 different bacterial species were identified including 16 species of anaerobes (30%). Discrepancies between culture and molecular data were numerous and demonstrate that accurate identification remains challenging. New or emerging bacteria not or rarely reported in CF patients were detected including Dolosigranulum pigrum, Dialister pneumosintes, and Inquilinus limosus. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate the complex microbial community in sputa from CF patients, especially anaerobic bacteria that are probably an underestimated cause of CF lung pathology. Metagenomic analysis is urgently needed to better understand those complex communities in CF pulmonary infections. PMID:18682840

  16. Clinical relevance of HLA donor-specific antibodies detected by single antigen assay in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro-Oleas, José Luis; González-Escribano, María Francisca; González-Roncero, Francisco Manuel; Acevedo-Calado, María José; Cabello-Chaves, Virginia; Gentil-Govantes, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Roldán, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    Clinical relevance of donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) detected by a single antigen Luminex virtual crossmatch in pre-transplant serum samples from patients with a negative cytotoxicity-dependent complement crossmatch is controversial. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of a pre-transplant positive virtual crossmatch in the outcome of kidney transplantation. A total of 892 patients who received a graft from deceased donors after a negative cytotoxicity crossmatch were included. Presence of anti-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies was investigated using a Luminex screening assay and anti-HLA specificities were assigned performing a Luminex single antigen assay. Graft survival was significantly worse among patients with anti-HLA DSA compared to both patients with anti-HLA with no DSA (P = 0.001) and patients without HLA antibodies (P HLA with no DSA and no HLA antibodies patient groups were observed (P = 0.595). Influence of both anti-Class I and anti-Class II DSA was detected (P 1500 (global P > 0.05). The presence of preformed HLA DSA in transplanted patients with a negative cytotoxicity crossmatch is associated with a lower allograft survival. The detection of anti-HLA with no DSA has no influence in the graft outcome. Finally, there were no demonstrable effects of mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) values >1500 on graft survival.

  17. Detection of mandarin in orange juice by single-nucleotide polymorphism qPCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldeguer, Miriam; López-Andreo, María; Gabaldón, José A; Puyet, Antonio

    2014-02-15

    A dual-probe real time PCR (qPCR) DNA-based analysis was devised for the identification of mandarin in orange juice. A single nucleotide polymorphism at the trnL-trnF intergenic region of the chloroplast chromosome was confirmed in nine orange (Citrus sinensis) and thirteen commercial varieties of mandarin, including Citrus reticulata and Citrus unshiu species and a mandarin × tangelo hybrid. Two short minor-groove binding fluorescent probes targeting the polymorphic sequence were used in the dual-probe qPCR, which allowed the detection of both species in single-tube reactions. The similarity of PCR efficiencies allowed a simple estimation of the ratio mandarin/orange in the juice samples, which correlated to the measured difference of threshold cycle values for both probes. The limit of detection of the assay was 5% of mandarin in orange juice, both when the juice was freshly prepared (not from concentrate) or reconstituted from concentrate, which would allow the detection of fraudulently added mandarin juice. The possible use of the dual-probe system for quantitative measurements was also tested on fruit juice mixtures. qPCR data obtained from samples containing equal amounts of mandarin and orange juice revealed that the mandarin target copy number was approximately 2.6-fold higher than in orange juice. The use of a matrix-adapted control as calibrator to compensate the resulting C(T) bias allowed accurate quantitative measurements to be obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Detection of isolated protein-bound metal ions by single-particle cryo-STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Nadav; Bellapadrona, Giuliano; Houben, Lothar; Sagi, Irit; Elbaum, Michael

    2017-10-17

    Metal ions play essential roles in many aspects of biological chemistry. Detecting their presence and location in proteins and cells is important for understanding biological function. Conventional structural methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-transmission electron microscopy can identify metal atoms on protein only if the protein structure is solved to atomic resolution. We demonstrate here the detection of isolated atoms of Zn and Fe on ferritin, using cryogenic annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (cryo-STEM) coupled with single-particle 3D reconstructions. Zn atoms are found in a pattern that matches precisely their location at the ferroxidase sites determined earlier by X-ray crystallography. By contrast, the Fe distribution is smeared along an arc corresponding to the proposed path from the ferroxidase sites to the mineral nucleation sites along the twofold axes. In this case the single-particle reconstruction is interpreted as a probability distribution function based on the average of individual locations. These results establish conditions for detection of isolated metal atoms in the broader context of electron cryo-microscopy and tomography.

  19. A superconducting microcalorimeter for low-flux detection of near-infrared single photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyling-Eschweiler, Jan

    2014-07-01

    This thesis covers the development and the characterization of a single photon detector based on a superconducting microcalorimeter. The detector development is motivated by the Any Light Particle Search II (ALPS II) experiment at DESY in Hamburg, which searches for weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs). Therefore, a detection of low-fluxes of 1064 nm light is required. The work is divided in three analyses: the characterization of a milli-kelvin (mK) cryostat, the characterization of superconducting sensors for single photon detection, and the determination of dark count rates concerning 1064 nm signals. Firstly, an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is characterized, which allows to reach mK-temperatures. During commissioning, the ADR cryostat is optimized and prepared to stably cool superconducting sensors at 80 mK±25 μK. It is found that sensors can be continuously operated for ∝20 h before recharging the system in -4 s -1 . By operating a fiber-coupled TES, it is found that the dark count rate for 1064 nm signals is dominated by pile-up events of near-infrared thermal photons coming through the fiber from the warm environment. Considering a detection efficiency of ∝18 %, a dark count rate of 8.6 . 10 -3 s -1 is determined for 1064 nm ALPS photons.Concerning ALPS II, this results in a sensitivity gain compared to the ALPS I detector. Furthermore, this thesis is the starting point of TES detector development in Hamburg, Germany.

  20. Wafer level fabrication of single cell dispenser chips with integrated electrodes for particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoendube, Jonas; Yusof, Azmi; Kalkandjiev, Kiril; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the microfabrication and experimental evaluation of a dispenser chip, designed for isolation and printing of single cells by combining impedance sensing and drop-on-demand dispensing. The dispenser chip features 50  ×  55 µm (width × height) microchannels, a droplet generator and microelectrodes for impedance measurements. The chip is fabricated by sandwiching a dry film photopolymer (TMMF) between a silicon and a Pyrex wafer. TMMF has been used to define microfluidic channels, to serve as low temperature (75 °C) bonding adhesive and as etch mask during 300 µm deep HF etching of the Pyrex wafer. Due to the novel fabrication technology involving the dry film resist, it became possible to fabricate facing electrodes at the top and bottom of the channel and to apply electrical impedance sensing for particle detection with improved performance. The presented microchip is capable of dispensing liquid and detecting microparticles via impedance measurement. Single polystyrene particles of 10 µm size could be detected with a mean signal amplitude of 0.39  ±  0.13 V (n=439) at particle velocities of up to 9.6 mm s −1 inside the chip. (paper)

  1. Electronic readout of a single nuclear spin using a molecular spin transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R.; Klyastskaya, S.; Ruben, M.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Balestro, F.

    2012-02-01

    Quantum control of individual spins in condensed matter devices is an emerging field with a wide range of applications ranging from nanospintronics to quantum computing [1,2]. The electron, with its spin and orbital degrees of freedom, is conventionally used as carrier of the quantum information in the devices proposed so far. However, electrons exhibit a strong coupling to the environment leading to reduced relaxation and coherence times. Indeed quantum coherence and stable entanglement of electron spins are extremely difficult to achieve. We propose a new approach using the nuclear spin of an individual metal atom embedded in a single-molecule magnet (SMM). In order to perform the readout of the nuclear spin, the quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM) of the magnetic moment of the SMM in a transitor-like set-up is electronically detected. Long spin lifetimes of an individual nuclear spin were observed and the relaxation characteristics were studied. The manipulation of the nuclear spin state of individual atoms embedded in magnetic molecules opens a completely new world, where quantum logic may be integrated.[4pt] [1] L. Bogani, W. Wernsdorfer, Nature Mat. 7, 179 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Urdampilleta, S. Klyatskaya, J.P. Cleuziou, M. Ruben, W. Wernsdorfer, Nature Mat. 10, 502 (2011).

  2. Monte Carlo Simulations for the Detection of Buried Objects Using Single Sided Backscattered Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Yip

    Full Text Available Detection of buried improvised explosive devices (IEDs is a delicate task, leading to a need to develop sensitive stand-off detection technology. The shape, composition and size of the IEDs can be expected to be revised over time in an effort to overcome increasingly sophisticated detection methods. As an example, for the most part, landmines are found through metal detection which has led to increasing use of non-ferrous materials such as wood or plastic containers for chemical based explosives being developed.Monte Carlo simulations have been undertaken considering three different commercially available detector materials (hyperpure-Ge (HPGe, lanthanum(III bromide (LaBr and thallium activated sodium iodide (NaI(Tl, applied at a stand-off distance of 50 cm from the surface and burial depths of 0, 5 and 10 cm, with sand as the obfuscating medium. Target materials representing medium density wood and mild steel have been considered. Each detector has been modelled as a 10 cm thick cylinder with a 20 cm diameter.It appears that HPGe represents the most promising detector for this application. Although it was not the highest density material studied, its excellent energy resolving capability leads to the highest quality spectra from which detection decisions can be inferred.The simulation work undertaken here suggests that a vehicle-born threat detection system could be envisaged using a single betatron and a series of detectors operating in parallel observing the space directly in front of the vehicle path. Furthermore, results show that non-ferrous materials such as wood can be effectively discerned in such remote-operated detection system, with the potential to apply a signature analysis template matching technique for real-time analysis of such data.

  3. The Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Environment of Carbapenemases Detected in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekyere, John Osei; Govinden, Usha; Essack, Sabiha

    2016-01-01

    Research articles describing carbapenemases and their genetic environments in Gram-negative bacteria were reviewed to determine the molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases in Africa. The emergence of resistance to the carbapenems, the last resort antibiotic for difficult to treat bacterial infections, affords clinicians few therapeutic options, with a resulting increase in morbidities, mortalities, and healthcare costs. However, the molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases throughout Africa is less described. Research articles and conference proceedings describing the genetic environment and molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases in Africa were retrieved from Google Scholar, Scifinder, Pubmed, Web of Science, and Science Direct databases. Predominant carbapenemase genes so far described in Africa include the blaOXA-48 type, blaIMP, blaVIM, and blaNDM in Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter spp., and Escherichia coli carried on various plasmid types and sizes, transposons, and integrons. Class D and class B carbapenemases, mainly prevalent in A. baumannii, K. pneumoniae, E. cloacae, Citrobacter spp., and E. coli were the commonest carbapenemases. Carbapenemases are mainly reported in North and South Africa as under-resourced laboratories, lack of awareness and funding preclude the detection and reporting of carbapenemase-mediated resistance. Consequently, the true molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases and their genetic environment in Africa is still unknown.

  4. Genetic characterization, species differentiation and detection of Fasciola spp. by molecular approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hai-Long

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Liver flukes belonging to the genus Fasciola are among the causes of foodborne diseases of parasitic etiology. These parasites cause significant public health problems and substantial economic losses to the livestock industry. Therefore, it is important to definitively characterize the Fasciola species. Current phenotypic techniques fail to reflect the full extent of the diversity of Fasciola spp. In this respect, the use of molecular techniques to identify and differentiate Fasciola spp. offer considerable advantages. The advent of a variety of molecular genetic techniques also provides a powerful method to elucidate many aspects of Fasciola biology, epidemiology, and genetics. However, the discriminatory power of these molecular methods varies, as does the speed and ease of performance and cost. There is a need for the development of new methods to identify the mechanisms underpinning the origin and maintenance of genetic variation within and among Fasciola populations. The increasing application of the current and new methods will yield a much improved understanding of Fasciola epidemiology and evolution as well as more effective means of parasite control. Herein, we provide an overview of the molecular techniques that are being used for the genetic characterization, detection and genotyping of Fasciola spp..

  5. Detection and direction discrimination of single vortex rings by harbour seals (Phoca vitulina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Yvonne; Hanke, Wolf; Miersch, Lars; Dehnhardt, Guido

    2018-02-27

    Harbour seals possess highly sensitive vibrissae that enable them to track hydrodynamic trails left behind by a swimming fish. Most of these trails contain vortex rings as a main hydrodynamic component. They may reveal information about their generator as the trails differ depending on the fish species, the fish's body shape, size, and swimming style. Additionally, fish generate single vortex rings in diverse natural situations. In this study, the ability of blindfolded stationary harbour seals to detect and analyse single vortex rings regarding directional information has been investigated. In three different behavioural experiments, the animals were trained to respond to single artificially generated vortex rings. The results show that harbour seals are able to respond to a variety of different vortex rings upon vibrissal stimulation. The investigation of the minimum hydrodynamically perceivable angle revealed that it is at least as small as 5.7°, which was the smallest adjustable angle. Moreover, harbour seals are capable of analysing the travel direction of a vortex ring perceived by the mystacial pads irrespective of whether the vibrissae were stimulated ipsilaterally or contralaterally. In situations in which no complex hydrodynamic trail is available, it is advantageous for a hunting seal to be able to extract information from a single vortex ring. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Detection of charged particles with a methylammonium lead tribromide perovskite single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qiang [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Wei, Haotong; Wei, Wei [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Chuirazzi, William; DeSantis, Dylan [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Huang, Jinsong, E-mail: jhuang2@unl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Cao, Lei, E-mail: cao.152@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2017-03-11

    Methylammonium lead tribromide (MAPbBr{sub 3}) perovskite crystals have attracted significant attention due to their attractive performance in various optoelectronic applications such as solar cells, light-emitting devices, photodetectors, and recently in X-ray detectors. In this study, we demonstrate a possible use of perovskite-based devices for detection of charged particles (which can be applied in basic scientific research, health physics, and environmental analysis) and investigate the mechanism of fundamental charge transport inside perovskite crystals. It was found that inexpensive MAPbBr{sub 3} single crystals could be used for measuring the energy spectrum of charged particles through direct collection of the produced charge. After fitting the plot of the centroid peak position versus voltage with the Hecht equation for single-polarity charge transport, the obtained hole mobility-lifetime product was in the range of (0.4–1.6)×10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/V.

  7. Serological and molecular detection of Theileria equi in sport horses of northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Edlainne P; Vidotto, Odilon; Almeida, Jonatas C; Ribeiro, Luana P S; Borges, Marcos V; Pequeno, Walter H C; Stipp, Danilo T; de Oliveira, Celso J B; Biondo, Alexander W; Vieira, Thállitha S W J; Vieira, Rafael F C

    2016-08-01

    Theileriosis is a worldwide protozoal tick-borne disease caused by Theileria equi, which may produce a variety of clinical signs and turn infected horses into lifetime carriers. This study has aimed to perform a serological and molecular detection of T. equi and associated factors in sports horses from six areas of northeastern Brazil. In overall, 59.6% horses were positive by indirect immunofluorescence assay and 50.4% by polymerase chain reaction. No significant association was found when presence of ticks, age, gender, anemia or total plasma proteins was analyzed with seropositivity and molecular techniques. Although a significant association of infection was found in two cities. Thus, local risk factors other than presence of ticks, horse age, gender, anemia and total plasmatic proteins may dictate prevalence of T. equi infection in sports horses, even in highly endemic areas with no control of infection prior to horse competitions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of high molecular weight proteins by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainini, Veronica; Bovo, Giorgio; Chinello, Clizia; Gianazza, Erica; Grasso, Marco; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Magni, Fulvio

    2013-06-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a unique technology to explore the spatial distribution of biomolecules directly on tissues. It allows the in situ investigation of a large number of small proteins and peptides. Detection of high molecular weight proteins through MALDI IMS still represents an important challenge, as it would allow the direct investigation of the distribution of more proteins involved in biological processes, such as cytokines, enzymes, neuropeptide precursors and receptors. In this work we compare the traditional method performed with sinapinic acid with a comparable protocol using ferulic acid as the matrix. Data show a remarkable increase of signal acquisition in the mass range of 20k to 150k Th. Moreover, we report molecular images of biomolecules above 70k Th, demonstrating the possibility of expanding the application of this technology both in clinical investigations and basic science.

  9. Molecular scatology: how to improve prey DNA detection success in avian faeces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehm, Johannes; Juen, Anita; Nagiller, Karin; Neuhauser, Sigrid; Traugott, Michael

    2011-07-01

    The analysis of prey DNA in faeces is a non-invasive approach to examine the diet of birds. However, it is poorly known how gut transition time, environmental factors and laboratory treatments such as storage conditions or DNA extraction procedures affect the detection success of prey DNA. Here, we examined several of these factors using faeces from carrion crows fed with insect larvae. Faeces produced between 30 min and 4 h post-feeding tested positive for insect DNA, representing the gut transition time. Prey detection was not only possible in fresh but also in 5-day-old faeces. The type of surface the faeces were placed on for these 5 days, however, affected prey DNA detection success: samples placed on soil provided the lowest rate of positives compared to faeces left on leaves, on branches and within plastic tubes. Exposing faeces to sunlight and rain significantly lowered prey DNA detection rates (17% and 68% positives in exposed and protected samples, respectively). Storing faeces in ethanol or in the freezer did not affect molecular prey detection. Extracting DNA directly from larger pieces of faecal pellets resulted in significantly higher prey detection rates than when using small amounts of homogenized faeces. A cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide-based DNA extraction protocol yielded significantly higher DNA detection rates (60%) than three commercial kits, however, for small amounts of homogenized faeces only. Our results suggest that collecting faeces from smooth, clean and non-absorbing surfaces, protected from sunlight and rain, improves DNA detection success in avian faeces. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. A Nanosensor for TNT Detection Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikella E. Hankus

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on a new sensor strategy that integrates molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs with surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS. The sensor was developed to detect the explosive, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT. Micron thick films of sol gel-derived xerogels were deposited on a SERS-active surface as the sensing layer. Xerogels were molecularly imprinted for TNT using non-covalent interactions with the polymer matrix. Binding of the TNT within the polymer matrix results in unique SERS bands, which allow for detection and identification of the molecule in the MIP. This MIP-SERS sensor exhibits an apparent dissociation constant of (2.3 ± 0.3 × 10−5 M for TNT and a 3 µM detection limit. The response to TNT is reversible and the sensor is stable for at least 6 months. Key challenges, including developing a MIP formulation that is stable and integrated with the SERS substrate, and ensuring the MIP does not mask the spectral features of the target analyte through SERS polymer background, were successfully met. The results also suggest the MIP-SERS protocol can be extended to other target analytes of interest.

  11. International external quality assessment study for molecular detection of Lassa virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergejs Nikisins

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV is a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever in West Africa. In recent years, it has been imported several times to Europe and North America. The method of choice for early detection of LASV in blood is RT-PCR. Therefore, the European Network for Diagnostics of 'Imported' Viral Diseases (ENIVD performed an external quality assessment (EQA study for molecular detection of LASV. A proficiency panel of 13 samples containing various concentrations of inactivated LASV strains Josiah, Lib-1580/121, CSF, or AV was prepared. Samples containing the LASV-related lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV and negative sera were included as specificity controls. Twenty-four laboratories from 17 countries (13 European, one African, one Asian, two American countries participated in the study. Thirteen laboratories (54% reported correct results, 4 (17% laboratories reported 1 to 2 false-negative results, and 7 (29% laboratories reported 3 to 5 false-negative results. This EQA study indicates that most participating laboratories have a good or acceptable performance in molecular detection of LASV. However, several laboratories need to review and improve their diagnostic procedures.

  12. Detection of molecular changes induced by antibiotics in Escherichia coli using vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan Nguyen, N. T.; Sarter, Samira; Hai Nguyen, N.; Daniel, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to test Raman (400-1800 cm- 1) and Infra-red (1900-500 cm- 1) spectroscopies followed by statistical analysis (principal component analysis) to detect molecular changes induced by antibiotics (ampicillin, cefotaxime - cell wall synthesis inhibitors, tetracycline - protein synthesis inhibitor, ciprofloxacin - DNA synthesis inhibitor) against Escherichia coli TOP10. In case of ampicillin and cefotaxime, a decrease in protein bands in both Raman (1240, 1660 cm- 1), and IR spectra (1230, 1530, 1630 cm- 1), and an increase in carbohydrate bands (1150, 1020 cm- 1) in IR spectra were observed. Tetracycline addition caused an increase in nucleic acid bands (775, 1478, 1578 cm- 1), a sharp decrease in phenylalanine (995 cm- 1) in Raman spectra and the amide I and amide II bands (1630, 1530 cm- 1) in IR spectra, an increase in DNA in both Raman (1083 cm- 1) and IR spectra (1080 cm- 1). Regarding ciprofloxacin, an increase in nucleic acids (775, 1478, 1578 cm- 1) in Raman spectra and in protein bands (1230, 1520, 1630 cm- 1), in DNA (1080 cm- 1) in IR spectra were detected. Clear discrimination of antibiotic-treated samples compared to the control was recorded, showing that Raman and IR spectroscopies, coupled to principal component analysis for data, could be used to detect molecular modifications in bacteria exposed to different classes of antibiotics. These findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of action of antibiotics in bacteria.

  13. Standoff Detection of Uranium and its Isotopes by Femtosecond Filament Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, Kyle C.; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-03-01

    The ability to perform not only elementally but also isotopically sensitive detection and analysis at standoff distances is impor-tant for remote sensing applications in diverse ares, such as nuclear nonproliferation, environmental monitoring, geophysics, and planetary science. We demonstrate isotopically sensitive real-time standoff detection of uranium by the use of femtosecond filament-induced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry. A uranium oxide molecular emission isotope shift of 0.05 ± 0.007 nm is reported at 593.6 nm. We implement both spectroscopic and acoustic diagnostics to characterize the properties of uranium plasma generated at different filament-uranium interaction points. The resulting uranium oxide emis-sion exhibits a nearly constant signal-to-background ratio over the length of the filament, unlike the uranium atomic and ionic emission, for which the signal-to-background ratio varies significantly along the filament propagation. This is explained by the different rates of increase of plasma density and uranium oxide density along the filament length resulting from spectral and temporal evolution of the filament along its propagation. The results provide a basis for the optimal use of filaments for standoff detection and analysis of uranium isotopes and indicate the potential of the technique for a wider range of remote sensing applications that require isotopic sensitivity.

  14. Electricity-free amplification and detection for molecular point-of-care diagnosis of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jered; Osborn, Jennifer L; Lillis, Lorraine; Hawkins, Kenneth; Guelig, Dylan; Price, Will; Johns, Rachel; Ebels, Kelly; Boyle, David; Weigl, Bernhard; LaBarre, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In resource-limited settings, the lack of decentralized molecular diagnostic testing and sparse access to centralized medical facilities can present a critical barrier to timely diagnosis, treatment, and subsequent control and elimination of infectious diseases. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods, including reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), are well-suited for decentralized point-of-care molecular testing in minimal infrastructure laboratories since they significantly reduce the complexity of equipment and power requirements. Despite reduced complexity, however, there is still a need for a constant heat source to enable isothermal nucleic acid amplification. This requirement poses significant challenges for laboratories in developing countries where electricity is often unreliable or unavailable. To address this need, we previously developed a low-cost, electricity-free heater using an exothermic reaction thermally coupled with a phase change material. This heater achieved acceptable performance, but exhibited considerable variability. Furthermore, as an enabling technology, the heater was an incomplete diagnostic solution. Here we describe a more precise, affordable, and robust heater design with thermal standard deviation electricity-free heater and NALF-detection platform, we demonstrate sensitive and repeatable detection of HIV-1 with a ß-actin positive internal amplification control from processed sample to result in less than 80 minutes. Together, these elements are building blocks for an electricity-free platform capable of isothermal amplification and detection of a variety of pathogens.

  15. Molecular detection of equine piroplasms in donkeys (Equus asinus) in North Khorasan province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, V; Razmi, Gh; Seifi, H; Naghibi, A

    2015-01-01

    Equine piroplasmosis is a tickborne disease of equids with worldwide distribution, caused by Theileria equi and Babesia caballi. The aim of this study was molecular detection of T. equi and B. caballi in donkeys in northeastern Iran and investigate the association between positivity of piroplasm infection and host-related factors. In the present study, Blood samples were collected from 106 apparently healthy donkeys (Equus asinus) in North Khorasan province, Iran. Blood smears were prepared and stained by giemsa method. DNA was extracted from blood and then multiplex-PCR was done for detection of any piroplasms infection. According to the results, four donkeys showed T. equi in blood smears but B. caballi was not found. Also, fifty four donkeys (50.94%) showed T. equi infection using multiplex-PCR. No siginificant difference was observed between the frequency of T. equi infection with host-related factors in donkeys. This is the first report on the molecular detection of eqiune piroplamosis in donkeys in Iran. Also, no significant association was found between the rate of T. equi infected animals.

  16. Optimized acoustic biochip integrated with microfluidics for biomarkers detection in molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, G; Friedt, J M; Eck, M; Rabus, D; Jobst, G; Gizeli, E

    2017-09-01

    The development of integrated platforms incorporating an acoustic device as the detection element requires addressing simultaneously several challenges of technological and scientific nature. The present work was focused on the design of a microfluidic module, which, combined with a dual or array type Love wave acoustic chip could be applied to biomedical applications and molecular diagnostics. Based on a systematic study we optimized the mechanics of the flow cell attachment and the sealing material so that fluidic interfacing/encapsulation would impose minimal losses to the acoustic wave. We have also investigated combinations of operating frequencies with waveguide materials and thicknesses for maximum sensitivity during the detection of protein and DNA biomarkers. Within our investigations neutravidin was used as a model protein biomarker and unpurified PCR amplified Salmonella DNA as the model genetic target. Our results clearly indicate the need for experimental verification of the optimum engineering and analytical parameters, in order to develop commercially viable systems for integrated analysis. The good reproducibility of the signal together with the ability of the array biochip to detect multiple samples hold promise for the future use of the integrated system in a Lab-on-a-Chip platform for application to molecular diagnostics.

  17. Single-tube nested PCR for detection of tritrichomonas foetus in feline feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gookin, Jody L; Birkenheuer, Adam J; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Levy, Michael G

    2002-11-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus, a venereal pathogen of cattle, was recently identified as an inhabitant of the large intestine in young domestic cats with chronic diarrhea. Recognition of the infection in cats has been mired by unfamiliarity with T. foetus in cats as well as misdiagnosis of the organisms as Pentatrichomonas hominis or Giardia sp. when visualized by light microscopy. The diagnosis of T. foetus presently depends on the demonstration of live organisms by direct microscopic examination of fresh feces or by fecal culturing. As T. foetus organisms are fastidious and fragile, routine flotation techniques and delayed examination and refrigeration of feces are anticipated to preclude the diagnosis in numerous cases. The objective of this study was to develop a sensitive and specific PCR test for the diagnosis of feline T. foetus infection. A single-tube nested PCR was designed and optimized for the detection of T. foetus in feline feces by using a combination of novel (TFITS-F and TFITS-R) and previously described (TFR3 and TFR4) primers. The PCR is based on the amplification of a conserved portion of the T. foetus internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S rRNA gene. The absolute detection limit of the single-tube nested PCR was 1 organism, while the practical detection limit was 10 organisms per 200 mg of feces. Specificity was examined by using P. hominis, Giardia lamblia, and feline genomic DNA. Our results demonstrate that the single-tube nested PCR is ideally suited for (i) diagnostic testing of feline fecal samples that are found negative by direct microscopy and culturing and (ii) definitive identification of microscopically observable or cultivated organisms.

  18. An integrated system for optical and electrical detection of single molecules/particles inside a solid-state nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin; Gao, Rui; Ying, Yi-Lun; Si, Wei; Chen, Yunfei; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore techniques have proven to be useful tools for single-molecule detection. The combination of optical detection and ionic current measurements enables a new possibility for the parallel readout of multiple nanopores without complex nanofluidics and embedded electrodes. In this study, we developed a new integrated system for the label-free optical and electrical detection of single molecules based on a metal-coated nanopore. The entire system, containing a dark-field microscopy system and an ultralow current detection system with high temporal resolution, was designed and fabricated. An Au-coated nanopore was used to generate the optical signal. Light scattering from a single Au-coated nanopore was measured under a dark-field microscope. A lab-built ultralow current detection system was designed for the correlated optical and electrical readout. This integrated system might provide more direct and detailed information on single analytes inside the nanopore compared with classical ionic current measurements.

  19. Reliable Grid Condition Detection and Control of Single-Phase Distributed Power Generation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciobotaru, Mihai

    to the utility grid but also to sustain it. This thesis was divided into two main parts, namely "Grid Condition Detection" and "Control of Single-Phase DPGS". In the first part, the main focus was on reliable Phase Locked Loop (PLL) techniques for monitoring the grid voltage and on grid impedance estimation...... of the entire system. Regarding the advance control of DPGS, an active damping technique for grid-connected systems using inductor-capacitorinductor (LCL) filters was proposed in the thesis. The method is based on a notch filter, whose stopband can be automatically adjusted in relation with an estimated value...

  20. Analysis of hybrid subcarrier multiplexing of OCDMA based on single photodiode detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, N. A. A.; Junita, M. N.; Aljunid, S. A.; Rashidi, C. B. M.; Endut, R.

    2017-11-01

    This paper analyzes the performance of subcarrier multiplexing (SCM) of spectral amplitude coding optical code multiple access (SAC-OCDMA) by applying Recursive Combinatorial (RC) code based on single photodiode detection (SPD). SPD is used in the receiver part to reduce the effect of multiple access interference (MAI) which contributes as a dominant noise in incoherent SAC-OCDMA systems. Results indicate that the SCM OCDMA network performance could be improved by using lower data rates and higher number of weight. Total number of users can also be enhanced by adding lower data rates and higher number of subcarriers.

  1. Fast measurement of luminosity at LEP by detecting the single bremsstrahlung photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bini, C.; De Zorzi, G.; Diambrini Palazzi, G.; Di Cosimo, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Gauzzi, P.; Zanello, D.

    1991-01-01

    Luminosity and beam angular divergence have been measured at LEP with a fast monitor based on the single bremsstrahlung process e + e - → e + e - γ. The photons emitted at the interaction point 1 are detected by an electromagnetic calorimeter: both the photon energy and the impact point are measured. The beam angular divergence and the luminosity are determined in few minutes with a statistical error of 1%. With the present experimental layout the systematic error is of few percent; it would be reduced by performing the measurement on an experimental interaction point. (orig.)

  2. Theoretical approach to surface plasmon scattering microscopy for single nanoparticle detection in near infrared region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Taehwang; Kim, Donghyun

    2015-03-01

    We present a theoretical approach to single nanoparticle detection using surface plasmon scattering microscopy. Through rigorous coupled wave analysis assuming light incidence on a gold coated BK7 glass substrate under total internal reflection condition for a 200-nm polystyrene as targets attached to the gold film, it was found that surface plasmon polariton induced by incident light on the gold thin film is perturbed. As a result, parabolic waves were observed in the reflection plane. By varying angles of incidence and wavelengths, optimum incident conditions for surface plasmon scattering microscopy were obtained.

  3. Microsecond fiber laser pumped, single-frequency optical parametric oscillator for trace gas detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barria, Jessica Barrientos; Roux, Sophie; Dherbecourt, Jean-Baptiste; Raybaut, Myriam; Melkonian, Jean-Michel; Godard, Antoine; Lefebvre, Michel

    2013-07-01

    We report on the first microsecond doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO). It is based on a nested cavity OPO architecture allowing single longitudinal mode operation and low oscillation threshold (few microjoule). The combination with a master oscillator-power amplifier fiber pump laser provides a versatile optical source widely tunable in the 3.3-3.5 μm range with an adjustable pulse repetition rate (from 40 to 100 kHz), high duty cycle (~10(-2)) and mean power (up to 25 mW in the idler beam). The potential for trace gas sensing applications is demonstrated through photoacoustic detection of atmospheric methane.

  4. Single photon timing resolution and detection efficiency of the IRST silicon photo-multipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collazuol, G.; Ambrosi, G.; Boscardin, M.; Corsi, F.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Del Guerra, A.; Dinu, N.; Galimberti, M.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L.A.; Labate, L.; Llosa, G.; Marcatili, S.; Morsani, F.; Piemonte, C.; Pozza, A.; Zaccarelli, L.; Zorzi, N.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) consist in matrices of tiny, passive quenched avalanche photo-diode cells connected in parallel via integrated resistors and operated in Geiger mode. Novel types of SiPM are being developed at FBK-IRST (Trento, Italy). Despite their classical shallow junction n-on-p structure the devices are unique in their enhanced photo-detection efficiency (PDE) for short-wavelengths and in their low level of dark rate and excess noise factor. After a summary of the extensive SiPM characterization we will focus on the study of PDE and the single photon timing resolution

  5. Analysis of hybrid subcarrier multiplexing of OCDMA based on single photodiode detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad N. A. A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the performance of subcarrier multiplexing (SCM of spectral amplitude coding optical code multiple access (SAC-OCDMA by applying Recursive Combinatorial (RC code based on single photodiode detection (SPD. SPD is used in the receiver part to reduce the effect of multiple access interference (MAI which contributes as a dominant noise in incoherent SAC-OCDMA systems. Results indicate that the SCM OCDMA network performance could be improved by using lower data rates and higher number of weight. Total number of users can also be enhanced by adding lower data rates and higher number of subcarriers.

  6. Label-Free, Single Molecule Resonant Cavity Detection: A Double-Blind Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Chistiakova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical resonant cavity sensors are gaining increasing interest as a potential diagnostic method for a range of applications, including medical prognostics and environmental monitoring. However, the majority of detection demonstrations to date have involved identifying a “known” analyte, and the more rigorous double-blind experiment, in which the experimenter must identify unknown solutions, has yet to be performed. This scenario is more representative of a real-world situation. Therefore, before these devices can truly transition, it is necessary to demonstrate this level of robustness. By combining a recently developed surface chemistry with integrated silica optical sensors, we have performed a double-blind experiment to identify four unknown solutions. The four unknown solutions represented a subset or complete set of four known solutions; as such, there were 256 possible combinations. Based on the single molecule detection signal, we correctly identified all solutions. In addition, as part of this work, we developed noise reduction algorithms.

  7. Electrical detection of single magnetic skyrmions in metallic multilayers at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccariello, Davide; Legrand, William; Reyren, Nicolas; Garcia, Karin; Bouzehouane, Karim; Collin, Sophie; Cros, Vincent; Fert, Albert

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically protected whirling spin textures that can be stabilized in magnetic materials by an asymmetric exchange interaction between neighbouring spins that imposes a fixed chirality. Their small size, together with the robustness against external perturbations, make magnetic skyrmions potential storage bits in a novel generation of memory and logic devices. To this aim, their contribution to the electrical transport properties of a device must be characterized—however, the existing demonstrations are limited to low temperatures and mainly in magnetic materials with a B20 crystal structure. Here we combine concomitant magnetic force microscopy and Hall resistivity measurements to demonstrate the electrical detection of sub-100 nm skyrmions in a multilayered thin film at room temperature. Furthermore, we detect and analyse the Hall signal of a single skyrmion, which indicates that it arises from the anomalous Hall effect with a negligible contribution from the topological Hall effect.

  8. Chemiresistor Devices for Chemical Warfare Agent Detection Based on Polymer Wrapped Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, John F.; Hamaguchi, Hitoshi; Yoon, Bora; Swager, Timothy M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWA) continue to present a threat to civilian populations and military personnel in operational areas all over the world. Reliable measurements of CWAs are critical to contamination detection, avoidance, and remediation. The current deployed systems in United States and foreign militaries, as well as those in the private sector offer accurate detection of CWAs, but are still limited by size, portability and fabrication cost. Herein, we report a chemiresistive CWA sensor using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) wrapped with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) derivatives. We demonstrate that a pendant hexafluoroisopropanol group on the polymer that enhances sensitivity to a nerve agent mimic, dimethyl methylphosphonate, in both nitrogen and air environments to concentrations as low as 5 ppm and 11 ppm, respectively. Additionally, these PEDOT/SWCNT derivative sensor systems experience negligible device performance over the course of two weeks under ambient conditions. PMID:28452929

  9. Detecting the shape of anisotropic gold nanoparticles in dispersion with single particle extinction and scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, M A C; Krpetić, Ž; Sanvito, T; Cai, Q; Monopoli, M; de Araújo, J M; Cella, C; Boselli, L; Castagnola, V; Milani, P; Dawson, K A

    2017-02-23

    The shape and size of nanoparticles are important parameters affecting their biodistribution, bioactivity, and toxicity. The high-throughput characterisation of the nanoparticle shape in dispersion is a fundamental prerequisite for realistic in vitro and in vivo evaluation, however, with routinely available bench-top optical characterisation techniques, it remains a challenging task. Herein, we demonstrate the efficacy of a single particle extinction and scattering (SPES) technique for the in situ detection of the shape of nanoparticles in dispersion, applied to a small library of anisotropic gold particles, with a potential development for in-line detection. The use of SPES paves the way to the routine quantitative analysis of nanoparticles dispersed in biologically relevant fluids, which is of importance for the nanosafety assessment and any in vitro and in vivo administration of nanomaterials.

  10. Gold-based optical biosensor for single-mismatched DNA detection using salt-induced hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Zongrui; Ma, Xingyi; Cao, Cuong

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a gold nanoparticle (Au-NP)-based detection method for sensitive and specific DNA-based diagnostic applications is described. A sandwich format consisting of Au-NPs/DNA/PMP (Streptavidin-coated MagnetSphere Para-Magnetic Particles) was fabricated. PMPs captured and separated target...... DNA while Au-NPs modified with oligonucleotide detection sequences played a role in recognition and signal production. Due to the much lower stability of mismatched DNA strands caused by unstable duplex structures in solutions of relatively low salt concentration, hybridization efficiency...... in the presence of different buffers was well investigated, and thus, the optimized salt concentration allowed for discrimination of single-mismatched DNA (MMT) from perfectly matched DNA (PMT). Therefore, quantitative information concerning the target analyte was translated into a colorimetric signal, which...

  11. Detection of antibodies to single-stranded DNA in naturally acquired and experimentally induced viral hepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, I.D.; Feinstone, S.M.; Purcell, R.H.; Alter, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive ''Farr'' assay, utilizing /sup 125/I-labelled DNA was developed for detecting antibody to single-stranded DNA (anti-ssDNA). The test was shown to be specific and as sensitive as assays using /sup 14/C-labelled DNA, for the detection of antibody in patients with connective tissue diseases. Groups of sera from patients with naturally acquired viral hepatitis and experimentally infected chimpanzees were tested for anti-ssDNA by the /sup 125/I assay and by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP). No consistent pattern was observed with either technique, indicating the elevated levels of this antibody are not as reliable markers of parenchymal liver damage as had been previously suggested.

  12. Detection of Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus strains using a single-stage PCR method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamian, S.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus are of the most important causes of brucellosis, an infectious disease which is transmitted either directly or indirectly including consuming unpasteurized dairy products. Both strains are considered endemic in Iran. Common diagnostic methods such as bacteriologic cultures are difficult and time consuming regarding the bacteria. The aim of this study was to suggest a single-stage PCR method using a pair of primers to detect both B. melitensis and B. abortus. The primers were named UF1 and UR1 and the results showed that the final size of PCR products were 84 bp and 99 bp for B. melitensis and B. abortus, respectively. Therefore the method could be useful for rapid detection of B. melitensis and B. abortus simultaneously.

  13. Molecular and microscopic techniques for detection of Sarcocystis neurona sporocysts in fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheikha, Hany M; Murphy, Alice J; Trembley, Sarah J; Mansfield, Linda S; Ghanam, Mohammad S; el-Garhy, Manal F

    2006-08-01

    Diagnosis of Sarcocystis sp. in the definitive host is generally by microscopic detection of the sporocysts in feces. This method is insensitive and cannot differentiate between species because sporocysts lack specific staining criteria. The hypothesis suggested that molecular techniques provide better alternatives to classical detection of Sarcocystis sporocysts. The sensitivity of two PCR assays was compared to one another and to microscopic examination by conventional fecal flotation and Diamant-Fuchsin staining procedures for detection of sporocysts spiked into mice feces. PCR1 assay using LSM1 & LSM2 primers that amplified 496 bp of the ssurRNA gene was more sensitive than the PCR2 method using JNB25 and JD396 primers that amplified 334 bp of a RAPD-derived marker. PCRI gave positive results with 200 microl of fecal suspension spiked with as little as 5 sporocysts compared to 75 sporocysts detected by JNB25 & JD396 primers. PCRI was more sensitive than conventional microscopy. PCR1 or PCR2 followed by sequencing or RFLP analysis not only detected Sarcocystis sporocysts in feces but also enabled to ascertain the genotype of the species as S. neurona.

  14. Detection and quantification through a lipid membrane using the molecularly controlled semiconductor resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavli, Danny; Tkachev, Maria; Piwonski, Hubert; Capua, Eyal; de Albuquerque, Ian; Bensimon, David; Haran, Gilad; Naaman, Ron

    2012-01-10

    The detection of covalent and noncovalent binding events between molecules and biomembranes is a fundamental goal of contemporary biochemistry and analytical chemistry. Currently, such studies are performed routinely using fluorescence methods, surface-plasmon resonance spectroscopy, and electrochemical methods. However, there is still a need for novel sensitive miniaturizable detection methods where the sample does not have to be transferred to the sensor, but the sensor can be brought into contact with the sample studied. We present a novel approach for detection and quantification of processes occurring on the surface of a lipid bilayer membrane, by monitoring the current change through the n-type GaAs-based molecularly controlled semiconductor resistor (MOCSER), on which the membrane is adsorbed. Since GaAs is susceptible to etching in an aqueous environment, a protective thin film of methoxysilane was deposited on the device. The system was found to be sensitive enough to allow monitoring changes in pH and in the concentration of amino acids in aqueous solution on top of the membrane. When biotinylated lipids were incorporated into the membrane, it was possible to monitor the binding of streptavidin or avidin. The device modified with biotin-streptavidin complex was capable of detecting the binding of streptavidin antibodies to immobilized streptavidin with high sensitivity and selectivity. The response depends on the charge on the analyte. These results open the way to facile electrical detection of protein-membrane interactions.

  15. A new insight into electrochemical microRNA detection: a molecular caliper, p19 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Tugba; Nur Topkaya, Seda; Ozsoz, Mehmet

    2013-10-15

    microRNA (miRNA) has drawn a great attention in biomedical research due to its functions on biological processes. Detection of miRNAs is a big challenge since the amount present in real samples is very low and the length of them is short. In this study, for the first time an electrochemical biosensor for detection of mir21 using the oxidation signal of protein 19 (p19) as a molecular caliper was designed. The proposed method enables detection of mir21 in direct, rapid, sensitive, inexpensive and label-free way. Binding specificity of the p19 to 20-23 base pair length double stranded RNA (dsRNA) and direct/water-mediated intermolecular contacts between the fusion protein and miRNA allows detection of miRNA-antimiRNA hybrid structure. The detection of mir21 was achieved in picomole sensitivity through the changes of intrinsic p19 oxidation signals observed at +0.80 V with Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) and the specifity of the designed sensor was proved by control studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Instrument-Free Point-of-Care Molecular Detection of Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jinzhao; Mauk, Michael G; Hackett, Brent A; Cherry, Sara; Bau, Haim H; Liu, Changchun

    2016-07-19

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in the Americas and its devastating impact on fetal development have prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare the ZIKV pandemic as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Rapid and reliable diagnostics for ZIKV are vital because ZIKV-infected individuals display no symptoms or nonspecific symptoms similar to other viral infections. Because immunoassays lack adequate sensitivity and selectivity and are unable to identify active state of infection, molecular diagnostics are an effective means to detect ZIKV soon after infection and throughout pregnancy. We report on a highly sensitive reverse-transcription loop-mediated, isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for rapid detection of ZIKV and its implementation in a simple, easy-to-use, inexpensive, point-of-care (POC) disposable cassette that carries out all the unit operations from sample introduction to detection. For thermal control of the cassette, we use a chemically heated cup without a need for electrical power. Amplification products are detected with leuco crystal violet (LCV) dye by eye without a need for instrumentation. We demonstrated the utility of our POC diagnostic system by detecting ZIKV in oral samples with sensitivity of 5 plaque-forming units (PFU) in less than 40 min. Our system is particularly suitable for resource-poor settings, where centralized laboratory facilities, funds, and trained personnel are in short supply, and for use in doctors' offices, clinics, and at home.

  17. Molecular Detection of Toxoplasma gondii Oocytes in the Soil from the Public Parks of the Arak City, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadis Solymane

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: This study showed soils of public parks in the Arak city were contaminated to oocyst of Toxoplasma. Also molecular method for the detection of parasites in the soil was more suitable than staining method.

  18. Robust nanoplasmonic substrates for aptamer macroarrays with single-step detection of PDGF-BB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong; Yang, Rui Xiang; Tang, Yu-Ping; Li, Wei; Miao, Zhao Yi; Hu, Yue; Chen, Jun; Yu, Sheng; Wang, Juan; Xu, Chen Yang

    2016-11-15

    An aptamer macroarray on a robust nanoplasmonic substrate with fluorescence enhancement is developed for a single-step sensitive detection of human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), a predominant cancer biomarker in cancer angiogenesis. A hybrid Au-nanoparticles-poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as nanoplasmonic substrate is prepared via the in-situ reduction of AuCl4(-) ions in PDMS matrixes onto 96 or 384 well plates. In the absence of target molecules, unfolded PDGF-BB aptamer conjugated with dye TAMRA is electrostatically bound to a positively charged poly-L-lysine (PLL)-coated Au nanocomposites film surface, and the fluorescence enhancement effects can be optimized by varying the distance between TAMRA and the Au nanocomposites film, which is easily adjusted by varying the thickness of the biocompatible poly-(acrylic acid) (PAA/PLL) multilayers, and thus metal-enhanced fluorescence of dye TAMRA conjugated with the aptamer is generated up to 15.2-fold. The interaction of the aptamer to its target induces the reversible conformation change of the aptamer, and consequently, the electrostatic potential is overcome by binding force. As a result, the target-binding interaction of the aptamer causes the irreversible detachment of the aptamer from the nanostructured Au film surface to decrease fluorescence of TAMRA. The aptamer macroarray provides not only the appropriate sensitivity for clinical diagnostics with a wide range of linear detection from 10pg/mL to 10μg/mL, high specificity for PDGF-BB against VEGF-165, VEGF-121, NaCl and IgG, and temporal biological stability, but also a single-step detection. We envision that the efficient and robust aptamer macroarray can be extended to the detection of other biomarkers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of HIV drug resistance mutations in pregnant women receiving single dose Nevirapine in south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mini S Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single dose of Nevirapine to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV is the commonest preventive regimen in resource-limited countries. Objectives: The objective of this study was to detect drug-resistant virus after single dose of Nevirapine (sdNVP provided to delivering HIV seropositive (HIV+ve women and to evaluate the time taken for its decay. Results: Of the 36 consenting HIV+ve pregnant women enrolled into the study, the mean hemoglobin and total lymphocyte counts were 10.8 g/dl and 1843 cells/mm 3 , respectively. Mean CD4 counts in 64% of women was 363 cells/mm 3 and mean viral load for 16/36 women was 28,143 copies/ml of plasma. Nevirapine-resistance mutations were detected in 28% of women at delivery; using OLA (Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay. K103N mutations were seen in 19.4% of women while the Y181C mutation was seen in 5%. Both the mutations were detected in 2.7% of women. Sequential blood samples collected at delivery, 7-10 days, 6 weeks, 4 months, 6 months and one year postpartum showed that 81% of K103N mutations and 66.7% of Y181C mutations were detected at 6 weeks postpartum . Wild-type virus had replaced the mutants by one year postpartum in all women except one. Conclusion : These observations are relevant for future treatment with antiretroviral therapy in these women for their HIV disease.

  20. Toward photostable multiplex analyte detection on a single mode planar optical waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Harshini [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xei, Hongshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Aaron S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grace, Wynne K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jennifer S [NON LANL; Swanson, Basil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a waveguide-based optical biosensor for the sensitive and specific detection of biomarkers associated with disease. Our technology combines the superior optical properties of single-mode planar waveguides, the robust nature of functionalized self-assembled monolayer sensing films and the specificity of fluorescence sandwich immunoassays to detect biomarkers in complex biological samples such as serum, urine and sputum. We have previously reported the adaptation of our technology to the detection of biomarkers associated with breast cancer and anthrax. However, these approaches primarily used phospholipid bilayers as the functional film and organic dyes (ex: AlexaFluors) as the fluorescence reporter. Organic dyes are easily photodegraded and are not amenable to multiplexing because of their narrow Stokes' shift. Here we have developed strategies for conjugation of the detector antibodies with quantum dots for use in a multiplex detection platform. We have previously evaluated dihydroxylipoic acid quantum dots for the detection of a breast cancer biomarker. In this manuscript, we investigate the detection of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen using antibodies conjugated with polymer-coated quantum dots. Kinetics of binding on the waveguide-based biosensor is reported. We compare the sensitivity of quantum dot labeled antibodies to those labeled with AlexaFluor and demonstrate the photostability of the former in our assay platform. In addition, we compare sulfydryl labeling of the antibody in the hinge region to that of nonspecific amine labeling. This is but the first step in developing a multiplex assay for such biomarkers on our waveguide platform.